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Sample records for multimetal resistant bacterial

  1. Comparison of two multimetal resistant bacterial strains: Enterobacter sp. YSU and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ORO2.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew; Vinayak, Anubhav; Benton, Cherise; Esbenshade, Aaron; Heinselman, Carlisle; Frankland, Daniel; Kulkarni, Samatha; Kurtanich, Adrienne; Caguiat, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, TN, which manufactured nuclear weapons during World War II and the Cold War, contaminated East Fork Poplar Creek with heavy metals. The multimetal resistant bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Oak Ridge strain O2 (S. maltophilia O2), was isolated from East Fork Poplar Creek. Sequence analysis of 16s rDNA suggested that our working strain of S. maltophilia O2 was a strain of Enterobacter. Phylogenetic tree analysis and biochemical tests confirmed that it belonged to an Enterobacter species. This new strain was named Enterobacter sp. YSU. Using a modified R3A growth medium, R3A-Tris, the Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Au(III), Cr(VI), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV) MICs for a confirmed strain of S. maltophilia O2 were 0.24, 0.33, 5, 5, 0.25, 7, 0.03, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, compared to 0.07, 0.24, 0.8, 3, 0.05, 0.4, 0.08, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, for Enterobacter sp. YSU. Although S. maltophilia O2 was generally more metal resistant than Enterobacter sp. YSU, in comparison to Escherichia coli strain HB101, Enterobacter sp. YSU was resistant to Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Au(III), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV). By studying metal resistances in these two strains, it may be possible to understand what makes one microorganism more metal resistant than another microorganism. This work also provided benchmark MICs that can be used to evaluate the metal resistance properties of other bacterial isolates from East Fork Poplar Creek and other metal contaminated sites. PMID:19688378

  2. The hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola harbors metal-resistant endophytic bacteria that improve its phytoextraction capacity in multi-metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Oliveira, Rui S; Nai, Fengjiao; Rajkumar, Mani; Luo, Yongming; Rocha, Inês; Freitas, Helena

    2015-06-01

    Endophyte-assisted phytoremediation has recently been suggested as a successful approach for ecological restoration of metal contaminated soils, however little information is available on the influence of endophytic bacteria on the phytoextraction capacity of metal hyperaccumulating plants in multi-metal polluted soils. The aims of our study were to isolate and characterize metal-resistant and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) utilizing endophytic bacteria from tissues of the newly discovered Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola and to examine if these endophytic bacterial strains could improve the efficiency of phytoextraction of multi-metal contaminated soils. Among a collection of 42 metal resistant bacterial strains isolated from the tissues of S. plumbizincicola grown on Pb/Zn mine tailings, five plant growth promoting endophytic bacterial strains (PGPE) were selected due to their ability to promote plant growth and to utilize ACC as the sole nitrogen source. The five isolates were identified as Bacillus pumilus E2S2, Bacillus sp. E1S2, Bacillus sp. E4S1, Achromobacter sp. E4L5 and Stenotrophomonas sp. E1L and subsequent testing revealed that they all exhibited traits associated with plant growth promotion, such as production of indole-3-acetic acid and siderophores and solubilization of phosphorus. These five strains showed high resistance to heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Pb) and various antibiotics. Further, inoculation of these ACC utilizing strains significantly increased the concentrations of water extractable Cd and Zn in soil. Moreover, a pot experiment was conducted to elucidate the effects of inoculating metal-resistant ACC utilizing strains on the growth of S. plumbizincicola and its uptake of Cd, Zn and Pb in multi-metal contaminated soils. Out of the five strains, B. pumilus E2S2 significantly increased root (146%) and shoot (17%) length, fresh (37%) and dry biomass (32%) of S. plumbizincicola as well as plant Cd uptake (43%), whereas

  3. Comparative performance evaluation of multi-metal resistant fungal strains for simultaneous removal of multiple hazardous metals.

    PubMed

    Dey, Priyadarshini; Gola, Deepak; Mishra, Abhishek; Malik, Anushree; Kumar, Peeyush; Singh, Dileep Kumar; Patel, Neelam; von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico

    2016-11-15

    In the present study, five fungal strains viz., Aspergillus terreus AML02, Paecilomyces fumosoroseus 4099, Beauveria bassiana 4580, Aspergillus terreus PD-17, Aspergillus fumigatus PD-18, were screened for simultaneous multimetal removal. Highest metal tolerance index for each individual metal viz., Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn (500mg/L) was recorded for A. fumigatus for the metals (Cd, 0.72; Cu, 0.72; Pb, 1.02; Zn, 0.94) followed by B. bassiana for the metals (Cd, 0.56; Cu, 0.14; Ni, 0.29; Zn, 0.85). Next, the strains were exposed to multiple metal mixture (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) of various concentrations (6, 12, 18, 30mg/L). Compared to other strains, B. bassiana and A. fumigatus had higher cube root growth (k) constants indicating their better adaptability to multi metal stress. After 72h, multimetal accumulation potential of B. bassiana (26.94±0.07mg/L) and A. fumigatus (27.59±0.09mg/L) were higher than the other strains at initial multimetal concentration of 30mg/L. However, considering the post treatment concentrations of individual metals in multimetal mixture (at all the tested concentrations), A. fumigatus demonstrated exceptional performance and could bring down the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn below the threshold level for irrigation prescribed by Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). PMID:27497228

  4. Bacterial resistance to uncouplers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K; Naroditskaya, V; Ferrante, A; Fokina, I

    1994-12-01

    Uncoupler resistance presents a potential challenge to the conventional chemiosmotic coupling mechanism. In E. coli, an adaptive response to uncouplers was found in cell growing under conditions requiring oxidative phosphorylation. It is suggested that uncoupler-resistant mutants described in the earlier literature might represent a constitutive state of expression of this "low energy shock" adaptive response. In the environment, bacteria are confronted by nonclassical uncoupling factors such as organic solvents, heat, and extremes of pH. It is suggested that the low energy shock response will aid the cell in coping with the effects of natural uncoupling factors. The genetic analysis of uncoupler resistance has only recently began, and is yielding interesting and largely unexpected results. In Bacillus subtilis, a mutation in fatty acid desaturase causes an increased content of saturated fatty acids in the membrane and increased uncoupler resistance. The protonophoric efficiency of uncouplers remains unchanged in the mutants, inviting nonorthodox interpretations of the mechanism of resistance. In E. coli, two loci conferring resistance to CCCP and TSA were cloned and were found to encode multidrug resistance pumps. Resistance to one of the uncouplers, TTFB, remained unchanged in strains mutated for the MDRs, suggesting a resistance mechanism different from uncoupler extrusion. PMID:7721726

  5. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  6. Bacterial strategies of resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Fu, Chih-Iung; Otto, Michael

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a key component of the host's innate immune system, targeting invasive and colonizing bacteria. For successful survival and colonization of the host, bacteria have a series of mechanisms to interfere with AMP activity, and AMP resistance is intimately connected with the virulence potential of bacterial pathogens. In particular, because AMPs are considered as potential novel antimicrobial drugs, it is vital to understand bacterial AMP resistance mechanisms. This review gives a comparative overview of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strategies of resistance to various AMPs, such as repulsion or sequestration by bacterial surface structures, alteration of membrane charge or fluidity, degradation and removal by efflux pumps.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160595

  7. Bacterial resistance in biofilm-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Nandakumar; Perumal, Govindaraj; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are structured groups of different bacterial species that are responsible for most chronic and recurrent infections. Biofilm-related infections reoccur in approximately 65-80% of cases. Bacteria associated with the biofilm are highly resistant to antibiotics. Knowledge of biofilm formation, its propagation and the resistance associated with it is scant and a multidisciplinary approach is followed to understand the science and develop strategies to address this problem. This article discusses the role of various biochemical factors, molecular mechanisms and altered host environment causes associated with bacterial resistance in biofilm. It also reveals the target sites and different multidisciplinary strategies adapted for destroying or preventing the formation of biofilms. PMID:26517598

  8. Bacterial gold sensing and resistance.

    PubMed

    Checa, Susana K; Soncini, Fernando C

    2011-06-01

    Gold ions are mobilized and disseminated through the environment and enter into the cells by non-specific intake. To avoid deleterious effect that occurs even at very low concentrations, bacteria such as Salmonella enterica and Cupriavidus metallidurans use Au-specific MerR-type transcriptional regulators to detect the presence of these toxic ions, and control the expression of specific resistance factors. In contrast to the related copper sensor CueR, the Au-selective metalloregulatory proteins are able to distinguish Au(I) from Cu(I) or Ag(I). This is achieved by finely tuning a single dithiolate metal coordination with conserved cysteine residues at the metal binding site of the proteins to lower the affinity for Cu(I) in comparison to the Cu-sensors, while maintaining or even increasing the affinity for Au(I). In Salmonella, GolS not only privileges the binding of Au(I) over Cu(I) or Ag(I), but also distinguishes its target recognition sites in its regulated promoters minimizing cross-activation of CueR-controlled operators. In this sense, the presence of a selective Au sensory devise would allow species harbouring resident Cu-homeostasis systems to eliminate the toxic ion without affecting Cu acquisition in Au rich environments. PMID:21153861

  9. Antibacterial Mechanisms of Polymyxin and Bacterial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wangrong; Fang, Shisong; Qiu, Juanping

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in pathogens is an increasingly significant threat for human health. Indeed, some strains are resistant to almost all currently available antibiotics, leaving very limited choices for antimicrobial clinical therapy. In many such cases, polymyxins are the last option available, although their use increases the risk of developing resistant strains. This review mainly aims to discuss advances in unraveling the mechanisms of antibacterial activity of polymyxins and bacterial tolerance together with the description of polymyxin structure, synthesis, and structural modification. These are expected to help researchers not only develop a series of new polymyxin derivatives necessary for future medical care, but also optimize the clinical use of polymyxins with minimal resistance development. PMID:25664322

  10. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Lauren

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  11. Bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides: an evolving phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Fleitas, Osmel; Agbale, Caleb M; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics is currently a real problem all over the world, making novel antimicrobial compounds a real research priority. Some of the most promising compounds found to date are antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). The benefits of these drugs include their broad spectrum of activity that affects several microbial processes, making the emergence of resistance less likely. However, bacterial resistance to AMPs is an evolving phenomenon that compromises the therapeutic potential of these compounds. Therefore, it is mandatory to understand bacterial mechanisms of resistance to AMPs in depth, in order to develop more powerful AMPs that overcome the bacterial resistance response. PMID:27100488

  12. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial litter isolates.

    PubMed

    Kelley, T R; Pancorbo, O C; Merka, W C; Barnhart, H M

    1998-02-01

    Use of antibiotics in subtherapeutic doses as growth-promoting feed additives for animal production is widespread in the U.S. and throughout the world. Previous studies by our research group concluded that size fractionation of poultry (broiler) litter followed by storage facilitated reutilization of litter as a soil amendment or bedding supplement. However, litter microbial contamination, including antibiotic-resistant populations, and accumulation of metals and other elements may limit litter reutilization. Litter from four broiler houses was separated into a fine fraction for use as a soil amendment, and a coarse fraction for reutilization as a bedding supplement in growing subsequent flocks of broilers. Fractions and whole litter were stored in indoor piles simulating farm storage conditions for 4 mo with periodic analysis for metals, other elements, and culturable bacteria (including total and fecal coliform, Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Campylobacter jejuni). Representative bacterial isolates were tested for their sensitivity to 12 common antibiotics (ampicillin, bacitracin, cephalothin, erythromycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, neomycin, penicillin, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline) using the Kirby-Bauer technique. Pathogens and indicator bacteria tested were found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics. Data suggest that microbial contamination of litter should be reduced or eliminated prior to reutilization to minimize environmental health risks related to transfer of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to humans or other animals. PMID:9495488

  13. Developing live bacterial vaccines by selecting resistance to antibacterials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four chemicals were used in this study to modify bacterial isolates through chemical-resistance strategy. All bacteria were able to develop high resistance to gossypol. However, none of the gossypol-resistant isolate was attenuated. Although majority of the proflavine hemisulfate-resistant isolates ...

  14. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  15. SCREENING OF TRANSGENIC ANTHURIUMS FOR BACTERIAL BLIGHT AND NEMATODE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthuriums exhibit limited resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae and to the nematodes Radopholus simile and Meloidogyne javanica. Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of embryogenic calli with strains LBA4404, EHA105, and AGLO resulted in transgenic p...

  16. Bacterial resistance to antimicrobials in urinary isolates.

    PubMed

    Muratani, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2004-09-01

    Escherichia coli accounted for about 80% of organisms in uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs), followed by Staphylococcus spp. especially Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Proteus mirabilis. Against E. coli isolates from patients with uncomplicated UTI, faropenem was the most effective. Up to 1999, fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates were not observed in patients with uncomplicated UTI, but in 2001 fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates emerged and accounted for about 8%. Various types of organisms were isolated in patients with complicated UTI. Enterococcus faecalis, E. coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the three most frequent organisms isolated. These three organisms accounted for 44.6%. Amongst oral agents, faropenem showed the lowest rate of resistance against E. coli followed by cephems. The rates of highly fluoroquinolone-resistant and cefpodoxime-resistant E. coli isolates increased rapidly from 1998 to 2001. Fluoroquinolone-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates accounted for about 40% in 2001. Against this species, amikacin was the most effective antimicrobials among all agents tested. About 17% of Pseudomonas were resistant to carbapenem. Eight milligram per litre of ampicillin inhibited all E. faecalis isolates; about 60% of Enterococcus faecium were resistant to ampicillin. The rates of levofloxacin-resistant isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium were 38 and 97% respectively. UTIs caused by vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) are rare in Japan. PMID:15364302

  17. Bacterial Cheating Limits the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Xiao Chao, Hui; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tatiana; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removal of the antibiotic. The presence of a cooperative mechanism of resistance suggests that a cheater strain - which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic - may be able to take advantage of resistant cells. We find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We use a simple model in conjunction with difference equations to explain the observed population dynamics as a function of cell density and antibiotic concentration. Our experimental difference equations resemble the logistic map, raising the possibility of oscillations or even chaotic dynamics.

  18. Assessment of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Transfer in the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Schjørring, Susanne; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed horizontal gene transfer between bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. During the last decades, the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains and treatment failures of bacterial infections have increased the public awareness of antibiotic usage. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics creates a selective pressure on the bacterial flora, thus increasing the emergence of multiresistant bacteria, which results in a vicious circle of treatments and emergence of new antibiotic resistant bacteria. The human gastrointestinal tract is a massive reservoir of bacteria with a potential for both receiving and transferring antibiotic resistance genes. The increased use of fermented food products and probiotics, as food supplements and health promoting products containing massive amounts of bacteria acting as either donors and/or recipients of antibiotic resistance genes in the human GI tract, also contributes to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains. This paper deals with the assessment of antibiotic resistance gene transfer occurring in the gut. PMID:21318188

  19. Clinical management of resistance evolution in a bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Robert J.; Read, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with a chronic bacterial infection that could not be cured. Drug treatment became progressively less effective due to antibiotic resistance, and the patient died, in effect from overwhelming evolution. Even though the evolution of drug resistance was recognized as a major threat, and the fundamentals of drug resistance evolution are well understood, it was impossible to make evidence-based decisions about the evolutionary risks associated with the various treatment options. We present this case to illustrate the urgent need for translational research in the evolutionary medicine of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26454762

  20. Mechanisms and consequences of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Andersson, D I; Hughes, D; Kubicek-Sutherland, J Z

    2016-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an intrinsic part of the human innate immune system. Over 100 different human AMPs are known to exhibit broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Because of the increased frequency of resistance to conventional antibiotics there is an interest in developing AMPs as an alternative antibacterial therapy. Several cationic peptides that are derivatives of AMPs from the human innate immune system are currently in clinical development. There are also ongoing clinical studies aimed at modulating the expression of AMPs to boost the human innate immune response. In this review we discuss the potential problems associated with these therapeutic approaches. There is considerable experimental data describing mechanisms by which bacteria can develop resistance to AMPs. As for any type of drug resistance, the rate by which AMP resistance would emerge and spread in a population of bacteria in a natural setting will be determined by a complex interplay of several different factors, including the mutation supply rate, the fitness of the resistant mutant at different AMP concentrations, and the strength of the selective pressure. Several studies have already shown that AMP-resistant bacterial mutants display broad cross-resistance to a variety of AMPs with different structures and modes of action. Therefore, routine clinical administration of AMPs to treat bacterial infections may select for resistant bacterial pathogens capable of better evading the innate immune system. The ramifications of therapeutic levels of exposure on the development of AMP resistance and bacterial pathogenesis are not yet understood. This is something that needs to be carefully studied and monitored if AMPs are used in clinical settings. PMID:27180309

  1. Alternatives to overcoming bacterial resistances: State-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Rios, Alessandra C; Moutinho, Carla G; Pinto, Flávio C; Del Fiol, Fernando S; Jozala, Angela; Chaud, Marco V; Vila, Marta M D C; Teixeira, José A; Balcão, Victor M

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, bacterial resistance to chemical antibiotics has reached such a high level that endangers public health. Presently, the adoption of alternative strategies that promote the elimination of resistant microbial strains from the environment is of utmost importance. This review discusses and analyses several (potential) alternative strategies to current chemical antibiotics. Bacteriophage (or phage) therapy, although not new, makes use of strictly lytic phage particles as an alternative, or a complement, in the antimicrobial treatment of bacterial infections. It is being rediscovered as a safe method, because these biological entities devoid of any metabolic machinery do not possess any affinity whatsoever to eukaryotic cells. Lysin therapy is also recognized as an innovative antimicrobial therapeutic option, since the topical administration of preparations containing purified recombinant lysins with amounts in the order of nanograms, in infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria, demonstrated a high therapeutic potential by causing immediate lysis of the target bacterial cells. Additionally, this therapy exhibits the potential to act synergistically when combined with certain chemical antibiotics already available on the market. Another potential alternative antimicrobial therapy is based on the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), amphiphilic polypeptides that cause disruption of the bacterial membrane and can be used in the treatment of bacterial, fungal and viral infections, in the prevention of biofilm formation, and as antitumoral agents. Interestingly, bacteriocins are a common strategy of bacterial defense against other bacterial agents, eliminating the potential opponents of the former and increasing the number of available nutrients in the environment for their own growth. They can be applied in the food industry as biopreservatives and as probiotics, and also in fighting multi-resistant bacterial strains. The use of antibacterial antibodies

  2. Important aspects of nosocomial bacterial resistance and its management.

    PubMed

    Kandelaki, G; Tsertsvadze, T; Macharashvili, N; Esugbaia, M; Gogichaishvili, Sh

    2008-12-01

    The article reviews management of nosocomial bacterial resistance aspects. Nosocomial infections are associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and cost. During the last several decades multi-drug resistant organisms increased in number considerably. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin-intermediately resistant staphylococcus aureus and fully vancomycin-resistant staphylococcus aureus evolved as a consequence of methicillin and vancomycin use. The introduction of third generation cephalosporins were followed by emergence of extended spectrum and AMP-C -lactamases among gram negative bacteria, and carbapenems were targeted by carbapenemases. The poor diagnostic yield of current microbiologic methods in identifying certain resistant organisms, combined with decreasing numbers of newly developed antibiotics pose a significant challenge to physicians. We reviewed some of the approaches which can be followed to maximize the positive clinical outcome in patients with resistant nosocomial infections, using currently available antibiotics. More sensitive microbiological methods and new types of antibiotics are needed to adequately address the problem in the future. PMID:19124917

