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Sample records for multidrug-resistant tumor cells

  1. Reversal of multidrug resistance by 7-O-benzoylpyripyropene A in multidrug-resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rho, M C; Hayashi, M; Fukami, A; Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Tomoda, H; Komiyama, K; Omura, S

    2000-10-01

    7-O-Benzoylpyripyropene A (7-O-BzP), a semi-synthetic analog of pyripyropene, was investigated for its reversing effect on multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells. 7-O-BzP (6.25 microg/ml) completely reversed resistance against vincristine and adriamycin in vincristine-resistant KB cells (VJ-300) and adriamycin-resistant P388 cells (P388/ADR), respectively. 7-O-BzP alone had no effect on the growth of drug sensitive and drug-resistant cells. 7-O-BzP (6.25 microg/ml) significantly enhanced accumulation of [3H]vincristine in VJ-300 cells and completely inhibited the binding of [3H]azidopine to the P-glycoprotein in VJ-300 cells and P388/ADR cells. The result suggests that 7-O-BzP effectively reverses P-glycoprotein-related MDR by interacting directly with P-glycoprotein in drug resistant VJ-300 and P388/ADR cells. PMID:11132967

  2. Cell biological mechanisms of multidrug resistance in tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S M; Schindler, M

    1994-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleiotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs. PMID:7909602

  3. Cell Biological Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs.

  4. Bioengineering approaches to study multidrug resistance in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Fallica, Brian; Makin, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cancer cells to become resistant to chemotherapeutic agents is a major challenge for the treatment of malignant tumors. Several strategies have emerged to attempt to inhibit chemoresistance, but the fact remains that resistance is a problem for every effective anticancer drug. The first part of this review will focus on the mechanisms of chemoresistance. It is important to understand the environmental cues, transport limitations and the cellular signaling pathways associated with chemoresistance before we can hope to effectively combat it. The second part of this review focuses on the work that needs to be done moving forward. Specifically, this section focuses on the necessity of translational research and interdisciplinary directives. It is critical that the expertise of oncologists, biologists, and engineers be brought together to attempt to tackle the problem. This discussion is from an engineering perspective, as the dialogue between engineers and other cancer researchers is the most challenging due to non-overlapping background knowledge. Chemoresistance is a complex and devastating process, meaning that we urgently need sophisticated methods to study the process of how cells become resistant. PMID:21387035

  5. Bisbenzylisoquinolines as modulators of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Frappier, F; Jossang, A; Soudon, J; Calvo, F; Rasoanaivo, P; Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Saez, J; Schrevel, J; Grellier, P

    1996-06-01

    Ten naturally occurring bisbenzylisoquinolines (BBIQ) and two dihydro derivatives belonging to five BBIQ subgroups were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth and, in drug combination, to reverse the resistance to chloroquine of strain FcB1. The same alkaloids were also assessed in vitro for their potentiating activity against vinblastine with the multidrug-resistant clone CCRF-CEM/VLB, established from lymphoblastic acute leukemia. Three of the BBIQ tested had 50% inhibitory concentrations of less than 1 microM. The most potent antimalarial agent was cocsoline (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.22 microM). Regarding the chloroquine-potentiating effect, fangchinoline exhibited the highest biological activity whereas the remaining compounds displayed either antagonistic or slight synergistic effects. Against the multidrug-resistant cancer cell line, fangchinoline was also by far the most active compound. Although there were clear differences between the activities of tested alkaloids, no relevant structure-activity relationship could be established. Nevertheless, fangchinoline appears to be a new biochemical tool able to help in the comprehension of the mechanism of both chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells. PMID:8726022

  6. Bisbenzylisoquinolines as modulators of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Frappier, F; Jossang, A; Soudon, J; Calvo, F; Rasoanaivo, P; Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Saez, J; Schrevel, J; Grellier, P

    1996-01-01

    Ten naturally occurring bisbenzylisoquinolines (BBIQ) and two dihydro derivatives belonging to five BBIQ subgroups were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth and, in drug combination, to reverse the resistance to chloroquine of strain FcB1. The same alkaloids were also assessed in vitro for their potentiating activity against vinblastine with the multidrug-resistant clone CCRF-CEM/VLB, established from lymphoblastic acute leukemia. Three of the BBIQ tested had 50% inhibitory concentrations of less than 1 microM. The most potent antimalarial agent was cocsoline (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.22 microM). Regarding the chloroquine-potentiating effect, fangchinoline exhibited the highest biological activity whereas the remaining compounds displayed either antagonistic or slight synergistic effects. Against the multidrug-resistant cancer cell line, fangchinoline was also by far the most active compound. Although there were clear differences between the activities of tested alkaloids, no relevant structure-activity relationship could be established. Nevertheless, fangchinoline appears to be a new biochemical tool able to help in the comprehension of the mechanism of both chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells. PMID:8726022

  7. Inhibition of tumor cells multidrug resistance by cucumarioside A2-2, frondoside A and their complexes with cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Menchinskaya, Ekaterina S; Aminin, Dmitry L; Avilov, Sergey A; Silchenko, Aleksandra S; Andryjashchenko, Pelageya V; Kalinin, Vladimir I; Stonik, Valentin A

    2013-10-01

    In non-cytotoxic concentrations, frondoside A (1) from the sea cucumber Cucumaria okhotensis and cucumarioside A2-2 (2) from C. japonica, as well as their complexes with cholesterol block the activity of membrane transport P-glycoprotein in cells of the ascite form of mouse Ehrlich carcinoma. They prevent in this way an efflux of fluorescent probe Calcein from the cells. Since the blocking of P-glycoprotein activity results in decrease of multidrug resistance, these glycosides and their complexes with cholesterol may be considered as potential inhibitors of multidrug resistance of tumor cells. PMID:24354179

  8. Pharmacogenomic and molecular docking studies on the cytotoxicity of the natural steroid wortmannin against multidrug-resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kuete, Victor; Saeed, Mohamed E M; Kadioglu, Onat; Börtzler, Jonas; Khalid, Hassan; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-15

    Wortmannin is a cytotoxic compound derived from the endophytic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Penicillium wortmannii and Penicillium funiculosum that occurs in many plants, including medicinal herbs. The rationale to develop novel anticancer drugs is the frequent development of tumor resistance to the existing antineoplasic agents. Therefore, it is mandatory to analyze resistance mechanisms of novel drug candidates such as wortmannin as well to bring effective drugs into the clinic that have the potential to bypass or overcome resistance to established drugs and to substantially increase life span of cancer patients. In the present project, we found that P-glycoprotein-overexpressing tumor cells displaying the classical multidrug resistance phenotype toward standard anticancer drugs were not cross-resistant to wortmannin. Furthermore, three point-mutated PIK3CA protein structures revealed similar binding energies to wortmannin than wild-type PIK3CA. This protein is the primary target of wortmannin and part of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. PIK3CA mutations are known to be associated with worse response to therapy and shortened its activity toward wild-type and mutant PIK3CA with similar efficacy. PMID:25636880

  9. BRCA2-deficient sarcomatoid mammary tumors exhibit multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Janneke E; Sol, Wendy; Kersbergen, Ariena; Schlicker, Andreas; Guyader, Charlotte; Xu, Guotai; Wessels, Lodewyk; Borst, Piet; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-02-15

    Pan- or multidrug resistance is a central problem in clinical oncology. Here, we use a genetically engineered mouse model of BRCA2-associated hereditary breast cancer to study drug resistance to several types of chemotherapy and PARP inhibition. We found that multidrug resistance was strongly associated with an EMT-like sarcomatoid phenotype and high expression of the Abcb1b gene, which encodes the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein could partly resensitize sarcomatoid tumors to the PARP inhibitor olaparib, docetaxel, and doxorubicin. We propose that multidrug resistance is a multifactorial process and that mouse models are useful to unravel this. PMID:25511378

  10. Activation of the mouse mdr3 gene by insertion of retroviruses in multidrug-resistant P388 tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lepage, P; Devault, A; Gros, P

    1993-01-01

    In multidrug-resistant (MDR) derivatives of the mouse lymphoid tumor P388, the emergence of MDR is associated with overexpression and transcriptional activation of the mdr3 gene, either in the absence of (P388/VCR-10) or concomitant with (P388/ADM-2) gene amplification. In both instances, Northern (RNA) blotting analyses have suggested the presence of altered mdr3 transcripts in these cells, possibly originating from novel transcription initiation sites. The mechanisms underlying mdr3 overexpression in these cells have been investigated. In P388/VCR-10 cells, Southern blotting analyses together with genomic DNA cloning and nucleotide sequencing have demonstrated the presence of an intact mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) within the boundaries of intron 1 of mdr3. cDNA cloning and nucleotide sequencing indicated that this integration event results in the synthesis and overexpression of a hybrid MMTV-mdr3 mRNA which initiates within the U3 region of the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) of the provirus. Consequently, this mRNA lacks the normal exon 1 of mdr3 but contains (i) MMTV LTR-derived sequences at its 5' end, (ii) a novel mdr3 exon, mapping within the boundaries of intron 1 downstream of the MMTV integration site and generated by alternative splicing, and (iii) an otherwise intact 3' portion of mdr3 starting at exon 2. A similar type of analysis of P388/ADM-2 cells revealed that mdr3 overexpression in these cells is associated with the integration of an intracisternal A particle (IAP) within an L1Md repetitive element, immediately upstream of mdr3. The IAP insertion results in the overexpression of hybrid IAP-mdr3 mRNA transcripts that initiate within the 3' LTR of the IAP and which contain IAP LTR-derived sequences at the 5' end spliced 14 nucleotides upstream of the normal exon 1 of mdr3. Taken together, these results indicate that independent retroviral insertions were the initial mutagenic event responsible for mdr3 overexpression and survival during drug

  11. Investigations on the cell metabolomics basis of multidrug resistance from tumor cells by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruixing; Zhuang, Xiaoyu; Zong, Li; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Song, Fengrui

    2016-08-01

    Although anticancer drug resistance has been linked to high expression of P-glycoprotein and the enhanced DNA repair ability, the biochemical process and the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance are not clear. In order to clarify the biochemical mechanisms of drug resistance during anticancer drug treatment, we studied the metabolomics of MCF-7/S and MCF-7/Adr cell lines, the COC1 and COC1/DDP cell lines, including the metabolic pathways of multidrug-resistant tumor cells and the changes of endogenous substances in cells. The intracellular metabolites were profiled using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). In this study, 24 biomarkers in MCF-7/Adr cells and 15 biomarkers in COC1/DDP cells that are involved in some important metabolic pathways were putatively identified. Several metabolic pathways are changed in tumor cells showing drug resistance, such as protein synthesis pathways, cysteine synthesis, the glutamine metabolic pathway, and the ammonia cycle; the first of these are involved in the synthesis of some important proteins including membrane proteins, multidrug resistance-associated proteins, and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Proteins related to drug resistance were overexpressed in multidrug-resistant tumor cells. These proteins depended on energy and play important roles in the emergence of drug resistance. The changes in glutathione and cysteine metabolic pathways showed that the cells can activate related metabolic pathways and reduce the cell apoptosis when they encounter oxidative damage. These findings indicate that drug resistance is likely associated with increased P-gp synthesis and reduced apoptosis of tumor cells. Graphical Abstract Drug resistance was charactered in the changing of genomics and proteomics. Like enhancing DNA repair, reducing uptake, high P-g protein expression. Here, we studied the changes of metabolite pathway which could be also play an imported role in drug resistance. PMID

  12. Four ardeemin analogs from endophytic Aspergillus fumigatus SPS-02 and their reversal effects on multidrug-resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-Wei; Ying, Chen; Tang, Yi-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Four ardeemin derivatives, 5-N-acetylardeemin (1), 5-N-acetyl-15bβ-hydroxyardeemin (2), 5-N-acetyl-15b-didehydroardeemin (3), and 5-N-acetyl-16α-hydroxyardeemin (4), were isolated from the fermentation broth of an endophytic Aspergillus fumigatus SPS-02 associated with Artemisia annua L. The structures of these metabolites were elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic data, including 1D-, 2D-NMR and MS. In vitro chemosensitization assay indicated that these ardeemins had different activities of reversing the multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype in three cancer cell lines, leukemia doxorubicin resistant cell K562/DOX, human lung adenocarcinoma cis-platin-resistant cell A549/DDP, and ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cell SK-OV-S/DDP. Compound 4 exhibited the strongest MDR reversing effect at 5 μM concentration in K562/DOX and A549/DDP cell lines 5.2±0.18-fold, 8.2±0.23-fold, respectively, while compound 2 had the highest reversal capacity in SK-OV-S/DDP cell line with 10.8±0.28 fold. Preliminary investigation of their structureactivity relationship suggested that a OH group at C(15b) or C(16) in ardeemin plays a key role in reversing the MDR effect. It is the first report on ardeemin analogs from endophytic A. fumigatus with reversal effects on MDR cancer cell lines K562/DOX, A549/DDP and SK-OV-S/DDP. PMID:24443428

  13. Triptolide Induces Cell Killing in Multidrug-Resistant Tumor Cells via CDK7/RPB1 Rather than XPB or p44.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jun-Mei; Huan, Xia-Juan; Song, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Hu; Wang, Ying-Qing; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause of tumor treatment failure; therefore, drugs that can avoid this outcome are urgently needed. We studied triptolide, which directly kills MDR tumor cells with a high potency and a broad spectrum of cell death. Triptolide did not inhibit P-glycoprotein (P-gp) drug efflux and reduced P-gp and MDR1 mRNA resulting from transcription inhibition. Transcription factors including c-MYC, SOX-2, OCT-4, and NANOG were not correlated with triptolide-induced cell killing, but RPB1, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, was critical in mediating triptolide's inhibition of MDR cells. Triptolide elicited antitumor and anti-MDR activity through a universal mechanism: by activating CDK7 by phosphorylating Thr170 in both parental and MDR cell lines and in SK-OV-3 cells. The CDK7-selective inhibitor BS-181 partially rescued cell killing induced by 72-hour treatment of triptolide, which may be due to partial rescue of RPB1 degradation. We suggest that a precise phosphorylation site on RPB1 (Ser1878) was phosphorylated by CDK7 in response to triptolide. In addition, XPB and p44, two transcription factor TFIIH subunits, did not contribute to triptolide-driven RPB1 degradation and cell killing, although XPB was reported to covalently bind to triptolide. Several clinical trials are underway to test triptolide and its analogues for treating cancer and other diseases, so our data may help expand potential clinical uses of triptolide, as well as offer a compound that overcomes tumor MDR. Future investigations into the primary molecular target(s) of triptolide responsible for RPB1 degradation may suggest novel anti-MDR target(s) for therapeutic development. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1495-503. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197304

  14. Identification of compounds selectively killing multidrug resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Türk, Dóra; Hall, Matthew D.; Chu, Benjamin F.; Ludwig, Joseph A.; Fales, Henry M.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Szakács, Gergely

    2009-01-01

    There is a great need for the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents that overcome the emergence of multidrug resistance in cancer. We catalogued the National Cancer Institute’s Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) drug repository in search of compounds showing increased toxicity in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. By comparing the sensitivity of parental cell lines with multidrug resistant derivatives, we identified 22 compounds possessing MDR-selective activity. Analysis of structural congeners led to the identification of 15 additional drugs showing increased toxicity in Pgp-expressing cells. Analysis of MDR-selective compounds led to the formulation of structure activity relationships (SAR) and pharmacophore models. This data mining coupled with experimental data points to a possible mechanism of action linked to metal chelation. Taken together, the discovery of the MDR-selective compound set demonstrates the robustness of the developing field of MDR-targeting therapy as a new strategy for resolving Pgp-mediated multidrug resistance. PMID:19843850

  15. Nanodrug delivery in reversing multidrug resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kapse-Mistry, Sonali; Govender, Thirumala; Srivastava, Rohit; Yergeri, Mayur

    2014-01-01

    Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance (MDR) which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective, and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells, or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses, and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading, or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1α gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-κB. "Theragnostics" combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent, and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome MDR in

  16. Nanodrug delivery in reversing multidrug resistance in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapse-Mistry, Sonali; Govender, Thirumala; Srivastava, Rohit; Yergeri, Mayur

    2014-01-01

    Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance (MDR) which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective, and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells, or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses, and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading, or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1α gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-κB. “Theragnostics” combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent, and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  17. Reversal effect of Dioscin on multidrug resistance in human hepatoma HepG2/adriamycin cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bu Tong; Zheng, Li Hua; Bao, Yong Li; Yu, Chun Lei; Wu, Yin; Meng, Xiang Ying; Li, Yu Xin

    2011-03-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious obstacle encountered in cancer treatment. Since drug resistance in human cancer is mainly associated with overexpression of the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), the promoter of the human MDR1 gene may be a target for multidrug resistance reversion drug screening. In the present study, HEK293T cells were transfected with pGL3 reporter plasmids containing the 2kb of MDR1 promoter, and the transfected cells were used as models to screen for candidate multidrug resistance inhibitors from over 300 purified naturally occurring compounds extracted from plants and animals. Dioscin was found to have an inhibiting effect on MDR1 promoter activity. The resistant HepG2 cell line (HepG2/adriamycin) was used to validate the activity of multidrug resistance reversal by Dioscin. Results showed that Dioscin could decrease the resistance degree of HepG2/adriamycin cells, and significantly inhibit P-glycoprotein expression, as well as increase the accumulation of adriamycin in HepG2/adriamycin cells as measured by Flow Cytometric analysis. These results suggest that Dioscin is a potent multidrug resistance reversal agent and may be a potential adjunctive agent for tumor chemotherapy. PMID:21195709

  18. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  19. Nanomedicinal strategies to treat multidrug-resistant tumors: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaowei; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein is an important and the best-known membrane transporter involved in MDR. Several strategies have been used to address MDR, especially P-glycoprotein-mediated drug resistance in tumors. However, clinical success has been limited, largely due to issues regarding lack of efficacy and/or safety. Nanoparticles have shown the ability to target tumors based on their unique physical and biological properties. To date, nanoparticles have been investigated primarily to address P-glycoprotein and the observed improved anticancer efficacy suggests that nanomedicinal strategies provide a new opportunity to overcome MDR. This article focuses on nanotechnology-based formulations and current nanomedicine approaches to address MDR in tumors and discusses the proposed mechanisms of action. PMID:20528455

  20. Increased multi-drug resistance and reduced apoptosis in osteosarcoma side population cells are crucial factors for tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANG; TENG, JIA-SONG

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the characteristic features of cancer stem cells (CSCs) using an aggressive human osteosarcoma cell line OS-65. Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion was used to distinguish the cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells from OS-65 cells. Furthermore, the SP cells were characterized via chemoresistance and cell death assays, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence. The present study identified ~3.3% of cancer stem-like SP cells from OS-65 cells whose prevalence is reduced significantly (0.9%) following treatment with verapamil. It was demonstrated that osteosarcoma SP cells are highly efficient at generating additional sarcospheres as transcriptional regulation of stemness genes, including SOX2, OCT-4 and NANOG, is highly upregulated. Notably, these SP cells demonstrated high resistance against chemotherapeutic drugs and apoptosis via elevated transcriptional regulation of several ATPase binding cassette (ABC) transporter and anti-apoptotic proteins, including ABCG2, ABCB1/MDR1 ABCB5, B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2 associated X protein, respectively. The results of the present study suggested that CSCs may be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of tumor relapse. PMID:27347020

  1. An Autocrine Cytokine/JAK/STAT-Signaling Induces Kynurenine Synthesis in Multidrug Resistant Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Campia, Ivana; Buondonno, Ilaria; Castella, Barbara; Rolando, Barbara; Kopecka, Joanna; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Riganti, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistant cancer cells are hard to eradicate for the inefficacy of conventional anticancer drugs. Besides escaping the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy, they also bypass the pro-immunogenic effects induced by anticancer drugs: indeed they are not well recognized by host dendritic cells and do not elicit a durable anti-tumor immunity. It has not yet been investigated whether multidrug resistant cells have a different ability to induce immunosuppression than chemosensitive ones. We addressed this issue in human and murine chemosensitive and multidrug resistant cancer cells. Results We found that the activity and expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), which catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan into the immunosuppressive metabolite kynurenine, was higher in all the multidrug resistant cells analyzed and that IDO1 inhibition reduced the growth of drug-resistant tumors in immunocompetent animals. In chemoresistant cells the basal activity of JAK1/STAT1 and JAK1/STAT3 signaling was higher, the STAT3 inhibitor PIAS3 was down-regulated, and the autocrine production of STAT3-target and IDO1-inducers cytokines IL-6, IL-4, IL-1β, IL-13, TNF-α and CD40L, was increased. The disruption of the JAK/STAT signaling lowered the IDO1 activity and reversed the kynurenine-induced pro-immunosuppressive effects, as revealed by the restored proliferation of T-lymphocytes in STAT-silenced chemoresistant cells. Conclusions Our work shows that multidrug resistant cells have a stronger immunosuppressive attitude than chemosensitive cells, due to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT/IDO1 axis, thus resulting chemo- and immune-evasive. Disrupting this axis may significantly improve the efficacy of chemo-immunotherapy protocols against resistant tumors. PMID:25955018

  2. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moitra, Karobi

    2015-01-01

    The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed. PMID:26649310

  3. A highly tumor-targeted nanoparticle of podophyllotoxin penetrated tumor core and regressed multidrug resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Aniruddha; Ernsting, Mark J.; Undzys, Elijus; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllotoxin (PPT) exhibited significant activity against P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistant (MDR) tumor cell lines; however, due to its poor solubility and high toxicity, PPT cannot be dosed systemically, preventing its clinical use for MDR cancer. We developed a nanoparticle dosage form of PPT by covalently conjugating PPT and polyethylene glycol (PEG) with acetylated carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Ac) using one-pot esterification chemistry. The polymer conjugates self-assembled into nanoparticles (NPs) of variable sizes (20–120 nm) depending on the PPT-to-PEG molar ratio (2–20). The conjugate with a low PPT/PEG molar ratio of 2 yielded NPs with a mean diameter of 20 nm and released PPT at ~5%/day in serum, while conjugates with increased PPT/PEG ratios (5 and 20) produced bigger particles (30 nm and 120 nm respectively) that displayed slower drug release (~2.5%/day and ~1%/day respectively). The 20 nm particles exhibited 2- to 5-fold enhanced cell killing potency and 5- to 20-fold increased tumor delivery compared to the larger NPs. The biodistribution of the 20 nm PPT-NPs was highly selective to the tumor with 8-fold higher accumulation than all other examined tissues, while the larger PPT-NPs (30 and 100 nm) exhibited increased liver uptake. Within the tumor, >90% of the 20 nm PPT-NPs penetrated to the hypovascular core, while the larger particles were largely restricted in the hypervascular periphery. The 20 nm PPT-NPs displayed significantly improved efficacy against MDR tumors in mice compared to the larger PPT-NPs, native PPT and the standard taxane chemotherapies, with minimal toxicity. PMID:25818440

  4. IF7-Conjugated Nanoparticles Target Annexin 1 of Tumor Vasculature against P-gp Mediated Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, De-Hong; Liu, Ya-Rong; Luan, Xin; Liu, Hai-Jun; Gao, Yun-Ge; Wu, Hao; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2015-08-19

    Multidrug resistance is the main cause of clinical chemotherapeutic failure. Antiangiogenic cancer therapy with nanomedicine that allows the targeted delivery of antiangiogenic agents to tumor endothelial cells may contribute to innovative strategies for treating multidrug-resistant cancers. In this study, we developed a new nanodrug delivery system (nano-DDS), with improved antiangiogenic efficacy against multidrug resistant human breast cancer MCF-7/ADR cells. Here, the IF7 ligand was a peptide designed to bind the annexin 1 (Anxa 1), a highly specific marker of the tumor vasculature surface, with high affinity and specificity. IF7-conjugated Anxa 1-targeting nanoparticles containing paclitaxel (IF7-PTX-NP) allowed controlled drug release and displayed favorable prolonged circulation in vivo. IF7-PTX-NP was significantly internalized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) through the IF7-Anxa 1 interaction, and this facilitated uptake enhanced the expected antiangiogenic activity of inhibiting HUVEC proliferation, migration, and tube formation in a Matrigel plug relative to those of Taxol and PTX-NP. As IF7-PTX-NP targeted the tumor vessels, more nanoparticles accumulated in MCF-7/ADR tumors, and more importantly, induced significant apoptosis of the tumor vascular endothelial cells and necrosis of the tumor tissues. Low dose paclitaxel (1 mg/kg) formulated in IF7-PTX-NP showed significant anticancer efficacy, delaying the growth of MCF-7/ADR tumors. The same efficacy was only obtained with an 8-fold dose of paclitaxel (8 mg/kg) as Taxol plus XR9576, a potent P-gp inhibitor. The anticancer efficacy of IF7-PTX-NP was strongly associated with the improved antiangiogenic effect, evident as a dramatic reduction in the tumor microvessel density and pronounced increase in apoptotic tumor cells, with no obvious toxicity to the mice. This nano-DDS, which targets the tumor neovasculature, offers a promising strategy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant

  5. Metformin reverses multidrug resistance in human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402/5-fluorouracil cells

    PubMed Central

    LING, SUNBIN; TIAN, YU; ZHANG, HAIQUAN; JIA, KAIQI; FENG, TINGTING; SUN, DEGUANG; GAO, ZHENMING; XU, FEI; HOU, ZHAOYUAN; LI, YAN; WANG, LIMING

    2014-01-01

    Metformin exhibits anti-proliferative effects in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The present study investigated the ability of metformin to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402/5-fluorouracil (5-Fu; Bel/Fu) cells. The synergistic anti-proliferative effect of metformin combined with 5-Fu was evaluated using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay. The variation in apoptotic rates and cell cycle distribution were evaluated using a flow cytometric assay and variations in target gene and protein expression were monitored using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that metformin had a synergistic anti-proliferative effect with 5-Fu in the Bel/Fu cells. The variations in the number of apoptotic cells and distribution of the cell cycle were consistent with the variability in cell viability. Metformin targeted the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, suppressed the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and transcriptionally downregulated the expression of multidrug resistance protein 1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1). Collectively, these findings suggested that metformin may target the AMPK/mTOR/HIF-1α/P-gp and MRP1 pathways to reverse MDR in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25310259

  6. Codelivery of Chemotherapeutics via Crosslinked Multilamellar Liposomal Vesicles to Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kye-Il; Wong, Michael K.; Wang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a significant challenge to effective cancer chemotherapy treatment. However, the development of a drug delivery system that allows for the sustained release of combined drugs with improved vesicle stability could overcome MDR in cancer cells. To achieve this, we have demonstrated codelivery of doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel (PTX) via a crosslinked multilamellar vesicle (cMLV). This combinatorial delivery system achieves enhanced drug accumulation and retention, in turn resulting in improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells, including drug-resistant cells. Moreover, this delivery approach significantly overcomes MDR by reducing the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in cancer cells, thus improving antitumor activity in vivo. Thus, by enhancing drug delivery to tumors and lowering the apoptotic threshold of individual drugs, this combinatorial delivery system represents a potentially promising multimodal therapeutic strategy to overcome MDR in cancer therapy. PMID:25330237

  7. A peptide derived from phage display library exhibits anti-tumor activity by targeting GRP78 in gastric cancer multidrug resistance cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jianqin; Zhao, Guohong; Lin, Tao; Tang, Shanhong; Xu, Guanghui; Hu, Sijun; Bi, Qian; Guo, Changcun; Sun, Li; Han, Shuang; Xu, Qian; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Biaoluo; Liang, Shuhui; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kaichun

    2013-10-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a significant challenge to the clinical treatment of gastric cancer (GC). In the present study, using a phage display approach combined with MTT assays, we screened a specific peptide GMBP1 (Gastric cancer MDR cell-specific binding peptide), ETAPLSTMLSPY, which could bind to the surface of GC MDR cells specifically and reverse their MDR phenotypes. Immunocytochemical staining showed that the potential receptor of GMBP1 was located at the membrane and cytoplasm of MDR cells. In vitro and in vivo drug sensitivity assays, FACS analysis and Western blotting confirmed that GMBP1 was able to re-sensitize MDR cells to chemical drugs. Western blotting and proteomic approaches were used to screen the receptor of GMBP1, and GRP78, a MDR-related protein, was identified as a receptor of GMBP1. This result was further supported by immunofluoresence microscopy and Western blot. Additionally, Western blotting demonstrated that pre-incubation of GMBP1 in MDR cells greatly diminished MDR1, Bcl-2 and GRP78 expression but increased the expression of Bax, whereas downregulation of GRP78, function as a receptor and directly target for GMBP1, only inhibited MDR1 expression. Our findings suggest that GMBP1 could re-sensitize GC MDR cells to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents and this role might be mediated partly through down-regulating GRP78 expression and then inhibiting MDR1 expression. These findings indicate that peptide GMBP1 likely recognizes a novel GRP78 receptor and mediates cellular activities associated with the MDR phenotype, which provides new insight into research on the management of MDR in gastric cancer cells. PMID:23792224

  8. Quantitative analysis of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene expression in human tumors by polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, K.E.; Beck, C.; Holzmayer, T.A.; Chin, J.E.; Roninson, I.B. ); Wunder, J.S.; Andrulis, I.L. ); Gazdar, A.F. ); Willman, C.L.; Griffith, B. ); Von Hoff, D.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The resistance of tumor cells ot chemotheraprutic drugs is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. In human cells, expression of the MDR1 gene, encoding a transmembrane efflux pump (P-glycoprotein), leads to decreased intracellular accumulation and resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs (multidrug resistance; MDR). The levels of MDR in cell lines selected in bitro have been shown to correlate with the steady-state levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein. In cells with a severalfold increase in cellular drug resistance, MDR1 expression levels are close to the limits of detection by conventional assays. MDR1 expression has been frequently observed in human tumors after chemotherapy and in some but not all types of clinically refactory tumors untreated with chemotherapeutic drugs. The authors have devised a highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative protocol for measuring the levels of MDR1 mRNA in clincal samples, based on the polymerase chain reaction. They have used this assay to measure MDR1 gene expression in MDR cell lines and >300 normal tissues, tumor-derived cell lines, and clinical specimens of untreated tumors of the types in which MDR1 expression was rarely observed by standard assays. Low levels of MDR1 expression were found by polymerase chain reaction in most solid tumors and leukemias tested. The frequency of samples without detectable MDR1 expression varied among different types of tumors; MDR1-negative samples were ost common among tumor types known to be relatively responsive to chemotherapy.

  9. Chinese hamster pleiotropic multidrug-resistant cells are not radioresistant

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.B.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, N.; DeGraff, W.; Carmichael, J.; Glatstein, E.

    1988-01-01

    The inherent cellular radiosensitivity of a Chinese hamster ovary pleiotropic cell line that is multidrug resistant (CHRC5) was compared to that of its parental cell line (AuxB1). Radiation survival curve parameters n and D0 were 4.5 and 1.1 Gy, respectively, for the CHRC5 line and 5.0 and 1.2 Gy, respectively, for the parental line. Thus, the inherent radiosensitivity of the two lines was similar even though key intracellular free radical scavenging and detoxifying systems employing glutathione, glutathione transferase, and catalase produced enzyme levels that were 2.0-, 1.9-, and 1.9-fold higher, respectively, in the drug-resistant cell line. Glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine resulted in the same extent of aerobic radiosensitization in both lines (approximately 10%). Incorporation of iododeoxyuridine into cellular DNA sensitized both cell lines to radiation. These studies indicate that pleiotropic drug resistance does not necessarily confer radiation resistance.

  10. Aliphatic acid-conjugated antimicrobial peptides--potential agents with anti-tumor, multidrug resistance-reversing activity and enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Qiu, Qianqian; Ma, Ke; Wang, Xuekun; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-07-28

    Compared with traditional therapeutics, antimicrobial peptides as novel anti-tumor agents have prominent advantages of higher specificity and circumvention of multi-drug resistance. In a previous study, we found that B1, an antimicrobial peptide derived from Cathelicidin-BF15, presented specific anti-tumor activity against several tumor cells. Since aliphatic chain-conjugated peptides have shown ameliorative activity and stability, we conjugated aliphatic acids with different lengths to the amino terminal of B1. All the conjugated peptides exhibited improved anti-tumor activity over B1. Further investigations revealed that the peptides were capable of disrupting the cell membrane, stimulating cytochrome c release into the cytosol, which results in apoptosis. The peptides also acted against multidrug resistant cells and had multidrug resistance-reversing effects. Additionally, conjugation of aliphatic acid enhanced the peptide stability in plasma. In summary, aliphatic acid-modified peptides might be promising anti-tumor agents in the future. PMID:26083110

  11. Role of multidrug resistance in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diddens, Heyke C.

    1992-06-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy is a well established phenomenon. One of the most common phenotypical changes in acquired or intrinsic multidrug resistance in human tumor cells is the overexpression of the mdrl gene product P-glycoprotein, which acts as an active efflux pump. Increased levels of P-glycoprotein are associated with resistance to a variety of anticancer drugs commonly used in tumor chemotherapy like anthracyclins, vinca- alcaloids, epipodophyllotoxins or actinomycin D. We investigated the efficacy or photodynamic therapy in the treatment of tumor cells expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype. Our data show that multidrug resistant cells are highly cross resistant to the phototoxic stain rhodamine 123 but exhibit only low degrees of cross resistance (2 - 3 -folds) to the photosensitizers Photosan-3, Clorin-2, methylene blue and meso-tetra (4- sulfonatophenyl) porphine (TPPS4). Resistance is associated with a decrease in intracellular accumulation of the photosensitizer. Verapamil, a membrane active compound known to enhance drug sensitivity in multidrug resistant cells by inhibition of P-glycoprotein, also increases phototoxicity in multidrug resistant cells. Our results imply that tumors expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype might fail to respond to photochemotherapy with rhodamine 123. On the other hand, multidrug resistance may not play an important role in photodynamic therapy with Photosan-3, Chlorin-2, methylene blue or TPPS4.

  12. Ascites Increases Expression/Function of Multidrug Resistance Proteins in Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lihong; Pospichalova, Vendula; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K; Payne, Sturgis; Wang, Fang; Kennedy, Margaret; Cianciolo, George J; Bryja, Vitezslav; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Bachelder, Robin E

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy resistance is the major reason for the failure of ovarian cancer treatment. One mechanism behind chemo-resistance involves the upregulation of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes (ABC transporters) that effectively transport (efflux) drugs out of the tumor cells. As a common symptom in stage III/IV ovarian cancer patients, ascites is associated with cancer progression. However, whether ascites drives multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer cells awaits elucidation. Here, we demonstrate that when cultured with ascites derived from ovarian cancer-bearing mice, a murine ovarian cancer cell line became less sensitive to paclitaxel, a first line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer patients. Moreover, incubation of murine ovarian cancer cells in vitro with ascites drives efflux function in these cells. Functional studies show ascites-driven efflux is suppressible by specific inhibitors of either of two ABC transporters [Multidrug Related Protein (MRP1); Breast Cancer Related Protein (BCRP)]. To demonstrate relevance of our findings to ovarian cancer patients, we studied relative efflux in human ovarian cancer cells obtained from either patient ascites or from primary tumor. Immortalized cell lines developed from human ascites show increased susceptibility to efflux inhibitors (MRP1, BCRP) compared to a cell line derived from a primary ovarian cancer, suggesting an association between ascites and efflux function in human ovarian cancer. Efflux in ascites-derived human ovarian cancer cells is associated with increased expression of ABC transporters compared to that in primary tumor-derived human ovarian cancer cells. Collectively, our findings identify a novel activity for ascites in promoting ovarian cancer multidrug resistance. PMID:26148191

  13. Biomimetic RNA Silencing Nanocomplexes Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells**

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongliang; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Dingbin; Yan, Xuefeng; Wang, Fu; Niu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an RNA-dependent gene silencing approach controlled by RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Here we represent a synthetic RISC-mimic nanocomplex, which can actively cleave its target RNA in a sequence-specific manner. With high enzymatic stability and efficient self-delivery to target cells, the designed nanocomplex can selectively and potently induce gene silencing without cytokine activation. The nanocomplexes targeting to multidrug resistance are able to not only bypass P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter due to their nano-size effect, but also effectively suppress the Pgp expression, thus resulting in successful restoration of drug sensitivity of OVCAR8/ADR cells to Pgp-transportable cytotoxic agents. This nanocomplex approach has the potential for both functional genomics and cancer therapy. PMID:24446433

  14. In vivo uptake of carbon-14-colchicine for identification of tumor multidrug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, B.M.; Rosa, E.; Biedler, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    A major limitation in the treatment of cancer with natural product chemotherapeutic agents is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). Multidrug resistance is attributed to enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance gene MDR1. Colchicine (CHC) is known to be one of the MDR drugs. The authors have previously demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish multidrug resistant tumors from the multidrug-sensitive tumors in vivo on the basis of tritium ({sup 3}H) uptake following injection of {sup 3}H-CHC. The present studies were carried out in xenografted animals using {sup 14}C-CHC which may be more indicative of {sup 11}C-labeled CHC distribution with regard to circulating metabolites, since metabolic processes following injection of (ring C, methoxy-{sup 11}C)-CHC may produce significant amounts of circulating 1l-carbon fragments (i.e., methanol and/or formaldehyde). Experiments were carried out at a dose of 2 mg/kg. Activity concentration per injected dose was approximately twice as great in sensitive as in resistant tumors (p < 0.05) at 60 min following intravenous injection of {sup 14}C-CHC. About 75% of total activity was CHC in the sensitive tumors. The findings are further confirmed by the quantitative autoradiographic evaluation of resistant and sensitive tumors. These studies confirm our previous observations that it is possible to noninvasively distinguish multidrug-resistant tumors from sensitive tumors in vivo based on uptake of an injected MDR drug using a{sup 14}C-labeled CHC at the same position and of comparable specific activity to a {sup 11}C-CHC tracer used for PET imaging. 16 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Enhancing Activity of Anticancer Drugs in Multidrug Resistant Tumors by Modulating P-Glycoprotein through Dietary Nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad; Maryam, Amara; Mehmood, Tahir; Zhang, Yaofang; Ma, Tonghui

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a principal mechanism by which tumors become resistant to structurally and functionally unrelated anticancer drugs. Resistance to chemotherapy has been correlated with overexpression of p-glycoprotein (p-gp), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of membrane transporters. P-gp mediates resistance to a broad-spectrum of anticancer drugs including doxorubicin, taxol, and vinca alkaloids by actively expelling the drugs from cells. Use of specific inhibitors/blocker of p-gp in combination with clinically important anticancer drugs has emerged as a new paradigm for overcoming multidrug resistance. The aim of this paper is to review p-gp regulation by dietary nutraceuticals and to correlate this dietary nutraceutical induced-modulation of p-gp with activity of anticancer drugs. PMID:26514453

  16. Metformin reverses multidrug resistance in human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel‑7402/5‑fluorouracil cells.

    PubMed

    Ling, Sunbin; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Haiquan; Jia, Kaiqi; Feng, Tingting; Sun, Deguang; Gao, Zhenming; Xu, Fei; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Li, Yan; Wang, Liming

    2014-12-01

    Metformin exhibits anti‑proliferative effects in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The present study investigated the ability of metformin to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel‑7402/5‑fluorouracil (5‑Fu; Bel/Fu) cells. The synergistic anti‑proliferative effect of metformin combined with 5‑Fu was evaluated using a Cell Counting kit‑8 assay. The variation in apoptotic rates and cell cycle distribution were evaluated using a flow cytometric assay and variations in target gene and protein expression were monitored using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that metformin had a synergistic anti‑proliferative effect with 5‑Fu in the Bel/Fu cells. The variations in the number of apoptotic cells and distribution of the cell cycle were consistent with the variability in cell viability. Metformin targeted the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, suppressed the expression of hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α) and transcriptionally downregulated the expression of multidrug resistance protein 1/P‑glycoprotein (P‑gp) and multidrug resistance‑associated protein 1 (MRP1). Collectively, these findings suggested that metformin may target the AMPK/mTOR/HIF‑1α/P‑gp and MRP1 pathways to reverse MDR in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25310259

  17. Plasma membrane microorganization of LR73 multidrug-resistant cells revealed by FCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winckler, Pascale; Jaffiol, Rodolphe; Cailler, Aurélie; Morjani, Hamid; Jeannesson, Pierre; Deturche, Régis

    2011-03-01

    Tumoral cells could present a multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapeutic treatments. This drug resistance would be associated to biomechanisms occurring at the plasma membrane level, involving modification of membrane fluidity, drug permeability, presence of microdomains (rafts, caveolae...), and membrane proteins overexpression such as Pglycoprotein. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is the relevant method to investigate locally the fluidity of biological membranes through the lateral diffusion of a fluorescent membrane probe. Thus, we use FCS to monitor the plasma membrane local organization of LR73 carcinoma cells and three derived multidrug-resistant cancer cells lines. Measurements were conducted at the single cell level, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of the plasma membrane microviscosity distribution of each cell line studied. Moreover, we propose 2D diffusion simulation based on a Monte Carlo model to investigate the membrane organisation in terms of microdomains. This simulation allows us to relate the differences in the fluidity distributions with microorganization changes in plasma membrane of MDR cells.

  18. Reversal effect of vitamin D on different multidrug-resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, M; Nuriding, H

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the reversal effect of vitamin D on the multidrug-resistant leukemic Jurkat/ADR and K562/ADR cell lines and conducted a preliminary investigation of its reversal mechanism. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method was used to detect the reversal effect of vitamin D on multidrug-resistant cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the effect of vitamin D on intracellular expression of mRNA of the multidrug-resistant gene (MDRI) and the multidrug-resistance-related gene (MRP1). A protein quantitative analysis method was used to determine the effect of vitamin D on intracellular glutathione content. After treatment of Jurkat/ADR and K562/ADR cells with vitamin D, multidrug resistance was reversed in a dose-dependent manner, which may have reduced mRNA expression of the MDR1 and MRP1 genes, the P-glycoprotein content on the cell surface, and the intracellular glutathione level. Different concentrations of vitamin D showed varying reversal effects on different multidrug-resistant cells. The resistance mechanism may be related to the inhibition of the expression of MDR1 and MRP1 genes. PMID:25158250

  19. PEITC reverse multi-drug resistance of human gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cell line.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tao; Song, Xin; Liu, Yu-Fen; Wang, Wen-Yue

    2014-04-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world and nearly all patients who respond initially to cisplatin later develop drug resistance, indicating multi-drug resistance is an essential aspect of the failure of treatment. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) has been implicated in inhibiting metastasis of several types of human cancer. However, the effect and potential mechanism of PEITC reversed multi-drug resistance of human gastric cancer is not fully clear. We have identified the role of PEITC in multi-drug resistance reversal of human gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cell line. PEITC inhibited cisplatin-resistant human SGC7901/DDP cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, causing increased apoptosis, ROS generation, glutathione depletion, accumulation of Rhodamine-123, decreased expression of P-glycoprotein and cell cycle arrest. mRNA and protein expression of the multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1), multi-drug resistance-associated protein (MRP1), excision repair cross-complementing gene 1 (ERCC1), survivin, and Mad2 was decreased, and phosphorylation of Akt and transcriptional activation of NF-κB were suppressed. PEITC may be useful as the therapeutic strategy for overcoming multi-drug resistance through suppressing the PI3K-Akt pathway in human gastric cancer. PMID:23956061

  20. Role of mitochondrial translocation of telomerase in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xianlong; Wen, Lei; Zhou, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle of cancer chemotherapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of mitochondrial translocation of telomerase (hTERT) in MDR of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. In this study, three HCC cell lines (SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells) with differential resistance index (RI) to cisplatin (CDDP) were induced by pulse treatment of SK-Hep1 (human hepatocellular cell line) with CDDP in vitro. The RI of SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells was 5.14, 8.66, and 14.25, respectively, and all the cell lines showed cross-resistance to Doxorubicin (DOX) and 5-Fuorouracil (5-FU). The apoptosis rates in drug-resistant cells were significantly reduced. Cell cycle analysis revealed the ratio of drug-resistant cells in G2/M and S phases increased, while that in G1 phase decreased. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot assay demonstrated, with the gradual elevation in RI, increasing hTERT translocated from the nuclei to the mitochondria, while real-time PCR indicated the shortening of telomere length in drug-resistant cells under the chemotherapeutic stress and the reduction of damaged mtDNA with the increase in RI. Furthermore, JC-1 staining also indicated the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential in drug-resistant cells. The mitochondrial translocation of hTERT increases in multidrug-resistant cells and exerts protective effect on mitochondrial function. Drug-resistant tumor cells escape from apoptosis through hTERT-mediated mitochondrial protection. Mitochondrial translocation of hTERT may serve as an underlying mechanism of MDR. PMID:22991493

  1. Human SPF45, a splicing factor, has limited expression in normal tissues, is overexpressed in many tumors, and can confer a multidrug-resistant phenotype to cells.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Janardhan; Long, Pandy R; Shepard, Robert L; Xia, Xiaoling; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Sandusky, George E; Perry, William L; Dantzig, Anne H; Williamson, Mark; Rolfe, Mark; Moore, Robert E

    2003-11-01

    Our effort to identify novel drug-resistant genes in cyclophosphamide-resistant EMT6 mouse mammary tumors led us to the identification of SPF45. Simultaneously, other groups identified SPF45 as a component of the spliceosome that is involved in alternative splicing. We isolated the human homologue and examined the normal human tissue expression, tumor expression, and the phenotype caused by overexpression of human SPF45. Our analyses revealed that SPF45 is expressed in many, but not all, normal tissues tested with predominant expression in normal ductal epithelial cells of the breast, liver, pancreas, and prostate. Our analyses using tissue microarrays and sausages of tumors indicated that SPF45 is highly expressed in numerous carcinomas including bladder, breast, colon, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate. Interestingly, this study revealed that overexpression of SPF45 in HeLa, a cervical carcinoma cell line, resulted in drug resistance to doxorubicin and vincristine, two chemotherapeutic drugs commonly used in cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing tumor overexpression of an alternate splicing factor resulting in drug resistance. PMID:14578179

  2. BIIB021, a synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor, has broad application against tumors with acquired multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Neely, Laura; Lundgren, Karen; Yang, Yong-Ching; Lough, Rachel; Timple, Noel; Burrows, Francis

    2010-03-01

    17-AAG, the first-generation clinical Hsp90 inhibitor, exhibits promising antitumor activity in clinical studies, but is limited by poor solubility and hepatotoxicity. To pursue compounds with better biopharmaceutical properties, we have developed a series of fully synthetic orally bioavailable inhibitors of Hsp90. Here, we report that 17-AAG and other ansamycin derivatives are inactive in P-gp and/or MRP-1 expressing cell lines and sensitivity could be restored by coadministration of P-gp or MRP inhibitors. In contrast, the synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor, BIIB021 was active in these models. Accordingly, BIIB021 was considerably more active than 17-AAG against adrenocortical carcinoma, a tumor that naturally expresses P-gp, both in vitro and in vivo. This efflux pump-mediated resistance is manifested in both cytotoxicity assays and measurements of target inhibition, such as client protein degradation. Other than this, the cytotoxic activity of BIIB021 was also not influenced by loss of NQO1 or Bcl-2 overexpression, molecular lesions that do not prevent client loss but are nonetheless associated with reduced cell killing by 17-AAG. Our results indicate that the activity of 17-AAG and other ansamycins may be curtailed in tumors that have upregulated efflux pumps or antiapoptotic proteins or other genetic alterations. These data indicate that the new generation of synthetic anti-Hsp90 drugs, exemplified by BIIB021 that is currently undergoing Phase II testing, may have broader application against tumors with acquired multidrug resistance or tumors located in organs protected by MDR proteins, such as the adrenal glands, brain and testis. PMID:19676042

  3. ATP-dependent transport of vinblastine in vesicles from human multidrug-resistant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horio, M.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I. )

    1988-05-01

    Resistance of human cancer cells to multiple cytotoxic hydrophobic agents (multidrug resistance) is due to overexpression of the MDR1 gene, whose product is the plasma membrane P-glycoprotein. Plasma membrane vesicles partially purified from multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells, but not from drug-sensitive cells, accumulate ({sup 3}H)vinblastine in an ATP-dependent manner. This transport is osmotically sensitive, with an apparent K{sub m} of 38 {mu}M for ATP and of {approx} 2 {mu}M for vinblastine. The nonhydrolyzable analog adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate does not substitute for ATP but is a competitive inhibitor of ATP for the transport process. Vanadate, and ATPase inhibitor, is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of transport. These results indicate that hydrolysis of ATP is probably required for active transport vinblastine. Several other drugs to which multidrug-resistant cell lines are resistant inhibit transport, with relative potencies as follows: vincristine > actinomycin D > daunomycin > colchicine = puromycin. Verapamil and quinidine, which reverse the multidrug-resistance phenotype, are good inhibitors of the transport process. These results confirm that multidrug-resistant cells express an energy-dependent plasma membrane transporter for hydrophobic drugs, and establish a system for the detailed biochemical analysis of this transport process.

  4. A safe, simple and efficient doxorubicin prodrug hybrid micelle for overcoming tumor multidrug resistance and targeting delivery.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuling; Yin, Mingxing; Hu, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Xiangting; Sun, Yu; Guo, Yuanyuan; Tan, Songwei; Zhang, Zhiping

    2016-08-10

    A pH-sensitive prodrug, TPGS-CHN-DOX, was introduced by conjugating anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), onto d-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) via a cleavable Schiff base linkage. The prodrug was mixed with a PEGylated lipid to form a simple but multifunctional hybrid micelle system, which can realize high drug loading capability and biocompatibility, extended blood circulation time, inhibited drug resistance in cancer cells, improved therapeutic response, reduced side effects, and easy functionalities for targeting delivery. The hybrid micelles exhibited in vitro pH-sensitive drug release, enhanced cellular uptake and strengthened cytotoxicity on both drug-sensitive human breast cancer MCF-7 and resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. P-glycoprotein functional inhibition and mitochondria-associated cell apoptosis induced by TPGS were thought to play an important role in overcoming the multidrug resistance. As a result, the hybrid micelles demonstrated good anticancer efficacy in MCF-7/ADR xenograft model. Additionally, after modifying with a tumor-specific targeting peptic ligand, cRGD, the tumor growth/metastasis inhibition was further evidenced in integrin receptor overexpressed melanoma cancer B16F10 and even murine hepatocarcinoma H22 models. This TPGS-based pH-sensitive prodrug provides a safe and "Molecular economical" way in the rational design of prodrugs for overcoming multidrug resistance and targeting delivery, which can improve the potency for clinical use. PMID:27264552

  5. Microbial transformation of ginsenoside-Rg₁ by Absidia coerulea and the reversal activity of the metabolites towards multi-drug resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Qiao, Lirui; Xie, Dan; Zhang, Yi; Zou, Jianhua; Chen, Xiaoguang; Dai, Jungui

    2011-12-01

    Biotransformation of ginsenoside-Rg₁ (1) by the fungus Absidia coerulea AS 3.2462 yielded five metabolites (2-6). On the basis of spectroscopic data analyses, the metabolites were identified as ginsenoside-F₁ (2), 6α,12β-dihydroxydammar-3-one-20(S)-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), 3-oxo-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (4), 3-oxo-7β-hydroxy-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (5), and 3-oxo-7β,15α-dihydroxy-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (6), respectively. Among them, 5 and 6 are new compounds. These results indicated that Absidia coerulea AS 3.2462 could catalyze the specific C-3 dehydrogenation of derivatives of ginsenoside-Rg₁, as well as hydroxylation at the 7β and 15α positions. Metabolites 2, 4 and 5 exhibited moderate reversal activity towards A549/taxol MDR tumor cells in vitro. PMID:21946057

  6. The multidrug resistant modulator HZ08 reverses multidrug resistance via P-glycoprotein inhibition and apoptosis sensitization in human epidermoid carcinoma cell line KBV200.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y-L; Cen, J; Zhang, Y-Y; Feng, Y-D; Yang, Y; Li, Y-M; Huang, W-L

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the multidrug resistance modulator HZ08 has a strong multidrug resistance reversal effect in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 in K562/A02 and MCF-7/ADM cells, respectively. However, there are many other mechanisms responsible for resistance. In this study, MTT assay was used to examine the cytotoxicity and multidrug resistance reversal of HZ08 in KBV200 cells. It was also used to detect Rh123 and adriamycin accumulation in the presence of HZ08 to assess the effect on P-glycoprotein. Caspase-3 activity was analyzed under the incubation of HZ08 per se and in combination with vincristine. Results showed that HZ08 could increase the activity of caspase-3 with P-glycoprotein inhibition. Further studies revealed that HZ08 increased vincristine-induced apoptosis, characterized as an intrinsic apoptosis pathway with enhanced G2/M phase arrest, since HZ08 had an effect on the intrinsic apoptotic regulator Bcl-2 and Bax. Therefore, the outstanding reversal effect of HZ08 occurs not only through suppressing the P-glycoprotein function but also through activating the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. PMID:22344570

  7. Expression of a multidrug-resistance gene in human tumors and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Fojo, A.T.; Ueda, K.; Slamon, D.J.; Poplack, D.G.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I.

    1987-01-01

    The identification and cloning of a segment of a human multidrug resistance gene (mdr1) was reported recently. To examine, the molecular basis of one type of multidrug resistance, the authors have prepared RNA from human tumors and normal tissues and measured their content of mdr1 RNA. They find that the mdr1 gene is expressed at a very high level in the adrenal gland; at a high level in the kidney; at intermediate levels in the lung, liver, lower jejunum, colon, and rectum; and at low levels in many other tissues. The mdr1 gene is also expressed in several human tumors, including many but not all tumors derived from the adrenal gland and the colon. In addition, increased expression was detected in a few tumors at the time of relapse following initial chemotherapy. Although controlled clinical studies will be required, the results suggest that measurement of mdr1 RNA may prove to be a valuable tool in the design of chemotherapy protocols.

  8. A Multidrug-resistant Engineered CAR T Cell for Allogeneic Combination Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Julien; Guyot, Valérie; Marechal, Alan; Filhol, Jean-Marie; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe; Poirot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell represents a highly promising strategy to fight against multiple cancers. The clinical outcome of such therapies is intimately linked to the ability of effector cells to engraft, proliferate, and specifically kill tumor cells within patients. When allogeneic CAR T-cell infusion is considered, host versus graft and graft versus host reactions must be avoided to prevent rejection of adoptively transferred cells, host tissue damages and to elicit significant antitumoral outcome. This work proposes to address these three requirements through the development of multidrug-resistant T cell receptor αβ-deficient CAR T cells. We demonstrate that these engineered T cells displayed efficient antitumor activity and proliferated in the presence of purine and pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, currently used in clinic as preconditioning lymphodepleting regimens. The absence of TCRαβ at their cell surface along with their purine nucleotide analogues-resistance properties could prevent their alloreactivity and enable them to resist to lymphodepleting regimens that may be required to avoid their ablation via HvG reaction. By providing a basic framework to develop a universal T cell compatible with allogeneic adoptive transfer, this work is laying the foundation stone of the large-scale utilization of CAR T-cell immunotherapies. PMID:26061646

  9. Targeted multidrug-resistance reversal in tumor based on PEG-PLL-PLGA polymer nano drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liting; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yonglu; Xia, Guohua; Liu, Ran; Li, Xueming; Yin, Haixiang; Jiang, Hulin; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) and the biodistribution of nanoparticles (NPs) that target leukemia cells in a nude mice model via a surface-bound transferrin (Tf). The cytotoxic cargo of daunorubicin (DNR) and tetrandrine (Tet) was protected in the NPs by an outer coat composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly-l-lysine (PLL)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs. Injection of DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs into nude mice bearing MDR leukemia cell K562/A02 xenografts was shown to inhibit tumor growth, and contemporaneous immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue showed the targeted NPs induced apoptosis in tumor cells. Targeted tumor cells exhibited a marked increase in Tf receptor expression, with noticeable decreases in P-glycoprotein, MDR protein, and nuclear factor κB, as assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Moreover, the concentration of DNR was shown to increase in plasma, tumor tissue, and major organs. Flow cytometry analysis with a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye, NIR797, was used to study the effectiveness of Tf as a targeting group for leukemia cells, a finding that was supported by NIRF imaging in tumor-bearing nude mice. In summary, our studies show that DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs provide a specific and effective means to target cytotoxic drugs to MDR tumor cells. PMID:26213467

  10. Targeted multidrug-resistance reversal in tumor based on PEG-PLL-PLGA polymer nano drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liting; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yonglu; Xia, Guohua; Liu, Ran; Li, Xueming; Yin, Haixiang; Jiang, Hulin; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) and the biodistribution of nanoparticles (NPs) that target leukemia cells in a nude mice model via a surface-bound transferrin (Tf). The cytotoxic cargo of daunorubicin (DNR) and tetrandrine (Tet) was protected in the NPs by an outer coat composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly-L-lysine (PLL)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs. Injection of DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs into nude mice bearing MDR leukemia cell K562/A02 xenografts was shown to inhibit tumor growth, and contemporaneous immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue showed the targeted NPs induced apoptosis in tumor cells. Targeted tumor cells exhibited a marked increase in Tf receptor expression, with noticeable decreases in P-glycoprotein, MDR protein, and nuclear factor κB, as assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Moreover, the concentration of DNR was shown to increase in plasma, tumor tissue, and major organs. Flow cytometry analysis with a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye, NIR797, was used to study the effectiveness of Tf as a targeting group for leukemia cells, a finding that was supported by NIRF imaging in tumor-bearing nude mice. In summary, our studies show that DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs provide a specific and effective means to target cytotoxic drugs to MDR tumor cells. PMID:26213467

  11. The involvement of sphingolipids in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sietsma, H; Veldman, R J; Kok, J W

    2001-06-01

    Administration of most chemotherapeutic agents eventually results in the onset of apoptosis, despite the agents' variety in structure and molecular targets. Ceramide, the central molecule in cellular glycosphingolipid metabolism, has recently been identified as an important mediator of this process. Indeed, one of the events elicited by application of many cytotoxic drugs is an accumulation of this lipid. Treatment failure in cancer chemotherapy is largely attributable to multidrug resistance, in which tumor cells are typically cross-resistant to multiple chemotherapeutic agents. Different cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have been described. Of these the drug efflux pump activity of P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated proteins are the most extensively studied examples. Recently, an increased cellular capacity for ceramide glycosylation has been recognized as a novel multidrug resistance mechanism. Indeed, virtually all multidrug-resistant cells exhibit a deviating sphingolipid composition, most typically, increased levels of glucosylceramide. On the other hand, several direct molecular interactions between sphingolipids and drug efflux proteins have been described. Therefore, in addition to a role in the multidrug resistance phenotype by which ceramide accumulation and, thus, the onset of apoptosis are prevented, an indirect role for sphingolipids might be envisaged, by which the activity of these efflux proteins is modulated. In this review, we present an overview of the current understanding of the interesting relations that exist between sphingolipid metabolism and multidrug resistance. PMID:11420602

  12. Meayamycin Inhibits pre-mRNA Splicing and Exhibits Picomolar Activity Against Multidrug Resistant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Brian J.; McPherson, Peter A.; O'Brien, Kristine; Czaicki, Nancy L.; DeStefino, Vincent; Osman, Sami; Li, Miaosheng; Day, Billy W.; Grabowski, Paula J.; Moore, Melissa J.; Vogt, Andreas; Koide, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    FR901464 is a potent antitumor natural product that binds to the SF3b complex and inhibits pre-mRNA splicing. Its analogue, meayamycin, is two orders of magnitude more potent as an antiproliferative agent against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Here, we report the picomolar antiproliferative activity of meayamycin against various cancer cell lines and multidrug resistant cells. Time-dependence studies implied that meayamycin may form a covalent bond with its target protein(s). Meayamycin inhibited pre-mRNA splicing in HEK-293 cells but not alternative splicing in a neuronal system. Meayamycin exhibited specificity toward human lung cancer cells compared to non-tumorigenic human lung fibroblasts and retained picomolar growth inhibitory activity against multi-drug resistant cells. These data suggest that meayamycin is a useful chemical probe to study pre-mRNA splicing in live cells and is a promising lead as an anticancer agent. PMID:19671752

  13. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD) analogues chemosensitize multidrug-resistant cancer cells to clinical anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junhua; Wang, Xu; Liu, Peng; Deng, Rongxin; Lei, Min; Chen, Wantao; Hu, Lihong

    2013-07-15

    Novel 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD) analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for the chemosensitizing activity against a multidrug resistant (MDR) cell line (KBvcr) overexpressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that aromatic substituted aliphatic amine at the 24-positions (groups V) effectively and significantly sensitized P-gp overexpressing multidrug resistant (MDR) cells to anticancer drugs, such as docetaxel (DOC), vincristine (VCR), and adriamycin (ADM). PPD derivatives 12 and 18 showed 1.3-2.6 times more effective reversal ability than verapamil (VER) for DOC and VCR. Importantly, no cytotoxicity was observed by the active PPD analogues (5μM) against both non-MDR and MDR cells, suggesting that PPD analogues serve as novel lead compounds toward a potent and safe resistance modulator. Moreover, a preliminary mechanism study demonstrated that the chemosensitizing activity of PPD analogues results from inhibition of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpressed in MDR cancer cells. PMID:23683834

  14. Cytotoxicity of novel sulfanilamides towards sensitive and multidrug-resistant leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    AlSalim, T; Saeed, M E M; Hadi, J S; Zeino, M; Gany, R; Kadioglu, O; Titinchi, S J J; Abbo, H S; Efferth, T

    2014-01-01

    Novel sulfa Schiff bases were synthesized and characterized by a reaction between aromatic sulfonamides and aromatic aldehydes or heterocyclic ketones in equimolar ratios. Their cytotoxicity was evaluated by the resazurin assay towards human sensitive CCRF-CEM and multidrug-resistant CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cells. Three of the tested compounds viz., 4-(anthracen-9-ylmethyleneamino)-N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzenesulfonamide (4), 4-(anthracen-9- ylmethyleneamino)benzenesulfonamide, (5) and 4-((3-phenylallylidene)amino)benzene-sulfonamide, (6) were cytotoxic (IC50 values: 5.38-19.96 µM). CEM/ADR5000 cells were not cross-resistant to these compounds, indicating activity against otherwise drug-resistant tumors. Compound 6 inhibited P-glycoprotein by increasing doxorubicin accumulation and reducing expression of P-glycoprotein in CEM/ADR5000 cells. A human P-glycoprotein homology model was used for molecular docking studies. Compound 6 and verapamil (a well-known P-glycoprotein inhibitor) docked with similar binding energies to the same binding pocket. PMID:24438524

  15. Self-assembling nanoparticles encapsulating zoledronic acid revert multidrug resistance in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gazzano, Elena; Salzano, Giuseppina; Giordano, Antonio; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Ghigo, Dario; Caraglia, Michele; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Riganti, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters makes tumor cells simultaneously resistant to several cytotoxic drugs. Impairing the energy metabolism of multidrug resistant (MDR) cells is a promising chemosensitizing strategy, but many metabolic modifiers are too toxic in vivo. We previously observed that the aminobisphosphonate zoledronic acid inhibits the activity of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a master regulator of cancer cell metabolism. Free zoledronic acid, however, reaches low intratumor concentration. We synthesized nanoparticle formulations of the aminobisphosphonate that allow a higher intratumor delivery of the drug. We investigated whether they are effective metabolic modifiers and chemosensitizing agents against human MDR cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. At not toxic dosage, nanoparticles carrying zoledronic acid chemosensitized MDR cells to a broad spectrum of cytotoxic drugs, independently of the type of ABC transporters expressed. The nanoparticles inhibited the isoprenoid synthesis and the Ras/ERK1/2-driven activation of HIF-1α, decreased the transcription and activity of glycolytic enzymes, the glucose flux through the glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, the electron flux through the mitochondrial respiratory chain, the synthesis of ATP. So doing, they lowered the ATP-dependent activity of ABC transporters, increasing the chemotherapy efficacy in vitro and in vivo. These effects were more pronounced in MDR cells than in chemosensitive ones and were due to the inhibition of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS), as demonstrated in FPPS-silenced tumors. Our work proposes nanoparticle formulations of zoledronic acid as the first not toxic metabolic modifiers, effective against MDR tumors. PMID:26372812

  16. High heterogeneity of plasma membrane microfluidity in multidrug-resistant cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Céline; Roche, Yann; Millot, Christine; Deturche, Régis; Royer, Pascal; Manfait, Michel; Plain, Jérôme; Jeannesson, Pierre; Millot, Jean-Marc; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2009-05-01

    Diffusion-time distribution analysis (DDA) has been used to explore the plasma membrane fluidity of multidrug-resistant cancer cells (LR73 carcinoma cells) and also to characterize the influence of various membrane agents present in the extracellular medium. DDA is a recent single-molecule technique, based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), well suited to retrieve local organization of cell membrane. The method was conducted on a large number of living cells, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of plasma membrane microviscosity, and plasma membrane micro-organization, between the cells of the same line. Thus, we clearly reveal the higher heterogeneity of plasma membrane in multidrug-resistant cancer cells in comparison with the nonresistant ones (denoted sensitive cells). We also display distinct modifications related to a membrane fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol, and two revertants of multidrug resistance, verapamil and cyclosporin-A. A relation between the distribution of the diffusion-time values and the modification of membrane lateral heterogeneities is proposed.