  3. Antibiotics and Bacterial Resistance in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Richard J; Tor, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Dangerous, antibiotic resistant bacteria have been observed with increasing frequency over the past several decades. In this review the factors that have been linked to this phenomenon are addressed. Profiles of bacterial species that are deemed to be particularly concerning at the present time are illustrated. Factors including economic impact, intrinsic and acquired drug resistance, morbidity and mortality rates, and means of infection are taken into account. Synchronously with the waxing of bacterial resistance there has been waning antibiotic development. The approaches that scientists are employing in the pursuit of new antibacterial agents are briefly described. The standings of established antibiotic classes as well as potentially emerging classes are assessed with an emphasis on molecules that have been clinically approved or are in advanced stages of development. Historical perspectives, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum of activity, and preeminent members of each class are discussed. PMID:25232278

  4. Antiplaque biocides and bacterial resistance: a review.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Prem; Gaffar, Abdul

    2002-11-01

    Modern dentistry emphasizes the importance of dental plaque control to improve oral health. The use of oral care formulations with antiplaque biocides plays a crucial role in patient-directed approaches for plaque control. The antiplaque efficacies of these formulations have been extensively studied in many long-term clinical studies designed in accordance with well-accepted guidelines. The results from these studies conclusively demonstrate that long-term use of oral care formulations with well-known antiplaque biocides such as chlorhexidine and triclosan reduce supragingival plaque and gingivitis. This review summarizes microbiological results from clinical studies conducted with oral care formulations containing antiplaque biocides. Results from a number of long-term clinical studies conducted under real-life use conditions indicate no adverse alterations in the bacteria found in dental plaque or emergent microbial resistance. Additionally, microbial sampling of dental plaque subsequent to extended use of antiplaque biocides reveals no increase in resistant microflora. Large numbers of common oral bacteria isolated from patients using chlorhexidine indicate no increase in microbial resistance to chlorhexidine or to commonly used antibiotics. The effects of antiplaque biocides containing oral care formulations on dental plaque that exists naturally as a biofilm are examined. These formulations contain biocide, surfactants, polymers and other components that are effective against the biofilm. In summary, the results of studies on the real-life use of oral care formulations with antiplaque biocides show no emergence of resistant microflora or alterations of the oral microbiota, while such formulations have been found to provide the benefits of reducing plaque and gingivitis. PMID:12472989

  5. Genetics and breeding of bacterial leaf spot resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot (BLS) caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians (Xcv) is a globally important disease of whole head and baby leaf lettuce that reduces crop yield and quality. Host resistance is the most feasible method to reduce disease losses. Screening Lactuca accessions has id...

  6. Test for bacterial resistance build-up against plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, J. L.; Shimizu, T.; Schmidt, H.-U.; Li, Y.-F.; Morfill, G. E.; Isbary, G.

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that the evolution of resistance of microorganisms to a range of different antibiotics presents a major problem in the control of infectious diseases. Accordingly, new bactericidal ‘agents’ are in great demand. Using a cold atmospheric pressure (CAP) plasma dispenser operated with ambient air, a more than five orders of magnitude inactivation or reduction of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; resistant against a large number of the tested antibiotics) was obtained in less than 10 s. This makes CAP the most promising candidate for combating nosocomial (hospital-induced) infections. To test for the occurrence and development of bacterial resistance against such plasmas, experiments with Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus mundtii) were performed. The aim was to determine quantitative limits for primary (naturally) or secondary (acquired) resistance against the plasma treatment. Our results show that E. coli and E. mundtii possess no primary resistance against the plasma treatment. By generating four generations of bacteria for every strain, where the survivors of the plasma treatment were used for the production of the next generation, a lower limit to secondary resistance was obtained. Our results indicate that CAP technology could contribute to the control of infections in hospitals, in outpatient care and in disaster situations, providing a new, fast and efficient broad-band disinfection technology that is not constrained by bacterial resistance mechanisms.

  7. Persistence and resistance as complementary bacterial adaptations to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vogwill, T; Comfort, A C; Furió, V; MacLean, R C

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial persistence represents a simple of phenotypic heterogeneity, whereby a proportion of cells in an isogenic bacterial population can survive exposure to lethal stresses such as antibiotics. In contrast, genetically based antibiotic resistance allows for continued growth in the presence of antibiotics. It is unclear, however, whether resistance and persistence are complementary or alternative evolutionary adaptations to antibiotics. Here, we investigate the co-evolution of resistance and persistence across the genus Pseudomonas using comparative methods that correct for phylogenetic nonindependence. We find that strains of Pseudomonas vary extensively in both their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and rifampicin) and persistence following exposure to these antibiotics. Crucially, we find that persistence correlates positively to antibiotic resistance across strains. However, we find that different genes control resistance and persistence implying that they are independent traits. Specifically, we find that the number of type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) in the genome of a strain is correlated to persistence, but not resistance. Our study shows that persistence and antibiotic resistance are complementary, but independent, evolutionary adaptations to stress and it highlights the key role played by TAs in the evolution of persistence. PMID:26999656

  8. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed. PMID:24375653

  9. Cooperative Bacterial Growth Dynamics Predict the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Hsin-Jung Li, Sophia; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Since the discovery of penicillin, antibiotics have been our primary weapon against bacterial infections. Unfortunately, bacteria can gain resistance to penicillin by acquiring the gene that encodes beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. However, mutations in this gene are necessary to degrade the modern antibiotic cefotaxime. Understanding the conditions that favor the spread of these mutations is a challenge. Here we show that bacterial growth in beta-lactam antibiotics is cooperative and that the nature of this growth determines the conditions in which resistance evolves. Quantitative analysis of the growth dynamics predicts a peak in selection at very low antibiotic concentrations; competition between strains confirms this prediction. We also find significant selection at higher antibiotic concentrations, close to the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the strains. Our results argue that an understanding of the evolutionary forces that lead to antibiotic resistance requires a quantitative understanding of the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

  10. [Effect of Three Typical Disinfection Byproducts on Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance].

    PubMed

    Lü, Lu; Zhang, Meng-lu; Wang, Chun-ming; Lin, Hui-rong; Yu, Xin

    2015-07-01

    The effect of typical disinfection byproducts (DBPs) on bacterial antibiotic resistance was investigated in this study. chlorodibromomethane (CDBM), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and chloral hydrate (CH) were selected, which belong to trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and aldehydes, respectively. After exposure to the selected DBPs, the resistance change of the tested strains to antibiotics was determined. As a result, all of the three DBPs induced Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to gain increased resistance to the five antibiotics tested, and the DBPs ranked as IAA > CH > CDBM according to their enhancement effects. Multidrug resistance could also be enhanced by treatment with IAA. The same result was observed in Escherichia coli K12, suggesting that the effect of DBPs on antibiotic resistance was a common phenomenon. The mechanism was probably that DBPs stimulated oxidative stress, which induced mutagenesis. And the antibiotic resistance mutation frequency could be increased along with mutagenesis. This study revealed that the acquisition of bacterial antibiotic resistance might be related to DBPs in drinking water systems. Besides the genotoxicological risks, the epidemiological risks of DBPs should not be overlooked. PMID:26489321

  11. PARAMETERS OF TREATED STAINLESS STEEL SURFACES IMPORTANT FOR RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of materials that are resistant to bacterial contamination could enhance food safety during processing. Common finishing treatments of stainless steel surfaces used for components of poultry processing equipment were tested for resistance to bacterial attachment. Surface char...

  12. Essential Oils, A New Horizon in Combating Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Yiap, Beow Chin; Ping, Hu Cai; Lim, Swee Hua Erin

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the battle between humans and the multitudes of infection and disease causing pathogens continues. Emerging at the battlefield as some of the most significant challenges to human health are bacterial resistance and its rapid rise. These have become a major concern in global public health invigorating the need for new antimicrobial compounds. A rational approach to deal with antibiotic resistance problems requires detailed knowledge of the different biological and non-biological factors that affect the rate and extent of resistance development. Combination therapy combining conventional antibiotics and essential oils is currently blooming and represents a potential area for future investigations. This new generation of phytopharmaceuticals may shed light on the development of new pharmacological regimes in combating antibiotic resistance. This review consolidated and described the observed synergistic outcome between essential oils and antibiotics, and highlighted the possibilities of essential oils as the potential resistance modifying agent. PMID:24627729

  13. Using the Vernier LabPro as an Ohmmeter and Multimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Word, Robert C.; Bodegom, Erik; Honohan, Ian

    2004-10-01

    Vernier Software and Technology's LabPro® data acquisition device has the cursorily documented2 ability to measure resistance. Here we describe how to build a resistance probe and how to configure Vernier's Logger Pro® data acquisition software to automatically detect and understand the probe. We discuss the range, accuracy, and limitations of this ohm-meter. When this probe is used with voltage and current probes already available from Vernier, the LabPro may be used as a digital multimeter.

  14. Marine bacterial communities are resistant to elevated carbon dioxide levels.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Anna E; Newbold, Lindsay K; Whiteley, Andrew S; van der Gast, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    It is well established that the release of anthropogenic-derived CO2 into the atmosphere will be mainly absorbed by the oceans, with a concomitant drop in pH, a process termed ocean acidification. As such, there is considerable interest in how changes in increased CO2 and lower pH will affect marine biota, such as bacteria, which play central roles in oceanic biogeochemical processes. Set within an ecological framework, we investigated the direct effects of elevated CO2, contrasted with ambient conditions on the resistance and resilience of marine bacterial communities in a replicated temporal seawater mesocosm experiment. The results of the study strongly indicate that marine bacterial communities are highly resistant to the elevated CO2 and lower pH conditions imposed, as demonstrated from measures of turnover using taxa–time relationships and distance–decay relationships. In addition, no significant differences in community abundance, structure or composition were observed. Our results suggest that there are no direct effects on marine bacterial communities and that the bacterial fraction of microbial plankton holds enough flexibility and evolutionary capacity to withstand predicted future changes from elevated CO2 and subsequent ocean acidification. PMID:25756110

  15. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Leilei; Pan, Qiuhui; Gao, Xubin; He, Mingfeng

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1) have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings. PMID:26904150

  16. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Leilei; Pan, Qiuhui; Gao, Xubin; He, Mingfeng

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1) have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings. PMID:26904150

  17. Screening Rice Cultivars for Resistance to Bacterial Leaf Blight.

    PubMed

    Fred, Agaba Kayihura; Kiswara, Gilang; Yi, Gihwan; Kim, Kyung-Min

    2016-05-28

    Bacterial leaf blight (BLB) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most serious threats to rice production. In this study, screening of rice for resistance to BLB was carried out at two different times and locations; that is, in a greenhouse during winter and in an open field during summer. The pathogenicity of Xoo race K1 was tested on 32 Korean rice cultivars. Inoculation was conducted at the maximum tillering stage, and the lesion length was measured after 14 days of inoculation. Five cultivars, Hanareum, Namcheon, Samgdeok, Samgang, and Yangjo, were found to be resistant in both the greenhouse and open-field screenings. Expression of the plant defense-related genes JAmyb, OsNPR1, OsPR1a, OsWRKY45, and OsPR10b was observed in resistant and susceptible cultivars by qRT-PCR. Among the five genes tested, only OsPR10b showed coherent expression with the phenotypes. Screening of resistance to Xoo in rice was more accurate when conducted in open fields in the summer cultivation period than in greenhouses in winter. The expression of plant defenserelated genes after bacterial inoculation could give another perspective in elucidating defense mechanisms by using both resistant and susceptible individuals. PMID:26869604

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance and Bacterial Identification Utilizing a Microelectronic Chip Array

    PubMed Central

    Westin, Lorelei; Miller, Carolyn; Vollmer, Dana; Canter, David; Radtkey, Ray; Nerenberg, Michael; O'Connell, James P.

    2001-01-01

    Species-specific bacterial identification of clinical specimens is often limited to a few species due to the difficulty of performing multiplex reactions. In addition, discrimination of amplicons is time-consuming and laborious, consisting of gel electrophoresis, probe hybridization, or sequencing technology. In order to simplify the process of bacterial identification, we combined anchored in situ amplification on a microelectronic chip array with discrimination and detection on the same platform. Here, we describe the simultaneous amplification and discrimination of six gene sequences which are representative of different bacterial identification assays: Escherichia coli gyrA, Salmonella gyrA, Campylobacter gyrA, E. coli parC, Staphylococcus mecA, and Chlamydia cryptic plasmid. The assay can detect both plasmid and transposon genes and can also discriminate strains carrying antibiotic resistance single-nucleotide polymorphism mutations. Finally, the assay is similarly capable of discriminating between bacterial species through reporter-specific discrimination and allele-specific amplification. Anchored strand displacement amplification allows multiplex amplification and complex genotype discrimination on the same platform. This assay simplifies the bacterial identification process greatly, allowing molecular biology techniques to be performed with minimal processing of samples and practical experience. PMID:11230433

  19. Absence of bacterial resistance following repeat exposure to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedigo, Lisa A.; Gibbs, Aaron J.; Scott, Robert J.; Street, Cale N.

    2009-06-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria necessitates exploration of alternative approaches to treat hospital and community acquired infections. The aim of this study was to determine whether bacterial pathogens develop resistance to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) during repeated sub-lethal challenge. Antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus and antibiotic sensitive E. coli were subjected to repeat PDT treatments using a methylene blue photosensitizer formulation and 670 nm illumination from a non-thermal diode laser. Parameters were adjusted such that kills were <100% so that surviving colonies could be passaged for subsequent exposures. With each repeat, kills were compared to those using non-exposed cultures of the same strain. Oxacillin resistance was induced in S. aureus using a disc diffusion method. For each experiment, "virgin" and "repeat" cultures were exposed to methylene blue at 0.01% w/v and illuminated with an energy dose of 20.6 J/cm2. No significant difference in killing of E. coli (repeat vs. virgin culture) was observed through 11 repeat exposures. Similar results were seen using MSSA and MRSA, wherein kill rate did not significantly differ from control over 25 repeat exposures. In contrast, complete oxacillin resistance could be generated in S. aureus over a limited number of exposures. PDT is effective in the eradication of pathogens including antibiotic resistance strains. Furthermore, repeated sub-lethal exposure does not induce resistance to subsequent PDT treatments. The absence of resistance formation represents a significant advantage of PDT over traditional antibiotics.

  20. Bacterial cheating limits the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Hui Xiao; Datta, Manoshi; Yurtsev, Eugene; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain--which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic--may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we experimentally find that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors found in nature.

  1. Drug resistance analysis of bacterial strains isolated from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, L F; Li, J L; Ma, W H; Li, J Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spectrum and drug resistance of bacteria isolated from burn patients to provide a reference for rational clinical use of antibiotics. Up to 1914 bacterial strain specimens isolated from burn patients admitted to hospital between 2001 and 2010 were subjected to resistance monitoring by using the K-B paper disk method. Retrospective analysis was performed on drug resistance analysis of burn patients. The top eight bacterium strains according to detection rate. A total of 1355 strains of Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria and 559 strains of Gram-positive (G(+)) bacteria were detected. The top eight bacterium strains, according to detection rate, were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Enterococcus. Drug resistance rates were higher than 90% in A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, S. epidermidis, and S. aureus, which accounted for 52.2, 21.7, 27.8, and 33.3%, respectively, of the entire sample. Those with drug resistance rates lower than 30% accounted for 4.3, 30.4, 16.7, and 16.7%, respectively. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) accounted for 49.2 and 76.4% of the S. epidermis and S. aureus resistance, respectively. Antibacterial drugs that had drug resistance rates to MRSE and MRSA higher than 90% accounted for 38.9 and 72.2%, respectively, whereas those with lower than 30% drug resistance rates accounted for 11.1 and 16.7%, respectively. The burn patients enrolled in the study were mainly infected with G(-) bacteria. These results strongly suggest that clinicians should practice rational use of antibiotics based on drug susceptibility test results. PMID:24535909

  2. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-02-07

    Mechanistic explanations have been found for the migration of atoms and ions through the zeolite channels leading to specific distribution of ions and the metal clusters. In this report, we summarize the state of understanding attained on a number of topics in the area of mono- and multimetal/zeolite systems, to which our recent research has made significant contributions. The following topics are discussed: (1) Formation of isolated metal atoms in sodalite cages; (2) differences of metal/zeolite systems prepared by ion reduction in channels or via isolated atoms; (3) rejuvenation of Pd/NaY and Pd/HY catalysts by oxidative redispersion of the metal; (4) formation of mono- or bimetal particles in zeolites by programmed reductive decomposition of volatile metal complexes; (5) cation-cation interaction as a cause of enhanced reducibility; (6) formation of palladium carbonyl clusters in supercages; (7) enhanced catalytic activity of metal particle-proton complexes for hydrocarbon conversion reactions; (8) stereoselectivity of catalytic reactions due to geometric constraints of particles in cages.

  3. QTLs for Resistance to Major Rice Diseases Exacerbated by Global Warming: Brown Spot, Bacterial Seedling Rot, and Bacterial Grain Rot.

    PubMed

    Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Tsushima, Seiya; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa L.), damage from diseases such as brown spot, caused by Bipolaris oryzae, and bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, caused by Burkholderia glumae, has increased under global warming because the optimal temperature ranges for growth of these pathogens are relatively high (around 30 °C). Therefore, the need for cultivars carrying genes for resistance to these diseases is increasing to ensure sustainable rice production. In contrast to the situation for other important rice diseases such as blast and bacterial blight, no genes for complete resistance to brown spot, bacterial seedling rot or bacterial grain rot have yet been discovered. Thus, rice breeders have to use partial resistance, which is largely influenced by environmental conditions. Recent progress in molecular genetics and improvement of evaluation methods for disease resistance have facilitated detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with resistance. In this review, we summarize the results of worldwide screening for cultivars with resistance to brown spot, bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot and we discuss the identification of QTLs conferring resistance to these diseases in order to provide useful information for rice breeding programs. PMID:27178300

  4. Synthesis of Multimetal-Graphene Composite by Mechanical Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiphaneendra, Bachu; Srivastava, Avi Krishna; Srivastava, Chandan

    2016-06-01

    Multimetal-graphene composites were synthesized using the ball milling technique. To prepare the composite, graphite powder was mixed with Fe, Cr, Co, Cu and Mg powders. This mixture was then mechanically milled for 35 h in toluene medium. After milling, the multimetal-graphite mixture was mixed with sodium lauryl sulfate and sonicated for 2 h. Sonication led to the exfoliation of graphene sheets. Formation of graphene was confirmed from x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy-based analysis revealed the formation of multimetal deposits over the graphene surface. Compositional analysis of the multimetal deposits revealed fairly uniform distribution of all the five component metal atoms over the graphene sheet. The average composition of the multimetal deposit was determined to be 11.4 ± 4 at.% Mg, 33.8 ± 19 at.% Cr, 21.8 ± 16 at.% Fe, 9.4 ± 5.7 at.% Co and 23.6 ± 12 at.% Cu.