  17. Assessment of multidrug resistance on cell coculture patterns using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Sabine; Polcari, David; Geissler, Matthias; Brassard, Daniel; Mauzeroll, Janine

    2013-06-01

    The emergence of resistance to multiple unrelated chemotherapeutic drugs impedes the treatment of several cancers. Although the involvement of ATP-binding cassette transporters has long been known, there is no in situ method capable of tracking this transporter-related resistance at the single-cell level without interfering with the cell's environment or metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can quantitatively and noninvasively track multidrug resistance-related protein 1-dependent multidrug resistance in patterned adenocarcinoma cervical cancer cells. Nonresistant human cancer cells and their multidrug resistant variants are arranged in a side-by-side format using a stencil-based patterning scheme, allowing for precise positioning of target cells underneath the SECM sensor. SECM measurements of the patterned cells, performed with ferrocenemethanol and [Ru(NH3)6](3+) serving as electrochemical indicators, are used to establish a kinetic "map" of constant-height SECM scans, free of topography contributions. The concept underlying the work described herein may help evaluate the effectiveness of treatment administration strategies targeting reduced drug efflux. PMID:23686580

  18. Assessment of multidrug resistance on cell coculture patterns using scanning electrochemical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuss, Sabine; Polcari, David; Geissler, Matthias; Brassard, Daniel; Mauzeroll, Janine

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to multiple unrelated chemotherapeutic drugs impedes the treatment of several cancers. Although the involvement of ATP-binding cassette transporters has long been known, there is no in situ method capable of tracking this transporter-related resistance at the single-cell level without interfering with the cell’s environment or metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can quantitatively and noninvasively track multidrug resistance-related protein 1–dependent multidrug resistance in patterned adenocarcinoma cervical cancer cells. Nonresistant human cancer cells and their multidrug resistant variants are arranged in a side-by-side format using a stencil-based patterning scheme, allowing for precise positioning of target cells underneath the SECM sensor. SECM measurements of the patterned cells, performed with ferrocenemethanol and [Ru(NH3)6]3+ serving as electrochemical indicators, are used to establish a kinetic “map” of constant-height SECM scans, free of topography contributions. The concept underlying the work described herein may help evaluate the effectiveness of treatment administration strategies targeting reduced drug efflux. PMID:23686580

  19. Overexpression of CDX2 in gastric cancer cells promotes the development of multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin-Hai; Wei, Wei-Yuan; Cao, Wen-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Xie, Yu-Bo; Xiao, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Modulator of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene is a direct transcriptional target of CDX2. However, we still speculate whether CDX2 affects MDR through other ways. In this study, a cisplatin-resistant (SGC7901/DDP) and a 5-fluoro-2, 4(1h,3h)pyrimidinedione-resistant (BGC823/5-FU) gastric cancer cell line with stable overexpression of CDX2 were established. The influence of overexpression of CDX2 on MDR was assessed by measuring IC50 of SGC7901/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil, rate of doxorubicin efflux, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression detected by flow cytometry. In addition, we determined the in vivo effects of CDX2-overexpression lentiviral vector (LV-CDX2-GFP) on tumor size, and apoptotic cells in tumor tissues were detected by deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results showed that LV-CDX2-GFP led to up-regulation of CDX2 mRNA and protein expression. It significantly inhibited the sensitivity of SGC7901/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil. Flow cytometry confirmed that the percentage of apoptotic cells decreased after CDX2 up-regulation. This notion was further supported by the observation that up-regulation of CDX2 blocked entry into the M-phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, up-regulation of CDX2 significantly decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin. In molecular studies, quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed that CDX2 up-regulation could suppress expression of Caspase-3, Caspase-9 and PTEN, and increased the expression of MDR1, MRP, mTOR, HIF-1α. PMID:25628941

  20. Regulatory mechanism of ZNF139 in multi-drug resistance of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Tan, Bi-bo; Zhao, Qun; Fan, Li-qiao; Liu, Yü; Wang, Dong

    2014-06-01

    Our previous study found increased zinc finger protein 139 (ZNF139) expression in gastric cancer (GC) cells. Purpose of the study is to further clarify the role and mechanism of ZNF139 in multi-drug resistance (MDR) of GC cells. MTT assay, RT-PCR, Western blotting were employed to detect susceptibility of GC cells to chemotherapeutic agents (5-FU, L-OHP) in vitro, and expressions of ZNF139 and MDR associated genes MDR1/P-gp, MRP1, Bcl-2, Bax were also detected. siRNA specific to ZNF139 was transfected into MKN28 cells, then chemosensitivity of GC cells as well as changes of ZNF139 and MDR associated genes were detected. It's found the inhibition rate of 5-FU, L-OHP to well-differentiated GC tissues and cell line was lower than that in the poorly differentiated tissues and cell line; expressions of ZNF139 and MDR1/P-gp, MRP1 and Bcl-2 in well-differentiated GC tissues and cell line MKN28 were higher, while Bax expression was lower. After ZNF139-siRNA was transfected into MKN28, ZNF139 expression in GC cells was inhibited by 90%; inhibition rate of 5-FU, L-OHP to tumor cells increased, and expressions of MDR1/P-gp, MRP1 and Bcl-2 were down-regulated, while Bax was up-regulated. ZNF139 was involved in GC MDR by promoting expressions of MDR1/P-gp, MRP1 and Bcl-2 and inhibiting Bax simultaneously. PMID:24515389

  1. Sweat but no gain: Inhibiting proliferation of multidrug resistant cancer cells with “Ersatzdroges”

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Yoonseok; Das, Tuhin; Tian, Haibin; Foroutan, Parastou; Ruiz, Epifanio; Martinez, Gary; Minton, Susan; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters consuming ATPs for drug efflux is a common mechanism by which clinical cancers develop multidrug resistance (MDR). We hypothesized that MDR phenotypes could be suppressed by administration of “ersatzdroges”, non-chemotherapy drugs that are, nevertheless, ABC substrates. We reasoned that, through prolonged activation of the ABC pumps, ersatzdroges will force MDR cells to divert limited resources from proliferation and invasion thus delaying disease progression. We evaluated ABC substrates as ersatzdroge by comparing their effects on proliferation and survival of MDR cell lines (MCF-7/Dox and 8226/Dox40) with the effects on the drug-sensitive parental lines (MCF-7 and 8226/s, respectively) in glucose-limited condition. The changes in glucose and energy demands were also examined in vitro and in vivo. MCF-7/Dox showed higher ATP demand and susceptibility to glucose resource limitation. Ersatzdroges significantly decreased proliferation of MCF-7/Dox when the culture media contained physiological glucose concentrations (1.0 g/L) or less, but had no effect on MCF-7. Similar evidence was obtained from 8226/Dox40 and 8226/s comparison. In vivo 18F-FDG-PET imaging demonstrated that glucose uptake was increased by systemic administration of an ersatzdroge in tumors composed of MDR. These results suggest that administration of ersatzdroges, by increasing the metabolic cost of resistance, can suppress proliferation of drug-resistance phenotypes. This provides a novel and relatively simple application model of evolution-based strategy which can exploit the cost of resistance to delay proliferation of drug-resistant cancer phenotypes. Furthermore, suggested is the potential of ersatzdroges to identify tumors or regions of tumors that express the MDR phenotype. PMID:25156304

  2. Sweat but no gain: inhibiting proliferation of multidrug resistant cancer cells with "ersatzdroges".

    PubMed

    Kam, Yoonseok; Das, Tuhin; Tian, Haibin; Foroutan, Parastou; Ruiz, Epifanio; Martinez, Gary; Minton, Susan; Gillies, Robert J; Gatenby, Robert A

    2015-02-15

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters consuming ATPs for drug efflux is a common mechanism by which clinical cancers develop multidrug resistance (MDR). We hypothesized that MDR phenotypes could be suppressed by administration of "ersatzdroges," nonchemotherapy drugs that are, nevertheless, ABC substrates. We reasoned that, through prolonged activation of the ABC pumps, ersatzdroges will force MDR cells to divert limited resources from proliferation and invasion thus delaying disease progression. We evaluated ABC substrates as ersatzdroge by comparing their effects on proliferation and survival of MDR cell lines (MCF-7/Dox and 8226/Dox40) with the effects on the drug-sensitive parental lines (MCF-7 and 8226/s, respectively) in glucose-limited condition. The changes in glucose and energy demands were also examined in vitro and in vivo. MCF-7/Dox showed higher ATP demand and susceptibility to glucose resource limitation. Ersatzdroges significantly decreased proliferation of MCF-7/Dox when the culture media contained physiological glucose concentrations (1.0 g/L) or less, but had no effect on MCF-7. Similar evidence was obtained from 8226/Dox40 and 8226/s comparison. In vivo 18F-FDG-PET imaging demonstrated that glucose uptake was increased by systemic administration of an ersatzdroge in tumors composed of MDR. These results suggest that administration of ersatzdroges, by increasing the metabolic cost of resistance, can suppress proliferation of drug-resistance phenotypes. This provides a novel and relatively simple application model of evolution-based strategy, which can exploit the cost of resistance to delay proliferation of drug-resistant cancer phenotypes. Furthermore, suggested is the potential of ersatzdroges to identify tumors or regions of tumors that express the MDR phenotype. PMID:25156304

  3. Complexation study and anticellular activity enhancement by doxorubicin-cyclodextrin complexes on a multidrug-resistant adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Al-Omar, A; Abdou, S; De Robertis, L; Marsura, A; Finance, C

    1999-04-19

    Ability of molecular complexes of [Doxorubicin (DX)-cyclodextrin (Cd)] to enhance the anticellular activity of antineoplastic drug Doxorubicin and to reverse its multidrug resistance has been investigated. A spectroscopic study of the alpha, beta, and gamma-[DX-Cds] complexes has been investigated in relation to their biological effects on a multidrug resistant (MDR) human rectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HRT-18). A ten fold enhancement of DX anticellular activity in presence of beta-cyclodextrin alone was detected. PMID:10328296

  4. Phytochemical analysis and cytotoxicity towards multidrug-resistant leukemia cells of essential oils derived from Lebanese medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Saab, Antoine M; Guerrini, Alessandra; Sacchetti, Gianni; Maietti, Silvia; Zeino, Maʼen; Arend, Joachim; Gambari, Roberto; Bernardi, Francesco; Efferth, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Juniperus excelsa fruit essential oil as well as J. oxycedrus, Cedrus libani, and Pinus pinea wood essential oils have been obtained with yields between 2.2 ± 0.3 % to 3.4 ± 0.5 % and analyzed by gas chromatography. Sesquiterpenes mainly characterized C. libani and J. oxycedrus essential oils, while in P. pinea and J. excelsa, monoterpenes were the most abundant compounds. In J. oxycedrus, cis-calamenene (7.8 %), cuparene (3.8 %), and cis-thujopsenal (2.0 %) have been detected for the first time. The cytotoxic activity of these essential oils against drug-sensitive CCRF-CEM and multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein-expressing CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cells has been investigated (IC₅₀ values: 29.46 to 61.54 µg/mL). Remarkably, multidrug-resistant CEM/ADR5000 cells did not reveal cross-resistance, indicating that these essential oils might be useful to treat otherwise drug-resistant and refractory tumors. PMID:23154840

  5. Preliminary studies on phenothiazine-mediated reversal of multidrug resistance in mouse lymphoma and COLO 320 cells.

    PubMed

    Pajak, Beata; Molnar, Joseph; Engi, Helga; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2005-01-01

    The ability of phenothiazine derivatives to inhibit the transport activity of P-glycoprotein in resistant mouse lymphoma and MDR/COLO 320 cells was studied. A rhodamine 123 efflux from the above-mentioned neoplastic cells in the presence of tested compounds was examined by flow cytometry. Two of the phenothiazine derivatives, namely perphenazine and prochlorperazine dimaleate, proved to be effective inhibitors of the rhodamine efflux. Other tested phenothiazine derivatives (promethazine hydrochloride, oxomemazine, methotrimeprazine maleate, trifluoropromazine hydrochloride, trimeprazine) also modulated the intracellular drug accumulation in both resistant cell lines, however, they exerted additional cytotoxic effects. The differences observed between the effects of the test compounds on intracellular drug accumulation could be the outcome of differences in phenothiazine's chemical structure, which is crucial for drug-cell membrane interactions. The results of this study provide information about a new group of compounds that offer promise in multidrug resistance reversal in tumor cells. PMID:16277030

  6. Cytotoxicity of Salvia miltiorrhiza Against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Bohnert, Stefan; Thines, Eckhard; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Lamiaceae) is a well-known Chinese herb that possesses numerous therapeutic activities, including anticancer effects. In this study, the cytotoxicity and the biological mechanisms of S. miltiorrhiza (SM) root extract on diverse resistant and sensitive cancer cell lines were investigated. CEM/ADR5000 cells were 1.68-fold resistant to CCRF-CEM cells, while HCT116 (p53[Formula: see text] and U87.MG[Formula: see text]EGFR cells were hypersensitive (collateral sensitive) compared to their parental cells. SM root extract stimulated ROS generation, cell cycle S phase arrest and apoptosis. The induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway was validated by increased cleavage of caspase 3, 7, 9 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). MAP kinases including JNK, ERK1/2 and p38 were obviously phosphorylated and nuclear P65 was downregulated upon SM treatment. Transcriptome-wide COMPARE analysis revealed that the expression of encoding genes with diverse functions were associated with the cellular response to cryptotanshinone, one of the main constituents of SM root extract. In conclusion, SM root extract exerted profound cytotoxicity towards various sensitive and resistant cancer cells and induced the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:27222067

  7. Involvement of EGFR in the promotion of malignant properties in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Wen; Li, Qing-Quan; Tao, Li-Li; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Juan; Chen, Qi; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Xu, Zu-De

    2011-12-01

    Multidrug resistance is the most predominant phenomenon leading to chemotherapy treatment failure in breast cancer patients. Despite many studies having suggested that overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a potent predictor of malignancy in cancers, systematic research of EGFR in multidrug resistant (MDR) breast cancer cells is lacking. In order to clarify the role of EGFR in MDR breast cancer cells, MCF7/Adr expressing relatively higher EGFR, and its parental cell line MCF7 expressing relatively lower EGFR, were chosen for this study. Knockdown of EGFR by siRNA in MCF7/Adr cells showed that EGFR siRNA inhibits cell migration, invasion and proliferation in vitro; converse effects were observed in MCF7 cells transfected with pcDNA3.0-EGFR plasmid. Moreover, we found that EGFR upregulated migration and invasion via EMMPRIN, MMP2 and MMP9 in addition to promoting cell cycle passage via elevation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 in MDR breast cancer cells. Interestingly, MCF7/Adr cells not expressing EGFR showed significant decrease of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and ABCG2 expression levels, and became more sensitive to treatment of adriamycin (ADR) and paclitaxel (Taxol); the above results indicated that MDR of cancer cells is related to S-phase arrest. In conclusion, EGFR is an important factor enhancing the malignancy of MDR breast cancer cells, partially, inducing MDR. Anti-EGFR therapy may improve outcome in chemorefractory breast cancer patients. PMID:21805028

  8. Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Large amounts of antibiotics used for human therapy, as well as for farm animals and even for fish in aquaculture, resulted in the selection of pathogenic bacteria resistant to multiple drugs. Multidrug resistance in bacteria may be generated by one of two mechanisms. First, these bacteria may accumulate multiple genes, each coding for resistance to a single drug, within a single cell. This accumulation occurs typically on resistance (R) plasmids. Second, multidrug resistance may also occur by the increased expression of genes that code for multidrug efflux pumps, extruding a wide range of drugs. This review discusses our current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in both types of resistance. PMID:19231985

  9. Effect of different agents onto multidrug resistant cells revealed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, C.; Roche, Y.; Jaffiol, R.; Millot, J.-M.; Millot, C.; Plain, J.; Deturche, R.; Jeannesson, P.; Manfait, M.; Royer, P.

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which is a sensitive and non invasive technique, has been used to characterize the plasma membrane fluidity and heterogeneity of multidrug resistant living cells. At the single cell level, the effects of different membrane agents present in the extra-cellular medium have been analyzed. Firstly, we reveal a modification of plasma membrane microviscosity according to the addition of a fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol. In the other hand, revertant such as verapamil and cyclosporin-A appears to act more specifically on the slow diffusion sites as microdomains.

  10. Tetrandrine and fangchinoline, bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Stephania tetrandra can reverse multidrug resistance by inhibiting P-glycoprotein activity in multidrug resistant human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan Fang; Wink, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The overexpression of ABC transporters is a common reason for multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. In this study, we found that the isoquinoline alkaloids tetrandrine and fangchinoline from Stephania tetrandra showed a significant synergistic cytotoxic effect in MDR Caco-2 and CEM/ADR5000 cancer cells in combination with doxorubicin, a common cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Furthermore, tetrandrine and fangchinoline increased the intracellular accumulation of the fluorescent P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123) and inhibited its efflux in Caco-2 and CEM/ADR5000 cells. In addition, tetrandrine and fangchinoline significantly reduced P-gp expression in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that tetrandrine and fangchinoline can reverse MDR by increasing the intracellular concentration of anticancer drugs, and thus they could serve as a lead for developing new drugs to overcome P-gp mediated drug resistance in clinic cancer therapy. PMID:24856768

  11. Altered sphingolipid metabolism in multidrug-resistant ovarian cancer cells is due to uncoupling of glycolipid biosynthesis in the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Veldman, Robert Jan; Klappe, Karin; Hinrichs, John; Hummel, Ina; van der Schaaf, Gieta; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    2002-07-01

    Multidrug-resistant tumor cells display enhanced levels of glucosylceramide. In this study, we investigated how this relates to the overall sphingolipid composition of multidrug-resistant ovarian carcinoma cells and which mechanisms are responsible for adapted sphingolipid metabolism. We found in multidrug-resistant cells substantially lower levels of lactosylceramide and gangliosides in sharp contrast to glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, and sphingomyelin levels. This indicates a block in the glycolipid biosynthetic pathway at the level of lactosylceramide formation, with concomitant accumulation of glucosylceramide. A series of observations exclude regulation at the enzyme level as the underlying mechanism. First, reduced lactosylceramide formation occurred only in intact resistant cells whereas cell-free activity of lactosylceramide synthase was higher compared with the parental cells. Second, the level of lactosylceramide synthase gene expression was equal in both phenotypes. Third, glucosylceramide synthase (mRNA and protein) expression and activity were equal or lower in resistant cells. Based on the kinetics of sphingolipid metabolism, the observation that brefeldin A does not restore lactosylceramide synthesis, and altered localization of lactosylceramide synthase fused to green fluorescent protein, we conclude that lactosylceramide biosynthesis is highly uncoupled from glucosylceramide biosynthesis in the Golgi apparatus of resistant cells. PMID:12039850

  12. Reversal of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in human hepatoma cells by hedyotiscone A, a compound isolated from Hedyotis corymbosa.

    PubMed

    Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Kin-Ming Lee, Julia; Cheng, Ling; Chung-Lap Chan, Ben; Jiang, Lei; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Bik-San Lau, Clara

    2012-06-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major problem in hepatocellular carcinoma. Hedyotiscone A, a compound isolated from Chinese herbal medicine Hedyotis corymbosa (HC, family Rubiaceae), was used as the chemical marker to distinguish between HC and an anticancer herb Hedyotis diffusa (HD) in our previous study. The present study aimed to investigate whether HA exhibited antiproliferative activities in multidrug-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cells R-HepG2 and the parental cells HepG2 using MTT assay and [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Our results showed that HA could significantly inhibit cell proliferation in R-HepG2 and HepG2 (IC(50) = 43.7 and 56.3 µg/mL, respectively), but not in normal human liver cells WRL-68 (IC(50) > 100 µg/mL) cells, suggesting its selective cytotoxic effects. Besides, HA induced apoptosis in R-HepG2 cells, as confirmed by annexin-V & propidium iodide staining, and DNA fragmentation assay. The caspase cascade was activated as shown by a significant increase of cleaved caspases-3, -7 and -9 in HA-treated R-HepG2 cells. The activities and protein expression of P-glycoprotein as well as mRNA expression of MDR1 were also decreased in HA-treated R-HepG2 cells. Our study demonstrated for the first time the antiproliferative activities of hedyotiscone A in multidrug-resistant R-HepG2 cells. The findings revealed the potential of this compound in treating multidrug-resistant tumor. PMID:22352391

  13. Reversal of Multidrug Resistance in Mouse Lymphoma Cells by Extracts and Flavonoids from Pistacia integerrima.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Abdur; Uddin, Ghias; Raza, Muslim; Ahmad, Bashir; Jehan, Noor; Siddiqui, Bina S; Molnar, Joseph; Csonka, Akos; Szabo, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Pistacia integerrima has highlighted isolation of two known compounds naringenin (1) and dihydrokaempferol (2). A crude extract and these isolated compounds were here evaluated for their effects on reversion of multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein is a target for chemotherapeutic drugs from cancer cells. In the present study rhodamine- 123 exclusion screening test on human mdr1 gene transfected mouse gene transfected L5178 and L5178Y mouse T-cell lymphoma cells showed excellent MDR reversing effects in a dose dependent manner. In-silico molecular docking investigations demonstrated a common binding site for Rhodamine123, and compounds naringenin and dihydrokaempferol. Our results showed that the relative docking energies estimated by docking softwares were in satisfactory correlation with the experimental activities. Preliminary interaction profile of P-gp docked complexes were also analysed in order to understand the nature of binding modes of these compounds. Our computational investigation suggested that the compounds interactions with the hydrophobic pocket of P-gp are mainly related to the inhibitory activity. Moreover this study s a platform for the discovery of novel natural compounds from herbal origin, as inhibitor molecules against the P-glycoprotein for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26838254

  14. Biochemical and genetic characterization of the multidrug resistance phenotype in murine macrophage-like J774.2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, L S; Greenberger, L M; Hsu, S I; Yang, C P; Cohen, D; Piekarz, R L; Castillo, G; Han, E K; Yu, L J; Horwitz, S B

    1992-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in malignant tumors is a major obstacle to the treatment of many cancers. MDR sublines have been derived from the J774.2 mouse macrophage-like cell line and utilized to characterize the phenotype at the biochemical and genetic level. Two isoforms of the drug resistance-associated P-glycoprotein are present and distinguishable both electrophoretically and pharmacologically. Genetic analysis has revealed the presence of a three-member gene family; expression of two of these genes, mdr1a and mdr1b, is associated with MDR whereas the expression of the third, mdr2, is not. Studies of these three genes have revealed similarities and differences in the manner in which they are regulated at the transcriptional level, and have suggested that post-transcriptional effects may also be important. PMID:1346495

  15. In silico identified targeted inhibitors of P-glycoprotein overcome multidrug resistance in human cancer cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Follit, Courtney A; Brewer, Frances K; Wise, John G; Vogel, Pia D

    2015-01-01

    Failure of cancer chemotherapies is often linked to the over expression of ABC efflux transporters like the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp expression in cells leads to the elimination of a variety of chemically unrelated, mostly cytotoxic compounds. Administration of chemotherapeutics during therapy frequently selects for cells that over express P-gp and are therefore capable of robustly exporting diverse compounds, including chemotherapeutics, from the cells. P-gp thus confers multidrug resistance to a majority of drugs currently available for the treatment of cancers and diseases like HIV/AIDS. The search for P-gp inhibitors for use as co-therapeutics to combat multidrug resistances has had little success to date. In a previous study (Brewer et al., Mol Pharmacol 86: 716–726, 2014), we described how ultrahigh throughput computational searches led to the identification of four drug-like molecules that specifically interfere with the energy harvesting steps of substrate transport and inhibit P-gp catalyzed ATP hydrolysis in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that three of these compounds reversed P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance of cultured prostate cancer cells to restore sensitivity comparable to naïve prostate cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic drug, paclitaxel. Potentiation concentrations of the inhibitors were <3 μmol/L. The inhibitors did not exhibit significant toxicity to noncancerous cells at concentrations where they reversed multidrug resistance in cancerous cells. Our results indicate that these compounds with novel mechanisms of P-gp inhibition are excellent leads for the development of co-therapeutics for the treatment of multidrug resistances. PMID:26516582

  16. Broad distribution of the multidrug resistance-related vault lung resistance protein in normal human tissues and tumors.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, M A; Scheffer, G L; Flens, M J; Giaccone, G; Broxterman, H J; Meijer, C J; van der Valk, P; Scheper, R J

    1996-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a major cause of treatment failure in cancer. The lung resistance protein LRP is a newly described protein related to MDR in several in vitro models. LRP has been shown to be a strong predictor of poor response to chemotherapy and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia and in ovarian carcinoma patients. Recently, based on a 57% and 88% amino acid identity with major vault proteins from Dictyostelium discoideum and Rattus norvegicus, respectively, we identified LRP as the human major vault protein, the main component of highly conserved cellular organelles named vaults. We have studied the immunohistochemical expression of LRP in freshly frozen normal human tissues and 174 cancer specimens of 28 tumor types. LRP was broadly distributed in normal and malignant cells, but distinct patterns of expression were noticed. High LRP expression was seen in bronchus, digestive tract, renal proximal tubules, keratinocytes, macrophages, and adrenal cortex whereas varying ing levels were observed in other organs. LRP was detected in all tumor types examined, but its frequency varied, fairly reflecting the chemosensitivity of different cancers. For example, low rates of LRP positivity were seen in testicular cancer, neuroblastoma, and acute myeloid leukemia; intermediate in ovarian cancer; and high in colon, renal, and pancreatic carcinomas. The wide occurrence of LRP in normal and transformed cells in humans, its similar distribution to that of vaults in other species, as well as the high level of conservation among eukaryotic cells of both the amino acid sequence of the major vault protein and the composition and structure of vaults, suggest that vault function is important to eukaryotic cells. PMID:8774142

  17. Induction of multidrug resistance downregulates the expression of CFTR in colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Breuer, W; Slotki, I N; Ausiello, D A; Cabantchik, I Z

    1993-12-01

    The epithelial cell line HT-29, which constitutively expresses the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), was induced to become drug resistant by cultivation in the presence of colchicine. The gradual acquisition of drug resistance was associated with a corresponding increase in the expression of the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and a marked (> 80%) decrease in the constitutive levels of CFTR protein, as determined by immunoblotting. The reduction in CFTR content occurred at the onset of acquisition of drug resistance when P-gp expression was still relatively low. Reversal of drug resistance by removal of colchicine from the culture medium led to a 70% decrease in P-gp levels and a concomitant 40% increase in CFTR. The levels of other membrane proteins such as Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and alkaline phosphatase remained relatively constant (< 26% variation). We propose that a selective downregulation of CFTR is elicited by acquisition of the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype and that induction of P-gp expression leads to a reversible repression of CFTR biosynthesis. These findings provide an experimental foundation for the complementary patterns of expression of the CFTR and MDR1 genes observed in vivo. PMID:7506492

  18. Meloxicam increases intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin via downregulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, S F; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, J L

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that selected COX inhibitors can overcome multidrug resistance through the inhibition of ATP‑binding cassette-transporter proteins thereby enhancing the inhibitory effect of doxorubicin on human tumor growth and promoting the actions of cytostatics. However, their effect on lung cancer and the molecular mechanisms involved in the overcoming of multidrug resistance are unclear. In the present study, the ability of meloxicam, a COX-2-specific inhibitor to enhance doxorubicin‑mediated inhibition was investigated in human A549 lung cancer in vivo and in vitro. In order to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved in doxorubicin accumulation, we measured the levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)-transporter protein activity and expression by western blotting, since this has been implicated in meloxicam action as well as in chemoresistance. We found that, in A549 cells, meloxicam could increase intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin, a substrate for MRP, through inhibition of cellular export. Western blot analysis indicated that meloxicam reduced the expression of MRP1 and MRP4. The results reported in the present study demonstrate for the first time that the specific COX-2 inhibitor meloxicam can increase the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and enhance doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in A549 cancer cells by reducing the expression of MRP1 and MRP4. PMID:26600514

  19. Modulation of P-glycoprotein function and multidrug resistance in cancer cells by Thai plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Takano, M; Kakizoe, S; Kawami, M; Nagai, J; Patanasethnont, D; Sripanidkulchai, B; Yumoto, R

    2014-11-01

    The effects of ethanol extracts from Thai plants belonging to the families of Annonaceae, Rutaceae, and Zingiberaceae on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function and multidrug resistance were examined in paclitaxel-resistant HepG2 (PR-HepG2) cells. All the extracts tested, significantly increased the accumulation of [3H]paclitaxel, a P-gp substrate, in the cells. Among nine extracts, Z01 and Z02, extracts from Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata (Zingiberaceae family), respectively, potently increased the accumulation. In addition, Z01 and Z02 increased the accumulation of other P-gp substrates, rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin, in PR-HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Increased accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin by Z01 and Z02 was also confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The effect of Z01 and Z02 pretreatment on the expression of MDR1 mRNA was also examined. The expression of MDR1 mRNA was not affected by the treatment of PR-HepG2 cells with these extracts for 48 hours. Cytotoxicity of paclitaxel was examined by XTT and protein assays in the absence and presence of Z02. Z02 potentiated the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in PR-HepG2 cells. These results suggest that Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata belonging to Zingiberaceae are useful sources to search for new P-gp modulator(s) that can be used to overcome multidrug resistance of cancer cells. PMID:25985578

  20. Circumvention of multi-drug resistance of cancer cells by Chinese herbal medicines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells severely limits therapeutic outcomes. A proposed mechanism for MDR involves the efflux of anti-cancer drugs from cancer cells, primarily mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters including P-glycoprotein. This article reviews the recent progress of using active ingredients, extracts and formulae from Chinese medicine (CM) in circumventing ABC transporters-mediated MDR. Among the ABC transporters, Pgp is the most extensively studied for its role in MDR reversal effects. While other MDR reversal mechanisms remain unclear, Pgp inhibition is a criterion for further mechanistic study. More mechanistic studies are needed to fully establish the pharmacological effects of potential MDR reversing agents. PMID:20653978

  1. [Multidrug resistance (MDR) in oncology].

    PubMed

    Souvirón Rodríguez, A; Ruiz Gómez, M J; Morales Moreno, J A; Martínez Morillo, M

    1997-03-01

    Multidrug resistance or mdr is a frequent phenomenon for which tumor cells can develop, in only one step, cross-resistance to a different anticancer drugs such as antibiotics, vinca alkaloids and podophylotoxins. This is due to an extrusion of drugs out of the cells, since it is interrelated with the decrease of the intracellular concentration of the drug, compared to sensitive cells. This phenomeno of multidrug resistance (mdr) is considered one of the principal causes of failure in quimiotherapic treatment of cancer, and is associated in many cases to an hyperexpression of mdr-I gene, that codifies for a high molecular weight glycoprotein (p-170) (170-180 Kdaltons), also called p-glycoprotein (pgp). Locadet it in the cellular membrane extracts, like a pump, the quimiotherapic drugs with consumption of ATP. In humans, there are two principal genes that codify for pgp: mdr-I and mdr2/3; being the most important the mdr-I gene. The structure of p-glycoprotein consists in two symmetrical halves anchored in the cellular membrane that includes three extracellular dominances each one, and on intracellular portion with the ATP binding site. Also, has got an for extracellular carbohydrates chain. It is specially important to find drugs that reverse the multidrug resistance. Chemicals such as verapamil, nifedine, quinidine and calmodulin inhibitors are joined to pgp inhibiting it. A Cyclosporine and its non-immunosuppressors derivateds such as SDZ 280-125 and SDZ PSC 833 reverse mdr. At present it is being advancing in clinical trials, but the results are not satisfactory. Most useful chemicals are verapamil, better R-verapamil and A-cyclosporine or its non-immunosuppressors derivates. Futures possibilities are grateful. From diagnostic point of view the mains are: 1. Detection of mdr-I gene. 2. Recognition of the presence of mRNA for pgp. 3. Detection of pgp by flow cytometry or western blot. 4. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies to pgp. 5. Rhodamine 123 to

  2. Modulation of multidrug resistance gene expression in human breast cancer cells by (-)-gossypol-enriched cottonseed oil.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    P-glycoprotein, the product of the multidrug resistance 1 gene, acts as an efflux pump and prevents sufficient intracellular accumulation of several anticancer agents. Thus, it plays a major role in multidrug cancer resistance. Using the non-radioactive cell proliferation MTS assay, none of three ...

  3. MRP1 and glucosylceramide are coordinately over expressed and enriched in rafts during multidrug resistance acquisition in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Klappe, Karin; Hinrichs, John W J; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    2004-07-01

    Previously we have described a novel multidrug-resistant cell line, HT29(col), which displayed over expression of the multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and an altered sphingolipid composition, including enhanced levels of glucosylceramide (GlcCer; Kok JW, Veldman RJ, Klappe K, Koning H, Filipeanu C, Muller M. Int J Cancer 2000;87:172-8). In our study, long-term screening revealed that, during colchicine-induced acquisition of multidrug resistance in a new HT29(col) cell line, increases in GlcCer occurred concomitantly with upregulation of MRP1 expression. Both MRP1 and GlcCer were found enriched in Lubrol-insoluble membrane domains. The expression of MRP1 and GlcCer were tightly correlated, as indicated also by a reversal of both at the later stage of colchicine consolidation. Resistance to colchicine was determined by MRP1, while glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) did not contribute: 1). Resistance was fully inhibited by MK571. 2). GCS expression and activity were not upregulated in HT29(col) cells. 3). Inhibition of GCS did not affect MRP1-mediated efflux function or sensitivity to colchicine. Instead, overall sphingolipid metabolism was upregulated through an increased rate of ceramide biosynthesis. In conclusion, upregulation of MRP1 occurs in concert with upregulation of GlcCer during multidrug-resistance acquisition, and both are enriched in rafts. The increased GlcCer pool does not directly modulate MRP1 function and cell survival. PMID:15122583

  4. Biofunctionalized polymer-lipid supported mesoporous silica nanoparticles for release of chemotherapeutics in multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Feifei; Guo, Shiyan; Chen, Xi; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Juan; Gan, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. A polymer-lipid supported mesoporous silica nanoparticle (PLS-MSNs) is described here to facilitate intracellular delivery of anticancer drug and enhance the antitumor efficacy against MDR breast cancer cells. By coating MSNs with a synthetic dual-functional polymer-lipid material P123-DOPE, the supported membrane acted as an intact barrier against the escape of encapsulated drugs before reaching the target cells, leading to depolymerization and triggered storm release of loaded irinotecan (CPT-11) in acidic endosomal pH of tumor cells. In addition, P123-DOPE can inhibit breast cancer resistance protein (BCPR) mediated CPT-11 efflux in drug resistant MCF-7/BCRP breast cancer cells, thus acting as a "door blocker". Compared to free CPT-11, PLS-MSNs resulted in a maximum increase in the intracellular CPT-11 concentration (12.9-fold), had 7.1-fold higher cytotoxicity and processed a stronger cell cycle arrest in MCF-7/BCRP cells. Moreover, CPT-11 loaded PLS-MSNs showed high therapeutic performance and low toxicity in BALB/c nude mice bearing drug resistant breast tumors, with an inhibition rate of 81.2% compared to free CPT-11 treatment group. The reported PLS-MSNs provide promising applicability in future preclinical and clinical MDR cancer treatment. PMID:24462359

  5. Cytotoxicity of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Neoambrosin and Damsin from Ambrosia maritima Against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohamed; Jacob, Stefan; Sandjo, Louis P.; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Khalid, Hassan E.; Opatz, Till; Thines, Eckhard; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a prevailing phenomenon leading to chemotherapy treatment failure in cancer patients. In the current study two known cytotoxic pseudoguaianolide sesquiterpene lactones; neoambrosin (1) and damsin (2) that circumvent MDR were identified. The two cytotoxic compounds were isolated using column chromatography, characterized using 1D and 2D NMR, MS, and compared with literature values. The isolated compounds were investigated for their cytotoxic potential using resazurin assays and thereafter confirmed with immunoblotting and in silico studies. MDR cells overexpressing ABC transporters (P-glycoprotein, BCRP, ABCB5) did not confer cross-resistance toward (1) and (2), indicating that these compounds are not appropriate substrates for any of the three ABC transporters analyzed. Resistance mechanisms investigated also included; the loss of the functions of the TP53 and the mutated EGFR. The HCT116 p53-/- cells were sensitive to 1 but resistant to 2. It was interesting to note that resistant cells transfected with oncogenic ΔEGFR exhibited hypersensitivity CS toward (1) and (2) (degrees of resistances were 0.18 and 0.15 for (1) and (2), respectively). Immunoblotting and in silico analyses revealed that 1 and 2 silenced c-Src kinase activity. It was hypothesized that inhibition of c-Src kinase activity may explain CS in EGFR-transfected cells. In conclusion, the significant cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 against different drug-resistant tumor cell lines indicate that they may be promising candidates to treat refractory tumors. PMID:26617519

  6. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), heat shock proteins (HSPs) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) expression in co-culture of colon tumor spheroids with normal cells after incubation with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and/or camptothecin (CPT-11).

    PubMed

    Paduch, Roman; Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna; Niedziela, Piotr

    2010-04-01

    Tumor chemoresistance and metastasis are some of the most important problems in colon cancer therapy. In the present study, co-cultures of human colon carcinoma cell spheroids, obtained from different grades of tumor, with human colon epithelium, myofibroblast and endothelial cell monolayers were performed. The purpose of these co-cultures was to reflect, in in vitro conditions, different stages of colon tumor development. In order to investigate the invasive capacities of the tumor cells and their resistance to chemotherapy, HGF, HSP27, HSP72 and MRP levels were analyzed after incubation of the co-cultures with IL-1beta and irinotecan (CPT-11) added as single agents or in combination. Myofibroblasts produced significantly higher amounts of HGF than epithelial cells. Tumor cells released trace amounts of this molecule. In cocultures, IL-1beta induced HGF release, while CPT-11 alone or combined with IL-1beta decreased HGF secretion. An immunoblotting analysis followed by densitometry revealed that the combination of IL-1beta plus CPT-11 added to the cocultures led to a decrease in HSPs and MRP levels. In conclusion, direct and paracrine interactions of colon tumor cell spheroids with normal cells and exogenously added CPT-11 change HSP27, HSP72 and MRP expression in comparison to monocultures. IL-1beta and CPT-11, dependent on whether they are added separately or jointly, differentially modulate HGF expression in monocultures of colon tumor spheroids or normal cells and their co-cultures. PMID:20726333

  7. The multidrug-resistance transporter Abcc3 protects NK cells from chemotherapy in a murine model of malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Sara; Cantini, Gabriele; Kapetis, Dimos; Cazzato, Emanuela; Di Ianni, Natalia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Pellegatta, Serena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abcc3, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily, plays a role in multidrug resistance. Here, we found that Abcc3 is highly expressed in blood-derived NK cells but not in CD8+ T cells. In GL261 glioma-bearing mice treated with the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) for 5 d, an early increased frequency of NK cells was observed. We also found that Abcc3 is strongly upregulated and functionally active in NK cells from mice treated with TMZ compared to controls. We demonstrate that Abcc3 is critical for NK cell survival during TMZ administration; more importantly, Akt, involved in lymphocyte survival, is phosphorylated only in NK cells expressing Abcc3. The resistance of NK cells to chemotherapy was accompanied by increased migration and homing in the brain at early time points. Cytotoxicity, evaluated by IFNγ production and specific lytic activity against GL261 cells, increased peripherally in the later phases, after conclusion of TMZ treatment. Intra-tumor increase of the NK effector subset as well as in IFNγ, granzymes and perforin-1 expression, were found early and persisted over time, correlating with a profound modulation on glioma microenvironment induced by TMZ. Our findings reveal an important involvement of Abcc3 in NK cell resistance to chemotherapy and have important clinical implications for patients treated with chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:27467914

  8. Synergistic effect of a novel cyclic pentadepsipeptide, neoN-methylsansalvamide, and paclitaxel on human multidrug resistance cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Seok; Phat, Chanvorleak; Choi, Sang-Un; Lee, Chan

    2013-06-01

    NeoN-methylsansalvamide is a novel low-molecular-weight cyclic pentadepsipeptide that exerts cytotoxic effects on various human cancer cell lines. Its structural analysis using liquid chromatography mass/mass spectrometry showed the cyclic structure sequence -phenylalanine-leucine-valine-N-methylleucine-leucic acid-. The intrinsic cytotoxic and multidrug resistance reversal effects of neoN-methylsansalvamide were evaluated on the human cancer cell lines MES-SA and HCT15 as well as on their multidrug resistance sublines (MES-SA/DX5 and HCT15/CL05, respectively) using the sulforhodamine B assay. The EC50 values of paclitaxel for MES-SA, HCT15, and for the multidrug resistance sublines MES-SA/DX5 and HCT15/CL05 were 1.00±0.20, 0.85±0.63, 10.00±0.53, and >1000 nmol/l, respectively. However, the EC50 values for paclitaxel including 3 μmol/l neoN-methylsansalvamide for MES-SA/DX5, HCT15, and HCT15/CL02 were 1.58±0.12, 0.10±0.02, and 288.40±21.02 nmol/l, respectively. The in-vitro multidrug resistance reversal activity of neoN-methylsansalvamide was similar to that of the control verapamil. These finding suggests that a novel cyclic pentadepsipeptide, neoN-methylsansalvamide, is effective in reversing multidrug resistance in vitro, and this activity may be a major applicable biological function of this compound. PMID:23411682

  9. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based extracellular metabolomic analysis of multidrug resistant Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HUI; CHEN, JIAO; FENG, YUN; ZHOU, WENJIE; ZHANG, JIHUA; YU, YU; WANG, XIAOQIAN; ZHANG, PING

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle of successful chemotherapy is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in the cancer cells, which is difficult to reverse. Metabolomic analysis, an emerging approach that has been increasingly applied in various fields, is able to reflect the unique chemical fingerprints of specific cellular processes in an organism. The assessment of such metabolite changes can be used to identify novel therapeutic biomarkers. In the present study, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyze the extracellular metabolomic spectrum of the Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cell line, in which MDR was induced using the carboplatin (CBP) and pingyangmycin (PYM) chemotherapy drugs in vitro. The data were analyzed using the principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) methods. The results demonstrated that the extracellular metabolomic spectrum of metabolites such as glutamate, glycerophosphoethanol amine, α-Glucose and β-Glucose for the drug-induced Tca8113 cells was significantly different from the parental Tca8113 cell line. A number of biochemicals were also significantly different between the groups based on their NMR spectra, with drug-resistant cells presenting relatively higher levels of acetate and lower levels of lactate. In addition, a significantly higher peak was observed at δ 3.35 ppm in the spectrum of the PYM-induced Tca8113 cells. Therefore, 1H NMR-based metabolomic analysis has a high potential for monitoring the formation of MDR during clinical tumor chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26137105

  10. A protein kinase Cβ inhibitor attenuates multidrug resistance of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Karin; Larsson, Christer

    2003-01-01

    Background The acquisition of drug resistance is a major reason for poor outcome of neuroblastoma. Protein kinase C (PKC) has been suggested to influence drug resistance in cancer cells. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether inhibition of PKCβ isoforms influences drug-resistance of neuroblastoma cells. Methods The effect of the PKCβ inhibitor LY379196 on the growth-suppressing effects of different chemotherapeutics on neuroblastoma cells was analyzed with MTT assays. The effect of LY379196 on the accumulation of [3H]vincristine was also investigated Results The PKCβ inhibitor LY379196 suppressed the growth of three neuroblastoma cell lines. LY379196 also augmented the growth-suppressive effect of doxorubicin, etoposide, paclitaxel, and vincristine, but not of carboplatin. The effect was most marked for vincristine and for the cell-line (SK-N-BE(2)) that was least sensitive to vincristine. No effect was observed on the non-resistant IMR-32 cells. Two other PKC inhibitors, Gö6976 and GF109203X, also enhanced the vincristine effect. The PKC inhibitors caused an increased accumulation of [3H]vincristine in SK-N-BE(2) cells. Conclusions This indicates that inhibition of PKCβ could attenuate multidrug resistance in neuroblastoma cells by augmenting the levels of natural product anticancer drugs in resistant cells. PMID:12697075

  11. Simple avarone mimetics as selective agents against multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeremić, Marko; Pešić, Milica; Dinić, Jelena; Banković, Jasna; Novaković, Irena; Šegan, Dejan; Sladić, Dušan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, synthesis of alkylamino and aralkylamino derivatives of sesquiterpene quinone avarone and its model compound tert-butylquinone was described. For all obtained derivatives biological activity was studied. Cytotoxic activity of the synthesized derivatives towards multidrug resistant MDR human non-small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H460/R cells, their sensitive counterpart NCI-H460 and human normal keratinocytes (HaCaT) as well as detection of cell death superoxide anion generation were investigated. Antimicrobial activity towards Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and fungal cultures was determined. The results showed that strong cytotoxic activity toward cancer cells was improved with simple avarone mimetics. Some derivatives were selective towards MDR cancer cells. The most active derivatives induced apoptosis in both cancer cell lines, but not in normal cells. Superoxide production was induced by 2,6-disubstituted compounds in MDR cancer cells and not by less active 2,5-disubstituted compounds and was accompanied by the collapse of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Two tert-butylquinone derivatives were particularly selective towards MDR cancer cells. Some tert-butylquinone derivatives exhibited a strong antimicrobial activity. PMID:27128177

  12. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Massimi, Isabella; Ciuffetta, Ambra; Temperilli, Flavia; Ferrandino, Francesca; Zicari, Alessandra; Pulcinelli, Fabio M; Felli, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα). In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293) to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin. PMID:26491233

  13. Differential expression of sphingolipids in P-glycoprotein or multidrug resistance-related protein 1 expressing human neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Douwes, Jenny; Kamps, Willem; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    2003-07-31

    The sphingolipid composition and multidrug resistance status of three human neuroblastoma cell lines were established. SK-N-FI cells displayed high expression and functional (efflux) activity of P-glycoprotein, while multidrug resistance-related protein 1 was relatively abundant and most active in SK-N-AS cells. These two cell lines exhibited higher sphingolipid levels, compared to SK-N-DZ, which had the lowest activity of either ATP-binding cassette transporter protein. SK-N-DZ cells also differed in ganglioside composition with predominant expression of b-series gangliosides. In conclusion, these three neuroblastoma cell lines offer a good model system to study sphingolipid metabolism in relation to ATP-binding cassette transporter protein function. PMID:12885402

  14. Inhibition of Glutathione Peroxidase Mediates the Collateral Sensitivity of Multidrug-resistant Cells to Tiopronin*

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew D.; Marshall, Travis S.; Kwit, Alexandra D. T.; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Dulcey, Andrés E.; Madigan, James P.; Pluchino, Kristen M.; Goldsborough, Andrew S.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Griffiths, Gary L.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle to the successful chemotherapy of cancer. MDR is often the result of overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters following chemotherapy. A common ATP-binding cassette transporter that is overexpressed in MDR cancer cells is P-glycoprotein, which actively effluxes drugs against a concentration gradient, producing an MDR phenotype. Collateral sensitivity (CS), a phenomenon of drug hypersensitivity, is defined as the ability of certain compounds to selectively target MDR cells, but not the drug-sensitive parent cells from which they were derived. The drug tiopronin has been previously shown to elicit CS. However, unlike other CS agents, the mechanism of action was not dependent on the expression of P-glycoprotein in MDR cells. We have determined that the CS activity of tiopronin is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and that CS can be reversed by a variety of ROS-scavenging compounds. Specifically, selective toxicity of tiopronin toward MDR cells is achieved by inhibition of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and the mode of inhibition of GPx1 by tiopronin is shown in this report. Why MDR cells are particularly sensitive to ROS is discussed, as is the difficulty in exploiting this hypersensitivity to tiopronin in the clinic. PMID:24930045

  15. Natural lignans from Arctium lappa modulate P-glycoprotein efflux function in multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan; Cheng, Xinlai; Wink, Michael

    2015-02-15

    Arctium lappa is a well-known traditional medicinal plant in China (TCM) and Europe that has been used for thousands of years to treat arthritis, baldness or cancer. The plant produces lignans as secondary metabolites which have a wide range of bioactivities. Yet, their ability to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells has not been explored. In this study, we isolated six lignans from A. lappa seeds, namely arctigenin, matairesinol, arctiin, (iso)lappaol A, lappaol C, and lappaol F. The MDR reversal potential of the isolated lignans and the underlying mechanism of action were studied using two MDR cancer cell lines, CaCo2 and CEM/ADR 5000 which overexpress P-gp and other ABC transporters. In two-drug combinations of lignans with the cytotoxic doxorubicin, all lignans exhibited synergistic effects in CaCo2 cells and matairesinol, arctiin, lappaol C and lappaol F display synergistic activity in CEM/ADR 5000 cells. Additionally, in three-drug combinations of lignans with the saponin digitonin and doxorubicin MDR reversal activity was even stronger enhanced. The lignans can increase the retention of the P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 in CEM/ADR 5000 cells, indicating that lignans can inhibit the activity of P-gp. Our study provides a first insight into the potential chemosensitizing activity of a series of natural lignans, which might be candidates for developing novel adjuvant anticancer agents. PMID:25765837

  16. Mixed Micelles for Targeted and Efficient Doxorubicin Delivery to Multidrug-Resistant Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heesun; Mok, Hyejung

    2016-05-01

    For efficient treatment of multidrug-resistance (MDR) breast cancer cells, design of biocompatible mixed micelles with diverse functional moieties and superior stability is needed for targeted delivery of chemical drugs. In this study, polypropylene glycol (PPG)-grafted hyaluronic acid (HA) copolymers (PPG-g-HA) are used to make mixed micelles with different amounts of pluronic L61, named PPG-g-HA/L61 micelles. Optimized PPG-g-HA/L61 micelles with 3% pluronic L61 exhibit great stability in aqueous solution, superior biocompatibility, and significantly increased uptake into MCF-7 MDR cells via HA-CD44-specific interactions when compared to free doxorubicin (DOX) and other types of micelles. In addition, DOX in PPG-g-HA/L61 micelles with 3% pluronic L61 have toxicity in MCF-7 MDR cells but significantly lower toxicity in fibroblast L929 cells compared to free DOX. Thus, PPG-g-HA/L61 micelles with 3% pluronic L61 content can be a promising nanocarrier to overcome MDR and release DOX in a hyaluronidase-sensitive manner without any toxicity to normal cells. PMID:26806493

  17. Multidrug resistance reversal and apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cells by some flavonoids present in citrus plants.

    PubMed

    Wesołowska, Olga; Wiśniewski, Jerzy; Sroda-Pomianek, Kamila; Bielawska-Pohl, Aleksandra; Paprocka, Maria; Duś, Danuta; Duarte, Noélia; Ferreira, Maria-José U; Michalak, Krystyna

    2012-11-26

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells constitutes one of the main reasons for chemotherapy failure. The search for nontoxic modulators that reduce MDR is a task of great importance. An ability to enhance apoptosis of resistant cells would also be beneficial. In the present study, the MDR reversal and apoptosis-inducing potency of three flavonoids produced by Citrus plants, namely, naringenin (1a), aromadendrin (2), and tangeretin (3), and the methylated naringenin derivatives (1b, 1c), have been studied in sensitive (LoVo) and multidrug-resistant (LoVo/Dx) human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity of methoxylated flavonoids was higher as compared to hydroxylated analogues. Only 3 turned out to inhibit P-glycoprotein, as demonstrated by a rhodamine 123 accumulation assay. It also increased doxorubicin accumulation in LoVo/Dx cells and enabled doxorubicin to enter cellular nuclei. In addition, 3 was found to be an effective MDR modulator in resistant cells by sensitizing them to doxorubicin. Tangeretin-induced caspase-3 activation and elevated surface phosphatidylserine exposure demonstrated its apoptosis-inducing activity in LoVo/Dx cells, while the other flavonoids evaluated were not active. Additionally, 3 was more toxic to resistant rather than to sensitive cancer cells. Its apoptosis-inducing activity was also higher in LoVo/Dx than in LoVo cells. It was concluded that the activity of 3 against multidrug-resistant cancer cells may be enhanced by its apoptosis-inducing activity. PMID:23137376

  18. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances multidrug resistance in breast cancer cell lines by translational regulation of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Theile, Dirk; Ruiz, María Laura; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-06-28

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women. Multidrug resistance due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a common cause of chemotherapy failure and disease recurrence. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen present in soybeans and hormone supplements. We investigated the effect of GNT on the expression and function of ABC transporters in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Results demonstrated an induction at the protein level of ABCC1 and ABCG2 and of ABCC1 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. MCF-7 cells showed a concomitant increase in doxorubicin and mitoxantrone efflux and resistance, dependent on ABCG2 activity. ABCC1 induction by GNT in MDA-MB-231 cells modified neither drug efflux nor chemoresistance due to simultaneous acute inhibition of the transporter activity by GNT. All inductions took place at the translational level, as no increment in mRNA was observed and protein increase was prevented by cycloheximide. miR-181a, already demonstrated to inhibit ABCG2 translation, was down-regulated by GNT, explaining translational induction. Effects were independent of classical estrogen receptors. Results suggest potential nutrient-drug interactions that could threaten chemotherapy efficacy, especially in ABCG2-expressing tumors treated with substrates of this transporter. PMID:27033456

  19. Reversion of p-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in human leukemic cell line by diallyl trisulfide.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qing; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Li, Hui-Qing; Diao, Yu-Tao; Li, Xiao-Li; Cui, Jia; Chen, Xue-Liang; Li, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major obstacle in chemotherapy, which involves multiple signaling pathways. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) is the main sulfuric compound in garlic. In the present study, we aimed to explore whether DATS could overcome P-glycoprotein-(P-gp-)mediated MDR in K562/A02 cells, and to investigate whether NF-κB suppression is involved in DATS-induced reversal of MDR. MTT assay revealed that cotreatment with DATS increased the response of K562/A02 cells to adriamycin (the resistance reversal fold was 3.79) without toxic side effects. DATS could enhance the intracellular concentration of adriamycin by inhibiting the function and expression of P-gp, as shown by flow cytometry, RT-PCR, and western blot. In addition, DATS resulted in more K562/A02 cell apoptosis, accompanied by increased expression of caspase-3. The expression of NF-κB/p65 (downregulation) was significantly linked to the drug-resistance mechanism of DATS, whereas the expression of IκBα was not affected by DATS. Our findings demonstrated that DATS can serve as a novel, nontoxic modulator of MDR, and can reverse the MDR of K562/A02 cells in vitro by increasing intracellular adriamycin concentration and inducing apoptosis. More importantly, we proved for the first time that the suppression of NF-κB possibly involves the molecular mechanism in the course of reversion by DATS. PMID:22919419

  20. The Effects and Mechanisms of Periplaneta americana Extract Reversal of Multi-Drug Resistance in BEL-7402/5-FU Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Falu; Liu, Junyong; Qiao, Tingting; Li, Ting; Shen, Qi; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the reversing effects of extracts from P. americana on multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU cells, as well as a preliminary investigation on their mechanism of action. A methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) method was applied to determine the multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU, while an intracellular drug accumulation assay was used to evaluate the effects of a column chromatography extract (PACC) and defatted extract (PADF) from P. americana on reversing multi-drug resistance. BEL-7402/5-FU reflected high resistance to 5-FU; PACC and PADF could promote drug accumulation in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, among which PADF was more effective than PACC. Moreover, results from the immunocytochemical method showed that PACC and PADF could downregulate the expression of drug resistance-associated proteins (P-gp, MRP, LRP); PACC and PADF had no effects on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (GST-π), but PACC could increase the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (PKC). Results of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR revealed that PACC and PADF were able to markedly inhibit the expression of multidrug resistance-associated genes (MDR1, LRP and MRP1); PACC presented a significant impact on the gene expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes, which increased the gene expression of GST-π and PKC. However, PADF had little impact on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes. These results demonstrated that PACC and PADF extracted from P. americana could effectively reverse MDR in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, whose mechanism was to inhibit the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP, and that PADF was more effective in the reversal of MDR than did PACC. In addition, some of extracts from P. americana altered (sometimes increasing) the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes. PMID:27367657

  1. Enhanced chemosensitization in multidrug-resistant human breast cancer cells by inhibition of IL-6 and IL-8 production.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi; Yang, Wei-Min; Chen, Li-Pai; Yang, Dong-Hua; Zhou, Qi; Zhu, Jin; Chen, Jun-Jiang; Huang, Ruo-Chun; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2012-10-01

    Drug resistance remains a major hurdle to successful cancer treatment. Many mechanisms such as overexpression of multidrug-resistance related proteins, increased drug metabolism, decreased apoptosis, and impairment of signal transduction pathway can contribute multidrug resistance (MDR). Recent studies strongly suggest a close link between cytokines and drug resistance. To identify new targets involved in drug resistance, we established a multidrug-resistant human breast cancer cell line MCF-7/R and examined the cytokine profile using cytokine antibody array technology. Among 120 cytokines/chemokines screened, IL-6, IL-8, and 13 other proteins were found to be markedly increased in drug-resistant MCF-7/R cell line as compared to sensitive MCF-7/S cell line, while 7 proteins were specifically reduced in drug-resistant MCF-7/R cells. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and IL-8 partially reversed the drug resistance of MCF-7/R to paclitaxel and doxorubicin, while a neutralizing antibody against MCP-1 had no significant effect. Inhibition of endogenous IL-6 or IL-8 by siRNA technology significantly enhanced drug sensitivity of MCF-7/R cells. Furthermore, overexpression of IL-6 or IL-8 expression by transfection increased the ADM resistance in MCF-7/S cells. Our data suggest that increased expression levels of IL-6 and IL-8 may contribute to MDR in human breast cancer cells. PMID:22923236

  2. Reversal effects of traditional Chinese herbs on multidrug resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Wei, Dan-Dan; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Jun-Song; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2011-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) continues to be a major obstacle for successful anticancer therapy. In this work, fractions from 17 clinically used antitumour traditional Chinese medicinal herbs were tested for their potential to restore the sensitivity of MCF-7/ADR and A549/Taxol cells to a known antineoplastic agent. The effects of these fractions were evaluated by MTT method and an assay of the cellular accumulation of doxorubicin. Fractions from the PB group (herbs with the ability to promote blood circulation and remove blood stasis) showed more significant effects than fractions from the CH group (herbs with the ability to clear away heat and toxic materials). Fractions from CH₂Cl₂ extracts were more effective than fractions from EtOAc extracts. Five herbs (Curcuma wenyujin, Chrysanthemum indicum, Salvia chinensis, Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. and Cassia tora L.) could sensitise these resistant cancer cells at a non-toxic concentration (10 µg mL⁻¹), and markedly increased doxorubicin accumulation in MCF-7/ADR cells, which necessitates further investigations on the active ingredients of these herbs and their underlying mechanisms. PMID:21848372

  3. Overcoming of multidrug resistance by introducing the apoptosis gene, bcl-Xs, into MRP-overexpressing drug resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Ohi, Y; Kim, R; Toge, T

    2000-05-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is one of drug transport membranes that confer multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Multidrug resistance has been known to be associated with resistance to apoptosis. In this study, using MRP overexpressing multidrug resistant nasopharyngeal cancer cells, we examined the expression of apoptosis related genes including p53, p21WAF1, bax and bcl-Xs between drug sensitive KB and its resistant KB/7D cells. We also examined whether the introduction of apoptosis related gene could increase the sensitivity to anticancer drugs in association with apoptotic cell death. The relative resistances to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells evaluated by IC50 values were 3.6, 61.3, 10.4 and 10.5 to adriamycin (ADM), etoposide (VP-16), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS), respectively. The resistance to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells was associated with the attenuation of internucleosomal DNA ladder formation in apoptosis. Of important, the mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in KB/7D cells was decreased in one-fourth as compared to that of KB cells among the apoptosis genes. The mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in a bcl-Xs transfected clone (KB/7Dbcl-Xs) was increased about 2-fold compared to that of KB/7Dneo cells, while the mRNA expression of MRP gene was not significantly different in KB/7bcl-Xs and KB/7Dneo cells. The sensitivities to anticancer drugs including ADM, VCR and VDS except VP-16 were increased in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells, in turn, the relative resistance in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells was decreased to 1.4, 4.0, and 3.0 in ADM, VCR and VDS, respectively, as compared to those of KB/7Dneo cells. Of interest, the studies on the accumulation of [3H]VCR showed that the decrease of [3H]VCR accumulation in KB/7Dbcl-Xs was not significantly different from that of KB/7Dneo cells. Collectively, these results indicated that the mechanism(s) of drug resistance in KB/7D cells could be explained at least by two factors: a) reduced drug accumulation mediated by

  4. miR-1915 inhibits Bcl-2 to modulate multidrug resistance by increasing drug-sensitivity in human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Liang, Xin; Cui, Daling; Wu, Yixin; Shi, Weibin; Liu, Jianwen

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a frequent cause of cancer-related death in the world for men and women. microRNAs are endogenous small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression negatively at post-transcriptional level. Here, we investigated the possible role of microRNAs in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in colorectal carcinoma cells. We analyzed microRNA (miRNA) expression levels between multidrug resistant colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116/L-OHP and its parent cell line HCT116 using a miRNA microarray. miR-1915 had the lowest expression of miRNA in HCT116/L-OHP cells compared to its parental cells. Overexpression of Bcl-2 is generally associated with tumor drug resistance, meanwhile Bcl-2 is a predicted target of miR-1915. We found that elevated levels of miR-1915 in the mimics-transfected HCT116/L-OHP cells reduced Bcl-2 protein level and the luciferase activity of a Bcl-2 3'-untranslated region-based reporter, and also sensitized these cells to some anticancer drugs. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-1915 could play a role in the development of MDR in colorectal carcinoma cells at least in part by modulation of apoptosis via targeting Bcl-2. PMID:22121083

  5. Redox active copper chelate overcomes multidrug resistance in T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell by triggering apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Avishek; Basu, Soumya; Banerjee, Kaushik; Chakraborty, Paramita; Sarkar, Avijit; Chatterjee, Mitali; Chaudhuri, Soumitra Kumar

    2011-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the over expression of drug efflux protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the major impediments to successful treatment of cancer. P-gp acts as an energy-dependent drug efflux pump and reduces the intracellular concentration of structurally unrelated drugs inside the cells. Therefore, there is an urgent need for development of new molecules that are less toxic to normal cell and preferentially effective against drug resistant malignant cells. In this preclinical study we report the apoptotic potential of copper N-(2-hydroxyacetophenone) glycinate (CuNG) on doxorubicin resistant T lymphoblastic leukaemia cells (CEM/ADR5000). To evaluate the cytotoxic effect of CuNG, we used different normal cell lines (NIH 3T3, Chang liver and human PBMC) and cancerous cell lines (CEM/ADR5000, parental sensitive CCRF-CEM, SiHa and 3LL) and conclude that CuNG preferentially kills cancerous cells, especially both leukemic cell types irrespective of their MDR status, while leaving normal cell totally unaffected. Moreover, CuNG involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) for induction of apoptosis in CEM/ADR5000 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. This is substantiated by our observation that antioxidant N-acetyle-cysteine (NAC) and PEG catalase could completely block ROS generation and, subsequently, abrogates CuNG induced apoptosis. On the other hand, uncomplexed ligand N-(2-hydroxyacetophenone) glycinate (NG) fails to generate a significant amount of ROS and concomitant induction of apoptosis in CEM/ADR5000 cells. Therefore, CuNG induces drug resistant leukemia cells to undergo apoptosis and proves to be a molecule having therapeutic potential to overcome MDR in cancer. PMID:21409205

  6. Deficiency of multidrug resistance 2 contributes to cell transformation through oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Tebbi, Ali; Levillayer, Florence; Jouvion, Grégory; Fiette, Laurence; Soubigou, Guillaume; Varet, Hugo; Boudjadja, Nesrine; Cairo, Stefano; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Suzuki, Ana Maria; Carninci, Piero; Carissimo, Annamaria; di Bernardo, Diego; Wei, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance 2 (Mdr2), also called adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette B4 (ABCB4), is the transporter of phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the canalicular membrane of mouse hepatocytes, which plays an essential role for bile formation. Mutations in human homologue MDR3 are associated with several liver diseases. Knockout of Mdr2 results in hepatic inflammation, liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Whereas the pathogenesis in Mdr2 −/− mice has been largely attributed to the toxicity of bile acids due to the absence of PC in the bile, the question of whether Mdr2 deficiency per se perturbs biological functions in the cell has been poorly addressed. As Mdr2 is expressed in many cell types, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) derived from Mdr2 −/− embryos to show that deficiency of Mdr2 increases reactive oxygen species accumulation, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. We found that Mdr2 −/− MEFs undergo spontaneous transformation and that Mdr2 −/− mice are more susceptible to chemical carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis. Microarray analysis in Mdr2−/− MEFs and cap analysis of gene expression in Mdr2 −/− HCCs revealed extensively deregulated genes involved in oxidation reduction, fatty acid metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. Our findings imply a close link between Mdr2 −/−-associated tumorigenesis and perturbation of these biological processes and suggest potential extrahepatic functions of Mdr2/MDR3. PMID:26542370

  7. Chemotherapeutic activities of Carthami Flos and its reversal effect on multidrug resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jimmy Yiu-Cheong; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Fong, Wang-Fun; Shi, Yi-Qian

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistance (MDR) represents a major cause of failure in cancer chemotherapy. The need for a reduction in MDR by natural-product-based drugs of low toxicity led to the current investigation of applying medicinal herbs in future cancer adjuvant therapy. Carthami Flos (CF), the dried flower of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicinal herbs used to alleviate pain, increase circulation, and reduce blood-stasis syndrome. The drug resistance index of the total extract of CF in MDR KB-V1 cells and its synergistic effects with other chemotherapeutic agents were studied. SRB cell viability assays were used to quantify growth inhibition after exposure to single drug and in combinations with other chemotherapeutic agents using the median effect principle. The combination indexes were then calculated according to the classic isobologram equation. The results revealed that CF showed a drug resistance index of 0.096. In combination with other chemotherapeutic agents, it enhanced their chemo-sensitivities by 2.8 to 4.0 folds and gave a general synergism in cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that CF could be a potential alternative adjuvant antitumour herbal medicine representing a promising approach to the treatment of some malignant and MDR cancers in the future. PMID:24146498

  8. Regulation of Multi-drug Resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells is TRPC6/Calcium Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Liang; Liang, Chao; Chen, Enjiang; Chen, Wei; Liang, Feng; Zhi, Xiao; Wei, Tao; Xue, Fei; Li, Guogang; Yang, Qi; Gong, Weihua; Feng, Xinhua; Bai, Xueli; Liang, Tingbo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is notoriously refractory to chemotherapy because of its tendency to develop multi-drug resistance (MDR), whose various underlying mechanisms make it difficult to target. The calcium signalling pathway is associated with many cellular biological activities, and is also a critical player in cancer. However, its role in modulating tumour MDR remains unclear. In this study, stimulation by doxorubicin, hypoxia and ionizing radiation was used to induce MDR in HCC cells. A sustained aggregation of intracellular calcium was observed upon these stimuli, while inhibition of calcium signalling enhanced the cells’ sensitivity to various drugs by attenuating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), Hif1-α signalling and DNA damage repair. The effect of calcium signalling is mediated via transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a subtype of calcium-permeable channel. An in vivo xenograft model of HCC further confirmed that inhibiting TRPC6 enhanced the efficacy of doxorubicin. In addition, we deduced that STAT3 activation is a downstream signalling pathway in MDR. Collectively, this study demonstrated that the various mechanisms regulating MDR in HCC cells are calcium dependent through the TRPC6/calcium/STAT3 pathway. We propose that targeting TRPC6 in HCC may be a novel antineoplastic strategy, especially combined with chemotherapy. PMID:27011063

  9. TRAIL Recombinant Adenovirus Triggers Robust Apoptosis in Multidrug-Resistant HL-60/Vinc Cells Preferentially Through Death Receptor DR5

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Huang; Kao, Ching-Hai

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising cancer therapeutic because of its highly selective apoptosis-inducing action on neoplastic versus normal cells. However, some cancer cells express resistance to recombinant soluble TRAIL. To overcome this problem, we used a TRAIL adenovirus (Ad5/35-TRAIL) to induce apoptosis in a drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant variant of HL-60 leukemia cells and determined the molecular mechanisms of Ad5/35-TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Ad5/35-TRAIL did not induce apoptosis in normal human lymphocytes, but caused massive apoptosis in acute myelocytic leukemia cells. It triggered more efficient apoptosis in drug-resistant HL-60/Vinc cells than in HL-60 cells. Treating the cells with anti-DR4 and anti-DR5 neutralizing antibodies (particularly anti-DR5) reduced, whereas anti-DcR1 antibody enhanced, the apoptosis triggered by Ad5/35-TRAIL. Whereas Ad5/35-TRAIL induced apoptosis in both cell lines through activation of caspase-3 and caspase-10, known to link the cell death receptor pathway to the mitochondrial pathway, it triggered increased mitochondrial membrane potential change (Δψm) only in HL-60/Vinc cells. Ad5/35-TRAIL also increased the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in apoptosis. Therefore, using Ad5/35-TRAIL may be an effective therapeutic strategy for eliminating TRAIL-resistant malignant cells and these studies may provide clues to treat and eradicate acute myelocytic leukemias. PMID:18476767

  10. Natural paniceins from mediterranean sponge inhibit the multidrug resistance activity of Patched and increase chemotherapy efficiency on melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Laura; Tribalat, Marie-Aude; Sauvard, Lucy; Cazareth, Julie; Lalli, Enzo; Broutin, Isabelle; Thomas, Olivier P; Mus-Veteau, Isabelle

    2015-09-01

    Multidrug resistance has appeared to mitigate the efficiency of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. The Hedgehog receptor Patched is a multidrug transporter expressed in several cancers and as such it represents a new target to circumvent chemotherapy resistance. We report herein that paniceins and especially panicein A hydroquinone, natural meroterpenoids produced by the Mediterranean sponge Haliclona (Soestella) mucosa, inhibit the doxorubicin efflux activity of Patched and enhance the cytotoxicity of this chemotherapeutic agent on melanoma cells in vitro. These results are supported by the molecular docking performed on the structure of the bacterial drug efflux pump AcrB and on the Patched model built from AcrB structure. Docking calculations show that panicein A hydroquinone interacts with AcrB and Patched model close to the doxorubicin binding site. This compound thus appears as the first antagonist of the doxorubicin efflux activity of Patched. The use of inhibitors of Patched drug efflux activity in combination with classical chemotherapy could represent a novel approach to reduce tumor drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis. PMID:26068979

  11. Natural paniceins from mediterranean sponge inhibit the multidrug resistance activity of Patched and increase chemotherapy efficiency on melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Laura; Tribalat, Marie-Aude; Sauvard, Lucy; Cazareth, Julie; Lalli, Enzo; Broutin, Isabelle; Thomas, Olivier P.; Mus-Veteau, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance has appeared to mitigate the efficiency of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. The Hedgehog receptor Patched is a multidrug transporter expressed in several cancers and as such it represents a new target to circumvent chemotherapy resistance. We report herein that paniceins and especially panicein A hydroquinone, natural meroterpenoids produced by the Mediterranean sponge Haliclona (Soestella) mucosa, inhibit the doxorubicin efflux activity of Patched and enhance the cytotoxicity of this chemotherapeutic agent on melanoma cells in vitro. These results are supported by the molecular docking performed on the structure of the bacterial drug efflux pump AcrB and on the Patched model built from AcrB structure. Docking calculations show that panicein A hydroquinone interacts with AcrB and Patched model close to the doxorubicin binding site. This compound thus appears as the first antagonist of the doxorubicin efflux activity of Patched. The use of inhibitors of Patched drug efflux activity in combination with classical chemotherapy could represent a novel approach to reduce tumor drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis. PMID:26068979

  12. Curcumin promotes apoptosis in A549/DDP multidrug-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cells through an miRNA signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Tao; Ti, Xinyu; Shi, Jieran; Wu, Changgui; Ren, Xinling; Yin, Hong

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} Curcumin had anti-cancer effects on A549/DDP multidrug-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cells {yields} Curcumin promotes apoptosis in A549/DDP cells through a miRNA signaling pathway {yields} Curcumin induces A549/DDP cell apoptosis by downregulating miR-186* {yields} miR-186* may serve as a potential gene therapy target for refractory lung cancer that is sensitive to curcumin -- Abstract: Curcumin extracted from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa L. has been shown to have inhibitory effects on cancers through its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. Emerging evidence demonstrates that curcumin can overcome drug resistance to classical chemotherapies. Thus, the mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activities of curcumin require further study. In our study, we first demonstrated that curcumin had anti-cancer effects on A549/DDP multidrug-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Further studies showed that curcumin altered miRNA expression; in particular, significantly downregulated the expression of miR-186* in A549/DDP. In addition, transfection of cells with a miR-186* inhibitor promoted A549/DDP apoptosis, and overexpression of miR-186* significantly inhibited curcumin-induced apoptosis in A549/DDP cells. These observations suggest that miR-186* may serve as a potential gene therapy target for refractory lung cancer that is sensitive to curcumin.