  5. Antibiotic resistance in prevalent bacterial and protozoan sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Karl; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is causing a treatment crisis across the globe. While cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea is one of the most pressing issues, extensively antibiotic resistant Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma hominis are also becoming commonplace. Experts have suggested that the failure of current treatment regimens are "largely inevitable" and have called for entirely new classes of antimicrobial agents. With the exception of several new classes of drugs primarily targeting nosocomial infections, progress has been slow. While pharmaceutical companies continue to introduce new drugs, they are based on decade-old discoveries. While there is disagreement about what constitutes new classes of antibiotics, many experts suggest that the last truly new family of antimicrobials was discovered in 1987. This review summarizes the existing literature on antibiotic resistance in common bacterial and protozoal STIs. It also briefly discusses several of the most promising alternatives to current therapies, and further examines how advances in drug delivery, formulation, concentration, and timing are improving the efficacy of existing treatments. Finally, the paper discusses the current state of pharmaceutical development for multidrug-resistant STI. PMID:26392647

  6. Protoplast dehydration correlated with heat resistance of bacterial spores.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashio, S; Gerhardt, P

    1985-01-01

    Water content of the protoplast in situ within the fully hydrated dormant bacterial spore was quantified by use of a spore in which the complex of coat and outer (pericortex) membrane was genetically defective or chemically removed, as evidenced by susceptibility of the cortex to lysozyme and by permeability of the periprotoplast integument to glucose. Water content was determined by equilibrium permeability measurement with 3H-labeled water (confirmed by gravimetric measurement) for the entire spore, with 14C-labeled glucose for the integument outside the inner (pericytoplasm) membrane, and by the difference for the protoplast. The method was applied to lysozyme-sensitive spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus, B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. megaterium (four types). Comparable lysozyme-resistant spores, in which the outer membrane functioned as the primary permeability barrier to glucose, were employed as controls. Heat resistances were expressed as D100 values. Protoplast water content of the lysozyme-sensitive spore types correlated with heat resistance exponentially in two distinct clusters, with the four B. megaterium types in one alignment, and with the four other species types in another. Protoplast water contents of the B. megaterium spore types were sufficiently low (26 to 29%, based on wet protoplast weight) to account almost entirely for their lesser heat resistance. Corresponding values of the other species types were similar or higher (30 to 55%), indicating that these spores depended on factors additional to protoplast dehydration for their much greater heat resistance. PMID:3988704

  7. Evaluation of Glyphosate-Resistant Soybean Cultivars for Resistance to Bacterial Pustule

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines causes bacterial pustule of soybean, which is a common disease in many soybean-growing areas of the world and is controlled by a single recessive gene that was commonly found in many conventional glyphosate-sensitive soybean cultivars. Since glyphosate-resistant c...

  8. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Piddock, Laura J V

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  9. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  10. Sterilization Resistance of Bacterial Spores Explained with Water Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Friedline, Anthony W; Zachariah, Malcolm M; Middaugh, Amy N; Garimella, Ravindranath; Vaishampayan, Parag A; Rice, Charles V

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial spores can survive for long periods without nutrients and in harsh environmental conditions. This survival is influenced by the structure of the spore, the presence of protective compounds, and water retention. These compounds, and the physical state of water in particular, allow some species of bacterial spores to survive sterilization schemes with hydrogen peroxide and UV light. The chemical nature of the spore core and its water has been a subject of some contention and the chemical environment of the water impacts resistance paradigms. Either the spore has a glassy core, where water is immobilized along with other core components, or the core is gel-like with mobile water diffusion. These properties affect the movement of peroxide and radical species, and hence resistance. Deuterium solid-state NMR experiments are useful for examining the nature of the water inside the spore. Previous work in our lab with spores of Bacillus subtilis indicate that, for spores, the core water is in a more immobilized state than expected for the gel-like core theory, suggesting a glassy core environment. Here, we report deuterium solid-state NMR observations of the water within UV- and peroxide-resistant spores from Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032. Variable-temperature NMR experiments indicate no change in the line shape after heating to 50 °C, but an overall decrease in signal after heating to 100 °C. These results show glass-like core dynamics within B. pumilus SAFR-032 that may be the potential source of its known UV-resistance properties. The observed NMR traits can be attributed to the presence of an exosporium containing additional labile deuterons that can aid in the deactivation of sterilizing agents. PMID:26435315

  11. Emergence of antibiotic resistance from multinucleated bacterial filaments

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Julia; Zhang, Qiucen; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Rogers, Elizabeth; Rosenberg, Susan M.; Austin, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can rapidly evolve resistance to antibiotics via the SOS response, a state of high-activity DNA repair and mutagenesis. We explore here the first steps of this evolution in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Induction of the SOS response by the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin changes the E. coli rod shape into multichromosome-containing filaments. We show that at subminimal inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin the bacterial filament divides asymmetrically repeatedly at the tip. Chromosome-containing buds are made that, if resistant, propagate nonfilamenting progeny with enhanced resistance to ciprofloxacin as the parent filament dies. We propose that the multinucleated filament creates an environmental niche where evolution can proceed via generation of improved mutant chromosomes due to the mutagenic SOS response and possible recombination of the new alleles between chromosomes. Our data provide a better understanding of the processes underlying the origin of resistance at the single-cell level and suggest an analogous role to the eukaryotic aneuploidy condition in cancer. PMID:25492931

  12. Effect of bacterial growth stage on resistance to chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Cherchi, C; Gu, A Z

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms and factors that affect microbial resistance to chlorine disinfection have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the impact of the cell growth stage on chlorine disinfection efficiency. Specifically, we evaluated the impact of the growth stage on chlorination resistance by comparing the inactivation efficiencies of two indicator bacterial strains (Escherichia coli K12 and Escherichia coli O157:H7) obtained from various growth phases, using Chick-Watson kinetic parameters. For both E. coli strains (K12 and O157:H7), the inactivation rate constants are the lowest at stationary phase (0.19 and 0.32) compared to those at initial lag (0.54 and 0.76) and exponential growth phase (0.63 and 0.69), respectively. These results suggested that the abundance of resistant subpopulations increases at stressed stationary conditions and E. coli cells obtained from the stationary growth phase exhibited more resistance and lower inactivation efficiency compared to those from the lag and exponential phases. This implies that microbes in wastewater treatment process with varying solids retention times (SRTs, which indicate growth rates) may show different extents of chlorine resistance. Comparison of the coefficient of dilution (n) values in both E. coli strains for the various growth phases suggest that cells seem to be more sensitive to disinfectant concentration at the stationary-lag phase than that at the exponential stage. Comparing the two E. coli strains, higher inactivation rates were observed for the pathogenic O157:H7 than for K12 at different stages of growth. The strain-to-strain variability in survivability to chlorine exposure has to be considered when selecting indicator microorganisms for water quality monitoring. PMID:22053451

  13. MOCVD of multimetal and noble metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endle, James Patrick

    2000-11-01

    Carbon content in TiN films produced with tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium (TDMAT) and methylhydrazine or dimethylhydrazine can be controlled at or below 10% with a N/Ti ratio of ˜1.3 at growth temperatures between 573 and 723 K. Post-dosing either hydrazine on a CVD TiN film results in additional N-Ti bonds, indicating a surface reaction between the two precursors occurs. Co-dosing hydrazine-like compounds with larger alkyl ligands than methyl resulted in additional carbon incorporation in the TiN film. A growth system, consisting of a load lock and growth chamber, and a precursor pyrolysis system were designed and built to study metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Addition of a bubbler and a direct liquid injection system allowed for the vaporization of solid and liquid precursors and solutions of multiple precursors. A precursor pyrolysis system was designed for high and low vapor pressure precursors and high carrier gas flow rates. The systems were used to study (Al,Ti)N and Ir film growth. (Al,Ti)N was used as a template to study the incorporation of elements into a multimetal chemical vapor deposited film using NH3 and a DLI solution of TDMAT and the tris(dimethylarnino)alane dimer (TDMAA) in toluene-NH 3 significantly decreases the decomposition temperature of both precursors. Carbon was reduced by increasing the NH3 partial pressure, and the Al incorporation was increased by increasing the TDMAA/TDMAT ratio in the DLI solution. Exposure to ambient resulted in significant oxygen incorporation and the removal of carbon and nitrogen from the (AI,Ti)N film. Conformal (AI,Ti)N films were produced at 450 K in the presence of NH3 and at 550 K without NH3. The role of O2 in Ir film growth was studied with the newly designed equipment. O2 significantly decreases the decomposition temperature of (MeCp)Ir(COD) below 425 K by preventing a carbonaceous build-up on the iridium film. By decreasing the oxygen partial pressure, the island nucleation and coalescence

  14. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS. PMID:25750934

  15. Use of a bacterial antimicrobial resistance gene microarray for the identification of resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Garneau, P; Labrecque, O; Maynard, C; Messier, S; Masson, L; Archambault, M; Harel, J

    2010-11-01

    As diagnostic and surveillance activities are vital to determine measures needed to control antimicrobial resistance (AMR), new and rapid laboratory methods are necessary to facilitate this important effort. DNA microarray technology allows the detection of a large number of genes in a single reaction. This technology is simple, specific and high-throughput. We have developed a bacterial antimicrobial resistance gene DNA microarray that will allow rapid antimicrobial resistance gene screening for all Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A prototype microarray was designed using a 70-mer based oligonucleotide set targeting AMR genes of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In the present version, the microarray consists of 182 oligonucleotides corresponding to 166 different acquired AMR gene targets, covering most of the resistance genes found in both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. A test study was performed on a collection of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from milk samples from dairy farms in Québec, Canada. The reproducibility of the hybridizations was determined, and the microarray results were compared with those obtained by phenotypic resistance tests (either MIC or Kirby-Bauer). The microarray genotyping demonstrated a correlation between penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin resistance phenotypes with the corresponding acquired resistance genes. The hybridizations showed that the 38 antimicrobial resistant S. aureus isolates possessed at least one AMR gene. PMID:21083822

  16. Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) resistance to columnaris disease is heritable and favorably correlated with bacterial cold water disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease (CD) is an emerging disease affecting rainbow trout aquaculture. Objectives were to estimate heritability of CD resistance in a line (ARS-Fp-R) selected 4 generations for improved bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance; estimate genetic correlations among CD resistance, BC...

  17. Molecular structure and dynamics in bacterial mercury resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Shi, Liang; Miller, Susan M; Summers, Anne O; Liang, Liyuan

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria participate significantly in mercury transformation in natural and industrial environments. Previous studies have shown that bacterial mercury resistance is mediated by the mer operon, typically located on transposons or plasmids. It encodes specific genes that facilitate uptake of mercury species, cleavage of organomercurials, and reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Expression of mer operon genes is regulated by MerR, a metal-responsive regulator protein on the level of transcription. In vitro studies have shown that MerR forms a non-transcribing pre-initiation complex with RNA polymerase and the promoter DNA. Binding of Hg(II) induces conformational changes in MerR and other components of the complex resulting in the transcription of mer operon genes. As part of ongoing investigations on allosteric conformational changes induced by Hg(II) in dimeric MerR, and the implications on the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter of the mer operon, we applied small angle scattering to study the regulatory mechanism of MerR in the presence and absence of Hg(II). Our results show that in the presence of Hg(II) the MerR dimer undergoes a significant reorientation from a compact state to a conformation revealing two distinct domains. Bacterial reduction of Hg(II) can also occur at concentrations too low to induce mer operon functions. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter are able to reduce Hg(II) in the presence of mineral oxides. This process has been linked to the activity of outer membrane multiheme cytochromes. We isolated and purified a decaheme outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and characterized its envelope shape in solution by small angle x-ray scattering. Structural features were identified and compared to homology models. These results show that OmcA is an elongated macromolecule consisting of separate modules, which may be connected by flexible linkers.

  18. Understanding bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides: From the surface to deep inside.

    PubMed

    Maria-Neto, Simone; de Almeida, Keyla Caroline; Macedo, Maria Ligia Rodrigues; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2015-11-01

    Resistant bacterial infections are a major health problem in many parts of the world. The major commercial antibiotic classes often fail to combat common bacteria. Although antimicrobial peptides are able to control bacterial infections by interfering with microbial metabolism and physiological processes in several ways, a large number of cases of resistance to antibiotic peptide classes have also been reported. To gain a better understanding of the resistance process various technologies have been applied. Here we discuss multiple strategies by which bacteria could develop enhanced antimicrobial peptide resistance, focusing on sub-cellular regions from the surface to deep inside, evaluating bacterial membranes, cell walls and cytoplasmic metabolism. Moreover, some high-throughput methods for antimicrobial resistance detection and discrimination are also examined. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides. PMID:25724815

  19. TRANSFORMATION OF ANTHURIUM WITH TRANSGENES FOR BACTERIAL BLIGHT AND NEMATODE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthurium transformation was undertaken to engineer plants for resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae and to the nematodes Radopholus simile and Meloidogyne javanica. Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of embryogenic calli of ‘Marian Seefurth’ was sh...

  20. Dominant gene for common bean resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common bacterial blight pathogen [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap)] is a limiting factor for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production worldwide and resistance to the pathogen in most commercial cultivars is inadequate. Variability in virulence of the bacterial pathogen has been ob...

  1. Suppression of bacterial blight on mustard greens with host plant resistance and Acibenzolar-S-Methyl

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial blight, caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, attacks the leaves of most brassica vegetables, including mustard greens (Brassica juncea). ‘Carolina Broadleaf,’ a new mustard cultivar, is resistant to bacterial blight. Acibenzolar-S-methyl (trade name Actigard) has been used to m...

  2. Registration of Common Bacterial Blight Resistant White Kidney Bean Germplasm Line USWK-CBB-17

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White kidney bean germplasm line USWK-CBB-17 was developed by USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station and released in 2006. This line was bred with a high level of resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap). Common bacteri...

  3. The First Global Forum on Bacterial Infections calls for urgent action to contain antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Vlieghe, Erika

    2012-02-01

    The 1st Global Forum on Bacterial Infections: Balancing Treatment Access and Antibiotic Resistance was organized by the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy and the Public Health Foundation of India for researchers, policymakers, clinicians and public health program managers dealing with the problems of bacterial infection and antibiotic resistance in low- and middle-income countries. This meeting was the first gathering of its kind to be held in a developing country. PMID:22339188

  4. Mitomycin resistance in mammalian cells expressing the bacterial mitomycin C resistance protein MCRA.

    PubMed

    Belcourt, M F; Penketh, P G; Hodnick, W F; Johnson, D A; Sherman, D H; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1999-08-31

    The mitomycin C-resistance gene, mcrA, of Streptomyces lavendulae produces MCRA, a protein that protects this microorganism from its own antibiotic, the antitumor drug mitomycin C. Expression of the bacterial mcrA gene in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells causes profound resistance to mitomycin C and to its structurally related analog porfiromycin under aerobic conditions but produces little change in drug sensitivity under hypoxia. The mitomycins are prodrugs that are enzymatically reduced and activated intracellularly, producing cytotoxic semiquinone anion radical and hydroquinone reduction intermediates. In vitro, MCRA protects DNA from cross-linking by the hydroquinone reduction intermediate of these mitomycins by oxidizing the hydroquinone back to the parent molecule; thus, MCRA acts as a hydroquinone oxidase. These findings suggest potential therapeutic applications for MCRA in the treatment of cancer with the mitomycins and imply that intrinsic or selected mitomycin C resistance in mammalian cells may not be due solely to decreased bioactivation, as has been hypothesized previously, but instead could involve an MCRA-like mechanism. PMID:10468636

  5. Mitomycin resistance in mammalian cells expressing the bacterial mitomycin C resistance protein MCRA

    PubMed Central

    Belcourt, Michael F.; Penketh, Philip G.; Hodnick, William F.; Johnson, David A.; Sherman, David H.; Rockwell, Sara; Sartorelli, Alan C.

    1999-01-01

    The mitomycin C-resistance gene, mcrA, of Streptomyces lavendulae produces MCRA, a protein that protects this microorganism from its own antibiotic, the antitumor drug mitomycin C. Expression of the bacterial mcrA gene in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells causes profound resistance to mitomycin C and to its structurally related analog porfiromycin under aerobic conditions but produces little change in drug sensitivity under hypoxia. The mitomycins are prodrugs that are enzymatically reduced and activated intracellularly, producing cytotoxic semiquinone anion radical and hydroquinone reduction intermediates. In vitro, MCRA protects DNA from cross-linking by the hydroquinone reduction intermediate of these mitomycins by oxidizing the hydroquinone back to the parent molecule; thus, MCRA acts as a hydroquinone oxidase. These findings suggest potential therapeutic applications for MCRA in the treatment of cancer with the mitomycins and imply that intrinsic or selected mitomycin C resistance in mammalian cells may not be due solely to decreased bioactivation, as has been hypothesized previously, but instead could involve an MCRA-like mechanism. PMID:10468636

  6. Effect of Vibration on Bacterial Growth and Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research grant was to provide a fundamental, systematic investigation of the effects of oscillatory acceleration on bacterial proliferation and their responses to antibiotics in a liquid medium.