  13. An AS1411 aptamer-conjugated liposomal system containing a bubble-generating agent for tumor-specific chemotherapy that overcomes multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zi-Xian; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Lin, Chia-Chen; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Kun-Ju; Cheng, Po-Yuan; Chen, Ko-Jie; Wei, Hao-Ji; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2015-06-28

    Recent research in chemotherapy has prioritized overcoming the multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells. In this work, liposomes that contain doxorubicin (DOX) and ammonium bicarbonate (ABC, a bubble-generating agent) are prepared and functionalized with an antinucleolin aptamer (AS1411 liposomes) to target DOX-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR), which overexpress nucleolin receptors. Free DOX and liposomes without functionalization with AS1411 (plain liposomes) were used as controls. The results of molecular dynamic simulations suggest that AS1411 functionalization may promote the affinity and specific binding of liposomes to the nucleolin receptors, enhancing their subsequent uptake by tumor cells, whereas plain liposomes enter cells with difficulty. Upon mild heating, the decomposition of ABC that is encapsulated in the liposomes enables the immediate activation of generation of CO2 bubbles, creating permeable defects in their lipid bilayers, and ultimately facilitating the swift intracellular release of DOX. In vivo studies in nude mice that bear tumors demonstrate that the active targeting of AS1411 liposomes can substantially increase the accumulation of DOX in the tumor tissues relative to free DOX or passively targeted plain liposomes, inhibiting tumor growth and reducing systemic side effects, including cardiotoxicity. The above findings indicate that liposomes that are functionalized with AS1411 represent an attractive therapeutic alternative for overcoming the MDR effect, and support a potentially effective strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25637705

  14. Phospholipase D activation mediates cobalamin-induced downregulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 gene and increase in sensitivity to vinblastine in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Marguerite, Véronique; Gkikopoulou, Effrosyni; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Merten, Marc

    2013-02-01

    Failure of cancer chemotherapy due to multidrug resistance is often associated with altered Multidrug Resistance-1 gene expression. Cobalamin is the cofactor of methionine synthase, a key enzyme of the methionine cycle which synthesizes methionine, the precursor of cell S-adenosyl-methionine synthesis. We previously showed that cobalamin was able to down-regulate Multidrug Resistance-1 gene expression. Herein we report that this effect occurs through cobalamin-activation of phospholipase D activity in HepG2 cells. Cobalamin-induced down-regulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 gene expression was similar to that induced by the phospholipase D activator oleic acid and was negatively modulated by the phospholipase D inhibitor n-butanol. Cobalamin increased cell S-adenosyl-methionine content, which is the substrate for phosphatidylethanolamine-methyltransferase-dependent phosphatidylcholine production. We showed that cobalamin-induced increase in cell phosphatidylcholine production was phosphatidylethanolamine-methyltransferase-dependent. Oleic acid-dependent activation of phospholipase D was accompanied by an increased sensitivity to vinblastine of HepG2 cells while n-butanol enhanced the resistance of the cells to vinblastine. These data indicate that cobalamin mediates down-regulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 gene expression through increased S-adenosyl-methionine and phosphatidylcholine productions and phospholipase D activation. This points out phospholipase D as a potential target to down-regulate Multidrug Resistance-1 gene expression for improving chemotherapy efficacy. PMID:23032700

  15. Knockdown of HOXA10 reverses the multidrug resistance of human chronic mylogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells by downregulating P-gp and MRP-1.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ying-Jie; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie; Wang, Hong; Xie, Shu-Yang

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of leukemia cells is a major obstacle in chemotherapeutic treatment. The high expression and constitutive activation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1) have been reported to play a vital role in enhancing cell resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. The present study aimed to investigate the reversal of MDR by silencing homeobox A10 (HOXA10) in adriamycin (ADR)-resistant human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562/ADM cells by modulating the expression of P-gp and MRP-1. K562/ADM cells were stably transfected with HOXA10-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression of HOXA10 was markedly suppressed following transfection with a shRNA-containing vector. The sensitivity of the K562/ADM cells to ADR was enhanced by the silencing of HOXA10, due to the increased intracellular accumulation of ADR. The accumulation of ADR induced by the silencing of HOXA10 may be due to the downregulation of P-gp and MRP-1. Western blot analysis revealed that downregulating HOXA10 inhibited the protein expression of P-gp and MRP-1. Taken together, these results suggest that knockdown of HOXA10 combats resistance and that HOXA10 is a potential target for resistant human CML. PMID:27035504

  16. Arachidonic acid pathway activates multidrug resistance related protein in cultured human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Torky, Abdelrahman; Raemisch, Anja; Glahn, Felix; Foth, Heidi

    2008-05-01

    Primary cultures of human lung cells can serve as a model system to study the mechanisms underlying the effects of irritants in air and to get a deeper insight into the (patho)physiological roles of the xenobiotic detoxification systems. For 99 human lung cancer cases the culture duration for bronchial epithelium and peripheral lung cells (PLC) are given in term of generations and weeks. Using this system, we investigated whether and how prostaglandins (PG) modify multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) function in normal human lung cells. PGF2alpha had no effect on MRP function, whereas PGE2 induced MRP activity in cultured NHBECs. The transport activity study of MRP in NHBEC, PLC, and A549 under the effect of exogenously supplied PGF2alpha (10 microM, 1 day) using single cell fluorimetry revealed no alteration in transport activity of MRP. PG concentrations were within the physiological range. COX I and II inhibitors indomethacin (5, 10 microM) and celecoxib (5, 10 microM) could substantially decrease the transport activity of MRP in NHBEC, PLC, and A549 in 1- and 4-day trials. Prostaglandin E2 did not change cadmium-induced caspase 3/7 activation in NHBECs and had no own effect on caspase 3/7 activity. Cadmium chloride (5, 10 microM) was an effective inducer of caspase 3/7 activation in NHBECs with a fivefold and ninefold rise of activity. In primary human lung cells arachidonic acid activates MRP transport function only in primary epithelial lung cells by prostaglandin E2 but not by F2alpha mediated pathways and this effect needs some time to develop. PMID:17943274

  17. Chemosensitizing effects of synthetic curcumin analogs on human multi-drug resistance leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Mapoung, Sariya; Pitchakarn, Pornsiri; Yodkeeree, Supachai; Ovatlarnporn, Chitchamai; Sakorn, Natee; Limtrakul, Pornngarm

    2016-01-25

    Curcumin analogs were synthesized and their multi-drug resistance (MDR) reversing properties were determined in human MDR leukemic (K562/Adr) cells. Four analogs, 1,7-bis-(3,4-dimethoxy-phenyl)-hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione (1J), 2,6-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzylidene)-cyclohexanone (2A), 2,6-bis-(3,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-cyclohexanone (2F) and 2,6-bis-(3,4-dimethoxy-benzylidene)-cyclohexanone (2J) markedly increased the sensitivity of K562/Adr cells to paclitaxel (PTX) for 8-, 2-, 8- and 16- folds, respectively and vinblastine (Vin) for 5-, 3-, 12- and 30- folds, respectively. The accumulation of P-gp substrates, Calcein-AM, Rhodamine 123 and Doxorubicin, was significantly increased by 1J (up to 6-, 11- and 22- folds, respectively) and 2J (up to 7-, 12- and 17- folds, respectively). Besides 2A, 2F and 2J dramatically decreased P-gp expression in K562/Adr cells. These results could be summarized in the following way. Analog 1J inhibited only P-gp function, while 2A and 2F inhibited only P-gp expression. Interestingly, 2J exerts inhibition of both P-gp function and expression. The combination index (CI) of combination between 2J and PTX (0.09) or Vin (0.06) in K562/Adr cells indicated strong synergistic effects, which likely due to its MDR reversing activity. Moreover, these analogs showed less cytotoxicity to peripheral mononuclear cells (human) and red blood cells (human and rat) suggesting the safety of analogs for further animal and clinical studies. PMID:26689174

  18. Feroniellin A-induced autophagy causes apoptosis in multidrug-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kaewpiboon, Chutima; Surapinit, Serm; Malilas, Waraporn; Moon, Jeong; Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha; Tip-Pyang, Santi; Johnston, Randal N; Koh, Sang Seok; Assavalapsakul, Wanchai; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2014-04-01

    During the screening of natural chemicals that can reverse multidrug resistance in human A549 lung cancer cells resistant to etoposide (A549RT-eto), we discovered that Feroniellin A (FERO), a novel furanocoumarin, shows toxicity toward A549RT-eto cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. FERO reduced the expression of NF-κB, leading to downregulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by MDR1, which eventually sensitized A549RT-eto cells to apoptosis. FERO specifically diminished transcription and promoter activity of MDR1 but did not inhibit the expression of other multidrug resistance genes MRP2 and BCRP. Moreover, co-administration of FERO with Bay11-7802, an inhibitor of NF-κB, accelerated apoptosis of A549RT-eto cells through decreased expression of P-gp, indicating that NF-κB is involved in multidrug resistance. Conversely, addition of Z-VAD, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells but did not block downregulation of P-gp, indicating that a decrease in P-gp expression is necessary but not sufficient for FERO-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, we found that FERO also induces autophagy, which is characterized by the conversion of LC3 I to LC3 II, induction of GFP-LC3 puncta, enhanced expression of Beclin-1 and ATG5, and inactivation of mTOR. Furthermore, suppression of Beclin-1 by siRNA reduced FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells and activation of autophagy by rapamycin accelerated FERO-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy plays an active role in FERO-induced apoptosis. Herein, we report that FERO reverses multidrug resistance in A549RT-eto cells and exerts its cytotoxic effect by induction of both autophagy and apoptosis, which suggests that FERO can be a useful anticancer drug for multidrug-resistant lung cancer. PMID:24535083

  19. Cytotoxic and multidrug resistance reversal activities of novel 1,4-dihydropyridines against human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shekari, Farnaz; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Javidnia, Katayoun; Saso, Luciano; Nazari, Farhad; Firuzi, Omidreza; Miri, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1, MDR-1) transporter over-expression in cancer cells substantially limits the effectiveness of chemotherapy. 1,4-Dihydropyridines (DHPs) derivatives possess several pharmacological activities. In this study, 18 novel asymmetrical DHPs bearing 3-pyridyl methyl carboxylate and alkyl carboxylate moieties at C₃ and C₅ positions, respectively, as well as nitrophenyl or hetero aromatic rings at C₄ were synthesized and tested for MDR reversal with the aim of establishing a structure-activity relationship (SAR) for these agents. Effect of these compounds on P-gp mediated MDR was assessed in P-gp over-expressing MES-SA/DX5 doxorubicin resistant cells by flow cytometric detection of rhodamine 123 efflux. MDR reversal was further examined as the alteration of doxorubicin׳s IC₅₀ in MES-SA/DX5 cells in the presence of DHPs by MTT assay and was compared to nonresistant MES-SA cells. Direct anticancer effect was examined against 4 human cancer cells including HL-60, K562, MCF-7 and LS180. Calcium channel blocking (CCB) activity was also measured as a potential side effect. Most DHPs, particularly compounds bearing 3-nitrophenyl (A2B2 and A3B2) and 4-nitrophenyl (A3B1 and A4B1) moieties at C₄ significantly inhibited rhodamine 123 efflux at 5-25 µM, showing that the mechanism of MDR reversal by these agents is P-gp transporter modulation. Same derivatives were also able to selectively lower the resistance of MES-SA/DX5 to doxorubicin. A2B2 bearing ethyl carboxylate at C₅ had also high direct antitumoral effect (IC₅₀ range: 3.77-15.60 μM). Our findings suggest that SAR studies of DHPs may lead to the discovery of novel MDR reversal agents. PMID:25445037

  20. A new method to induce multi-drug resistance to carboplatin in a mouse model of human tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feng, G; Wang, D-Z; Chen, H-Q; Hu, J; He, J

    2008-12-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) constitutes a major obstacle to the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In previous studies, MDR was mainly induced in vitro. The authors report a novel in vivo method of inducing MDR in nude mice with xenotransplanted Tca8113 cells. Carboplatin, a chemotherapeutic agent used to treat HNSCC, was injected around the tumors for 10 weeks. A subsequent cell survival assay of dissociated tumor cells suggested that MDR had been induced successfully. Immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of MDR-related proteins, including topoisomerase II, MRP and glutathione transferase, were elevated in the induction group. The authors conclude that in vivo induction of MDR provides a useful method for establishing animal models of MDR. PMID:18715753

  1. Probenecid-resistant J774 cell expression of enhanced organic anion transport by a mechanism distinct from multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cao, C; Steinberg, T H; Neu, H C; Cohen, D; Horwitz, S B; Hickman, S; Silverstein, S C

    1993-08-01

    Macrophages possess organic anion transporters that carry membrane-impermeant fluorescent dyes, such as lucifer yellow (LY) and carboxy-fluorescein, from the cytoplasm into endosomes and out of the cells. Probenecid, an organic anion transport inhibitor, blocks these processes. Prolonged incubation of J774 cells in medium containing 2.5 mM probenecid eventually kills most of these cells. To identify J774 variants that express increased organic anion transport activity, we selected probenecid-resistant (PBR) J774 cells by growing them in medium containing increasing concentrations of probenecid. When PBR and unselected J774 cells were loaded with LY by ATP4- permeabilization, the amount of LY accumulated by the PBR cells was about half that in the unselected cells. This difference was abolished by adding 10 mM probenecid to the medium in which the cells were loaded, suggesting that the diminished LY accumulation in PBR cells was due to enhanced LY secretion and that the PBR cells expressed increased organic anion transport activity. Direct comparison of LY efflux from J774 and PBR J774 cells showed a faster initial rate of secretion of LY from PBR J774 cells than from unselected J774 cells. To determine whether LY efflux is mediated by P-glycoprotein, we compared LY efflux in unselected J774 cells, PBR J774 cells, and multidrug-resistant J774 cells (J7.C1). LY efflux from J7.C1 cells was not sensitive to verapamil, which inhibits multidrug-resistance transporters, and reverses the multidrug-resistant phenotype of J7.C1 cells. The rates of LY efflux from unselected J774 and J7.C1 cells were virtually identical.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7909709

  2. Cucurbitacin B reverses multidrug resistance by targeting CIP2A to reactivate protein phosphatase 2A in MCF-7/adriamycin cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Fen; Zhang, Liang; Xiao, Xiangling; Duan, Chao; Huang, Qiuyue; Fan, Chunsheng; Li, Jian; Liu, Xuewen; Li, Shan; Liu, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein that is overexpressed in various tumors. A previous study found that CIP2A expression is associated with doxorubicin (Dox) resistance. In the present study, we investigated whether cucurbitacin B (CuB), a natural anticancer compound found in Cucurbitaceae, reversed multidrug resistance (MDR) and downregulated CIP2A expression in MCF-7/Adriamycin (MCF-7/Adr) cells, a human breast multidrug-resistant cancer cell line. CuB treatment significantly suppressed MCF-7/Adr cell proliferation, and reversed Dox resistance. CuB treatment also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, decreased phosphorylation of Akt (pAkt). The suppression of pAkt was mediated through CuB-induced activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Furthermore, CuB activated PP2A through the suppression of CIP2A. Silencing CIP2A enhanced CuB-induced growth inhibition, apoptosis and MDR inhibition in MCF-7/Adr cells. In conclusion, we found that enhancement of PP2A activity by inhibition of CIP2A promotes the reversal of MDR induced by CuB. PMID:27350399

  3. Fallopia japonica, a Natural Modulator, Can Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Eid, Safaa Yehia; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki; Ashour, Mohamed Lotfy; Wink, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy is controlled by the decrease of intracellular drug accumulation, increase of detoxification, and diminished propensity of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters with intracellular metabolic enzymes contribute to the complex and unresolved phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR). Natural products as alternative medicine have great potential to discover new MDR inhibitors with diverse modes of action. In this study, we characterized several extracts of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) plants (N = 16) for their interaction with ABC transporters, cytochrome P3A4 (CYP3A4), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and their cytotoxic effect on different cancer cell lines. Fallopia japonica (FJ) (Polygonaceae) shows potent inhibitory effect on CYP3A4 P-glycoprotein activity about 1.8-fold when compared to verapamil as positive control. FJ shows significant inhibitory effect (39.81%) compared with the known inhibitor ketoconazole and 100 μg/mL inhibited GST activity to 14 μmol/min/mL. FJ shows moderate cytotoxicity in human Caco-2, HepG-2, and HeLa cell lines; IC50 values were 630.98, 198.80, and 317.37 µg/mL, respectively. LC-ESI-MS were used to identify and quantify the most abundant compounds, emodin, polydatin, and resveratrol, in the most active extract of FJ. Here, we present the prospect of using Fallopia japonica as natural products to modulate the function of ABC drug transporters. We are conducting future study to evaluate the ability of the major active secondary metabolites of Fallopia japonica to modulate MDR and their impact in case of failure of chemotherapy. PMID:26346937

  4. Fallopia japonica, a Natural Modulator, Can Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Safaa Yehia; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki; Ashour, Mohamed Lotfy; Wink, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy is controlled by the decrease of intracellular drug accumulation, increase of detoxification, and diminished propensity of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters with intracellular metabolic enzymes contribute to the complex and unresolved phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR). Natural products as alternative medicine have great potential to discover new MDR inhibitors with diverse modes of action. In this study, we characterized several extracts of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) plants (N = 16) for their interaction with ABC transporters, cytochrome P3A4 (CYP3A4), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and their cytotoxic effect on different cancer cell lines. Fallopia japonica (FJ) (Polygonaceae) shows potent inhibitory effect on CYP3A4 P-glycoprotein activity about 1.8-fold when compared to verapamil as positive control. FJ shows significant inhibitory effect (39.81%) compared with the known inhibitor ketoconazole and 100 μg/mL inhibited GST activity to 14 μmol/min/mL. FJ shows moderate cytotoxicity in human Caco-2, HepG-2, and HeLa cell lines; IC50 values were 630.98, 198.80, and 317.37 µg/mL, respectively. LC-ESI-MS were used to identify and quantify the most abundant compounds, emodin, polydatin, and resveratrol, in the most active extract of FJ. Here, we present the prospect of using Fallopia japonica as natural products to modulate the function of ABC drug transporters. We are conducting future study to evaluate the ability of the major active secondary metabolites of Fallopia japonica to modulate MDR and their impact in case of failure of chemotherapy. PMID:26346937

  5. Effects of hypergravity on the expression of multidrug resistance proteins in human melanocytic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambers, B.; Stieber, C.; Grigorieva, O.; Block, I.; Bromeis, B.; Buravkova, L.; Gerzer, R.; Ivanova, K.

    In humans the skin serves as a barrier against potentially harmful effects of the environment Human melanocytes constitute the principal cells for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress The melanocytes are also able to secrete a wide range of signal molecules In previous studies we found that normal human melanocytes NHMs and non-metastatic melanoma cells respond to long-time exposure to hypergravity up to 5 g for 24 h with elevated efflux of guanosine 3 5 -cyclic monophosphate cGMP in the presence of phosphodiesterase PDE inhibitors e g 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine Cyclic GMP is known to play a signaling role in human melanocyte physiology It controls the signaling activities of nitric oxide NO in relation to melanogenesis as well as in melanocyte-extracellular matrix interactions that may be important for some pathological processes including metastasis The present study investigated the effects of hypergravity on the expression of the multidrug resistance proteins MRP 4 and 5 as highly selective cGMP exporters in non-stimulated and NO-stimulated NHMs and melanoma cells MCs on mRNA levels using semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis Hypergravity up to 5 g for 24 h was produced by horizontal centrifugal acceleration The NONOate DETA-NO 0 1 mM was used as a direct NO donor for cell stimulation For 5-g experiments the mRNA levels for the highly specific cGMP transporter MRP5 appeared to be

  6. Silencing of long non-coding RNA ANRIL inhibits the development of multidrug resistance in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wei-Guang; Xu, Dian-Hong; Xu, Chen; Ding, Chang-Ling; Ning, Fang-Ling; Zhou, Yan-Li; Ma, Long-Bo; Liu, Chang-Min; Han, Xia

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is a crucial cause of therapy failure in gastric cancer, which results in disease recurrence and metastasis. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been proven to be critical in carcinogenesis and metastasis of gastric cancer. However, little is known about the roles of ANRIL (antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus) in gastric cancer MDR. The aim of our study is to identify the biological function of ANRIL in gastric cancer MDR. In our results, ANRIL was highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues of cisplatin-resistant and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-resistant patients, and the same upregulation trends were observed in cisplatin-resistant cells (BGC823/DDP) and 5-FU-resistant cells (BGC823/5-FU). In addition, BGC823/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells transfected with ANRIL siRNA and treated with cisplatin or 5-FU, respectively, exhibited significant lower survival rate, decreased invasion capability, and high percentage of apoptotic tumor cells. The influence of ANRIL knockdown on MDR was assessed by measuring IC50 of BGC823/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells to cisplatin and 5-FU, the result showed that silencing ANRIL decreased the IC50 values in gastric cancer cells. Moreover, qRT-PCR and western blotting revealed that ANRIL knockdown decreased the expression of MDR1 and MRP1, both of which are MDR related genes; regression analysis showed that the expression of ANRIL positively correlated with the expression of MDR1 and MRP1, resprectively In summary, knockdown of lncRNA ANRIL in gastric cancer cells inhibits the development of MDR, suggesting an efficacious target for reversing MDR in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27121324

  7. Effect of Prostaglandin E2 on Multidrug Resistance Transporters In Human Placental Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gene T.; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen; He, Lily; Weiner, Carl P.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2, a major product of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, acts as an immunomodulator at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. It exerts biologic function through interaction with E-prostanoid (EP) receptors localized to the placenta. The activation of the COX-2/PGE2/EP signal pathway can alter the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, multidrug resistance protein 1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp); gene: ABCB1], and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; gene: ABCG2), which function to extrude drugs and xenobiotics from cells. In the placenta, PGE2-mediated changes in ABC transporter expression could impact fetal drug exposure. Furthermore, understanding the signaling cascades involved could lead to strategies for the control of Pgp and BCRP expression levels. We sought to determine the impact of PGE2 signaling mechanisms on Pgp and BCRP in human placental cells. The treatment of placental cells with PGE2 up-regulated BCRP expression and resulted in decreased cellular accumulation of the fluorescent substrate Hoechst 33342. Inhibiting the EP1 and EP3 receptors with specific antagonists attenuated the increase in BCRP. EP receptor signaling results in activation of transcription factors, which can affect BCRP expression. Although PGE2 decreased nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B activation and increased activator protein 1, chemical inhibition of these inflammatory transcription factors did not blunt BCRP up-regulation by PGE2. Though PGE2 decreased Pgp mRNA, Pgp expression and function were not significantly altered. Overall, these findings suggest a possible role for PGE2 in the up-regulation of placental BCRP expression via EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling cascades. PMID:25261564

  8. Effect of prostaglandin E2 on multidrug resistance transporters in human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, Clifford W; Lee, Gene T; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen; He, Lily; Weiner, Carl P

    2014-12-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2, a major product of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, acts as an immunomodulator at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. It exerts biologic function through interaction with E-prostanoid (EP) receptors localized to the placenta. The activation of the COX-2/PGE2/EP signal pathway can alter the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, multidrug resistance protein 1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp); gene: ABCB1], and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; gene: ABCG2), which function to extrude drugs and xenobiotics from cells. In the placenta, PGE2-mediated changes in ABC transporter expression could impact fetal drug exposure. Furthermore, understanding the signaling cascades involved could lead to strategies for the control of Pgp and BCRP expression levels. We sought to determine the impact of PGE2 signaling mechanisms on Pgp and BCRP in human placental cells. The treatment of placental cells with PGE2 up-regulated BCRP expression and resulted in decreased cellular accumulation of the fluorescent substrate Hoechst 33342. Inhibiting the EP1 and EP3 receptors with specific antagonists attenuated the increase in BCRP. EP receptor signaling results in activation of transcription factors, which can affect BCRP expression. Although PGE2 decreased nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B activation and increased activator protein 1, chemical inhibition of these inflammatory transcription factors did not blunt BCRP up-regulation by PGE2. Though PGE2 decreased Pgp mRNA, Pgp expression and function were not significantly altered. Overall, these findings suggest a possible role for PGE2 in the up-regulation of placental BCRP expression via EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling cascades. PMID:25261564

  9. [Cytological Study in vitro on Co-delivery of siRNA and Paclitaxel within Solid Lipid Nanoparticles to Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Tumors].

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Yao, Xinyu; Chen, Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lin, Yunzhu

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains the major obstacle to the success of clinical cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by the MDR1, is an important part with complex mechanisms associated with the MDR. In order to overcome the MDR of tumors, we in the present experimental design incorporated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting MDR1 gene and anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) into the solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to achieve the combinational therapeutic effects of genetherapy and chemotherapy. In this study, siRNA-PTX-SLNs were successfully prepared. The cytotoxicity of blank SLNs and siRNA-PTX-SLNs in MCF-7 cells and MCF-7/ADR cells were detected by MTT; and the uptake efficiency of PTX in MCF-7/ADR cells were detected via HPLC method; quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry were performed to investigate the silencing effect of siRNA-PTX- SLNs on MDR1 gene in MCF-7/ADR cells. The results showed that PTX loaded SLNs could significantly inhibit the growth of tumor cells, and more importantly, the MDR tumor cells treated with siRNA-PTX-SLNs showed the lowest viability. HPLC study showed that SLNs could enhance the cellular uptake for PTX. Meanwhile, siRNA delivered by SLNs significantly decreased the P-gp expression in MDR tumor cells, thus increased the cellular accumulation of rhodamine123 as a P-gp substrate. In conclusion, the MDR1 gene could be silenced by siRNA-PTX-SLNs, which could promote the growth inhibition efficiency of PTX on tumor cells, leading to synergetic effect on MDR tumor therapy. PMID:27382749

  10. Cosilencing of PKM-2 and MDR-1 Sensitizes Multidrug-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells to Paclitaxel in a Murine Model of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Meghna; Ouyang, Qijun; Goldberg, Michael S; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2015-07-01

    Tumor multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious clinical challenge that significantly limits the effectiveness of cytotoxic chemotherapy. As such, complementary therapeutic strategies are being explored to prevent relapse. The altered metabolic state of cancer cells, which perform aerobic glycolysis, represents an interesting target that can enable discrimination between healthy cells and cancer cells. We hypothesized that cosilencing of genes responsible for aerobic glycolysis and for MDR would have synergistic antitumor effect. In this study, siRNA duplexes against pyruvate kinase M2 and multidrug resistance gene-1 were encapsulated in hyaluronic acid-based self-assembling nanoparticles. The particles were characterized for morphology, size, charge, encapsulation efficiency, and transfection efficiency. In vivo studies included biodistribution assessment, gene knockdown confirmation, therapeutic efficacy, and safety analysis. The benefit of active targeting of cancer cells was confirmed by modifying the particles' surface with a peptide targeted to epidermal growth factor receptor, which is overexpressed on the membranes of the SKOV-3 cancer cells. To augment the studies involving transplantation of a paclitaxel-resistant cell line, an in vivo paclitaxel resistance model was developed by injecting repeated doses of paclitaxel following tumor inoculation. The nanoparticles accumulated significantly in the tumors, hindering tumor volume doubling time (P < 0.05) upon combination therapy in both the wild-type (2-fold) and resistant (8-fold) xenograft models. Although previous studies indicated that silencing of MDR-1 alone sensitized MDR ovarian cancer to paclitaxel only modestly, these data suggest that concurrent silencing of PKM-2 improves the efficacy of paclitaxel against MDR ovarian cancer. PMID:25964202

  11. Co-Silencing of PKM-2 and MDR-1 Sensitizes Multidrug Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells to Paclitaxel in a Murine Model of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Talekar, Meghna; Ouyang, Qijun; Goldberg, Michael S.; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious clinical challenge that significantly limits the effectiveness of cytotoxic chemotherapy. As such, complementary therapeutic strategies are being explored to prevent relapse. The altered metabolic state of cancer cells, which perform aerobic glycolysis, represents an interesting target that can enable discrimination between healthy cells and cancer cells. We hypothesized that co-silencing of genes responsible for aerobic glycolysis and for MDR would have synergistic antitumor effect. In the current study, siRNA duplexes against pyruvate kinase M2 (siPKM-2) and multidrug resistance gene-1 (siMDR-1) were encapsulated in hyaluronic acid (HA)-based self-assembling nanoparticles. The particles were characterized for morphology, size, charge, encapsulation efficiency and transfection efficiency. In vivo studies included biodistribution assessment, gene knockdown confirmation, therapeutic efficacy, and safety analysis. The benefit of active targeting of cancer cells was confirmed by modifying the particles’ surface with a peptide targeted to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed on the membranes of the SKOV-3 cancer cells. To augment the studies involving transplantation of a PTX-resistant cell line, an in vivo paclitaxel (PTX) resistance model was developed by injecting repeated doses of PTX following tumor inoculation. The nanoparticles accumulated significantly in the tumors, hindering tumor volume doubling time (p<0.05) upon combination therapy in both the wild type (2-fold) and resistant (8-fold) xenograft models. Whereas previous studies indicated that silencing of MDR-1 alone sensitized MDR ovarian cancer to PTX only modestly, these data suggest that concurrent silencing of PKM-2 improves the efficacy of PTX against MDR ovarian cancer. PMID:25964202

  12. Screening for phenotype selective activity in multidrug resistant cells identifies a novel tubulin active agent insensitive to common forms of cancer drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is a common cause of treatment failure in cancer patients and encompasses a multitude of different mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to identify drugs effective on multidrug resistant cells. Methods The RPMI 8226 myeloma cell line and its multidrug resistant subline 8226/Dox40 was screened for cytotoxicity in response to 3,000 chemically diverse compounds using a fluorometric cytotoxicity assay (FMCA). Follow-up profiling was subsequently performed using various cellular and biochemical assays. Results One compound, designated VLX40, demonstrated a higher activity against 8226/Dox40 cells compared to its parental counterpart. VLX40 induced delayed cell death with apoptotic features. Mechanistic exploration was performed using gene expression analysis of drug exposed tumor cells to generate a drug-specific signature. Strong connections to tubulin inhibitors and microtubule cytoskeleton were retrieved. The mechanistic hypothesis of VLX40 acting as a tubulin inhibitor was confirmed by direct measurements of interaction with tubulin polymerization using a biochemical assay and supported by demonstration of G2/M cell cycle arrest. When tested against a broad panel of primary cultures of patient tumor cells (PCPTC) representing different forms of leukemia and solid tumors, VLX40 displayed high activity against both myeloid and lymphoid leukemias in contrast to the reference compound vincristine to which myeloid blast cells are often insensitive. Significant in vivo activity was confirmed in myeloid U-937 cells implanted subcutaneously in mice using the hollow fiber model. Conclusions The results indicate that VLX40 may be a useful prototype for development of novel tubulin active agents that are insensitive to common mechanisms of cancer drug resistance. PMID:23919498

  13. Regulation of Multidrug Resistance Proteins by Genistein in a Hepatocarcinoma Cell Line: Impact on Sorafenib Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ciriaci, Nadia; Arias, Agostina; Ceballos, María Paula; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Luquita, Marcelo Gabriel; Mottino, Aldo Domingo; Ghanem, Carolina Inés; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Ruiz, María Laura

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequent cancer worldwide. Sorafenib is the only drug available that improves the overall survival of HCC patients. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 and 3 (MRP2 and 3) and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are efflux pumps that play a key role in cancer chemoresistance. Their modulation by dietary compounds may affect the intracellular accumulation and therapeutic efficacy of drugs that are substrates of these transporters. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen abundant in soybean that exerts its genomic effects through Estrogen-Receptors and Pregnane-X-Receptor (PXR), which are involved in the regulation of the above-mentioned transporters. We evaluated the effect of GNT on the expression and activity of P-gp, MRP2, MRP3 and BCRP in HCC-derived HepG2 cells. GNT (at 1.0 and 10 μM) increased P-gp and MRP2 protein expression and activity, correlating well with an increased resistance to sorafenib cytotoxicity as detected by the methylthiazole tetrazolium (MTT) assay. GNT induced P-gp and MRP2 mRNA expression at 10 but not at 1.0 μM concentration suggesting a different pattern of regulation depending on the concentration. Induction of both transporters by 1.0 μM GNT was prevented by cycloheximide, suggesting translational regulation. Downregulation of expression of the miR-379 by GNT could be associated with translational regulation of MRP2. Silencing of PXR abolished P-gp induction by GNT (at 1.0 and 10 μM) and MRP2 induction by GNT (only at 10 μM), suggesting partial mediation of GNT effects by PXR. Taken together, the data suggest the possibility of nutrient-drug interactions leading to enhanced chemoresistance in HCC when GNT is ingested with soy rich diets or dietary supplements. PMID:25781341

  14. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  15. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  16. Establishment and characterization of gemcitabine-resistant human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines with multidrug resistance and enhanced invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Wattanawongdon, Wareeporn; Hahnvajanawong, Chariya; Namwat, Nisana; Kanchanawat, Sirimas; Boonmars, Thidarut; Jearanaikoon, Patcharee; Leelayuwat, Chanwit; Techasen, Anchalee; Seubwai, Wunchana

    2015-07-01

    To establish and characterize the gemcitabine-resistant cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cell lines, CCA KKU‑M139 and KKU‑M214 cell lines were exposed stepwisely to increasing gemcitabine (GEM). The resultant drug-resistant cell lines, KKU‑M139/GEM and KKU‑M214/GEM, retained the resistant phenotype in drug-free medium at least for 2 months. Sulforhodamine B assay demonstrated that KKU‑M139/GEM and KKU‑M214/GEM were 25.88- and 62.31-fold more resistant to gemcitabine than their parental cells. Both gemcitabine-resistant cell lines were cross-resistant to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin and paclitaxel indicating their multidrug-resistant nature. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR and western blot analyses, gemcitabine-resistant cells showed upregulation of RRM1 and downregulation of hENT1 and dCK. In relation to multidrug resistance, these cell lines showed upregulation of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) leading to an increase of drug efflux. Using cell adhesion and Boyden chamber transwell assays, these cell lines also showed higher cell adhesion, migration and invasion capabilities via the activations of protein kinase C (PKC), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Higher activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was also observed by a gelatin zymography assay and a casein-plasminogen zymography assay. Flow cytometry analysis indicated the G2/M arrest regulated by downregulation of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) resulted in an extended population doubling time. Using Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, evasion of apoptosis via an intrinsic pathway was observed in both cell lines in association with upregulation of Bcl-2 and downregulation of Bax. Interestingly, Fas was additionally downregulated in KKU‑M214/GEM supporting the view of its higher GEM resistant

  17. Increased fucosylation has a pivotal role in multidrug resistance of breast cancer cells through miR-224-3p targeting FUT4.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaobin; Zhao, Lifen; Gao, Shuhang; Song, Xiaobo; Dong, Weijie; Zhao, Yongfu; Zhou, Huimin; Cheng, Lei; Miao, Xiaolong; Jia, Li

    2016-03-10

    Fucosylation is the final step in the glycosylation machinery, which produces glycans involved in tumor multidrug resistance development. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous negative regulators of gene expression and have been implicated in most cellular processes of tumors, including drug resistance. This study was undertaken to determine the roles of fucosylation and miR-224-3p in multidrug resistance of human breast cancer cell lines. Comparative analysis revealed differential modification patterns of fucosylation of the fucosylated N-glycans in drug-resistant T47D/ADR cells and sensitive line T47D cells. The expressional profiles of fucosyltransferase genes in two pairs of parental and chemoresistant human breast cancer cell lines showed that FUT4 was up-regulated highly in MDR cell lines. Altered level of FUT4 affected the drug-resistant phenotype of T47D and T47D/ADR cells both in vitro and in vivo. By bioinformatics analysis, we identified FUT4 as one of the miR-224-3p-targeted genes. Further studies showed an inverse relationship between of FUT4 and miR-224-3p in parental and ADR-resistant breast cancer cells, wherein miR-224-3p was downregulated in resistant cells. 3'-UTR dual-luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-224-3p directly targeted 3'-untranslation region (3'-UTR) of FUT4 mRNA. In addition, miR-224-3p overexpression sensitized T47D/ADR cells to chemotherapeutics and reduced the growth rate of breast cancer xenografts in vivo. Our results indicate that FUT4 and miR-224-3p are crucial regulators of cancer response to chemotherapy, and may serve as therapeutic targets to reverse chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer. PMID:26701615

  18. Multidrug-resistant hela cells overexpressing MRP1 exhibit sensitivity to cell killing by hyperthermia: Interactions with etoposide

    SciTech Connect

    Souslova, Tatiana; Averill-Bates, Diana A. . E-mail: averill.diana@uqam.ca

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains one of the primary obstacles in cancer chemotherapy and often involves overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1). Regional hyperthermia is undergoing clinical investigation in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This study evaluates whether hyperthermia can reverse MDR mediated by MRP1 in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells. Methods and materials: Cytotoxicity of hyperthermia and/or etoposide was evaluated using sulforhodamine-B in HeLa cells overexpressing MRP1 and their drug-sensitive counterparts. Glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were quantified by spectrophotometry. GST isoenzymes were quantified by immunodetection. Caspase activation was evaluated by fluorometry and chromatin condensation by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258. Necrosis was determined using propidium iodide. Results: The major finding is that HeLa and HeLaMRP cells are both sensitive to cytotoxicity of hyperthermia (41-45 deg C). Hyperthermia induced activation of caspase 3 and chromatin condensation. Although total levels of cell killing were similar, there was a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in MDR cells. This could be explained by decreased glutathione and GPx in MDR cells. MDR cells also contained very low levels of GST and were resistant to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia caused a modest increase in etoposide-induced apoptosis in HeLa and HeLaMRP cells, which required appropriate heat-drug scheduling. Conclusions: Hyperthermia could be useful in eliminating MDR cells that overexpress MRP1.

  19. Multifunctional polyamidoamine-modified selenium nanoparticles dual-delivering siRNA and cisplatin to A549/DDP cells for reversal multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjing; Cao, Chengwen; Liu, Yanan; Yu, Qianqian; Zheng, Chuping; Sun, Dongdong; Ren, Xiaofan; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major barrier against effective cancer treatment. Dual-delivering a therapeutic small interfering RNA (siRNA) and chemotherapeutic agents has been developed to reverse drug resistance in tumor cells. In this study, amine-terminated generation 5 polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (G5.NH2)-modified selenium nanoparticles (G5@Se NP) were synthesized for the systemic dual-delivery of mdr1 siRNA and cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum-(II), DDP), which was demonstrated to enhance siRNA loading, releasing efficiency and gene-silencing efficacy. When the mdr1 siRNA was conjugated with G5@Se NP via electrostatic interaction, a significant down-regulation of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein expression was observed; G5@Se-DDP-siRNA arrested A549/DDP cells at G1 phase and led to enhanced cytotoxicity in A549/DDP cells through induction of apoptosis involving the AKT and ERK signaling pathways. Interestingly, G5@Se-DDP NP were much less reactive than DDP in the reactions with both MT and GSH, indicating that loading of DDP in a nano-delivery system could effectively prevent cell detoxification. Furthermore, animal studies demonstrated that the new delivery system of G5@Se-DDP-siRNA significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect on tumor-bearing nude mice, with no appreciable abnormality in the major organs. These results suggest that G5@Se NP could be a potential platform to combine chemotherapy and gene therapy technology in the treatment of human disease. PMID:25204523

  20. Silencing clusterin gene transcription on effects of multidrug resistance reversing of human hepatoma HepG2/ADM cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjie; Sai, Wenli; Yao, Min; Gu, Hongbin; Yao, Yao; Qian, Qi; Yao, Dengfu

    2015-05-01

    Abnormal clusterin (CLU) expression is associated with multidrug resistance (MDR) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, the CLU expression was analyzed in human hepatoma cells and chemoresistant counterpart HepG2/ADM cells. Compared with L02 cells, the overexpression of cellular CLU was identified in HepG2, HepG2/ADM, SMMC7721, Hep3B ,and PLC cells and relatively lower expression in Bel-7404, SNU-739, and MHCC97H cells. Specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to silence CLU gene transcription were designed, and the most effective sequences were screened. After the HepG2/ADM cells transfected with shRNA-1, the inhibition of CLU expression was 73.68 % at messenger RNA (mRNA) level by real-time quantitative RT-PCR with obvious enhancement in cell chemosensitivity, increasing apoptosis induced by doxorubicin using fluorescence kit, and Rh-123 retention qualified with flow cytometry. Knockdown CLU also significantly decreased the drug efflux pump activity through the depression of MDR1/P-glycoprotein (q = 11.739, P < 0.001). Moreover, silencing CLU led to downregulation of β-catenin (q = 13.544, P = 0.001), suggesting that downregulation of CLU might be a key point to reverse multidrug resistance of HepG2/ADM cells. PMID:25600802

  1. Effect of CD38 on the multidrug resistance of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    YALÇINTEPE, LEMAN; HALIS, EMRE; ULKU, SIBEL

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is a serious challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Alterations in the intracellular concentration and homeostasis of calcium (Ca2+) may contribute to the development of drug resistance. To investigate the mechanism of drug resistance in leukemia, the present study rendered human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells resistant to the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin by progressively adapting the sensitive parental K562 cells to doxorubicin. The resulting cells were termed K562/DOX. Subsequently, the expression of two multidrug resistance proteins, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), was analyzed in K562/DOX cells. In addition to P-gp and MRP1, these cells also expressed cluster of differentiation (CD)38 and its active enzyme adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosyl cyclase. The present study also demonstrated that K562/DOX cells responded to cyclic ADP-ribose-mediated increases in intracellular Ca2+. These data indicate that CD38 may participate in the development of drug resistance to doxorubicin in K562 cells. PMID:26998164

  2. Shugoshin1 enhances multidrug resistance of gastric cancer cells by regulating MRP1, Bcl-2, and Bax genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yafang; Liu, Lili; Liu, Xiangqiang; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jiaming; Feng, Bin; Shang, Yulong; Zhou, Lin; Wu, Kaichun; Nie, Yongzhan; Zhang, Hongbo; Fan, Daiming

    2013-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major clinical obstacle in treatment of gastric cancer (GC) and it accounts for the majority of cancer-related mortalities. Shugoshin1 (SGO1) is an important player in appropriate chromosome segregation and is involved in tumorigenesis. In this study, we found endogenous SGO1 overexpression in the multidrug-resistant GC cell lines SGC7901/VCR and SGC7901/ADR compared with their parental cell line SGC7901. By enhancing expression of SGO1, sensitivity of SGC7901 cells to vincristine (VCR), adriamycin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and cisplatin (CDDP) was significantly diminished. Silencing its expression resulted in enhanced sensitivity of SGC7901/VCR and SGC7901/ADR cells to these antitumor drugs. Additionally, we confirmed that SGO1 increased capacity of cells to enable adriamycin (ADR) efflux and inhibit drug-induced apoptosis by regulating MRP 1, Bcl-2, and Bax genes so as to confer a MDR phenotype to GC cells. In brief, these findings suggest that SGO1 promotes MDR of GC cells and may be useful as a novel therapeutic target for preventing or reversing MDR. PMID:23564482

  3. Effects of the multidrug resistance modulator HZ08 on the apoptosis pathway in human chronic leukaemia cell line K562/A02.

    PubMed

    Cen, Juan; Zhu, Yi-Lin; Yang, Yu; Zhu, Jun-Rong; Fang, Wei-Rong; Huang, Wen-Long; Li, Yun-Man; Tao, Yi-Fu

    2011-01-01

    ōancer falls to respond to chemotherapy by acquiring multidrug resistance in over 90% of patients. A previous study revealed that multidrug resistance modulator HZ08 had great multidrug resistance reversal effect in vitro and in vivo. It could enhance adriamycin (doxorubicin) induced intrinsic apoptosis pathway and rectify cell cycle and some apoptosis related proteins in human breast resistant cancer MCF-7/ADM cells. This study detected Rh123 accumulation to assess the effect of HZ08 on P-glycoprotein function in human chronic leukaemia cell line K562/A02. Moreover, mitochondria membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activity were analyzed for HZ08 treatment with or without vincristine. Since pretreatment with HZ08 could also reverse the multidrug resistance to vincristine in K562/A02 cells, the individual influence of HZ08 was further detected on apoptotic regulator like Bcl-2, Bax, p53, cell cycle checkpoints and proliferation regulatory factors like survivin, hTERT, c-Myc, c-Fos, c-Jun. Finally, it revealed that HZ08 increased vincristine induced activation in intrinsic apoptosis pathway by inhibition of P-gp mediated efflux. In addition, the outstanding reversal effect of HZ08 should also attribute to its individual effect on apoptosis and proliferation related regulatory factors. It renders HZ08 possibility of application in pretreatment to reverse multidrug resistance while avoiding unexpected drug interactions and accumulative toxicity. PMID:22232851

  4. Sinomenine Sensitizes Multidrug-Resistant Colon Cancer Cells (Caco-2) to Doxorubicin by Downregulation of MDR-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Chang, Jiu-Yang; Zhang, Zhi-feng; Chu, Rui; Li, Yu-Ling; Dai, Ke-Hang; Mo, Guang-quan; Chang, Qing-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Chemoresistance in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cells over expressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the MDR1 gene, is a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. Previous studies have indicated that sinomenine can enhance the absorption of various P-gp substrates. In the present study, we investigated the effect of sinomenine on the chemoresistance in colon cancer cells and explored the underlying mechanism. We developed multidrug-resistant Caco-2 (MDR-Caco-2) cells by exposure of Caco-2 cells to increasing concentrations of doxorubicin. We identified overexpression of COX-2 and MDR-1 genes as well as activation of the NF-κB signal pathway in MDR-Caco-2 cells. Importantly, we found that sinomenine enhances the sensitivity of MDR-Caco-2 cells towards doxorubicin by downregulating MDR-1 and COX-2 expression through inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings provide a new potential strategy for the reversal of P-gp-mediated anticancer drug resistance. PMID:24901713

  5. Retroviral transfer of a murine cDNA for multidrug resistance confers pleiotropic drug resistance to cells without prior drug selection

    SciTech Connect

    Guild, B.C.; Mulligan, R.C.; Gros, P.; Housman, D.E.

    1988-03-01

    The authors have constructed a retrovirus expression vector that carries the murine mdr cDNA transcribed under the control of the human H4 histone promoter to examine the feasibility of efficiently transferring a multidrug resistance phenotype to cells without requiring drug selection. This approach will facilitate the transfer of mdr cDNA to hematopoietic progenitor cells for the study of multidrug resistance in vivo. The retrovirus vector pHmdr has been used for transmission and expression of the mdr cDNA in initially drug-sensitive NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Selection of pHmdr infectants in the cytotoxic agents colchicine or doxorubicin gave rise to highly multidrug-resistant colonies containing a single gene copy of the vector. Moreover, in the analysis of 12 cloned unselected NIH 3T3 cell infectants, a multidrug resistance phenotype was conferred by as few as two copies of the pHmdr vector. Overexpression of the mdr cDNA in drug-selected and unselected pHmdr infectants was directly related to cell survival in three cytotoxic agents tested. These results hold significant implications for the study of multidrug resistance in vivo.

  6. Reversal of multidrug resistance by cisplatin-loaded magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles in A549/DDP lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Chen, Baoan; Xu, Lin; Feng, Jifeng; Xia, Guohua; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Jun; Gao, Feng; Wang, Xuemei

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4-MNP) loaded with cisplatin (Fe3O4-MNP-DDP) can reverse DDP resistance in lung cancer cells and to investigate mechanisms of multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay showed that DDP inhibited both A549 cells and DDP-resistant A549 cells in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner, and that this inhibition was enhanced by Fe3O4-MNP. An increased rate of apoptosis was detected in the Fe3O4-MNP-DDP group compared with a control group and the Fe3O4-MNP group by flow cytometry, and typical morphologic features of apoptosis were confirmed by confocal microscopy. Accumulation of intracellular DDP in the Fe3O4-MNP-DDP group was greater than that in the DDP group by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Further, lower levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein-1, lung resistance-related protein, Akt, and Bad, and higher levels of caspase-3 genes and proteins, were demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting in the presence of Fe3O4-MNP-DDP. We also demonstrated that Fe3O4-MNP enhanced the effect of DDP on tumor growth in BALB/c nude mice bearing DDP-resistant human A549 xenografts by decreasing localization of lung resistance-related protein and Ki-67 immunoreactivity in cells. There were no apparent signs of toxicity in the animals. Overall, these findings suggest potential clinical application of Fe3O4-MNP-DDP to increase cytotoxicity in lung tumor xenografts. PMID:23690684

  7. Purine Nucleoside Analog - Sulfinosine Modulates Diverse Mechanisms of Cancer Progression in Multi-Drug Resistant Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Dačević, Mirjana; Isaković, Aleksandra; Podolski-Renić, Ana; Isaković, Andelka M.; Stanković, Tijana; Milošević, Zorica; Rakić, Ljubisav; Ruždijić, Sabera; Pešić, Milica

    2013-01-01

    Achieving an effective treatment of cancer is difficult, particularly when resistance to conventional chemotherapy is developed. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity governs multi-drug resistance (MDR) development in different cancer cell types. Identification of anti-cancer agents with the potential to kill cancer cells and at the same time inhibit MDR is important to intensify the search for novel therapeutic approaches. We examined the effects of sulfinosine (SF), a quite unexplored purine nucleoside analog, in MDR (P-gp over-expressing) non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and glioblastoma cell lines (NCI-H460/R and U87-TxR, respectively). SF showed the same efficacy against MDR cancer cell lines and their sensitive counterparts. However, it was non-toxic for normal human keratinocytes (HaCaT). SF induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death and autophagy in MDR cancer cells. After SF application, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated and glutathione (GSH) concentration was decreased. The expression of key enzyme for GSH synthesis, gamma Glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase (γGCS) was decreased as well as the expression of gst-π mRNA. Consequently, SF significantly decreased the expression of hif-1α, mdr1 and vegf mRNAs even in hypoxic conditions. SF caused the inhibition of P-gp (coded by mdr1) expression and activity. The accumulation of standard chemotherapeutic agent – doxorubicin (DOX) was induced by SF in concentration- and time-dependent manner. The best effect of SF was obtained after 72 h when it attained the effect of known P-gp inhibitors (Dex-verapamil and tariquidar). Accordingly, SF sensitized the resistant cancer cells to DOX in subsequent treatment. Furthermore, SF decreased the experssion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on mRNA and protein level and modulated its secretion. In conclusion, the effects on P-gp (implicated in pharmacokinetics and MDR), GSH (implicated in detoxification) and VEGF (implicated in tumor-angiogenesis and

  8. Non-alkaloids extract from Stemona sessilifolia enhances the activity of chemotherapeutic agents through P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Ma, Yang-Mei; An, Li; Zhang, Qiao; Wang, Chang-Li; Zhao, Qing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    One of the major impediments to the successful treatment of cancer is the development of resistant cancer cells, which could cause multidrug resistance (MDR), and overexpression of ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the most common causes of MDR in cancer cells. Recently, natural products or plant-derived chemicals have been investigated more and more widely as potential multidrug-resistant (MDR) reversing agents. The current study demonstrated for the first time that non-alkaloids extract from Stemona sessilifolia significantly reversed the resistance of chemotherapeutic agents, adriamycin, paclitaxel and vincristine to MCF-7/ADR cells compared with MCF-7/S cells in a dose-dependent manner. The results obtained from these studies indicated that the non-alkaloids extract from S. sessilifolia plays an important role in reversing MDR of cancer as a P-gp modulator in vitro and may be effective in the treatment of multidrug-resistant cancers. PMID:26190165

  9. Rapid identification of the multidrug resistance in the human leukemic cells by near-infrared Fourier transform Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Morjani, Hamid; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Manfait, Michel

    1998-04-01

    In this work, we have studied the cancer cell lines sharing a common feature: the multi-drug resistance where P- glycoprotein is responsible for the active efflux of the drug out of the cell. For this, we have used two types of cells, MDR-human leukemic K562 cells and non-MDR acute promyelocytic leukemic HL60 cells. The comparison between normalized micro FT-Raman spectra of resistant and sensitive K652 cells shows a decrease in the intensity of the amide I and III bands and a down shift of the amide I band. On the other hand, control experiments with HL60 cells do not show any remarkable changes. Analysis of micro-FT-Raman spectra by resolution enhancement methods and by chemometrics tools reveal further information concerning the conformational changes of the cell constituents involved in the expression of the MDR-phenotype.

  10. Synthesis of α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl-Based Compounds, Oxime and Oxime Ether Analogs as Potential Anticancer Agents for Overcoming Cancer Multidrug Resistance by Modulation of Efflux Pumps in Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua-Li; Leng, Jing; Zhang, Cheng-Pan; Jantan, Ibrahim; Amjad, Muhammad Wahab; Sher, Muhammad; Naeem-Ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2016-04-14

    Sixty-nine novel α,β-unsaturated carbonyl based compounds, including cyclohexanone, tetralone, oxime, and oxime ether analogs, were synthesized. The antiproliferative activity determined by using seven different human cancer cell lines provided a structure-activity relationship. Compound 8ag exhibited high antiproliferative activity against Panc-1, PaCa-2, A-549, and PC-3 cell lines, with IC50 value of 0.02 μM, comparable to the positive control Erlotinib. The ten most active antiproliferative compounds were assessed for mechanistic effects on BRAF(V600E), EGFR TK kinases, and tubulin polymerization, and were investigated in vitro to reverse efflux-mediated resistance developed by cancer cells. Compound 8af exhibited the most potent BRAF(V600E) inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.9 μM. Oxime analog 7o displayed the most potent EGFR TK inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.07 μM, which was analogous to the positive control. Some analogs including 7f, 8af, and 8ag showed a dual role as anticancer and MDR reversal agents. PMID:27010345

  11. Reversal effect of bufalin on multidrug resistance in human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7402/5-FU cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei; Liu, Long; Fang, Fan-Fu; Huang, Feng; Cheng, Bin-Bin; Li, Bai

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle to chemotherapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To overcome MDR and improve chemotherapeutic efficacy, novel reversal agents with higher efficacy and lower toxicity are urgently needed for HCC. The present study was designed to examine the potential reversal activity of bufalin, a toxic ligand isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine 'Chansu' and to elucidate the possible related mechanisms. A multidrug-resistant HCC cell line, BEL-7402/5-FU, was used as the cell model. The working concentration of bufalin as an effective reversal agent, and the cell viability in the reversal experiments were determined by MTT assay. The effects of bufalin at a non-cytotoxic dose on cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and drug efflux pump activity were measured by flow cytometry. Qualitative observation of apoptosis was also carried out by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the effects of bufalin on the expression of potential genes involved in MDR of BEL-7402/5-FU cells, including thymidylate synthase (TS), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), were determined using real-time PCR and western blot analysis. The results showed that bufalin at a concentration of 1 nM enhanced the chemosensitivity of BEL-7402/5-FU cells to 5-FU with a reversal fold of 3.8 which was similar to that of 1 µM verapamil. Bufalin significantly arrested the cell cycle at the G₀/G₁ phase, induced apoptosis through an increase in the Bax/Bcl-xL ratio, inhibited drug efflux pump activity via downregulation of MRP1, and reduced the expression of TS in BEL-7402/5-FU cells. The present study revealed that bufalin effectively reversed MDR in BEL-7402/5-FU cells through multiple pathways. The combination of bufalin with cytotoxic drugs may serve as a promising strategy for the chemotherapy of HCC. PMID:24173654

  12. Combating P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance with 10-O-phenyl dihydroartemisinin ethers in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hang; Zhao, Xuan; Zuo, Zhizhong; Sun, Jingwei; Yao, Yao; Wang, Tao; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Linxiang

    2016-01-27

    A series of 10-β-phenyl ethers of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) with piperazine substitutions were synthesized with the goal of overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer therapy. These novel compounds exerted significant antiproliferative activities in breast cancer MCF-7 and MCF-7/Adr cell lines at the submicromolar level and were shown to be approximately 100- to 300-times more potent than the lead compound DHA. Remarkably, the P-gp-overexpressed MCF-7/Adr cell line showed collateral sensitivity towards these derivatives. Furthermore, compounds 3d and 5c, with the highest selectivity for MCF-7/Adr towards MCF-7 cells, were free from P-gp efflux in a MDCK-MDR1 assay. Flow cytometry and western blot assays suggested that the antiproliferative effects of 5c were associated with cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through the downregulation of Cyclin D1 and Cyclin B1. PMID:26741854

  13. miR-218 inhibits multidrug resistance (MDR) of gastric cancer cells by targeting Hedgehog/smoothened

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Liang; Shi, Hui-Juan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Tang, Hong-Sheng; Cui, Shu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main obstacle to successful chemotherapy for patients with gastric cancer. The microRNA miR-218 influences various pathobiological processes in gastric cancer, and its down-regulation in this disease raises the question of whether it normally inhibits MDR. In this study we observed that two MDR gastric cancer cell lines showed lower expression of miR-218 compared with their chemosensitive parental cell line. Overexpressing miR-218 chemosensitizes gastric cancer cells, slowed efflux of adriamycin, and accelerated drug-induced apoptosis. We identified the smoothened (SMO) gene as a functional target of miR-218, and found that SMO overexpression counteracts the chemosensitizing effects of miR-218. These findings suggest that miR-218 inhibits MDR of gastric cancer cells by down-regulating SMO expression. PMID:26261515

  14. A Novel Nitrobenzoate Microtubule Inhibitor that Overcomes Multidrug Resistance Exhibits Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Bo; Gong, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Wu, Shu-Ying; Li, Yi; Xu, Xian-Dong; Shang, Bo-Yang; Zhou, Jin-Ming; Zhu, Zhi-Ling; Si, Shu-Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major limitation for microtubule-binding agents in cancer treatment. Here we report a novel microtubule inhibitor (2-morpholin-4-yl-5-nitro-benzoic acid 4-methylsulfanyl-benzyl ester, IMB5046), its cytotoxicity against multidrug-resistant cell lines and its antitumor efficacy in animal models. IMB5046 disrupted microtubule structures in cells and inhibited purified tubulin polymerization in vitro. It bound to the colchicine pocket of tubulin. IMB5046 displayed potent cytotoxicity against multiple tumor cell lines with an IC50 range of 0.037-0.426 μM. Notably, several multidrug-resistant cell lines which were resistant to colchicine, vincristine and paclitaxel remained sensitive to IMB5046. IMB5046 was not a P-glycoprotein substrate. IMB5046 blocked cell cycle at G2/M phase and induced cell apoptosis. Microarray assay indicated that the differentially expressed genes after IMB5046 treatment were highly related to immune system, cell death and cancer. In a mouse xenograft model IMB5046 inhibited the growth of human lung tumor xenograft by 83% at a well-tolerated dose. It is concluded that IMB5046 is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor with novel chemical structure and can overcome multidrug resistance. It is a promising lead compound for cancer chemotherapy, especially for treatment of multidrug-resistant tumors. PMID:27510727

  15. A Novel Nitrobenzoate Microtubule Inhibitor that Overcomes Multidrug Resistance Exhibits Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan-Bo; Gong, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Wu, Shu-Ying; Li, Yi; Xu, Xian-Dong; Shang, Bo-Yang; Zhou, Jin-Ming; Zhu, Zhi-Ling; Si, Shu-Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major limitation for microtubule-binding agents in cancer treatment. Here we report a novel microtubule inhibitor (2-morpholin-4-yl-5-nitro-benzoic acid 4-methylsulfanyl-benzyl ester, IMB5046), its cytotoxicity against multidrug-resistant cell lines and its antitumor efficacy in animal models. IMB5046 disrupted microtubule structures in cells and inhibited purified tubulin polymerization in vitro. It bound to the colchicine pocket of tubulin. IMB5046 displayed potent cytotoxicity against multiple tumor cell lines with an IC50 range of 0.037–0.426 μM. Notably, several multidrug-resistant cell lines which were resistant to colchicine, vincristine and paclitaxel remained sensitive to IMB5046. IMB5046 was not a P-glycoprotein substrate. IMB5046 blocked cell cycle at G2/M phase and induced cell apoptosis. Microarray assay indicated that the differentially expressed genes after IMB5046 treatment were highly related to immune system, cell death and cancer. In a mouse xenograft model IMB5046 inhibited the growth of human lung tumor xenograft by 83% at a well-tolerated dose. It is concluded that IMB5046 is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor with novel chemical structure and can overcome multidrug resistance. It is a promising lead compound for cancer chemotherapy, especially for treatment of multidrug-resistant tumors. PMID:27510727

  16. Indomethacin Analogues that Enhance Doxorubicin Cytotoxicity in Multidrug Resistant Cells without Cox Inhibitory Activity.

    PubMed

    Arisawa, Mitsuhiro; Kasaya, Yayoi; Obata, Tohru; Sasaki, Takuma; Ito, Mika; Abe, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Yamano, Akihito; Shuto, Satoshi

    2011-05-12

    Conformationally restricted indomethacin analogues were designed and prepared from the corresponding 2-substituted indoles, which were synthesized by a one-pot isomerization/enamide-ene metathesis as the key reaction. Conformational analysis by calculations, NMR studies, and X-ray crystallography suggested that these analogues were conformationally restricted in the s-cis or the s-trans form due to the 2-substituent as expected. Their biological activities on cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibition, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition, and modulation of MRP-1-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) are described. Some of these indomethacin analogues enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity, although they do not have any COX inhibitory activity, which suggests that the MDR-modulating effect of an NSAID can be unassociated with its COX-inhibitory activity. This may be an entry into the combination chemotherapy of doxorubicin with a MDR modulator. PMID:24900317

  17. Label-free detection of multidrug resistance in K562 cells through isolated 3D-electrode dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Demircan, Yağmur; Koyuncuoğlu, Aziz; Erdem, Murat; Özgür, Ebru; Gündüz, Ufuk; Külah, Haluk

    2015-05-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a technique used to separate particles based on different sizes and/or dielectric properties under nonuniform electric field, is a promising method to be applied in label-free, rapid, and effective cell manipulation and separation. In this study, a microelectromechanical systems-based, isolated 3D-electrode DEP device has been designed and implemented for the label-free detection of multidrug resistance in K562 leukemia cells, based on the differences in their cytoplasmic conductivities. Cells were hydrodynamically focused to the 3D-electrode arrays, placed on the side walls of the microchannel, through V-shaped parylene-C obstacles. 3D-electrodes extruded along the z-direction provide uniformly distributed DEP force through channel depth. Cell suspension containing resistant and sensitive cancer cells with 1:100 ratio was continuously flown through the channel at a rate of 10 μL/min. Detection was realized at 48.64 MHz, the cross-over frequency of sensitive K562 cells, at which sensitive cells flow with the fluid, while the resistant ones are trapped by positive DEP force. Device can be operated at considerably low voltages (<9 Vpp ). This is achieved by means of a very thin (0.5 μm) parylene coating on electrodes, providing the advantages offered by the isolation of electrodes from the sample, while the working voltage can still be kept low. Results prove that the presented DEP device can provide an efficient platform for the detection of multidrug resistance in leukemia, in a label-free manner. PMID:25781271

  18. Identification of microRNAs and mRNAs associated with multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wanzhong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xin; Song, Wenzhi; Cui, Xiangyan; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious impediment to the success of chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer. To identify microRNAs and mRNAs associated with MDR of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells, we developed a multidrug-resistant human laryngeal cancer subline, designated Hep-2/v, by exposing Hep-2 cells to stepwise increasing concentrations of vincristine (0.02-0.96'µM). Microarray assays were performed to compare the microRNA and mRNA expression profiles of Hep-2 and Hep-2/v cells. Compared to Hep-2 cells, Hep-2/v cells were more resistant to chemotherapy drugs (∼45-fold more resistant to vincristine, 5.1-fold more resistant to cisplatin, and 5.6-fold more resistant to 5-fluorouracil) and had a longer doubling time (42.33±1.76 vs 28.75±1.12'h, P<0.05), higher percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase (80.98±0.52 vs 69.14±0.89, P<0.05), increased efflux of rhodamine 123 (95.97±0.56 vs 12.40±0.44%, P<0.01), and up-regulated MDR1 expression. A total of 7 microRNAs and 605 mRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cell types. Of the differentially expressed mRNAs identified, regulator of G-protein signaling 10, high-temperature requirement protein A1, and nuclear protein 1 were found to be the putative targets of the differentially expressed microRNAs identified. These findings may open a new avenue for clarifying the mechanisms responsible for MDR in laryngeal cancer. PMID:23780424

  19. Multidrug-resistance gene (P-glycoprotein) is expressed by endothelial cells at blood-brain barrier sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; O'Brien, J.P.; Casals, D.; Biedler, J.L.; Melamed, M.R.; Bertino, J.R. ); Rittman-Grauer, L. )

    1989-01-01

    Endothelial cells of human capillary blood vessels at the blood-brain and other blood-tissue barrier sites express P-glycoprotein as detected by mouse monoclonal antibodies against the human multidrug-resistance gene product. This pattern of endothelial cell expression may indicate a physiological role for P-glycoprotein in regulating the entry of certain molecules into the central nervous system and other anatomic compartments, such as the testes. These tissues, which limit the access of systemic drugs, are known pharmacologic sanctuaries for metastatic cancer. P-glycoprotein expression in capillary endothelium of brain and testes and not other tissues (i.e., kidney and placenta) may in part explain this phenomenon and could have important implications in cancer chemotherapy.

  20. [The structure of cellular vaults, their role in the normal cell and in the multidrug resistance of cancer].

    PubMed

    Szaflarski, Witold; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    The cellular vaults have been described for the first time in 1986 as ribonucleoprotein complexes composed of three proteins, MVP, TEP1 and vPARP and several vRNA strains. Biochemical and structural studies revealed their ubiquitous existence in the cytoplasm of many eukaryotic cells and their barrel-like structure indicating their engagement in the intracellular transport. Furthermore, the high homology between MVP and LRP which was already known to be involved in multidrug resistance mechanism opened a discussion about the role of vaults in both normal and cancer cells. The histopathology research demonstrated an increased amount of MVP/LRP proteins in the cancer as well as showed translocation possibility between cytoplasm and nuclear envelope, which can be of crucial point in the prevention of nucleus against anticancer drugs. PMID:22235652

  1. Membrane vesicles from multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells contain a specific 150,000-170,000 dalton protein detected by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, M.M.; Safa, A.R.; Felsted, R.L.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have selected multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells in high levels of colchicine (KB-C4) or vinblastine (KB-V1) which are cross-resistant to many other structurally unrelated chemotheraputic agents. To determine the mechanism of reduced drug accumulation, they measured /sup 3/H-vinblastine (/sup 3/H-VBL) association with membrane vesicles made from parental drug sensitive, drug-resistant and revertant cells. Membrane vesicles from highly multidrug resistant cells exhibited increased specific and saturable binding of vinblastine, (Kd = 1 ..mu..M) that was temperature dependent and trypsin sensitive. To identify the molecules which bind vinblastine, membrane vesicles were exposed to two photo-activatable analogs of vinblastine, (N-P-(azido-3,5,-(/sup 3/H)-benzoyl)-N'-..beta..-aminoethylvindisine (/sup 3/H-NAB) and N-P-(azido-3-(/sup 125/I)-solicyl)-N'-..beta..-aminoethylvindesine (/sup 125/I-NASV). The specific labeling of a 150,000-170,000 dalton protein in membrane vesicles from multidrug-resistant KB-C4 and KB-V1 cells was found. /sup 125/I-NASV labeling was inhibited by vinblastine, vincrinstine and verapamil but not by colchicine or dexamethasone. The 150,000-170,000 dalton protein may have an important role in the multidrug resistance phenotype.

  2. Pirarubicin inhibits multidrug-resistant osteosarcoma cell proliferation through induction of G2/M phase cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shui-er; Xiong, Sang; Lin, Feng; Qiao, Guang-lei; Feng, Tao; Shen, Zan; Min, Da-liu; Zhang, Chun-ling; Yao, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Pirarubicin (THP) is recently found to be effective in treating patients with advanced, relapsed or recurrent high-grade osteosarcoma. In this study, the effects of THP on the multidrug-resistant (MDR) osteosarcoma cells were assessed, and the underlying mechanisms for the disruption of cell cycle kinetics by THP were explored. Methods: Human osteosarcoma cell line MG63 and human MDR osteosarcoma cell line MG63/DOX were tested. The cytotoxicity of drugs was examined using a cell proliferation assay with the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). The distribution of cells across the cell cycle was determined with flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle-regulated genes cyclin B1 and Cdc2 (CDK1), and the phosphorylated Cdc2 and Cdc25C was examined using Western blot analyses. Results: MG63/DOX cells were highly resistant to doxorubicin (ADM) and gemcitabine (GEM), but were sensitive or lowly resistant to THP, methotrexate (MTX) and cisplatin (DDP). Treatment of MG63/DOX cells with THP (200–1000 ng/mL) inhibited the cell proliferation in time- and concentration-dependent manners. THP (50–500 ng/mL) induced MG63/DOX cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Furthermore, the treatment of MG63/DOX cells with THP (200–1000 ng/mL) downregulated cyclin B1 expression, and decreased the phosphorylated Cdc2 at Thr161. Conversely, the treatment increased the phosphorylated Cdc2 at Thr14/Tyr15 and Cdc25C at Ser216, which led to a decrease in Cdc2-cyclin B1 activity. Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of THP to MG63/DOX cells may be in part due to its ability to arrest cell cycle progression at the G2/M phase, which supports the use of THP for managing patients with MDR osteosarcoma. PMID:22580740

  3. Screening for multidrug resistance in leukemia: cell reactivity to MRK-16 correlates with anthracycline retention and sensitivity of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Michieli, M; Damiani, D; Michelutti, A; Grimaz, S; Geromin, A; Fanin, R; Russo, D; Masolini, P; Baccarani, M

    1996-09-01

    The biologic and clinical importance of the multidrug resistance (MDR) that is related with the overexpression of the P170 glycoprotein (Pgp) is widely recognized. However, a major issue that has not yet been solved is the definition of the degree of Pgp expression which is associated with a significant decrease of the sensitivity of the cells to chemotherapy. For this reason we studied the leukemic cells from 83 cases of acute leukemia. Leukemic cells were fixed in PLP and treated with saponine. Pgp expression was assayed by flow cytometry, using the anti Pgp monoclonal antibody MRK-16. Results were expressed both as the number of positive cells and by the intensity of the reaction as defined by the mean fluorescence index (MFI), i.e. the ratio between the mean fluorescence intensity of the MRK-16 incubated cells and of the IgG2a incubated cells. Thus, Pgp expression was compared with the results of two in vitro tests of cell sensitivity to anthracyclines, daunorubicin (DNR) cell retention and DNR cytotoxicity. We found that it was not the number of MRK-16 positive cells, but the degree of the reaction with MRK-16 (MFI) that significantly related to the anthracycline toxicity tests. Therefore, we propose that for clinical purposes a quick and cheap determination of Pgp-related MDR in leukemic cells may be obtained by measuring the MFI with MRK-16 in a standard flow cytometry assay and that the assay may indeed be sufficient to estimate Pgp expression as well as the influence of Pgp on cell sensitivity to anthracyclines. PMID:9021691

  4. Chemotherapeutic efficacy of the protein-doxorubicin conjugates on multidrug resistant rat hepatoma cell line in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, K.; Hatano, T.; Tsukada, Y.; Matsuda, M.

    1993-01-01

    In vitro studies were initiated to study the antitumour effect of protein-doxorubicin (DXR) conjugate on the growth of the multidrug resistant rat ascites hepatoma cell line, AH66DR. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for DXR in AH66DR cell line was 16 mumol l-1 (AH66 parental cell line, AH66P, IC50 was 0.08 mumol l-1). Treatment of AH66P and AH66DR cells with various concentrations of DXR or conjugates at equivalent concentrations of DXR was performed. The two types of conjugates used were bovine serum albumin (BSA)-DXR conjugate and immunoglobulin G (IgG)-DXR conjugate. Both of these conjugates showed potent dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth against AH66DR cells as compared with the cells treated with DXR or other controls. The IC50 for BSA-DXR and IgG-DXR conjugates in AH66DR cell line was 0.05 (equivalent DXR) mumol l-1 and 0.07 (equivalent DXR) mumol l-1, respectively. These values were similar to that of the AH66P treated with DXR. Cellular uptake and accumulation of DXR or BSA-DXR conjugate was also quantitated in both cell lines. The cellular concentration of DXR in AH66DR cells was 2-fold lower than that of AH66P cells throughout the experiment. In contrast, by the treatment of AH66DR cells with BSA-DXR conjugate, the intracellular drug concentration increased as a function of time up to 24 h (639.1 +/- 41.8, equivalent DXR, ng 10(-5) cells) and reached the same drug level as AH66P cells treated with DXR (617.9 +/- 17.3 ng-5 cells). Ammonium chloride treatment inhibited the effects of the conjugates but did not inhibit the free drugs. Intracellular DXR was effluxed rapidly from AH66DR cells, but BSA-DXR conjugate remained in the cells at relatively high concentration for a long time. These results indicate that by chemically modifying DXR, such as by conjugation of the drug with proteins, it may be possible to overcome multidrug resistance. Images Figure 2 PMID:8431358

  5. [Relevance of animal models in the development of compounds targeting multidrug resistant cancer].

    PubMed

    Füredi, András; Tóth, Szilárd; Hámori, Lilla; Nagy, Veronika; Tóvári, József; Szakács, Gergely

    2015-12-01

    Anticancer compounds are typically identified in in vitro screens. Unfortunately, the in vitro drug sensitivity of cell lines does not reflect treatment efficiency in animal models, and neither show acceptable correlation to clinical results. While cell lines and laboratory animals can be readily "cured", the treatment of malignancies remains hampered by the multidrug resistance (MDR) of tumors. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) giving rise to spontaneous tumors offer a new possibility to characterize the evolution of drug resistance mechanisms and to target multidrug resistant cancer. PMID:26665195

  6. Quaternized Chitosan/Alginate-Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles Enhance the Chemosensitization of Multidrug-Resistant Gastric Carcinoma by Regulating Cell Autophagy Activity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiujuan; Feng, Jing; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Jinda; Su, Tao; Tian, Zuhong; Han, Dong; Zhao, Chuanxu; Fan, Miaomiao; Li, Congye; Liu, Bing; Feng, Xuyang; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Chen, Yundai; Deng, Hongbing; Cao, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and targeted therapies present major challenges in tumor chemotherapy. Nanoparticles (NPs) hold promise for use in cancer theranostics due to their advantages in terms of tumor-targeted cytotoxicity and imaging. In this study, we developed N-((2-hydroxy-3-trimethylammonium) propyl) chitosan chloride (HTCC)/alginate-encapsulated Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (HTCC-MNPs) and applied them to MDR gastric cancer both in vivo and in vitro. HTCC-MNPs were fabricated from sodium alginate (ALG), Fe3O4 and HTCC using an ionic gelation method. The sizes and physical characteristics of the NPs were determined using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and zeta potential analysis. The HTCC-MNPs exhibited excellent water solubility and biocompatibility as well as significantly reduced cell viability in the drug-resistant cancer cell line SGC7901/ADR, but not in normal gastric cells (P < 0.05). An analysis of LC3 expression demonstrated the involvement of autophagy in HTCC-MNP cytotoxicity. Additionally, apoptosis was verified using a DNA content assay. HTCC-MNPs led to mitochondrial membrane potential loss, decreased ATP production and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation compared to a control group (P < 0.05). Magnetic resonance imaging showed enrichment of HTCC-MNPs in tumor-bearing mice. In vivo bioluminescence imaging and tumor volume measurements revealed that HTCC-MNPs markedly inhibited in vivo tumor growth (P < 0.05). In conclusion, HTCC-MNPs significantly inhibited MDR gastric tumor growth and reduced tumor volume via the induction of cellular autophagy and apoptosis, which was attributed to mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive ROS accumulation. PMID:27305817

  7. Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein-1 (MRP-1)-dependent Glutathione Disulfide (GSSG) Efflux as a Critical Survival Factor for Oxidant-enriched Tumorigenic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Gayle M; Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Spieldenner, James M; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial cell tumors are the most common soft tissue tumors in infants. Tumor-forming endothelial (EOMA) cells are able to escape cell death fate despite excessive nuclear oxidant burden. Our previous work recognized perinuclear Nox-4 as a key contributor to EOMA growth. The objective of this work was to characterize the mechanisms by which EOMA cells evade oxidant toxicity and thrive. In EOMA cells, compared with in the cytosol, the nuclear GSSG/GSH ratio was 5-fold higher. Compared to the ratio observed in healthy murine aortic endothelial (MAE) cells, GSSG/GSH was over twice as high in EOMA cells. Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1), an active GSSG efflux mechanism, showed 2-fold increased activity in EOMA compared with MAE cells. Hyperactive YB-1 and Ape/Ref-1 were responsible for high MRP-1 expression in EOMA. Proximity ligand assay demonstrated MRP-1 and YB-1 binding. Such binding enabled the nuclear targeting of MRP-1 in EOMA in a leptomycin-B-sensitive manner. MRP-1 inhibition as well as knockdown trapped nuclear GSSG, causing cell death of EOMA. Disulfide loading of cells by inhibition of GSSG reductase (bischoloronitrosourea) or thioredoxin reductase (auranofin) was effective in causing EOMA death as well. In sum, EOMA cells survive a heavy oxidant burden by rapid efflux of GSSG, which is lethal if trapped within the cell. A hyperactive MRP-1 system for GSSG efflux acts as a critical survival factor for these cells, making it a potential target for EOMA therapeutics. PMID:26961872

  8. CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Shouju; Shi, Donghong; Zhou, Xianguang; Wang, Chunyan; Wu, Jiang; Zeng, Zhiyong; Li, Yanjun; Sun, Jing; Wang, Jiandong; Zhang, Longjiang; Teng, Zhaogang; Lu, Guangming

    2015-03-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major impediment for the successful chemotherapy in breast cancer. CD44 is over-expressed in multidrug resistant human breast cancer cells. CD44 monoclonal antibody exhibits anticancer potential by inhibiting proliferation and regulating P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux activity in multidrug resistant cells. Thereby, CD44 monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapeutic drug might be result in enhancing chemosensitivity and overcoming multidrug resistance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the CD44 monoclonal antibody functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing doxorubicin on human breast resistant cancer MCF-7 cells. The data showed that CD44-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles increased cytotoxicity and enhanced the downregulation of P-glycoprotein in comparison to CD44 antibody. Moreover, CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles provided active target, which promoted more cellular uptake of DOX in the resistant cells and more retention of DOX in tumor tissues than unengineered counterpart. Animal studies of the resistant breast cancer xenografts demonstrated that CD44-engineered drug delivery system remarkably induced apoptosis and inhibited the tumor growth. Our results indicated that the CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system offers an effective approach to overcome multidrug resistance in human breast cancer.

  9. Chromosomal instability, tolerance of mitotic errors and multidrug resistance are promoted by tetraploidization in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Anastasia Y; Seget, Katarzyna; Moeller, Giuliana K; de Pagter, Mirjam S.; de Roos, Jeroen A D M; Dürrbaum, Milena; Kuffer, Christian; Müller, Stefan; Zaman, Guido J R; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Storchová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Up to 80% of human cancers, in particular solid tumors, contain cells with abnormal chromosomal numbers, or aneuploidy, which is often linked with marked chromosomal instability. Whereas in some tumors the aneuploidy occurs by missegregation of one or a few chromosomes, aneuploidy can also arise during proliferation of inherently unstable tetraploid cells generated by whole genome doubling from diploid cells. Recent findings from cancer genome sequencing projects suggest that nearly 40% of tumors underwent whole genome doubling at some point of tumorigenesis, yet its contribution to cancer phenotypes and benefits for malignant growth remain unclear. Here, we investigated the consequences of a whole genome doubling in both cancerous and non-transformed p53 positive human cells. SNP array analysis and multicolor karyotyping revealed that induced whole-genome doubling led to variable aneuploidy. We found that chromosomal instability (CIN) is a frequent, but not a default outcome of whole genome doubling. The CIN phenotypes were accompanied by increased tolerance to mitotic errors that was mediated by suppression of the p53 signaling. Additionally, the expression of pro-apoptotic factors, such as iASPP and cIAP2, was downregulated. Furthermore, we found that whole genome doubling promotes resistance to a broad spectrum of chemotherapeutic drugs and stimulates anchorage-independent growth even in non-transformed p53-positive human cells. Taken together, whole genome doubling provides multifaceted benefits for malignant growth. Our findings provide new insight why genome-doubling promotes tumorigenesis and correlates with poor survival in cancer. PMID:26151317

  10. AB249. 15-oxospiramilactone reverses multidrug resistance in the Human Renal Cell Carcinoma by targeting ABCB1 through Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tianyi; Yi, Xiaoming; Zhou, Wenquan

    2016-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main barrier to the success of chemotherapy for Human Renal Cell Carcinoma. P-glycoprotein ABCB1 plays a major role in MDR of malignant cells and is regulated by various transcription factors, including Wnt/β-catenin /TCF4. We previously reported 15-oxospiramilactone was a new Wnt molecule inhibiter. In this study, ABCB1 was found to be significantly down regulated in A498 and ACHN cells by using 15-oxospiramilactone, suggesting an important role for the Wnt/b-catenin/TCF4 signaling pathway in cancer drug resistance. Methods Here we demonstrated thatin the renal cancer cell lines A498and ACHN, the level of ABCB1 expression and function correlate with nuclear TCF7L2-luciferase reporter gene activity (A498>ACHN). We constructed TCF7L2 interference vector withLV-TCF7L2-GFPplasmid reduced the expression of TCF7L2 by shRNA-mediated partial depletion.15-oxospiramilactone was treated ACHN, A498 andTCF7L2 knock down RCC cell lines. Carcinogenesis and tumor development measured by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and clonogenic survival assays. The efflux function of P glycoprotein was assayed by ABCB1 efflux assay. Protein and mRNA expression were assayed by western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The association between ABCB1 and TCF7L2 was assayed by luciferase reporter assay. Results 15-oxospiramilactone could cooperate with toxicity to suppress RCC cell lines proliferation while had no significant effect in shTCF7L2 groups. 15-oxospiramilactone could inhibit the efflux function of P glycoprotein and had no obvious effect in shTCF7L2 groups either. The association between ABCB1 and TCF7L2 was ensured by luciferase reporter assay. Protein and mRNA of ABCB1, TCF4 andβ-catenin expression were significant down regulated while MRP1 had no obvious change in 15-oxospiramilactone treated group, however, 15-oxospiramilactonehad no obvious effect in shTCF7L2 groups in RCC

  11. Reduced topoisomerase II activity in multidrug-resistant human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Eijdems, E. W.; de Haas, M.; Timmerman, A. J.; Van der Schans, G. P.; Kamst, E.; de Nooij, J.; Astaldi Ricotti, G. C.; Borst, P.; Baas, F.

    1995-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell lines often have a compound phenotype, combining reduced drug accumulation with a decrease in topoisomerase II. We have analysed alterations in topoisomerase II in MDR derivatives of the human lung cancer cell line SW-1573. Selection with doxorubicin frequently resulted in reduced topo II alpha mRNA and protein levels, whereas clones selected with vincristine showed normal levels of topo II alpha. No alterations of topo II beta levels were detected. To determine the contribution of topo II alterations to drug resistance, topo II activity was analysed by the determination of DNA breaks induced by the topo II-inhibiting drug 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methane-sulphon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA) in living cells, as m-AMSA is not affected by the drug efflux mechanism in the SW-1573 cells. The number of m-AMSA-induced DNA breaks correlated well (r = 0.96) with in vitro m-AMSA sensitivity. Drug sensitivity, however, did not always correlate with reduced topo II mRNA or protein levels. In one of the five doxorubicin-selected clones m-AMSA resistance and a reduction in m-AMSA-induced DNA breaks were found in the absence of reduced topo II protein levels. Therefore, we assume that post-translational modifications of topo II also contribute to drug resistance in SW-1573 cells. These results suggest that methods that detect quantitative as well as qualitative alterations of topo II should be used to predict the responsiveness of tumours to cytotoxic agents. The assay we used, which measures DNA breaks as an end point of topo II activity, could be a good candidate. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7819046

  12. EZH2 inhibition re-sensitizes multidrug resistant B-cell lymphomas to etoposide mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Smonskey, Matthew; Lasorsa, Elena; Rosario, Spencer; Kirk, Jason S.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Ellis, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Reactivation of apoptotic pathways is an attractive strategy for patients with treatment-resistant B-cell lymphoma. The tumor suppressor, p53 is central for apoptotic response to multiple DNA damaging agents used to treat aggressive B-cell lymphomas, including etoposide. It has been demonstrated that etoposide induced DNA damage and therapeutic efficacy is enhanced by combination with inhibitors of the histone methyltransferase, enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2). Further, EZH2 was identified to regulate cell fate decisions in response to DNA damage. Using B-cell lymphoma cell lines resistant to etoposide induced cell death; we show that p53 is dramatically down regulated and MDMX, a negative regulator of p53, is significantly up regulated. However, these cell lines remain responsive to etoposide mediated DNA damage and exhibit cell cycle inhibition and induction of senescence. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of EZH2 directs DNA damage to a predominant p53 dependent apoptotic response associated with loss of MDMX and BCL-XL. These data provide confirmation of EZH2 in determining cell fate following DNA damage and propose a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with aggressive treatment-resistant B-cell lymphoma. PMID:26973857

  13. Investigation of doxorubicin for multidrug resistance using a fluorescent cytometric imaging system integrated onto cell culture analog devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyun; Xu, Hui; Kim, Sung J.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2004-06-01

    An integrated cytometric fluorescent imaging system is developed for characterizing chemical concentration and cellular status in microscale cell culture analog (μCCA) devices. A μCCA is used to evaluate the potential toxicity and efficacy of proposed pharmaceutical treatment of animals or humans. The imaging system, based on discrete optical components, not only provides a robust and compact tool for real-time measurements, but the modularity of the system also offers flexibility to be applicable to various μCCA structures that may be appropriate to various animal or human models. We investigate the dynamics of doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic agent, on cultured cells in a μCCA using the integrated cytometric fluorescent imaging system. This study incorporates two uteran cancer cell lines representing a sensitive cell type and a multi-drug resistant (MDR) derivative cell line. The ultimate goal is to test the effect of MDR modulators in combination with doxorubicin to kill cancer cells while not causing undue harm to normal cells.

  14. The multidrug resistance pumps are inhibited by silibinin and apoptosis induced in K562 and KCL22 leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza; Saffari, Mojtaba; Raoofian, Reza; Yekaninejad, Mirsaeed; Dinehkabodi, Orkideh Saydi; Noori-Daloii, Ali Reza

    2014-05-01

    Silibinin have been introduced for several years as a potent antioxidant in the field of nutraceuticals. Based on wide persuasive effects of this drug, we have decided to investigate the effects of silibinin on chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in vitro models, K562 and KCL22 cell lines. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, microculture tetrazolium test (MTT assay) and real-time PCR were employed to evaluate the effects of silibinin on cell cytotoxicity, cell proliferation and expression of various multidrug resistance genes in these cell lines, respectively. Our results have shown that presence of silibinin has inhibitory effects on cell proliferation of K562 and KCL22 cell lines. Also, our data indicated that silibinin, in a dose-dependent manner with applying no cytotoxic effects, inhibited cell proliferation and reduced mRNA expression levels of some transporter genes e.g. MDR1, MRP3, MRP2, MRP1, MRP5, MRP4, ABCG2, ABCB11, MRP6 and MRP7. The multifarious in vitro inhibitory effects of silibinin are in agreement with growing body of evidence that silibinin would be an efficient anticancer agent in order to be used in multi-target therapy to prevail the therapeutic hold backs against CML. PMID:24522246

  15. Progesterone interacts with P-glycoprotein in multidrug-resistant cells and in the endometrium of gravid uterus.

    PubMed

    Yang, C P; DePinho, S G; Greenberger, L M; Arceci, R J; Horwitz, S B

    1989-01-15

    P-Glycoprotein (P-GP) plays a pivotal role in maintaining the multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype. This membrane glycoprotein is overproduced in MDR cells and the endometrium of the mouse gravid uterus (Arceci, R.J., Croop, J.M., Horwitz, S.B., and Housman, D. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 85, 4350-4354). This latter observation and an interest in endogenous substrates for P-GP led to a study of the interaction of steroids with P-GP found in the endometrium of the mouse gravid uterus and in MDR cells derived from the murine macrophage-like cell J774.2. [3H]Azidopine labeling of P-GP from these two sources was inhibited by various steroids, particularly progesterone. Progesterone also markedly inhibited [3H]vinblastine binding to membrane vesicles prepared from MDR cells, enhanced vinblastine accumulation in MDR cells, and increased the sensitivity of MDR cells to vinblastine. In addition, we have demonstrated that the hydrophobicity of a steroid is important in determining its effect on inhibition of drug binding to P-GP. It is concluded that progesterone, a relatively nontoxic endogenous steroid, interacts with P-GP and is capable of reversing drug resistance in MDR cells. PMID:2562956

  16. Biodegradable cationic polymeric nanocapsules for overcoming multidrug resistance and enabling drug-gene co-delivery to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Kuang; Law, Wing-Cheung; Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Yu, Yun; Nair, Bindukumar; Wu, Jincheng; Mahajan, Supriya; Reynolds, Jessica L.; Li, Yukun; Lai, Cheng Kee; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Prasad, Paras N.; Cheng, Chong

    2014-01-01

    Having unique architectural features, cationic polymeric nanocapsules (NCs) with well-defined covalently stabilized biodegradable structures were generated as potentially universal and safe therapeutic nanocarriers. These NCs were synthesized from allyl-functionalized cationic polylactide (CPLA) by highly efficient UV-induced thiol-ene interfacial cross-linking in transparent miniemulsions. With tunable nanoscopic sizes, negligible cytotoxicity and remarkable degradability, they are able to encapsulate doxorubicin (Dox) with inner cavities and bind interleukin-8 (IL-8) small interfering RNA (siRNA) with cationic shells. The Dox-encapsulated NCs can effectively bypass the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF7/ADR cancer cells, thereby resulting in increased intracellular drug concentration and reduced cell viability. In vitro studies also showed that the NCs loaded with Dox, IL-8 siRNA and both agents can be readily taken up by PC3 prostate cancer cells, resulting in a significant chemotherapeutic effect and/or IL-8 gene silencing.Having unique architectural features, cationic polymeric nanocapsules (NCs) with well-defined covalently stabilized biodegradable structures were generated as potentially universal and safe therapeutic nanocarriers. These NCs were synthesized from allyl-functionalized cationic polylactide (CPLA) by highly efficient UV-induced thiol-ene interfacial cross-linking in transparent miniemulsions. With tunable nanoscopic sizes, negligible cytotoxicity and remarkable degradability, they are able to encapsulate doxorubicin (Dox) with inner cavities and bind interleukin-8 (IL-8) small interfering RNA (siRNA) with cationic shells. The Dox-encapsulated NCs can effectively bypass the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF7/ADR cancer cells, thereby resulting in increased intracellular drug concentration and reduced cell viability. In vitro studies also showed that the NCs loaded with Dox, IL-8 siRNA and both

  17. Cytotoxicity of spermine oxidation products to multidrug resistant melanoma M14 ADR2 cells: sensitization by the MDL 72527 lysosomotropic compound.

    PubMed

    Agostinelli, Enzo; Condello, Maria; Molinari, Agnese; Tempera, Giampiero; Viceconte, Nikenza; Arancia, Giuseppe

    2009-09-01

    It has been confirmed that multidrug resistant (MDR) human melanoma cells are more sensitive than their wild-type counterparts to H2O2 and aldehydes, the products of bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO)-catalyzed oxidation of spermine. The metabolites formed by BSAO and spermine are more toxic than exogenous H2O2 and acrolein, even though their concentration is lower during the initial phase of incubation due to their more gradual release than the exogenous products. Both wild-type and MDR cells, after pre-treatment with MDL 72527, an inactivator of polyamine oxidase and a lysosomotropic compound, show to be sensitized to subsequent exposure to BSAO/spermine. Evidence of ultrastructural aberrations and acridine orange release from lysosomes is presented in this work that is in favor of the permeabilization of the lysosomal membrane as the major cause of sensitization by MDL 72527. Owing to its lysosomotropic effect, pre-treatment with MDL 72527 amplifies the ability of the metabolites formed from spermine by oxidative deamination to induce cell death. Since it is conceivable that combined treatment with a lysosomotropic compound and BSAO/spermine would be effective against tumor cells, it is of interest to search for such novel compounds, which might be promising for application in a therapeutic setting. PMID:19639169

  18. Astragaloside IV reduces the expression level of P-glycoprotein in multidrug-resistant human hepatic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    WANG, PEI-PEI; XU, DU-JUAN; HUANG, CAN; WANG, WEI-PING; XU, WEN-KE

    2014-01-01

    Astragaloside is a saponin widely used in traditional Chinese medicine and has been reported to be a potent multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal agent. The present study investigated the role of astragaloside IV (ASIV) in the regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, encoded by the mdr1 gene) and its effect on the reversal of MDR. The activity of ASIV was evaluated using human hepatic cancer cells Bel-7402 and the corresponding 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant cells Bel-7402/FU. ASIV (0.08 mg/ml) potentiated the cytotoxicity of 5-FU which was demonstrated using the MTT assay on Bel-7402/FU cells. ASIV reduced the expression of P-gp as was revealed by immunocytochemistry. Accumulation and efflux studies with the P-gp substrate, rhodamine 123 (Rh123), demonstrated that ASIV inhibited P-gp-mediated drug efflux. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that ASIV enhanced the drug accumulation of 5-FU using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay for drug resistant cells. Furthermore, ASIV may downregulate the expression of P-gp, which was examined using western blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that ASIV reverses the drug resistance of Bel-7402/FU cells by downregulating the expression of mdr1. ASIV may represent a potent modulator of P-gp-mediated MDR in hepatic cancer therapy. PMID:24676670

  19. Astragaloside Ⅳ reduces the expression level of P-glycoprotein in multidrug-resistant human hepatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Pei; Xu, Du-Juan; Huang, Can; Wang, Wei-Ping; Xu, Wen-Ke

    2014-06-01

    Astragaloside is a saponin widely used in traditional Chinese medicine and has been reported to be a potent multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal agent. The present study investigated the role of astragaloside Ⅳ (ASIV) in the regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, encoded by the mdr1 gene) and its effect on the reversal of MDR. The activity of ASIV was evaluated using human hepatic cancer cells Bel-7402 and the corresponding 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant cells Bel-7402/FU. ASIV (0.08 mg/ml) potentiated the cytotoxicity of 5-FU which was demonstrated using the MTT assay on Bel-7402/FU cells. ASIV reduced the expression of P-gp as was revealed by immunocytochemistry. Accumulation and efflux studies with the P-gp substrate, rhodamine 123 (Rh123), demonstrated that ASIV inhibited P-gp-mediated drug efflux. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that ASⅣ enhanced the drug accumulation of 5-FU using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay for drug resistant cells. Furthermore, ASIV may downregulate the expression of P-gp, which was examined using western blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that ASIV reverses the drug resistance of Bel-7402/FU cells by downregulating the expression of mdr1. ASIV may represent a potent modulator of P-gp-mediated MDR in hepatic cancer therapy. PMID:24676670

  20. Sensitization of multidrug-resistant human cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors by down-regulation of SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Bong; Lee, Su-Hoon; Um, Jee-Hyun; Oh, Won Keun; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kang, Chi-Dug; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of Hsp90 inhibitors as anticancer agents was limited in multidrug-resistant (MDR) human cancer cells due to induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) such as Hsp70/Hsp27 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated efflux. In the present study, we showed that resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors of MDR human cancer cells could be overcome with SIRT1 inhibition. SIRT1 knock-down or SIRT1 inhibitors (amurensin G and EX527) effectively suppressed the resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors (17-AAG and AUY922) in several MDR variants of human lymphoblastic leukemia and human breast cancer cell lines. SIRT1 inhibition down-regulated the expression of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and subsequently Hsps and facilitated Hsp90 multichaperone complex disruption via hyperacetylation of Hsp90/Hsp70. These findings were followed by acceleration of ubiquitin ligase CHIP-mediated mutant p53 (mut p53) degradation and subsequent down-regulation of P-gp in 17-AAG-treated MDR cancer cells expressing P-gp and mut p53 after inhibition of SIRT1. Therefore, combined treatment with Hsp90 inhibitor and SIRT1 inhibitor could be a more effective therapeutic approach for Hsp90 inhibitor-resistant MDR cells via down-regulation of HSF1/Hsps, mut p53 and P-gp. PMID:26416354

  1. Multidrug resistance in chronic myeloid leukaemia: how much can we learn from MDR–CML cell lines?

    PubMed Central

    Rumjanek, Vivian M.; Vidal, Raphael S.; Maia, Raquel C.

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark of CML (chronic myeloid leukaemia) is the BCR (breakpoint cluster region)–ABL fusion gene. CML evolves through three phases, based on both clinical and pathological features: a chronic phase, an accelerated phase and blast crisis. TKI (tyrosine kinase inhibitors) are the treatment modality for patients with chronic phase CML. The therapeutic potential of the TKI imatinib is affected by BCR–ABL dependent an independent mechanisms. Development of MDR (multidrug resistance) contributes to the overall clinical resistance. MDR involves overexpression of ABC -transporters (ATP-binding-cassette transporter) among other features. MDR studies include the analysis of cancer cell lines selected for resistance. CML blast crisis is accompanied by increased resistance to apoptosis. This work reviews the role played by the influx transporter OCT1 (organic cation transporter 1), by efflux ABC transporters, molecules involved in the modulation of apoptosis (p53, Bcl-2 family, CD95, IAPs (inhibitors of apoptosis protein)], Hh and Wnt/β-catenin pathways, cytoskeleton abnormalities and other features described in leukaemic cells of clinical samples and CML cell lines. An MDR cell line, Lucena-1, generated from K562 by stepwise exposure to vincristine, was used as our model and some potential anticancer drugs effective against the MDR cell line and patients’ samples are presented. PMID:24070327

  2. Chromosome breakage at a major fragile site associated with P-glycoprotein gene amplification in multidrug-resistant CHO cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, M T; Vyas, R C; Jiang, L X; Hittelman, W N

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies of several drug-resistant Chinese hamster cell lines suggested that a breakage-fusion-bridge mechanism is frequently involved in the amplification of drug resistance genes. These observations underscore the importance of chromosome breakage in the initiation of DNA amplification in mammalian cells. However, the mechanism of this breakage is unknown. Here, we propose that the site of chromosome breakage consistent with the initial event of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) gene amplification via the breakage-fusion-bridge cycle in three independently established multidrug-resistant CHO cells was located at 1q31. This site is a major chromosome fragile site that can be induced by methotrexate and aphidicolin treatments. Pretreatments of CHO cells with methotrexate or aphidicolin enhanced the frequencies of resistance to vinca alkaloid and amplification of the P-gp gene. These observations suggest that chromosome fragile sites play a pivotal role in DNA amplification in mammalian cells. Our data are also consistent with the hypothesis that gene amplification can be initiated by stress-induced chromosome breakage that is independent of modes of action of cytotoxic agents. Drug-resistant variants may arise by their growth advantage due to overproduction of cellular target molecules via gene amplification. Images PMID:7913517

  3. Chromosome breakage at a major fragile site associated with P-glycoprotein gene amplification in multidrug-resistant CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M T; Vyas, R C; Jiang, L X; Hittelman, W N

    1994-08-01

    Recent studies of several drug-resistant Chinese hamster cell lines suggested that a breakage-fusion-bridge mechanism is frequently involved in the amplification of drug resistance genes. These observations underscore the importance of chromosome breakage in the initiation of DNA amplification in mammalian cells. However, the mechanism of this breakage is unknown. Here, we propose that the site of chromosome breakage consistent with the initial event of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) gene amplification via the breakage-fusion-bridge cycle in three independently established multidrug-resistant CHO cells was located at 1q31. This site is a major chromosome fragile site that can be induced by methotrexate and aphidicolin treatments. Pretreatments of CHO cells with methotrexate or aphidicolin enhanced the frequencies of resistance to vinca alkaloid and amplification of the P-gp gene. These observations suggest that chromosome fragile sites play a pivotal role in DNA amplification in mammalian cells. Our data are also consistent with the hypothesis that gene amplification can be initiated by stress-induced chromosome breakage that is independent of modes of action of cytotoxic agents. Drug-resistant variants may arise by their growth advantage due to overproduction of cellular target molecules via gene amplification. PMID:7913517

  4. Sensitization of multidrug-resistant human cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors by down-regulation of SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak-Bong; Lee, Su-Hoon; Um, Jee-Hyun; Oh, Won Keun; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kang, Chi-Dug; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Hsp90 inhibitors as anticancer agents was limited in multidrug-resistant (MDR) human cancer cells due to induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) such as Hsp70/Hsp27 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated efflux. In the present study, we showed that resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors of MDR human cancer cells could be overcome with SIRT1 inhibition. SIRT1 knock-down or SIRT1 inhibitors (amurensin G and EX527) effectively suppressed the resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors (17-AAG and AUY922) in several MDR variants of human lymphoblastic leukemia and human breast cancer cell lines. SIRT1 inhibition down-regulated the expression of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and subsequently Hsps and facilitated Hsp90 multichaperone complex disruption via hyperacetylation of Hsp90/Hsp70. These findings were followed by acceleration of ubiquitin ligase CHIP-mediated mutant p53 (mut p53) degradation and subsequent down-regulation of P-gp in 17-AAG-treated MDR cancer cells expressing P-gp and mut p53 after inhibition of SIRT1. Therefore, combined treatment with Hsp90 inhibitor and SIRT1 inhibitor could be a more effective therapeutic approach for Hsp90 inhibitor-resistant MDR cells via down-regulation of HSF1/Hsps, mut p53 and P-gp. PMID:26416354

  5. Overexpression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in NIH 3T3 cells lowers membrane potential and intracellular pH and confers a multidrug resistance phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L Y; Stutts, M J; Hoffman, M M; Roepe, P D

    1995-01-01

    Because of the similarities between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, recent observations of decreased plasma membrane electrical potential (delta psi) in cells overexpressing either MDR protein or the CFTR, and the effects of delta psi on passive diffusion of chemotherapeutic drugs, we have analyzed chemotherapeutic drug resistance for NIH 3T3 cells overexpressing different levels of functional CFTR. Three separate clones not previously exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs exhibit resistance to doxorubicin, vincristine, and colchicine that is similar to MDR transfectants not previously exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs. Two other clones expressing lower levels of CFTR are less resistant. As shown previously these clones exhibit decreased plasma membrane delta psi similar to MDR transfectants, but four of five exhibit mildly acidified intracellular pH in contrast to MDR transfectants, which are in general alkaline. Thus the MDR protein and CFTR-mediated MDR phenotypes are distinctly different. Selection of two separate CFTR clones on either doxorubicin or vincristine substantially increases the observed MDR and leads to increased CFTR (but not measurable MDR or MRP) mRNA expression. CFTR overexpressors also exhibit a decreased rate of 3H -vinblastine uptake. These data reveal a new and previously unrecognized consequence of CFTR expression, and are consistent with the hypothesis that membrane depolarization is an important determinant of tumor cell MDR. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 PMID:8519988

  6. Biodegradable cationic polymeric nanocapsules for overcoming multidrug resistance and enabling drug-gene co-delivery to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Kuang; Law, Wing-Cheung; Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Yu, Yun; Nair, Bindukumar; Wu, Jincheng; Mahajan, Supriya; Reynolds, Jessica L; Li, Yukun; Lai, Cheng Kee; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Schwartz, Stanley A; Prasad, Paras N; Cheng, Chong

    2014-01-01

    Having unique architectural features, cationic polymeric nanocapsules (NCs) with well-defined covalently stabilized biodegradable structures were generated as potentially universal and safe therapeutic nanocarriers. These NCs were synthesized from allyl-functionalized cationic polylactide (CPLA) by highly efficient UV-induced thiol-ene interfacial cross-linking in transparent miniemulsions. With tunable nanoscopic sizes, negligible cytotoxicity and remarkable degradability, they are able to encapsulate doxorubicin (Dox) with inner cavities and bind interleukin-8 (IL-8) small interfering RNA (siRNA) with cationic shells. The Dox-encapsulated NCs can effectively bypass the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF7/ADR cancer cells, thereby resulting in increased intracellular drug concentration and reduced cell viability. In vitro studies also showed that the NCs loaded with Dox, IL-8 siRNA and both agents can be readily taken up by PC3 prostate cancer cells, resulting in a significant chemotherapeutic effect and/or IL-8 gene silencing. PMID:24326457

  7. Silencing of ABCG2 by MicroRNA-3163 Inhibits Multidrug Resistance in Retinoblastoma Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ming; Wei, Zhenhua; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the function and regulation mechanism of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) in retinoblastoma cancer stem cells (RCSCs), a long-term culture of RCSCs from WERI-Rb1 cell line was successfully established based on the high expression level of ABCG2 on the surface of RCSCs. To further explore the molecular mechanism of ABCG2 on RCSCs, a microRNA that specifically targets ABCG2 was predicted. Subsequently, miR-3163 was selected and confirmed as the ABCG2-regulating microRNA. Overexpression of miR-3163 led to a significant decrease in ABCG2 expression. Additionally, ABCG2 loss-of-function induced anti-proliferation and apoptosis-promoting functions in RCSCs, and multidrug resistance to cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide was greatly improved in these cells. Our data suggest that miR-3163 has a significant impact on ABCG2 expression and can influence proliferation, apoptosis, and drug resistance in RCSCs. This work may provide new therapeutic targets for retinoblastoma. PMID:27247490

  8. Silencing of ABCG2 by MicroRNA-3163 Inhibits Multidrug Resistance in Retinoblastoma Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhenhua; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the function and regulation mechanism of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) in retinoblastoma cancer stem cells (RCSCs), a long-term culture of RCSCs from WERI-Rb1 cell line was successfully established based on the high expression level of ABCG2 on the surface of RCSCs. To further explore the molecular mechanism of ABCG2 on RCSCs, a microRNA that specifically targets ABCG2 was predicted. Subsequently, miR-3163 was selected and confirmed as the ABCG2-regulating microRNA. Overexpression of miR-3163 led to a significant decrease in ABCG2 expression. Additionally, ABCG2 loss-of-function induced anti-proliferation and apoptosis-promoting functions in RCSCs, and multidrug resistance to cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide was greatly improved in these cells. Our data suggest that miR-3163 has a significant impact on ABCG2 expression and can influence proliferation, apoptosis, and drug resistance in RCSCs. This work may provide new therapeutic targets for retinoblastoma. PMID:27247490

  9. New mouse xenograft model modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts for human multi-drug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, YAN; LIN, ZHIQIANG; FALLON, JOHN K.; ZHAO, QIANG; LIU, DAN; WANG, YONGJUN; LIU, FENG

    2015-01-01

    We developed an MDR tumor model that is modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts. Studies on proliferation of tumor cell lines including paclitaxel-sensitive and resistant cell lines were performed. The expressions of P-gp and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antigen were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Quantitative P-gp analyses of different cell lines were accomplished by nanoUPLC-MS/MS. Tumor cell colony formation assay and established xenograft model was used to investigate the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. The mouse xenograft model was developed after co-inoculation with MDR tumor cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells. There was no correlation between tumorigenesis in vivo and the growth rate of cells in vitro. The proliferation among different cell lines had no significant differences, but the P-gp expression and tumor growth in the xenograft model were fairly different. P-gp determination and α-SMA immunofluorescence staining clarified the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. It was more difficult for tumor cells with higher P-gp levels to recruit fibroblasts in vivo, resulting in lower tumorigenesis due to the lack of structural and chemical support during tumor progression. In the established paclitaxel-resistant mouse xenograft model, no obvious antitumor effect was observed after Taxol treatment, but a significant decrease in tumor size for the group treated with gemcitabine sensitive to the model. The results show that the added fibroblasts do not disturb the applicability of the model in MDR. Therefore, this mouse xenograft MDR model could serve as an effective tool for MDR research. PMID:26352907

  10. [Proteins in cancer multidrug resistance].

    PubMed

    Popęda, Marta; Płuciennik, Elżbieta; Bednarek, Andrzej K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug Resistance (MDR) is defined as insensitivity to administered medicines that are structurally unrelated and have different molecular targets. Cancers possess numerous mechanisms of drug resistance, involving various aspects of cell biology. A pivotal role in this phenomenon is played by proteins--enzymatic or structural parts of the cell. Membrane transporters, including the main members of ABC protein family--P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP, as well as LRP, which builds structure of vaults, determine the multidrug-resistant phenotype by decreasing drug concentration within the cell or modifying its distribution to intracellular compartments. The π isoform of protein enzyme--glutathione S-transferase (GSTP-1), is responsible for excessive intensity of detoxification of cytostatics. A common example of altered drug target site that does not respond to chemotherapy is topoisomerase II α (TopoIIa). Alterations of programmed cell death result from expression of metallothionein (MT)--inhibitor of the process, and cytokeratin 18 (CK18), which, if in high concentration, also prevents apoptosis of cells. Several methods of decreasing activity of these proteins have been developed, aiming to overcome MDR in cancer cells. However, for a variety of reasons, their clinical suitability is still very low, leading to continuous increase in death rate among patients. This paper presents current state of knowledge on the most important examples of proteins responsible for MDR of cancer cells and molecular mechanisms of their action. PMID:24864112

  11. A retrovirus carrying an MDR1 cDNA confers multidrug resistance and polarized expression of P-glycoprotein in MDCK cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pastan, I; Gottesman, M M; Ueda, K; Lovelace, E; Rutherford, A V; Willingham, M C

    1988-01-01

    A full-length cDNA for the human multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) has been inserted into a retroviral vector containing a murine Harvey sarcoma virus from which the viral oncogene was deleted. Ecotropic and amphotropic virus was produced after transfection of this vector into psi-2 and PA-12 packaging cell lines. This virus conferred the full phenotype of multidrug resistance on mouse and human cell lines. Viral titers of up to 2 X 10(5) drug-resistant colonies per ml were observed. Infected cells became resistant to colchicine, vinblastine, doxorubicin, VP16 (etoposide), and puromycin, but not cisplatin, indicating that the presence of the human MDR1 gene is sufficient to cause multidrug resistance. When the dog kidney cell line MDCK was infected with the MDR1 virus, P-glycoprotein was expressed in a polarized manner on the upper surface of the cells, showing that the cloned cDNA also encodes information for polarized expression of P-glycoprotein. The MDR1 virus should be useful for introducing this drug resistance gene into a variety of cell types for biological experiments in vitro and in vivo. Images PMID:2898143

  12. Yeast ABC proteins involved in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance is a complex phenomenon that involves many proteins that together create a network. One of the common mechanisms of multidrug resistance in eukaryotic cells is the active efflux of a broad range of xenobiotics through ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often used as a model to study such activity because of the functional and structural similarities of its ABC transporters to mammalian ones. Numerous ABC transporters are found in humans and some are associated with the resistance of tumors to chemotherapeutics. Efflux pump modulators that change the activity of ABC proteins are the most promising candidate drugs to overcome such resistance. These modulators can be chemically synthesized or isolated from natural sources (e.g., plant alkaloids) and might also be used in the treatment of fungal infections. There are several generations of synthetic modulators that differ in specificity, toxicity and effectiveness, and are often used for other clinical effects. PMID:24297686

  13. Epoxylathyrol Derivatives: Modulation of ABCB1-Mediated Multidrug Resistance in Human Colon Adenocarcinoma and Mouse T-Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ana M; Reis, Mariana; Duarte, Noélia; Spengler, Gabriella; Molnár, Joseph; Ferreira, Maria-José U

    2015-09-25

    Epoxyboetirane A (1), a macrocyclic diterpene that was found to be inactive as an ABCB1 modulator, was submitted to several chemical transformations, aimed at generating a series of compounds with improved multidrug resistance (MDR)-modifying activity. Overall, 23 new derivatives were prepared, in addition to the already reported epoxylathyrol (2) and methoxyboetirol (3). Their anti-MDR potential was assessed through both functional and chemosensitivity assays on resistant human colon adenocarcinoma and human ABCB1-gene transfected L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that different substitution patterns led to distinct ABCB1 inhibitory activities, although intrinsic cellular characteristics seemed to influence the modulatory behavior. A considerable enhancement in MDR-modifying activity was observed for aromatic compounds in both cell lines, particularly in 3,17-disubstituted esters derived from 3, a Payne-rearranged Michael adduct of 2. All compounds tested were revealed to interact synergistically with doxorubicin, and ATPase inhibition by three representative MDR-modifying compounds was also investigated. On account of its outstanding ABCB1 inhibitory activity at 0.2 μM and overall remarkable bioactive profile, methoxyboetirane B (22) was found to be a new promising lead for MDR-reversing anticancer drug development. PMID:26331763

  14. Reversal of multidrug resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma cells by metformin through inhibiting NF-κB gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Yang, Jun-Ling; Wang, Yi-Lang; Wang, Han; Yao, Min; Wang, Li; Gu, Juan-Juan; Cai, Yin; Shi, Yun; Yao, Deng-Fu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To interfere with the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) with metformin and explore its effect in reversing multidrug resistance (MDR) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. METHODS Expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and NF-κB in human HepG2 or HepG2/adriamycin (ADM) cells treated with pCMV-NF-κB-small interference RNA (siRNA) with or without metformin, was analyzed by Western blot or fluorescence quantitative PCR. Cell viability was tested by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry and Annexin-V-PE/7-AnnexinV apoptosis detection double staining assay, respectively. RESULTS P-gp overexpression in HepG2 and HepG2/ADM cells was closely related to mdr1 mRNA (3.310 ± 0.154) and NF-κB mRNA (2.580 ± 0.040) expression. NF-κB gene transcription was inhibited by specific siRNA with significant down-regulation of P-gp and enhanced HCC cell chemosensitivity to doxorubicin. After pretreatment with metformin, HepG2/ADM cells were sensitized to doxorubicin and P-gp was decreased through the NF-κB signaling pathway. The synergistic effect of metformin and NF-κB siRNA were found in HepG2/ADM cells with regard to proliferation inhibition, cell cycle arrest and inducing cell apoptosis. CONCLUSION Metformin via silencing NF-κB signaling could effectively reverse MDR of HCC cells by down-regulating MDR1/P-gp expression.

  15. Visual detection of multidrug resistance gene in living cell using the molecular beacon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Ma, Yi; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in tumor cells. Detection of effective prognostic biomarkers and targets are of crucial importance to the management of individualized therapies. However, quantitative analysis of the drug resistance gene had been difficult because of technical limitations. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which served as a beacon for detecting human drug resistance indicater. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5'end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The hDAuNP beacons could be taken up by living cells with low inherent cytotoxicity and higher stability. hDAuNP beacon imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy to detect the resistance gene expression. The detected fluorescence in MCF7and MCF7/ADR cells correlates with the specific drug resistance gene expression, which is consistent with the result from Q-PCR. Thus, this approach overcame many of the challenges of previous techniques by creating highly sensitive and effective intracellular probes for monitoring gene expression.

  16. Cytotoxicity of Elaoephorbia drupifera and other Cameroonian medicinal plants against drug sensitive and multidrug resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major hurdle for cancer treatment worldwide and accounts for chemotherapy failure in over 90% of patients with metastatic cancer. Evidence of the cytotoxicity of Cameroonian plants against cancer cell lines including MDR phenotypes is been intensively and progressively provided. The present work was therefore designed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the methanol extracts of twenty-two Cameroonian medicinal plants against sensitive and MDR cancer cell lines. Methods The methanol maceration was used to obtain the crude plant extracts whilst the cytotoxicity of the studied extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction assay. Results A preliminary assay on leukemia CCRF-CEM cells at 40 μg/mL shows that six of the twenty plant extract were able to enhance less than 50% of the growth proliferation of CCRF-CEM cells. These include Crinum zeylanicum (32.22%), Entada abyssinica (34.67%), Elaoephorbia drupifera (35.05%), Dioscorea bulbifera (45.88%), Eremomastax speciosa (46.07%) and Polistigma thonningii (45.11%). Among these six plants, E. drupifera showed the best activity with IC50 values below or around 30 μg/mL against the nine tested cancer cell lines. The lowest IC50 value of 8.40 μg/mL was recorded with the extract of E. drupifera against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell line. The IC50 values below 10 μg/mL were recorded with the extracts of E. drupifera against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells, C. zeylanicum against HCT116 p53+/+ and HCT116p53-/- colon cancer cells and E. abyssinica against HCT116 p53+/+ cells. Conclusion The results of the present study provide evidence of the cytotoxic potential of some Cameroonian medicinal plants and a baseline information for the potential use of Elaoephorbia drupifera in the treatment of sensitive and drug-resistant cancer cell lines. PMID:24088184

  17. B4GALT family mediates the multidrug resistance of human leukemia cells by regulating the hedgehog pathway and the expression of p-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, H; Ma, H; Wei, W; Ji, D; Song, X; Sun, J; Zhang, J; Jia, L

    2013-01-01

    β-1, 4-Galactosyltransferase gene (B4GALT) family consists of seven members, which encode corresponding enzymes known as type II membrane-bound glycoproteins. These enzymes catalyze the biosynthesis of different glycoconjugates and saccharide structures, and have been recognized to be involved in various diseases. In this study, we sought to determine the expressional profiles of B4GALT family in four pairs of parental and chemoresistant human leukemia cell lines and in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) of leukemia patients with multidrug resistance (MDR). The results revealed that B4GALT1 and B4GALT5 were highly expressed in four MDR cells and patients, altered levels of B4GALT1 and B4GALT5 were responsible for changed drug-resistant phenotype of HL60 and HL60/adriamycin-resistant cells. Further data showed that manipulation of these two gene expression led to increased or decreased activity of hedgehog (Hh) signaling and proportionally mutative expression of p-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR-associated protein 1 (MRP1) that are both known to be related to MDR. Thus, we propose that B4GALT1 and B4GALT5, two members of B4GALT gene family, are involved in the development of MDR of human leukemia cells, probably by regulating the activity of Hh signaling and the expression of P-gp and MRP1. PMID:23744354

  18. P-glycoprotein antagonists confer synergistic sensitivity to short-chain ceramide in human multidrug resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Jacqueline V.; Gouazé-Andersson, Valérie; Karimi, Ramin; Messner, Maria C; Cabot, Myles C.

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) antagonists inhibit ceramide metabolism at the juncture of glycosylation. The purpose of this study was to test whether targeting P-gp would be a viable alternative to targeting glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) for enhancing ceramide cytotoxicity. A2780 wild-type, and multidrug resistant 2780AD and NCI/ADR-RES human ovarian cancer cell lines and the cell-permeable ceramide analog, C6-ceramide (C6-cer), were employed. Compared to P-gp-poor A2780 cells, P-gp-rich 2780AD cells converted 3.7-fold more C6-cer to nontoxic C6-glucosylceramide (C6-GC), whereas cell-free GCS activities were equal. 2780AD cells displayed resistance to C6-cer (10 μM) that was reversed by inclusion of the P-gp antagonist tamoxifen (5 μM) but not by inclusion of a GCS inhibitor. Co-administration of C6-cer and P-gp antagonists was also effective in NCI/ADR-RES cells. For example, C6-cer, VX-710 (Biricodar), and cyclosporin A (cyc A) exposure resulted in viabilities of ~90% of control; however, C6-cer/VX-710 and C6-cer/cyc A additions were synergistic and resulted in viabilities of 22 and 17%, respectively. Further, whereas C6-ceramide and cyc A imparted 1.5- and zero-fold increases in caspase 3/7 activity, the combination produced a 3.5-fold increase. Although the upstream elements of cell death have not been elucidated, the novel C6-ceramide/P-gp antagonist combination merits further study and assessment of clinical translational potential. PMID:21396934

  19. Nitrogen monoxide (NO)-mediated iron release from cells is linked to NO-induced glutathione efflux via multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Ralph N.; Hawkins, Clare; Ponka, Prem; Richardson, Des R.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen monoxide (NO) plays a role in the cytotoxic mechanisms of activated macrophages against tumor cells by inducing iron (Fe) release. We have shown that NO-mediated Fe efflux from cells required glutathione (GSH), and we have hypothesized that a GS–Fe–NO complex was released. Hence, we studied the role of the GSH-conjugate transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) in NO-mediated Fe efflux. MCF7-VP cells overexpressing MRP1 exhibited a 3- to 4-fold increase in NO-mediated 59Fe and GSH efflux compared with WT cells (MCF7-WT) over 4 h. Similar results were found for other MRP1-overexpressing cell types but not those expressing another drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein. NO-mediated 59Fe and GSH efflux were temperature- and energy-dependent and were significantly decreased by the GSH-depleting agent and MRP1 transport inhibitor l-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine. Other MRP1 inhibitors, MK571, probenecid, and difloxacin, significantly inhibited NO-mediated 59Fe release. EPR spectroscopy demonstrated the dinitrosyl-dithiol-Fe complex (DNIC) peak in NO-treated cells was increased by MRP1 inhibitors, indicating inhibited DNIC transport from cells. The extent of DNIC accumulation correlated with the ability of MRP1 inhibitors to prevent NO-mediated 59Fe efflux. MCF7-VP cells were more sensitive than MCF7-WT cells to growth inhibition by effects of NO, which was potentiated by l-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine. These data indicate the importance of GSH in NO-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Collectively, NO stimulates Fe and GSH efflux from cells via MRP1. Active transport of NO by MRP1 overcomes diffusion that is inefficient and nontargeted, which has broad ramifications for understanding NO biology. PMID:16679408

  20. Modulation of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in K562 leukemic cells by indole-3-carbinol

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Annu; Seth, Kavita; Kalra, Neetu; Shukla, Yogeshwer . E-mail: yogeshwer_shukla@hotmail.com

    2005-02-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is one of the major problems in the treatment of cancer. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the mdr gene is a highly conserved protein, acts as a multidrug transporter, and has a major role in multiple drug resistance (MDR). Targeting of P-gp by naturally occurring compounds is an effective strategy to overcome MDR. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a glucosinolates present in cruciferous vegetables, is a promising chemopreventive agent as it is reported to possess antimutagenic, antitumorigenic, and antiestrogenic properties in experimental studies. In the present investigation, the potential of I3C to modulate P-gp expression was evaluated in vinblastine (VBL)-resistant K562 human leukemic cells. The resistant K562 cells (K562/R10) were found to be cross-resistant to vincristine (VCR), doxorubicin (DXR), and other antineoplastic agents. I3C at a nontoxic dose (10 x 10{sup -3} M) enhanced the cytotoxic effects of VBL time dependently in VBL-resistant human leukemia (K562/R10) cells but had no effect on parent-sensitive cells (K562/S). The Western blot analysis of K 562/R 10 cells showed that I3C downregulates the induced levels of P-gp in resistant cells near to normal levels. The quantitation of immunocytochemically stained K562/R10 cells showed 24%, 48%, and 80% decrease in the levels of P-gp by I3C for 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation. The above features thus indicate that I3C could be used as a novel modulator of P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro and may be effective as a dietary adjuvant in the treatment of MDR cancers.

  1. Differential growth inhibition of isoquinolinesulfonamides H-8 and H-7 towards multidrug-resistant P388 murine leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ido, M.; Nagao, Y.; Higashigawa, M.; Shibata, T.; Taniguchi, K.; Hamazaki, M.; Sakurai, M.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-8) and 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7) on the growth of P388 and its multidrug-resistant (MDR) variants were examined with the objective of assessing the possible changes in cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases and protein kinase C-mediated pathways associated with MDR. H-8, an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases, inhibited the growth of the parental P388 murine leukaemic cells, but not that of MDR variants up to 200 microM. However the growth of both drug-sensitive and resistant cell lines were uniformly inhibited by H-7. Both the cytotoxic and cytokinetic results revealed that the growth-inhibition by H-8 of P388 cells is mainly due to a blockade of cell-cycle progression rather than due to a killing of cells. The degree of resistance to H-8 was directly proportional to their extent of resistance to vincristine, adriamycin, and 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin-9-(4,6-O-ethylidene)-beta-D-gluco pyr anoside (VP-16) and to that of the expression of P-glycoprotein. These findings raised the possibility that P-glycoprotein might play a role in the cross-resistance to H-8. To test the hypothesis, we examined the effect of H-8 on the binding of 3H-vincristine to membrane fraction isolated from P388/VCR-600 cells and on the enhancement of cytotoxicity to anticancer drugs in MDR cells. H-8 did not have any influences on these reactions. Thus, the cross-resistance to H-8 may be mediated through a mechanism different from an overexpression of P-glycoprotein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 PMID:1684908

  2. Psoralen reverses the P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in human breast cancer MCF-7/ADR cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingru; Wang, Xiaohong; Cheng, Kai; Zhao, Wanzhong; Hua, Yitong; Xu, Chengfeng; Yang, Zhenlin

    2016-06-01

    The resistance of cancer to chemotherapeutic agents is a major obstacle during chemotherapy. Clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) is commonly mediated by membrane drug efflux pumps, including ATP‑binding cassette subfamily B member 1, also termed P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp is a membrane transporter encoded by the MDR1 gene. The current study aimed to investigate the impact of psoralen on the expression and function of P‑gp. The 10% inhibitory concentration (IC10) of psoralen, and its capacity to reduce MDR in adriamycin (ADR)‑resistant MCF‑7/ADR cells were determined using MTT assay. The ability of psoralen to modulate the transport activity of P‑gp in MCF‑7/ADR cells was evaluated by measuring the accumulation and efflux of rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) and adriamycin with flow cytometry. The present study evaluated the mRNA level of MDR1 in MCF‑7 and MCF‑7/ADR cells treated with psoralen using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression level of P‑gp was examined by western blot analysis. The current study demonstrated that the IC10 of psoralen in MCF‑7/ADR cells was 8 µg/ml. At 8 µg/ml, psoralen reduced MDR and the sensitivity of the MCF‑7/ADR cells to ADR compared with untreated cells. Additionally, psoralen significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of ADR and Rh 123. However, the IC10 of psoralen did not affect the protein expression levels of P‑gp or mRNA levels of MDR1 (P>0.05). Psoralen reduces MDR by inhibiting the efflux function of P‑gp, which may be important for increasing the efficiency of chemotherapy and improving the clinical protocols aiming to reverse P-gp-mediated MDR. PMID:27082231

  3. Effect of curcumin on human colon cancer multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei-Dong; Qin, Yong; Yang, Chuang; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether curcumin reverses the multidrug resistance of human colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: In a vincristine-resistant cell line of human colon cancer, the cell viability of curcumin-treated cells was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Rhodamine123 efflux was evaluated to detect P-glycoprotein transporter activity, and expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1 and survivin genes was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. In addition, xenograft mouse tumors were grown and treated with curcumin. The morphology of the xenografts was investigated by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The in vivo expression of the multidrug resistance gene and P-glycoprotein and survivin genes and proteins was observed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. RESULTS: Curcumin was not obviously toxic to the vincristine-resistant human colon cancer cells at concentrations less than 25 μM, but the growth of cells was significantly inhibited. At concentrations greater than 25 μM, curcumin was toxic in a concentration-dependent manner. The sensitivity of cells to vincristine, cisplatin, fluorouracil, and hydroxycamptothecin was enhanced, intracellular Rhodamine123 accumulation was increased (p<0.05), and the expression of the multidrug resistance gene and P-glycoprotein were significantly suppressed (p<0.05). The combination of curcumin and vincristine significantly inhibited xenograft growth. The expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1 and survivin genes was significantly reduced in xenografts of curcumin-treated mice and mice treated with both curcumin and vincristine relative to control mice. CONCLUSION: Curcumin has strong reversal effects on the multidrug resistance of human colon carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23778405

  4. Molecular/cytogenetic alterations accompanying the development of multidrug resistance in the J774.2 murine cell line.

    PubMed

    Slovak, M L; Lothstein, L; Horwitz, S B; Trent, J M

    1988-07-01

    Mouse macrophage-like J774.2 cells were selected for resistance to colchicine and examined by molecular/cytogenetic analysis to determine whether the acquisition of the multidrug resistant (mdr) phenotype was associated with specific chromosomal rearrangements. Cytogenetic studies of the J774.2 parental and two colchicine-resistant (CLCR) sublines--J7.Cl-30 (770-fold CLCR) and J7.Cl-100 (2500-fold CLCR)--demonstrated specific numeric and structural karyotypic alterations accompanying the emergence of mdr. The parental cells demonstrated a modal chromosome number of 63, while the modal number of the J7.Cl-30 subline was 53. The most striking difference between the parental and J7.Cl-30 subline was the presence of an average of 60 double minutes (DMs) per cell in the CLCR cells. The 2500-fold resistant J7.Cl-100 subline displayed a modal number of 50, which included structural rearrangements involving chromosomes 2 and 7 and concomitant replacement of DMs by a homogeneously staining region (HSR). Southern blotting analysis demonstrated a approximately 35-fold amplification of P-glycoprotein homologous sequences in the J7.Cl-30 subline and approximately 70-fold amplification in the J7.Cl-100 subline. Chromosomal in situ hybridization localized the amplified P-glycoprotein sequences to DMs (J7.Cl-30) and the HSR (J7.Cl-100) in these CLCR sublines. Our results suggest that CLCR in J774.2 cells results from overexpression of P-glycoprotein via gene amplification which was accompanied by chromosomal evolution from DMs to an HSR. PMID:2899184

  5. Consequences of cell-to-cell P-glycoprotein transfer on acquired multidrug resistance in breast cancer: a cell population dynamics model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer is a proliferation disease affecting a genetically unstable cell population, in which molecular alterations can be somatically inherited by genetic, epigenetic or extragenetic transmission processes, leading to a cooperation of neoplastic cells within tumoural tissue. The efflux protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is overexpressed in many cancer cells and has known capacity to confer multidrug resistance to cytotoxic therapies. Recently, cell-to-cell P-gp transfers have been shown. Herein, we combine experimental evidence and a mathematical model to examine the consequences of an intercellular P-gp trafficking in the extragenetic transfer of multidrug resistance from resistant to sensitive cell subpopulations. Methodology and Principal Findings We report cell-to-cell transfers of functional P-gp in co-cultures of a P-gp overexpressing human breast cancer MCF-7 cell variant, selected for its resistance towards doxorubicin, with the parental sensitive cell line. We found that P-gp as well as efflux activity distribution are progressively reorganized over time in co-cultures analyzed by flow cytometry. A mathematical model based on a Boltzmann type integro-partial differential equation structured by a continuum variable corresponding to P-gp activity describes the cell populations in co-culture. The mathematical model elucidates the population elements in the experimental data, specifically, the initial proportions, the proliferative growth rates, and the transfer rates of P-gp in the sensitive and resistant subpopulations. Conclusions We confirmed cell-to-cell transfer of functional P-gp. The transfer process depends on the gradient of P-gp expression in the donor-recipient cell interactions, as they evolve over time. Extragenetically acquired drug resistance is an additional aptitude of neoplastic cells which has implications in the diagnostic value of P-gp expression and in the design of chemotherapy regimens. Reviewers This article was reviewed by

  6. pH-Responsive therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles for reducing P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux of multidrug resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Wen-Chia; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Liu, Te-I; Shen, Ming-Yin; Hsu, Yuan-Hung; Lin, Sung-Chyr; Chiu, Hsin-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel pH-responsive cholesterol-PEG adduct-coated solid lipid nanoparticles (C-PEG-SLNs) carrying doxorubicin (DOX) capable of overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) breast cancer cells is presented. The DOX-loaded SLNs have a mean hydrodynamic diameter of ~100 nm and a low polydispersity index (under 0.20) with a high drug-loading efficiency ranging from 80.8% to 90.6%. The in vitro drug release profiles show that the DOX-loaded SLNs exhibit a pH-controlled drug release behavior with the maximum and minimum unloading percentages of 63.4% at pH 4.7 and 25.2% at pH 7.4, respectively. The DOX-loaded C-PEG-SLNs displayed a superior ability in inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7/MDR cells. At a DOX concentration of 80 μM, the cell viabilities treated with C-PEG-SLNs were approximately one-third of the group treated with free DOX. The inhibition activity of C-PEG-SLNs could be attributed to the transport of C-PEG to cell membrane, leading to the change of the composition of the cell membrane and thus the inhibition of permeability glycoprotein activity. This hypothesis is supported by the confocal images showing the accumulation of DOX in the nuclei of cancer cells and the localization of C-PEG on the cell membranes. The results of in vivo study further demonstrated that the DOX delivered by the SLNs accumulates predominantly in tumor via enhanced permeability and retention effect, the enhanced passive tumor accumulation due to the loose intercellular junctions of endothelial cells lining inside blood vessels at tumor site, and the lack of lymphatic drainage. The growth of MCF-7/MDR xenografted tumor on Balb/c nude mice was inhibited to ~400 mm3 in volume as compared with the free DOX treatment group, 1,140 mm3, and the group treated with 1,2 distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)] solid lipid nanoparticles, 820 mm3. Analysis of the body weight of nude mice and the histology of organs and tumor after the

  7. pH-Responsive therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles for reducing P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux of multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Wen-Chia; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Liu, Te-I; Shen, Ming-Yin; Hsu, Yuan-Hung; Lin, Sung-Chyr; Chiu, Hsin-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel pH-responsive cholesterol-PEG adduct-coated solid lipid nanoparticles (C-PEG-SLNs) carrying doxorubicin (DOX) capable of overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) breast cancer cells is presented. The DOX-loaded SLNs have a mean hydrodynamic diameter of ~100 nm and a low polydispersity index (under 0.20) with a high drug-loading efficiency ranging from 80.8% to 90.6%. The in vitro drug release profiles show that the DOX-loaded SLNs exhibit a pH-controlled drug release behavior with the maximum and minimum unloading percentages of 63.4% at pH 4.7 and 25.2% at pH 7.4, respectively. The DOX-loaded C-PEG-SLNs displayed a superior ability in inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7/MDR cells. At a DOX concentration of 80 μM, the cell viabilities treated with C-PEG-SLNs were approximately one-third of the group treated with free DOX. The inhibition activity of C-PEG-SLNs could be attributed to the transport of C-PEG to cell membrane, leading to the change of the composition of the cell membrane and thus the inhibition of permeability glycoprotein activity. This hypothesis is supported by the confocal images showing the accumulation of DOX in the nuclei of cancer cells and the localization of C-PEG on the cell membranes. The results of in vivo study further demonstrated that the DOX delivered by the SLNs accumulates predominantly in tumor via enhanced permeability and retention effect, the enhanced passive tumor accumulation due to the loose intercellular junctions of endothelial cells lining inside blood vessels at tumor site, and the lack of lymphatic drainage. The growth of MCF-7/MDR xenografted tumor on Balb/c nude mice was inhibited to ~400 mm(3) in volume as compared with the free DOX treatment group, 1,140 mm(3), and the group treated with 1,2 distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)] solid lipid nanoparticles, 820 mm(3). Analysis of the body weight of nude mice and the histology of organs and tumor after the

  8. An Inactivated Antibiotic-Exposed Whole-Cell Vaccine Enhances Bactericidal Activities Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Meng-Hooi; MatRahim, NorAziyah; NorAmdan, NurAsyura; Pang, Sui-Ping; Hashim, Sharina H.; Phoon, Wai-Hong; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination may be an alternative treatment for infection with multidrug-resistance (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. The study reported here evaluated the bactericidal antibody responses following immunization of mice using an inactivated whole-cell vaccine derived from antibiotic-exposed MDR A. baumannii (I-M28-47-114). Mice inoculated with I-M28-47 (non-antibiotic-exposed control) and I-M28-47-114 showed a high IgG antibody response by day 5 post-inoculation. Sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47-114 collected on day 30 resulted in 80.7 ± 12.0% complement-mediated bacteriolysis in vitro of the test MDR A. baumannii treated with imipenem, which was a higher level of bacteriolysis over sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47. Macrophage-like U937 cells eliminated 49.3 ± 11.6% of the test MDR A. baumannii treated with imipenem when opsonized with sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47-114, which was a higher level of elimination than observed for test MDR A. baumannii opsonized with sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47. These results suggest that vaccination with I-M28-47-114 stimulated antibody responses capable of mounting high bactericidal killing of MDR A. baumannii. Therefore, the inactivated antibiotic-exposed whole-cell vaccine (I-M28-47-114) has potential for development as a candidate vaccine for broad clearance and protection against MDR A. baumannii infections. PMID:26923424

  9. An Inactivated Antibiotic-Exposed Whole-Cell Vaccine Enhances Bactericidal Activities Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Shu, Meng-Hooi; MatRahim, NorAziyah; NorAmdan, NurAsyura; Pang, Sui-Ping; Hashim, Sharina H; Phoon, Wai-Hong; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination may be an alternative treatment for infection with multidrug-resistance (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. The study reported here evaluated the bactericidal antibody responses following immunization of mice using an inactivated whole-cell vaccine derived from antibiotic-exposed MDR A. baumannii (I-M28-47-114). Mice inoculated with I-M28-47 (non-antibiotic-exposed control) and I-M28-47-114 showed a high IgG antibody response by day 5 post-inoculation. Sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47-114 collected on day 30 resulted in 80.7 ± 12.0% complement-mediated bacteriolysis in vitro of the test MDR A. baumannii treated with imipenem, which was a higher level of bacteriolysis over sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47. Macrophage-like U937 cells eliminated 49.3 ± 11.6% of the test MDR A. baumannii treated with imipenem when opsonized with sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47-114, which was a higher level of elimination than observed for test MDR A. baumannii opsonized with sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47. These results suggest that vaccination with I-M28-47-114 stimulated antibody responses capable of mounting high bactericidal killing of MDR A. baumannii. Therefore, the inactivated antibiotic-exposed whole-cell vaccine (I-M28-47-114) has potential for development as a candidate vaccine for broad clearance and protection against MDR A. baumannii infections. PMID:26923424

  10. Dielectrophoretic Microfluidic Chip Enables Single-Cell Measurements for Multidrug Resistance in Heterogeneous Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Khamenehfar, Avid; Gandhi, Maher K; Chen, Yuchun; Hogge, Donna E; Li, Paul C H

    2016-06-01

    The front-line treatment for adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is anthracycline-based combination chemotherapy. However, treatment outcomes remain suboptimal with relapses frequently observed. Among the mechanisms of treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the ABCB1, ABCC1, and ABCG2 drug-efflux transporters. Although genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity between leukemic blast cells is a well-recognized phenomenon, there remains minimal data on differences in MDR activity at the individual cell level. Specifically, functional assays that can distinguish the variability in MDR activity between individual leukemic blasts are lacking. Here, we outline a new dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip-based assay. This assay permits measurement of drug accumulation in single cells, termed same-single-cell analysis in the accumulation mode (SASCA-A). Initially, the assay was optimized in pretherapy samples from 20 adults with AML whose leukemic blasts had MDR activity against the anthracyline daunorubicin (DNR) tested using multiple MDR inhibitors. Parameters tested were initial drug accumulation, time to achieve signal saturation, fold-increase of DNR accumulation with MDR inhibition, ease of cell trapping, and ease of maintaining the trapped cells stationary. This enabled categorization into leukemic blast cells with MDR activity (MDR(+)) and leukemic blast cells without MDR activity (MDR(-ve)). Leukemic blasts could also be distinguished from benign white blood cells (notably these also lacked MDR activity). MDR(-ve) blasts were observed to be enriched in samples taken from patients who went on to enter complete remission (CR), whereas MDR(+) blasts were frequently observed in patients who failed to achieve CR following front-line chemotherapy. However, pronounced variability in functional MDR activity between leukemic blasts was observed, with MDR(+) cells not infrequently seen in some patients that went on to achieve CR. Next, we tested MDR activity in two

  11. Osthole shows the potential to overcome P-glycoprotein‑mediated multidrug resistance in human myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Chen, Jie-Ru; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie

    2016-06-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) has been reported to play a pivotal role in tumor chemotherapy failure. Study after study has illustrated that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling cascade is involved in the MDR phenotype and is correlated with P-gp expression in many human malignancies. In the present study, osthole, an O-methylated coumarin, exhibited potent reversal capability of MDR in myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells. Simultaneously, the uptake and efflux of Rhodamine-123 (Rh-123) and the accumulation of doxorubicin assays combined with flow cytometric analysis suggested that osthole could increase intracellular drug accumulation. Furthermore, osthole decreased the expression of multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) at both the mRNA and protein levels. Further experiments elucidated that osthole could suppress P-gp expression by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway which might be the main mechanism accounting for the reversal potential of osthole in the MDR in K562/ADM cells. In conclusion, osthole combats MDR and could be a promising candidate for the development of novel MDR reversal modulators. PMID:27109742

  12. Co-encapsulation of chrysophsin-1 and epirubicin in PEGylated liposomes circumvents multidrug resistance in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Li; Tu, Wei-Chen

    2015-12-01

    Chrysophsin-1, an amphipathic alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide, is isolated from the gills of the red sea bream and possesses different structure and mechanism(s) in comparison with traditional multidrug resistance (MDR) modulators. For the purpose of reducing off-target normal cell toxicity, it is rational to incorporate chrysophsin-1 and epirubicin in a PEGylated liposomal formulation. In the present study, we report a multifunctional liposomes with epirubicin as an antineoplastic agent and an apoptosis inducer, as well as chrysophsin-1 as a MDR transporter inhibitor and an apoptosis modulator in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Co-incubation of HeLa cells with PEGylated liposomal formulation of epirubicin and chrysophsin-1 resulted in a significant increase in the cytotoxicity of epirubicin. The liposomal formulations of epirubicin and/or chrysophsin-1 were shown to considerably improve the intracellular H2O2 and O2(-) levels of HeLa cells. Furthermore, these treatments were found to extensively reduce mRNA expression levels of MDR1, MRP1, and MRP2. The addition of chrysophsin-1 in liposomes was demonstrated to substantially enhance the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in HeLa cells. Moreover, the PEGylated liposomes of epirubicin and chrysophsin-1 were also found to significantly increase the mRNA expressions of p53, Bax, and Bcl-2. The ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 was noticeably amplified in the presence of these formulations. Apoptosis induction was also validated by chromatin condensation, a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, the increased sub-G1 phase of cell cycle, and more populations of apoptosis using annexin V/PI assay. These formulations were verified to increase the activity and mRNA expression levels of caspase-9 and caspases-3. Collectively, our findings provide the first evidence that cotreatment with free or liposomal chrysophsin-1 and epirubicin leads to cell death in human cervical cancer cells through the ROS

  13. Nuclear Multidrug Resistance-Related Protein 1 Is Highly Associated with Better Prognosis of Human Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma through the Suppression of Cell Proliferation, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang-Liang; Zhao, Jin-Long; Liu, Yuan; Wu, Jun-Zheng; Liu, Yan-Pu; Yu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1) overexpression is a well acknowledged predictor of poor response to chemotherapy, but MRP1 also correlated to better prognosis in some reports, especially for patients not pretreated with chemotherapy. In our previous study, we found nuclear translocation of MRP1 in mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) for the first time. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the function of nuclear MRP1 in MEC. Materials and Methods Human MEC tissue samples of 125 patients were selected and stained using immunohistochemistry. The expression level of total MRP1/nuclear MRP1 of each sample was evaluated by expression index (EI) which was scored using both qualitative and quantitative analysis. The correlations between the clinicopathologic parameters and the EI of nuclear MRP1 were analyzed using Spearman’s rank correlation analysis, respectively. The effects of RNAi-mediated downregulation of nuclear MRP1 on MEC cells were assessed using flow cytometric analysis, MTT assay, plate colony formation assay, transwell invasion assay and monolayer wound healing assay. Results In this study, we found the EI of nuclear MRP1 was negatively correlated to the pathologic grading (r = -0.498, P<0.01) / clinical staging (r = -0.41, P<0.01) / tumor stage (r = -0.28, P = 0.02) / nodal stage (r = -0.29, P<0.01) of MEC patients. The RNAi-mediated downregulation of nuclear MRP1 further proved that the downregulation of nuclear MRP1 could increase the cell replication, growth speed, colony formation efficiency, migration and invasion ability of MEC cells. Conclusion Our results suggested that nuclear MRP1 is highly associated with better prognosis of human mucoepidermoid carcinoma and further study of its function mechanism would provide clues in developing new treatment modalities of MEC. PMID:26829120

  14. Tumor hypoxia, the Warburg effect, and multidrug resistance: Modulation of hypoxia induced MDR using EGFR-targeted polymer blend nanocarriers for combination paclitaxel/lonidamine therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabr-Milane, Lara Scheherazade

    Multi-drug resistant (MDR) cancer is a significant clinical obstacle and is often implicated in cases of recurrent, non-responsive disease. The biological focus of this work is to explore the relationship between the hypoxic microenvironment of a tumor, the development of MDR, and the energetic profile characteristic of the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis). The therapeutic aim of this research is to develop an EGFR-targeted nanocarrier system for combination (paclitaxel/lonidamine) therapy for the treatment of MDR cancer. The stability of the nanocarrier formulation was validated in vitro and the system was characterized for drug release kinetics, size, surface modification, and EGFR-targeting ability. An orthotopic animal model of hypoxic, MDR breast cancer was developed for the pre-clinical evaluation of this system. The EGFR-targeted nanoparticles loaded with lonidamine and paclitaxel demonstrated superior pharmacokinetic parameters relative to non-targeted nanoparticles and drug solution. Combination therapy with lonidamine and paclitaxel, in solution and EGFR-targeted nanoparticle form, was more effective at suppressing tumor growth than single agent treatment. However, combination therapy with EGFR-targeted nanoparticles was less toxic than treatment with drug solution. Combination therapy did change the MDR and hypoxic character of the tumors as demonstrated by a decrease in marker proteins. This EGFR-targeted combination nanocarrier therapy has the potential to make the successful treatment of MDR a clinical reality.