  7. Pilot Screening to Determine Antimicrobial Synergies in a Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strain Library

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Chulmin; Chun, Hye-Sun; Choi, Jae-Ki; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Su-Mi; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    With the rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections, there has been increasing interest in combinations of ≥2 antimicrobial agents with synergistic effects. We established an MDR bacterial strain library to screen for in vitro antimicrobial synergy by using a broth microdilution checkerboard method and high-throughput luciferase-based bacterial cell viability assay. In total, 39 MDR bacterial strains, including 23 carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, 9 vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus, and 7 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, were used to screen for potential antimicrobial synergies. Synergies were more frequently identified with combinations of imipenem plus trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole for carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the library. To verify this finding, we tested 34 A. baumannii clinical isolates resistant to both imipenem and trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole by the checkerboard method. The imipenem plus trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole combination showed synergy in the treatment of 21 (62%) of the clinical isolates. The results indicate that pilot screening for antimicrobial synergy in the MDR bacterial strain library could be valuable in the selection of combination therapeutic regimens to treat MDR bacterial infections. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this screening system can be useful to screen for the combined effects of conventional antimicrobials and new-generation antimicrobials or nonantimicrobials. PMID:26974861

  8. Pilot Screening to Determine Antimicrobial Synergies in a Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strain Library.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Chulmin; Chun, Hye-Sun; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Jae-Ki; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Su-Mi; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-07-01

    With the rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections, there has been increasing interest in combinations of ≥2 antimicrobial agents with synergistic effects. We established an MDR bacterial strain library to screen for in vitro antimicrobial synergy by using a broth microdilution checkerboard method and high-throughput luciferase-based bacterial cell viability assay. In total, 39 MDR bacterial strains, including 23 carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, 9 vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus, and 7 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, were used to screen for potential antimicrobial synergies. Synergies were more frequently identified with combinations of imipenem plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the library. To verify this finding, we tested 34 A. baumannii clinical isolates resistant to both imipenem and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole by the checkerboard method. The imipenem plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination showed synergy in the treatment of 21 (62%) of the clinical isolates. The results indicate that pilot screening for antimicrobial synergy in the MDR bacterial strain library could be valuable in the selection of combination therapeutic regimens to treat MDR bacterial infections. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this screening system can be useful to screen for the combined effects of conventional antimicrobials and new-generation antimicrobials or nonantimicrobials. PMID:26974861

  9. Bacterial resistance and impetigo treatment trends: a review.

    PubMed

    Bangert, Scott; Levy, Moise; Hebert, Adelaide A

    2012-01-01

    Impetigo is a common cutaneous infection that is especially prevalent in children. The prevalence of colonization and infection with resistant strains is continually increasing, forcing clinicians to reevaluate treatment strategies. Newer topical agents are effective in treating infections with resistant strains and may help minimize resistance and adverse effects from systemic agents. Use of topical disinfectants to decrease colonization is an important adjunctive measure. Physicians should be aware of local resistance patterns in impetigo to help guide therapy. PMID:22299710

  10. Phenotypic Resistance and the Dynamics of Bacterial Escape from Phage Control

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James J.; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Schmerer, Matthew; Chaudhry, Waqas Nasir; Levin, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    The canonical view of phage - bacterial interactions in dense, liquid cultures is that the phage will eliminate most of the sensitive cells; genetic resistance will then ascend to restore high bacterial densities. Yet there are various mechanisms by which bacteria may remain sensitive to phages but still attain high densities in their presence – because bacteria enter a transient state of reduced adsorption. Importantly, these mechanisms may be cryptic and inapparent prior to the addition of phage yet result in a rapid rebound of bacterial density after phage are introduced. We describe mathematical models of these processes and suggest how different types of this ‘phenotypic’ resistance may be elucidated. We offer preliminary in vitro studies of a previously characterized E. coli model system and Campylobacter jejuni illustrating apparent phenotypic resistance. As phenotypic resistance may be specific to the receptors used by phages, awareness of its mechanisms may identify ways of improving the choice of phages for therapy. Phenotypic resistance can also explain several enigmas in the ecology of phage-bacterial dynamics. Phenotypic resistance does not preclude the evolution of genetic resistance and may often be an intermediate step to genetic resistance. PMID:24743264

  11. EPISTATIC INTERACTION BETWEEN TWO MAJOR QTL CONDITIONING RESISTANCE TO COMMON BACTERIAL BLIGHT IN COMMON BEAN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to common bacterial blight in common bean is a complex trait that is quantitatively inherited. Combining QTL is the current strategy for improving resistance, but interactions among different QTL are unknown. We examined the interaction between two independent QTL present in dry bean bre...

  12. Response to selection for bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies indicate that resistance to experimental bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) challenge is heritable and thus may be improved through selective breeding. Our objective was to estimate response after one generation of genetic selection for resistance to BCWD in a pedigreed population ...

  13. Effects of antibiotic resistance alleles on bacterial evolutionary responses to viral parasites.

    PubMed

    Arias-Sánchez, Flor I; Hall, Alex R

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance has wide-ranging effects on bacterial phenotypes and evolution. However, the influence of antibiotic resistance on bacterial responses to parasitic viruses remains unclear, despite the ubiquity of such viruses in nature and current interest in therapeutic applications. We experimentally investigated this by exposing various Escherichia coli genotypes, including eight antibiotic-resistant genotypes and a mutator, to different viruses (lytic bacteriophages). Across 960 populations, we measured changes in population density and sensitivity to viruses, and tested whether variation among bacterial genotypes was explained by their relative growth in the absence of parasites, or mutation rate towards phage resistance measured by fluctuation tests for each phage. We found that antibiotic resistance had relatively weak effects on adaptation to phages, although some antibiotic-resistance alleles impeded the evolution of resistance to phages via growth costs. By contrast, a mutator allele, often found in antibiotic-resistant lineages in pathogenic populations, had a relatively large positive effect on phage-resistance evolution and population density under parasitism. This suggests costs of antibiotic resistance may modify the outcome of phage therapy against pathogenic populations previously exposed to antibiotics, but the effects of any co-occurring mutator alleles are likely to be stronger. PMID:27194288

  14. Effects of antibiotic resistance alleles on bacterial evolutionary responses to viral parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Alex R.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has wide-ranging effects on bacterial phenotypes and evolution. However, the influence of antibiotic resistance on bacterial responses to parasitic viruses remains unclear, despite the ubiquity of such viruses in nature and current interest in therapeutic applications. We experimentally investigated this by exposing various Escherichia coli genotypes, including eight antibiotic-resistant genotypes and a mutator, to different viruses (lytic bacteriophages). Across 960 populations, we measured changes in population density and sensitivity to viruses, and tested whether variation among bacterial genotypes was explained by their relative growth in the absence of parasites, or mutation rate towards phage resistance measured by fluctuation tests for each phage. We found that antibiotic resistance had relatively weak effects on adaptation to phages, although some antibiotic-resistance alleles impeded the evolution of resistance to phages via growth costs. By contrast, a mutator allele, often found in antibiotic-resistant lineages in pathogenic populations, had a relatively large positive effect on phage-resistance evolution and population density under parasitism. This suggests costs of antibiotic resistance may modify the outcome of phage therapy against pathogenic populations previously exposed to antibiotics, but the effects of any co-occurring mutator alleles are likely to be stronger. PMID:27194288

  15. Combinatorial discovery of polymers resistant to bacterial attachment

    PubMed Central

    Luckett, Jeni; Cockayne, Alan; Atkinson, Steve; Mei, Ying; Bayston, Roger; Irvine, Derek J; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Williams, Paul; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation pose key challenges to the optimal performance of medical devices. In this study, we determined the attachment of selected bacterial species to hundreds of polymeric materials in a high-throughput microarray format. Using this method, we identified a group of structurally related materials comprising ester and cyclic hydrocarbon moieties that substantially reduced the attachment of pathogenic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli). Coating silicone with these ‘hit’ materials achieved up to a 30-fold (96.7%) reduction in the surface area covered by bacteria compared with a commercial silver hydrogel coating in vitro, and the same material coatings were effective at reducing bacterial attachment in vivo in a mouse implant infection model. These polymers represent a class of materials that reduce the attachment of bacteria that could not have been predicted to have this property from the current understanding of bacteria-surface interactions. PMID:22885723

  16. Evolution of resistance to a last-resort antibiotic in Staphyloccocus aureus via bacterial competition

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Gudrun; Yepes, Ana; Förstner, Konrad U.; Wermser, Charlotte; Stengel, Stephanie T.; Modamio, Jennifer; Ohlsen, Knut; Foster, Kevin R.; Lopez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Antibiotic resistance is a key medical concern, with antibiotic use likely being an important cause. However, here we describe an alternative route to clinically-relevant antibiotic resistance that occurs solely due to competitive interactions between bacterial cells. We consistently observe that isolates of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus diversify spontaneously into two distinct, sequentially arising strains. The first evolved strain outgrows the parent strain via secretion of surfactants and a toxic bacteriocin. The second is resistant to the bacteriocin. Importantly, this second strain is also resistant to intermediate levels of vancomycin. This so-called VISA (vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus) phenotype is seen in many hard-to-treat clinical isolates. This strain diversification also occurs during in vivo infection in a mouse model, consistent with the fact that both coevolved phenotypes resemble strains commonly found in clinic. Our study shows how competition between coevolving bacterial strains can generate antibiotic resistance and recapitulate key clinical phenotypes. PMID:25171407

  17. Performance testing of multi-metal continuous emissions monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, W.J.; French, N.B.; Brown, C.H.; Burns, D.B.; Lemieux, P.M.; Ryan, J.V.; Priebe, S.J.; Waterland, L.R.

    1997-11-17

    Three prototype multi-metals continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) were tested in April 1996 at the Rotary Kiln Incinerator Simulator facility at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The CEM instruments were: Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES); Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometry-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (LIBS); and Laser Spark Spectrometry, another LIBS instrument. The three CEMs were tested simultaneously during test periods in which low, medium, and high concentration levels of seven toxic metals -- antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury -- were maintained under carefully controlled conditions. Two methods were used to introduce the test metals into the flue gas: (1) solution atomization, introducing metal-containing aerosol directly into the secondary combustion burner, and (2) injection of fly ash particulates. The testing addressed four measures of CEM performance: relative accuracy (RA), calibration drift, zero drift, and response time. These were accomplished by comparing the toxic metal analyte concentrations reported by the CEMs to the concentrations measured using the EPA reference method (RM) for the same analytes. Overall, the test results showed the prototype nature of the test CEMs and the clear need for further development. None of the CEMs tested consistently achieved RA values of 20% or less as required by the EPA draft performance specification. Instrument size reduction and automation will also likely need additional attention before multi-metal CEMs systems become commercially available for service as envisioned by regulators and citizens.

  18. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors leading to acquired bacterial resistance to antibiotics in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, I. N.; Lamikanra, A.; Edelman, R.

    1999-01-01

    In developing countries, acquired bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is common in isolates from healthy persons and from persons with community-acquired infections. Complex socioeconomic and behavioral factors associated with antibiotic resistance, particularly regarding diarrheal and respiratory pathogens, in developing tropical countries, include misuse of antibiotics by health professionals, unskilled practitioners, and laypersons; poor drug quality; unhygienic conditions accounting for spread of resistant bacteria; and inadequate surveillance. PMID:10081668

  19. Bacterial recombination promotes the evolution of multi-drug-resistance in functionally diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Lee, Alexander E. G.; Wang, Yun; Huang, Wei E.; Barraclough, Timothy G.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial recombination is believed to be a major factor explaining the prevalence of multi-drug-resistance (MDR) among pathogenic bacteria. Despite extensive evidence for exchange of resistance genes from retrospective sequence analyses, experimental evidence for the evolutionary benefits of bacterial recombination is scarce. We compared the evolution of MDR between populations of Acinetobacter baylyi in which we manipulated both the recombination rate and the initial diversity of strains with resistance to single drugs. In populations lacking recombination, the initial presence of multiple strains resistant to different antibiotics inhibits the evolution of MDR. However, in populations with recombination, the inhibitory effect of standing diversity is alleviated and MDR evolves rapidly. Moreover, only the presence of DNA harbouring resistance genes promotes the evolution of resistance, ruling out other proposed benefits for recombination. Together, these results provide direct evidence for the fitness benefits of bacterial recombination and show that this occurs by mitigation of functional interference between genotypes resistant to single antibiotics. Although analogous to previously described mechanisms of clonal interference among alternative beneficial mutations, our results actually highlight a different mechanism by which interactions among co-occurring strains determine the benefits of recombination for bacterial evolution. PMID:22048956

  20. METHOD FOR MEASURING BACTERIAL RESISTANCE TO METALS EMPLOYING EPIFLUORESCENT MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct viable counting method has been developed which can be used to measure resistance of bacteria to metal (DVCMR bio-assay). Results obtained using DVCMR was compared with classical culture methods and proven superior. Evaluation of test strains resistant to arsenic or mang...

  1. [Influence of chronic lead exposure on resistence to bacterial infection (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ewers, U; Weisser, L; Wegner, A

    1980-01-01

    Suppression by lead of resistance to bacterial or viral infections has been reported by several authors. We have studied, if a decrease of resistance to bacterial infection could be evaluated at blood lead concentrations (PbB), which correspond to the upper levels of environmental or occupational lead exposure regarded as tolerable (PbB = 35 resp. 60 microgram/100 ml). NMRI mice were chronically exposed to lead by feeding with lead acetate containing diets and given a challenge with Salmonella typhimurium. No increase of susceptibility to bacterial infection could be demonstrated at PbB < 90 microgram/100 g. At PbB > 100 microgram/100 g, however, an increase of lethality and a decrease of 50% survival times could be observed after bacterial infection. PMID:6999813

  2. Identification, Characterization and Antibiotic Resistance of Bacterial Isolates Obtained from Waterpipe Device Hoses

    PubMed Central

    Masadeh, Majed M.; Hussein, Emad I.; Alzoubi, Karem H.; Khabour, Omar; Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K.; Gharaibeh, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The general lack of knowledge about the health effects of waterpipe smoking is among the reasons for its global spread. In this study, bacterial contamination of waterpipe hoses was investigated. Twenty hoses were collected from waterpipe cafés and screened for bacterial pathogens using standard culture and isolation techniques. Additionally, resistance of isolated bacteria to common antibiotics was determined by identifying the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each isolate. Forty eight bacterial isolates were detected. Isolates included both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens from species that included Micrococcus (12), Corynebacterium (13) and Bacillus (9). In addition, some of the detected pathogens were found to be resistant to aztreonam (79%), cefixime (79%), norfloxacin, amoxicillin (47%), clarithromycin (46%) and enrofloxacin (38%). In conclusion, the hose of the waterpipe device is a good environment for the growth of bacterial pathogens, which can then be transmitted to users. PMID:25985311

  3. Identification, characterization and antibiotic resistance of bacterial isolates obtained from waterpipe device hoses.

    PubMed

    Masadeh, Majed M; Hussein, Emad I; Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar; Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K; Gharaibeh, Mahmoud

    2015-05-01

    The general lack of knowledge about the health effects of waterpipe smoking is among the reasons for its global spread. In this study, bacterial contamination of waterpipe hoses was investigated. Twenty hoses were collected from waterpipe cafés and screened for bacterial pathogens using standard culture and isolation techniques. Additionally, resistance of isolated bacteria to common antibiotics was determined by identifying the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each isolate. Forty eight bacterial isolates were detected. Isolates included both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens from species that included Micrococcus (12), Corynebacterium (13) and Bacillus (9). In addition, some of the detected pathogens were found to be resistant to aztreonam (79%), cefixime (79%), norfloxacin, amoxicillin (47%), clarithromycin (46%) and enrofloxacin (38%). In conclusion, the hose of the waterpipe device is a good environment for the growth of bacterial pathogens, which can then be transmitted to users. PMID:25985311

  4. Bacterial resistance to tetracycline: mechanisms, transfer, and clinical significance.

    PubMed Central

    Speer, B S; Shoemaker, N B; Salyers, A A

    1992-01-01

    Tetracycline has been a widely used antibiotic because of its low toxicity and broad spectrum of activity. However, its clinical usefulness has been declining because of the appearance of an increasing number of tetracycline-resistant isolates of clinically important bacteria. Two types of resistance mechanisms predominate: tetracycline efflux and ribosomal protection. A third mechanism of resistance, tetracycline modification, has been identified, but its clinical relevance is still unclear. For some tetracycline resistance genes, expression is regulated. In efflux genes found in gram-negative enteric bacteria, regulation is via a repressor that interacts with tetracycline. Gram-positive efflux genes appear to be regulated by an attenuation mechanism. Recently it was reported that at least one of the ribosome protection genes is regulated by attenuation. Tetracycline resistance genes are often found on transmissible elements. Efflux resistance genes are generally found on plasmids, whereas genes involved in ribosome protection have been found on both plasmids and self-transmissible chromosomal elements (conjugative transposons). One class of conjugative transposon, originally found in streptococci, can transfer itself from streptococci to a variety of recipients, including other gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and mycoplasmas. Another class of conjugative transposons has been found in the Bacteroides group. An unusual feature of the Bacteroides elements is that their transfer is enhanced by preexposure to tetracycline. Thus, tetracycline has the double effect of selecting for recipients that acquire a resistance gene and stimulating transfer of the gene. PMID:1423217

  5. Bacterial Community Shift Drives Antibiotic Resistance Promotion during Drinking Water Chlorination.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuyu; Shi, Peng; Hu, Qing; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Xu-Xiang

    2015-10-20

    For comprehensive insights into the effects of chlorination, a widely used disinfection technology, on bacterial community and antibiotic resistome in drinking water, this study applied high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic approaches to investigate the changing patterns of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and bacterial community in a drinking water treatment and distribution system. At genus level, chlorination could effectively remove Methylophilus, Methylotenera, Limnobacter, and Polynucleobacter, while increase the relative abundance of Pseudomonas, Acidovorax, Sphingomonas, Pleomonas, and Undibacterium in the drinking water. A total of 151 ARGs within 15 types were detectable in the drinking water, and chlorination evidently increased their total relative abundance while reduced their diversity in the opportunistic bacteria (p < 0.05). Residual chlorine was identified as the key contributing factor driving the bacterial community shift and resistome alteration. As the dominant persistent ARGs in the treatment and distribution system, multidrug resistance genes (mainly encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division transportation system) and bacitracin resistance gene bacA were mainly carried by chlorine-resistant bacteria Pseudomonas and Acidovorax, which mainly contributed to the ARGs abundance increase. The strong correlation between bacterial community shift and antibiotic resistome alteration observed in this study may shed new light on the mechanism behind the chlorination effects on antibiotic resistance. PMID:26397118

  6. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) resistance to columnaris disease is heritable and favorably correlated with bacterial cold water disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease (CD), caused by Flabobacterium columnare, is an emerging disease affecting rainbow trout aquaculture. Objectives of this study were to 1) estimate heritability of innate CD resistance in a rainbow trout line (ARS-Fp-R) previously selected four generations for improved bacterial co...

  7. Bacterial panicle blight resistance QTL in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and their association with resistance to other diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial panicle blight (BPB) of rice (Oryza sativa L.) occurs when the bacterium Burkholderia glumae infects and colonizes emerging and flowering panicles, causing kernels to abort. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for BPB resistance, a population of 300 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) d...

  8. Bacterial antibiotic resistance in soils irrigated with reclaimed municipal wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wastewater reclamation for municipal irrigation and groundwater recharge is an increasingly attractive option for extending water supplies. However, public health concerns include the potential for development of antibiotic resistance (AR) in soil bacteria after exposure to residual chemicals in rec...

  9. Development of a Protocol for Predicting Bacterial Resistance to Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Laura; Amézquita, Alejandro; McClure, Peter; Stewart, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Regulations dealing with microbicides in Europe and the United States are evolving and now require data on the risk of the development of resistance in organisms targeted by microbicidal products. There is no standard protocol to assess the risk of the development of resistance to microbicidal formulations. This study aimed to validate the use of changes in microbicide and antibiotic susceptibility as initial markers for predicting microbicide resistance and cross-resistance to antibiotics. Three industrial isolates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains (SL1344 and 14028S) were exposed to a shampoo, a mouthwash, eye makeup remover, and the microbicides contained within these formulations (chlorhexidine digluconate [CHG] and benzalkonium chloride [BZC]) under realistic, in-use conditions. Baseline and postexposure data were compared. No significant increases in the MIC or the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were observed for any strain after exposure to the three formulations. Increases as high as 100-fold in the MICs and MBCs of CHG and BZC for SL1344 and 14028S were observed but were unstable. Changes in antibiotic susceptibility were not clinically significant. The use of MICs and MBCs combined with antibiotic susceptibility profiling and stability testing generated reproducible data that allowed for an initial prediction of the development of resistance to microbicides. These approaches measure characteristics that are directly relevant to the concern over resistance and cross-resistance development following the use of microbicides. These are low-cost, high-throughput techniques, allowing manufacturers to provide to regulatory bodies, promptly and efficiently, data supporting an early assessment of the risk of resistance development. PMID:25636848

  10. Development of a protocol for predicting bacterial resistance to microbicides.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Laura; Amézquita, Alejandro; McClure, Peter; Stewart, Sara; Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2015-04-01

    Regulations dealing with microbicides in Europe and the United States are evolving and now require data on the risk of the development of resistance in organisms targeted by microbicidal products. There is no standard protocol to assess the risk of the development of resistance to microbicidal formulations. This study aimed to validate the use of changes in microbicide and antibiotic susceptibility as initial markers for predicting microbicide resistance and cross-resistance to antibiotics. Three industrial isolates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains (SL1344 and 14028S) were exposed to a shampoo, a mouthwash, eye makeup remover, and the microbicides contained within these formulations (chlorhexidine digluconate [CHG] and benzalkonium chloride [BZC]) under realistic, in-use conditions. Baseline and postexposure data were compared. No significant increases in the MIC or the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were observed for any strain after exposure to the three formulations. Increases as high as 100-fold in the MICs and MBCs of CHG and BZC for SL1344 and 14028S were observed but were unstable. Changes in antibiotic susceptibility were not clinically significant. The use of MICs and MBCs combined with antibiotic susceptibility profiling and stability testing generated reproducible data that allowed for an initial prediction of the development of resistance to microbicides. These approaches measure characteristics that are directly relevant to the concern over resistance and cross-resistance development following the use of microbicides. These are low-cost, high-throughput techniques, allowing manufacturers to provide to regulatory bodies, promptly and efficiently, data supporting an early assessment of the risk of resistance development. PMID:25636848

  11. How Fitness Reduced, Antimicrobial Resistant Bacteria Survive and Spread: A Multiple Pig - Multiple Bacterial Strain Model

    PubMed Central

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2014-01-01

    More than 30% of E. coli strains sampled from pig farms in Denmark over the last five years were resistant to the commonly used antimicrobial tetracycline. This raises a number of questions: How is this high level sustained if resistant bacteria have reduced growth rates? Given that there are multiple susceptible and resistant bacterial strains in the pig intestines, how can we describe their coexistence? To what extent does the composition of these multiple strains in individual pigs influence the total bacterial population of the pig pen? What happens to a complex population when antimicrobials are used? To investigate these questions, we created a model where multiple strains of bacteria coexist in the intestines of pigs sharing a pen, and explored the parameter limits of a stable system; both with and without an antimicrobial treatment. The approach taken is a deterministic bacterial population model with stochastic elements of bacterial distributions and transmission. The rates that govern the model are process-oriented to represent growth, excretion, and uptake from environment, independent of herd and meta-population structures. Furthermore, an entry barrier and elimination process for the individual strains in each pig were implemented. We demonstrate how competitive growth between multiple bacterial strains in individual pigs, and the transmission between pigs in a pen allow for strains of antimicrobial resistant bacteria to persist in a pig population to different extents, and how quickly they can become dominant if antimicrobial treatment is initiated. The level of spread depends in a non-linear way of the parameters that govern excretion and uptake. Furthermore, the sampling of initial distributions of strains and stochastic transmission events give rise to large variation in how homogenous and how resistant the bacterial population becomes. Most important: resistant bacteria are demonstrated to survive with a disadvantage in growth rate of well over 10

  12. Wear and corrosion resistance of anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings on titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo; Zhang, Xiangyu; He, Xiaojing; Li, Meng; Huang, Xiaobo; Hang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Anti-bacterial coatings with excellent wear and corrosion resistance play a vital role in ensuring the durability of implant materials in constant use. To this end, a novel anti-bacterial surface modification by combining magnetron sputtering with plasma nitriding was adopted in this paper to fabricate Cu-bearing Ti-based nitrides coatings (Ti-Cu-N) on titanium surface. The anti-bacterial properties of Ti-Cu-N coatings were evaluated. The microstructures and composition of the coatings were investigated by using FESEM, EDS, GDOES, XRD. The wear and corrosion resistance of the coatings were investigated. The results confirmed that an anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coating with a thickness of 6 μm and good adhesive strength to substrate was successfully achieved on titanium surface. As implied by XRD, the coatings were consisted of TiN, Ti2N, TiN0.3 phases. The surface micro-hardness and wear resistance of Ti-Cu-N coatings were significantly enhanced after plasma nitriding treatment. The analysis of potentiodynamic polarization curves and Nyquist plots obtained in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution suggested that the Ti-Cu-N coatings also exhibited an excellent corrosion resistance. As mentioned above, it can be concluded that the duplex-treatment reported here was a versatile approach to develop anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings with excellent comprehensive properties on titanium implants.

  13. Trends in bacterial resistance in a tertiary university hospital over one decade.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Fernando Góngora; Oliveira, Viviane Decicera Colombo; Rangel, Regina Mara Custódio; Nogueira, Mara Corrêa Lelles; Almeida, Margarete Teresa Gottardo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate bacterial resistance trends, infection sites and the relationship between resistance and admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU). A total of 53,316 bacteria identified between 1999 and 2008 were evaluated. Multidrug resistance was characterized when gram-negative bacilli (GNB) presented resistance to two or more classes of antibiotics. Gram-positive cocci (CPC) were assessed for resistance to penicillin, oxacillin and vancomycin. GNB were the most common (66.1%) isolate. There was a 3.7-fold overall increase in multidrug resistant GNB over the study period; Acinetobacter baumanii and Staphylococcus aureus were the most prevalent. Highest increases were recorded for Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.6-fold) and enterococci (73-fold). The resistance rates for GNB and GPC were 36% and 51.7%, respectively. Most multidrug resistant GNB and GPC were recovered from ICU patients (p-value<0.001). Vancomycin-resistant enterococci were isolated during this decade with an increase of 18.7% by 2008. These data confirm the worldwide trend in multidrug bacterial resistance. PMID:23797009

  14. Role of old antibiotics in multidrug resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Maviglia, R; Nestorini, R; Pennisi, M

    2009-09-01

    Multidrug resistant bacteria infections are associated with an increase in attributable mortality and morbidity in ICU patients. Unfortunately, an emerging resistance to novel antibiotics used in the therapy of gram negative and gram positive bacteria infections is often reported in literature. Old antibiotics have been reintroduced in clinical practice. In this review we report the efficacy and safety use of older antimicrobial agents in critically ill patients. Polymyxins are used for nosocomial infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii resistant strains. Patients with polymyxin-only susceptible gram-negative nosocomial pneumonia are reported to be successfully treated with inhaled colistin. Isepamicin can probably be used in intensive care units that harbor Gram-negative bacteria resistant to other aminoglycosides. Fosfomycin may be a useful alternative to linezolid and quinupristin-dalfopristin in the treatment of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) infections in certain clinical situations, e.g. uncomplicated urinary tract infections. Chloramphenicol has a wide antimicrobial spectrum and excellent tissue penetration; though it is sometimes used empirically in the hospital setting for the treatment of patients with unknown source of fever, its role is still a matter of controversy. The colistin/rifampicin combination might have a synergistic effect in Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. Fusidic acid is active against staphylococcal strains. PMID:19799544

  15. Antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacterial infections in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Perez, Federico; Adachi, Javier; Bonomo, Robert A

    2014-11-15

    Patients with cancer are at high risk for infections caused by antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacteria. In this review, we summarize trends among the major pathogens and clinical syndromes associated with antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacterial infection in patients with malignancy, with special attention to carbapenem and expanded-spectrum β-lactam resistance in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia--all major threats to our cancer patients. Optimal therapy for these antibiotic-resistant pathogens still remains to be determined. PMID:25352627

  16. Antibiotic-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections in Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Federico; Adachi, Javier; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cancer are at high risk for infections caused by antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacteria. In this review, we summarize trends among the major pathogens and clinical syndromes associated with antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacterial infection in patients with malignancy, with special attention to carbapenem and expanded-spectrum β-lactam resistance in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia—all major threats to our cancer patients. Optimal therapy for these antibiotic-resistant pathogens still remains to be determined. PMID:25352627

  17. Pyramiding B genes in cotton achieves broader but not always higher resistance to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Essenberg, Margaret; Bayles, Melanie B; Pierce, Margaret L; Verhalen, Laval M

    2014-10-01

    Near-isogenic lines of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) carrying single, race-specific genes B4, BIn, and b7 for resistance to bacterial blight were used to develop a pyramid of lines with all possible combinations of two and three genes to learn whether the pyramid could achieve broad and high resistance approaching that of L. A. Brinkerhoff's exceptional line Im216. Isogenic strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum carrying single avirulence (avr) genes were used to identify plants carrying specific resistance (B) genes. Under field conditions in north-central Oklahoma, pyramid lines exhibited broader resistance to individual races and, consequently, higher resistance to a race mixture. It was predicted that lines carrying two or three B genes would also exhibit higher resistance to race 1, which possesses many avr genes. Although some enhancements were observed, they did not approach the level of resistance of Im216. In a growth chamber, bacterial populations attained by race 1 in and on leaves of the pyramid lines decreased significantly with increasing number of B genes in only one of four experiments. The older lines, Im216 and AcHR, exhibited considerably lower bacterial populations than any of the one-, two-, or three-B-gene lines. A spreading collapse of spray-inoculated AcBIn and AcBInb7 leaves appears to be a defense response (conditioned by BIn) that is out of control. PMID:24655289

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence: a Successful or Deleterious Association in the Bacterial World?

    PubMed Central

    Beceiro, Alejandro; Tomás, María

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts and bacteria have coevolved over millions of years, during which pathogenic bacteria have modified their virulence mechanisms to adapt to host defense systems. Although the spread of pathogens has been hindered by the discovery and widespread use of antimicrobial agents, antimicrobial resistance has increased globally. The emergence of resistant bacteria has accelerated in recent years, mainly as a result of increased selective pressure. However, although antimicrobial resistance and bacterial virulence have developed on different timescales, they share some common characteristics. This review considers how bacterial virulence and fitness are affected by antibiotic resistance and also how the relationship between virulence and resistance is affected by different genetic mechanisms (e.g., coselection and compensatory mutations) and by the most prevalent global responses. The interplay between these factors and the associated biological costs depend on four main factors: the bacterial species involved, virulence and resistance mechanisms, the ecological niche, and the host. The development of new strategies involving new antimicrobials or nonantimicrobial compounds and of novel diagnostic methods that focus on high-risk clones and rapid tests to detect virulence markers may help to resolve the increasing problem of the association between virulence and resistance, which is becoming more beneficial for pathogenic bacteria. PMID:23554414

  19. PREVALENCE OF BACTERIAL RESISTANCE IN HOSPITALIZED CIRRHOTIC PATIENTS IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL: A NEW CHALLENGE

    PubMed Central

    COSTABEBER, Ane Micheli; de MATTOS, Angelo Alves; SUKIENNIK, Teresa Cristina Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: An increased frequency of infections by multiresistant bacteria has been described in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial resistance profile in cirrhotic patients. Methods: This is a retrospective observational study. We assessed the antimicrobial susceptibility of 5,839 bacterial isolates from patients with and without cirrhosis. Regarding the multidrug resistance, we evaluated 4,505 bacterial isolates from 2,180 patients. Results: Two hundred and fifty-one patients had cirrhosis (mean age 57.6 ± 11 years; 61.8% were male, 47.8% of cases associated with hepatitis C virus). Of the isolates of patients with and without cirrhosis, 174/464 (37.5%) and 1,783/4,041 (44.1%) were multiresistant, respectively (p = 0.007). E. coli was the most common multiresistant bacteria in both groups. Approximately 20% of E. coli and Klebsiella sp. isolates were ESBL-producers and 44% of S. aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant in cirrhotic patients. In cirrhotic patients admitted to the emergency department, hospital ward, and intensive care unit, 28.3%, 50% and 40% had multiresistant isolates, respectively. In patients with and without cirrhosis, 36.2% and 33.5% of isolates were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, respectively. Conclusions: The empirical treatment of infections in hospitalized patients using broad-spectrum antibiotics should consider the observed pattern of bacterial resistance. PMID:27253738

  20. Interferon in resistance to bacterial and protozoan infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Gould, Cheryl L.; Kierszenbaum, Felipe; Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of genetic differences in mouse strains on the modulation of protozoan infections by interferon (IFN) were investigated. In one set of experiments, three different strains of mice were injected with T. cruzi, and their sera were assayed at five time intervals for IFN titer. A greater quantity of IFN was produced by mouse strains that were susceptible to T. cruzi infection than by the more resistant strain. In another set of experiments, spleen cell cultures from inbred strains of mice were challenged with an antigen made from T.b. rhodesiense. The cells from mice resistant to infection, produced greater amounts of IFN-gamma than did cells from the susceptible mice. In a third set of experiments, it was found that mice injected with T.b. rhodesiense before being infected with a diabetogenic virus (EMC-D) were resistant to the effects of the virus and did not produce virus-specific antibody.

  1. Examination of Bacterial Resistance to Exogenous Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Privett, Benjamin J.; Broadnax, Angela D.; Bauman, Susanne J.; Riccio, Daniel A.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    While much research has been directed to harnessing the antimicrobial properties of exogenous NO, the possibility of bacteria developing resistance to such therapy has not been thoroughly studied. Herein, we evaluate potential NO resistance using spontaneous and serial passage mutagenesis assays. Specifically, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were systematically exposed to NO-releasing 75mol% MPTMS-TEOS nitrosothiol particles at or below minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels. In the spontaneous mutagenesis assay, bacteria that survived exposure to lethal concentrations of NO showed no increase in MIC. Similarly, no increase in MIC was observed in the serial passage mutagenesis assay after exposure of these species to sub-inhibitory concentrations of NO through 20 d. PMID:22349019

  2. Nanobiotechnological Approaches Against Multidrug Resistant Bacterial Pathogens: An Update.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Shakil, Shazi; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Rizvi, Syed Mohd Danish; Roberts, Philip Michael; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Multiple drug resistant bacteria remain the greatest challenge in public health care. Globally, infections produced by such resistant strains are on the rise. Recent advent of genetic tolerance to antibiotics in many pathogens such as multiple drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a matter of concern, prompting researchers and pharmaceutical companies to search for new molecules and unconventional antibacterial agents. Recent advances in nanotechnology offer new opportunities to develop formulations based on metallic nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes and variable antimicrobial properties. This article is an extensive literature review that covers the latest approaches in the development of new and unconventional antibacterial agents using nanobiotechnological approaches which will better equip scientists and clinicians to face the challenges in view of dwindling stocks of effective and potent antimicrobial agents and formulations. PMID:26419545

  3. Induced Bacterial Cross-Resistance toward Host Antimicrobial Peptides: A Worrying Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Fleitas, Osmel; Franco, Octávio L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has reached alarming levels, threatening to return to the pre-antibiotic era. Therefore, the search for new antimicrobial compounds that overcome the resistance phenomenon has become a priority. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear as one of the most promising antibiotic medicines. However, in recent years several AMP-resistance mechanisms have been described. Moreover, the AMP-resistance phenomenon has become more complex due to its association with cross-resistance toward AMP effectors of the host innate immune system. In this context, the use of AMPs as a therapeutic option could be potentially hazardous, since bacteria could develop resistance toward our innate immune system. Here, we review the findings of major studies that deal with the AMP cross-resistance phenomenon. PMID:27047486

  4. 1997 Performance Testing of Multi-Metal Continuous Emissions Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sky +, Inc.

    1998-09-01

    Five prototype and two commercially available multi-metals continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) were tested in September 1997 at the Rotary Kiln Incinerator Simulator facility at the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The seven CEMs were tested side by side in a long section of duct following the secondary combustion chamber of the RKIS. Two different concentrations of six toxic metals were introduced into the incinerator-approximately 15 and 75 µg/dscm of arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury (We also tested for antimony but we are not reporting on it here because EPA recently dropped antimony from the list of metals addressed by the draft MACT rule). These concentrations were chosen to be close to emission standards in the draft MACT rule and the estimated Method Detection Limit (MDL) required of a CEM for regulatory compliance purposes. Results from this test show that no CEMs currently meet the performance specifications in the EPA draft MACT rule for hazardous waste incinerators. Only one of the CEMs tested was able to measure all six metals at the concentrations tested. Even so, the relative accuracy of this CEM varied between 35% and 100%, not 20% or less as required in the EPA performance specification. As a result, we conclude that no CEM is ready for long-term performance validation for compliance monitoring applications. Because sampling and measuring Hg is a recurring problem for multi-metal CEMs as well as Hg CEMs, we recommended that developers participate in a 1998 DOE-sponsored workshop to solve these and other common CEM measurement issues.

  5. Towards an understanding of the genetics of bacterial metal resistance.

    PubMed

    Mergeay, M

    1991-01-01

    Many bacteria show great promise for use in metal recovery. However, the genetics of metal-leaching, accumulation-resistance, and oxidation/reduction mechanisms of these bacteria is still an area of research in its infancy. The introduction of such genes into bacteria of economic importance would have application in biomining and environmental bioremediation. PMID:1366923

  6. Antibiotic resistant bacterial profiles of anaerobic swine lagoon effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although land application of swine manure lagoon effluent is a common and effective method of disposal, the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal can complicate already understood issues associated with its safe disposal. To better understand this, more data is ne...

  7. Antibiotic Resistant Bacterial Profiles of Anaerobic Swine Lagoon Effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although land application of swine manure lagoon effluent is a common and effective method of disposal, the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal can complicate already understood issues associated with its safe disposal. The aim of this study was to assess antibi...