  15. Deletions of multidrug resistance gene loci in breast cancer leads to the down-regulation of its expression and predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Litviakov, Nikolai V.; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V.; Tsyganov, Matvey M.; Slonimskaya, Elena M.; Ibragimova, Marina K.; Kazantseva, Polina V.; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Choinzonov, Eugeniy L.

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is intensively used for the treatment of primary breast cancer. In our previous studies, we reported that clinical tumor response to NAC is associated with the change of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expression in tumors after chemotherapy. In this study we performed a combined analysis of MDR gene locus deletions in tumor DNA, MDR gene expression and clinical response to NAC in 73 BC patients. Copy number variations (CNVs) in biopsy specimens were tested using high-density microarray platform CytoScanTM HD Array (Affymetrix, USA). 75%–100% persons having deletions of MDR gene loci demonstrated the down-regulation of MDR gene expression. Expression of MDR genes was 2–8 times lower in patients with deletion than in patients having no deletion only in post-NAC tumors samples but not in tumor tissue before chemotherapy. All patients with deletions of ABCB1 ABCB 3 ABCC5 gene loci – 7q21.1, 6p21.32, 3q27 correspondingly, and most patients having deletions in ABCC1 (16p13.1), ABCC2 (10q24), ABCG1 (21q22.3), ABCG2 (4q22.1), responded favorably to NAC. The analysis of all CNVs, including both amplification and deletion showed that the frequency of 13q14.2 deletion was 85% among patients bearing tumor with the deletion at least in one MDR gene locus versus 9% in patients with no deletions. Differences in the frequency of 13q14.2 deletions between the two groups were statistically significant (p = 2.03 ×10−11, Fisher test, Bonferroni-adjusted p = 1.73 × 10−8). In conclusion, our study for the first time demonstrates that deletion MDR gene loci can be used as predictive marker for tumor response to NAC. PMID:26799285

  16. Arsenite-loaded nanoparticles inhibit PARP-1 to overcome multidrug resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Zongjun; Chi, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Huang, Dengtong; Jin, Jianbin; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the highest incidences in cancers; however, traditional chemotherapy often suffers from low efficiency caused by drug resistance. Herein, we report an arsenite-loaded dual-drug (doxorubicin and arsenic trioxide, i.e., DOX and ATO) nanomedicine system (FeAsOx@SiO2-DOX, Combo NP) with significant drug synergy and pH-triggered drug release for effective treatment of DOX resistant HCC cells (HuH-7/ADM). This nano-formulation Combo NP exhibits the synergistic effect of DNA damage by DOX along with DNA repair interference by ATO, which results in unprecedented killing efficiency on DOX resistant cancer cells. More importantly, we explored the possible mechanism is that the activity of PARP-1 is inhibited by ATO during the treatment of Combo NP, which finally induces apoptosis of HuH-7/ADM cells by poly (ADP-ribosyl) ation suppression and DNA lesions accumulation. This study provides a smart drug delivery strategy to develop a novel synergistic combination therapy for effectively overcome drug- resistant cancer cells. PMID:27484730

  17. Constitutive expression of multidrug resistance in human colorectal tumours and cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, R.; Weber, T. K.; Morse, B.; Arceci, R.; Staniunas, R.; Steele, G.; Summerhayes, I. C.

    1993-01-01

    In this study we report detection of mdr1 gene expression in the liver metastases of 7/11 patients with colon carcinoma and characterise the MDR phenotype associated with a panel of 19 human colon carcinoma cell lines. Within this panel, mdr1 mRNA biosynthesis and surface localisation of Pgp were assessed with respect to MDR functionality where the cell lines are representative of different clinical stages of tumour progression, metastatic potential and differentiation. The data indicates that constitutive levels of mdr1 mRNA/Pgp expression may not necessarily result in the functional expression of the MDR phenotype. While low levels of mdr1 mRNA/Pgp were detected in 5/8 well differentiated colon cell lines, only 2/8 were functionally MDR. In contrast, 10/11 moderate and poorly differentiated lines expressed mdr1 mRNA/Pgp and of these, 9/11 were functionally MDR. The phosphorylation status of the mature 170 kD P-glycoprotein and the surface localisation of this glycoprotein showed the strongest correlation with functionality. Analysis of cell lines for cross-resistance and chemosensitivity profiles against a battery of chemotherapeutic drugs suggests multiple mechanisms, in addition to Pgp, contribute to the overall resistance of colorectal cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8098614

  18. Arsenite-loaded nanoparticles inhibit PARP-1 to overcome multidrug resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Zongjun; Chi, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Huang, Dengtong; Jin, Jianbin; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the highest incidences in cancers; however, traditional chemotherapy often suffers from low efficiency caused by drug resistance. Herein, we report an arsenite-loaded dual-drug (doxorubicin and arsenic trioxide, i.e., DOX and ATO) nanomedicine system (FeAsOx@SiO2-DOX, Combo NP) with significant drug synergy and pH-triggered drug release for effective treatment of DOX resistant HCC cells (HuH-7/ADM). This nano-formulation Combo NP exhibits the synergistic effect of DNA damage by DOX along with DNA repair interference by ATO, which results in unprecedented killing efficiency on DOX resistant cancer cells. More importantly, we explored the possible mechanism is that the activity of PARP-1 is inhibited by ATO during the treatment of Combo NP, which finally induces apoptosis of HuH-7/ADM cells by poly (ADP-ribosyl) ation suppression and DNA lesions accumulation. This study provides a smart drug delivery strategy to develop a novel synergistic combination therapy for effectively overcome drug- resistant cancer cells. PMID:27484730

  19. Molecular basis of preferential resistance to colchicine in multidrug-resistant human cells conferred by Gly-185 yields Val-185 substitution in P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Safa, A.R.; Stern, R.K.; Choi, Kyunghee; Agresti, M.; Tamai, Ikumi; Mehta, N.D.; Roninson, I.B. )

    1990-09-01

    Expression of P-glycoprotein, encoded by the human MDR1 gene, results in cross-resistance to many lipophilic cytotoxic drugs (multidrug resistance). P-glycoprotein is believed to function as an energy-dependent efflux pump that is responsible for decreased drug accumulation in multidrug-resistant cells. Previous work showed that preferential resistance to colchicine in a colchicine-selected multidrug-resistant cell line was caused by spontaneous mutations in the MDR1 gene that resulted in a Gly-185 {yields} Val-185 substitution in P-glycoprotein. The authors have now compared transfectant cell lines expressing the wild-type Gly-185 or the mutant Val-185 P-glycoprotein with regard to their levels of resistance to and accumulation and binding of different drugs. In cells expressing the mutant protein, increased resistance to colchicine and decreased resistance to vinblastine correlated with a decreased accumulation of colchicine and increased accumulation of vinblastine. Expression of the mutant P-glycoprotein also resulted in significantly increased resistance to epipodophyllotoxin and decreased resistance to vincristine and actinomycin D; smaller changes in resistance were observed for several other drugs. Unexpectedly, the mutant P-glycoprotein showed increased binding of photoactive analogs of vinblastine and verapamil and the photoactive compound azidopine and decreased binding of a photoactive colchicine analog. These results suggest that the Gly-185 {yields} Val-185 substitution affects not the initial drug-binding site of P-glycoprotein but another site, associated with the release of P-glycoprotein-bound drugs to the outside of the cell.

  20. Synthesis and study of cytotoxic activity of 1,2,4-trioxane- and egonol-derived hybrid molecules against Plasmodium falciparum and multidrug-resistant human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Christoph; Capcı Karagöz, Aysun; Fröhlich, Tony; Klein, Volker; Zeino, Maen; Viertel, Katrin; Held, Jana; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Emirdağ Öztürk, Safiye; Anıl, Hüseyin; Efferth, Thomas; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2014-03-21

    Malaria and cancer cause the death of millions of people every year. To combat these two diseases, it is important that new pharmaceutically active compounds have the ability to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer and Plasmodium falciparum strains. In search of effective anti-cancer and anti-malaria hybrids that possess improved properties compared to their parent compounds, a series of novel 1,2,4-trioxane-based hybrids incorporating egonol and/or ferrocene fragments were synthesized and tested in vitro against P. falciparum strains, CCRF-CEM cells and the multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein-over-expressing CEM/ADR5000 cells. The most active compounds against P. falciparum strains were artesunic acid homodimers 12 and 13 (IC50 of 0.32 and 0.30 nM, respectively), whereas novel hybrids 7 (1,2,4-trioxane-ferrocene-egonol), 9 (1,2,4-trioxane-ferrocene) and 11 (artesunic acid-egonol) showed a remarkable cytotoxicity toward CCRF-CEM cells (IC50 of 0.07, 0.25 and 0.18 μM, respectively). A cooperative and synergistic effect of the three moieties 1,2,4-trioxane, ferrocene and egonol in hybrid molecule 7 is significant and is obviously stronger than in hybrids 9 (1,2,4-trioxane-ferrocene) and 11 (artesunic acid-egonol), which comprises of only two of the three considered parent compounds. Interestingly, hybrid 9 containing a 1,2,4-trioxane and a ferrocene fragment has shown to be the most effective among the studied hybrids against the tested multidrug-resistant leukemia CEM/ADR5000 cells (IC50 of 0.57 μM) and possesses a degree of cross-resistance of 2.34. PMID:24561670

  1. MicroRNA-199a targets CD44 to suppress the tumorigenicity and multidrug resistance of ovarian cancer-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weiwei; Liu, Te; Wan, Xiaoping; Gao, Yongtao; Wang, Hui

    2012-06-01

    In ovarian cancer, CD44(+) /CD117(+) stem cells, also known as cancer-initiating cells (CICs), are highly proliferative, have a low degree of differentiation, and are resistant to chemotherapeutics. Therefore, the CD44(+) /CD117(+) subpopulation is thought to be an important target for novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated the role of microRNA-199a (miR-199a) in ovarian cancer stem cells. Luciferase reporter gene assays confirmed that miR-199a targets CD44 via an miR-199a-binding site in the 3'-UTR. CD44(+) /CD117(+) ovarian CICs were enriched from human primary ovarian tumor tissues and confirmed by flow cytometric sorting. miR-199a was cloned and transfected into ovarian CICs. CD44 mRNA and protein expression was significantly decreased in miR-199a-transfected ovarian CICs as compared with miR-199a mutant-transfected and untransfected cells. Cell cycle analysis, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide proliferation assays, the colony formation assay and the transwell migration assay indicated that miR-199a significantly affected cell cycle regulation and suppressed the proliferation and invasive capacity of ovarian CICs in vitro. miR-199a significantly increased the chemosensitivity of ovarian CICs to cisplatin, pacitaxel, and adriamycin, and reduced mRNA expression of the multidrug resistance gene ABCG2 as compared with miR-199a mutant-transfected and untransfected cells. The expression of stemness markers was also significantly reduced in miR-199a-transfected CICs as compared with miR-199a mutant-transfected and untransfected ovarian cells. Furthermore, xenograft experiments confirmed that miR-199a suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors formed by ovarian CICs in vivo. Thus, expression of endogenous mature miR-199a may prevent tumorigenesis in human ovarian cancer by regulating expression of its target gene CD44. PMID:22498306

  2. Zosuquidar and an albumin-binding prodrug of zosuquidar reverse multidrug resistance in breast cancer cells of doxorubicin and an albumin-binding prodrug of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Abu Ajaj, Khalid; Graeser, Ralph; Kratz, Felix

    2012-07-01

    The P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a 170-kDa protein that acts as an energy dependent, transmembrane efflux pump and is encoded by the MDR1 gene. It has been shown to be responsible for multidrug resistance (MDR) in a defined subpopulation of breast cancer patients and thus represents a molecular target for circumventing MDR in this tumor indication. MDR modulators have been developed and demonstrated high selectivity for P-gp with inhibitory activities in the low nanomolar range. Although some objective responses were achieved in clinical trials, combination therapy with these MDR modulators, such as Ca2+ antagonists caused unacceptable toxicity. Targeting P-gp inhibitors to the tumor site is a mean to increase their therapeutic index, and in this context binding of tailor-made prodrugs to circulating albumin is an established technology to reduce the toxicity and enhance the efficacy of anticancer drugs. In this study, we consequently developed an acid-sensitive albumin-binding prodrug of the P-gp inhibitor zosuquidar (LY335979) in a two-step synthesis using a maleimide hydrazone linker system established in our laboratory that first introduces acetylbenzoic acid at the HO-group of zosuquidar followed by derivatization with 6-maleimidocaproyl hydrazide to form the acid-sensitive hydrazone bond. The maleimide group enables the prodrug to bind rapidly and selectively to the cysteine-34 position of endogenous albumin after intravenous administration. HPLC analysis demonstrated rapid albumin binding of the zosuquidar prodrug as well as the quantitative release of the acetylbenzoic ester derivative of zosuquidar at pH 5.0. Subsequently, its ability to circumvent MDR was tested in two doxorubicin-resistant breast carcinoma cell lines (MCF-7/ADR and MT-3/ADR). The MDR status of these cell lines can be reversed by zosuquidar which was confirmed in a rhodamine 123 assay using fluorescence microscopy and FACS analysis. Furthermore, zosuquidar as well its acid-sensitive albumin

  3. Clitocine Reversal of P-Glycoprotein Associated Multi-Drug Resistance through Down-Regulation of Transcription Factor NF-κB in R-HepG2 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianguo; Yeung, Chilam Au; Co, Ngai Na; Tsang, Tsun Yee; Yau, Esmond; Luo, Kewang; Wu, Ping; Wa, Judy Chan Yuet; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Kwok, Tim-Tak; Liu, Feiyan

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance(MDR)is one of the major reasons for failure in cancer chemotherapy and its suppression may increase the efficacy of therapy. The human multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene encodes the plasma membrane P-glycoprotein (P-gp) that pumps various anti-cancer agents out of the cancer cell. R-HepG2 and MES-SA/Dx5 cells are doxorubicin induced P-gp over-expressed MDR sublines of human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells and human uterine carcinoma MES-SA cells respectively. Herein, we observed that clitocine, a natural compound extracted from Leucopaxillus giganteus, presented similar cytotoxicity in multidrug resistant cell lines compared with their parental cell lines and significantly suppressed the expression of P-gp in R-HepG2 and MES-SA/Dx5 cells. Further study showed that the clitocine increased the sensitivity and intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin in R-HepG2 cells accompanying down-regulated MDR1 mRNA level and promoter activity, indicating the reversal effect of MDR by clitocine. A 5′-serial truncation analysis of the MDR1 promoter defined a region from position −450 to −193 to be critical for clitocine suppression of MDR1. Mutation of a consensus NF-κB binding site in the defined region and overexpression of NF-κB p65 could offset the suppression effect of clitocine on MDR1 promoter. By immunohistochemistry, clitocine was confirmed to suppress the protein levels of both P-gp and NF-κB p65 in R-HepG2 cells and tumors. Clitocine also inhibited the expression of NF-κB p65 in MES-SA/Dx5. More importantly, clitocine could suppress the NF-κB activation even in presence of doxorubicin. Taken together; our results suggested that clitocine could reverse P-gp associated MDR via down-regulation of NF-κB. PMID:22927901

  4. Reconstituted high density lipoprotein mediated targeted co-delivery of HZ08 and paclitaxel enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel in multidrug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangrong; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xu, Xiangting; Li, Min; Zhou, Jianping; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-20

    In the past decades, reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) has been successfully developed as a drug carrier since the enhanced HDL-lipids uptake is demonstrated in several human cancers. In this paper, rHDL, for the first time, was utilized to co-encapsulate two hydrophobic drugs: an anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), and a new reversal agent for P-gp (P-glycoprotein)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer, N-cyano-1-[(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-N'-octyl-2(1H)-isoquinoline-carboximidamide (HZ08). We proposed this drug co-delivery strategy to reverse PTX resistance. The study aimed to develop a biomimetic nanovector, reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL), mediating targeted PTX-HZ08 delivery for cancer therapy. Using sodium cholate dialysis method, we successfully formulated dual-agent co-delivering rHDL nanoparticles (PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs) with a typical spherical morphology, well-distributed size (~100nm), high drug encapsulation efficiency (approximately 90%), sustained drug release properties and exceptional stability even after storage for 1month or incubation in 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) DMEM for up to 2days. Results demonstrated that PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs significantly enhanced anticancer efficacy in vitro, including higher cytotoxicity and better ability to induce cell apoptosis against both PTX-sensitive and -resistant MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MCF-7/PTX cells). Mechanism studies demonstrated that these improvements could be correlated with increased cellular uptake of PTX mediated by scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) as well as prolonged intracellular retention of PTX due to the HZ08 mediated drug-efflux inhibition. In addition, in vivo investigation showed that the PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs were substantially safer, have higher tumor-targeted capacity and have stronger antitumor activity than the corresponding dosage of paclitaxel injection. These findings suggested that rHDL NPs could

  5. Design, synthesis and evaluation of the multidrug resistance-reversing activity of pyridine acid esters of podophyllotoxin in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Fan; Zhang, Zeguo; Chen, Yongzheng; Lin, Ya; Wang, Jing

    2016-09-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main cause for chemotherapeutic failure in cancer treatment. To overcome MDR, a serious of pyridine acid esters of podophyllotoxin was synthesized and their antiproliferation activities were evaluated against two human chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines in vitro. Most of them exhibited potent growth inhibition with IC50 values in the nanomolar range as well as markedly reduced resistance factors. The most potent compound, Y8 exhibited an IC50 of 0.046±0.003μM against resistance K562/ADR cells, showing more significant than that of adriamycin and etoposide, respectively. Furthermore, Y8 efficiently triggered cell cycle arrest at S phase and simultaneously induced apoptosis in K562/ADR cells. Meanwhile, Y8 also regulated the expression levels of cell cycle- and apoptosis-related proteins. Additionally, Y8 stimulated the ERK1/2 signalling and reduced the expression of Pgp protein. Finally, on the basis of results obtained using U0126, an ERK1/2 inhibitor, the ERK1/2 signalling pathway was proposed for the multidrug resistance-reversing effect of Y8 in K562/ADR cells. Together, Y8 could be a novel potential MDR reversal agent for the treatment of drug-resistant leukemia. PMID:27503681

  6. The Effects and Molecular Mechanisms of MiR-106a in Multidrug Resistance Reversal in Human Glioma U87/DDP and U251/G Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Zhenlian; Chu, LinYang; Li, Xu; Kan, Pengcheng; Xin, Xin; Zhu, Yu; Yang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy resistance is one of the major obstacles to effective glioma therapy. Currently, the mechanism underlying chemotherapy resistance is unclear. A recent study showed that miR-106a is an important molecule involved in chemotherapy resistance. To explore the effects and mechanisms of miR-106a on multidrug resistance reversal in human glioma cells, we silenced miR-106a expression in the cisplatin-resistant U87 (U87/DDP) and the gefitinib-resistant U251 (U251/G) glioma cell lines and measured the resulting drug sensitivity, cell apoptosis rate and rhodamine 123 content. In addition, we detected decreased expression of P-glycoprotein, MDR1, MRP1, GST-π, CDX2, ERCC1, RhoE, Bcl-2, Survivin and Topo-II, as well as reduced production of IL-6, IL-8 and TGF-β in these cell lines. Furthermore, we found decreased expression of p-AKT and transcriptional activation of NF-κB, Twist, AP-1 and Snail in these cell lines. These results suggest that miR-106a is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of human multidrug resistant glioma. PMID:25950430

  7. Asclepiasterol, a novel C21 steroidal glycoside derived from Asclepias curassavica, reverses tumor multidrug resistance by down-regulating P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Rong-Rong; Wang, Jun; Ma, Yan; Li, Wen-Xue; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-05-24

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a major cause of cancer therapy failure. In this study, we identified a novel C21 steroidal glycoside, asclepiasterol, capable of reversing P-gp-mediated MDR. Asclepiasterol (2.5 and 5.0μM) enhanced the cytotoxity of P-gp substrate anticancer drugs in MCF-7/ADR and HepG-2/ADM cells. MDR cells were more responsive to paclitaxel in the presence of asclepiasterol, and colony formation of MDR cells was only reduced upon treatment with a combination of asclepiasterol and doxorubicin. Consistent with these findings, asclepiasterol treatment increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123) in MDR cells. Asclepiasterol decreased expression of P-gp protein without stimulating or suppressing MDR1 mRNA levels. Asclepiasterol-mediated P-gp suppression caused inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in two MDR cell types, and EGF, an activator of the MAPK/ERK pathway, reversed the P-gp down-regulation, implicating the MAPK/ERK pathway in asclepiasterol-mediated P-gp down-regulation. These results suggest that asclepiasterol could be developed as a modulator for reversing P-gp-mediated MDR in P-gp-overexpressing cancer variants. PMID:27129170

  8. Modulation of Multidrug Resistance Protein 2 Efflux in the Cisplatin Resistance Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cells A2780/RCIS by Sesquiterpene Coumarins.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, Jamal; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Behravan, Javad; Masullo, Milena; Piacente, Sonia; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Recent in vitro studies showed that sesquiterpene coumarins (SCs) can be used as chemosensitizers. In this study, 14 SCs were isolated and purified from roots of four Ferula species and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. The purified SCs were evaluated for multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal properties in A2780/RCIS cells (cisplatin-resistant derivatives of the human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780P). Among the tested compounds, mogoltacin, mogoltadone, farnesiferol A, farnesiferol B, farnesiferol C, lehmferin, conferdione, and samarcandin showed significant MDR reversing effects. The combination of nontoxic concentrations of SCs (20 μM) with cisplatin enhanced cisplatin cytotoxicity on A2780/RCIS cells significantly. Flow cytometric efflux assay confirmed that the intracellular accumulation of 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (5-CFDA) was significantly increased in A2780/RCIS cells when treated with SCs. Our findings revealed that conferdione and samarcandin possessed the highest inhibitory effects on multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 pump efflux, and therefore, these compounds could be considered as lead scaffolds for further structure modifications. PMID:26503061

  9. Immunohistochemical detection of DNA topoisomerase IIalpha, P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Kreisholt, J.; Sorensen, M.; Jensen, P. B.; Nielsen, B. S.; Andersen, C. B.; Sehested, M.

    1998-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) differ significantly in their clinical response to topoisomerase IIalpha (topo-IIalpha)-directed drugs, such as etoposide and teniposide, as NSCLC is virtually insensitive to single-agent therapy, while SCLC responds in two-thirds of cases. Preclinical studies have indicated that resistance to topo-IIalpha drugs depends on topo-IIalpha content and/or activity, the altered-topo-II multidrug resistance phenotype (at-MDR) and/or one of two different drug efflux pumps, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and the multidrug resistance protein (MRP). Immunohistochemical analysis on paraffin-embedded tissue from 27 cases of untreated NSCLC and 29 cases of untreated SCLC (of which additional tumour biopsies after treatment with topo-IIalpha-directed drugs were available in ten cases) yielded the following results: NSCLC had significantly less topo-IIalpha than SCLC (P < 0.0001), as only 5 out of 27 NSCLC cases had > 5% positive cells compared with 28 out of 29 SCLC, and 0 out of 27 NSCLC had > 25% positive cells compared with 26 out of 29 SCLC. P-gp was detected in > 5% of cells in only 3 out of 27 NSCLC and in 6 out of 29 SCLC, and MRP in 5 out of 27 of NSCLC and 9 out of 29 SCLC. After treatment of patients with SCLC with either etoposide or teniposide, which are topo-IIalpha-directed drugs, there was an increase in MRP (P < 0.1) and P-gp (P < 0.05) positivity, while topo-IIalpha decreased (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the major difference between untreated NSCLC and SCLC was in topo-IIalpha content. In the small series of ten patients treated for SCLC, all three MDR phenotypes appeared to increase. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9652763

  10. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Vikas; Sanchaita, Sinha; Singh, NP

    2010-01-01

    Emergence and spread of Acinetobacter species, resistant to most of the available antimicrobial agents, is an area of great concern. It is now being frequently associated with healthcare associated infections. Literature was searched at PUBMED, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library, using the terms ‘Acinetobacter Resistance, multidrug resistant (MDR), Antimicrobial Therapy, Outbreak, Colistin, Tigecycline, AmpC enzymes, and carbapenemases in various combinations. The terms such as MDR, Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR), and Pan Drug Resistant (PDR) have been used in published literature with varied definitions, leading to confusion in the correlation of data from various studies. In this review various mechanisms of resistance in the Acinetobacter species have been discussed. The review also probes upon the current therapeutic options, including combination therapies available to treat infections due to resistant Acinetobacter species in adults as well as children. There is an urgent need to enforce infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs to prevent the further spread of these resistant Acinetobacter species and to delay the emergence of increased resistance in the bacteria. PMID:20927292

  11. Pluronic mixed micelles overcoming methotrexate multidrug resistance: in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanzuo; Sha, Xianyi; Zhang, Wei; Zhong, Weitong; Fan, Zhuoyang; Ren, Qiuyue; Chen, Liangcen; Fang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    A Pluronic polymeric mixed micelle delivery system was developed in this study by using Pluronic P105 and F127 block copolymers to encapsulate the antitumor compound, methotrexate (MTX). The MTX-loaded Pluronic P105/F127 mixed micelle exhibited the spherical shape with about 22 nm in diameter, high encapsulation efficiency (about 85%) and pH-dependent in vitro drug release. In this study, A-549 and KBv cell lines were selected as multidrug resistance tumor cell models, while H-460 and KB cell lines were chosen as sensitive tumor cells. The MTX-loaded Pluronic P105/F127 mixed micelle exhibited significant higher in vitro cytotoxicity in multidrug resistant tumor cells than that of control (MTX injection) mainly because of higher cellular uptake of MTX. The pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the Pluronic micelles significantly prolonged systemic circulation time of MTX compared to MTX injection. Moreover, a much stronger antitumor efficacy in KBv tumor xenografts nude mice was observed in the MTX-loaded Pluronic P105/F127 mixed micelle group, than MTX. Collectively, Pluronic P105/F127 mixed micelles could significantly enhance the antitumor activity of MTX and might be a promising drug delivery platform for multidrug resistance modulation. PMID:23620663

  12. Suppression of MAPK Signaling and Reversal of mTOR-Dependent MDR1-Associated Multidrug Resistance by 21α-Methylmelianodiol in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aldonza, Mark Borris Docdoc; Hong, Ji-Young; Bae, Song Yi; Song, Jayoung; Kim, Won Kyung; Oh, Jedo; Shin, Yoonho; Lee, Seung Ho; Lee, Sang Kook

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and remains the most prevalent. Interplay between PI3K/AMPK/AKT and MAPK pathways is a crucial effector in lung cancer growth and progression. These signals transduction protein kinases serve as good therapeutic targets for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) which comprises up to 90% of lung cancers. Here, we described whether 21α-Methylmelianodiol (21α-MMD), an active triterpenoid derivative of Poncirus trifoliate, can display anticancer properties by regulating these signals and modulate the occurrence of multidrug resistance in NSCLC cells. We found that 21α-MMD inhibited the growth and colony formation of lung cancer cells without affecting the normal lung cell phenotype. 21α-MMD also abrogated the metastatic activity of lung cancer cells through the inhibition of cell migration and invasion, and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest with increased intracellular ROS generation and loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity. 21α-MMD regulated the expressions of PI3K/AKT/AMPK and MAPK signaling which drove us to further evaluate its activity on multidrug resistance (MDR) in lung cancer cells by specifying on P-glycoprotein (P-gp)/MDR1-association. Employing the established paclitaxel-resistant A549 cells (A549-PacR), we further found that 21α-MMD induced a MDR reversal activity through the inhibition of P-gp/MDR1 expressions, function, and transcription with regained paclitaxel sensitivity which might dependently correlate to the regulation of PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, the mechanistic evaluation in vitro of 21α-MMD displaying growth-inhibiting potential with influence on MDR reversal in human lung cancer cells. PMID:26098947

  13. Fludarabine phosphate selectively inhibits growth and modifies the antigenic phenotype of human glioblastoma-multiforme cells expressing a multidrug resistance phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Su, Z; Datta, S; Guarini, L; Waxman, S; Fisher, P

    1992-07-01

    Fludarabine phosphate (FLU), the 2-fluro derivative of Ara-A, 9-beta-D-arabino-furanosyl-2-fluoroadenine, has been shown to display both in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative activity toward a variety of murine tumors and human lymphoid malignancies. In the present study, we have determined the effect of FLU, alone and in combination with recombinant human fibroblast interferon (IFN-B), on in vitro growth, gene expression and the antigenic phenotype of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells displaying a multidrug sensitive and a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype. FLU exhibited a marked differential toxicity toward GBM-MDR cells versus the multidrug sensitive GBM parental cell line. Growth of GBM-MDR cells for seven days in 2.5 to 7.5 muM FLU resulted in a dose-dependent reduction or elimination of growth which persisted after removal of this agent. In contrast, recovery from FLU-induced growth suppression was observed in parental multidrug sensitive GBM cells. Acquisition of increased FLU sensitivity in GBM-MDR cells did not appear to result from selection for a subset of sensitive cells or an artifact associated with the DNA-transfection process. This conclusion is supported by the similar pattern of FLU resistance in GBM-18 clones isolated after transfection with a cloned hygromycin resistance gene and selection for resistance to hygromycin. The antiproliferative and toxic effect of FLU was increased in GBM-MDR cells by simultaneous growth in IFN-B and the toxic effect of FLU could be blocked in a dose-dependent manner by the simultaneous addition of deoxycytidine. In contrast, the toxicity of FLU toward GBM-MDR cells was not altered when cells were grown in the presence or absence of colchicine or by the administration of verapamil, which can reverse the MDR phenotype in GBM-MDR cells. The selective toxicity of FLU toward GBM-MDR versus GBM-18 cells was not associated with a consistent differential change in all of the GBM-18 MDR clones in the steady

  14. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients. PMID:24253450

  15. RNA helicase A in the MEF1 transcription factor complex up-regulates the MDR1 gene in multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoling; Safa, Ahmad R

    2004-04-23

    RNA helicase A (RHA) is a member of the DEAD/H family of RNA helicases and unwinds duplex RNA and DNA. Recent studies have shown that RHA regulates the activity of gene promoters. However, little information is available about the in vivo relevance of RHA in the regulation of natural genes. We previously characterized a nuclear protein (MEF1) that binds to the proximal promoter of the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1) and up-regulates the promoter activity. In the present study, we isolated and identified RHA as a component of the MEF1 complex by using DNA-affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry. The antibody against RHA specifically disrupted the complex formation in electrophoretic mobility shift assay, confirming the identity of RHA. Western blotting showed that RHA in drug-resistant cells had a higher molecular weight than that in drug-sensitive cells. Similar results were obtained when FLAG-tagged RHA was overexpressed in these cells. This size difference probably reflects posttranslational modification(s) of RHA in drug-resistant cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RHA occupies the MDR1 promoter in vivo. Overexpression of RHA enhanced expression of the MDR1 promoter/reporter construct and endogenous P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the MDR1 gene product, and increased drug resistance of drug-resistant cells but not the drug-sensitive counterpart. Introduction of short interfering RNA targeting the RHA gene sequence selectively knocked-down RHA expression and concomitantly reduced P-gp level. Thus, our study demonstrates, for the first time, the involvement of RHA in up-regulation of the MDR1 gene. Interactions of RHA with other protein factors in the MEF1 complex bound to the promoter element may contribute to P-gp overexpression and multidrug resistance phenotype in drug-resistant cancer cells. PMID:14769796

  16. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein-mediated transport by S-adenosylmethionine and cynarin in multidrug-resistant human uterine sarcoma MES-SA/Dx5 cells.

    PubMed

    Angelini, A; Di Pietro, R; Centurione, L; Castellani, M L; Conti, P; Porreca, E; Cuccurullo, F

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer chemotherapy is often mediated by the overexpression of the plasma membrane drug transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) encoded by multidrug resistance gene (MDR1). Various chemosensitizing agents are able to inhibit Pgp activity but their clinical application is limited by their toxicity. Furthermore, hepatotoxicity related to chemotherapy causes delays of treatment in cancer patients and often requires supplementation of anti-tumour therapy with hepatoprotective agents. In this in vitro study, we investigated the effectiveness of an endogenous hepatoprotective agent, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), and a natural hepatoprotective compound, Cynarin (Cyn), to inhibit Pgp activity in order to evaluate their potential use as chemosensitizing agents. Human doxorubicin (doxo) resistant uterine sarcoma cells (MES-SA/Dx5) expressing high levels of Pgp were treated with two hepatoprotectors at various concentrations (1, 5 and 10 microM) that are clinically achievable, in the presence or absence of three different concentrations of doxo (2, 4 and 8 microM). In order to evaluate the effects of both hepatoprotectors, we measured the intracellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of doxo, the cellular GSH level, ROS production and catalase (CAT) activity. We found that treatment with 2, 4 and 8 microM doxo in the presence of SAMe or Cyn significantly increased the doxo accumulation and cytotoxicity on MES-SA/Dx5 cells, when compared to control cells receiving doxo alone. Moreover, treatment with SAMe or Cyn significantly increased GSH content, greater than 80 percent and 60 percent, respectively) and CAT activity greater than 60 and 150 percent, respectively) in resistant cancer cells, while ROS production was below the values of corresponding untreated control cells. Our in vitro findings provide a rationale for the potential clinical use of these hepatoprotectors both as chemosensitizing agents, to reverse Pgp-mediated MDR, and as antioxidants to

  17. Impaired NK cells' activity and increased numbers of CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Renhua; Xiang, Yangen; Yang, Li; Liu, Yanke; Chen, Pingsheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wenjun; Yin, Ke; Fu, Manjiao; Xu, Yixin; Wu, Jialin

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) often causes persistent infection and chemotherapy failure, which brings heavy burden of society and family. Many immune cell subsets and regulatory mechanisms may operate throughout the various stages of infection. The presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is thought to be an important mechanism that TB successfully evades the immune system. Tregs play a central role in the prevention of autoimmunity and in the control of immune responses. The role of Tregs in MDR-TB infection and persistence is inadequately documented. The current study was designed to determine whether CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells may modulate innate immunity (such as NK cells) against human tuberculosis. Our results indicated that the numbers of CD4 + CD25+ Treg cells increased in MDR-TB patients' blood, and the cytokine production of IL-10 increased from MDR-patients compared with healthy subjects, along with the lower activity and low CD69 expression of NK cells in patients. These results suggested that immunity to MDR-TB patients induced circulating CD4 + CD25+ T regulatory cells expansion, which may be related to the persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, and to the balance between effectors immune responses and suppression immune responses. PMID:27156613

  18. Activating transcription factor 4 mediates a multidrug resistance phenotype of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells through transactivation of STAT3 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongwu; Chen, Xiong; Chen, Bin; Chen, Bei; Fan, Jianyong; Song, Weibing; Xie, Ziying; Jiang, Dan; Li, Qiuqiong; Zhou, Meihua; Sun, Dayong; Zhao, Yagang

    2014-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major challenge to the clinical treatment of esophageal cancer. The stress response gene activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is involved in homeostasis and cellular protection. However, relatively little is known about the expression and function of ATF4 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) MDR. In this study, we investigate the potential role and mechanisms of ATF4 in ESCC MDR. We demonstrated that overexpression of ATF4 promotes the MDR phenotype in ESCC cells, while depletion of ATF4 in the MDR ESCC cell line induces drug re-sensitization. We also demonstrated that ATF4 transactivates STAT3 expression by directly binding to the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) promoter, resulting in MDR in ESCC cells. Significantly, inhibition of STAT3 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or a selective inhibitor (JSI-124) reintroduces therapeutic sensitivity. In addition, increased Bcl-2, survivin, and MRP1 expression levels were observed in ATF4-overexpressing cells. In conclusion, ATF4 may promote MDR in ESCC cells through the up-regulation of STAT3 expression, and thus is an attractive therapeutic target to combat therapeutic resistance in ESCC. PMID:25130172

  19. The involvement of a LINE-1 element in a DNA rearrangement upstream of the mdr1a gene in a taxol multidrug-resistant murine cell line.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D; Higman, S M; Hsu, S I; Horwitz, S B

    1992-10-01

    Two closely related but functionally distinct P-glycoprotein isoforms are encoded by the murine multidrug-resistance genes mdr1a and mdr1b. In a series of independently selected multidrug-resistant (MDR) J774.2 cell lines, mdr gene amplification and/or overexpression and overproduction of either the mdr1a or mdr1b products, or both gene products, correlates with the MDR phenotype. To investigate the possibility that mutations in the promoter regions of the mdr1a or mdr1b genes could influence their differential expression, mdr promoter-specific probes were used to detect and map potential structural alterations. An unusual structural rearrangement was found in the 5'-region of the amplified mdr1a allele in J7.T1, a cell line selected with taxol. To characterize this rearrangement, the regulatory regions of the mdr1a and mdr1b genes were analyzed. Whereas no gross structural alterations were detected by Southern blot hybridization using the mdr1b promoter probe, a novel amplified EcoRI fragment was detected by the mdr1a promoter probe. To determine the precise nature of this mutation, an mdr1a 5'-genomic clone was isolated from J7.T1 cells. Sequence analysis revealed an unusual DNA rearrangement consisting of the mdr1b gene, from its fourth intron toward its 3'-end, upstream of an intact mdr1a promoter on the amplified allele. We propose that this event occurred by an unequal sister chromatid exchange that was mediated by LINE-1 repetitive elements. PMID:1356977

  20. Adenovirus vector infection of non-small-cell lung cancer cells is a trigger for multi-drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Tomono, Takumi; Kajita, Masahiro; Yano, Kentaro; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-08-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette protein involved in cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR). It has been reported that infection with some bacteria and viruses induces changes in the activities of various drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, including P-gp. Although human adenoviruses (Ad) cause the common cold, the effect of Ad infection on MDR in cancer has not been established. In this study, we investigated whether Ad infection is a cause of MDR in A549, H441 and HCC827 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, using an Ad vector system. We found that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cell lines induced P-gp mRNA expression, and the extent of induction was dependent on the number of Ad vector virus particles and the infection time. Heat-treated Ad vector, which is not infectious, did not alter P-gp mRNA expression. Uptake experiments with doxorubicin (DOX), a P-gp substrate, revealed that DOX accumulation was significantly decreased in Ad vector-infected A549 cells. The decrease of DOX uptake was blocked by verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor. Our results indicated that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cells caused MDR mediated by P-gp overexpression. The Ad vector genome sequence is similar to that of human Ad, and therefore human Ad infection of lung cancer patients may lead to chemoresistance in the clinical environment. PMID:27286705

  1. Jalapinoside, a macrocyclic bisdesmoside from the resin glycosides of Ipomea purga, as a modulator of multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Elihú; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2015-01-23

    The first macrocyclic bisdesmoside resin glycoside, jalapinoside (4), was purified by preparative-scale recycling HPLC from the MeOH-soluble extracts of Ipomoea purga roots, the officinal jalap. Purgic acid C (3), a new glycosidic acid of ipurolic acid, was identified as 3-O-β-d-quinovopyranoside, 11-O-β-d-quinovopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-[β-d-fucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-d-quinovopyranoside (3S,11S)-dihydroxytetradecanoic acid. The acylating residues of this core were acetic, (+)-(2S)-methylbutanoic, and dodecanoic acids. The site of lactonization was defined as C-3 of the second saccharide moiety. Reversal of multidrug resistance by this noncytotoxic compound was evaluated in vinblastine-resistant human breast carcinoma cells. PMID:25536852

  2. An antimitotic and antivascular agent BPR0L075 overcomes multidrug resistance and induces mitotic catastrophe in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Wu, Erxi; Wu, Jun; Wang, Tian-Li; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Liu, Xinli

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel plays a major role in the treatment of ovarian cancer; however, resistance to paclitaxel is frequently observed. Thus, new therapy that can overcome paclitaxel resistance will be of significant clinical importance. We evaluated antiproliferative effects of an antimitotic and antivascular agent BPR0L075 in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells. BPR0L075 displays potent and broad-spectrum cytotoxicity at low nanomolar concentrations (IC50 = 2-7 nM) against both parental ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3, SKOV-3, and A2780-1A9) and paclitaxel-resistant sublines (OVCAR-3-TR, SKOV-3-TR, 1A9-PTX10), regardless of the expression levels of the multidrug resistance transporter P-gp and class III β-tubulin or mutation of β-tubulin. BPR0L075 blocks cell cycle at the G2/M phase in paclitaxel-resistant cells while equal concentration of paclitaxel treatment was ineffective. BPR0L075 induces cell death by a dual mechanism in parental and paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells. In the parental cells (OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3), BPR0L075 induced apoptosis, evidenced by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and DNA ladder formation. BPR0L075 induced cell death in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3-TR and SKOV-3-TR) is primarily due to mitotic catastrophe, evidenced by formation of giant, multinucleated cells and absence of PARP cleavage. Immunoblotting analysis shows that BPR0L075 treatment induced up-regulation of cyclin B1, BubR1, MPM-2, and survivin protein levels and Bcl-XL phosphorylation in parental cells; however, in resistant cells, the endogenous expressions of BubR1 and survivin were depleted, BPR0L075 treatment failed to induce MPM-2 expression and phosphorylation of Bcl-XL. BPR0L075 induced cell death in both parental and paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells proceed through caspase-3 independent mechanisms. In conclusion, BPR0L075 displays potent cytotoxic effects in ovarian cancer cells with a potential to overcome paclitaxel

  3. NANOPREPARATIONS TO OVERCOME MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Niravkumar R.; Pattni, Bhushan S.; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is the most widely exploited phenomenon by which cancer eludes chemotherapy. Broad variety of factors, ranging from the cellular ones, such as over-expression of efflux transporters, defective apoptotic machineries, and altered molecular targets, to the physiological factors such as higher interstitial fluid pressure, low extracellular pH, and formation of irregular tumor vasculature are responsible for multidrug resistance. A combination of various undesirable factors associated with biological surroundings together with poor solubility and instability of many potential therapeutic small & large molecules within the biological systems and systemic toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents has necessitated the need for nano-preparations to optimize drug delivery. The physiology of solid tumors presents numerous challenges for successful therapy. However, it also offers unique opportunities for the use of nanotechnology. Nanoparticles, up to 400 nm in size, have shown great promise for carrying, protecting and delivering potential therapeutic molecules with diverse physiological properties. In this review, various factors responsible for the MDR and the use of nanotechnology to overcome the MDR, the use of spheroid culture as well as the current technique of producing micro tumor tissues in vitro are discussed in detail. PMID:23973912

  4. Regulation of MAPKs Signaling Contributes to the Growth Inhibition of 1,7-Dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxyxanthone on Multidrug Resistance A549/Taxol Cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jian; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Wen; Luan, Jia-Jie

    2016-01-01

    1,7-Dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxyxanthone (XAN) is a bioactive compound isolated from Securidaca inappendiculata Hassk. and validated with antiproliferative activities on a panel of cancer cell lines. This study was designed to investigate its growth inhibitory effects on multidrug resistance (MDR) non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell line A549/Taxol and explore the possible linkage between modulation of MAPKs and the bioactivities. Its growth inhibitory potency on the cells was estimated by MTT assay, and flow cytometric analysis was employed to investigate its potential cell cycle arrest and proapoptosis effects. Expressions of hallmark proteins were assessed by Western-Blot method. The results showed A549/Taxol cells were sensitive to XAN. XAN inhibited the proliferation of A549/Taxol cells in the time and concentration dependent manners. It acted as a potent inducer of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the cells. Western-Blot investigation validated the proapoptosis and cell cycle arrest activities of XAN and the potential of MDR reversion. Upregulation of p38 by XAN, which accounted for the cell cycle arrest at G2 phase, and the downregulation of ERK associated with the proapoptosis activity were also revealed. Further analysis found p53 may be the central role mediated the bioactivities of MAPKs in A549/Taxol cells. Based on these evidences, a conclusion has been deduced that XAN could be a potential agent for MDR NSCLC therapy targeting specifically MAPKs. PMID:27403196

  5. Regulation of MAPKs Signaling Contributes to the Growth Inhibition of 1,7-Dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxyxanthone on Multidrug Resistance A549/Taxol Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Jian; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    1,7-Dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxyxanthone (XAN) is a bioactive compound isolated from Securidaca inappendiculata Hassk. and validated with antiproliferative activities on a panel of cancer cell lines. This study was designed to investigate its growth inhibitory effects on multidrug resistance (MDR) non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell line A549/Taxol and explore the possible linkage between modulation of MAPKs and the bioactivities. Its growth inhibitory potency on the cells was estimated by MTT assay, and flow cytometric analysis was employed to investigate its potential cell cycle arrest and proapoptosis effects. Expressions of hallmark proteins were assessed by Western-Blot method. The results showed A549/Taxol cells were sensitive to XAN. XAN inhibited the proliferation of A549/Taxol cells in the time and concentration dependent manners. It acted as a potent inducer of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the cells. Western-Blot investigation validated the proapoptosis and cell cycle arrest activities of XAN and the potential of MDR reversion. Upregulation of p38 by XAN, which accounted for the cell cycle arrest at G2 phase, and the downregulation of ERK associated with the proapoptosis activity were also revealed. Further analysis found p53 may be the central role mediated the bioactivities of MAPKs in A549/Taxol cells. Based on these evidences, a conclusion has been deduced that XAN could be a potential agent for MDR NSCLC therapy targeting specifically MAPKs. PMID:27403196

  6. Pyrazine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 3-ethylpyridine are cigarette smoke components that alter the growth of normal and malignant human lung cells, and play a role in multidrug resistance development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Poo, Wak-Kim; Lin, Yu-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Lung cancer is one of the few human diseases for which the primary etiological agent, cigarette smoke (CS), has been described; however, the precise role of individual cigarette smoke toxicant in tumor development and progression remains to be elusive. The purpose of this study was to assess in vitro the effects of previously identified cigarette smoke components, pyrazine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 3-ethylpyridine, on non-tumorigenic (MRC5) and adenocarcinomic (A549) human lung cell lines. Our data showed that the administration of three cigarette smoke components in combination perturbed the proliferation of both normal and adenocarcinomic cells. Study of malignant cells revealed that CS components were cytotoxic at high concentration (10(-6) M) and stimulatory in a dose-dependent manner at lower concentrations (10(-8) M to 10(-10) M). This adverse effect was enhanced when adenocarcinomic cells were maintained in hypoxia resembling intratumoral environment. Furthermore, exposure to pyrazine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 3-ethylpyridine induced oxidative stress in both normal and malignant cells. Finally, assessment of P-gp activity revealed that multidrug resistance was induced in CS component exposed adenocarcinomic lung cells and the induction was augmented in hypoxia. Taken together, pyrazine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 3-ethylpyridine adversely altered both normal and diseased lung cells in vitro and data collected from this study may help lung cancer patients to understand the importance of quitting smoking during lung cancer treatment. PMID:25449333

  7. Reversal of multidrug resistance in MCF-7/Adr cells by codelivery of doxorubicin and BCL2 siRNA using a folic acid-conjugated polyethylenimine hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin nanocarrier

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Wei; Su, Hua; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Tan, Cai-Ping; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-01-01

    Systemic administration of chemotherapy for cancer often faces drug resistance, limiting its applications in cancer therapy. In this study, we developed a simple multifunctional nanocarrier based on polyethylenimine (PEI) to codeliver doxorubicin (DOX) and BCL2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) for overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) and enhancing apoptosis in MCF-7/Adr cancer cells by combining chemotherapy and RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. The low-molecular-weight branch PEI was used to conjugate hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and folic acid (FA), forming the codelivery nanocarrier (FA-HP-β-CD-PEI) to encapsulate DOX with the cavity HP-β-CD and bind siRNA with the positive charge of PEI for tumor-targeting codelivering drugs. The drug-loaded nanocomplexes (FA-HP-β-CD-PEI/DOX/siRNA) showed uniform size distribution, high cellular uptake, and significant gene suppression of BCL2, displaying the potential of overcoming MDR for enhancing the effect of anticancer drugs. Furthermore, the nanocomplexes achieved significant cell apoptosis through a mechanism of downregulating the antiapoptotic protein BCL2, resulted in improving therapeutic efficacy of the coadministered DOX by tumor targeting and RNA interference. Our study indicated that combined RNAi therapy and chemotherapy using our functional codelivery nanocarrier could overcome MDR and enhance apoptosis in MDR cancer cells for a potential application in treating MDR cancers. PMID:25960653

  8. Interrogation of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells: correlation of 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake with western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Harpstrite, Scott E; Gu, Hannah; Natarajan, Radhika; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    Histopathological studies indicate that ∼63% of pancreatic tumors express multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and its polymorphic variants. However, Pgp expression detected at the mRNA or protein level does not always correlate with functional transport activity. Because Pgp transport activity is affected by specific mutations and the phosphorylation state of the protein, altered or less active forms of Pgp may also be detected by PCR or immunohistochemistry, which do not accurately reflect the status of tumor cell resistance. To interrogate the status of the functional expression of MDR1 Pgp in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, cellular transport studies using Tc-Sestamibi were performed and correlated with western blot analysis. Biochemical transport assays in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, human epidermal carcinoma drug-sensitive KB-3-1 cells, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells (negative controls), and human epidermal carcinoma drug-resistant KB-8-5 cells, human breast carcinoma stably transfected with Pgp MCF-7/MDR1Pgp cells, and liver carcinoma HepG2 cells (positive controls) were performed. Protein levels were determined using a monoclonal antibody C219. Tc-Sestamibi demonstrates accumulation in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Uptake profiles are not affected by treatment with LY335979, a Pgp inhibitor, and correlate with western blot analysis. These cellular transport studies indicate an absence of Pgp at a functional level in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Because major pancreatic tumors originate from the pancreatic duct and Tc-Sestamibi undergoes a dominant hepatobiliary mode of excretion, it would not be a sensitive probe for imaging pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Following interrogation of the functional status of Pgp in other pancreatic carcinoma cells, chemotherapeutic drugs that are also MDR1 substrates could offer alternative therapeutics for treating pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:25036383

  9. Vitamin E derivative-based multifunctional nanoemulsions for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nannan; Gao, Yanan; Ji, Hongyu; Wu, Linhua; Qi, Xuejing; Liu, Xiaona; Tang, Jingling

    2016-08-01

    The multidrug resistance (MDR), including intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance, is a major problem in tumor chemotherapy. Here, we proposed a strategy for modulating intrinsic and/or acquired multidrug resistance by altering the levels of Bax and Bcl-2 expression and inhibiting the transport function of P-gp, increasing the intracellular concentration of its substrate anticancer drugs. Vitamin E derivative-based nanoemulsions containing paclitaxel (MNEs-PTX) were fabricated in this study, and in vitro anticancer efficacy of the nanoemulsion system was evaluated in the paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780/Taxol. The MNEs-PTX exhibited a remarkably enhanced antiproliferation effect on A2780/Taxol cells than free paclitaxel (PTX) (p < 0.01). Compared with that in the Taxol group, MNEs-PTX further decreased mitochondrial potential. Vitamin E derivative-based multifunctional nanoemulsion (MNEs) obviously increased intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 (P-gp substrate). Overexpression of Bcl-2 is generally associated with tumor drug resistance, we found that MNEs could reduce Bcl-2 protein level and increase Bax protein level. Taken together, our findings suggest that anticancer drugs associated with MNEs could play a role in the development of MDR in cancers. PMID:26710274

  10. Biosynthesis of heterogeneous forms of multidrug resistance-associated glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, L M; Williams, S S; Horwitz, S B

    1987-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant J774.2 mouse macrophage-like cells, selected for resistance to colchicine, vinblastine, or taxol, overexpress antigenically related glycoproteins with distinct electrophoretic mobilities. These plasma membrane glycoproteins are likely to play a pivotal role in the expression of the multidrug resistance phenotype. To determine how these multidrug resistance-associated glycoproteins differ, the biosynthesis and N-linked carbohydrate composition of these proteins were examined and compared. Vinblastineor colchicine-selected cells made a 125-kDa precursor that was rapidly processed (t1/2 approximately equal to 20 min) to mature forms of 135 and 140 kDa, respectively. Heterogeneity between the 135- and 140-kDa forms of the molecule can be attributed to N-linked carbohydrate. In contrast, taxol-selected cells made two precursors, 125 and 120 kDa, which appeared within 5 and 15 min after the onset of pulse labeling, respectively. They were processed to mature forms of 140 and 130 kDa. Since a single deglycosylated precursor or mature form was not observed after enzymatic removal of N-linked oligosaccharides, other differences, besides N-linked glycosylation, which occur in early processing compartments, are likely to account for the two multidrug resistance-associated glycoproteins in taxol-selected cells. These results demonstrate that a family of multidrug resistance-associated glycoproteins can be differentially expressed. PMID:2888763

  11. Reversal of multidrug resistance in breast cancer MCF-7/ADR cells by h-R3-siMDR1-PAMAM complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Liu, Jing; Guo, Nana; Zhang, Xiaoning

    2016-09-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) among breast cancer cells is the paramount obstacle for the successful chemotherapy. In this study, anti-EGFR antibody h-R3 was designed to self-assembled h-R3-siRNA-PAMAM-complexes (HSPCs) via electrostatic interactions for siRNA delivery. The physicochemical characterization, cell uptake, MDR1 silencing efficiency, cell migration, cell growth and cell apoptosis were investigated. The HSPCs presented lower cytotoxicity, higher cellular uptake and enhanced endosomal escape ability. Also, HSPCs encapsulating siMDR1 knockdowned 99.4% MDR1 gene with up to ∼6 times of enhancement compared to naked siMDR1, increased the doxorubicin accumulation, down-regulated P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression and suppressed cellular migration in breast cancer MCF-7/ADR cells. Moreover, the combination of anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) and siMDR1 loaded HSPCs showed synergistic effect on overcoming MDR, which inhibited cell growth and induced cell apoptosis. This h-R3-mediated siMDR1 delivery system could be a promising vector for effective siRNA therapy of drug resistant breast cancer. PMID:27444552

  12. Starvation, detoxification, and multidrug resistance in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changhan; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Longo, Valter D.

    2013-01-01

    The selection of chemotherapy drugs is based on the cytotoxicity to specific tumor cell types and the relatively low toxicity to normal cells and tissues. However, the toxicity to normal cells poses a major clinical challenge, particularly when malignant cells have acquired resistance to chemotherapy. This drug resistance of cancer cells results from multiple factors including individual variation, genetic heterogeneity within a tumor, and cellular evolution. Much progress in the understanding of tumor cell resistance has been made in the past 35 years, owing to milestone discoveries such as the identification and characterization of ABC transporters. Nonetheless, the complexity of the genetic and epigenetic rewiring of cancer cells makes drug resistance an equally complex phenomenon that is difficult to overcome. In this review, we discuss how the remarkable changes in the levels of glucose, IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and in other proteins caused by fasting have the potential to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy against tumors by protecting normal cells and tissues and possibly by diminishing multidrug resistance in malignant cells. PMID:22391012

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of the multidrug-resistance-related P-glycoprotein with photoactive analogs of verapamil

    SciTech Connect

    Safa, A.R. )

    1988-10-01

    Verapamil, a phenylalkylamine calcium channel blocker, has been shown to reverse multidrug resistance in tumor cells, possibly by increasing drug retention through interaction with an outward drug transporter of the resistant cells. In this study two photoactive radioactive analogs of verapamil, N-(p-azido(3,5-{sup 3}H)benzoyl)aminomethyl verapamil and N-(p-azido(3-{sup 125}I)salicyl)aminomethyl verapamil, were synthesized and used to identify the possible biochemical target(s) for verapamil in multidrug-resistance DC-3F/VCRd-5L Chinese hamster lung cells selected for resistance to vincristine. The results show that a specifically labeled 150- to 180-kDa membrane protein in resistant cells was immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody specific for P-glycoprotein. Phenylalkylamine binding specificity was established by competitive blocking of specific photolabeling with the nonradioactive photoactive analogs as well as with verapamil. Photoaffinity labeling was also inhibited by 50 {mu}M concentrations of the calcium channel blockers nimodipine, nifedipine, nicardipine, azidopine, bepridil, and diltiazem and partially by prenylamine. Moreover, P-glycoprotein labeling was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by vinblastine with half-maximal inhibition at 0.2 {mu}M compared to that by verapamil at 8 {mu}M. These data provide direct evidence that P-glycoprotein has broad drug recognition capacity and that it serves as a molecular target for calcium channel blocker action in reversing multidrug resistance.

  14. Establishment by adriamycin exposure of multidrug-resistant rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells showing low DT-diaphorase activity and high cross resistance to mitomycins.

    PubMed

    Wakusawa, S; Nakamura, S; Miyamoto, K

    1997-01-01

    A resistant subline (AH130/5A) selected from rat hepatoma AH130 cells after exposure to adriamycin (ADM) showed remarkable resistance to multiple antitumor drugs, including mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PFM). PFM, vinblastine (VLB), and ADM accumulated in AH130/5A far less than in the parent AH130 (AH130/P) cells. AH130/5A cells showed overexpression of P-glycoprotein (PGP), an increase in glutathione S-transferase activity, and a decrease in DT-diaphorase and glutathione peroxidase activity. The resistance to MMC and VLB of AH130/5A cells was partly reversed by H-87, an inhibitor of PGP. Buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthase, did not affect the action of MMC. tert-Butylhydroquinone induced DT-diaphorase activity, increased PFM uptake, and enhanced the growth-inhibitory action of MMC in AH130/5A cells. Dicumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase, decreased PFM uptake and reduced the growth-inhibitory action of MMC in AH130/P cells. These results indicated that the adriamycin treatment of hepatoma cells caused multifactorial multidrug resistance involving a decrease in DT-diaphorase activity. PMID:9045901

  15. A combination of curcumin with either gramicidin or ouabain selectively kills cells that express the multidrug resistance-linked ABCG2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Rao, Divya K; Liu, Haiyan; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Mayer, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces a strategy to kill selectively multidrug-resistant cells that express the ABCG2 transporter (also called breast cancer resistance protein, or BCRP). The approach is based on specific stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by ABCG2 transporters with subtoxic doses of curcumin combined with stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with subtoxic doses of gramicidin A or ouabain. After 72 h of incubation with the drug combinations, the resulting overconsumption of ATP by both pathways inhibits the efflux activity of ABCG2 transporters, leads to depletion of intracellular ATP levels below the viability threshold, and kills resistant cells selectively over cells that lack ABCG2 transporters. This strategy, which was also tested on a clinically relevant human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7/FLV1), exploits the overexpression of ABCG2 transporters and induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death selectively in resistant cells. This work thus introduces a novel strategy to exploit collateral sensitivity (CS) with a combination of two clinically used compounds that individually do not exert CS. Collectively, this work expands the current knowledge on ABCG2-mediated CS and provides a potential strategy for discovery of CS drugs against drug-resistant cancer cells. PMID:25253691

  16. Adenovirus-mediated ING4 expression reduces multidrug resistance of human gastric carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zong-Lei; He, Song-Bing; Sheng, Wei-Hua; Dong, Xiao-Qiang; Yang, Ji-Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Chemotherapy is the primary treatment for both resectable and advanced gastric carcinoma, yet multiple drug resistance (MDR) of gastric carcinoma remains a significant therapeutic obstacle. The development of novel strategies to reduce MDR in gastric carcinoma would yield a better outcome following chemotherapy. ING4, a member of the inhibitor of growth (ING) tumor-suppressor family, possesses antitumor and radiosensitization or chemosensitization effects in a variety of human cancers. The present study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of action of adenovirus-mediated ING4 (AdVING4) on the reversion of human gastric carcinoma cell MDR in vitro and in vivo in nude mouse xenografts. The data showed that the expression of ING4 mRNA and protein was dramatically downregulated (or lost) in gastric carcinoma SGC7901/CDDP cells after CDDP-induced MDR phenotype and in the parental SGC7901 cells. AdVING4‑induced ING4 expression reversed MDR and induced apoptosis of SGC7901/CDDP cells in vitro and in vivo in the SGC7901/CDDP xenograft tumors. Furthermore, AdVING4 substantially downregulated the expression of MDR-related proteins P-gp and MRP1 and apoptosis‑related proteins Bcl-2 and survivin, but upregulated the expression of apoptosis-related protein Bax in the SGC7901/CDDP xenograft tissues. The reversion effects elicited by AdVING4 on gastric cancer cell MDR were closely associated with the downregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters and activation of apoptotic pathways. Thus, these findings suggest that AdVING4 may be a feasible modulator for the MDR phenotype of gastric carcinoma cells. PMID:23969950

  17. Apoptotic effect of a novel kefir product, PFT, on multidrug-resistant myeloid leukemia cells via a hole-piercing mechanism

    PubMed Central

    GHONEUM, MAMDOOH; GIMZEWSKI, JAMES

    2014-01-01

    We examined the apoptotic effect of a novel Probiotics Fermentation Technology (PFT) kefir grain product; PFT is a natural mixture composed primarily of Lactobacillus kefiri P-IF, a specific strain of L. kefiri with unique growth characteristics. The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic effect of PFT on human multidrug-resistant (MDR) myeloid leukemia (HL60/AR) cells in vitro and explore the mechanistic approach underlying its effect. HL60/AR cells were cultured with PFT (0.6–5.0 mg/ml) for 3 days. The apoptotic effect of PFT was assessed through examination of percent apoptosis, caspase 3 activation, Bcl-2 expression levels and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). PFT induced apoptosis in HL60/AR cells in a dose-dependent manner which was maximal at 67.5% for 5 mg/ml. Induction of apoptosis was associated with activation of caspase 3, decreased expression of Bcl-2 and decreased polarization of MMP. In addition, PFT showed a unique characteristic of piercing holes in HL60/AR cells, as indicated by AFM studies. This hole induction may be responsible for the apoptotic effect on cancer cells. These results suggest that PFT may act as a potential therapy for the treatment of MDR leukemia. PMID:24430613

  18. Regulation of Mucin 1 and multidrug resistance protein 1 by honokiol enhances the efficacy of doxorubicin-mediated growth suppression in mammary carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Thulasiraman, Padmamalini; Johnson, Andrea Butts

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the link between chemoresistance and cancer progression may identify future targeted therapy for breast cancer. One of the mechanisms by which chemoresistance is attained in cancer cells is mediated through the expression of multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs). Acquiring drug resistance has been correlated to the emergence of metastasis, accounting for the progression of the disease. One of the diagnostic markers of metastatic progression is the overexpression of a transmembrane protein called Mucin 1 (MUC1) which has been implicated in reduced survival rate. The objective of this study was to understand the relationship between MUC1 and MRP1 using natural phenolic compound isolated from Magnolia grandiflora, honokiol, in mammary carcinoma cells. We provide evidence that honokiol suppresses the expression level of MUC1 and MRP1 in mammary carcinoma cells. In a time-dependent manner, honokiol-mediated reduction of MUC1 is followed by a reduction of MRP1 expression in the breast cancer cells. Additionally, silencing MUC1 suppresses the expression level of MRP1 and enhances the efficacy of doxorubicin, an MRP1 substrate. Taken together, these findings suggest MUC1 regulates the expression of MRP1 and provides a direct link between cancer progression and chemoresistance in mammary carcinoma cells. PMID:27221150

  19. Regulation of Mucin 1 and multidrug resistance protein 1 by honokiol enhances the efficacy of doxorubicin-mediated growth suppression in mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Thulasiraman, Padmamalini; Johnson, Andrea Butts

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the link between chemoresistance and cancer progression may identify future targeted therapy for breast cancer. One of the mechanisms by which chemoresistance is attained in cancer cells is mediated through the expression of multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs). Acquiring drug resistance has been correlated to the emergence of metastasis, accounting for the progression of the disease. One of the diagnostic markers of metastatic progression is the overexpression of a transmembrane protein called Mucin 1 (MUC1) which has been implicated in reduced survival rate. The objective of this study was to understand the relationship between MUC1 and MRP1 using natural phenolic compound isolated from Magnolia grandiflora, honokiol, in mammary carcinoma cells. We provide evidence that honokiol suppresses the expression level of MUC1 and MRP1 in mammary carcinoma cells. In a time-dependent manner, honokiol-mediated reduction of MUC1 is followed by a reduction of MRP1 expression in the breast cancer cells. Additionally, silencing MUC1 suppresses the expression level of MRP1 and enhances the efficacy of doxorubicin, an MRP1 substrate. Taken together, these findings suggest MUC1 regulates the expression of MRP1 and provides a direct link between cancer progression and chemoresistance in mammary carcinoma cells. PMID:27221150

  20. Apoptotic effect of a novel kefir product, PFT, on multidrug-resistant myeloid leukemia cells via a hole-piercing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Gimzewski, James

    2014-03-01

    We examined the apoptotic effect of a novel Probiotics Fermentation Technology (PFT) kefir grain product; PFT is a natural mixture composed primarily of Lactobacillus kefiri P-IF, a specific strain of L. kefiri with unique growth characteristics. The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic effect of PFT on human multidrug-resistant (MDR) myeloid leukemia (HL60/AR) cells in vitro and explore the mechanistic approach underlying its effect. HL60/AR cells were cultured with PFT (0.6-5.0 mg/ml) for 3 days. The apoptotic effect of PFT was assessed through examination of percent apoptosis, caspase 3 activation, Bcl-2 expression levels and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). PFT induced apoptosis in HL60/AR cells in a dose-dependent manner which was maximal at 67.5% for 5 mg/ml. Induction of apoptosis was associated with activation of caspase 3, decreased expression of Bcl-2 and decreased polarization of MMP. In addition, PFT showed a unique characteristic of piercing holes in HL60/AR cells, as indicated by AFM studies. This hole induction may be responsible for the apoptotic effect on cancer cells. These results suggest that PFT may act as a potential therapy for the treatment of MDR leukemia. PMID:24430613

  1. Expression and role of PGP, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP3 in multidrug resistance of canine mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In both women and female dogs, the most prevalent type of malignant neoplasm is the spontaneous mammary tumor. In dogs, half of these are malignant. The treatment of choice for the canine patients is surgical mastectomy. Unfortunately, it often fails in high-risk, locally invasive mammary tumors as of during the time of the surgery the micro-metastases are present. Moreover, there are neither large studies conducting to prove of the benefit from the chemotherapy in dogs nor established chemotherapy treatment protocols available. Additionally, the effectiveness of each individual chemotherapeutic agent and drug resistance of canine mammary cancer have not yet been characterized. That has become the aim of our study, to assess the expression of PGP, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP3 in canine mammary cancer cell lines and to investigate their role in cancer resistance to vinblastine, cisplatin and cyclophosphamide with using RNAi approach. Results The results suggested that in canine mammary cancer, the vinblastine efflux was mediated by PGP and MRP1 proteins, cisplatin efflux was mediated by all four examined efflux pumps (PGP, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP3), whereas cyclophosphamide resistance was related to BCRP activity. RNAi silencing of these efflux pumps significantly decreased IC50 doses of the examined drugs in canine mammary carcinoma cells. Conclusions Our results have indicated the treatment of cells involving use of the siRNA targeting efflux pumps could be a beneficial approach in the future. PMID:23773525

  2. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado, W.; Horwitz, S.B.

    1987-11-03

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistant phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl/sub 2/ was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 ..mu..M cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance.

  3. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Mellado, W; Horwitz, S B

    1987-11-01

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistance phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl2 was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 microM cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by [gamma-32P]ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance. PMID:3427052

  4. Cross-talk between EPAS-1/HIF-2α and PXR signaling pathway regulates multi-drug resistance of stomach cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiuda; Bai, Zhenzhong; Feng, Fan; Song, Erlin; Du, Feng; Zhao, Junhui; Shen, Guoshuang; Ji, Faxiang; Li, Guoyuan; Ma, Xinfu; Hang, Xingyi; Xu, Binghe

    2016-03-01

    EPAS-1/HIF-2α (Endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1/hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 2α) is a transcription factor expressed in a wide range of human cancers, including stomach cancer. Although EPAS-1 has been studied for years, its function in oncogenic transformation processes needs to be further investigated. In this study, we found that EPAS-1 would promote the growth of stomach cancer cell line BGC-823. Our results revealed that EPAS-1 interacts with Pregnane X Receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that regulates multiple genes' transcription involved in multi-drugs resistance (MDR) process. Protein-protein interaction between EPAS-1 and PXR was identified by co-immunoprecipitation and GST-pull down assays. By this interaction, EPAS-1 recruited PXR to its response elements in promoter/enhancer regions of CYP3A4, a PXR target gene. Over-expression of EPAS-1 increased the expression of PXR responsive genes, enhanced the proliferation of BGC-823 cells and boosted the resistance of BGC-823 cells against the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs, e.g. Mitomycin C and Paclitaxel. Reduction of EPAS-1 level via its siRNA disrupted the proliferation, and enhanced the susceptibility of BGC-823 cells to those chemotherapeutic drugs. Our findings suggested that EPAS-1 and PXR may cooperatively participate in development and especially MDR process of stomach cancer. These findings may contribute to more effective targeted drugs discovery for the stomach cancer therapy. PMID:26783937

  5. pH and near-infrared light dual-stimuli responsive drug delivery using DNA-conjugated gold nanorods for effective treatment of multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Feihu; Wang, Yun; Wang, Jining; Yu, Yanna; Guo, Shengrong; Chen, Rongjun; Zhou, Dejian

    2016-06-28

    A thiolated pH-responsive DNA conjugated gold nanorod (GNR) was developed as a multifunctional nanocarrier for targeted, pH-and near infrared (NIR) radiation dual-stimuli triggered drug delivery. It was further passivated by a thiolated poly(ethylene glycol)-biotin to improve its cancer targeting ability by specific binding to cancer cell over-expressed biotin receptors. Doxorubicin (DOX), a widely used clinical anticancer drug, was conveniently loaded into nanocarrier by intercalating inside the double-stranded pH-responsive DNAs on the GNR surface to complete the construction of the multifunctional nanomedicine. The nanomedicine can rapidly and effectively release its DOX payload triggered by an acidic pH environment (pH~5) and/or applying an 808nm NIR laser radiation. Compared to free DOX, the biotin-modified nanomedicine displayed greatly increased cell uptake and significantly reduced drug efflux by model multidrug resistant (MDR) breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7/ADR). The application of NIR radiation further increased the DOX release and facilitated its nuclear accumulation. As a result, this new DNA-GNR based multifunctional nanomedicine exerted greatly increased potency (~67 fold) against the MDR cancer cells over free DOX. PMID:27072026

  6. Multidrug resistance protein 1 reduces the aggregation of mutant huntingtin in neuronal cells derived from the Huntington's disease R6/2 model.

    PubMed

    Im, Wooseok; Ban, Jae-Jun; Chung, Jin-Young; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Kim, Manho

    2015-01-01

    Mutant huntingtin (mHtt) aggregation in the nucleus is the most readily apparent phenotype and cause of neuronal death in Huntington's disease (HD). Inhibiting mHtt aggregation reduces cell death in the brain and is thus a promising therapeutic approach. The results of the present study demonstrated that mHtt aggregation in the nucleus was altered by the activity of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), which was experimentally modulated by verapamil, siRNA and an expression vector. MDR1 detoxifies drugs and metabolites through its excretory functions in the membrane compartment, thereby protecting cells against death or senescence. When they were treated with verapamil, R6/2 mice showed a progressive decline in rotarod performance and increased mHtt aggregation in the brain. Using neuronal stem cells from R6/2 mice, we developed an in vitro HD model to test mHtt accumulation in the nuclei of neurons. When MDR1 activity in cells was decreased by verapamil or siRNA, mHtt aggregation in the nuclei increased, whereas the induction of MDR1 resulted in a decrease in mHtt aggregation. Thus, our data provide evidence that MDR1 plays an important role in the clearance of mHtt aggregation and may thus be a potential target for improving the survival of neurons in Huntington's disease. PMID:26586297

  7. Dasatinib reverses the multidrug resistance of breast cancer MCF-7 cells to doxorubicin by downregulating P-gp expression via inhibiting the activation of ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Qi; Meng, Qiang; Sun, Huijun; Huo, Xiaokui; Sun, Pengyuan; Peng, Jinyong; Liu, Zhihao; Yang, Xiaobo; Liu, Kexin

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major obstacles to the efficiency of cancer chemotherapy, which often results from the overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). In the present study, we determined the effect of dasatinib which was approved for imatinib resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment on P-gp-mediated MDR. Our results showed that dasatinib significantly increased the sensitivity of P-gp-overexpressing MCF-7/Adr cells to doxorubicin in MTT assays; thus lead to an enhanced cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in MCF-7/Adr cells. Additionally, dasatinib increased the intracellular accumulation, inhibited the efflux of doxorubicin in MCF-7/Adr cells, and significantly enhanced doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in MCF-7/Adr cells. Further studies showed that dasatinib altered the expression levels of mRNA, protein levels of P-gp, and the phosphorylation of signal–regulated kinase (ERK) both in time-dependent (before 24 h) and dose-dependent manners at concentrations that produced MDR reversals. In conclusion, dasatinib reverses P-gp-mediated MDR by downregulating P-gp expression, which may be partly attributed to the inhibition of ERK pathway. Dasatinib may play an important role in circumventing MDR when combined with other conventional antineoplastic drugs. PMID:25482933

  8. Multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein dampens SR-BI cholesteryl ester uptake from high density lipoproteins in human leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Spolitu, Stefano; Uda, Sabrina; Deligia, Stefania; Frau, Alessandra; Collu, Maria; Angius, Fabrizio; Batetta, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells are characterised by a high content of cholesterol esters (CEs), while tumor-bearing patients show low levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). The origin and significance of high CE levels in cancer cell biology has not been completely clarified. Recent evidence that lymphoblastic cells selectively acquire exogenous CE from HDL via the scavenger receptor SR-BI has drawn attention to the additional membrane proteins involved in this pathway. P-glycopotein-MDR1 (P-gp) is a product of the MDR1 gene and confers resistance to antitumor drugs. Its possible role in plasma membrane cholesterol trafficking and CE metabolism has been suggested. In the present study this aspect was investigated in a lymphoblastic cell line selected for MDR1 resistance. CEM were made resistant by stepwise exposure to low (LR) and high (HR) doses of vincristine (VCR). P-gp activity (3H-vinblastine), CE content, CE and triglycerides (TG) synthesis (14C-oleate), neutral lipids and Dil-HDL uptake (fluorescence), SR-BI, ABCA1 and P-gp protein expression (western blotting) were determined. To better evaluate the relationship between CE metabolism and P-gp activity, the ACAT inhibitor Sandoz-58035 and the P-gp inhibitors progesterone, cyclosporine and verapamil were used. CE content and synthesis were similar in the parental and resistant cells. However, in the latter population, SR-BI protein expression increased, whereas CE-HDL uptake decreased. These changes correlated with the degree of VCR-resistance. As well as reverting MDR1-resistance, the inhibitors of P-gp activity induced the CE-HDL/SR-BI pathway by reactivating membrane cholesterol trafficking. Indeed, CE-HDL uptake, SRBI expression and CE content increased, whereas there was a decrease in cholesterol esterification. These results demonstrated that P-gp overexpression impairs anticancer drug uptake as well as the SR-BI mediated selective CE-HDL uptake. This suggests that these membrane proteins act in an opposite manner on

  9. Multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein dampens SR-BI cholesteryl ester uptake from high density lipoproteins in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Spolitu, Stefano; Uda, Sabrina; Deligia, Stefania; Frau, Alessandra; Collu, Maria; Angius, Fabrizio; Batetta, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells are characterised by a high content of cholesterol esters (CEs), while tumor-bearing patients show low levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). The origin and significance of high CE levels in cancer cell biology has not been completely clarified. Recent evidence that lymphoblastic cells selectively acquire exogenous CE from HDL via the scavenger receptor SR-BI has drawn attention to the additional membrane proteins involved in this pathway. P-glycopotein-MDR1 (P-gp) is a product of the MDR1 gene and confers resistance to antitumor drugs. Its possible role in plasma membrane cholesterol trafficking and CE metabolism has been suggested. In the present study this aspect was investigated in a lymphoblastic cell line selected for MDR1 resistance. CEM were made resistant by stepwise exposure to low (LR) and high (HR) doses of vincristine (VCR). P-gp activity ((3)H-vinblastine), CE content, CE and triglycerides (TG) synthesis ((14)C-oleate), neutral lipids and Dil-HDL uptake (fluorescence), SR-BI, ABCA1 and P-gp protein expression (western blotting) were determined. To better evaluate the relationship between CE metabolism and P-gp activity, the ACAT inhibitor Sandoz-58035 and the P-gp inhibitors progesterone, cyclosporine and verapamil were used. CE content and synthesis were similar in the parental and resistant cells. However, in the latter population, SR-BI protein expression increased, whereas CE-HDL uptake decreased. These changes correlated with the degree of VCR-resistance. As well as reverting MDR1-resistance, the inhibitors of P-gp activity induced the CE-HDL/SR-BI pathway by reactivating membrane cholesterol trafficking. Indeed, CE-HDL uptake, SRBI expression and CE content increased, whereas there was a decrease in cholesterol esterification. These results demonstrated that P-gp overexpression impairs anticancer drug uptake as well as the SR-BI mediated selective CE-HDL uptake. This suggests that these membrane proteins act in an opposite

  10. Green Tea Catechin-Based Complex Micelles Combined with Doxorubicin to Overcome Cardiotoxicity and Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tangjian; Liu, Jinjian; Ren, Jie; Huang, Fan; Ou, Hanlin; Ding, Yuxun; Zhang, Yumin; Ma, Rujiang; An, Yingli; Liu, Jianfeng; Shi, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer treatment has been demonstrated to cause some side effects on healthy tissues and multidrug resistance of the tumor cells, which greatly limits therapeutic efficacy. To address these limitations and achieve better therapeutic efficacy, combination therapy based on nanoparticle platforms provides a promising approach through delivering different agents simultaneously to the same destination with synergistic effect. In this study, a novel green tea catechin-based polyion complex (PIC) micelle loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) was constructed through electrostatic interaction and phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction between poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lysine-co-lysine-phenylboronic acid) (PEG-PLys/PBA) and EGCG. DOX was co-loaded in the PIC micelles through π-π stacking interaction with EGCG. The phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction endowed the PIC micelles with high stability under physiological condition. Moreover, acid cleavability of phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction in the micelle core has significant benefits for delivering EGCG and DOX to same destination with synergistic effects. In addition, benefiting from the oxygen free radicals scavenging activity of EGCG, combination therapy with EGCG and DOX in the micelle core could protect the cardiomyocytes from DOX-mediated cardiotoxicity according to the histopathologic analysis of hearts. Attributed to modulation of EGCG on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity, this kind of PIC micelles could effectively reverse multidrug resistance of cancer cells. These results suggested that EGCG based PIC micelles could effectively overcome DOX induced cardiotoxicity and multidrug resistance. PMID:27375779

  11. Synergism of three-drug combinations of sanguinarine and other plant secondary metabolites with digitonin and doxorubicin in multi-drug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Eid, Safaa Yehia; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki; Wink, Michael

    2012-11-15

    We determined the ability of some phytochemicals, including alkaloids (glaucine, harmine, and sanguinarine), phenolics (EGCG and thymol), and terpenoids (menthol, aromadendrene, β-sitosterol-O-glucoside, and β-carotene), alone or in combination with the saponin digitonin to reverse the relative multi-drug resistance of Caco-2 and CEM/ADR5000 cells to the chemotherapeutical agent doxorubicin. The IC(50) of doxorubicin in Caco-2 and CEM/ADR5000 was 4.22 and 44.08μM, respectively. Combination of non-toxic concentrations of individual secondary metabolite with doxorubicin synergistically sensitized Caco-2 and CEM/ADR5000 cells, and significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin. Furthermore, three-drug combinations (secondary metabolite+digitonin+doxorubicin) were even more powerful. The best synergist was the benzophenanthridine alkaloid sanguinarine. It reduced the IC(50) value of doxorubicin 17.58-fold in two-drug combinations (sanguinarine+doxorubicin) and even 35.17-fold in three-drug combinations (sanguinarine+digitonin+doxorubicin) in Caco-2 cells. Thus synergistic drug combinations offer the possibility to enhance doxorubicin efficacy in chemotherapy. PMID:23146422

  12. Butorphanol, a synthetic opioid, sensitizes ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance via inhibition of the efflux function of ABCB1 in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Zhang, Tao; Shan, Zhi-Ming; Qi, Min-Yue; Xiu, Huan-Huan; Liu, Lei; Wu, Shi-Zhe; Jia, Zhen; Xu, Kang-Qing

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a formidable challenge in the use of chemotherapy and represents a powerful obstacle to the treatment of leukemia. ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) is a recognized factor which causes MDR and is closely related to poor outcome and relapse in leukemia. Ongoing research concerning the strategy for inhibiting the abnormally high activity of the ABCB1 transporter is critically needed. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the interaction between ABCB1 transporter and butorphanol. Our results showed that butorphanol significantly antagonized ABCB1-mediated drug efflux and increased the intracellular drug concentration by inhibiting the transport activity of ABCB1 in leukemia cells. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that butorphanol did not alter the protein expression or localization of ABCB1 in HL60/VCR and K562/ADR cells. Furthermore, homology modeling indicated that butorphanol could fit into the large drug-binding cavity of ABCB1 and form a binding conformation. In conclusion, butorphanol reversed the ABCB1-mediated MDR in leukemia cells by directly suppressing the efflux activity of ABCB1. PMID:26062728

  13. NOTE: Dielectrophoretic analysis of changes in cytoplasmic ion levels due to ion channel blocker action reveals underlying differences between drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant leukaemic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, L.; Shelmerdine, H.; Hughes, M. P.; Coley, H. M.; Hübner, Y.; Labeed, F. H.

    2008-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP)—the motion of particles in non-uniform AC fields—has been used in the investigation of cell electrophysiology. The technique offers the advantages of rapid determination of the conductance and capacitance of membrane and cytoplasm. However, it is unable to directly determine the ionic strengths of individual cytoplasmic ions, which has potentially limited its application in assessing cell composition. In this paper, we demonstrate how dielectrophoresis can be used to investigate the cytoplasmic ion composition by using ion channel blocking agents. By blocking key ion transporters individually, it is possible to determine their overall contribution to the free ions in the cytoplasm. We use this technique to evaluate the relative contributions of chloride, potassium and calcium ions to the cytoplasmic conductivities of drug sensitive and resistant myelogenous leukaemic (K562) cells in order to determine the contributions of individual ion channel activity in mediating multi-drug resistance in cancer. Results indicate that whilst K+ and Ca2+ levels were extremely similar between sensitive and resistant lines, levels of Cl- were elevated by three times to that in the resistant line, implying increased chloride channel activity. This result is in line with current theories of MDR, and validates the use of ion channel blockers with DEP to investigate ion channel function.

  14. Targeting Multidrug-resistant Staphylococci with an anti-rpoA Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugated to the HIV-1 TAT Cell Penetrating Peptide.

    PubMed

    Abushahba, Mostafa Fn; Mohammad, Haroon; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibiotics. Due to their unique mode of action, peptide nucleic acids are novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics to tackle the issue of bacterial multidrug resistance. In this study, we designed a peptide nucleic acid covalently conjugated to the HIV-TAT cell penetrating peptide (GRKKKRRQRRRYK) in order to target the RNA polymerase α subunit gene (rpoA) required for bacterial genes transcription. We explored the antimicrobial activity of the anti-rpoA construct (peptide nucleic acid-TAT) against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus, linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis in pure culture, infected mammalian cell culture, and in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. The anti-rpoA construct led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth (at micromolar concentrations) in vitro and in both infected cell culture and in vivo in C. elegans. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of two important methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin). This study confirms that rpoA gene is a potential target for development of novel antisense therapeutics to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27434684

  15. Caveolin-1 regulates cell apoptosis and invasion ability in paclitaxel-induced multidrug-resistant A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Long; Zhou, Yongxin; Yi, Xianghua

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect and potential mechanism of caveolin-1 (Cav1) knockdown in paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer A549/Taxol cells. The human paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer cell line A549/Taxol was transfected with a Cav1 shRNA lentiviral vector. Interference efficiency for Cav1 was detected by real-time PCR and Western blotting. A MTT assay was used to determine cell proliferation, and flow cytometry was used to detect the cell cycle stage and apoptosis. Cell migration and invasion capability were detected by a transwell assay. Protein levels of related signaling molecules were detected by Western blotting. We successfully constructed a stable A549/Taxol cell line expressing low levels of Cav1. Cav1 knockdown significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced G0/G1 arrest and cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these effects correlated significantly with a reduction in cyclin D1 expression and activation of the Bcl-2/Bax-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, knockdown of Cav1 inhibited cell migration and invasion, and this may be related to the inhibition of AKT and the subsequent decreased protein expression of MMP2, MMP7 and MMP9. PMID:26464635

  16. Upregulation of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 by Allyl Isothiocyanate in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell: Involvement of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shujun; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Chenyin; Chen, Yajun; Li, Jie; Wang, Xueqi; Wang, Dianlei; Li, Zegeng; Peng, Zhaoliang; Fan, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) plays a protective role in the etiology and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which results from oxidative stress and inflammation of lung injury. The lower functional MRP1 activity is related to COPD development. Our previous study showed that Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) induced the expression and activity of MRP1 in a dose-dependent manner. However, which signaling pathway contributes to the upregulation of MRP1 by AITC is unclear. In this study, signaling pathway specific inhibitors were used to examine the mechanism of AITC. We found that JNK inhibitor SP600125 treatment decreased MRP1 mRNA expression in 16HBE14o- cells. But the ERK inhibitor U0126 or PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 produced no obvious effect. The AITC-induced increase of MRP1 mRNA expression was abolished by cotreatment of SP600125, while it was not obviously affected by U0126 or LY294002. Furthermore, AITC acivates the JNK signaling pathway in 16HBE14o- cells. Finally, we found that JNK pathway mediated the upregulation of AITC-induced expression and function of MRP1. Taken together, our results indicated that AITC increased the expression and the activity of MRP1 via a JNK-dependent pathway. ERK and PI3K signaling pathway were not involved in the expression of MRP1 mRNA. PMID:26273426

  17. Listeria monocytogenes multidrug resistance transporters and cyclic di-AMP, which contribute to type I interferon induction, play a role in cell wall stress.

    PubMed

    Kaplan Zeevi, Millie; Shafir, Nirit S; Shaham, Shira; Friedman, Sivan; Sigal, Nadejda; Nir Paz, Ran; Boneca, Ivo G; Herskovits, Anat A

    2013-12-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes activates a robust type I interferon response upon infection. This response is partially dependent on the multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter MdrM and relies on cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP) secretion, yet the functions of MdrM and cyclic-di-AMP that lead to this response are unknown. Here we report that it is not MdrM alone but a cohort of MDR transporters that together contribute to type I interferon induction during infection. In a search for a physiological function of these transporters, we revealed that they play a role in cell wall stress responses. A mutant with deletion of four transporter genes (ΔmdrMTAC) was found to be sensitive to sublethal concentrations of vancomycin due to an inability to produce and shed peptidoglycan under this stress. Remarkably, c-di-AMP is involved in this phenotype, as overexpression of the c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase (PdeA) resulted in increased susceptibility of the ΔmdrMTAC mutant to vancomycin, whereas overexpression of the c-di-AMP diadenylate cyclase (DacA) reduced susceptibility to this drug. These observations suggest a physiological association between c-di-AMP and the MDR transporters and support the model that MDR transporters mediate c-di-AMP secretion to regulate peptidoglycan synthesis in response to cell wall stress. PMID:24056102

  18. The combined treatment with chloroquine and the enzymatic oxidation products of spermine overcomes multidrug resistance of melanoma M14 ADR2 cells: a new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Agostinelli, Enzo; Condello, Maria; Tempera, Giampiero; Macone, Alberto; Bozzuto, Giuseppina; Ohkubo, Shinji; Calcabrini, Annarica; Arancia, Giuseppe; Molinari, Agnese

    2014-09-01

    It has been confirmed that multidrug resistant (MDR) melanoma cells (M14 ADR2) are more sensitive than their wild-type counterparts (M14 WT) to H2O2 and aldehydes, the products of bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO)-catalyzed oxidation of spermine. The metabolites formed by BSAO and spermine are more toxic, in M14 cells, than exogenous H2O2 and acrolein, even though their concentration is lower during the initial phase of incubation due to their more gradual release than the exogenous products. Binding of BSAO to the cell membrane and release of the reaction products of spermine into the immediate vicinity of the cells, or directly into the cells, may explain the apparently paradoxical phenomenon. Both WT and MDR cells, after pre-treatment for 24 h, or longer, with the lysosomotropic compound chloroquine (CQ), show to be sensitized to subsequent exposure to BSAO/spermine enzymatic system. Evidence of ultrastructural aberrations and acridine orange release from lysosomes is presented in this study that is in favor of the permeabilization of the lysosomal membrane as the major cause of sensitization by CQ. Pre-treatment with CQ amplifies the ability of the metabolites formed from spermine by oxidative deamination to induce cell death. Melanocytes, differently from melanoma cells, were unaffected by the enzymatic system, even when preceded by CQ treatment. Since it is conceivable that combined treatment with a lysosomotropic compound and BSAO/spermine would be effective against tumour cells, it is of interest to search for such novel compounds, which might be promising for application in a therapeutic setting. PMID:24969157

  19. Optimizing the design and in vitro evaluation of bioreactive glucose oxidase-microspheres for enhanced cytotoxicity against multidrug resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ji; Liu, Qun; Shuhendler, Adam J; Rauth, Andrew M; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2015-06-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOX) encapsulated in alginate-chitosan microspheres (GOX-MS) was shown in our previous work to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in situ and exhibit anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of present work was to optimize the design and thus enhance the efficacy of GOX-MS against multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cells. GOX-MS with different mean diameters of 4, 20 or 140 μm were prepared using an emulsification-internal gelation-adsorption-chitosan coating method with varying compositions and conditions. The GOX loading efficiency, loading level, relative bioactivity of GOX-MS, and GOX leakage were determined and optimal chitosan concentrations in the coating solution were identified. The influence of particle size on cellular uptake, ROS generation, cytotoxicity and their underlying mechanisms was investigated. At the same GOX dose and incubation time, smaller sized GOX-MS produced larger amounts of H2O2 in cell culture medium and greater cytotoxicity toward murine breast cancer MDR (EMT6/AR1.0) and wild type (EMT6/WT) cells. Fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed significant uptake of small sized (4 μm) GOX-MS by both MDR and WT cells, but no cellular uptake of large (140 μm) GOX-MS. The GOX-MS were equally effective in killing both MDR cells and WT cells. The cytotoxicity of the GOX formulations was positively correlated with membrane damage and lipid peroxidation. GOX-MS induced greater membrane damage and lipid peroxidation in MDR cells than the WT cells. These results suggest that the optimized, small micron-sized GOX-MS are highly effective against MDR breast cancer cells. PMID:25896537

  20. MiR-296-3p regulates cell growth and multi-drug resistance of human glioblastoma by targeting ether-à-go-go (EAG1).

    PubMed

    Bai, Yifeng; Liao, Hongzhan; Liu, Tianzhu; Zeng, Xiangping; Xiao, Faman; Luo, Luqiao; Guo, Hongbo; Guo, Linlang

    2013-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) - short non-coding RNA molecules - post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions and play crucial roles in diverse biological processes such as development, differentiation, apoptosis and proliferation. In order to investigate the possible role of miRNAs in the development of multi-drug resistance (MDR) in human glioblastoma, we first detected (by Western blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR] and immunohistochemistry) the expression of miR-296-3p and ether-à-go-go (EAG1 or KCNH1) in U251 cells, U251/imatinib mesylate (U251AR cells) and clinical specimens. The results showed that miR-296-3p was down-regulated in U251AR cells, concurrent with the up-regulation of EAG1 protein, compared with the parental U251 cell line. In vitro drug sensitivity assay demonstrated that over-expression of miR-296-3p sensitised glioblastoma (GBM) cells to anticancer drugs, whereas down-expression using antisense oligonucleotides conferred MDR. Ectopic expression of miR-296-3p reduced EAG1 expression and suppressed cell proliferation drug resistance, and the luciferase activity of an EAG1 3'-untranslated region-based reporter construct in U251AR cells, whereas EAG1 over-expression rescued the suppressive effect of miR-296-3p in U251AR cells. We also found that EAG1 was widely over-expressed and inversely correlated with miR-296-3p in clinical specimens. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-296-3p may play a role of MDR in glioblastoma at least in part by targeting EAG1. PMID:22999387

  1. 3D-QSAR AND CONTOUR MAP ANALYSIS OF TARIQUIDAR ANALOGUES AS MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE PROTEIN-1 (MRP1) INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Prathusha; Inupakutika, Madhuri; Devireddy, Amith R.; Gunda, Shravan Kumar; Willmon, Thomas Mark; Ranjana, KC; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranaweera, Indrika; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Barr, Sharla; Varela, Manuel F.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to the successful chemotherapy towards several cancers is multidrug resistance of human cancer cells to anti-cancer drugs. An important contributor to multidrug resistance is the human multidrug resistance protein-1 transporter (MRP1), which is an efflux pump of the ABC (ATP binding cassette) superfamily. Thus, highly efficacious, third generation MRP1 inhibitors, like tariquidar analogues, are promising inhibitors of multidrug resistance and are under clinical trials. To maximize the efficacy of MRP1 inhibitors and to reduce systemic toxicity, it is important to limit the exposure of MRP1 inhibitors and anticancer drugs to normal tissues and to increase their co-localization with tumor cells. Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) associated with 3D-Quantitiative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies were performed on a series of tariquidar analogues, as selective MDR modulators. Best predictability was obtained with CoMFA model r2(non-cross-validated square of correlation coefficient) = 0.968, F value = 151.768 with five components, standard error of estimate = 0.107 while the CoMSIA yielded r2 = 0.982, F value = 60.628 with six components, and standard error of estimate = 0.154. These results indicate that steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic (lipophilic), and hydrogen bond donor substituents play significant roles in multidrug resistance modulation of tariquidar analogues upon MRP1. The tariquidar analogue and MRP1 binding and stability data generated from CoMFA and CoMSIA based 3D–contour maps may further aid in study and design of tariquidar analogues as novel, potent and selective MDR modulator drug candidates. PMID:26913287

  2. Differential overexpression of three mdr gene family members in multidrug-resistant J774.2 mouse cells. Evidence that distinct P-glycoprotein precursors are encoded by unique mdr genes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, S I; Lothstein, L; Horwitz, S B

    1989-07-15

    A hallmark of the multidrug-resistant phenotype is the overproduction of a family of 130-180-kDa integral membrane phosphoglycoproteins collectively called P-glycoprotein. Gene-specific hybridization probes were derived from three classes of mouse P-glycoprotein cDNAs. These probes revealed the differential amplification and/or transcriptional activation of three distinct but closely related mdr genes (mdr1a, mdr1b, and mdr2) in independently selected multidrug-resistant J774.2 mouse cell lines. Overexpression of mdr1a and mdr1b was found to correlate, in general, with the differential overproduction of either a 120- or 125-kDa P-glycoprotein precursor, respectively. This same correlation was observed in a single cell line during the course of stepwise selection for resistance to vinblastine in which a switch in gene expression from mdr1b to mdr1a resulted in a switch from the 125- to 120-kDa P-glycoprotein precursor. These findings suggest that differential overexpression of distinct mdr genes which encode unique P-glycoprotein isoforms is a possible mechanism for generating diversity in the multidrug-resistant phenotype. PMID:2473069

  3. Multi-drug Resistance Protein 4 (MRP4)-mediated Regulation of Fibroblast Cell Migration Reflects a Dichotomous Role of Intracellular Cyclic Nucleotides*

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Chandrima; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Moon, Chang-Suk; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Zhang, Weiqiang; Cheepala, Satish B.; Schuetz, John D.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that cyclic nucleotides and cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling molecules control cell migration. However, the concept that it is not just the absence or presence of cyclic nucleotides, but a highly coordinated balance between these molecules that regulates cell migration, is new and revolutionary. In this study, we used multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4)-expressing cell lines and MRP4 knock-out mice as model systems and wound healing assays as the experimental system to explore this unique and emerging concept. MRP4, a member of a large family of ATP binding cassette transporter proteins, localizes to the plasma membrane and functions as a nucleotide efflux transporter and thus plays a role in the regulation of intracellular cyclic nucleotide levels. Here, we demonstrate that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from Mrp4−/− mice have higher intracellular cyclic nucleotide levels and migrate faster compared with MEFs from Mrp4+/+ mice. Using FRET-based cAMP and cGMP sensors, we show that inhibition of MRP4 with MK571 increases both cAMP and cGMP levels, which results in increased migration. In contrast to these moderate increases in cAMP and cGMP levels seen in the absence of MRP4, a robust increase in cAMP levels was observed following treatment with forskolin and isobutylmethylxanthine, which decreases fibroblast migration. In response to externally added cell-permeant cyclic nucleotides (cpt-cAMP and cpt-cGMP), MEF migration appears to be biphasic. Altogether, our studies provide the first experimental evidence supporting the novel concept that balance between cyclic nucleotides is critical for cell migration. PMID:23264633

  4. Sensitization of multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cells to vinblastine by novel acridones: correlation between anti-calmodulin activity and anti-MDR activity.

    PubMed

    Mayur, Y C; Padma, T; Parimala, B H; Chandramouli, K H; Jagadeesh, S; Gowda, N M Made; Thimmaiah, K N

    2006-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells remains to be an important cause of chemotherapy failure. Search for the new MDR reversal agents is still an unceasing challenge for the scientists. In an attempt to find clinically useful modulators of MDR, a series of 19 N(10)-substituted-2-bromoacridones has been synthesized. Parent compound 1, prepared by the Ullmann condensation of o-chlorobenzoic acid and p-bromoaniline, undergoes N-alkylation in the presence of a phase transfer catalyst. N-(omega-Chloroalkyl) analogues were subjected to iodide catalyzed nucleophilic substitution reaction with various secondary amines to get the products 3-10 and 12-19, which increased the uptake of vinblastine (VLB) in MDR KBCh(R)-8-5 cells to a greater extent (1.25 to 1.9-fold) than did a similar concentration of the standard modulator, verapamil (VRP). Results of the efflux experiment showed that each modulator significantly inhibited the efflux of VLB, suggesting that they may be competitors for P-gp. All the compounds effectively compete with [(3)H] azidopine for binding to P-gp, pointed out this transport membrane protein as their likely site of action. Compounds at IC(10) were evaluated for their efficacy to modulate the cytotoxicity of VLB in KBCh(R)-8-5 cells and found that the modulators enhanced the cytotoxicity of VLB by 3.8 to 34-fold. The study on the structure-activity relationship revealed that substitution of hydrogen atom at position C-2 in acridone nucleus by a bromine atom increased the cytotoxic and anti-MDR activities. The ability of acridones to inhibit calmodulin-dependent cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase has been determined and the results have shown a strong positive correlation between anti-calmodulin activity and cytotoxicity in KBCh(R)-8-5 cells or anti-MDR activity. PMID:16787357

  5. Multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 4 attenuates benzo[a]pyrene-mediated DNA-adduct formation in human bronchoalveolar H358 cells.

    PubMed

    Gelhaus, Stacy L; Gilad, Oren; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Penning, Trevor M; Blair, Ian A

    2012-02-25

    Multi-drug resistance protein (MRP) 4, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, has broad substrate specificity. It facilitates the transport of bile salt conjugates, conjugated steroids, nucleoside analogs, eicosanoids, and cardiovascular drugs. Recent studies in liver carcinoma cells and hepatocytes showed that MRP4 expression is regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The AhR has particular importance in the lung and is most commonly associated with the up-regulation of cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-mediated metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) to reactive intermediates. Treatment of H358, human bronchoalveolar, cells with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or (-)-benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydro-7,8-diol (B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol), the proximate carcinogen of B[a]P, revealed that MRP4 expression was increased compared to control. This suggested that MRP4 expression might contribute to the paradoxical decrease in (+)-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene-2'-deoxyguanosine ((+)-anti-trans-B[a]PDE-dGuo) DNA-adducts observed in TCDD-treated H358 cells. We have now found that decreased MRP4 expression induced by a short hairpin RNA (shRNA), or chemical inhibition with probenecid, increased (+)-anti-trans-B[a]PDE-dGuo formation in cells treated with (-)-B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol, but not the ultimate carcinogen (+)-anti-trans-B[a]PDE. Thus, up-regulation of MRP4 increased cellular efflux of (-)-B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol, which attenuated DNA-adduct formation. This is the first report identifying a specific MRP efflux transporter that decreases DNA damage arising from an environmental carcinogen. PMID:22155354

  6. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Yuta; Yuan, Bo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Takeichi, Makoto; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2011-12-15

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As{sup III}) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As{sup III} on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As{sup III} were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As{sup III} than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As{sup III} in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As{sup III} cytotoxicity between these cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examination of effect of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion

  7. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol-Hee

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:16202168

  8. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  9. Involvement of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in reversal of multidrug resistance of human leukemia cells in hypoxia by 5-bromotetrandrine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Bao-an; Jin, Jun-fei; He, You-ji; Niu, Yi-qi

    2013-11-01

    5-Bromotetrandrine (BrTet), a candidate multidrug resistance (MDR) modulator, is a potential compound for use in cancer therapy when combined with anticancer agents such as daunorubicin (DNR) and paclitaxel. The purposeof this study was to investigate the mechanism of reversal of P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated MDR by BrTet and the involvement of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun signaling pathway in both adriamycin-sensitive K562 and adriamycin-resistant K562 (KA) leukemia cells in hypoxia. The combination of BrTet and DNR decreased both phosphorylated JNK1/2 and MDR1/P-gp levels under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, a pharmacological inhibitor of JNK, SP600125, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligonucleotides to both JNK1 and JNK2 reversed BrTet- or DNR-induced JNK phosphorylation and MDR1/P-gp levels. We further demonstrated that the decreased JNK phosphorylation and MDR1/P-gp levels were associated with a significant increase in intracellular accumulation of DNR, which dramatically enhanced the sensitivity of drug-resistant KA cells to DNR, and led to cellular apoptosis through activation of the caspase-3 pathway. It is concluded that using BrTet in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents and pharmacological inhibitors of JNK can abrogate the P-gp-induced MDR in adriamycin-resistant K562 cells, which has potential clinical relevance in cancer therapy for chemotherapeutic-resistant human leukemia. PMID:23418897

  10. Synthesis and structure-activity evaluation of isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones with improved selective activity towards multidrug-resistant cells expressing P-glycoproteina

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew D.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Pluchino, Kristen M.; Monda, Julie K.; Li, Jiayang; Walsh, Martin J.; Boxer, Matthew B.; Warren, Timothy H.; Fales, Henry M.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters presents a significant unresolved clinical challenge. One strategy to resolve MDR is to develop compounds that selectively kill cells over-expressing the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (MDR1, P-gp, ABCB1). We have previously reported structure-activity studies based around the lead compound NSC73306 (1, 1-isatin-4-(4′-methoxyphenyl)-3-thiosemicarbazone, 4.3-fold selective). Here we sought to extend this work on MDR1-selective analogs by establishing whether 1 showed ‘robust’ activity against a range of cell lines expressing P-gp. We further aimed to synthesize and test analogs with varied substitution at the N4-position, and substitution around the N4-phenyl ring of isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones (IBTs), to identify compounds with increased MDR1-selectivity. Compound 1 demonstrated MDR1-selectivity against all P-gp-expressing cell lines examined. This selectivity was reversed by inhibitors of P-gp ATPase activity. Structural variation at the 4′-phenyl position of 1 yielded compounds of greater MDR1-selectivity. Two of these analogs, 1-isatin-4-(4′-nitrophenyl)-3-thiosemicarbazone (22, 8.3-fold selective) and 1-isatin-4-(4′-tert-butyl phenyl)-3-thiosemicarbazone (32, 14.8-fold selective), were selected for further testing, and were found to retain the activity profile of 1. These compounds are the most active IBTs identified to date. PMID:21721528

  11. Phase IB study of doxorubicin in combination with the multidrug resistance reversing agent S9788 in advanced colorectal and renal cell cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Punt, C. J.; Voest, E. E.; Tueni, E.; Van Oosterom, A. T.; Backx, A.; De Mulder, P. H.; Hecquet, B.; Lucas, C.; Gerard, B.; Bleiberg, H.

    1997-01-01

    S9788 is a new triazineaminopiperidine derivate capable of reversing multidrug resistance (MDR) in cells resistant to chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin. It does not belong to a known class of MDR revertants, but its action involves the binding of P-glycoprotein. Thirty-eight evaluable patients with advanced colorectal or renal cell cancer were treated with doxorubicin alone (16 patients) followed after disease progression with combination treatment of doxorubicin plus S9788 (12 patients) or upfront with the combination of doxorubicin plus S9788 (22 patients). S9788 was given i.v. as a loading dose of 56 mg m-2 over 30 min followed by doxorubicin given at 50 mg m-2 as a bolus infusion. Thereafter, a 2-h infusion of S9788 was administered at escalating doses ranging from 24 to 120 mg m-2 in subsequent cohorts of 4-10 patients. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that concentrations of S9788 that are known to reverse MDR in vitro were achieved in patients at non-toxic doses. Compared with treatment with doxorubicin alone, treatment with the combination of doxorubicin and S9788 produced a significant increase in the occurrence of WHO grade 3-4 granulocytopenia. Treatment with S9788 was cardiotoxic as it caused a dose-dependent and reversible increase in corrected QT intervals as well as clinically non-significant arrhythmias on 24- or 48-h Holter recordings. Although clinically relevant cardiac toxicities did not occur, the study was terminated as higher doses of S9788 may increase the risk of severe cardiac arrhythmias. Twenty-nine patients treated with S9788 plus doxorubicin were evaluable for response, and one patient, who progressed after treatment with doxorubicin alone, achieved a partial response. We conclude that S9788 administered at the doses and schedule used in this study results in relevant plasma concentrations in humans and can safely be administered in combination with doxorubicin. PMID:9374386

  12. Factors influencing the transfection efficiency and cellular uptake mechanisms of Pluronic P123-modified polypropyleneimine/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jijin; Hao, Junguo; Fang, Xiaoling; Sha, Xianyi

    2016-04-01

    Generally, the major obstacles for efficient gene delivery are cellular internalization and endosomal escape of nucleic acid such as plasmid DNA (pDNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA). We previously developed Pluronic P123 modified polypropyleneimine (PPI)/pDNA (P123-PPI/pDNA) polyplexes as a gene delivery system. The results showed that P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes revealed higher transfection efficiency than PPI/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells. As a continued effort, the present investigation on the factors influencing the transfection efficiency, cellular uptake mechanisms, and intracellular fate of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes is reported. The presence of P123 was the main factor influencing the transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in MCF-7/ADR cells, but other parameters, such as N/P ratio, FBS concentration, incubation time and temperature were important as well. The endocytic inhibitors against clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CvME), and macropinocytosis were involved in the internalization to investigate their effects on the cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in vitro. The data showed that the internalization of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes was obtained from both CME and CvME. Colocalization experiments with TRITC-transferrin (CME indicator), Alexa Fluor 555-CTB (CvME indicator), monoclonal anti-α-tubulin (microtubule indicator), and LysoTracker Green (Endosome/lysosome indicator) were carried out to confirm the internalization routes. The results showed that both CME and CvME played vital roles in the effective transfection of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes. Endosome/lysosome system and skeleton, including actin filament and microtubule, were necessary for the transportation after internalization. PMID:26741268

  13. Nonspecifically enhanced therapeutic effects of vincristine on multidrug-resistant cancers when coencapsulated with quinine in liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuzhen; Qiu, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    The use of vincristine (VCR) to treat cancer has been limited by its dose-dependent toxicity and development of drug resistance after repeated administrations. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which quinine hydrochloride (QN) acts as a sensitizer for VCR. Our experiments used three kinds of multidrug-resistant cancer cells and demonstrated that QN worked by inducing intracellular depletion of adenosine triphosphate, increasing adenosine triphosphatase activity, and decreasing P-glycoprotein expression. Based on these results, we designed and prepared a VCR and QN codelivery liposome (VQL) and investigated the effect of coencapsulated QN on the in vitro cytotoxicity of VCR in cells and three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids. The antitumor effects of the formulation were also evaluated in multidrug-resistant tumor-bearing mice. The results of this in vivo study indicated that VQL could reverse VCR resistance. In addition, it reduced tumor volume 5.4-fold when compared with other test groups. The data suggest that VQL could be a promising nanoscaled therapeutic agent to overcome multidrug resistance, and may have important clinical implications for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26170660

  14. Sirolimus induces apoptosis and reverses multidrug resistance in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro via increasing microRNA-34b expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Rui-hua; Tseng, Kuo-Fu; Li, Kun-peng; Lu, Zhi-gang; Liu, Yuan; Han, Kun; Gan, Zhi-hua; Lin, Shu-chen; Hu, Hai-yan; Min, Da-liu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Multi-drug resistance poses a critical bottleneck in chemotherapy. Given the up-regulation of mTOR pathway in many chemoresistant cancers, we examined whether sirolimus (rapamycin), a first generation mTOR inhibitor, might induce human osteosarcoma (OS) cell apoptosis and increase the sensitivity of OS cells to anticancer drugs in vitro. Methods: Human OS cell line MG63/ADM was treated with sirolimus alone or in combination with doxorubicin (ADM), gemcitabine (GEM) or methotrexate (MTX). Cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. MiRNAs in the cells were analyzed with miRNA microarray. The targets of miR-34b were determined based on TargetScan analysis and luciferase reporter assays. The expression of relevant mRNA and proteins was measured using qRT-PCR and Western blotting. MiR-34, PAK1 and ABCB1 levels in 40 tissue samples of OS patients were analyzed using qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization assays. Results: Sirolimus (1–100 nmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed the cell proliferation (IC50=23.97 nmol/L) and induced apoptosis. Sirolimus (10 nmol/L) significantly sensitized the cells to anticancer drugs, leading to decreased IC50 values of ADM, GEM and MTX (from 25.48, 621.41 and 21.72 μmol/L to 4.93, 73.92 and 6.77 μmol/L, respectively). Treatment of with sirolimus increased miR-34b levels by a factor of 7.5 in the cells. Upregulation of miR-34b also induced apoptosis and increased the sensitivity of the cells to the anticancer drugs, whereas transfection with miR-34b-AMO, an inhibitor of miR-34b, reversed the anti-proliferation effect of sirolimus. Two key regulators of cell cycle, apoptosis and multiple drug resistance, PAK1 and ABCB1, were demonstrated to be the direct targets of miR-34b. In 40 tissue samples of OS patients, significantly higher miR-34 ISH score and lower PAK5 and ABCB1 scores were detected in the chemo-sensitive group. Conclusion: Sirolimus increases the sensitivity of human OS

  15. Synthesis of new steroidal inhibitors of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance and biological evaluation on K562/R7 erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    de Ravel, Marc Rolland; Alameh, Ghina; Melikian, Maxime; Mahiout, Zahia; Emptoz-Bonneton, Agnès; Matera, Eva-Laure; Lomberget, Thierry; Barret, Roland; Rocheblave, Luc; Walchshofer, Nadia; Beltran, Sonia; El Jawad, Lucienne; Mappus, Elisabeth; Grenot, Catherine; Pugeat, Michel; Dumontet, Charles; Le Borgne, Marc; Cuilleron, Claude Yves

    2015-02-26

    A simple route for improving the potency of progesterone as a modulator of P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance was established by esterification or etherification of hydroxylated 5α/β-pregnane-3,20-dione or 5β-cholan-3-one precursors. X-ray crystallography of representative 7α-, 11α-, and 17α-(2'R/S)-O-tetrahydropyranyl ether diastereoisomers revealed different combinations of axial-equatorial configurations of the anomeric oxygen. Substantial stimulation of accumulation and chemosensitization was observed on K562/R7 erythroleukemia cells resistant to doxorubicin, especially using 7α,11α-O-disubstituted derivatives of 5α/β-pregnane-3,20-dione, among which the 5β-H-7α-benzoyloxy-11α-(2'R)-O-tetrahydropyranyl ether 22a revealed promising properties (accumulation index 2.9, IC50 0.5 μM versus 1.2 and 10.6 μM for progesterone), slightly overcoming those of verapamil and cyclosporin A. Several 7α,12α-O-disubstituted derivatives of 5β-cholan-3-one proved even more active, especially the 7α-O-methoxymethyl-12α-benzoate 56 (accumulation index 3.8, IC50 0.2 μM). The panel of modulating effects from different O-substitutions at a same position suggests a structural influence of the substituent completing a simple protection against stimulating effects of hydroxyl groups on P-gp-mediated transport. PMID:25634041

  16. Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), a “Multitasking” ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Susan P. C.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) encoded by ABCC1 was originally discovered as a cause of multidrug resistance in tumor cells. However, it is now clear that MRP1 serves a broader role than simply mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of drugs from cells. The antioxidant GSH and the pro-inflammatory cysteinyl leukotriene C4 have been identified as key physiological organic anions effluxed by MRP1, and an ever growing body of evidence indicates that additional lipid-derived mediators are also substrates of this transporter. As such, MRP1 is a multitasking transporter that likely influences the etiology and progression of a host of human diseases. PMID:25281745

  17. pH-responsive polymeric siRNA carriers sensitize multidrug resistant ovarian cancer cells to doxorubicin via knockdown of polo-like kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Danielle S.W.; Henry, Scott M.; Shubin, Andrew D.; Hoffman, Allan S.; Stayton, Patrick S.

    2010-01-01

    doxorubicin and utilized in ternary complexes to achieve cell sensitization through simultaneous siRNA and drug delivery from a single carrier. These results show knockdown of plk1 results in sensitization of multidrug resistant cells to doxorubicin, and this combination of gene silencing and small molecule drug delivery may prove useful to achieve potent therapeutic effects. PMID:20073508

  18. Pharmacotherapy for multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Naveen; Aseri, M. L.; Dixit, Ramakant; Gaur, S.

    2012-01-01

    The current global concern in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is the emergence of resistance to the two most potent drugs namely, isoniazid and rifampicin. Emergence of multidrug resistance tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is now a health problem faced by most of the developing countries as well as developed countries across the globe. MDR-TB is a man-made disease that is caused by improper treatment, inadequate drug supplies, and poor patient supervision. HIV infection and AIDS have been implicated as important cause for this. The review of a published literature suggests that the most powerful predictor of treatment of MDR-TB is a history of treatment of TB. Although the treatment is efficacious, there are also a number of adverse effects caused by drugs used in the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:22629081

  19. Nanomedicine to overcome cancer multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Yi, Cheng; Luo, Na; Gong, Changyang

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is still considered to be one of the most severe diseases so far. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle against curative cancer chemotherapy. The over-expression of drug efflux pumps in cellular membrane plays a critical role in preventing cancer cells from conventional chemotherapy. Nanotechnology is emerging as a class of therapeutics for MDR. This review mainly focuses on some pivotal strategies to combat MDR, including the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, stealth nanoparticles to prolong circulation time, endosomal escape, active drug delivery, stimuli sensitive drug release, and targeted co-delivery of different compounds. While convinced challenges need combatting, large numbers of preclinical studies strongly suggest that nanomedicine formations have potential application for improving the treatment of MDR. PMID:25255871

  20. The enriched fraction of Elephantopus scaber Triggers apoptosis and inhibits multi-drug resistance transporters in human epithelial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beeran, Asmy Appadath; Maliyakkal, Naseer; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medicinal plants have played an important role in the development of clinically useful anticancer agents. Elephantopus scaber (Asteraceae) (ES) is widely used in Indian traditional system of medicine for the treatment of various ailments including cancer. Objective: To investigate anticancer effects of ES in human epithelial cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxicity of ethanolic extract of ES (ES-ET) and its fractions, such as ES Petroleum ether fraction (ES-PET), ES Dichloromethane fraction (ES DCM), n Butyl alcohol fraction (ES-BT), and ES-Rest (ES-R) were assessed in human epithelial cancer cell lines using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide assay and Hoechst 33342 assays were used to gauge induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis and micronuclei assay were used to assess cell cycle specific pharmacological effects and drug induced genotoxicty. Further, the ability of ES to inhibit multi drug resistant (MDR) transporters (ABC-B1 and ABC-G2) was determined by Rhodamine (Rho) and Mitoxantrone (MXR) efflux assays. Results: The enriched fraction of ES (ES DCM) possessed dose-dependent potent cytotoxicity in human epithelial cancer cells. Further, treatment of cancer cells (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, and Caco-2) with ES DCM showed hall mark properties of apoptosis (membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation etc.). Similarly, ES DCM caused enhanced sub G0 content and micronuclei formation indicating the induction of apoptosis and drug induced genotoxicity in cancer cells, respectively. Interestingly, ES DCM inhibited MDR transporters (ABC B1 and ABC G2) in cancer cells. Conclusion: The enriched fraction of ES imparted cytotoxic effects, triggered apoptosis, induced genotoxicity, and inhibited MDR transporters in human epithelial cancer cells. Thus, ES appears to be potential anticancer agent. PMID:25829763

  1. The role of bioreductive activation of doxorubicin in cytotoxic activity against leukaemia HL60-sensitive cell line and its multidrug-resistant sublines

    PubMed Central

    Kostrzewa-Nowak, D; Paine, M J I; Wolf, C R; Tarasiuk, J

    2005-01-01

    Clinical usefulness of doxorubicin (DOX) is limited by the occurrence of multidrug resistance (MDR) associated with the presence of membrane transporters (e.g. P-glycoprotein, MRP1) responsible for the active efflux of drugs out of resistant cells. Doxorubicin is a well-known bioreductive antitumour drug. Its ability to undergo a one-electron reduction by cellular oxidoreductases is related to the formation of an unstable semiquionone radical and followed by the production of reactive oxygen species. There is an increasing body of evidence that the activation of bioreductive drugs could result in the alkylation or crosslinking binding of DNA and lead to the significant increase in the cytotoxic activity against tumour cells. The aim of this study was to examine the role of reductive activation of DOX by the human liver NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) in increasing its cytotoxic activity especially in regard to MDR tumour cells. It has been evidenced that, upon CPR catalysis, DOX underwent only the redox cycling (at low NADPH concentration) or a multistage chemical transformation (at high NADPH concentration). It was also found, using superoxide dismutase (SOD), that the first stage undergoing reductive activation according to the mechanism of the redox cycling had the key importance for the metabolic conversion of DOX. In the second part of this work, the ability of DOX to inhibit the growth of human promyelocytic-sensitive leukaemia HL60 cell line as well as its MDR sublines exhibiting two different phenotypes of MDR related to the overexpression of P-glycoprotein (HL60/VINC) or MRP1 (HL60/DOX) was studied in the presence of exogenously added CPR. Our assays showed that the presence of CPR catalysing only the redox cycling of DOX had no effect in increasing its cytotoxicity against sensitive and MDR tumour cells. In contrast, an important increase in cytotoxic activity of DOX after its reductive conversion by CPR was observed against HL60 as well as HL60

  2. SDZ 280-446, a novel semi-synthetic cyclopeptolide: in vitro and in vivo circumvention of the P-glycoprotein-mediated tumour cell multidrug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Loor, F.; Boesch, D.; Gavériaux, C.; Jachez, B.; Pourtier-Manzanedo, A.; Emmer, G.

    1992-01-01

    SDZ 280-446 is a semi-synthetic derivative of a natural cyclic peptolide. Its ability to sensitise in vitro tumour cells whose resistance is due to P-glycoprotein-mediated anticancer-drug efflux was shown using four different pairs of parental drug-sensitive (Par-) and multidrug-resistant (MDR-) cell lines, from three different species (mouse, human, Chinese hamster) representing four different cell lineages (monocytic leukaemia, nasopharyngeal epithelial carcinoma, colon epithelial carcinoma, ovary fibroblastoid carcinoma), and using four different drug classes (colchicine, vincristine, daunomycin/doxorubicin and etoposide). By measuring its capacity to restore normal drug sensitivity of MDR-cells in culture in vitro, it appeared that SDZ 280-446 belongs to the same class of very potent chemosensitisers as the cyclosporin derivative SDZ PSC 833: both are about one order of magnitude more active than cyclosporin A (CsA), which is itself about one order of magnitude more active than other known chemosensitisers (including verapamil, quinidine and amiodarone which have already entered clinical trials in MDR reversal). Low concentrations of SDZ 280-446 could also restore cellular daunomycin retention in MDR-P388 cells to the levels found in the Par-P388 cells. SDZ 280-446 was also effective as a chemosensitiser when given orally in vivo. In a syngeneic mouse model, combined therapy with vinca alkaloids given i.p. and SDZ 280-446 given per os for 5 consecutive days significantly prolonged the survival of MDR-P388 tumour-bearing mice, when compared with mice receiving vinca alkaloids alone. Another protocol, using three cycles of i.p. doxorubicin at 4 day intervals, could also not increase MDR-P388 tumour-bearing mouse survival unless the mice received SDZ 280-446 orally 4 h before each doxorubicin injection. Though only very few combined therapy treatment protocols have been tested so far, clear increases in survival time of MDR-tumour-bearing mice were regularly

  3. Interaction of ochratoxin A with human intestinal Caco-2 cells: possible implication of a multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2).

    PubMed

    Berger, Valérie; Gabriel, Anne-Françoise; Sergent, Thérèse; Trouet, André; Larondelle, Yvan; Schneider, Yves-Jacques

    2003-04-11

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a nephrotoxic mycotoxin, is absorbed from small intestine and, in plasma, binds to serum albumin. Prolonged half-live results from reabsorption by proximal tubules and enterohepatic circulation. The mechanism whereby OTA crosses intestine was investigated by means of a cell culture system consisting of Caco-2 cells, as in vitro model of human intestinal epithelium. Cytotoxicity assays on proliferating Caco-2 cells showed that 0.4 microM OTA inhibits MTT reduction by 50%. Transepithelial transport and intracellular accumulation of OTA were studied in Caco-2 cells, differentiated in bicameral inserts. At pH 7.4, OTA is transported preferentially in basolateral (BL) to apical (AP) direction, suggesting a net secretion. Conditions closer to in vivo situation in duodenum (AP pH 6.0, BL pH 7.4) increase intracellular accumulation and transepithelial transport. AP to BL transport becomes higher than BL to AP transport, suggesting OTA absorption. Addition of serum albumin in BL compartment further increases OTA absorption across Caco-2 cells and suggests that in vivo OTA transport from serosal to luminal side of enterocytes is prevented, due to its binding to plasma proteins. Competition experiments showed that carrier systems for large neutral amino acids, H(+)/dipeptides cotransporter, organic anion (p-aminohippurate) carrier and organic anion transporter (oatp) are not implicated in OTA transport across Caco-2 cells, in contrast to what was reported in kidney and liver. AP and BL transport and intracellular accumulation of OTA are increased in the presence of non specific inhibitors of MRPs (indomethacin, genistein and probenecid) and of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (biotransformed into 2,4-dinitrophenyl-gluthatione, a specific inhibitor of MRPs), but are affected by verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp. This suggests that the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2) could be implicated in transepithelial transport. Therefore, absorption of OTA

  4. PJ34, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, reverses melphalan-resistance and inhibits repair of DNA double-strand breaks by targeting the FA/BRCA pathway in multidrug resistant multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226/R.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ting; Wei, Heng; Chen, Xiaoqiong; Xiao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    There is still no ideal treatment for multidrug resistant multiple myeloma, looking for drugs which can reverse chemotherapy resistance and enhance curative effects of chemotherapy drugs becomes a problem that needs to be solved urgently. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors appear to be an important tool for medical therapy of several malignancies. In the present study, we investigated the potential of the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ34, in vitro, to further enhance the efficacy of the traditional chemotherapy drug melphalan in the multidrug-resistant multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226/R. The effects of different concentrations of PJ34 and melphalan on cell proliferation were determined by the CCK-8 assay. The expressions of FA/BRCA pathway-related factors were detected by western blotting and RT-PCR. The percentage of cell apoptosis was measured with flow cytometry. DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair was quantified by γH2AX immunofluorescence. In addition, DNA damage repair at the level of the individual cell was determined by comet assay. Co-administration of PJ34 and melphalan had synergistic inhibitory effects on the proliferation of RPMI8226/R cells, suggesting more powerful antitumor activities. The apoptosis percentage also was increased more obviously by the treatment of melphalan plus PJ34. The activation of FA/BRCA pathway was inhibited by downregulation of related factors including FANCD2, BRCA2 and Rad51. PJ34 significantly increased the ratio of γH2AX-positive cells and the number of foci/cells. The comet tail rate of cells, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment all increased after PJ34 treatment in RPMI8226/R cells. These results indicate that PJ34 combined treatment with melphalan produces synergistic effects and reverses multidrug resistance of RPMI8226/R cells effectively. PJ34 cannot induce DNA damage directly, but it may increase the DNA damage induced by melphalan through inhibiting DNA damage repair. The suppression of FA

  5. Mixed Micelles of Doxorubicin Overcome Multidrug Resistance by Inhibiting the Expression of P-Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Zhang, Zhijie; Zhao, Tie; Liu, Xiaodong; Jian, Lingyan

    2015-08-01

    With the goal of overcoming multidrug resistance, DSPE-PEG (polyethylene glycol 2000 grafted with distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine) and TPGS (d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate) were combined, each with a different inhibiting mechanism for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression, to create mixed micelles with the purpose of encapsulating the water-soluble drug, doxorubicin (Dox). As the molar ratio of Dox/DSPE-PEG/TPGS was 1:1:0.2, the encapsulation efficiency and particle size of the micelles were 98.2% and 12.8 nm respectively. Compared to Dox/DSPE-PEG micelles, Dox/DSPE-PEG/TPGS mixed micelles demonstrated enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity, drug uptake, and apoptosis for drug resistant H460/TaxR cancer cells. Western blot results showed that the expression level of P-gp significantly decreased as H460/TaxR cells were incubated with Dox/DSPE-PEG/TPGS mixed micelles. The anti-tumor efficacy in vivo was evaluated using H460/TaxR-bearing mice and showed that Dox/DSPE-PEG/TPGS mixed micelles were more effective at inhibiting tumor growth than Dox/DSPE-PEG micelles and free Dox solution. It was also found that the high efficacy of mixed micelles was associated with the ability to induce dramatic apoptosis of the tumor cells. In summary, through combining different P-gp inhibiting mechanisms, mixed micelles could be a promising nanocarrier for anti-cancer drugs in overcoming multidrug resistance. PMID:26295136

  6. Glutathione, glutathione S-transferases, and related redox enzymes in Adriamycin-resistant cell lines with a multidrug resistant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Schisselbauer, J C; Crescimanno, M; D'Alessandro, N; Clapper, M; Toulmond, S; Tapiero, H; Tew, K D

    1989-01-01

    Friend erythroleukemia cells (FLC) selected by exposure to Adriamycin (doxorubicin) express an approximate 2.5-fold (ARN1) or 13-fold (ARN2) resistance to the drug with various degrees of cross-resistance to other anthracyclines, vinca alkaloids, and epipodophyllotoxins. Because the redox cycling of the quinone moiety of Adriamycin is known to produce oxidative stress, however, an analysis of glutathione (GSH) and related enzyme systems was undertaken in the wild-type and selected resistant cells. In ARN1 and ARN2, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities were slightly decreased, intracellular GSH and GSH reductase were essentially unchanged, and total GSH peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase (GST), and DT-diaphorase activities were slightly elevated. In each case there was no stoichiometric relationship between degree of resistance and level of activity. GST isozymes were purified from each cell line by HPLC GSH affinity column chromatography. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and western blot immunoreactivity against a battery of GST isozyme polyclonal antibodies determined that both the resistant and sensitive cells expressed isozymes of the alpha, pi, and mu classes (alternative murine nomenclature: M1, M2, M3). Of significance, both ARN1 and ARN2 cell lines expressed a unique alpha subunit which was absent from the parent FLC cell line. This isozyme presumably accounted for the increased GSH peroxidase activity (cumene hydroperoxide as substrate) found in ARN1 and ARN2 and may play a role in the small incremental resistance to melphalan found for both resistant lines. Expression of the isozyme was not stoichiometric with respect to degree of resistance. The presence of this isozyme may contribute to the resistant phenotype or may be the consequence of a more general cellular response to oxidative stress. PMID:2639724

  7. Expression of lung resistance-related protein, LRP, and multidrug resistance-related protein, MRP1, in normal human lung cells in long-term cultures.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Thomas; Torky, Abdel-Rahman Wageeh; Stehfest, Ekkehard; Hofmann, Stefan; Foth, Heidi

    2005-10-01

    Transport processes form part of the body's defense mechanism, and they determine the intracellular levels of many endogenous and exogenous compounds. The multidrug resistance-related protein MRP1 and the lung resistance-related protein LRP are associated with drug resistance against chemotherapeutics; they protect cells against toxic compounds. There is much experimental evidence to suggest that both of these transporter proteins serve important physiological functions. The expression of LRP and MRP1 was studied in normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEC) and peripheral lung cells (PLC) obtained from explant cultures from morphologically-normal human lung tissue taken from patients with lung cancer. LRP (mRNA and protein) was detected in the cells of the bronchi as well as the peripheral lung with low (a factor of 2.6) inter-individual variation in the first generation. No significant alterations were noted for LRP within three-to-four generations in the same patient. LRP expression was not substantially different between cultures from different topographic regions of the human lung. MRP1 protein and MRP1 mRNA could also be detected in all of the NHBEC and PLC cultures studied, but with substantially higher (a factor of 7.7) intra-individual variation in the first generation than for LRP. MRP expression was the same for bronchial cells and PLC when the material was obtained from both sites. The level of mRNA for MRP1 was, in general, less stable than that for LRP. In multigeneration explant cultures, the levels of LRP mRNA and protein and MRP1 protein did not fluctuate greatly, but the level of MRP1 mRNA dropped to about 25% of the reference value within four generations (after about 8-10 weeks of culture). In one case, NHBEC subpassages were followed over a period of 20 weeks. In this system MRP mRNA levels increased by more than threefold, while levels of MRP1 protein and LRP mRNA and protein were expressed at almost constant rates. PMID:15986202

  8. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein activity and chemosensitization of multidrug-resistant ovarian carcinoma 2780AD cells by hexanoylglucosylceramide.