  8. Serpentine bacteria influence metal translocation and bioconcentration of Brassica juncea and Ricinus communis grown in multi-metal polluted soils

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying; Rajkumar, Mani; Rocha, Inês; Oliveira, Rui S.; Freitas, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of inoculation of rhizosphere or endophytic bacteria (Psychrobacter sp. SRS8 and Pseudomonas sp. A3R3, respectively) isolated from a serpentine environment on the plant growth and the translocation and accumulation of Ni, Zn, and Fe by Brassica juncea and Ricinus communis on a multi-metal polluted serpentine soil (SS). Field collected SS was diluted to 0, 25, 50, and 75% with pristine soil in order to obtain a range of heavy metal concentrations and used in microcosm experiments. Regardless of inoculation with bacteria, the biomass of both plant species decreased with increase of the proportion of SS. Inoculation of plants with bacteria significantly increased the plant biomass and the heavy metal accumulation compared with non-inoculated control in the presence of different proportion of SS, which was attributed to the production of plant growth promoting and/or metal mobilizing metabolites by bacteria. However, SRS8 showed a maximum increase in the biomass of the test plants grown even in the treatment of 75% SS. In turn, A3R3 showed maximum effects on the accumulation of heavy metals in both plants. Regardless of inoculation of bacteria and proportion of SS, both plant species exhibited low values of bioconcentration factor (<1) for Ni and Fe. The inoculation of both bacterial strains significantly increased the translocation factor (TF) of Ni while decreasing the TF of Zn in both plant species. Besides this contrasting effect, the TFs of all metals were <1, indicating that all studied bacteria–plant combinations are suitable for phytostabilization. This study demonstrates that the bacterial isolates A3R3 and SRS8 improved the growth of B. juncea and R. communis in SS soils and have a great potential to be used as inoculants in phytostabilization scenarios of multi-metal contaminated soils. PMID:25601876

  9. Development and spread of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tenover, F C

    2001-09-15

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is emerging in a wide variety of nosocomial and community-acquired pathogens. The emergence and spread of multiply resistant organisms represent the convergence of a variety of factors that include mutations in common resistance genes that extend their spectrum of activity, the exchange of genetic information among microorganisms, the evolution of selective pressures in hospitals and communities that facilitate the development and spread of resistant organisms, the proliferation and spread of multiply resistant clones of bacteria, and the inability of some laboratory testing methods to detect emerging resistance phenotypes. Twenty years ago, bacteria that were resistant to antimicrobial agents were easy to detect in the laboratory because the concentration of drug required to inhibit their growth was usually quite high and distinctly different from that of susceptible strains. Newer mechanisms of resistance, however, often result in much more subtle shifts in bacterial population distributions. Perhaps the most difficult phenotypes to detect, as shown in several proficiency testing surveys, are decreased susceptibility to beta-lactams in pneumococci and decreased susceptibility to vancomycin in staphylococci. In summary, emerging resistance has required adaptations and modifications of laboratory diagnostic techniques, empiric anti-infective therapy for such diseases as bacterial meningitis, and infection control measures in health care facilities of all kinds. Judicious use is imperative if we are to preserve our arsenal of antimicrobial agents into the next decade. PMID:11524705

  10. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping for Bacterial Blight Resistance in Rice Using Bulked Segregant Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xueying; Yang, Yong; Wang, Xuming; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Wenhao; Yu, Chulang; Cheng, Chen; Cheng, Ye; Yan, Chengqi; Chen, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Oryza meyeriana is highly resistant to rice bacterial blight (BB) and this resistance trait has been transferred to cultivated rice (O. sativa) using asymmetric somatic hybridization. However, no resistance genes have yet been cloned. In the present study, a progeny of the somatic hybridization with high BB resistance was crossed with a rice cultivar with high BB susceptibility to develop an F2 population. Using bulked segregant analysis (BSA), 17 polymorphic markers that were linked to rice BB resistance were obtained through scanning a total of 186 simple sequence repeats (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers, evenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. A genetic linkage map was then constructed based on the 17 linkage markers and the F2 segregating population, which was followed by mapping for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for BB resistance. Three QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5, respectively, and the alleles of the resistant parent at any of the QTLs increased BB resistance. All of the three QTLs had a strong effect on resistance, explaining about 21.5%, 12.3% and 39.2% of the resistance variance, respectively. These QTLs were different from the loci of the BB resistance genes that have been identified in previous studies. The QTLs mapped in this work will facilitate the isolation of novel BB resistance genes and their utilization in rice resistance breeding. PMID:24995697

  11. Performance testing of multi-metal continuous emissions monitors. Appendix Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, W.J. Jr.; French, N.B.; Brown, C.H.; Burns, D.B.; Lemieux, P.M.; Ryan, J.V.; Priebe, S.J.; Waterland, L.R.

    1997-11-17

    This report contains appendices to the study of three prototype multi-metal continuous emission monitors (CEMs). The appendices are: Final report of the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analytical Laboratory (DIAL) CEM developer team; Final report of Navy/Thermo Jarrell Ash Corp. CEM developer team; Final report of Sandia National Laboratories CEM developer team; Developer team comments; and Performance specification 10 -- Specifications and test procedures for multi-metals continuous monitoring systems in stationary sources.

  12. Insights into the amplification of bacterial resistance to erythromycin in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are significant reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance. However, little is known about wastewater treatment effects on the variation of antibiotic resistance. The shifts of bacterial resistance to erythromycin, a macrolide widely used in human medicine, on a lab-scale activated sludge system fed with real wastewater was investigated from levels of bacteria, community and genes, in this study. The resistance variation of total heterotrophic bacteria was studied during the biological treatment process, based on culture dependent method. The alterations of bacterial community resistant to erythromycin and nine typical erythromycin resistance genes were explored with molecular approaches, including high-throughput sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that the total heterotrophs tolerance level to erythromycin concentrations (higher than 32 mg/L) was significantly amplified during the activated sludge treatment, with the prevalence increased from 9.6% to 21.8%. High-throughput sequencing results demonstrated an obvious increase of the total heterotrophic bacterial diversity resistant to erythromycin. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the two dominant phyla in the influent and effluent of the bioreactor. However, the prevalence of Proteobacteria decreased from 76% to 59% while the total phyla number increased greatly from 18 to 29 through activated sludge treatment. The gene proportions of erm(A), mef(E) and erm(D) were greatly amplified after biological treatment. It is proposed that the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes through the variable mixtures of bacteria in the activated sludge might be the reason for the antibiotic resistance amplification. The amplified risk of antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment needs to be paid more attention. PMID:25957255

  13. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-10-15

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection. PMID:25059827

  14. Resistance of Aerosolized Bacterial Viruses to Relative Humidity and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Daniel; Marcoux-Voiselle, Mélissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2015-10-01

    The use of aerosolized bacteriophages as surrogates for hazardous viruses might simplify and accelerate the discovery of links between viral components and their persistence in the airborne state under diverse environmental conditions. In this study, four structurally distinct lytic phages, MS2 (single-stranded RNA [ssRNA]), ϕ6 (double-stranded RNA [dsRNA]), ϕX174 (single-stranded DNA [ssDNA]), and PR772 (double-stranded DNA [dsDNA]), were nebulized into a rotating chamber and exposed to various levels of relative humidity (RH) and temperature as well as to germicidal UV radiation. The aerosolized viral particles were allowed to remain airborne for up to 14 h before being sampled for analysis by plaque assays and quantitative PCRs. Phages ϕ6 and MS2 were the most resistant at low levels of relative humidity, while ϕX174 was more resistant at 80% RH. Phage ϕ6 lost its infectivity immediately after exposure to 30°C and 80% RH. The infectivity of all tested phages rapidly declined as a function of the exposure time to UVC radiation, phage MS2 being the most resistant. Taken altogether, our data indicate that these aerosolized phages behave differently under various environmental conditions and highlight the necessity of carefully selecting viral simulants in bioaerosol studies. PMID:26253683

  15. Resistance of Aerosolized Bacterial Viruses to Relative Humidity and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Daniel; Marcoux-Voiselle, Mélissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Moineau, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The use of aerosolized bacteriophages as surrogates for hazardous viruses might simplify and accelerate the discovery of links between viral components and their persistence in the airborne state under diverse environmental conditions. In this study, four structurally distinct lytic phages, MS2 (single-stranded RNA [ssRNA]), ϕ6 (double-stranded RNA [dsRNA]), ϕX174 (single-stranded DNA [ssDNA]), and PR772 (double-stranded DNA [dsDNA]), were nebulized into a rotating chamber and exposed to various levels of relative humidity (RH) and temperature as well as to germicidal UV radiation. The aerosolized viral particles were allowed to remain airborne for up to 14 h before being sampled for analysis by plaque assays and quantitative PCRs. Phages ϕ6 and MS2 were the most resistant at low levels of relative humidity, while ϕX174 was more resistant at 80% RH. Phage ϕ6 lost its infectivity immediately after exposure to 30°C and 80% RH. The infectivity of all tested phages rapidly declined as a function of the exposure time to UVC radiation, phage MS2 being the most resistant. Taken altogether, our data indicate that these aerosolized phages behave differently under various environmental conditions and highlight the necessity of carefully selecting viral simulants in bioaerosol studies. PMID:26253683

  16. Development of candidate gene markers associated to common bacterial blight resistance in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap), is a major yield-limiting factor of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production around the world. Two major CBB-resistant quantitative trait loci (QTL), linked to the sequence characterized amplified region marker...

  17. Antibiotic exposure can induce various bacterial virulence phenotypes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is one of the most prevalent bacterial foodborne diseases in the United States and causes an estimated 1 million human cases every year. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella has emerged as a public health issue as it has been associated with increased morbidity in humans and mortality in...

  18. Response to selection for bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A family-based selection program was initiated at the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture in 2005 to improve resistance to bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) in rainbow trout. The objective of this study was to estimate response to 2 generations of selection. A total of 14,841 juven...

  19. RELEASE OF COMMON BACTERIAL BLIGHT RESISTANT WHITE KIDNEY BEAN GERMPLASM LINE USWK-CBB-17

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station announce the release of USWK-CBB-17 white kidney (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm line with a high level of resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. ph...

  20. Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Donor-Derived Infections in Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jessica D; Sifri, Costi D

    2016-06-01

    Although rare, donor-derived infections (DDIs) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria can have devastating consequences for organ transplant recipients. Recognition of MDR bacterial DDIs can be challenging, as MDR bacteria are prevalent in most hospitals and distinguishing their transmission through transplantation from other, more typical routes of acquisition are difficult. New technologies such as whole genome sequencing have recently proven to be a powerful advance in the investigation of MDR bacterial DDIs. Once recognized, the optimal treatment of MDR bacterial DDIs is not clear. Herein, we review the clinical manifestations, outcomes, and management of MDR bacterial DDIs, and identify areas of uncertainty toward which the transplant community should direct further research efforts. PMID:27115701

  1. Amino Acid-Based Zwitterionic Polymer Surfaces Highly Resist Long-Term Bacterial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingsheng; Li, Wenchen; Wang, Hua; Newby, Bi-Min Zhang; Cheng, Fang; Liu, Lingyun

    2016-08-01

    The surfaces or coatings that can effectively suppress bacterial adhesion in the long term are of critical importance for biomedical applications. Herein, a group of amino acid-based zwitterionic polymers (pAAZ) were investigated for their long-term resistance to bacterial adhesion. The polymers were derived from natural amino acids including serine, ornithine, lysine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The pAAZ brushes were grafted on gold via the surface-initiated photoiniferter-mediated polymerization (SI-PIMP). Results show that the pAAZ coatings highly suppressed adsorption from the undiluted human serum and plasma. Long-term bacterial adhesion on these surfaces was investigated, using two kinds of representative bacteria [Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa] as the model species. Results demonstrate that the pAAZ surfaces were highly resistant to bacterial adhesion after culturing for 1, 5, 9, or even 14 days, representing at least 95% reduction at all time points compared to the control unmodified surfaces. The bacterial accumulation on the pAAZ surfaces after 9 or 14 days was even lower than on the surfaces grafted with poly[poly(ethyl glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] (pPEGMA), one of the most common antifouling materials known to date. The pAAZ brushes also exhibited excellent structural stability in phosphate-buffered saline after incubation for 4 weeks. The bacterial resistance and stability of pAAZ polymers suggest they have good potential to be used for those applications where long-term suppression to bacterial attachment is desired. PMID:27397718

  2. Bacterial resistance evolution by recruitment of super-integron gene cassettes.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Magnus, Dean A; Guerout, Anne-Marie; Mazel, Didier

    2002-03-01

    The capture and spread of antibiotic resistance determinants by integrons underlies the rapid evolution of multiple antibiotic resistance among diverse Gram-negative clinical isolates. The association of multiple resistance integrons (MRIs) with mobile DNA elements facilitates their transit across phylogenetic boundaries and augments the potential impact of integrons on bacterial evolution. Recently, ancestral chromosomal versions, the super-integrons (SIs), were found to be genuine components of the genomes of diverse bacterial species. SIs possess evolutionary characteristics and stockpiles of adaptive functions, including cassettes related to antibiotic resistance determinants previously characterized in clinical isolates, which suggest that MRIs and their resistance genes were originally recruited from SIs and their pool of amassed genes. However, the recombination activity of integrons has never been demonstrated in a bacterium other than Escherichia coli. We introduced a naturally occurring MRI (TpR, SulR) on a conjugative plasmid into Vibrio cholerae, a species known to harbour a SI. We show that MRIs can randomly recruit genes directly from the cache of SI cassettes. By applying a selective constraint for the development of antibiotic resistance, we demonstrate bacterial resistance evolution through the recruitment a novel, but phenotypically silent, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene from the V. cholerae SI and its precise insertion into the MRI. The resulting resistance profile (CmR, TpR, SulR) could then be disseminated by conjugation to other clinically relevant pathogens at high frequency. These results demonstrate that otherwise phenotypically sensitive strains may still be a genetic source for the evolution of resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics through integron-mediated recombination events. PMID:11952913

  3. High-level expression of the bacterial opd gene in Drosophila melanogaster: improved inducible insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Benedict, M Q; Scott, J A; Cockburn, A F

    1994-11-01

    The bacterial parathion hydrolase gene (opd) was expressed in transformed D. melanogaster under the control of an hsp70 promoter. Transformed lines carrying chimaeric genes designed for either cytoplasmic or secretory expression exhibited high- or low-level heat-shock-inducible transient resistance to paraoxon respectively. Greatest levels of resistance occurred approximately 12-16 h after heat shock and well after periods of maximal transcription. Insecticide resistance conferred by the cytoplasmic form of opd is expressed as a semidominant trait. PMID:7704308

  4. Heavy metals in liquid pig manure in light of bacterial antimicrobial resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzel, Christina S.; Mueller, Christa; Harms, Katrin S.; Mikolajewski, Sabine; Schaefer, Stefanie; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann

    2012-02-15

    Heavy metals are regularly found in liquid pig manure, and might interact with bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic spectroscopic methods in 305 pig manure samples and were connected to the phenotypic resistance of Escherichia coli (n=613) against 29 antimicrobial drugs. Concentrations of heavy metals (/kg dry matter) were 0.08-5.30 mg cadmium, 1.1-32.0 mg chrome, 22.4-3387.6 mg copper, <2.0-26.7 mg lead, <0.01-0.11 mg mercury, 3.1-97.3 mg nickel and 93.0-8239.0 mg zinc. Associated with the detection of copper and zinc, resistance rates against {beta}-lactams were significantly elevated. By contrast, the presence of mercury was significantly associated with low antimicrobial resistance rates of Escherichia coli against {beta}-lactams, aminoglycosides and other antibiotics. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of mercury on bacterial resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and doxycycline were also demonstrated in a laboratory trial. Antimicrobial resistance in the porcine microflora might be increased by copper and zinc. By contrast, the occurrence of mercury in the environment might, due to co-toxicity, act counter-selective against antimicrobial resistant strains.

  5. Antibiotic resistance among cultured bacterial isolates from bioethanol fermentation facilities across the United States.

    PubMed

    Murphree, Colin A; Heist, E Patrick; Moe, Luke A

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial contamination of fuel ethanol fermentations by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can have crippling effects on bioethanol production. Producers have had success controlling bacterial growth through prophylactic addition of antibiotics to fermentors, yet concerns have arisen about antibiotic resistance among the LAB. Here, we report on mechanisms used by 32 LAB isolates from eight different US bioethanol facilities to persist under conditions of antibiotic stress. Minimum inhibitory concentration assays with penicillin, erythromycin, and virginiamycin revealed broad resistance to each of the antibiotics as well as high levels of resistance to individual antibiotics. Phenotypic assays revealed that antibiotic inactivation mechanisms contributed to the high levels of individual resistances among the isolates, especially to erythromycin and virginiamycin, yet none of the isolates appeared to use a β-lactamase. Biofilm formation was noted among the majority of the isolates and may contribute to persistence under low levels of antibiotics. Nearly all of the isolates carried at least one canonical antibiotic resistance gene and many carried more than one. The erythromycin ribosomal methyltransferase (erm) gene class was found in 19 of 32 isolates, yet a number of these isolates exhibit little to no resistance to erythromycin. The erm genes were present in 15 isolates that encoded more than one antibiotic resistance mechanism, suggestive of potential genetic linkages. PMID:24748439

  6. Engineering serendipity: High-throughput discovery of materials that resist bacterial attachment☆

    PubMed Central

    Magennis, E.P.; Hook, A.L.; Davies, M.C.; Alexander, C.; Williams, P.; Alexander, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the colonisation of materials by microorganisms is important in a wide range of industries and clinical settings. To date, the underlying mechanisms that govern the interactions of bacteria with material surfaces remain poorly understood, limiting the ab initio design and engineering of biomaterials to control bacterial attachment. Combinatorial approaches involving high-throughput screening have emerged as key tools for identifying materials to control bacterial attachment. The hundreds of different materials assessed using these methods can be carried out with the aid of computational modelling. This approach can develop an understanding of the rules used to predict bacterial attachment to surfaces of non-toxic synthetic materials. Here we outline our view on the state of this field and the challenges and opportunities in this area for the coming years. Statement of significance This opinion article on high throughput screening methods reflects one aspect of how the field of biomaterials research has developed and progressed. The piece takes the reader through key developments in biomaterials discovery, particularly focusing on need to reduce bacterial colonisation of surfaces. Such bacterial resistant surfaces are increasingly required in this age of antibiotic resistance. The influence and origin of high-throughput methods are discussed with insights into the future of biomaterials development where computational methods may drive materials development into new fertile areas of discovery. New biomaterials will exhibit responsiveness to adapt to the biological environment and promote better integration and reduced rejection or infection. PMID:26577984

  7. Cultivable Bacterial Microbiota of Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus): A New Reservoir of Antimicrobial Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hongwen; McKelvey, Jessica; Rollins, Dale; Zhang, Michael; Brightsmith, Donald J.; Derr, James; Zhang, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    The northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) is an ecologically and economically important avian species. At the present time, little is known about the microbial communities associated with these birds. As the first step to create a quail microbiology knowledge base, the current study conducted an inventory of cultivable quail tracheal, crop, cecal, and cloacal microbiota and associated antimicrobial resistance using a combined bacteriology and DNA sequencing approach. A total of 414 morphologically unique bacterial colonies were selected from nonselective aerobic and anaerobic cultures, as well as selective and enrichment cultures. Analysis of the first 500-bp 16S rRNA gene sequences in conjunction with biochemical identifications revealed 190 non-redundant species-level taxonomic units, representing 160 known bacterial species and 30 novel species. The bacterial species were classified into 4 phyla, 14 orders, 37 families, and 59 or more genera. Firmicutes was the most commonly encountered phylum (57%) followed by Actinobacteria (24%), Proteobacteria (17%) and Bacteroidetes (0.02%). Extensive diversity in the species composition of quail microbiota was observed among individual birds and anatomical locations. Quail microbiota harbored several opportunistic pathogens, such as E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa, as well as human commensal organisms, including Neisseria species. Phenotypic characterization of selected bacterial species demonstrated a high prevalence of resistance to the following classes of antimicrobials: phenicol, macrolide, lincosamide, quinolone, and sulphate. Data from the current investigation warrant further investigation on the source, transmission, pathology, and control of antimicrobial resistance in wild quail populations. PMID:24937705

  8. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response.

    PubMed

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  9. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response

    PubMed Central

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  10. Breakthroughs in bacterial resistance mechanisms and the potential ways to combat them.

    PubMed

    Khameneh, Bahman; Diab, Roudayna; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Fazly Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh

    2016-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have increased at an alarming rate over recent decades and cause serious problems. The emergence of resistant infections caused by these bacteria has led to mortality and morbidity; consequently there is an urgent need to find solution for combating bacterial resistance. In the present paper, first, some mechanisms of antibiotic resistance such as changing the antibacterial agent's uptake and biofilm formation are discussed. Following, for removing the antibacterial resistance, a wide range of approaches like developing new generations of antibiotics, combination therapy, natural antibacterial substances and applying nanoparticulate systems have been explained. Among them, antibiotic delivery via nanoparticles, has been attracted more attention recently, so discussed in present review, separately. PMID:26911646

  11. Bottlenecks in the Transferability of Antibiotic Resistance from Natural Ecosystems to Human Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, José L.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally accepted that resistance genes acquired by human pathogens through horizontal gene transfer originated in environmental, non-pathogenic bacteria. As a consequence, there is increasing concern on the roles that natural, non-clinical ecosystems, may play in the evolution of resistance. Recent studies have shown that the variability of determinants that can provide antibiotic resistance on their expression in a heterologous host is much larger than what is actually found in human pathogens, which implies the existence of bottlenecks modulating the transfer, spread, and stability of antibiotic resistance genes. In this review, the role that different factors such as founder effects, ecological connectivity, fitness costs, or second-order selection may have on the establishment of a specific resistance determinant in a population of bacterial pathogens is analyzed. PMID:22319513

  12. Steroidal regulation of uterine resistance to bacterial infection in livestock

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gregory S

    2003-01-01

    Postpartum uterine infections reduce reproductive efficiency and have significant animal welfare and economic consequences. Postpartum uterine infections are classified as nonspecific, but Arcanobacterium pyogenes and Escherichia coli are usually associated with them in cattle and sheep. Pyometra is the most common type of uterine infection in dairy cattle, and it is detected almost exclusively in cows with active corpora lutea. Luteal progesterone typically down-regulates uterine immune functions and prevents the uterus from resisting infections. Progesterone also can down-regulate uterine eicosanoid synthesis. This seems to be a critical event in the onset of uterine infections, because eicosanoids can up-regulate immune cell functions in vitro. In addition, exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha stimulates uterine secretion of prostaglandin F2 alpha and enhances immune functions in vivo. Thus, one may hypothesize that eicosanoids can override the negative effects of progesterone and that the up-regulatory effects of exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha allow the uterus to resolve an infection, regardless of progesterone concentrations. Based on the results of studies to test that hypothesis, cows, sheep, and pigs in various physiological statuses are resistant to intrauterine infusions of Arcanobacterium pyogenes and Escherichia coli, unless progesterone concentrations are increased. In sheep and pigs, exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha stimulates uterine production of prostaglandin F2 alpha and allows the uterus to resolve Arcanobacterium pyogenes-Escherichia coli-induced infections, even when progesterone is maintained at luteal phase concentrations before and after treatment. Prostaglandin F2 alpha is a proinflammatory molecule that stimulates the production of various proinflammatory cytokines, and it may enhance uterine production of leukotriene B4. Proinflammatory cytokines and leukotriene B4 enhance phagocytosis and lymphocyte functions. Even though there are clear

  13. Peptide IDR-1018: modulating the immune system and targeting bacterial biofilms to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Sarah C; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-05-01

    Host defense (antimicrobial) peptides, produced by all complex organisms, typically contain an abundance of positively charged and hydrophobic amino acid residues. A small synthetic peptide termed innate defense regulator (IDR-)1018 was derived by substantial modification of the bovine neutrophil host defense peptide bactenecin. Here, we review its intriguing properties that include anti-infective, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, and anti-biofilm activities. It was initially developed as an immune modulator with an ability to selectively enhance chemokine production and polarize cellular differentiation while suppressing/balancing the pro-inflammatory response. In this regard, it has demonstrated in vivo activity in murine models including enhancement of wound healing and an ability to protect against Staphylococcus aureus, multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, herpes virus, and inflammatory disorders, including cerebral malaria and neuronal damage in a pre-term birth model. More recently, IDR-1018 was shown, in a broad-spectrum fashion, to selectively target bacterial biofilms, which are adaptively resistant to many antibiotics and represent the most common growth state of bacteria in human infections. Furthermore, IDR-1018 demonstrated synergy with conventional antibiotics to both prevent biofilm formation and treat pre-existing biofilms. These data are consistent with a strong potential as an adjunctive therapy against antibiotic-resistant infections. PMID:25358509

  14. Phenothiazinium antimicrobial photosensitizers are substrates of bacterial multidrug resistance pumps.

    PubMed

    Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) combines a nontoxic photoactivatable dye, or photosensitizer (PS), with harmless visible light to generate singlet oxygen and free radicals that kill microbial cells. Although the light can be focused on the diseased area, the best selectivity is achieved by choosing a PS that binds and penetrates microbial cells. Cationic phenothiazinium dyes, such as methylene blue and toluidine blue O, have been studied for many years and are the only PSs used clinically for antimicrobial PDT. Multidrug resistance pumps (MDRs) are membrane-localized proteins that pump drugs out of cells and have been identified for a wide range of organisms. We asked whether phenothiazinium salts with structures that are amphipathic cations could potentially be substrates of MDRs. We used MDR-deficient mutants of Staphylococcus aureus (NorA), Escherichia coli (TolC), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MexAB) and found 2 to 4 logs more killing than seen with wild-type strains by use of three different phenothiazinium PSs and red light. Mutants that overexpress MDRs were protected from killing compared to the wild type. Effective antimicrobial PSs of different chemical structures showed no difference in light-mediated killing depending on MDR phenotype. Differences in uptake of phenothiazinium PS by the cells depending on level of MDR expression were found. We propose that specific MDR inhibitors could be used in combination with phenothiazinium salts to enhance their photodestructive efficiency. PMID:16377686

  15. Results of the September 1997 DOE/EPA demonstration of multimetal continuous emission monitoring technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, P.M.; Ryan, J.V.; French, N.B.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Priebe, S.J.; Burns, D.B.

    1998-12-31

    In September 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) co-sponsored a demonstration of several multimetal continuous emission monitors (CEMs). The demonstration, performed at the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division`s combustion laboratory in Research Triangle Park, NC, involved the side-by-side testing of seven multimetal CEMs at various stages of commercialization. A series of tests were performed to compare results from the multimetal CEMs to Method 0060, the EPA reference method (RM) for metals emissions measurements, using the relative accuracy test audit (RATA) protocol. The EPA operated the test facility and performed the RM sampling, and each multimetal CEM was operated by the instrument`s respective developer. To accomplish these tests, an aqueous solution of six toxic metals (arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury), along with flyash from a coal-fired utility boiler, was injected into the afterburner of the EPAs rotary kiln incinerator simulator facility to generate a combustor flue gas with realistic post-flue gas cleaning system particulate loadings and target metals concentrations of approximately 15 and 75 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, which constituted the low and high concentration test conditions. The multimetal CEMs that participated in the test included two laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) systems, two inductively coupled plasma (ICP) systems, a spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy (SIBS) system, a hazardous element sampling train with X-ray fluorescence (HEST/XRF), and a microwave plasma system. Ten RM-CEM sample pairs were taken at both the low and high concentration test conditions, and the relative accuracies of the multimetal CEMs were calculated. This test provided performance data that will be used to assess the current state of the art in multimetal CEMs.

  16. No role for bacterially produced salicylic Acid in rhizobacterial induction of systemic resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ran, L X; van Loon, L C; Bakker, P A H M

    2005-11-01

    ABSTRACT The role of bacterially produced salicylic acid (SA) in the induction of systemic resistance in plants by rhizobacteria is far from clear. The strong SA producer Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r induces resistance in radish but not in Arabidopsis thaliana, whereas application of SA leads to induction of resistance in both plant species. In this study, we compared P. fluorescens WCS374r with three other SA-producing fluorescent Pseudomonas strains, P. fluorescens WCS417r and CHA0r, and P. aeruginosa 7NSK2 for their abilities to produce SA under different growth conditions and to induce systemic resistance in A. thaliana against bacterial speck, caused by P. syringae pv. tomato. All strains produced SA in vitro, varying from 5 fg cell(-1) for WCS417r to >25 fg cell(-1) for WCS374r. Addition of 200 muM FeCl(3) to standard succinate medium abolished SA production in all strains. Whereas the incubation temperature did not affect SA production by WCS417r and 7NSK2, strains WCS374r and CHA0r produced more SA when grown at 33 instead of 28 degrees C. WCS417r, CHA0r, and 7NSK2 induced systemic resistance apparently associated with their ability to produce SA, but WCS374r did not. Conversely, a mutant of 7NSK2 unable to produce SA still triggered induced systemic resistance (ISR). The possible involvement of SA in the induction of resistance was evaluated using SA-nonaccumulating transgenic NahG plants. Strains WCS417r, CHA0r, and 7NSK2 induced resistance in NahG Arabidopsis. Also, WCS374r, when grown at 33 or 36 degrees C, triggered ISR in these plants, but not in ethylene-insensitive ein2 or in non-plant pathogenesis- related protein-expressing npr1 mutant plants, irrespective of the growth temperature of the bacteria. These results demonstrate that, whereas WCS374r can be manipulated to trigger ISR in Arabidopsis, SA is not the primary determinant for the induction of systemic resistance against bacterial speck disease by this bacterium. Also, for the other

  17. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections: the emerging threat and potential novel treatment options.

    PubMed

    Vergidis, Paschalis I; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-02-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections constitute an emerging threat because of the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. There is a relative shortage of new drugs in the antimicrobial development pipeline that have been tested in vitro and evaluated in clinical studies. Antibiotics that are in the pipeline for the treatment of serious Gram-negative bacterial infections include the cephalosporins, ceftobiprole, ceftarolin and FR-264205. Tigecycline is the first drug approved from a new class of antibiotics called glycylcyclines, and there has been renewed interest in this drug for the treatment of some multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. Carbapenems in the pipeline include tomopenem, with the approved drugs doripenem and faropenem, an oral agent, under evaluation for activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections. Polymyxins are old antibiotics traditionally considered to be toxic, but which are being used because of their activity against resistant Gram-negative organisms. New pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data are available regarding the use of these agents. Finally, antimicrobial peptides and efflux pump inhibitors are two new classes of agents under development. This review of investigational antibiotics shows that several new agents will become available in the coming years, even though the pace of antimicrobial research is far from ideal. PMID:18246520

  18. Quaternary Ammonium Compounds: An Antimicrobial Mainstay and Platform for Innovation to Address Bacterial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Megan C; Minbiole, Kevin P C; Wuest, William M

    2015-07-10

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) have represented one of the most visible and effective classes of disinfectants for nearly a century. With simple preparation, wide structural variety, and versatile incorporation into consumer products, there have been manifold developments and applications of these structures. Generally operating via disruption of one of the most fundamental structures in bacteria-the cell membrane-leading to cell lysis and bacterial death, the QACs were once thought to be impervious to resistance. Developments over the past decades, however, have shown this to be far from the truth. It is now known that a large family of bacterial genes (generally termed qac genes) encode efflux pumps capable of expelling many QAC structures from bacterial cells, leading to a decrease in susceptibility to QACs; methods of regulation of qac transcription are also understood. Importantly, qac genes can be horizontally transferred via plasmids to other bacteria and are often transmitted alongside other antibiotic-resistant genes; this dual threat represents a significant danger to human health. In this review, both QAC development and QAC resistance are documented, and possible strategies for addressing and overcoming QAC-resistant bacteria are discussed. PMID:27622819

  19. Oscyp71Z2 involves diterpenoid phytoalexin biosynthesis that contributes to bacterial blight resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenqi; Shao, Min; Yang, Jie; Zhong, Weigong; Okada, Kazunori; Yamane, Hisakazu; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial blight is one of the most destructive rice diseases, which caused by Xoo, and results in yield losses, endangering worldwide food security. Diterpenoid phytoalexins, a type of antimicrobials produced in rice, are critical for resistance to fungal and bacterial pathogens. This article reports the characterization of the cytochrome P450 gene Oscyp71Z2, which belongs to the CYP71Z subfamily. Overexpression of Oscyp71Z2 in rice enhanced resistance to Xoo at the booting stage. The accumulation of phytoalexins was rapidly and strongly induced in Oscyp71Z2-overexpressing plants, and the transcript levels of genes related to the phytoalexin biosynthesis pathway were elevated. The H₂O₂ concentration in Oscyp71Z2-overexpressing plants was reduced in accordance with the increase in ROS-scavenging ability due to the induction of SOD as well as POD and CAT activation. We also showed that suppression of Oscyp71Z2 had no significantly effect on disease resistance to Xoo in rice. These results demonstrated that Oscyp71Z2 plays an important role in bacterial blight resistance by regulating the diterpenoid phytoalexin biosynthesis and H₂O₂ generation. PMID:23602104

  20. The prevalence of bacterial resistance in clinical, food, water and some environmental samples in Southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Lateef, A; Oloke, J K; Gueguimkana, E B

    2005-01-01

    The resistance pattern and mechanisms of bacterial isolates obtained from clinical origin, soil, industrial effluent, orange juice products and drinking water were studied using commonly used antibiotics. The microbial load of the water samples, industrial effluent and orange juice products were 1.0 x 10(1)-2.25 x 10(6), 2.15 x 10(5), and 3.5 x 10(4)-2.15 x 10(5) cfu mL(-1), respectively. The faecal coliform test revealed that only two out of twenty orange juice products had MPN of 2 and 20, the MPN of water ranged from 1-> or = 1800, while the effluent had MPN of > or = 1800. The bacterial isolates that were isolated include E. coli, S. aureus, P. vulgaris, S. marcescens, S. pyogenes, B. cereus, B. subtilis, Micrococcus sp., Klebsiella sp., P. aeruginosa, and Enterobacter sp. Also, clinical and soil isolates of P. aeruginosa were used in the study. Among the eight antibiotics tested for resistance on five strains of each bacterium, seven different resistance patterns were observed among the bacterial isolates obtained from water, effluent and orange juice products. Among the clinical and soil isolates of P. aeruginosa, four multiple-drug resistance patterns were obtained. Thirty strains of E. coli and S. aureus were tested for beta-lactamase production and fourteen strains, seven each of E. coli and S. aureus that had high Minimum Inhibitory Concentration values (MIC) for both Amoxycillin and Cloxacillin were positive. PMID:15727300

  1. A network-based approach for resistance transmission in bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Ronette; Schumm, Phillip; Youssef, Mina; Scoglio, Caterina

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements (conjugation) is an important mechanism whereby resistance is spread through bacterial populations. The aim of our work is to develop a mathematical model that quantitatively describes this process, and to use this model to optimize antimicrobial dosage regimens to minimize resistance development. The bacterial population is conceptualized as a compartmental mathematical model to describe changes in susceptible, resistant, and transconjugant bacteria over time. This model is combined with a compartmental pharmacokinetic model to explore the effect of different plasma drug concentration profiles. An agent-based simulation tool is used to account for resistance transfer occurring when two bacteria are adjacent or in close proximity. In addition, a non-linear programming optimal control problem is introduced to minimize bacterial populations as well as the drug dose. Simulation and optimization results suggest that the rapid death of susceptible individuals in the population is pivotal in minimizing the number of transconjugants in a population. This supports the use of potent antimicrobials that rapidly kill susceptible individuals and development of dosage regimens that maintain effective antimicrobial drug concentrations for as long as needed to kill off the susceptible population. Suggestions are made for experiments to test the hypotheses generated by these simulations. PMID:19747924

  2. Comparison of the Epidemiology of Bacterial Resistance to Mecillinam and Ampicillin

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. D.; Adams, Monica A.; Barrington, Jane C.; Spence, W. N.; Shepherd, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mecillinam is a new type of β-lactam antibiotic (an amidinopenicillanic acid) that is particularly active against Enterobacteriaceae and is taken orally as in the form of an ester, pivmecillinam. Assessment of any new antibiotic should include a survey of levels of bacterial resistance and investigation of its capacity to select resistant organisms or harm the commensal flora. Antibiotic resistance patterns of 2,000 Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the urine of patients with significant urinary tract infections were therefore determined. Mecillinam-resistant Enterobacteriaceae were found to be much less common than ampicillin-amoxycillin-resistant organisms both in the community and in hospital patients. Most ampicillin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from infected urines were susceptible to mecillinam, but the relatively rare mecillinam-resistant organisms were usually resistant to ampicillin and cephaloridine. The fecal flora of 26 healthy volunteers who served as controls or were given repeated courses of therapeutic doses of either ampicillin or pivmecillinam was studied. Pivmecillinam had only a transient effect on the aerobic fecal flora and in contrast to ampicillin did not increase populations of resistant Enterobacteriaceae, which would be a potential hazard to the patient and contaminate the environment. PMID:1051328

  3. Comparative Resistance of Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens to Non-thermal Technologies for Food Preservation.