    PubMed

    Veldman, R J; Sietsma, H; Klappe, K; Hoekstra, D; Kok, J W

    1999-12-20

    In the present study we show that neutral hexanoyl-(glyco)sphingolipids inhibit P-glycoprotein (Pgp) activity in human ovarian 2780AD cells. By contrast, hexanoylceramide and the gangliosides GM(3) and GM(2) had no effect on Pgp activity, whereas sphingosine had a stimulating effect. In the case of hexanoylglucosylceramide, inhibition of Pgp activity by was reflected by a regained doxorubicin sensitivity of cells, which were grown in medium supplemented with the lipid. Our results lead to the conclusion that a direct transmodulation of Pgp activity by glycolipids occurs, depending on lipid headgroup structure, which can result in reduced resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. PMID:10600530

  9. Vatalanib sensitizes ABCB1 and ABCG2-overexpressing multidrug resistant colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Li-wu

    2015-09-01

    Cancer microenvironment is characterized by significantly lower oxygen concentration. This hypoxic condition is known to reduce drug responsiveness to cancer chemotherapy via multiple mechanisms, among which the upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters confers resistance to a wide variety of structurally unrelated anticancer drugs. Vatalanib (PTK787/ZK22584) is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor for all isoforms of VEGFR, PDGFR and c-Kit, which exhibit potent anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the potentiation effect of vatalanib on the anticancer activity of conventional cytotoxic drugs in colon cancer cell lines under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Mechanistically, vatalanib was found to inhibit ABCG2 and ABCB1 efflux activity, presumably by acting as a competitive inhibitor and interfering with their ATPase activity. Under hypoxic growth condition, ABCG2 and ABCB1-overexpressing cells sorted out by FACS technique as side population (SP) were found to be significantly more responsive to SN-38 (ABCG2 and ABCB1 substrate anticancer drug) in the presence of vatalanib. The anchorage independent soft agar colony formation capacity of the SP cells was remarkably reduced upon treatment with a combination of SN-38 and vatalanib, compared to SN-38 alone. However, vatalanib, at concentrations that produced the circumvention of the transporters-mediated resistance, did not appreciably alter ABCG2/ABCB1 mRNA or protein expression levels or the phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Our study thus advocates the further investigation of vatalanib for use in combination chemotherapy to eradicate drug-resistant cancer cells under hypoxia. PMID:26206183

  10. TPGS/Phospholipids Mixed Micelles for Delivery of Icariside II to Multidrug-Resistant Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Huang, Houcai; Xia, Zhi; Wei, Yingjie; Yao, Nan; Zhang, Li; Yan, Hongmei; Jia, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zhenhai

    2016-09-01

    The biggest challenge for the treatment of multidrug resistant cancer is to deliver a high concentration of anticancer drugs to cancer cells. Icariside II is a flavonoid from Epimedium koreanum Nakai with remarkable anticancer properties, but poor solubility and significant efflux from cancer cells limited its clinical use. In our previous study, a self-assembled mixture of micelles (TPGS-Icariside II-phospholipid complex) was successfully constructed, which could substantially increase the solubility of Icariside II and inhibit the efflux on Caco-2 cells. In this study, we evaluate the anticancer effect of the mixed micelles encapsulating Icariside II (Icar-MC) on MCF-7/ADR, a multidrug-resistant breast cancer cell line. The cellular uptake of the micelles was confirmed by fluorescent coumarin-6-loaded micelles. The IC50 of Icar-MC in MCF-7/ADR was 2-fold less than the free drug. The in vitro study showed Icar-MC induced more apoptosis and lactate dehydrogenase release. Intravenous injection of Icar-MC into nude mice bearing MCF-7/ADR xenograft resulted in a better antitumor efficacy compared with the administration of free drug, without causing significant body weight changes in mice. The antitumor effect was further verified by magnetic resonance imaging and immunohistochemical assays for Ki-67, a proliferative indicator. Moreover, Icar-MC treatment also elevated Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the expressions of cleaved caspase-3, -8, -9 and AIFM1 in tumors. This study suggests that phospholipid/TPGS mixed micelles might be a suitable drug delivery system for Icariside II to treat multidrug resistant breast cancer. PMID:26293804

  11. Revisiting the ABCs of multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Amit K; Sodani, Kamlesh; Dai, Chun-Ling; Ashby, Charles R; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-04-01

    The adenosine tri-phosphate binding cassette (ABC) transporters are one of the largest transmembrane gene families in humans. The ABC transporters are present in a number of tissues, providing protection against xenobiotics and certain endogenous molecules. Unfortunately, their presence produces suboptimal chemotherapeutic outcomes in cancer patient tumor cells. It is well established that they actively efflux antineoplastic agents from cancer cells, producing the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The inadequate response to chemotherapy and subsequent poor prognosis in cancer patients can be in part the result of the clinical overexpression of ABC transporters. In fact, one of the targeted approaches for overcoming MDR in cancer cells is that directed towards blocking or inhibiting ABC transporters. Indeed, for almost three decades, research has been conducted to overcome MDR through pharmacological inhibition of ABC transporters with limited clinical success. Therefore, contemporary strategies to identify or to synthesize selective "resensitizers" of ABC transporters with limited nonspecific toxicity have been undertaken. Innovative approaches en route to understanding specific biochemical role of ABC transporters in MDR and tumorigenesis will prove essential to direct our knowledge towards more effective targeted therapies. This review briefly discusses the current knowledge regarding the clinical involvement of ABC transporters in MDR to antineoplastic drugs and highlights approaches undertaken so far to overcome ABC transporter-mediated MDR in cancer. PMID:21118094

  12. Multidrug resistance of DNA-mediated transformants is linked to transfer of the human mdr1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, D W; Fojo, A; Roninson, I B; Chin, J E; Soffir, R; Pastan, I; Gottesman, M M

    1986-01-01

    Mouse NIH 3T3 cells were transformed to multidrug resistance with high-molecular-weight DNA from multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells. The patterns of cross resistance to colchicine, vinblastine, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin; Adria Laboratories Inc.) of the human donor cell line and mouse recipients were similar. The multidrug-resistant human donor cell line contains amplified sequences of the mdr1 gene which are expressed at high levels. Both primary and secondary NIH 3T3 transformants contained and expressed these amplified human mdr1 sequences. Amplification and expression of the human mdr1 sequences and amplification of cotransferred human Alu sequences in the mouse cells correlated with the degree of multidrug resistance. These data suggest that the mdr1 gene is likely to be responsible for multidrug resistance in cultured cells. Images PMID:3796599

  13. Novel polymer micelle mediated co-delivery of doxorubicin and P-glycoprotein siRNA for reversal of multidrug resistance and synergistic tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Ge; Zhu, Wen-Jing; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Shu-di; Chen, Wei-Liang; Li, Ji-Zhao; Zhou, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Xue-Nong

    2016-01-01

    Co-delivery of chemotherapeutics and siRNA with different mechanisms in a single system is a promising strategy for effective cancer therapy with synergistic effects. In this study, a triblock copolymer micelle was prepared based on the polymer of N-succinyl chitosan-poly-L-lysine-palmitic acid (NSC-PLL-PA) to co-deliver doxorubicin (Dox) and siRNA-P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (Dox-siRNA-micelle). Dox-siRNA-micelle was unstable in pH 5.3 medium than in pH 7.4 medium, which corresponded with the in vitro rapid release of Dox and siRNA in acidic environments. The antitumor efficacy of Dox-siRNA-micelle in vitro significantly increased, especially in HepG2/ADM cells, which was due to the downregulation of P-gp. Moreover, almost all the Dox-siRNA-micelles accumulated in the tumor region beyond 24 h post-injection, and the co-delivery system significantly inhibited tumor growth with synergistic effects in vivo. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of Dox-siRNA-micelles in tumor-targeting and MDR reversal, and provided a promising strategy to develop a co-delivery system with synergistic effects for combined cancer therapy. PMID:27030638

  14. Novel polymer micelle mediated co-delivery of doxorubicin and P-glycoprotein siRNA for reversal of multidrug resistance and synergistic tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-ge; Zhu, Wen-jing; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Zhi-qiang; Yang, Shu-di; Chen, Wei-liang; Li, Ji-zhao; Zhou, Xiao-feng; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2016-01-01

    Co-delivery of chemotherapeutics and siRNA with different mechanisms in a single system is a promising strategy for effective cancer therapy with synergistic effects. In this study, a triblock copolymer micelle was prepared based on the polymer of N-succinyl chitosan–poly-L-lysine–palmitic acid (NSC–PLL–PA) to co-deliver doxorubicin (Dox) and siRNA–P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (Dox–siRNA-micelle). Dox–siRNA-micelle was unstable in pH 5.3 medium than in pH 7.4 medium, which corresponded with the in vitro rapid release of Dox and siRNA in acidic environments. The antitumor efficacy of Dox–siRNA-micelle in vitro significantly increased, especially in HepG2/ADM cells, which was due to the downregulation of P-gp. Moreover, almost all the Dox–siRNA-micelles accumulated in the tumor region beyond 24 h post-injection, and the co-delivery system significantly inhibited tumor growth with synergistic effects in vivo. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of Dox–siRNA-micelles in tumor-targeting and MDR reversal, and provided a promising strategy to develop a co-delivery system with synergistic effects for combined cancer therapy. PMID:27030638

  15. Induction of apoptosis and reversal of permeability glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADM by ginsenoside Rh2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Gong, Jian; Zhang, Huilai; Kong, Di

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a phenomenon that cancer cells develop a cross-resistant phenotype against several unrelated drugs, and permeability glycoprotein derived from the overexpression of multidrug resistance gene 1 has been taken as the most significant cause of multidrug resistance. In the present study, ginsenoside Rh2 was used to reverse permeability glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADM cell line. Effects of ginsenoside Rh2 on the apoptotic process and caspase-3 activity of MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADM cell lines were determined using flow cytometry and microplate reader. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium test was conducted to assess the IC50 values of ginsenoside Rh2 and adriamycin on MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADM cultures; Rhodamin 123 assay was used to assess the retention of permeability glycoprotein after ginsenoside Rh2 treatment; flow cytometry and real time polymerase chain reaction were used to determine the expression levels of permeability glycoprotein and multidrug resistance gene 1 in drug-resistant cells and their parental cells after exposure to ginsenoside Rh2. The results showed that ginsenoside Rh2, except for inducing apoptosis, had the ability to reverse multidrug resistance in MCF-7/ADM cell line without changing the expression levels of permeability glycoprotein and multidrug resistance gene 1. Our findings provided some valuable information for the application of ginsenoside Rh2 in cancer therapy, especially for multidrug resistance reversal in clinic. PMID:26191135

  16. Dioscin restores the activity of the anticancer agent adriamycin in multidrug-resistant human leukemia K562/adriamycin cells by down-regulating MDR1 via a mechanism involving NF-κB signaling inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Meng, Qiang; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Qi; Peng, Jinyong; Huo, Xiaokui; Sun, Huijun; Ma, Xiaochi; Liu, Kexin

    2013-05-24

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ameliorating effect of dioscin (1) on multidrug resistance (MDR) in adriamycin (ADR)-resistant erythroleukemic cells (K562/adriamycin, K562/ADR) and to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved. High levels of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) mRNA and protein and reduced ADR retention were found in K562/ADR cells compared with parental cells (K562). Dioscin (1), a constituent of plants in the genus Discorea, significantly inhibited MDR1 mRNA and protein expression and MDR1 promoter and nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κB) activity in K562/ADR cells. MDR1 mRNA and protein suppression resulted in the subsequent recovery of intracellular drug accumulation. Additionally, inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) degradation was inhibited by 1. Dioscin (1) reversed ADR-induced MDR by down-regulating MDR1 expression by a mechanism that involves the inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings provide evidence to support the further investigation of the clinical application of dioscin (1) as a chemotherapy adjuvant. PMID:23621869

  17. Simulated microgravity reduces mRNA levels of multidrug resistance genes 4 and 5 in non-metastatic human melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiermann, Peter; Tsiockas, Wasiliki; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Gerzer, Rupert; Ivanova, Krassimira

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) are members of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily that are able to export a large variety of substances into the extracellular space in-cluding nucleoside and nucleotide base analogs used in antiviral and anticancer therapy. MRP4 and 5 (MRP4/5) particularly transport cyclic nucleotides, e.g. guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophos-phate (cGMP). The second messenger cGMP, which is synthesized by the catalytic activity of the guanylyl cyclase (GC), plays an import role in vasodilatation, smooth muscle relaxation, and nitric oxide (NO)-induced perturbation of melanocyte-extracellular matrix interactions. In previous studies we have reported that different GC isoforms are responsible for cGMP synthe-sis in melanocytic cells. Normal human melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cell lines predominantly express the NO-sensitive soluble GC isoform (sGC), a heterodimeric protein consisting of α and β subunits. Metastatic melanoma cells lack the expression of the β sub-unit and show up-regulated activities of the particulate isoforms. We have further found that long-term exposure to hypergravity (5 g for 24 h) induced an increased cGMP export in normal human melanocytes, and non-metastatic, but not in metastatic human melanoma cells as a re-sult of up-regulated MRP4/5 expression. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether simulated microgravity may also alter the expression of MRP4/5 in non-metastatic melanoma cells. Experiments were performed using a fast-rotating clinostat (60 rpm) with one rotation axis. The non-metastatic 1F6 melanoma cells were exposed to simulated microgravity (up to 1.21x10-2 g) for 24 h. The mRNA analyses were performed by a relative calibrator-normalized and efficiency corrected quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Light Cycler R , Roche). Our data show a reduced expression of approximately 35% for MRP4 and of 50% for MRP5 in simulated microgravity in comparison to 1 g controls. Also, the

  18. Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles mediated co-delivery of paclitaxel and tetrandrine for overcoming multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lejiao; Li, Zhenyu; Shen, Jingyi; Zheng, Dandan; Tian, Xiaona; Guo, Hejian; Chang, Ping

    2015-07-15

    The objective of the study is to fabricate multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles for achieving co-delivery of conventional antitumor drug paclitaxel (PTX) and the multidrug resistance reversal agent tetrandrine (TET) expecting to overcome multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells. The nanoparticles were facile to prepare by self-assemble in situ drug loading approach. Namely, PTX and TET were solubilized in the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles and simultaneously silica resources hydrolyze and condense to form nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles, denoted as PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN, exhibited pH-responsive release property with more easily released in the weak acidic environment. Studies on cellular uptake of nanoparticles demonstrated TET could markedly increase intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles. Furthermore, the PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN suppressed tumor cells growth more efficiently than only delivery of PTX (PTX-CTAB@MSN) or the free PTX. Moreover, the nanoparticle loading drugs with a PTX/TET molar ratio of 4.4:1 completely reversed the resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells to PTX and the resistance reversion index was 72.3. Mechanism research showed that both TET and CTAB could arrest MCF-7/ADR cells at G1 phase; and besides PTX arrested cells at G2 phase. This nanocarrier might have important potential in clinical implications for co-delivery of multiple drugs to overcome MDR. PMID:25956050

  19. Timosaponin A-III reverses multi-drug resistance in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells via downregulation of MDR1 and MRP1 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Ru; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Hong; Yi, Ying-Jie; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie

    2016-05-01

    One of the major causes of failure in chemotherapy for patients with human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is the acquisition of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR is often associated with the overexpression of drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family. Timosaponin A-III (TAIII), a saponin isolated from the rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides, has previously demonstrated the ability to suppress certain human tumor processes and the potential to be developed as an anticancer agent. Nevertheless, the ability of TAIII to reverse MDR has not yet been explored. In this study, the adriamycin (ADM) resistance reversal effect of TAIII in human CML K562/ADM cells and the underlying mechanism was investigated. The Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay showed that TAIII had a reversal effect on the drug resistance of K562/ADM cells. Flow cytometry assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of ADM after cells were pretreated with TAIII, and the changes in the accumulation of rhodamine-123 (Rho-123) and 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) dye in K562/ADM cells were determined to be similar to the changes of intracellular accumulation of ADM. After pretreatment of cells with TAIII, the decreasing expression of P-gp and MRP1 mRNA was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Western blotting showed TAIII inhibiting P-gp and MRP1 expression depended on the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway by decreasing the activity of p-Akt. Moreover, wortmannin an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway has a strong inhibitory effect on the expression of p-Akt, P-gp and MRP1. Besides, the combined treatment with TAIII did not have an affect on wortmannin downregulation of p-Akt, P-gp and MRP1. Taken together, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that TAIII induced MDR reversal through inhibition of P-gp and MRP1 expression and function with regained adriamycin sensitivity which might mainly correlate to the regulation of PI3K

  20. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins: Export pumps for conjugates with glutathione, glucuronate or sulfate.

    PubMed

    Homolya, László; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2003-01-01

    Many endogenous or xenobiotic lipophilic substances are eliminated from the cells by the sequence of oxidation, conjugation to an anionic group (glutathione, glucuronate or sulfate) and transport across the plasma membrane into the extracellular space. The latter step is mediated by integral membrane glycoproteins belonging to the superfamily of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters. A subfamily, referred as ABCC, includes the famous/infamous cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), the sulfonylurea receptors (SUR 1 and 2), and the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs). The name of the MRPs refers to their potential role in clinical multidrug resistance, a phenomenon that hinders the effective chemotherapy of tumors. The MRPs that have been functionally characterized so far share the property of ATP-dependent export pumps for conjugates with glutathione (GSH), glucuronate or sulfate. MRP1 and MRP2 are also mediating the cotransport of unconjugated amphiphilic compounds together with free GSH. MRP3 preferentially transports glucuronides but not glutathione S-conjugates or free GSH. MRP1 and MRP2 also contribute to the control of the intracellular glutathione disulfide (GSSG) level. Although these proteins are low affinity GSSG transporters, they can play essential role in response to oxidative stress when the activity of GSSG reductase becomes rate limiting. The human MRP4, MRP5 and MRP6 have only partially been characterized. However, it has been revealed that MRP4 can function as an efflux pump for cyclic nucleotides and nucleoside analogues, used as anti-HIV drugs. MRP5 also transports GSH conjugates, nucleoside analogues, and possibly heavy metal complexes. Transport of glutathione S-conjugates mediated by MRP6, the mutation of which causes pseudoxantoma elasticum, has recently been shown. In summary, numerous members of the multidrug resistance-associated protein family serve as export pumps that prevent the accumulation of anionic conjugates

  1. A nanoparticulate pre-chemosensitizer for efficacious chemotherapy of multidrug resistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shengrong; Lv, Li; Shen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Zhongliang; He, Qianjun; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule chemosensitizers can reverse cancer multidrug resistance (MDR), thus significantly improving the in vitro effect of chemotherapy drugs for MDR cancer cells, however, their in vivo effects are not always very good, because they are difficult to effectively accumulate in tumor and enter the same cancer with chemotherapy drugs after systemic administration due to individual biopharmaceutical properties. To overcome these limitations, here we study a novel nanoparticular pre-chemosensitizer which can be also used as nanocarrier of chemotherapy drugs. We take an ‘all in one’ approach to develop a self-assembled nanoparticle formula of amphiphilic poly(curcumin-dithiodipropionic acid)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-biotin. The nanoparticle is capable of tumor-targeted delivery, responsive degradation at the intracellular level of glutathione and subsequent intracellular co-release of the chemosensitizer curcumin and the encapsulated chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin to maximize a synergistic effect of chemosensitization and chemotherapy. We demonstrate that the antitumor efficacy of nanoparticle is much superior to that of doxorubicin in the multidrug resistant MCF-7/ADR xenografted nude mice. PMID:26875787

  2. Pregnane glycoside multidrug-resistance modulators from Cynanchum wilfordii.

    PubMed

    Hwang, B Y; Kim, S E; Kim, Y H; Kim, H S; Hong, Y S; Ro, J S; Lee, K S; Lee, J J

    1999-04-01

    The methanol-soluble extracts of the roots of Cynanchum wilfordii showed a significant multidrug-resistance-reversing activity, and four known pregnane glycosides were isolated by bioassay-directed fractionation and separation. Their structures were identified as gagaminin 3-O-beta-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-oleandropyranosyl- (1-->4)-b eta-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-cymaropyranoside (1), wilfoside K1N (2), wilfoside C1N (3), and cynauricuoside A (4). In particular, compound 1, at a concentration level of 1 microM, was found to completely reverse the multidrug-resistance of KB-V1 and MCF7/ADR cells to adriamycin, vinblastine, and colchicine. PMID:10217732

  3. Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs/ABCCs) in cancer chemotherapy and genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Tiwari, Amit K

    2011-09-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a superfamily of membrane proteins that are best known for their ability to transport a wide variety of exogenous and endogenous substances across membranes against a concentration gradient via ATP hydrolysis. There are seven subfamilies of human ABC transporters, one of the largest being the 'C' subfamily (gene symbol ABCC). Nine ABCC subfamily members, the so-called multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) 1-9, have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance in tumor cells to varying degrees as the efflux extrude chemotherapeutic compounds (or their metabolites) from malignant cells. Some of the MRPs are also known to either influence drug disposition in normal tissues or modulate the elimination of drugs (or their metabolites) via hepatobiliary or renal excretory pathways. In addition, the cellular efflux of physiologically important organic anions such as leukotriene C(4) and cAMP is mediated by one or more of the MRPs. Finally, mutations in several MRPs are associated with human genetic disorders. In this minireview, the current biochemical and physiological knowledge of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy and human genetic disease is summarized. The mutations in MRP2/ABCC2 leading to conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (Dubin-Johnson syndrome) and in MRP6/ABCC6 leading to the connective tissue disorder Pseudoxanthoma elasticum are also discussed. PMID:21740521

  4. Interleukin-6: A Critical Cytokine in Cancer Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ghandadi, Morteza; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon through which tumor cells develop resistance against the cytotoxic effects of various structurally and mechanistically unrelated chemotherapeutic agents. The most consistent feature in MDR is overexpression and/or overactivity of ATP-dependent drug efflux transporters. Other mechanisms such as overexpression of drug-detoxifying enzymes and alterations in pro-survival or pro-death signaling pathways are also responsible for MDR. Inflammatory mediators including interleukin-6 (IL-6) play important roles in various events during inflammation and are also involved in development and progression of several types of cancers. Mounting evidence has suggested a crosstalk between IL-6 and MDR in cancer, highlighting the role of IL-6 in chemotherapy response, and the potential opportunity to control MDR through modulation of IL-6 expression. Upregulation of IL-6 has been shown to promote MDR through activation of Janus kinases (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), and Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathways. Activation of the aforementioned pathways changes the expression pattern of several genes involved in proliferation, survival and cell cycle regulation, thus facilitating MDR. Conversely, IL-6 inhibition using different strategies (antibodies, siRNA, and antisense transfection) has been shown to improve tumor responsiveness and mitigate MDR in different cancer cell lines. This review focuses on the in vitro, experimental and clinical findings on the role of IL-6 in MDR, and potential therapeutic opportunities arising from this role of IL-6. PMID:26601970

  5. 4,5-Di-substituted benzyl-imidazol-2-substituted amines as the structure template for the design and synthesis of reversal agents against P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Zhaohui; Wong, Iris L K; Wan, Shengbiao; Chow, Larry M C; Jiang, Tao

    2014-08-18

    Over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a primary multidrug transporter which is located in plasma membranes, plays a major role in the multidrug resistance (MDR) of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Naamidines are a class of marine imidazole alkaloids isolated from Leucetta and Clathrina sponges, possessing a Y-shaped scaffold. Based on the results previously obtained from the third-generation MDR modulator ONT-093 and other modulators developed in our group, we designed and synthesized a series of novel 4,5-di-substituted benzyl-1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-substituted amines using the Naamidine scaffold as the structure template. Subsequently, their reversing activity for Taxol resistance has been evaluated in P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance breast cancer cell line MDA435/LCC6MDR. Compounds 12c with a Y-shaped scaffold, and compound 17c which is 'X-shaped' scaffold and possesses a 4-diethylamino group at aryl ring B, turned out to be the most potent P-gp modulators. It appears that compounds 12c and 17c at 1 μM concentration can sensitize LCC6MDR cells toward Taxol by 26.4 and 24.5 folds, with an EC50 212.5 and 210.5 nM, respectively. These two compounds are about 5-6 folds more potent than verapamil (RF = 4.5). Moreover, compounds 12c and 17c did not exhibit obvious cytotoxicity in either cancer cell lines or normal mouse fibroblast cell lines. This study has demonstrated that the synthetic Naamidine analogues can be potentially employed as effective, safe modulators for the P-gp-mediated drug resistance cancer cells. PMID:24952376

  6. Cellular functions of vaults and their involvement in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Steiner, E; Holzmann, K; Elbling, L; Micksche, M; Berger, W

    2006-08-01

    Vaults are evolutionary highly conserved ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles with a hollow barrel-like structure. They are 41 x 73 nm in size and are composed of multiple copies of three proteins and small untranslated RNA (vRNA). The main component of vaults represents the 110 kDa major vault protein (MVP), whereas the two minor vault proteins comprise the 193 kDa vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) and the 240 kDa telomerase-associated protein-1 (TEP1). Vaults are abundantly present in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells and they were found to be associated with cytoskeletal elements as well as occasionally with the nuclear envelope. Vaults and MVP have been associated with several cellular processes which are also involved in cancer development like cell motility and differentiation. Due to the over-expression of MVP (also termed lung resistance-related protein or LRP) in several P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-negative chemoresistant cancer cell lines, vaults have been linked to multidrug resistance (MDR). Accordingly, high levels of MVP were found in tissues chronically exposed to xenobiotics. In addition, the expression of MVP correlated with the degree of malignancy in certain cancer types, suggesting a direct involvement in tumor development and/or progression. Based on the finding that MVP binds several phosphatases and kinases including PTEN, SHP-2 as well as Erk, evidence is accumulating that MVP might be involved in the regulation of important cell signalling pathways including the PI3K/Akt and the MAPK pathways. In this review we summarize the current knowledge concerning the vault particle and discuss its possible cellular functions, focusing on the role of vaults in chemotherapy resistance. PMID:16918321

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yingqian; Zhao, Shan; Han, Jinzhu; Zheng, Likang; Yang, Zixin; Zhao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1) were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at -378 to -373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. PMID:26251616

  8. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yingqian; Zhao, Shan; Han, Jinzhu; Zheng, Likang; Yang, Zixin; Zhao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1) were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at −378 to −373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. PMID:26251616

  9. Intracellular target delivery of 10-hydroxycamptothecin with solid lipid nanoparticles against multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Chen, Didi; Wang, Chenxu; Chen, Xunhu; Wen, Zhili; Cao, Yu; He, Hongxuan

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to design a suitable drug delivery system for 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT). In this study, HCPT-loaded solid lipid nanoparticle (HCPT-loaded SLN) was successfully prepared. The HCPT-loaded SLN was characterized by size, entrapment efficiency and drug release manner. The cytotoxicity of HCPT-loaded SLN was assessed in vitro using HepG2/HCPT cells and in vivo utilizing human tumor xenograft nude mouse model. HCPT-loaded SLN indicated the ability to target HepG2/HCPT cells and accumulated higher drug content in HepG2/HCPT cells. HCPT-loaded SLN enhanced the cytotoxicity of HCPT in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on these results, HCPT-loaded SLN suggested being a promising vehicle for liver-targeted drug delivery. Moreover, it can be of clinical interest to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR) effectively. PMID:25766079

  10. Mammalian multidrug-resistance proteins (MRPs).

    PubMed

    Slot, Andrew J; Molinski, Steven V; Cole, Susan P C

    2011-09-01

    Subfamily C of the human ABC (ATP-binding cassette) superfamily contains nine proteins that are often referred to as the MRPs (multidrug-resistance proteins). The 'short' MRP/ABCC transporters (MRP4, MRP5, MRP8 and ABCC12) have a typical ABC structure with four domains comprising two membrane-spanning domains (MSD1 and MSD2) each followed by a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1 and NBD2). The 'long' MRP/ABCCs (MRP1, MRP2, MRP3, ABCC6 and MRP7) have five domains with the extra domain, MSD0, at the N-terminus. The proteins encoded by the ABCC6 and ABCC12 genes are not known to transport drugs and are therefore referred to as ABCC6 and ABCC12 (rather than MRP6 and MRP9) respectively. A large number of molecules are transported across the plasma membrane by the MRPs. Many are organic anions derived from exogenous sources such as conjugated drug metabolites. Others are endogenous metabolites such as the cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandins which have important signalling functions in the cell. Some MRPs share a degree of overlap in substrate specificity (at least in vitro), but differences in transport kinetics are often substantial. In some cases, the in vivo substrates for some MRPs have been discovered aided by studies in gene-knockout mice. However, the molecules that are transported in vivo by others, including MRP5, MRP7, ABCC6 and ABCC12, still remain unknown. Important differences in the tissue distribution of the MRPs and their membrane localization (apical in contrast with basolateral) in polarized cells also exist. Together, these differences are responsible for the unique pharmacological and physiological functions of each of the nine ABCC transporters known as the MRPs. PMID:21967058

  11. Combination of Protoporphyrin IX-mediated Sonodynamic Treatment with Doxorubicin Synergistically Induced Apoptotic Cell Death of a Multidrug-Resistant Leukemia K562/DOX Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobing; Jia, Yali; Su, Xiaomin; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Kun; Feng, Xiaolan; Liu, Quanhong

    2015-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of administration of doxorubicin (DOX) in combination with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-assisted low-level therapeutic ultrasound (US) in K562/DOX cells as a potential strategy in cancer therapy. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the cytotoxicity of different treatments. Apoptosis was analyzed using annexin V-PE/7-amino-actinomycin D staining. Changes in DNA fragmentation, intracellular reactive oxygen species production, cellular membrane permeability, P-glycoprotein expression and DOX uptake were analyzed with flow cytometry. Under optimal conditions, PpIX-US significantly aggravated DOX-induced K562/DOX cell death, compared with either monotherapy. Synergistic potentiation of DNA damage, generation of reactive oxygen species and P-glycoprotein inhibition were observed. Plasma membrane integrity changed slightly after US exposure, and DOX uptake was notably improved after PpIX-US exposure. The results indicate that PpIX-US could increase the susceptibility of tumors to antineoplastic drugs, suggesting a clinical potential method for sonodynamic therapy-mediated tumor chemotherapy. PMID:26166458

  12. Amphiphilic Copolymeric Micelles for Doxorubicin and Curcumin Co-Delivery to Reverse Multidrug Resistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Li; Qiu, Kaifeng; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Chuxiong; Qin, Fengchao; Shi, Yonghui; Ou, Jiebin; Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Hua; Wu, Junyan; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Guocheng

    2016-05-01

    Development of multidrug resistance against chemotherapeutic drugs is one of the major obstacles to successful cancer therapy in the clinic. Thus far, amphiphilic polymeric micelles and chemosensitizers have been used to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer. The goals of this study were to prepare poly(ethylene glycol)-bock-poly(lactide) (PEG(2k)-PLA(5k)) micelles for co-delivery of the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) with a chemosensitizer curcumin (CUR), investigate the potential of the dual drug-loaded micelles ((DOX+CUR)-Micelles) to reverse multidrug resistance, and explore the underlying mechanisms. (DOX + CUR)-Micelles were prepared using an emulsion solvent evaporation method. The cellular uptake, drug efflux, down-regulation of P-glycoprotein expression and inhibition of ATP activity of (DOX+ CUR)-Micelles were studied in drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. In vitro analyses demonstrated that (DOX + CUR)-Micelles were superior to free DOX, free drug combination (DOX + CUR), and DOX-loaded micelles in inhibiting proliferation of MCF-7/ADR cells. This effect of (DOX + CUR)-Micelles was partially attributable to their highest cellular uptake, lowest efflux rate of DOX, and strongest effects on down-regulation of P-glycoprotein and inhibition of ATP activity. Additionally, (DOX+CUR)-Micelles showed increased tumor accumulation and strong inhibitory effect on tumor growth in the xenograft model of drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells compared to that of other drug formulations. These results indicate that (DOX + CUR)-Micelles display potential for application in the therapy of drug-resistant breast carcinoma. PMID:27305819

  13. Intracellular Self-Assembly of Taxol Nanoparticles for Overcoming Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Wang, Lin; Du, Wei; Ding, Zhanling; Zhang, Jia; Han, Tao; An, Linna; Zhang, Huafeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2015-08-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains the biggest challenge in treating cancers. Herein we propose the intracellular self-assembly of nanodrugs as a new strategy for overcoming MDR. By employing a biocompatible condensation reaction, we rationally designed a taxol derivative Ac-Arg-Val-Arg-Arg-Cys(StBu)-Lys(taxol)-2-cyanobenzothiazole (CBT-Taxol) which could be subjected to furin-controlled condensation and self-assembly of taxol nanoparticles (Taxol-NPs). In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that, compared with taxol, CBT-Taxol showed a 4.5-fold or 1.5-fold increase in anti-MDR effects, respectively, on taxol-resistant HCT 116 cancer cells or tumors without being toxic to the cells or the mice. Our results demonstrate that structuring protease-susceptible agents and assembling them intracellularly into nanodrugs could be a new optimal strategy for overcoming MDR. PMID:26118539

  14. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles loading doxorubicin reverse multidrug resistance: performance and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jianan; He, Qianjun; Gao, Yu; Shi, Jianlin; Li, Yaping

    2011-10-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major obstacles for successful chemotherapy in cancer. One of the effective approaches to overcome MDR is to use nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery to increase drug accumulation in drug resistant cancer cells. In this work, we first report that the performance and mechanism of an inorganic engineered delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) loading doxorubicin (DMNs) to overcome the MDR of MCF-7/ADR (a DOX-resistant and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) over-expression cancer cell line). The experimental results showed that DMNs could enhance the cellular uptake of doxorubicin (DOX) and increase the cell proliferation suppression effect of DOX against MCF-7/ADR cells. The IC50 of DMNs against MCF-7/ADR cells was 8-fold lower than that of free DOX. However, an improved effect of DOX in DMNs against MCF-7 cells (a DOX-sensitive cancer cell line) was not found. The increased cellular uptake and nuclear accumulation of DOX delivered by DMNs in MCF-7/ADR cells was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and could result from the down-regulation of P-gp and bypassing the efflux action by MSNs themselves. The cellular uptake mechanism of DMNs indicated that the macropinocytosis was one of the pathways for the uptake of DMNs by MCF-7/ADR cells. The in vivo biodistribution showed that DMNs induced a higher accumulation of DOX in drug resistant tumors than free DOX. These results suggested that MSNs could be an effective delivery system to overcome multidrug resistance.

  15. Notch1 is associated with the multidrug resistance of hypoxic osteosarcoma by regulating MRP1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Guo, D; Tang, B; Zhang, Y; Zhang, K; Nie, L

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia and Notch signaling pathway are closely related and both participate in cell proliferation and drug resistance of tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia and Notch signaling pathway in cell proliferation and drug resistance of osteosarcoma (OS) remain unclear. In this study, to further evaluate the role of hypoxia and Notch1 on drug resistance of OS, we investigated the influence of inhibiting Notch1 pathway by Notch1 small interference RNA (siRNA) on human MG-63 OS cells in hypoxia. Our data showed that hypoxia promoted OS cell proliferation, induced the G0/G1-S-G2/M phase transition, and increased multidrug resistance of human OS cells. Western blot analysis suggested that hypoxia increased the expression of HIF-1α, Notch1, and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP1) in human OS cells. Notch1 siRNA inhibits proliferation and increases apoptosis of hypoxic OS cells. Finally, these hypoxic OS cells can be sensitized to multidrug treatment through inhibition of the Notch protein expression by siRNA. Repression of the Notch protein expression resulted in down-regulation of MRP1 protein. These data support the conclusion that Notch signaling is up-regulated in human OS cells under hypoxia and Notch1 may represent a viable target to overcome chemoresistant OS cells in a hypoxic niche by regulating MRP1 gene expression. PMID:27468877

  16. Applications of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for the reversal of multidrug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YINGHONG; COLE, SUSAN P.C.; CAI, TIANGE; CAI, YU

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy presents a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients, which directly affects the clinical success rate of cancer therapy. Current research aims to improve the efficiency of chemotherapy, whilst reducing toxicity to prolong the lives of cancer patients. As with good biocompatibility, high stability and drug release targeting properties, nanodrug delivery systems alter the mechanism by which drugs function to reverse MDR, via passive or active targeting, increasing drug accumulation in the tumor tissue or reducing drug elimination. Given the potential role of nanodrug delivery systems used in multidrug resistance, the present study summarizes the current knowledge on the properties of liposomes, lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles, together with their underlying mechanisms. The current review aims to provide a reliable basis and useful information for the development of new treatment strategies of multidrug resistance reversal using nanodrug delivery systems. PMID:27347092

  17. Imidazoacridinone-dependent lysosomal photodestruction: a pharmacological Trojan horse approach to eradicate multidrug-resistant cancers.

    PubMed

    Adar, Y; Stark, M; Bram, E E; Nowak-Sliwinska, P; van den Bergh, H; Szewczyk, G; Sarna, T; Skladanowski, A; Griffioen, A W; Assaraf, Y G

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a primary hindrance to curative cancer therapy. Thus, introduction of novel strategies to overcome MDR is of paramount therapeutic significance. Sequestration of chemotherapeutics in lysosomes is an established mechanism of drug resistance. Here, we show that MDR cells display a marked increase in lysosome number. We further demonstrate that imidazoacridinones (IAs), which are cytotoxic fluorochromes, undergo a dramatic compartmentalization in lysosomes because of their hydrophobic weak base nature. We hence developed a novel photoactivation-based pharmacological Trojan horse approach to target and eradicate MDR cancer cells based on photo-rupture of IA-loaded lysosomes and tumor cell lysis via formation of reactive oxygen species. Illumination of IA-loaded cells resulted in lysosomal photodestruction and restoration of parental cell drug sensitivity. Lysosomal photodestruction of MDR cells overexpressing the key MDR efflux transporters ABCG2, ABCB1 or ABCC1 resulted in 10- to 52-fold lower IC(50) values of various IAs, thereby restoring parental cell sensitivity. Finally, in vivo application of this photodynamic therapy strategy after i.v. injection of IAs in human ovarian tumor xenografts in the chorioallantoic membrane model revealed selective destruction of tumors and their associated vasculature. These findings identify lysosomal sequestration of IAs as an Achilles heel of MDR cells that can be harnessed to eradicate MDR tumor cells via lysosomal photodestruction. PMID:22476101

  18. The Role of E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl Proteins in β-Elemene Reversing Multi-Drug Resistance of Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Mu, Xiao-Dong; Li, En-Zhe; Luo, Ying; Song, Na; Qu, Xiu-Juan; Hu, Xue-Jun; Liu, Yun-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that β-elemene, a compound isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Curcuma wenyujin, is capable of reversing tumor MDR, although the mechanism remains elusive. In this study, β-Elemene treatment markedly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and rhodamine 123 in both K562/DNR and SGC7901/ADR cells and significantly inhibited the expression of P-gp. Treatment of SGC7901/ADR cells with β-elemene led to downregulation of Akt phosphorylation and significant upregulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, c-Cbl and Cbl-b. Importantly, β-elemene significantly enhanced the anti-tumor activity of DOX in nude mice bearing SGC7901/ADR xenografts. Taken together, our results suggest that β-elemene may target P-gp-overexpressing leukemia and gastric cancer cells to enhance the efficacy of DOX treatment. PMID:23665906

  19. Vaccine Approaches for Multidrug Resistant Gram negative infections

    PubMed Central

    Campfield, Brian; Chen, Kong; Kolls, Jay K.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram negative bacterial infections are increasing in frequency and are associated with significant financial costs, morbidity and mortality. Current antibiotic therapies are associated with unacceptably poor clinical outcomes and toxicity. Unfortunately, the development of novel antimicrobials is stagnant leaving a significant clinical need for alternative treatments of MDR Gram negative rod infections. Recent preclinical studies have identified Th17 cells as critical mediators of broadly protective adaptive immunity, including protection against MDR infections. Studies of Th17 eliciting antigens, adjuvants and routes of immunization have identified potential vaccine strategies that may confer long-lived adaptive immunity against MDR Gram negative bacterial infections. PMID:24637162

  20. Light-Responsive Biodegradable Nanomedicine Overcomes Multidrug Resistance via NO-Enhanced Chemosensitization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; He, Qianjun; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Fuwu; Yang, Xiangyu; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Nan; Fan, Wenpei; Lin, Lisen; Niu, Gang; He, Nongyue; Song, Jibin; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-06-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is responsible for the relatively low effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. Herein, a nitric oxide (NO) gas-enhanced chemosensitization strategy is proposed to overcome MDR by construction of a biodegradable nanomedicine formula based on BNN6/DOX coloaded monomethoxy(polyethylene glycol)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (mPEG-PLGA). On one hand, the nanomedicine features high biocompatibility due to the high density of PEG and biodegradable PLGA. On the other hand, the nanoformula exhibits excellent stability under physiological conditions but exhibits stimuli-responsive decomposition of BNN6 for NO gas release upon ultraviolet-visible irradiation. More importantly, after NO release is triggered, gas molecules are generated that break the nanoparticle shell and lead to the release of doxorubicin. Furthermore, NO was demonstrated to reverse the MDR of tumor cells and enhance the chemosensitization for doxorubicin therapy. PMID:27213922

  1. Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) and Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Gupta, Pranav; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are members of a protein superfamily that are known to translocate various substrates across membranes, including metabolic products, lipids and sterols, and xenobiotic drugs. Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) belong to the subfamily C in the ABC transporter superfamily. MRPs have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance by actively extruding chemotherapeutic substrates. Moreover, some MRPs are known to be essential in physiological excretory or regulatory pathways. The importance of MRPs in cancer therapy is also implied by their clinical insights. Modulating the function of MRPs to re-sensitize chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy shows great promise in cancer therapy; thus, multiple MRP inhibitors have been developed recently. This review article summarizes the structure, distribution, and physiological as well as pharmacological function of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy. Several novel modulators targeting MRPs in cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:25840885

  2. Poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated multi-walled carbon nanotubes as an efficient drug carrier for overcoming multidrug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Jinping; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Sun Yaping; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2011-01-15

    The acquisition of multidrug resistance poses a serious problem in chemotherapy, and new types of transporters have been actively sought to overcome it. In the present study, poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated (PEGylated) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared and explored as drug carrier to overcome multidrug resistance. The prepared PEGylated MWCNTs penetrated into mammalian cells without damage plasma membrane, and its accumulation did not affect cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution. More importantly, PEGylated MWCNTs accumulated in the multidrug-resistant cancer cells as efficient as in the sensitive cancer cells. Intracellular translocation of PEGylated MWCNTs was visualized in both multidrug-resistant HepG2-DR cells and sensitive HepG2 cells, as judged by both fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy. PEGylated MWCNTs targeted cancer cells efficiently and multidrug-resistant cells failed to remove the intracellular MWCNTs. However, if used in combination with drugs without conjugation, PEGylated MWCNTs prompted drug efflux in MDR cells by stimulating the ATPase activity of P-glycoprotein. This study suggests that PEGylated MWCNTs can be developed as an efficient drug carrier to conjugate drugs for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

  3. Facing multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Giovanni; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-06-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to at least two of the most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs (i.e., isoniazid and rifampicin). Therapeutic regimens based on second- and third-line anti-tuberculosis medicines showed poor efficacy, safety, and tolerability profiles. It was estimated that in 2012 the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis incidence ranged from 300,000 to 600,000 cases, mainly diagnosed in the Eastern European and Central Asian countries. The highest proportion of cases is among individuals previously exposed to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Three main conditions can favour the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis: the poor implementation of the DOTS strategy, the shortage or the poor quality of the anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the poor therapeutic adherence of the patients to the prescribed regimens. Consultation with tuberculosis experts (e.g., consilium) is crucial to tailor the best anti-tuberculosis therapy. New therapeutic options are necessary: bedaquiline and delamanid seem promising drugs; in particular, during the development phase they demonstrated a protective effect against the emergence of further resistances towards the backbone drugs. In the recent past, other antibiotics have been administered off-label: the most relevant efficacy, safety, and tolerability profile was proved in linezolid-, meropenem/clavulanate-, cotrimoxazole-containing regimens. New research and development activities are needed in the diagnostic, therapeutic, preventive fields. PMID:24792579

  4. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  5. Implantable hydrogel embedded dark-gold nanoswitch as a theranostic probe to sense and overcome cancer multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Conde, João; Oliva, Nuria; Artzi, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells is a substantial limitation to the success of chemotherapy. Here, we describe facile means to overcome resistance by silencing the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), before chemotherapeutic drug delivery in vivo with a single local application. Our platform contains hydrogel embedded with dark-gold nanoparticles modified with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-intercalated nanobeacons that serve as an ON/OFF molecular nanoswitch triggered by the increased MRP1 expression within the tumor tissue microenvironment. This nanoswitch can sense and overcome MDR prior to local drug release. The nanobeacons comprise a 5-FU intercalated DNA hairpin, which is labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) dye and a dark-quencher. The nanobeacons are designed to open and release the intercalated drug only upon hybridization of the DNA hairpin to a complementary target, an event that restores fluorescence emission due to nanobeacons conformational reorganization. Despite the cross-resistance to 5-FU, more than 90% tumor reduction is achieved in vivo in a triple-negative breast cancer model following 80% MRP1 silencing compared with the continuous tumor growth following only drug or nanobeacon administration. Our approach can be applied to reverse cross-resistance to other chemotherapeutic drugs and restore treatment efficacy. As a universal nanotheranostic probe, this platform can pave the way to early cancer detection and treatment. PMID:25733851

  6. Implantable hydrogel embedded dark-gold nanoswitch as a theranostic probe to sense and overcome cancer multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Conde, João; Oliva, Nuria; Artzi, Natalie

    2015-03-17

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells is a substantial limitation to the success of chemotherapy. Here, we describe facile means to overcome resistance by silencing the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), before chemotherapeutic drug delivery in vivo with a single local application. Our platform contains hydrogel embedded with dark-gold nanoparticles modified with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-intercalated nanobeacons that serve as an ON/OFF molecular nanoswitch triggered by the increased MRP1 expression within the tumor tissue microenvironment. This nanoswitch can sense and overcome MDR prior to local drug release. The nanobeacons comprise a 5-FU intercalated DNA hairpin, which is labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) dye and a dark-quencher. The nanobeacons are designed to open and release the intercalated drug only upon hybridization of the DNA hairpin to a complementary target, an event that restores fluorescence emission due to nanobeacons conformational reorganization. Despite the cross-resistance to 5-FU, more than 90% tumor reduction is achieved in vivo in a triple-negative breast cancer model following 80% MRP1 silencing compared with the continuous tumor growth following only drug or nanobeacon administration. Our approach can be applied to reverse cross-resistance to other chemotherapeutic drugs and restore treatment efficacy. As a universal nanotheranostic probe, this platform can pave the way to early cancer detection and treatment. PMID:25733851

  7. Redox Regulation of Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Chemotherapy: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The development of multidrug resistance to cancer chemotherapy is a major obstacle to the effective treatment of human malignancies. It has been established that membrane proteins, notably multidrug resistance (MDR), multidrug resistance protein (MRP), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family encoding efflux pumps, play important roles in the development of multidrug resistance. Overexpression of these transporters has been observed frequently in many types of human malignancies and correlated with poor responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Evidence has accumulated showing that redox signals are activated in response to drug treatments that affect the expression and activity of these transporters by multiple mechanisms, including (a) conformational changes in the transporters, (b) regulation of the biosynthesis cofactors required for the transporter's function, (c) regulation of the expression of transporters at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, and (d) amplification of the copy number of genes encoding these transporters. This review describes various specific factors and their relevant signaling pathways that are involved in the regulation. Finally, the roles of redox signaling in the maintenance and evolution of cancer stem cells and their implications in the development of intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy are discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 99–133. PMID:18699730

  8. Repurposing ebselen for treatment of multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel antimicrobials and new approaches to developing them are urgently needed. Repurposing already-approved drugs with well-characterized toxicology and pharmacology is a novel way to reduce the time, cost, and risk associated with antibiotic innovation. Ebselen, an organoselenium compound, is known to be clinically safe and has a well-known pharmacology profile. It has shown potent bactericidal activity against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA). We demonstrated that ebselen acts through inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequently inhibited toxin production in MRSA. Additionally, ebselen was remarkably active and significantly reduced established staphylococcal biofilms. The therapeutic efficacy of ebselen was evaluated in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infections. Ebselen 1% and 2% significantly reduced the bacterial load and the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in MRSA USA300 skin lesions. Furthermore, it acts synergistically with traditional antimicrobials. This study provides evidence that ebselen has great potential for topical treatment of MRSA skin infections and lays the foundation for further analysis and development of ebselen as a potential treatment for multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections. PMID:26111644

  9. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen M.; Goodman, Samuel M.; McDaniel, Jessica A.; Madinger, Nancy E.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  10. CdTe quantum dots with daunorubicin induce apoptosis of multidrug-resistant human hepatoma HepG2/ADM cells: in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gen; Shi, Lixin; Selke, Matthias; Wang, Xuemei

    2011-06-01

    Cadmium telluride quantum dots (Cdte QDs) have received significant attention in biomedical research because of their potential in disease diagnosis and drug delivery. In this study, we have investigated the interaction mechanism and synergistic effect of 3-mercaptopropionic acid-capped Cdte QDs with the anti-cancer drug daunorubicin (DNR) on the induction of apoptosis using drug-resistant human hepatoma HepG2/ADM cells. Electrochemical assay revealed that Cdte QDs readily facilitated the uptake of the DNR into HepG2/ADM cells. Apoptotic staining, DNA fragmentation, and flow cytometry analysis further demonstrated that compared with Cdte QDs or DNR treatment alone, the apoptosis rate increased after the treatment of Cdte QDs together with DNR in HepG2/ADM cells. We observed that Cdte QDs treatment could reduce the effect of P-glycoprotein while the treatment of Cdte QDs together with DNR can clearly activate apoptosis-related caspases protein expression in HepG2/ADM cells. Moreover, our in vivo study indicated that the treatment of Cdte QDs together with DNR effectively inhibited the human hepatoma HepG2/ADM nude mice tumor growth. The increased cell apoptosis rate was closely correlated with the enhanced inhibition of tumor growth in the studied animals. Thus, Cdte QDs combined with DNR may serve as a possible alternative for targeted therapeutic approaches for some cancer treatments.

  11. A Novel Docetaxel-Loaded Poly (ɛ-Caprolactone)/Pluronic F68 Nanoparticle Overcoming Multidrug Resistance for Breast Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Lin; Zhang, Yangqing; Zheng, Yi; Tian, Ge; Song, Cunxian; Yang, Dongye; Chen, Hongli; Sun, Hongfan; Tian, Yan; Liu, Kexin; Li, Zhen; Huang, Laiqiang

    2009-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells is a significant obstacle to the success of chemotherapy in many cancers. The purpose of this research is to test the possibility of docetaxel-loaded poly (ɛ-caprolactone)/Pluronic F68 (PCL/Pluronic F68) nanoparticles to overcome MDR in docetaxel-resistance human breast cancer cell line. Docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles were prepared by modified solvent displacement method using commercial PCL and self-synthesized PCL/Pluronic F68, respectively. PCL/Pluronic F68 nanoparticles were found to be of spherical shape with a rough and porous surface. The nanoparticles had an average size of around 200 nm with a narrow size distribution. The in vitro drug release profile of both nanoparticle formulations showed a biphasic release pattern. There was an increased level of uptake of PCL/Pluronic F68 nanoparticles in docetaxel-resistance human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7 TAX30, when compared with PCL nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity of PCL nanoparticles was higher than commercial Taxotere® in the MCF-7 TAX30 cell culture, but the differences were not significant ( p > 0.05). However, the PCL/Pluronic F68 nanoparticles achieved significantly higher level of cytotoxicity than both of PCL nanoparticles and Taxotere® ( p < 0.05), indicating docetaxel-loaded PCL/Pluronic F68 nanoparticles could overcome multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells and therefore have considerable potential for treatment of breast cancer.

  12. Impaired 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine accumulation in T-lymphoblastoid cells as a mechanism of acquired resistance independent of multidrug resistant protein 4 with a possible role for ATP-binding cassette C11.

    PubMed Central

    Turriziani, O; Schuetz, J D; Focher, F; Scagnolari, C; Sampath, J; Adachi, M; Bambacioni, F; Riva, E; Antonelli, G

    2002-01-01

    Cellular factors may contribute to the decreased efficacy of chemotherapy in HIV infection. Indeed, prolonged treatment with nucleoside analogues, such as azidothymidine (AZT), 2',3'-deoxycytidine or 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine, induces cellular resistance. We have developed a human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM 3TC) that is selectively resistant to the antiproliferative effect of 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine (3TC) because the CEM 3TC cells were equally sensitive to AZT, as well as the antimitotic agent, vinblastine. The anti-retroviral activity of 3TC against HIV-1 was also severely impaired in the CEM 3TC cells. Despite similar deoxycytidine kinase activity and unchanged uptake of nucleosides such as AZT and 2'-deoxycytidine, CEM 3TC had profoundly impaired 3TC accumulation. Further studies indicated that CEM 3TC retained much less 3TC. However, despite a small overexpression of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 4, additional studies with cells specifically engineered to overexpress MRP4 demonstrated there was no impact on either 3TC accumulation or efflux. Finally, an increased expression of the MRP5 homologue, ATP-binding cassette C11 (ABCC11) was observed in the CEM 3TC cells. We speculate that the decreased 3TC accumulation in the CEM 3TC might be due to the upregulation of ABCC11. PMID:12133003

  13. Correlation of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter 1 and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 Transport Activities With Protein Expression Levels in Primary Cultured Human Tracheal, Bronchial, and Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Suzuki, Shinobu; Matsumaru, Takehisa; Yamamura, Norio; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how transporters contribute to the distribution of inhaled drugs in the lung is important for the discovery and development of such drugs. Protein expression levels may be useful to predict and understand drug distribution. As previously reported, organic cation/carnitine transporter 1 (OCTN1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) have higher levels of protein expression among transporters in primary cultured human lung cells. Nevertheless, it is unclear to what extent transport activity correlates with transporter protein expression. The purpose is to evaluate whether differences in OCTN1 and MRP1 protein expression govern the respective transport activity in primary cultured human lung cells. The model substrates of 4-[4-(dimethylamino) styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) and carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (CDF) for OCTN1 and MRP1, respectively, were used in the lung cells from five donors. Significant correlation was found between the kinetic parameter Vmax for ASP(+) and OCTN1 protein expression in plasma membrane of tracheal, bronchial, and alveolar cells (r(2) = 0.965, 0.834, and 0.877, respectively), and between the efflux of CDF and MRP1 protein expression in plasma membrane of tracheal, bronchial, and alveolar cells (r(2) = 0.800, 0.904, and 0.790, respectively). These findings suggest that OCTN1 and MRP1 protein concentrations are determinants for drug distribution in the lung. PMID:26429295

  14. Doxorubicin selected multidrug-resistant small cell lung cancer cell lines characterised by elevated cytoplasmic Ca2+ and resistance modulation by verapamil in absence of P-glycoprotein overexpression.

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, P.; Larsson, R.; Gruber, A.; Peterson, C.; Bergh, J.

    1991-01-01

    Sublines from the small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines U1285 and U1690, denoted U1285-100, U1285-250, U1690-40 and U1690-150, were adapted to grow in the continuous presence of 100, 250, 40 and 150 ng ml-1 doxorubicin (Dox), respectively. The Dox resistance was accompanied by cross-resistance to vincristine (Vcr), Vp-16 and for U1285-100 also to cisplatinum. Sublines of U1690-40 and U1285-100, cultured in absence of Dox for 4 months were only partially reversed with respect to Dox resistance. Neither the parental nor the most Dox resistance sublines had detectable levels of mdr 1 RNA but a small fraction of cells in all cell lines stained weakly positive for P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Verapamil (Ver) at 5 microM reversed the Dox resistance completely and partly in the U1690 and U1285 sublines, respectively, but did not increase the cellular accumulation of Dox. The cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+i) was close to 100 nM in both parental cell lines but elevated in the U1285-100 and U1690-40 sublines by 21 and 44%, respectively, and in U1285-250 and U1690-150 by 51 and 91%, respectively. The partly reverted sublines still showed significant but smaller elevations in Ca2+i of 10-30%. Ver was without acute or long term effects of Ca2+i in the U1285-100 and U1690-40 sublines. Selection for Dox resistance in SCLC may thus result in atypical multidrug-resistance characterised by absence of P-gp overexpression and atypical cross-resistance. Although Ver did not seem to affect Dox accumulation it may still work as a resistance modulator.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1684906

  15. Antiviral Drug- and Multidrug Resistance in Cytomegalovirus Infected SCT Patients

    PubMed Central

    Göhring, Katharina; Hamprecht, Klaus; Jahn, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    In pediatric and adult patients after stem cell transplantation (SCT) disseminated infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause life threatening diseases. For treatment, the three antivirals ganciclovir (GCV), foscarnet (PFA) and cidofovir (CDV) are approved and most frequently used. Resistance to all of these antiviral drugs may induce a severe problem in this patient cohort. Responsible for resistance phenomena are mutations in the HCMV phosphotransferase-gene (UL97) and the polymerase-gene (UL54). Most frequently mutations in the UL97-gene are associated with resistance to GCV. Resistance against all three drugs is associated to mutations in the UL54-gene. Monitoring of drug resistance by genotyping is mostly done by PCR-based Sanger sequencing. For phenotyping with cell culture the isolation of HCMV is a prerequisite. The development of multidrug resistance with mutation in both genes is rare, but it is often associated with a fatal outcome. The manifestation of multidrug resistance is mostly associated with combined UL97/UL54-mutations. Normally, mutations in the UL97 gene occur initially followed by UL54 mutation after therapy switch. The appearance of UL54-mutation alone without any detection of UL97-mutation is rare. Interestingly, in a number of patients the UL97 mutation could be detected in specific compartments exclusively and not in blood. PMID:25750703

  16. Multidrug resistance ABC transporter structure predictions by homology modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Honorat, Mylène; Falson, Pierre; Terreux, Raphael; Di Pietro, Attilio; Dumontet, Charles; Payen, Léa

    2011-03-01

    Human multidrug resistance ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane proteins responsible for the efflux of multiple, endogenous or exogenous, compounds out of the cells, and therefore they are involved in multi-drug resistance phenotype (MDR). They thus deeply impact the pharmacokinetic parameters and toxicity properties of drugs. A great pressure to develop inhibitors of these pumps is carried out, by either ligand-based drug design or (more ideally) structure-based drug design. In that goal, many biochemical studies have been carried out to characterize their transport functions, and many efforts have been spent to get high-resolution structures. Currently, beside the 3D-structures of bacterial ABC transporters Sav1866 and MsbA, only the mouse ABCB1 complete structure has been published at high-resolution, illustrating the tremendous difficulty in getting such information, taking into account that the human genome accounts for 48 ABC transporters encoding genes. Homology modeling is consequently a reasonable approach to overcome this obstacle. The present review describes, in the first part, the different approaches which have been published to set up human ABC pump 3D-homology models allowing the localization of binding sites for drug candidates, and the identification of critical residues therein. In a second part, the review proposes a more accurate strategy and practical keys to use such biological tools for initiating structure-based drug design. PMID:21470105

  17. Coencapsulated doxorubicin and bromotetrandrine lipid nanoemulsions in reversing multidrug resistance in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi; Luo, Jingwen; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; Sun, Xun; Fu, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance has remained a major cause of treatment failure in chemotherapy due to the presence of P-glycoproteins (P-gp) that actively pump drugs from inside the cell to the outside. P-gp inhibitors were developed and coadministered with chemotherapeutic drugs to overcome the effect of efflux pumps thus enhancing the chemosensitivity of therapeutics. Our study aimed at developing a lipid nanoemulsion system for the coencapsulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and bromotetrandrine (W198) to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in breast cancer. W198 was a potent P-gp inhibitor, and DOX was selected as a model compound which is a common substrate for P-gp. Coencapsulated DOX and W198 lipid nanoemulsions (DOX/W198-LNs) displayed significantly enhanced cytotoxicity in DOX-resistant human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR) compared with DOX loaded lipid nanoemulsions (DOX-LNs) (p < 0.05), which is due to the enhanced intracellular uptake of DOX in MCF-7/ADR cells. The biodistribution study was performed using a nude mice xenograft model, which demonstrates enhanced tumor uptake of DOX in the DOX/W198-LN treated group. Compared with DOX solution, DOX/W198-LNs showed reduced cardiac toxicity and gastrointestinal injury in rats. Taken together, DOX/W198-LNs represent a promising formulation for overcoming MDR in breast cancer. PMID:25469833

  18. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ). PMID:16922629

  19. Apoptosis Induction and Imaging of Cadmium-Telluride Quantum Dots with Wogonin in Multidrug-Resistant Leukemia K562/A02 Cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Liu, Hongyi; Huang, Dongliang; Mao, Xuhua; Hu, Xianyun; Jiang, Caiyun; Pu, Maomao; Zhang, Gen; Zeng, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Wogonin (5,7-dihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone) is one of the active components of flavonoids isolated from Scutellariae radix and possesses antitumor effect against leukemia. Cadmium-telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) are a kind of nanoparticles with great potential in functioning as an efficient drug delivery vector in biomedical research. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of CdTe-QDs with Wogonin on the induction of apoptosis using drug-resistant human leukemia KA cells. Flow cytometry analysis, assay of morphology under electron microscope, quantitative analysis of tumor volume and micro-CT imaging demonstrated that compared with that by pure CdTe-QDs or wogonin, the apoptosis rate increased sharply when treated wirh CdTe-QDs together with wogonin on KA cells. These results proved that the nanocomposites readily overcame the barrier of drug-resistance and provoked cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo by facilitating the interaction between wogonin and KA cells. As known to all, it is an inevitable tendency that new effective therapies will take the place of conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy presenting significant disadvantages. According to this article, CdTe-QD combined with wogonin is a possible alternative for some cancer treatments. PMID:27455661

  20. Emerging therapies for multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Pulido, Marina R; López-Rojas, Rafael; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    The global emergence of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has reduced the number of clinically available antibiotics that retain activity against this pathogen. For this reason, the development of novel prevention and treatment strategies for infections caused by A. baumannii is necessary. Several studies have begun to characterize nonantibiotic approaches that utilize novel mechanisms of action to achieve antibacterial activity. Recent advances in phage therapy, iron chelation therapy, antimicrobial peptides, prophylactic vaccination, photodynamic therapy, and nitric oxide (NO)-based therapies have all been shown to have activity against A. baumannii. However, before these approaches can be used clinically there are still limitations and remaining questions that must be addressed. PMID:23317680

  1. Congenital Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Espiritu, Nora; Aguirre, Lino; Jave, Oswaldo; Sanchez, Luis; Kirwan, Daniela E.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in a Peruvian infant. His mother was diagnosed with disseminated TB, and treatment commenced 11 days postpartum. The infant was diagnosed with TB after 40 days and died at 2 months and 2 days of age. Congenital transmission of TB to the infant was suspected, because direct postpartum transmission was considered unlikely; also, thorough screening of contacts for TB was negative. Spoligotyping confirmed that both mother and baby were infected with identical strains of the Beijing family (SIT1). PMID:24821847

  2. Wogonin reverses multi-drug resistance of human myelogenous leukemia K562/A02 cells via downregulation of MRP1 expression by inhibiting Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefen; Zhang, Yi; Li, Wei; Miao, Hanchi; Zhang, Haiwei; Zhou, Yuxin; Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong; Zhao, Li; Guo, Qinglong

    2014-11-15

    Constitutive NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation has been recently reported to play a pivotal role in enhancing cell survival and resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. Previously, much effort has been devoted to the investigation of blocking Nrf2 function in cultured cells and cancer tissues, but few researches have been undertaken to evaluate the precise mechanism of flavonoids-induced sensitivity by inhibiting Nrf2. In this study, we investigated the reversal effect of Wogonin, a flavonoid isolated from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, in resistant human myelogenous leukemia. Data indicated that Wogonin had strong reversal potency by inhibiting functional activity and expression of MRP1 at both protein and mRNA in adriamycin (ADR)-induced resistant human myelogenous leukemia K562/A02 cells. Consequently, the inhibition of MRP1 by Wogonin was dependent on Nrf2 through the decreased binding ability of Nrf2 to antioxidant response element (ARE). Further research revealed Wogonin modulated Nrf2 through the reduction of Nrf2mRNA at transcriptional processes rather than RNA degradation, which is regulated by the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, DNA-PKcs was found to be involved in the Wogonin-induced downregulation of Nrf2 mRNA at transcriptional levels. In summary, these results clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of using Wogonin via inhibiting Nrf2 to combat chemoresistance and suggested that Wogonin can be developed into an efficient natural sensitizer for resistant human myelogenous leukemia. PMID:25264278

  3. Overcoming multidrug resistance in Dox-resistant neuroblastoma cell lines via treatment with HPMA copolymer conjugates containing anthracyclines and P-gp inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Koziolová, Eva; Janoušková, Olga; Cuchalová, Lucie; Hvězdová, Zuzana; Hraběta, Jan; Eckschlager, Tomáš; Sivák, Ladislav; Ulbrich, Karel; Etrych, Tomáš; Šubr, Vladimír

    2016-07-10

    Water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer conjugates bearing the anticancer drugs doxorubicin (Dox) or pirarubicin (THP), P-gp inhibitors derived from reversin 121 (REV) or ritonavir (RIT)), or both anticancer drug and P-gp inhibitor were designed and synthesized. All biologically active molecules were attached to the polymer carrier via pH-sensitive spacer enabling controlled release in mild acidic environment modeling endosomes and lysosomes of tumor cells. The cytotoxicity of the conjugates against three sensitive and Dox-resistant neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines, applied alone or in combination, was studied in vitro. All conjugates containing THP displayed higher cytotoxicity against all three Dox-resistant NB cell lines compared with the corresponding Dox-containing conjugates. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of conjugates containing both drug and P-gp inhibitor was up to 10 times higher than that of the conjugate containing only drug. In general, the polymer-drug conjugates showed higher cytotoxicity when conjugates containing inhibitors were added 8 or 16h prior to treatment compared with conjugates bearing both the inhibitor and the drug. The difference in cytotoxicity was more pronounced at the 16-h time point. Moreover, higher inhibitor:drug ratios resulted in higher cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of the polymer-drug used in combination with polymer P-gp inhibitor was up to 84 times higher than that of the polymer-drug alone. PMID:27189135

  4. Angiopoietin-2 enhances survival in experimental sepsis induced by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tzepi, Ira-Maria; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Carrer, Dionyssia-Pinelopi; Tsaganos, Thomas; Claus, Ralf A; Vaki, Ilia; Pelekanou, Aimilia; Kotsaki, Antigone; Tziortzioti, Vassiliki; Topouzis, Stavros; Bauer, Michael; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Levels of circulating angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) increase in sepsis, raising the possibility that Ang-2 acts as a modulator in the sepsis cascade. To investigate this, experimental sepsis was induced in male C57BL6 mice by a multidrug-resistant isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa; survival was determined along with neutrophil tissue infiltration and release of proinflammatory cytokines. Survival was significantly increased either by pretreatment with recombinant Ang-2 2 h before or treatment with recombinant Ang-2 30 min after bacterial challenge. Likewise, Ang-2 pretreatment protected against sepsis-related death elicited by Escherichia coli; however, Ang-2 failed to provide protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged mice. The survival advantage of Ang-2 in response to P. aeruginosa challenge was lost in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-deficient mice or neutropenic mice. Infiltration of the liver by neutrophils was elevated in the Ang-2 group compared with saline-treated animals. Serum TNF-α levels were reduced by Ang-2, whereas those of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 remained unchanged. This was accompanied by lower release of TNF-α by stimulated splenocytes. When applied to U937 cells in vitro, heat-killed P. aeruginosa induced the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α; low levels of exogenous TNF-α synergized with P. aeruginosa. This synergistic effect was abolished after the addition of Ang-2. These results put in evidence a striking protective role of Ang-2 in experimental sepsis evoked by a multidrug-resistant isolate of P. aeruginosa attributed to modulation of TNF-α production and changes in neutrophil migration. The protective role of Ang-2 is shown when whole microorganisms are used and not LPS, suggesting complex interactions with the host immune response. PMID:22859861

  5. Anti-Microbial Dendrimers against Multidrug-Resistant P. aeruginosa Enhance the Angiogenic Effect of Biological Burn-wound Bandages

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Sayed, Philippe; Kaeppli, Ariane; Siriwardena, Thissa; Darbre, Tamis; Perron, Karl; Jafari, Paris; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Pioletti, Dominique P.; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has increased progressively and impedes further regression in mortality in burn patients. Such wound infections serve as bacterial reservoir for nosocomial infections and are associated with significant morbidity and costs. Anti-microbial polycationic dendrimers G3KL and G3RL, able to kill multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa, have been previously developed. The combination of these dendrimers with a class of biological bandages made of progenitor skin cells, which secrete growth factors, could positively impact wound-healing processes. However, polycations are known to be used as anti-angiogenic agents for tumor suppression. Since, neovascularization is pivotal in the healing of deep burn-wounds, the use of anti-microbial dendrimers may thus hinder the healing processes. Surprisingly, we have seen in this study that G3KL and G3RL dendrimers can have angiogenic effects. Moreover, we have shown that a dendrimer concentration ranging between 50 and 100 μg/mL in combination with the biological bandages can suppress bacterial growth without altering cell viability up to 5 days. These results show that antimicrobial dendrimers can be used in combination with biological bandages and could potentially improve the healing process with an enhanced angiogenesis. PMID:26912450

  6. Most drugs that reverse multidrug resistance also inhibit photoaffinity labeling of P-glycoprotein by a vinblastine analog

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, S.; Cornwell, M.M.; Kuwano, M.; Pastan, I.; Gottesman, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells express a 170,000-dalton membrane glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) that can be photoaffinity labeled with the vinblastine analog N-(p-azido-(3-/sup 125/I)salicyl)-N'-(beta-aminoethyl)vindesine. Several agents that suppress the multidrug-resistant phenotype, including N-solanesyl-N,N'-bis(3,4-dimethylbenzyl)ethylenediamine, cepharanthine, quinidine, and reserpine, were found to inhibit photolabeling of P-glycoprotein at doses comparable to those that reverse multidrug resistance. However, the phenothiazines chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine, which also effectively reverse multidrug resistance, were poor inhibitors of the photoaffinity labeling of P-glycoprotein. Chloroquine, propranolol, or atropine, which only partially reversed the drug resistance, also did not inhibit photolabeling. Naphthalene sulfonamide calmodulin inhibitors, W7 and W5, as well as many other drugs that did not circumvent multidrug resistance, did not inhibit photolabeling. These studies suggest that most, but not all, agents that phenotypically suppress multidrug resistance also inhibit drug binding to a site on P-glycoprotein with which a photoaffinity analog of vinblastine interacts.

  7. Management of multidrug-resistant enterococcal infections

    PubMed Central

    Arias, C. A.; Contreras, G. A.; Murray, B. E.

    2013-01-01

    Enterococci are organisms with a remarkable ability to adapt to the environment and acquire antibiotic resistance determinants. The evolution of antimicrobial resistance in these organisms poses enormous challenges for clinicians when faced with patients affected with severe infections. The increased prevalence and dissemination of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium worldwide has resulted in a major decrease in therapeutic options because the majority of E. faecium isolates are now resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin, and exhibit high-level resistance to aminoglycosides, which are three of the traditionally most useful anti-enterococcal antibiotics. Newer antibiotics such as linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline have good in vitro activity against enterococcal isolates, although their clinical use may be limited in certain clinical scenarios as a result of reduced rates of success, possible underdosing for enterococci and low serum levels, respectively, and also by the emergence of resistance. The experimental agent oritavancin may offer some hope for the treatment of vancomycin-resistant enterococci but clinical data are still lacking. Thus, optimal therapies for the treatment of multidrug-resistant enterococcal infections continue to be based on empirical observations and extrapolations from in vitro and animal data. Clinical studies evaluating new strategies, including combination therapies, to treat severe vancomycin-resistant E. faecium infections are urgently needed. PMID:20569266

  8. [Innovative treatments for multidrug-resistant bacteria].

    PubMed

    Pierre, Tattevin; Aurélien, Lorleac'h; Matthieu, Revest

    2014-03-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria has accelerated sharply in the last decade. According to the World Health Organization they are responsible for an estimated 25 000 deaths in Europe each year. In addition, few new antibiotics are under development, raising the spectrum of a return to the "pre-antibiotic era". Non antibiotic antibacterial agents have recently attracted renewed interest. The most promising candidates are: i) phages (bacteria-infecting viruses) have been widely used in Eastern European countries since the 1930s but come up against logistic and regulatory obstacles due to the evolutionary nature of these biologic agents, while convincing clinical data are lacking; ii) bacteriocines are smallantibacterialpeptidesproducedby numerous bacteria; some have a rapid bactericidal effect, good tolerability, and a limited impact on the commensal flora; however, clinical use of bacteriocines is complicated by their fragility, poor penetration, and substantial risk of resistance selection ; iii) antisense oligonucleo tides act by inactivating genes through specific interaction with a complementary DNA or RNA fragment, potentially allowing specific inhibition of selected bacterial virulence factors. However, this therapeutic class may be more suitable for viral or genetic diseases than for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, owing to the difficulty of delivering them inside bacteria. PMID:26427289

  9. Expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) in human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines, and the inhibitory effects of the MRP-specific inhibitor MK-571 on methotrexate distribution in rats

    PubMed Central

    TAKEUCHI, KENJI; SHIBATA, MASAKAZU; KASHIYAMA, EIJI; UMEHARA, KEN

    2012-01-01

    In the development of anti-blood cancer drugs, the chronic myelocytic leukemia (KU812), acute myelocytic leukemia (KG-1) and lymphoma (U937) cell lines are commonly used in preclinical pharmacology studies as human cancer xenograft models in mice. In the present study, mRNA expression levels of typical human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in these human blood cancer cell lines were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Based on the results, the expression level of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) was found to be extremely high in KU812 cells compared with those of other transporters. Additionally, MRP4 expression levels were found to be relatively high in U937, KG-1 and a blood cell line derived from a healthy subject (RPMI 1788). In addition, to elucidate the contribution of MRP4 to the methotrexate (MTX) distribution in normal blood cells and tissues, [3H]MTX was intravenously (i.v.) administered to two groups of rats. Animals in one group received [3H]MTX only; the other group was concomitantly administered i.v. MK-571, a typical inhibitor of MRP transporters. No marked difference was observed between the two groups; the Kp values (tissue concentration/plasma concentration) of the concomitant group showed slightly higher values compared with those of the MTX alone group in erythrocytes (1.4 times, P<0.001), spleen (1.3 times, P<0.05) and thymus (1.2 times, P<0.05), respectively. Although in the present study we could not evaluate the direct involvement of MRP4 in blood cancer cells in which MRP4 expression was excessively high, these results suggest a possible functional role of MRP4 in blood cancer cells and albeit only slightly in normal blood cells/tissues. PMID:23181130

  10. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Piddock, Laura J V

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  11. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  12. Is Resistance Useless? Multidrug Resistance and Collateral Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew D.; Handley, Misty D.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    When cancer cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutics, it is frequently conferred by the ATP-dependent efflux pump P-glycoprotein (MDR1, P-gp, ABCB1). P-gp can efflux a wide range of cancer drugs; thus its expression confers cross-resistance, termed multidrug resistance (MDR), to a wide range of drugs. Strategies to overcome this resistance have been actively sought for over 30 years, yet no clinical solutions exist. A less understood aspect of MDR is the hypersensitivity of resistant cancer cells to other drugs, a phenomenon generally known as collateral sensitivity (CS). This review highlights the extent of this effect for the first time, discusses hypotheses such as ROS generation to account for the underlying generality of this phenomenon, and proposes the exploitation of CS as a strategy to improve response to chemotherapy. PMID:19762091

  13. Reversing Cancer Multidrug Resistance in Xenograft Models via Orchestrating Multiple Actions of Functional Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Debin; Wang, Tingfang; Su, Zhigui; Xue, Lingjing; Mo, Ran; Zhang, Can

    2016-08-31

    A multistimuli responsive drug delivery system (DDS) based on sulfhydryl and amino-cofunctionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (SH/NH2-MSNs) has been developed, in which the multifunctional hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives were grafted onto the SH/NH2-MSNs by disulfide bonds for targeting delivery, controlling drug release and reversing multidrug resistance (MDR). The doxorubicin (Dox) loaded multifunctional HA derivatives modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Dox/HHS-MSNs) were enzyme and redox sensitive, which could respond to the intracellular stimuli of hyaluronidase (HAase) and glutathione (GSH) successively and prevent drug leakage before reaching the tumor tissues. The cellular uptake experiments showed that Dox/HHS-MSNs were vulnerable to be endocytosed into the Dox-resistant human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7/ADR) cells, efficiently realized the endolysosomal escape and remained in the cytoplasm. Because of orchestrating multiple actions above including active targeting, endolysosomal escape and efficient multilevel drug release, Dox/HHS-MSNs could induce the strongest apoptosis and cytotoxicity of MCF-7/ADR cells. Furthermore, a series of in vivo studies on MCF-7/ADR tumor-bearing xenograft mouse models demonstrated that Dox/HHS-MSNs possessed the enhanced tumor-targeting capacity and the best therapeutic efficacy to reverse cancer MDR. PMID:27420116

  14. Interleukin-18 Down-Regulates Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 Expression through Farnesoid X Receptor Associated with Nuclear Factor Kappa B and Yin Yang 1 in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-cong; Lian, Wei; Zhang, Liang-jun; Feng, Xin-chan; Gao, Yu; Li, Shao-xue; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Ying; Yang, Long; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Lei; Wang, Rong-quan; Chai, Jin; Chen, Wen-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) plays an important role in bile acid metabolism by transporting toxic organic anion conjugates, including conjugated bilirubin, glutathione, sulfate, and multifarious drugs. MRP2 expression is reduced in cholestatic patients and rodents. However, the molecular mechanism of MRP2 down-regulation remains elusive. In this report, we treated human hepatoma HepG2 cells with interleukin-18 (IL-18) and measured the expression of MRP2, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), and the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) by quantitative real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. We found that expression of MRP2 was repressed by IL-18 at both the mRNA and protein levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, the activated NF-κB pathway increased YY1 and reduced FXR. These changes were all attenuated in HepG2 cells with knockdown of the NF-κB subunit, p65. The reduced expression of FXR and MRP2 in HepG2 cells that had been caused by IL-18 treatment was also attenuated by YY1 knockdown. We further observed significantly elevated IL-18, NF-κB, and YY1 expression and decreased FXR and MRP2 expression in bile duct-ligated Sprague Dawley rat livers. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays also showed that FXR bound to the promoter region in MRP2 was less abundant in liver extracts from bile duct-ligated rats than sham-operated rats. Our findings indicate that IL-18 down-regulates MRP2 expression through the nuclear receptor FXR in HepG2 cells, and may be mediated by NF-κB and YY1. PMID:26292095

  15. Efflux Transport Characterization of Resveratrol Glucuronides in UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 Transfected HeLa Cells: Application of a Cellular Pharmacokinetic Model to Decipher the Contribution of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Li, Feng; Quan, Enxi; Dong, Dong; Wu, Baojian

    2016-04-01

    Resveratrol undergoes extensive metabolism to form biologically active glucuronides in humans. However, the transport mechanisms for resveratrol glucuronides are not fully established. Here, we aimed to characterize the efflux transport of resveratrol glucuronides using UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells (HeLa1A1 cells), and to determine the contribution of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 4 to cellular excretion of the glucuronides. Two glucuronide isomers [i.e., resveratrol 3-O-glucuronide (R3G) and resveratrol 4'-O-glucuronide (R4'G)] were excreted into the extracellular compartment after incubation of resveratrol (1-100 μM) with HeLa1A1 cells. The excretion rate was linearly related to the level of intracellular glucuronide, indicating that glucuronide efflux was a nonsaturable process. MK-571 (a dual inhibitor of UGT1A1 and MRPs) significantly decreased the excretion rates of R3G and R4'G while increasing their intracellular levels. Likewise, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated silencing of MRP4 caused a significant reduction in glucuronide excretion but an elevation in glucuronide accumulation. Furthermore, β-glucuronidase expressed in the cells catalyzed the hydrolysis of the glucuronides back to the parent compound. A cellular pharmacokinetic model integrating resveratrol transport/metabolism with glucuronide hydrolysis/excretion was well fitted to the experimental data, allowing derivation of the efflux rate constant values in the absence or presence of shRNA targeting MRP4. It was found that a large percentage of glucuronide excretion (43%-46%) was attributed to MRP4. In conclusion, MRP4 participated in cellular excretion of R3G and R4'G. Integration of mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling with transporter knockdown was a useful method to derive the contribution percentage of an exporter to overall glucuronide excretion. PMID:26758854

  16. Regulation of expression and activity of multidrug resistance proteins MRP2 and MDR1 by estrogenic compounds in Caco-2 cells. Role in prevention of xenobiotic-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Arias, Agostina; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Villanueva, Silvina S M; Ruiz, María L; Luquita, Marcelo G; Perdomo, Virginia G; Vore, Mary; Catania, Viviana A; Mottino, Aldo D

    2014-06-01

    ABC transporters including MRP2, MDR1 and BCRP play a major role in tissue defense. Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest a cytoprotective role of estrogens in intestine, though the mechanism remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether pharmacologic concentrations of ethynylestradiol (EE, 0.05pM to 5nM), or concentrations of genistein (GNT) associated with soy ingestion (0.1-10μM), affect the expression and activity of multidrug resistance proteins MRP2, MDR1 and BCRP using Caco-2 cells, an in vitro model of intestinal epithelium. We found that incubation with 5pM EE and 1μM GNT for 48h increased expression and activity of both MRP2 and MDR1. Estrogens did not affect expression of BCRP protein at any concentration studied. Irrespective of the estrogen tested, up-regulation of MDR1 and MRP2 protein was accompanied by increased levels of MDR1 mRNA, whereas MRP2 mRNA remained unchanged. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated association of MRP2 and MDR1 up-regulation with increased resistance to cell death induced by 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, an MRP2 substrate precursor, and by paraquat, an MDR1 substrate. Experiments using an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist implicate ER participation in MRP2 and MDR1 regulation. GNT but not EE increased the expression of ERβ, the most abundant form in human intestine and in Caco-2 cells, which could lead in turn to increased sensitivity to estrogens. We conclude that specific concentrations of estrogens can confer resistance against cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells, due in part to positive modulation of ABC transporters involved in extrusion of their toxic substrates. Although extrapolation of these results to the in vivo situation must be cautiously done, the data could explain tentatively the cytoprotective role of estrogens against chemical injury in intestine. PMID:24685904

  17. Cytotoxicity of rhein, the active metabolite of sennoside laxatives, is reduced by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    PubMed Central

    van Gorkom, B A P; Timmer-Bosscha, H; de Jong, S; van der Kolk, D M; Kleibeuker, J H; de Vries, E G E

    2002-01-01

    Anthranoid laxatives, belonging to the anthraquinones as do anthracyclines, possibly increase colorectal cancer risk. Anthracyclines interfere with topoisomerase II, intercalate DNA and are substrates for P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1. P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 protect colonic epithelial cells against xenobiotics. The aim of this study was to analyse the interference of anthranoids with these natural defence mechanisms and the direct cytotoxicity of anthranoids in cancer cell lines expressing these mechanisms in varying combinations. A cytotoxicity profile of rhein, aloe emodin and danthron was established in related cell lines exhibiting different levels of topoisomerases, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and P-glycoprotein. Interaction of rhein with multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 was studied by carboxy fluorescein efflux and direct cytotoxicity by apoptosis induction. Rhein was less cytotoxic in the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 overexpressing GLC4/ADR cell line compared to GLC4. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 inhibition with MK571 increased rhein cytotoxicity. Carboxy fluorescein efflux was blocked by rhein. No P-glycoprotein dependent rhein efflux was observed, nor was topoisomerase II responsible for reduced toxicity. Rhein induced apoptosis but did not intercalate DNA. Aloe emodin and danthron were no substrates for MDR mechanisms. Rhein is a substrate for multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and induces apoptosis. It could therefore render the colonic epithelium sensitive to cytotoxic agents, apart from being toxic in itself. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1494–1500. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600255 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11986786

  18. Epidemiology and Treatment of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Shin, Sonya S.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistant tuberculosis is now thought to afflict between 1 and 2 million patients annually. Although significant regional variability in the distribution of disease has been recorded, surveillance data are limited by several factors. The true burden of disease is likely underestimated. Nevertheless, the estimated burden is substantial enough to warrant concerted action. A range of approaches is possible, but all appropriate interventions require scale-up of laboratories and early treatment with regimens containing a sufficient number of second-line drugs. Ambulatory treatment for most patients, and improved infection control, can facilitate scale-up with decreased risk of nosocomial transmission. Several obstacles have been considered to preclude worldwide scale-up of treatment, mostly attributable to inadequate human, drug, and financial resources. Further delays in scale-up, however, risk continued generation and transmission of resistant tuberculosis, as well as associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:18810684

  19. Breaking the Spell: Combating Multidrug Resistant 'Superbugs'.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community wellbeing. Conventional antibiotics are getting progressively more ineffective as a consequence of resistance, making it imperative to realize improved antimicrobial options. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported of being resistance, referred as ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae) accentuating their capacity to "escape" from routine antimicrobial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at prelude of a drug development process, will enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and will maximize or predict therapeutic potential before clinical testing. PMID:26925046

  20. Intracellular targeted co-delivery of shMDR1 and gefitinib with chitosan nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiwei; Yang, Guang; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Liu, Ming; Feng, Bo; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, multidrug resistance and side effects of drugs limit the effectiveness of chemotherapies in clinics. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (MDR1), as a member of the ATP-binding cassette family, acts on transporting drugs into cell plasma across the membrane of cancer cells and leads to the occurrence of multidrug resistance, thus resulting in the failure of chemotherapy in cancer. The main aims of this research were to design a nanodelivery system for accomplishing the effective co-delivery of gene and antitumor drug and overcoming multidrug resistance effect. In this study, shMDR1 and gefitinib-encapsulating chitosan nanoparticles with sustained release, small particle size, and high encapsulation efficiency were prepared. The serum stability, protection from nuclease, and transfection efficiency of gene in vitro were investigated. The effects of co-delivery of shMDR1 and gefitinib in nanoparticles on reversing multidrug resistance were also evaluated by investigating the cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanism, and cell apoptosis on established gefitinib-resistant cells. The results demonstrated that chitosan nanoparticles entrapping gefitinib and shMDR1 had the potential to overcome the multidrug resistance and improve cancer treatment efficacy, especially toward resistant cells. PMID:26648717

  1. Honokiol enhances paclitaxel efficacy in multi-drug resistant human cancer model through the induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Beitler, Jonathan J; Wang, Hong; Lee, Michael J; Huang, Wen; Koenig, Lydia; Nannapaneni, Sreenivas; Amin, A R M Ruhul; Bonner, Michael; Shin, Hyung Ju C; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Arbiser, Jack L; Shin, Dong M

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy remains a major obstacle in cancer therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanism and efficacy of honokiol in inducing apoptosis and enhancing paclitaxel chemotherapy in pre-clinical multi-drug resistant (MDR) cancer models, including lineage-derived human MDR (KB-8-5, KB-C1, KB-V1) and their parental drug sensitive KB-3-1 cancer cell lines. In vitro analyses demonstrated that honokiol effectively inhibited proliferation in KB-3-1 cells and the MDR derivatives (IC50 ranging 3.35 ± 0.13 µg/ml to 2.77 ± 0.22 µg/ml), despite their significant differences in response to paclitaxel (IC50 ranging 1.66 ± 0.09 ng/ml to 6560.9 ± 439.52 ng/ml). Honokiol induced mitochondria-dependent and death receptor-mediated apoptosis in MDR KB cells, which was associated with inhibition of EGFR-STAT3 signaling and downregulation of STAT3 target genes. Combined treatment with honokiol and paclitaxel synergistically augmented cytotoxicity in MDR KB cells, compared with treatment with either agent alone in vitro. Importantly, the combined treatment significantly inhibited in vivo growth of KB-8-5 tumors in a subcutaneous model. Tumor tissues from the combination group displayed a significant inhibition of Ki-67 expression and an increase in TUNEL-positive cells compared with the control group. These results suggest that targeting multidrug resistance using honokiol in combination with chemotherapy drugs may provide novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:24586249

  2. Multidrug resistance-selective antiproliferative activity of Piper amide alkaloids and synthetic analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Hu; Goto, Masuo; Wang, Li-Ting; Hsieh, Kan-Yen; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Tang, Gui-Hua; Long, Chun-Lin; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-five amide alkaloids (1–25) from Piper boehmeriifolium and 10 synthetic amide alkaloid derivatives (39–48) were evaluated for antiproliferative activity against eight human tumor cell lines, including chemosensitive and multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell lines. The results suggested tumor type-selectivity. 1-[7-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl)heptanoyl]piperidine (46) exhibited the best inhibitory activity (IC50 = 4.94 µM) against the P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-overexpressing KBvin MDR sub-line, while it and all other tested compounds, except 9, were inactive (IC50 >40 µM) against MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3. Structure-activity relationships (SARs) indicated that (i) 3,4,5-trimethoxy phenyl substitution is critical for selectivity against KBvin, (ii) the 4-methoxy group in this pattern is crucial for antiproliferative activity, (iii) double bonds in the side chain are not needed for activity, and (iv), in arylalkenylacyl amide alkaloids, replacement of an isobutylamino group with pyrrolidin-1-yl or piperidin-1-yl significantly improved activity. Further study on Piper amides is warranted, particularly whether side chain length affects the ability to overcome the MDR cancer phenotype. PMID:25241925

  3. Characterization of multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein transport function with an organotechnetium cation

    SciTech Connect

    Piwnica-Worms, D.; Vallabhaneni, V.R.; Kronauge, J.F.

    1995-09-26

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in mammalian cells and tumors is associated with overexpression of an {approximately}170 integral membrane efflux transporter, the MDR1 P-glycoprotein. Hexakis(2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile) technetium(I) (Tc-SESTAMIBI), a {gamma}-emitting lipophilic cationic metallopharmaceutical, has recently been shown to be a P-glycoprotein transport substrate. Exploiting the negligible lipid membrane adsorption properties of this organometallic substrate, we studied the transport kinetics, pharmacology, drug binding, and modulation of P-glycoprotein in cell preparations derived from a variety of species and selection strategies, including SW-1573, V79, Alex, and CHO drug-sensitive cells and in 77A, LZ-8, and Alex/A.5 MDR cells. Rapid cell accumulation (T{sub 1/2} {approx} 6 min) of the agent to a steady state was observed which was inversely proportional to immunodetectable levels of P-glycoprotein. Many MDR cytotoxic agents inhibited P-glycoprotein-mediated Tc-SESTAMIBI efflux, thereby enhancing organometallic cation accumulation. 70 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Intracellular delivery of 10-hydroxycamptothecin with targeted nanostructured lipid carriers against multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Chen, Didi; Mukerabigwi, Jean Felix; Chen, Sha; Zhang, Yuannian; Lei, Shaojun; Luo, Shiying; Wen, Zhili; Cao, Yu; Huang, Xueying; He, Hongxuan

    2016-01-01

    10-Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) is a clinical therapy agent against hepatoma. The chemotherapy of HCPT is strongly obstructed by the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR), serious systemic toxicity, malfunction of rapid phagocytic and renal clearance disorder which are undesirable for its chemotherapy. In this paper, a drug delivery system (DDS) for HCPT has been developed in order to overcome MDR. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) coated with xyloglucan (XG) was prepared by soya oil and XG consisting of side chains with galactose residues, a terminal moiety that can be used to target HCPT to hepatoma. The therapeutic potential of XG-NLC/HCPT was investigated on HepG2/HCPT cells and on human tumor xenograft nude mouse model (implanted with HepG2/HCPT cells). XG-NLC/HCPT not only indicated superior cytotoxicity against the drug resistant HepG2 cells but also in vivo, generated a higher therapeutic effect. Systemic toxicity study demonstrated that the carrier reduced systemic toxicity. XG-NLC/HCPT proved a great potential to serve as DDS to overcome MDR of HepG2/HCPT cells. These results suggested that XG NLC/HCPT represent a promising carrier for drug delivery to the hepatoma and reverse the drug resistant of HepG2 cells and XG could be exploited as a potential targeting device for liver tissue. PMID:26422582

  5. Tangeretin, a citrus pentamethoxyflavone, antagonizes ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance by inhibiting its transport function.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sen-Ling; Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhong-Qiu; Xie, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and tumor metastasis are the main causes of chemotherapeutic treatment failure and mortality in cancer patients. In this study, at achievable nontoxic plasma concentrations, citrus flavonoid tangeretin has been shown to reverse ABCB1-mediated cancer resistance to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents effectively. Co-treatment of cells with tangeretin and paclitaxel activated apoptosis as well as arrested cell cycle at G2/M-phase. Tangeretin profoundly inhibited the ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin, and flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the expression of ABCB1. Moreover, it stimulated the ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. The molecular docking results indicated a favorable binding of tangeretin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled ABCB1 transporter. The overall results demonstrated that tangeretin could sensitize ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to chemotherapeutical agents by directly inhibiting ABCB1 transporter function, which encouraged further animal and clinical studies in the treatment of resistant cancers. PMID:27058921

  6. Multidrug resistance-associated protein gene overexpression and reduced drug sensitivity of topoisomerase II in a human breast carcinoma MCF7 cell line selected for etoposide resistance.

    PubMed

    Schneider, E; Horton, J K; Yang, C H; Nakagawa, M; Cowan, K H

    1994-01-01

    A human breast cancer cell line (MCF7/WT) was selected for resistance to etoposide (VP-16) by stepwise exposure to 2-fold increasing concentrations of this agent. The resulting cell line (MCF7/VP) was 28-, 21-, and 9-fold resistant to VP-16, VM-26, and doxorubicin, respectively. MCF7/VP cells also exhibited low-level cross-resistance to 4'-(9-acridinylamino)-methanesulfon-m-anisidide, mitoxantrone, and vincristine and no cross-resistance to genistein and camptothecin. Furthermore, these cells were collaterally sensitive to the alkylating agents melphalan and chlorambucil. DNA topoisomerase II levels were similar in both wild-type MCF7/WT and drug-resistant MCF7/VP cells. In contrast, topoisomerase II from MCF7/VP cells appeared to be 7-fold less sensitive to drug-induced cleavable complex formation in whole cells and 3-fold less sensitive in nuclear extracts than topoisomerase II from MCF7/WT cells. Although this suggested that the resistant cells may contain a qualitatively altered topoisomerase II, no mutations were detected in either the ATP-binding nor the putative breakage/resealing regions of either DNA topoisomerase II alpha or II beta. In addition, the steady-state intracellular VP-16 concentration was reduced by 2-fold in the resistant cells, in the absence of detectable mdr1/P-gp expression and without any change in drug efflux. In contrast, expression of the gene encoding the MRP was increased at least 10-fold in resistant MCF7/VP cells as compared to sensitive MCF7/WT cells. These results suggest that resistance to epipodophyllotoxins in MCF7/VP cells is multifactorial, involving a reduction in intracellular drug concentration, possibly as a consequence of MRP overexpression, and an altered DNA topoisomerase II drug sensitivity. PMID:7903202

  7. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of thiosemicarbazones, hydrazinobenzothiazoles and arylhydrazones as anticancer agents with a potential to overcome multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Pape, Veronika F S; Tóth, Szilárd; Füredi, András; Szebényi, Kornélia; Lovrics, Anna; Szabó, Pál; Wiese, Michael; Szakács, Gergely

    2016-07-19

    There is a constant need for new therapies against multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer. An attractive strategy is to develop chelators that display significant antitumor activity in multidrug resistant cancer cell lines overexpressing the drug efflux pump P-glycoprotein. In this study we used a panel of sensitive and MDR cancer cell lines to evaluate the toxicity of picolinylidene and salicylidene thiosemicarbazone, arylhydrazone, as well as picolinylidene and salicylidene hydrazino-benzothiazole derivatives. Our results confirm the collateral sensitivity of MDR cells to isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones, and identify several chelator scaffolds with a potential to overcome multidrug resistance. Analysis of structure-activity-relationships within the investigated compound library indicates that NNS and NNN donor chelators show superior toxicity as compared to ONS derivatives regardless of the resistance status of the cells. PMID:27161177

  8. Reversal of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance by a potent cyclopropyldibenzosuberane modulator, LY335979.

    PubMed

    Dantzig, A H; Shepard, R L; Cao, J; Law, K L; Ehlhardt, W J; Baughman, T M; Bumol, T F; Starling, J J

    1996-09-15

    Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) by tumors results in multidrug resistance (MDR) to structurally unrelated oncolytics. MDR cells may be sensitized to these oncolytics when treated with a Pgp modulator. The present study evaluates LY335979 as a modulator both in vitro and in vivo. LY335979 (0.1 microM) fully restored sensitivity to vinblastine, doxorubicin (Dox), etoposide, and Taxol in CEM/VLB100 cells. LY335979 modulated Dox cytotoxicity even when LY335979 (0.5 microM) was removed 24 h prior to the cytotoxicity assay. LY335979 blocked [3H]azidopine photoaffinity labeling of the M(r) approximately 170,000 Pgp in CEM/VLB100 plasma membranes and competitively inhibited equilibrium binding of [3H]vinblastine to Pgp (Ki of approximately 0.06 microM). Treatment of mice bearing P388/ADR murine leukemia cells with LY335979 in combination with Dox or etoposide gave a significant increase in life span with no apparent alteration of pharmacokinetics. LY335979 also enhanced the antitumor activity of Taxol in a MDR human non-small cell lung carcinoma nude mouse xenograft model. Thus, LY335979 is an extremely potent, efficacious modulator that apparently lacks pharmacokinetic interactions with coadministered anticancer drugs and is, therefore, an exciting new agent for clinical evaluation for reversal of Pgp-associated MDR. PMID:8797588

  9. The human multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump.

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, G J; Flens, M J; van Leusden, M R; de Haas, M; Mülder, H S; Lankelma, J; Pinedo, H M; Scheper, R J; Baas, F; Broxterman, H J

    1994-01-01

    The multidrug-resistance associated protein MRP is a 180- to 195-kDa membrane protein associated with resistance of human tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs. We have investigated how MRP confers drug resistance in SW-1573 human lung carcinoma cells by generating a subline stably transfected with an expression vector containing MRP cDNA. MRP-overexpressing SW-1573 cells are resistant to doxorubicin, daunorubicin, vincristine, VP-16, colchicine, and rhodamine 123, but not to 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide or taxol. The intracellular accumulation of drug (daunorubicin, vincristine, and VP-16) is decreased and the efflux of drug (daunorubicin) is increased in the transfectant. The decreased accumulation of daunorubicin is abolished by permeabilization of the plasma membrane with digitonin, showing that MRP can lower the intracellular daunorubicin level against a concentration gradient. Anti-MRP antisera predominantly stain the plasma membrane of MRP-overexpressing cells. We conclude that MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump. Images PMID:7916458

  10. Uptake of Compounds That Selectively Kill Multidrug-Resistant Cells: The Copper Transporter SLC31A1 (CTR1) Increases Cellular Accumulation of the Thiosemicarbazone NSC73306

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance in cancer continues to be a challenge in cancer therapy, in part due to overexpression of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1). NSC73306 is a thiosemicarbazone compound that displays greater toxicity against cells expressing functional P-gp than against other cells. Here, we investigate the cellular uptake of NSC73306, and examine its interaction with P-gp and copper transporter 1 (CTR1, SLC31A1). Overexpression of P-gp sensitizes LLC-PK1 cells to NSC73306. Cisplatin (IC50 = 77 μM), cyclosporin A (IC50 = 500 μM), and verapamil (IC50 = 700 μM) inhibited cellular accumulation of [3H]NSC73306. Cellular hypertoxicity of NSC73306 to P-gp-expressing cells was inhibited by cisplatin in a dose-dependent manner. Cells transiently expressing the cisplatin uptake transporter CTR1 (SLC31A1) showed increased [3H]NSC73306 accumulation. In contrast, CTR1 knockdown decreased [3H]NSC73306 accumulation. The presence of NSC73306 reduced CTR1 levels, similar to the negative feedback of CTR1 levels by copper or cisplatin. Surprisingly, although cisplatin is a substrate of CTR1, we found that CTR1 protein was overexpressed in high-level cisplatin-resistant KB-CP20 and BEL7404-CP20 cell lines. We confirmed that the CTR1 protein was functional, as uptake of NSC73306 was increased in KB-CP20 cells compared to their drug-sensitive parental cells, and downregulation of CTR1 in KB-CP20 cells reduced [3H]NSC73306 accumulation. These results suggest that NSC73306 is a transport substrate of CTR1. PMID:24800945

  11. Uptake of compounds that selectively kill multidrug-resistant cells: the copper transporter SLC31A1 (CTR1) increases cellular accumulation of the thiosemicarbazone NSC73306.

    PubMed

    Fung, King Leung; Tepede, Abisola K; Pluchino, Kristen M; Pouliot, Lynn M; Pixley, Jessica N; Hall, Matthew D; Gottesman, Michael M

    2014-08-01

    Acquired drug resistance in cancer continues to be a challenge in cancer therapy, in part due to overexpression of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1). NSC73306 is a thiosemicarbazone compound that displays greater toxicity against cells expressing functional P-gp than against other cells. Here, we investigate the cellular uptake of NSC73306, and examine its interaction with P-gp and copper transporter 1 (CTR1, SLC31A1). Overexpression of P-gp sensitizes LLC-PK1 cells to NSC73306. Cisplatin (IC50 = 77 μM), cyclosporin A (IC50 = 500 μM), and verapamil (IC50 = 700 μM) inhibited cellular accumulation of [(3)H]NSC73306. Cellular hypertoxicity of NSC73306 to P-gp-expressing cells was inhibited by cisplatin in a dose-dependent manner. Cells transiently expressing the cisplatin uptake transporter CTR1 (SLC31A1) showed increased [(3)H]NSC73306 accumulation. In contrast, CTR1 knockdown decreased [(3)H]NSC73306 accumulation. The presence of NSC73306 reduced CTR1 levels, similar to the negative feedback of CTR1 levels by copper or cisplatin. Surprisingly, although cisplatin is a substrate of CTR1, we found that CTR1 protein was overexpressed in high-level cisplatin-resistant KB-CP20 and BEL7404-CP20 cell lines. We confirmed that the CTR1 protein was functional, as uptake of NSC73306 was increased in KB-CP20 cells compared to their drug-sensitive parental cells, and downregulation of CTR1 in KB-CP20 cells reduced [(3)H]NSC73306 accumulation. These results suggest that NSC73306 is a transport substrate of CTR1. PMID:24800945

  12. Multiwavelength videomicrofluorometry for multiparametric investigations of multidrug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchi, Emmanuelle; Salmon, Jean-Marie; Vigo, Jean; Viallet, Pierre M.

    1996-05-01

    A major problem in the cancer chemotherapy is the development of resistance to a whole range of drugs not only similar to the drugs used for resistance induction but also to some functionally and structurally unrelated. It's one of the multifactorial causes of failure of chemotherapy. Thus it appears essential to evaluate the multi-drug resistance (MDR) in living cells populations to: detect the MDR phenotype, to discriminate between resistant and sensitive cells, to identify mechanisms which are involved in the induction or the reversion of resistance and to study the cytotoxic process. Such a challenge implies the use of multiparametric approach that has been possible using a protocol involving microfluorometry connected to numerical image analysis on single living cells. This protocol relays on the correlation existing between the decreased intracellular accumulation of some fluorescent probes such as Hoechst 33342 (Ho342) and Rhodamine 123 (R123) in resistant cells. The simultaneous estimation of the fluorescence intensities of these probes has required the use of a third probe, the Nile Red, for cell contour delineation. The analysis of parameters related to Ho342 and R123 allows the discrimination of sensitive and resistant cells. So the multiparametric approach using multi-wavelength image analysis, which appears to be a powerful technique, has allowed us to show on human lymphoblastoid CCRF-CEM cells lines that the cytotoxic effects could be different depending on the cell resistance or on the cytotoxic drug used: Adriamycine, Vinblastine and the different cell behavior could be used for cell differentiation.

  13. [Reversion of multidrug resistance in HL-60/VCR cells by down-regulation of bcl-2 with bcl-2 siRNA].

    PubMed

    Piao, Ying; Chen, Xie-Qun; Liu, Li-Mei; Hong, Liu; Liu, Jing-Hua; Zhou, Fan; Liu, Yan-Qin

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of gene therapy using bcl-2 as target in multiple drug resistance of leukemia, the small interfering RNA eukaryotic expression vector specific to human bcl-2 gene was constructed by gene recombination, then transfected into HL-60/VCR cells. Stable transfectants were obtained by G418 screening. The growth curve and drug sensitivity were detected by using MTT. The expression of Bax and ZNRD1 was analyzed by Western blot. The results showed that mU6pro-bcl-2 siRNA was successfully constructed and transfected into HL-60/VCR cells. The IC(50) of transfected cells to vincristine and adriamycin was significantly reduced as compared with that of the control. The expression of ZNRD1 in transfected cells was decreased as compared with that of the control, while Bax not. It is concluded that the bcl-2 siRNA restores the sensitivity of HL-60/VCR cells to conventional chemotherapeutic agents to a certain degree. PMID:16403269

  14. Antimicrobial Organometallic Dendrimers with Tunable Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola; Overy, David P; Lanteigne, Martin; McQuillan, Katherine; Kerr, Russell G

    2015-11-01

    Multidrug-resistant pathogens are an increasing threat to public health. In an effort to curb the virulence of these pathogens, new antimicrobial agents are sought. Here we report a new class of antimicrobial organometallic dendrimers with tunable activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria that included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Mechanistically, these redox-active, cationic organometallic dendrimers induced oxidative stress on bacteria and also disrupted the microbial cell membrane. The minimum inhibitory concentrations, which provide a quantitative measure of the antimicrobial activity of these dendrimers, were in the low micromolar range. AlamarBlue cell viability assay also confirms the antimicrobial activity of these dendrimers. Interestingly, these dendrimers were noncytotoxic to epidermal cell lines and to mammalian red blood cells, making them potential antimicrobial platforms for topical applications. PMID:26452022

  15. Modulating cancer multidrug resistance by sertraline in combination with a nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Drinberg, Velthe; Bitcover, Rivka; Rajchenbach, Wolf; Peer, Dan

    2014-11-28

    Inherent and acquired multiple drug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapeutic drugs is a major obstacle in cancer treatment. The ATP Binding Cassettes (ABC) transporter super family that act as extrusion pumps such as P-glycoprotein and multidrug-resistance-associated-proteins have prominent roles in cancer MDR. One of the most efficient strategies to modulate this active drug efflux from the cells is to physically block the pump proteins and thus change the balance between drug influx and efflux toward an accumulation of drug inside the cell, which eventually cumulates into cell death. MDR modulators (also known as chemosensitizers) were found among drugs approved for non-cancer indications. Yet, toxicity, adverse effects, and poor solubility at doses required for MDR reversal prevent their clinical application. Previous reports have shown that drugs belonging to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) family, which are clinically used as antidepressants, can act as effective chemosensitizers both in vitro and in vivo in tumor bearing mouse models. Here, we set out to explore whether sertraline (Zoloft®), a molecule belonging to the SSRI family, can be used as an MDR modulator. Combining sertraline with another FDA approved drug, Doxil® (pegylated liposomal doxorubicin), is expected to enhance the effect of chemotherapy while potentially reducing adverse effects. Our findings reveal that sertraline acts as a pump modulator in cellular models of MDR. In addition, in an aggressive and highly resistant human ovarian xenograft mouse model the use of sertraline in combination with Doxil® generated substantial reduction in tumor progression, with extension of the median survival of tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our results show that sertraline could act as a clinically relevant cancer MDR inhibitor. Moreover, combining two FDA approved drugs, DOXIL®, which favor the influx of chemotherapy inside the malignant cell with sertraline, which blocks the

  16. De-Differentiation Confers Multidrug Resistance Via Noncanonical PERK-Nrf2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Del Vecchio, Catherine A.; Feng, Yuxiong; Sokol, Ethan S.; Tillman, Erik J.; Sanduja, Sandhya; Reinhardt, Ferenc; Gupta, Piyush B.

    2014-01-01

    Malignant carcinomas that recur following therapy are typically de-differentiated and multidrug resistant (MDR). De-differentiated cancer cells acquire MDR by up-regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS)–scavenging enzymes and drug efflux pumps, but how these genes are up-regulated in response to de-differentiation is not known. Here, we examine this question by using global transcriptional profiling to identify ROS-induced genes that are already up-regulated in de-differentiated cells, even in the absence of oxidative damage. Using this approach, we found that the Nrf2 transcription factor, which is the master regulator of cellular responses to oxidative stress, is preactivated in de-differentiated cells. In de-differentiated cells, Nrf2 is not activated by oxidation but rather through a noncanonical mechanism involving its phosphorylation by the ER membrane kinase PERK. In contrast, differentiated cells require oxidative damage to activate Nrf2. Constitutive PERK-Nrf2 signaling protects de-differentiated cells from chemotherapy by reducing ROS levels and increasing drug efflux. These findings are validated in therapy-resistant basal breast cancer cell lines and animal models, where inhibition of the PERK-Nrf2 signaling axis reversed the MDR of de-differentiated cancer cells. Additionally, analysis of patient tumor datasets showed that a PERK pathway signature correlates strongly with chemotherapy resistance, tumor grade, and overall survival. Collectively, these results indicate that de-differentiated cells up-regulate MDR genes via PERK-Nrf2 signaling and suggest that targeting this pathway could sensitize drug-resistant cells to chemotherapy. PMID:25203443

  17. Effects of Withania somnifera and Tinospora cordifolia extracts on the side population phenotype of human epithelial cancer cells: toward targeting multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Maliyakkal, Naseer; Appadath Beeran, Asmy; Balaji, Sai A; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Ranganath Pai, Sreedhara; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2015-03-01

    Recent reports suggest the existence of a subpopulation of stem-like cancer cells, termed as cancer stem cells (CSCs), which bear functional and phenotypic resemblance with the adult, tissue-resident stem cells. Side population (SP) assay based on differential efflux of Hoechst 33342 has been effectively used for the isolation of CSCs. The drug resistance properties of SP cells are typically due to the increased expression of ABC transporters leading to drug efflux. Conventionally used chemotherapeutic drugs may often leads to an enrichment of SP, revealing their inability to target the drug-resistant SP and CSCs. Thus, identification of agents that can reduce the SP phenotype is currently in vogue in cancer therapeutics. Withania somnifera (WS) and Tinospora cordifolia (TC) have been used in Ayurveda for treating various diseases, including cancer. In the current study, we have investigated the effects of ethanolic (ET) extracts of WS and TC on the cancer SP phenotype. Interestingly, we found significant decrease in SP on treatment with TC-ET, but not with WS-ET. The SP-inhibitory TC-ET was further fractionated into petroleum ether (TC-PET), dichloromethane (TC-DCM), and n-butyl alcohol (TC-nBT) fractions using bioactivity-guided fractionation. Our data revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM, but not TC-nBT, significantly inhibited SP in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, flow cytometry-based functional assays revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM significantly inhibited ABC-B1 and ABC-G2 transporters and sensitized cancer cells toward chemotherapeutic drug-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, the TC-PET and TC-DCM may harbor phytochemicals with the potential to reverse the drug-resistant phenotype, thus improving the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25549922

  18. [Multidrug resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae: multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, Ilhem; Ben Salah, Dorra; Besbes, Makram; Mahjoubi, Faouzia; Ghozzi, Rafiaa; Ben Redjeb, Saida; Ben Hassen, Assia; Hammami, Adnène

    2002-01-01

    The extensive use of broad spectrum antibiotics, especially the third generation cephalosporins (C3G), was followed by the emergence of newer plasmid mediated betalactamases called extended spectrum betalactamases (ESBLs). To assess the impact of K. pneumoniae resistant to 3GC in Tunisia, this study was conducted in 3 teaching hospitals. A total of 1110 strains of K pneumoniae was collected. The antibiotics susceptibilities were tested by diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton agar. The quality control was regularly performed. I ESBLs producing solates were detected using the double-disc synergy test. Data analysis was done using the Whonet 4 software. 23.6% K. pneumoniae isolates showed phenotype pattern of ESBLs producers. The double-disc synergy test was positive in 75% of the cases. These isolates were recovered from hospitalized patients in different wards but mainly from pediatrics (23.6%), medicine (23.2%), surgery (22.9%), intensive care units (11%) and neonatology (11%). 54% were isolated from urines, 22% from blood cultures. These isolates remained susceptible to imipenem (100%) and most of them to cefoxitin (96.4%) but all had associated resistance to aminoglycosides, quinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The prevalence of multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae is high. This resistance can be minimized by the implementation of infection control measures including handwashing and isolation procedures. PMID:12071040

  19. Telatinib reverses chemotherapeutic multidrug resistance mediated by ABCG2 efflux transporter in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sodani, Kamlesh; Patel, Atish; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Singh, Satyakam; Yang, Dong-Hua; Kathawala, Rishil J; Kumar, Priyank; Talele, Tanaji T; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon where cancer cells become simultaneously resistant to anticancer drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action. MDR has been shown to be associated with overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Here, we report that telatinib, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhances the anticancer activity of ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs by inhibiting ABCG2 efflux transporter activity. Co-incubation of ABCG2-overexpressing drug resistant cell lines with telatinib and ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs significantly reduced cellular viability, whereas telatinib alone did not significantly affect drug sensitive and drug resistant cell lines. Telatinib at 1 μM did not significantly alter the expression of ABCG2 in ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. Telatinib at 1 μM significantly enhanced the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-mitoxantrone (MX) in ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. In addition, telatinib at 1 μM significantly reduced the rate of [3H]-MX efflux from ABCG2-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, telatinib significantly inhibited ABCG2-mediated transport of [3H]-E217βG in ABCG2 overexpressing membrane vesicles. Telatinib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCG2 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that telatinib might be a substrate of ABCG2. Binding interactions of telatinib were found to be in transmembrane region of homology modeled human ABCG2. In addition, telatinib (15 mg/kg) with doxorubicin (1.8 mg/kg) significantly decreased the growth rate and tumor size of ABCG2 overexpressing tumors in a xenograft nude mouse model. These results, provided that they can be translated to humans, suggesting that telatinib, in combination with specific ABCG2 substrate drugs may be useful in treating tumors that overexpress ABCG2. PMID:24565910

  20. Grape Seed Procyanidin Reversal of P-glycoprotein Associated Multi-Drug Resistance via Down-regulation of NF-κB and MAPK/ERK Mediated YB-1 Activity in A2780/T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-qi; Duan, Lian; Huo, Qi-lu; Ren, Fei; Li, Guo-feng

    2013-01-01

    The expression and function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is associated with the phenotype of multi-drug resistance (MDR), leading chemotherapy failure of patients suffered with cancer. Grape seed procyanidin(GSP) is a natural polyphenol supplement with anti-inflammatory effect. Present study assessed a new use of GSP on the MDR reversal activity and its possible molecular mechanisms in MDR1-overpressing paclitaxel resistant ovarian cancer cells. Our results showed GSP significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel and adriamycin in paclitaxel resistant A2780/T cells but its parental A2780 cells. Furthermore, GSP strongly inhibited P-gp expression by blocking MDR1 gene transcription, as well as, increased the intracellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate rhodamine-123 in A2780/T cells. Nuclear factor-κB(NF-κB) activity, IκB degradation level and NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) were markedly inhibited by pre-treatment with GSP. Meanwhile, GSP inhibited MAPK/ERK pathway by decreasing the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, resulting in reduced the Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) activation with blocking its nuclear translocation. Moreover, the up-regulation of P-gp expression, the activation of AKT/NF-κB and MAPK/ERK pathway induced by LPS was attenuated by GSP administration. Compared with PDTC and U1026, inhibitor of NF-κB and MAPK/ERK respectively, GSP showed the same tendency of down-regulating NF-κB and MAPK/ERK mediated YB-1 activities. Thus, GSP reverses P-gp associated MDR by inhibiting the function and expression of P-gp through down-regulation of NF-κB activity and MAPK/ERK pathway mediated YB-1 nuclear translocation, offering insight into the mechanism of reversing MDR by natural polyphenol supplement compounds. GSP could be a new potential MDR reversal agent used for combination therapy with chemotherapeutics in clinic. PMID:23967153

  1. Synthesis of methylated quercetin derivatives and their reversal activities on P-gp- and BCRP-mediated multidrug resistance tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jian; Wong, Iris L K; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Si Wen; Liu, Tao; Wen, Bin Jin; Chow, Larry M C; Wan Sheng, Biao

    2012-08-01

    Three methylated quercetins and a series of O-3 substituted 5,7,3',4'-tetra-O-methylated quercetin derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated on the modulating activity of P-gp, BCRP and MRP1 in cancer cell lines. Compound 17 (with a 2-((4-methoxybenzoyl)oxy)ethyl at O-3) is the most potent P-gp modulator. Three derivatives, compound 9 (3,7,3',4'-tetra-O-methylated quercetin), compound 14 (with a 2-((3-oxo-3-(3,4,5trimethoxyphenyl)prop-1-en-1-yl)oxy)ethyl at O-3) and compound 17, consistently exhibited promising BCRP-modulating activity. Interestingly, compound 17 was found to be equipotent against both P-gp and BCRP. Importantly, these synthetic quercetin derivatives did not exhibit any inherent cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines or normal mouse fibroblast cell lines. These quercetin derivatives can be employed as safe and effective modulators of P-gp- or BCRP-mediated drug resistance in cancer. PMID:22743241

  2. Yu Ping Feng San reverses cisplatin-induced multi-drug resistance in lung cancer cells via regulating drug transporters and p62/TRAF6 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jian-Shu; Yan, Lu; Bi, Cathy W. C.; Chan, Gallant K. L.; Wu, Qi-Yun; Liu, Yun-Le; Huang, Yun; Yao, Ping; Du, Crystal Y. Q.; Dong, Tina T. X.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Yu Ping Feng San (YPFS), an ancient Chinese herbal decoction composed of Astragali Radix, Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma and Saposhnikoviae Radix, has been used in the clinic for treating immune deficiency. In cancer therapy, YPFS is being combined with chemotherapy drugs to achieve improved efficacy; however, scientific evidence to illustrate this combination effect is lacking. The present study aims to demonstrate the anti-drug resistance of YPFS in cisplatin (DDP)-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549/DDP). The application of YPFS exhibited a synergistic enhancement of DDP-induced cytotoxicity as well as of the apoptotic signalling molecules. DDP-induced expression of the multi-drug-resistance efflux transporters was markedly reduced in the presence of YPFS, resulting in a higher intracellular concentration of DDP. In addition, the application of YPFS increased DDP-induced ROS accumulation and MMP depletion, decreased p62/TRAF6 signalling in DDP-treated A549/DDP cells. The co-treatment of DDP and YPFS in tumour-bearing mice reduced the tumour size robustly (by more than 80%), which was much better than the effect of DDP alone. These results indicate that YPFS can notably improve the DDP-suppressed cancer effect, which may be a consequence of the elevation of intracellular DDP via the drug transporters as well as the down regulation of p62/TRAF6 signalling. PMID:27558312

  3. Jatrophane diterpenoid esters from Euphorbia sororia serving as multidrug resistance reversal agents.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dongli; Liu, Yongqiang; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2014-01-01

    Six (1-6) new jatrophane diterpenoid esters together with four known compounds (7-10) were isolated from the acetone extract of fructus Euphorbia sororia. Their structures were elucidated by the spectral technology, including the 2D NMR experiments (HMQC, HMBC and NOESY). The absolute configuration of compound 1 and compound 7 were first confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. Compounds 1-7 were assayed for their antiproliferative activity in human cancer cell lines: human mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human lung adenocarcinoma (A549). All the compounds were inactive for the cell lines. The multidrug-resistance reversal activity was also tested on KBv200 cells and compound 2 displayed strong multidrug resistance reversal activity, outperforming verapamil at 10 μM. PMID:24291755

  4. Intestinal absorption mechanisms of MTBH, a novel hesperetin derivative, in Caco-2 cells, and potential involvement of monocarboxylate transporter 1 and multidrug resistance protein 2.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenlin; Chen, Ruonan; Qian, Zhengyue; Meng, Xiaoming; Hu, Tingting; Li, Yangyang; Chen, Zhaolin; Huang, Cheng; Hu, Chaojie; Li, Jun

    2015-10-12

    Hesperetin, the aglycone of hesperidin, occurs naturally in citrus fruits. It exerts extensive pharmacological activities. However, hesperetin's poor solubility and low bioavailability limit its wide application. In order to overcome these limitations, recently a series of novel hesperitin derivatives containing Mannich base moieties were synthesized and the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated, among which MTBH (8-methylene-tert-butylamine-3',5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone) showed a significantly improved water solubility, and promising anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo compared with hesperitin. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the permeability and transport mechanisms of MTBH, using Caco-2 cell monolayer. MTBH was effectively absorbed by Caco-2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner in both directions at 7.5-480 μM. Moreover, MTBH showed pH dependent and TEER values independent transport in both directions. Transport of MTBH was obviously decreased in the presence of sodium azide (an ATP inhibitor) or CCCP (a proton-ionophore). MTBH transport was markedly reduced by MCT inhibitors quercetin or phloretin, and the substrate analogs l-lactate or benzoic acid. We verified MCT1, MCT3, MCT4, MCT5, and MCT6 were expressed in Caco-2 cells by western blot. Silence MCT1 with siRNA resulted in significant inhibition of MTBH uptake. The verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor, and Ko143, a BCRP inhibitor, had no effect on the transport of MTBH. However, MK-571 or probenecid, MRP2 inhibitors, led to an apparently decrease in the efflux of MTBH. In summary, MTBH was absorbed by transcellular passive diffusion and a pH dependent mechanism mediated by MCT1. MRP2 but P-gp or BCRP may be involved in the transport of MTBH. PMID:26231439

  5. UV-triggered Affinity Capture Identifies Interactions between the Plasmodium falciparum Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (PfMDR1) and Antimalarial Agents in Live Parasitized Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Ralf; Ng, Caroline L.; Aissaoui, Hamed; Akabas, Myles H.; Boss, Christoph; Brun, Reto; Callaghan, Paul S.; Corminboeuf, Olivier; Fidock, David A.; Frame, Ithiel J.; Heidmann, Bibia; Le Bihan, Amélie; Jenö, Paul; Mattheis, Corinna; Moes, Suzette; Müller, Ingrid B.; Paguio, Michelle; Roepe, Paul D.; Siegrist, Romain; Voss, Till; Welford, Richard W. D.; Wittlin, Sergio; Binkert, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    A representative of a new class of potent antimalarials with an unknown mode of action was recently described. To identify the molecular target of this class of antimalarials, we employed a photo-reactive affinity capture method to find parasite proteins specifically interacting with the capture compound in living parasitized cells. The capture reagent retained the antimalarial properties of the parent molecule (ACT-213615) and accumulated within parasites. We identified several proteins interacting with the capture compound and established a functional interaction between ACT-213615 and PfMDR1. We surmise that PfMDR1 may play a role in the antimalarial activity of the piperazine-containing compound ACT-213615. PMID:23754276

  6. Targeting protein kinases to reverse multidrug resistance in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. PMID:26827688

  7. Inhibition of the Multidrug Resistance P-Glycoprotein: Time for a Change of Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Frederick; Bebawy, Mary

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a key player in the multidrug-resistant phenotype in cancer. The protein confers resistance by mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of an astonishing array of anticancer drugs. Its broad specificity has been the subject of numerous attempts to inhibit the protein and restore the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The general strategy has been to develop compounds that either compete with anticancer drugs for transport or act as direct inhibitors of P-gp. Despite considerable in vitro success, there are no compounds currently available to “block” P-gp–mediated resistance in the clinic. The failure may be attributed to toxicity, adverse drug interaction, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. This review provides a description of several alternative approaches to overcome the activity of P-gp in drug-resistant cells. These include 1) drugs that specifically target resistant cells, 2) novel nanotechnologies to provide high-dose, targeted delivery of anticancer drugs, 3) compounds that interfere with nongenomic transfer of resistance, and 4) approaches to reduce the expression of P-gp within tumors. Such approaches have been developed through the pursuit of greater understanding of resistance mediators such as P-gp, and they show considerable potential for further application. PMID:24492893

  8. Salvage therapy for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Seung, K J; Becerra, M C; Atwood, S S; Alcántara, F; Bonilla, C A; Mitnick, C D

    2014-05-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), defined as Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin, is challenging under the best of circumstances, and particularly in resource-limited settings. For patients who remain persistently sputum-culture-positive despite therapy with second-line TB drugs, treatment options are limited, especially if disease is too advanced for resective surgery. Salvage therapy refers to the design of a regimen combining new and previously used drugs in a final effort to attain sputum conversion before declaring treatment to have failed. We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of salvage therapy in 213 Peruvian patients. Salvage regimens included a median of two new drugs (range 1-6) and nine (range 5-13) total (new plus previously used) drugs. The most frequently used new drug was moxifloxacin, followed by capreomycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, kanamycin and clarithromycin. Culture conversion occurred in 65 (30.5%) patients. Salvage regimens that included moxifloxacin were significantly more likely to be followed by culture conversion (OR 2.2; p 0.02). Later-generation fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin should be used in salvage therapy but also in the initial treatment of MDR-TB, if the best clinical strategy is to use the most effective drugs when the patient has the best chance for cure. New TB drugs are most likely to be initially used in salvage patients, in conditions similar to those described here. Close bacteriological monitoring of these patients will be essential, as useful information about the best way to use these new drugs can be gained from analysis of salvage therapy cohorts. PMID:23991934

  9. Multidrug-resistance P-glycoprotein (MDR1) secretes platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Raggers, R J; Vogels, I; van Meer, G

    2001-01-01

    The human multidrug-resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter (ABCB1) that is ubiquitously expressed. Often its concentration is high in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, where it causes multidrug resistance by pumping lipophilic drugs out of the cell. In addition, MDR1 Pgp can transport analogues of membrane lipids with shortened acyl chains across the plasma membrane. We studied a role for MDR1 Pgp in transport to the cell surface of the signal-transduction molecule platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF is the natural short-chain phospholipid 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. [(14)C]PAF synthesized intracellularly from exogenous alkylacetylglycerol and [(14)C]choline became accessible to albumin in the extracellular medium of pig kidney epithelial LLC-PK1 cells in the absence of vesicular transport. Its translocation across the apical membrane was greatly stimulated by the expression of MDR1 Pgp, and inhibited by the MDR1 inhibitors PSC833 and cyclosporin A. Basolateral translocation was not stimulated by expression of the basolateral drug transporter MRP1 (ABCC1). It was insensitive to the MRP1 inhibitor indomethacin and to depletion of GSH which is required for MRP1 activity. While efficient transport of PAF across the apical plasma membrane may be physiologically relevant in MDR1-expressing epithelia, PAF secretion in multidrug-resistant tumours may stimulate angiogenesis and thereby tumour growth. PMID:11463358

  10. Inhibition of bacterial multidrug resistance by celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kalle, Arunasree M; Rizvi, Arshad

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major problem in the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-specific inhibitor celecoxib would not only inhibit COX-2 but also help in the reversal of drug resistance in cancers by inhibiting the MDR1 efflux pump. Here, we demonstrate that celecoxib increases the sensitivity of bacteria to the antibiotics ampicillin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol, and ciprofloxacin by accumulating the drugs inside the cell, thus reversing MDR in bacteria. PMID:20937780

  11. Trametinib modulates cancer multidrug resistance by targeting ABCB1 transporter

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Li, Yong; Zhao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Mei, Xiao-Long; Xue, You-Qiu; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Wei, Meng-Ning; Shi, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of adenine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is one of the main reasons of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. Trametinib, a novel specific small-molecule mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor, is currently used for the treatment of melanoma in clinic. In this study, we investigated the effect of trametinib on MDR mediated by ABC transporters. Trametinib significantly potentiated the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells overexpressed ABCB1, but not ABCC1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, trametinib did not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, trametinib potently blocked the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. Importantly, trametinib remarkably enhanced the effect of vincristine against the xenografts of ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells in nude mice. The predicted binding mode showed the hydrophobic interactions of trametinib within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. Consequently, our findings may have important implications for use of trametinib in combination therapy for cancer treatment. PMID:25915534

  12. Phenothiazinium antimicrobial photosensitizers are substrates of bacterial multidrug resistance pumps.

    PubMed

    Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) combines a nontoxic photoactivatable dye, or photosensitizer (PS), with harmless visible light to generate singlet oxygen and free radicals that kill microbial cells. Although the light can be focused on the diseased area, the best selectivity is achieved by choosing a PS that binds and penetrates microbial cells. Cationic phenothiazinium dyes, such as methylene blue and toluidine blue O, have been studied for many years and are the only PSs used clinically for antimicrobial PDT. Multidrug resistance pumps (MDRs) are membrane-localized proteins that pump drugs out of cells and have been identified for a wide range of organisms. We asked whether phenothiazinium salts with structures that are amphipathic cations could potentially be substrates of MDRs. We used MDR-deficient mutants of Staphylococcus aureus (NorA), Escherichia coli (TolC), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MexAB) and found 2 to 4 logs more killing than seen with wild-type strains by use of three different phenothiazinium PSs and red light. Mutants that overexpress MDRs were protected from killing compared to the wild type. Effective antimicrobial PSs of different chemical structures showed no difference in light-mediated killing depending on MDR phenotype. Differences in uptake of phenothiazinium PS by the cells depending on level of MDR expression were found. We propose that specific MDR inhibitors could be used in combination with phenothiazinium salts to enhance their photodestructive efficiency. PMID:16377686

  13. Genomic structure, gene expression, and promoter analysis of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Hsin-Hsin; Chang, Ming-Shi; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Huang, Jin-Ding

    2002-03-15

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) subfamily transporters associated with anticancer drug efflux are attributed to the multidrug-resistance of cancer cells. The genomic organization of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 7 (MRP7) was identified. The human MRP7 gene, consisting of 22 exons and 21 introns, greatly differs from other members of the human MRP subfamily. A splicing variant of human MRP7, MRP7A, expressed in most human tissues, was also characterized. The 1.93-kb promoter region of MRP7 was isolated and shown to support luciferase activity at a level 4- to 5-fold greater than that of the SV40 promoter. Basal MRP7 gene expression was regulated by 2 regions in the 5-flanking region at 1,780 1,287 bp, and at 611 to 208 bp. In Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, MRP7 promoter activity was increased by 226 percent by genotoxic 2-acetylaminofluorene and 347 percent by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A. The protein was expressed in the membrane fraction of transfected MDCK cells.

  14. Wallichinine reverses ABCB1-mediated cancer multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Lv, Min; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Huang, Jia-Rong; Wang, Kun; Wei, Meng-Ning; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). Wallichinine is a compound isolated from piper wallichii and works as an antagonist of platelet activiating factor receptor to inhibit the gathering of blood platelet. In this study, we investigate the effect of wallichinine on cancer MDR mediated by ABCB1 transporter. Wallichinine significantly potentiates the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, wallichinine do not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, wallichinine blocks the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. The predicted binding mode shows the hydrophobic interactions of wallichinine within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. At all, our study of the interaction of wallichinine with ABCB1 presented herein provides valuable clues for the development of novel MDR reversal reagents from natural products. PMID:27508017

  15. Wallichinine reverses ABCB1-mediated cancer multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Min; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Huang, Jia-Rong; Wang, Kun; Wei, Meng-Ning; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). Wallichinine is a compound isolated from piper wallichii and works as an antagonist of platelet activiating factor receptor to inhibit the gathering of blood platelet. In this study, we investigate the effect of wallichinine on cancer MDR mediated by ABCB1 transporter. Wallichinine significantly potentiates the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, wallichinine do not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, wallichinine blocks the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. The predicted binding mode shows the hydrophobic interactions of wallichinine within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. At all, our study of the interaction of wallichinine with ABCB1 presented herein provides valuable clues for the development of novel MDR reversal reagents from natural products. PMID:27508017

  16. Resin glycosides from Ipomoea wolcottiana as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corona-Castañeda, Berenice; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Castañeda-Gómez, Jhon; Aparicio-Cuevas, Manuel Alejandro; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2016-03-01

    Recycling liquid chromatography was used for the isolation and purification of resin glycosides from the CHCl3-soluble extracts prepared using flowers of Ipomoea wolcottiana Rose var. wolcottiana. Bioassay-guided fractionation, using modulation of both antibiotic activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Gram-negative bacteria and vinblastine susceptibility in breast carcinoma cells, was used to isolate the active glycolipids as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype. An ester-type dimer, wolcottine I, one tetra- and three pentasaccharides, wolcottinosides I-IV, in addition to the known intrapilosin VII, were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In vitro assays established that none of these metabolites displayed antibacterial activity (MIC>512 μg/mL) against multidrug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, and two nosocomial pathogens: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri; however, when tested (25 μg/mL) in combination with tetracycline, kanamycin or chloramphenicol, they exerted a potentiation effect of the antibiotic susceptibility up to eightfold (64 μg/mL from 512 μg/mL). It was also determined that these non-cytotoxic (CI50>8.68 μM) agents modulated vinblastine susceptibility at 25 μg/mL in MFC-7/Vin(+) cells with a reversal factor (RFMCF-7/Vin(+)) of 2-130 fold. PMID:26774597

  17. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:27296960

  18. Modification of sialylation is associated with multidrug resistance in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Zhou, H; Song, X; Shi, S; Zhang, J; Jia, L

    2015-02-01

    Aberrant cell surface sialylation patterns have been shown to correlate with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the role of sialylation regulation of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) remains poorly understood. This study investigated sialylation in modification on MDR in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, the composition profiling of sialylated N-glycans differed in three pairs of AML cell lines. Real-time PCR showed the differential expressional profiles of 20 sialyltransferase (ST) genes in the both AML cell lines and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) of AML patients. The expression levels of ST3GAL5 and ST8SIA4 were detected, which were overexpressed in HL60 and HL60/adriamycin-resistant (ADR) cells. The altered levels of ST3GAL5 and ST8SIA4 were found in close association with the MDR phenotype changing of HL60 and HL60/ADR cells both in vitro and in vivo. Further data demonstrated that manipulation of these two genes' expression modulated the activity of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway and its downstream target thus regulated the proportionally mutative expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR-related protein 1 (MRP1), both of which are known to be involved in MDR. Blocking the PI3K/Akt pathway by its specific inhibitor LY294002 or by Akt small interfering RNA resulted in the reduced chemosensitivity of HL60/ADR cells. Therefore, this study indicated that sialylation involved in the development of MDR of AML cells probably through ST3GAL5 or ST8SIA4 regulating the activity of PI3K/Akt signaling and the expression of P-gp and MRP1. PMID:24531716

  19. Multidrug resistance proteins: role of P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, and BCRP (ABCG2) in tissue defense

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, Elaine M.; Deeley, Roger G.; Cole, Susan P.C. . E-mail: coles@post.queensu.ca

    2005-05-01

    In tumor cell lines, multidrug resistance is often associated with an ATP-dependent decrease in cellular drug accumulation which is attributed to the overexpression of certain ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins. ABC proteins that confer drug resistance include (but are not limited to) P-glycoprotein (gene symbol ABCB1), the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, gene symbol ABCC1), MRP2 (gene symbol ABCC2), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, gene symbol ABCG2). In addition to their role in drug resistance, there is substantial evidence that these efflux pumps have overlapping functions in tissue defense. Collectively, these proteins are capable of transporting a vast and chemically diverse array of toxicants including bulky lipophilic cationic, anionic, and neutrally charged drugs and toxins as well as conjugated organic anions that encompass dietary and environmental carcinogens, pesticides, metals, metalloids, and lipid peroxidation products. P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, and BCRP/ABCG2 are expressed in tissues important for absorption (e.g., lung and gut) and metabolism and elimination (liver and kidney). In addition, these transporters have an important role in maintaining the barrier function of sanctuary site tissues (e.g., blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebral spinal fluid barrier, blood-testis barrier and the maternal-fetal barrier or placenta). Thus, these ABC transporters are increasingly recognized for their ability to modulate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity of xenobiotics. In this review, the role of these four ABC transporter proteins in protecting tissues from a variety of toxicants is discussed. Species variations in substrate specificity and tissue distribution of these transporters are also addressed since these properties have implications for in vivo models of toxicity used for drug discovery and development.

  20. Heat Shock-Independent Induction of Multidrug Resistance by Heat Shock Factor 1†

    PubMed Central

    Tchénio, Thierry; Havard, Marilyne; Martinez, Luis A.; Dautry, François

    2006-01-01

    The screening of two different retroviral cDNA expression libraries to select genes that confer constitutive doxorubicin resistance has in both cases resulted in the isolation of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) transcription factor. We show that HSF1 induces a multidrug resistance phenotype that occurs in the absence of heat shock or cellular stress and is mediated at least in part through the constitutive activation of the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR-1). This drug resistance phenotype does not correlate with an increased expression of heat shock-responsive genes (heat shock protein genes, or HSPs). In addition, HSF1 mutants lacking HSP gene activation are also capable of conferring multidrug resistance, and only hypophosphorylated HSF1 complexes accumulate in transduced cells. Our results indicate that HSF1 can activate MDR-1 expression in a stress-independent manner that differs from the canonical heat shock-activated mechanism involved in HSP induction. We further provide evidence that the induction of MDR-1 expression occurs at a posttranscriptional level, revealing a novel undocumented role for hypophosphorylated HSF1 in posttranscriptional gene regulation. PMID:16382149

  1. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds. PMID:27399665

  2. Demonstrating a Multi-drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice. PMID:24796567

  3. ATP7B expression confers multidrug resistance through drug sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, F M; Shinsato, Yoshinari; Komatsu, Masaharu; Mitsuo, Ryoichi; Minami, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Kawahara, Kohich; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that ATP7B is involved in cisplatin resistance and ATP7A confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. In this study, we show that ATP7B expressing cells also are resistant to doxorubicin, SN-38, etoposide, and paclitaxel as well as cisplatin. In ATP7B expressing cells, doxorubicin relocated from the nuclei to the late-endosome at 4 hours after doxorubicin exposure. EGFP-ATP7B mainly colocalized with doxorubicin. ATP7B has six metal binding sites (MBSs) in the N-terminal cytoplasmic region. To investigate the role of the MBSs of ATP7B in doxorubicin resistance, we used three mutant ATP7B (Cu0, Cu6 and M6C/S) expressing cells. Cu0 has no MBSs, Cu6 has only the sixth MBS and M6C/S carries CXXC to SXXS mutation in the sixth MBS. Cu6 expressing cells were less resistance to the anticancer agents than wild type ATP7B expressing cells, and had doxorubicin sequestration in the late-endosome. Cu0- and M6C/S-expressing cells were sensitive to doxorubicin. In these cells, doxorubicin did not relocalize to the late-endosome. EGFP-M6C/S mainly localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) even in the presence of copper. Thus the cysteine residues in the sixth MBS of ATP7B are essential for MDR phenotype. Finally, we found that ammonium chloride and tamoxifen suppressed late endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin, thereby attenuating drug resistance. These results suggest that the sequestration depends on the acidity of the vesicles partly. We here demonstrate that ATP7B confers MDR by facilitating nuclear drug efflux and late endosomal drug sequestration. PMID:26988911

  4. Overexpression of lncRNA NEAT1 mitigates multidrug resistance by inhibiting ABCG2 in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Caihua; Zhang, Jianying; Wang, Qingyan; Ren, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is a heterogeneous clonal disorder in which early hematopoietic cells fail to differentiate and do not undergo programmed cell death or apoptosis. Less than one-third of adult patients with leukemia are managed using current therapies due to the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR), emphasizing the need for newer and more robust approaches. Recent reports have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) contribute to selective gene expression and, hence, could be manipulated effectively to halt the progression of cancer. However, little is known regarding the role of lncRNA in leukemia. Nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1) is a nuclear-restricted lncRNA involved in the pathogenesis of certain types of cancer. Deregulated expression of NEAT1 has been reported in a number of human malignancies, including leukemia and other solid tumors. The present study aimed to characterize the role of NEAT1 in the regulation of MDR in leukemia. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was demonstrated that NEAT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels were significantly downregulated in leukemia patient samples compared with those from healthy donors. Furthermore, NEAT1 mRNA expression was repressed in a number of leukemia cell lines, including K562, THP-1, HL-60 and Jurkat cells, compared with peripheral white blood control cells, consistent with the expression observed in patients with leukemia. In addition, the transfection of a NEAT1 overexpression plasmid into K562 and THP-1 leukemia cell lines alleviated MDR induced by cytotoxic agents, such as Alisertib and Bortezomib, through inhibition of ATP-binding cassette G2. Although more robust studies are warranted, the current findings provide the basis for the use of NEAT1 as a novel promising target in the treatment of leukemia. PMID:27446393

  5. [Molecular physiology of receptor mediated endocytosis and its role in overcoming multidrug resistance].

    PubMed

    Severin, E S; Posypanova, G A

    2011-06-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis plays important role in the selective uptake of proteins at the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. Endocytosis regulates many processes of cell signalling by controlling the number of functional receptors on the cell surface. The article reviews the mechanism of clathrin-dependent endocytosis and the possibility of using this phenomenon for the targeted delivery of drugs. Use of certain proteins as targeting component of drug delivery systems can significantly improve the selectivity of this drug, as well as to overcome the multidrug resistance of cells resulting from the activity of the ABC-transporters. PMID:21874867

  6. Synergistic effect of folate-mediated targeting and verapamil-mediated P-gp inhibition with paclitaxel -polymer micelles to overcome multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feihu; Zhang, Dianrui; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Yuxuan; Zheng, Dandan; Hao, Leilei; Duan, Cunxian; Jia, Lejiao; Liu, Guangpu; Liu, Yue

    2011-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells is a significant obstacle for successful cancer chemotherapy. Overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a key factor contributing to the development of tumor drug resistance. Verapamil (VRP), a P-gp inhibitor, has been reported to be able to reverse completely the resistance caused by P-gp. For optimal synergy, the drug and inhibitor combination may need to be temporally colocalized in the tumor cells. Herein, we investigated the effectiveness of simultaneous and targeted delivery of anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), along with VRP, using DOMC-FA micelles to overcome tumor drug resistance. The floate-functionalized dual agent loaded micelles resulted in the similar cytotoxicity to PTX-loaded micelles/free VRP combination and co-administration of two single-agent loaded micelles, which was higher than that of PTX-loaded micelles. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of dual agent micelles could be ascribe to increased accumulation of PTX in drug-resistant tumor cells. We suggest that the synergistic effect of folate receptor-mediated internalization and VRP-mediated overcoming MDR could be beneficial in treatment of MDR solid tumors by targeting delivery of micellar PTX into tumor cells. As a result, the difunctional micelle systems is a very promising approach to overcome tumor drug resistance. PMID:21903258

  7. Characterization of a Multidrug-Resistant, Novel Bacteroides Genomospecies

    PubMed Central

    Salipante, Stephen J.; Kalapila, Aley; Pottinger, Paul S.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa; Duchin, Jeffrey S.; Sengupta, Dhruba J.; Pergam, Steven A.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole- and carbapenem-resistant Bacteroides fragilis are rare in the United States. We isolated a multidrug-resistant anaerobe from the bloodstream and intraabdominal abscesses of a patient who had traveled to India. Whole-genome sequencing identified the organism as a novel Bacteroides genomospecies. Physicians should be aware of the possibility for concomitant carbapenem- and metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides infections. PMID:25529016

  8. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Julia V; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Kaminski, Dorothy A; Somova, Tatiana R; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A; Kaunetis, Natalia V; Cegielski, J Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB. PMID:26488585

  9. Aquariums as Reservoirs for Multidrug-resistant Salmonella Paratyphi B

    PubMed Central

    Levings, Renee S.; Lightfoot, Diane; Hall, Ruth M.

    2006-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT+ isolates from patients with gastroenteritis were identical with isolates from their home aquariums. Matched isolates had identical phage types, XbaI and IS200 profiles, and Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). Ornamental fish tanks are reservoirs for SGI1-containing S. Paratyphi B dT+. PMID:16704796

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Veterinary Clinics, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Weiss, Reinhard; van der Reijden, Tanny; van den Broek, Peterhans; Baljer, Georg; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. in hospitalized animals was observed at the Justus-Liebig-University (Germany). Genotypic analysis of 56 isolates during 2000–2008 showed 3 clusters that corresponded to European clones I–III. Results indicate spread of genotypically related strains within and among veterinary clinics in Germany. PMID:21888812

  11. The multidrug resistance (mdr1) gene product functions as an ATP channel.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, E H; Prat, A G; Gerweck, L; Seneveratne, T; Arceci, R J; Kramer, R; Guidotti, G; Cantiello, H F

    1993-01-01

    The multidrug resistance (mdr1) gene product, P-glycoprotein, is responsible for the ATP-dependent extrusion of a variety of compounds, including chemotherapeutic drugs, from cells. The data presented here show that cells with increased levels of the P-glycoprotein release ATP to the medium in proportion to the concentration of the protein in their plasma membrane. Furthermore, measurements of whole-cell and single-channel currents with patch-clamp electrodes indicate that the P-glycoprotein serves as an ATP-conducting channel in the plasma membrane. These findings suggest an unusual role for the P-glycoprotein. PMID:7678345

  12. Partial synthesis and biological evaluation of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids derivatives: potential modulators of multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Sun, Hua; Jian, Xi-Xian; Chen, Qiao-Hong; Chen, Dong-Lin; Liu, Geng-Tao; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2012-01-01

    A series of new bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids was partially synthesized from tetrandrine and fangchinoline and evaluated for their ability to reverse P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. All the test compounds increased the intracellular accumulation rate of rhodamine 123 in MDR cells (Bel7402 and HCT8), and most exhibited more potent MDR-reversing activity relative to the reference compound verapamil. Compounds 8, 10, 13, and 14 enhanced intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin in Bel7402 and HCT8 cells. PMID:22587798

  13. A Novel Way of Treating Multidrug-resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Hem; Wong, Ryan; Pasha, Ahmed Khurshid

    2016-01-01

    Context: Daptomycin is the only antibiotic available with in vitro bactericidal activity against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Its increased use has resulted in cases of decreased daptomycin efficacy. Recent in vitro studies have shown effective use of beta (β)-lactam and daptomycin antibiotics, as a combination therapy, in the treatment of VRE. We describe a case of effective treatment in a patient with VRE infection using dual ampicillin and daptomycin therapy that shows bench-to-bedside application of the abovementioned finding. Case Report: A 76-year-old gentleman with a history of bilateral arthroplasty was admitted with a swollen left knee. Blood cultures were positive for Enterococcus faecium. Left knee joint aspiration showed leukocytosis and alpha defensins. Extensive imaging did not show any other source of infection. Culture sensitivity results showed multidrug-resistant enterococci sensitive to daptomycin. The patient was started on intravenous (IV) daptomycin. His left knee prosthesis was explanted and a