    PubMed

    Cebrián, Guillermo; Mañas, Pilar; Condón, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens to manosonication (MS), pulsed electric fields (PEFs), high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), and UV-light (UV) is reviewed and compared. The influence of different factors on the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens to these technologies is also compared and discussed. Only results obtained under harmonized experimental conditions have been considered. This has allowed us to establish meaningful comparisons and draw significant conclusions. Among the six microorganisms here considered, Staphyloccocus aureus is the most resistant foodborne pathogen to MS and HHP and Listeria monocytogenes to UV. The target microorganism of PEF would change depending on the treatment medium pH. Thus, L. monocytogenes is the most PEF resistant microorganism at neutral pH but Gram-negatives (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Cronobacter sakazakii, Campylobacter jejuni) would display a similar or even higher resistance at acidic pH. It should be noted that, in acidic products, the baroresistance of some E. coli strains would be comparable to that of S. aureus. The factors affecting the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens, as well as the magnitude of the effect, varied depending on the technology considered. Inter- and intra-specific differences in microbial resistance to PEF and HHP are much greater than to MS and UV. Similarly, both the pH and aw of the treatment medium highly condition microbial resistance to PEF and HHP but no to MS or UV. Growth phase also drastically affected bacterial HHP resistance. Regarding UV, the optical properties of the medium are, by far, the most influential factor affecting its lethal efficacy. Finally, increasing treatment temperature leads to a significant increase in lethality of the four technologies, what opens the possibility of the development of combined processes including heat. The appearance of sublethally damaged cells following PEF and HHP treatments could also be

  4. Comparative Resistance of Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens to Non-thermal Technologies for Food Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Cebrián, Guillermo; Mañas, Pilar; Condón, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens to manosonication (MS), pulsed electric fields (PEFs), high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), and UV-light (UV) is reviewed and compared. The influence of different factors on the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens to these technologies is also compared and discussed. Only results obtained under harmonized experimental conditions have been considered. This has allowed us to establish meaningful comparisons and draw significant conclusions. Among the six microorganisms here considered, Staphyloccocus aureus is the most resistant foodborne pathogen to MS and HHP and Listeria monocytogenes to UV. The target microorganism of PEF would change depending on the treatment medium pH. Thus, L. monocytogenes is the most PEF resistant microorganism at neutral pH but Gram-negatives (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Cronobacter sakazakii, Campylobacter jejuni) would display a similar or even higher resistance at acidic pH. It should be noted that, in acidic products, the baroresistance of some E. coli strains would be comparable to that of S. aureus. The factors affecting the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens, as well as the magnitude of the effect, varied depending on the technology considered. Inter- and intra-specific differences in microbial resistance to PEF and HHP are much greater than to MS and UV. Similarly, both the pH and aw of the treatment medium highly condition microbial resistance to PEF and HHP but no to MS or UV. Growth phase also drastically affected bacterial HHP resistance. Regarding UV, the optical properties of the medium are, by far, the most influential factor affecting its lethal efficacy. Finally, increasing treatment temperature leads to a significant increase in lethality of the four technologies, what opens the possibility of the development of combined processes including heat. The appearance of sublethally damaged cells following PEF and HHP treatments could also be

  5. Epidemiology of urinary tract infections, bacterial species and resistances in primary care in France.

    PubMed

    Malmartel, A; Ghasarossian, C

    2016-03-01

    General practitioners often have to manage urinary tract infections (UTI) with probabilistic treatments, although bacterial resistances are increasing. Therefore, the French Society of Infectious Diseases published new guidelines in 2014. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial epidemiology of UTI in the general population in primary care and analyse risk factors for Escherichia coli resistance to antibiotics. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 ambulatory laboratories. Patients over 18 years of age coming for urinalysis were included. Risk factors for UTI were collected using a questionnaire and the laboratory records. Bacteria meeting criteria for UTI were analysed. A positive urinalysis was found in 1119 patients, corresponding to 1125 bacterial isolates. The bacterial species were: E. coli (73 %), Enterococcus spp. (7 %), Klebsiella spp. (6 %), Proteus spp. (4 %), Staphylococcus spp. (3 %) and Pseudomonas spp. (2 %). Regardless of the bacteria, the most common resistance was that to co-trimoxazole: 27 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] = [0.24; 0.30]), followed by ofloxacin resistance: 16 % [0.14; 0.18]. Escherichia coli resistances to co-trimoxazole, ofloxacin, cefixime, nitrofurantoin and fosfomycin were, respectively, 25.5 % [0.23; 0.28], 17 % [0.14; 0.20], 5.6 % [0.04; 0.07], 2.2 % [0.01; 0.03] and 1.2 % [0.005; 0.02]. Independent risk factors for E. coli resistance to ofloxacin were age over 85 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.08; [1.61; 5.87]) and a history of UTI in the last 6 months (OR = 2.34; [1.54; 3.52]). Our findings support the guidelines recommending fluoroquinolone sparing. The scarcity of E. coli resistance to fosfomycin justifies its use as a first-line treatment in acute cystitis. These results should be reassessed in a few years to identify changes in the bacterial epidemiology of UTI. PMID:26740324

  6. Evaluation of radiation resistance of the bacterial contaminants from femoral heads processed for allogeneic transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer

    2009-09-01

    Femoral heads excised during surgery were obtained from patients who had a fractured neck of the femur and were processed as bone allograft. The bacterial contaminants were isolated from femoral heads at different stages of processing and identified based on morphological characteristics and biochemical tests. Bacterial contaminants on bone were mainly Gram-positive bacilli and cocci (58.3%). Twenty-four isolates from bone samples were screened for resistance to radiation. The D10 values for Gram-negative bacteria isolated from femoral heads ranged from 0.17 to 0.65 kGy. Higher D10 values 0.56-1.04 kGy were observed for Gram-positive bacterial isolates.

  7. Identification of QTL associated with resistance to bacterial spot race T4 in tomato.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Samuel F; Scott, Jay W; Yang, Wencai; Sim, Sung-Chur; Francis, David M; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2010-11-01

    Bacterial spot of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), caused by several Xanthomonas sp., is a serious but difficult disease to control by chemical means. Development of resistance has been hindered by emergence of races virulent to tomato, by the quantitative inheritance of resistance, and by a low correlation between seedling assays and resistance in the field. Resistance to multiple races, including race T4, has been described in the S. lycopersicum var. cerasiformae accession PI 114490. We used molecular markers to identify associations with quantitative trait loci (QTL) in an elite inbred backcross (IBC) population derived from OH 9242, PI 114490 and Fla. 7600, a breeding line with tomato accession Hawaii 7998 (H7998) in its pedigree. Race T4 resistance has also been described in the advanced breeding lines Fla. 8233, Fla. 8517, and Fla. 8326, and a selective genotyping approach was used to identify introgressions associated with resistance in segregating progeny derived from crosses with these lines. In the IBC population, loci on chromosomes 11 and 3, respectively, explained as much as 29.4 and 4.8% of resistance variation. Both these loci were also confirmed by selective genotyping: PI 114490 and H7998 alleles on chromosome 11 each provided resistance. The PI 114490 allele on chromosome 3 was confirmed in the Fla. 8517 population, and an allele of undetermined descent was confirmed at this locus in the Fla. 8326 population. A chromosome 12 allele was associated with susceptibility in the Fla. 8517 population. Additional loci contributing minor effects were also implicated in the IBC population or by selective genotyping. Selection for the major QTL in a marker-directed phenotyping approach should significantly improve the efficiency of breeding for resistance to bacterial spot race T4, although as yet undetected QTL would be necessary to carry out strict marker assisted selection. PMID:20563547

  8. MinION nanopore sequencing identifies the position and structure of a bacterial antibiotic resistance island.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Philip M; Nair, Satheesh; Dallman, Tim; Rubino, Salvatore; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Wain, John; O'Grady, Justin

    2015-03-01

    Short-read, high-throughput sequencing technology cannot identify the chromosomal position of repetitive insertion sequences that typically flank horizontally acquired genes such as bacterial virulence genes and antibiotic resistance genes. The MinION nanopore sequencer can produce long sequencing reads on a device similar in size to a USB memory stick. Here we apply a MinION sequencer to resolve the structure and chromosomal insertion site of a composite antibiotic resistance island in Salmonella Typhi Haplotype 58. Nanopore sequencing data from a single 18-h run was used to create a scaffold for an assembly generated from short-read Illumina data. Our results demonstrate the potential of the MinION device in clinical laboratories to fully characterize the epidemic spread of bacterial pathogens. PMID:25485618

  9. Analysis of Bacterial Biofilms on a Cochlear Implant Following Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    An, Yun Suk; Choi, June; Song, Jae Jun; Chae, Sung Won; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate biofilm formations on a cochlear implant magnet of a pediatric patient suffering from a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. The appearance of biofilm colonies was analyzed on different magnet sections. The appearance of MRSA biofilms on the surface of an explanted cochlear implant was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focusing on the pattern of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) within the biofilms. SEM revealed unique biofilms with a three-dimensional EPS complex and tower-like formations. Biofilm configurations changed from the margin to the center of the magnet. Biofilms were solitary and scattered at the margin; large and plate-like in the center; and stacked in layers, forming towers and water channels, in the middle region. After a MRSA infection, biofilm formations were observed on the surface of a magnet. Bacterial biofilms provide optimal conditions for bacterial growth and antibiotic resistance and can cause intractable infections that lead to device failure. PMID:26771017

  10. Antibiotic discovery: combatting bacterial resistance in cells and in biofilm communities.

    PubMed

    Penesyan, Anahit; Gillings, Michael; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance is a rapidly escalating threat to public health as our arsenal of effective antibiotics dwindles. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics. Drug discovery has historically focused on bacteria growing in planktonic cultures. Many antibiotics were originally developed to target individual bacterial cells, being assessed in vitro against microorganisms in a planktonic mode of life. However, towards the end of the 20th century it became clear that many bacteria live as complex communities called biofilms in their natural habitat, and this includes habitats within a human host. The biofilm mode of life provides advantages to microorganisms, such as enhanced resistance towards environmental stresses, including antibiotic challenge. The community level resistance provided by biofilms is distinct from resistance mechanisms that operate at a cellular level, and cannot be overlooked in the development of novel strategies to combat infectious diseases. The review compares mechanisms of antibiotic resistance at cellular and community levels in the light of past and present antibiotic discovery efforts. Future perspectives on novel strategies for treatment of biofilm-related infectious diseases are explored. PMID:25812150

  11. Anthelmintic closantel enhances bacterial killing of polymyxin B against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thien B.; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Yu, Heidi H.; Bergen, Phillip J.; Nation, Roger L.; Creek, Darren J.; Purcell, Anthony; Forrest, Alan; Doi, Yohei; Song, Jiangning; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Polymyxins, an old class of antibiotics, are currently used as the last resort for the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. However, recent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data indicate that monotherapy can lead to the development of resistance. Novel approaches are urgently needed to preserve and improve the efficacy of this last-line class of antibiotics. This study examined the antimicrobial activity of novel combination of polymyxin B with anthelmintic closantel against A. baumannii. Closantel monotherapy (16 mg/L) was ineffective against most tested A. baumannii isolates. However, closantel at 4–16 mg/L with a clinically achievable concentration of polymyxin B (2 mg/L) successfully inhibited the development of polymyxin resistance in polymyxin-susceptible isolates, and provided synergistic killing against polymyxin-resistant isolates (MIC ≥4 mg/L). Our findings suggest that the combination of polymyxin B with closantel could be potentially useful for the treatment of MDR, including polymyxin-resistant, A. baumannii infections. The re-positioning of non-antibiotic drugs to treat bacterial infections may significantly expedite discovery of new treatment options for bacterial ‘superbugs’. PMID:26669752

  12. High Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistance Among Common Bacterial Isolates in a Tertiary Healthcare Facility in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Ntirenganya, Cyprien; Manzi, Olivier; Muvunyi, Claude Mambo; Ogbuagu, Onyema

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a serious public health threat in both developed and developing countries. Many developing countries, including Rwanda, lack adequate surveillance systems, and therefore, the prevalence of AMR is not well-known. We conducted a prospective observational study to assess the prevalence of AMR among common bacterial isolates from clinical specimens obtained from patients on the medical wards of Kigali University Teaching Hospital (KUTH). We evaluated the antibiotic sensitivity patterns of bacterial pathogens cultured from urine, blood, sputum, and wound swab specimens obtained over a 6-month period (July 1 to December 30, 2013). There were 154 positive cultures from specimens obtained from 141 unique patients over the study period. Urine, blood, wound swab, and sputum cultures comprised 55.2%, 25.3%, 16.2%, and 3.3% of the total specimens evaluated; 31.4% and 58.7% of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella isolates, respectively, were resistant to at least one of the third generation cephalosporins. Eight percent of E. coli isolates were resistant to imipenem; 82% and 6% of Staphylococcus aureus strains were oxacillin- and vancomycin-resistant respectively. Antimicrobial resistance rates are high in Rwanda and pose a serious therapeutic challenge to the management of common infections. PMID:25646259

  13. Transcriptional Responses of Resistant and Susceptible Fish Clones to the Bacterial Pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Samuel A. M.; Jouneau, Luc; Bernardet, Jean-Francois; Houel, Armel; Lunazzi, Aurélie; Duchaud, Eric; Michel, Christian; Quillet, Edwige; Boudinot, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a bacterial species that represents one of the most important pathogens for aquaculture worldwide, especially for salmonids. To gain insights into the genetic basis of the natural resistance to F. psychrophilum, we selected homozygous clones of rainbow trout with contrasted susceptibility to the infection. We compared the transcriptional response to the bacteria in the pronephros of a susceptible and a resistant line by micro-array analysis five days after infection. While the basal transcriptome of healthy fish was significantly different in the resistant and susceptible lines, the transcriptome modifications induced by the bacteria involved essentially the same genes and pathways. The response to F. psychrophilum involved antimicrobial peptides, complement, and a number of enzymes and chemokines. The matrix metalloproteases mmp9 and mmp13 were among the most highly induced genes in both genetic backgrounds. Key genes of both pro- and anti-inflammatory response such as IL1 and IL10, were up-regulated with a greater magnitude in susceptible animals where the bacterial load was also much higher. While higher resistance to F. psychrophilum does not seem to be based on extensive differences in the orientation of the immune response, several genes including complement C3 showed stronger induction in the resistant fish. They may be important for the variation of susceptibility to the infection. PMID:22720048

  14. Emerging issues in gram-negative bacterial resistance: an update for the practicing clinician.

    PubMed

    Vasoo, Shawn; Barreto, Jason N; Tosh, Pritish K

    2015-03-01

    The rapid and global spread of antimicrobial-resistant organisms in recent years has been unprecedented. Although resistant gram-positive infections have been concerning to clinicians, the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant gram-negative infections has become the most pressing issue in bacterial resistance. Indiscriminate antimicrobial use in humans and animals coupled with increased global connectivity facilitated the transmission of gram-negative infections harboring extended-spectrum β-lactamases in the 1990s. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, such as those containing Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamases, have been the latest scourge since the late 1990s to 2000s. Besides β-lactam resistance, these gram-negative infections are often resistant to multiple drug classes, including fluoroquinolones, which are commonly used to treat community-onset infections. In certain geographic locales, these pathogens, which have been typically associated with health care-associated infections, are disseminating into the community, posing a significant dilemma for clinicians treating community-onset infections. In this Concise Review, we summarize emerging trends in antimicrobial resistance. We also review the current knowledge on the detection, treatment, and prevention of infection with these organisms, with a focus on the carbapenemase-producing gram-negative bacilli. Finally, we discuss emerging therapies and areas that need further research and effort to stem the spread of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:25744116

  15. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy: Study of Bacterial Recovery Viability and Potential Development of Resistance after Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Anabela; Carvalho, Carla M. B.; Faustino, Maria A.; Neves, Maria G. P. M. S.; Tomé, João P. C.; Tomé, Augusto C.; Cavaleiro, José A. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Alves, Eliana; Almeida, Adelaide

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has emerged in the clinical field as a potential alternative to antibiotics to treat microbial infections. No cases of microbial viability recovery or any resistance mechanisms against it are yet known. 5,10,15-tris(1-Methylpyridinium-4-yl)-20-(pentafluorophenyl)-porphyrin triiodide (Tri-Py+-Me-PF) was used as photosensitizer. Vibrio fischeri and recombinant Escherichia coli were the studied bacteria. To determine the bacterial recovery after treatment, Tri-Py+-Me-PF (5.0 μM) was added to bacterial suspensions and the samples were irradiated with white light (40 W m−2) for 270 minutes. Then, the samples were protected from light, aliquots collected at different intervals and the bioluminescence measured. To assess the development of resistance after treatment, bacterial suspensions were exposed to white light (25 minutes), in presence of 5.0 μM of Tri-Py+-Me-PF (99.99% of inactivation) and plated. After the first irradiation period, surviving colonies were collected from the plate and resuspended in PBS. Then, an identical protocol was used and repeated ten times for each bacterium. The results suggest that aPDT using Tri-Py+-Me-PF represents a promising approach to efficiently destroy bacteria since after a single treatment these microorganisms do not recover their viability and after ten generations of partially photosensitized cells neither of the bacteria develop resistance to the photodynamic process. PMID:20161973

  16. Cockroaches as a Source of High Bacterial Pathogens with Multidrug Resistant Strains in Gondar Town, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Moges, Feleke; Eshetie, Setegn; Endris, Mengistu; Huruy, Kahsay; Muluye, Dagnachew; Feleke, Tigist; G/Silassie, Fisha; Ayalew, Getenet; Nagappan, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cockroaches are source of bacterial infections and this study was aimed to assess bacterial isolates and their antimicrobial profiles from cockroaches in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Methods. A total of 60 cockroaches were collected from March 1 to May 30, 2014, in Gondar town. Bacterial species were isolated from external and internal parts of cockroaches. Disk diffusion method was used to determine antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20; P values <0.005 were considered as statistically significant. Results. Of 181 identified bacteria species, 110 (60.8%) and 71 (39.2%) were identified from external and internal parts of cockroaches, respectively. Klebsiella pneumoniae 32 (17.7%), Escherichia coli 29 (16%), and Citrobacter spp. 27 (15%) were the predominant isolates. High resistance rate was observed to cotrimoxazole, 60 (33.1%), and least resistance rate was noted to ciprofloxacin, 2 (1.1%). Additionally, 116 (64.1%) of the isolates were MDR strains; Salmonella spp. were the leading MDR isolates (100%) followed by Enterobacter (90.5%) and Shigella spp. (76.9%). Conclusion. Cockroaches are the potential source of bacteria pathogens with multidrug resistant strains and hence effective preventive and control measures are required to minimize cockroach related infections. PMID:27340653

  17. Cockroaches as a Source of High Bacterial Pathogens with Multidrug Resistant Strains in Gondar Town, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Huruy, Kahsay; Muluye, Dagnachew; Feleke, Tigist; G/Silassie, Fisha; Ayalew, Getenet; Nagappan, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cockroaches are source of bacterial infections and this study was aimed to assess bacterial isolates and their antimicrobial profiles from cockroaches in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Methods. A total of 60 cockroaches were collected from March 1 to May 30, 2014, in Gondar town. Bacterial species were isolated from external and internal parts of cockroaches. Disk diffusion method was used to determine antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20; P values <0.005 were considered as statistically significant. Results. Of 181 identified bacteria species, 110 (60.8%) and 71 (39.2%) were identified from external and internal parts of cockroaches, respectively. Klebsiella pneumoniae 32 (17.7%), Escherichia coli 29 (16%), and Citrobacter spp. 27 (15%) were the predominant isolates. High resistance rate was observed to cotrimoxazole, 60 (33.1%), and least resistance rate was noted to ciprofloxacin, 2 (1.1%). Additionally, 116 (64.1%) of the isolates were MDR strains; Salmonella spp. were the leading MDR isolates (100%) followed by Enterobacter (90.5%) and Shigella spp. (76.9%). Conclusion. Cockroaches are the potential source of bacteria pathogens with multidrug resistant strains and hence effective preventive and control measures are required to minimize cockroach related infections. PMID:27340653

  18. Reduction of rainbow trout spleen size by splenectomy does not alter resistance against bacterial cold water disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In lower vertebrates, the contribution of the spleen to anti-bacterial immunity is poorly understood. Researchers have previously reported a phenotypic and genetic correlation between resistance to Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) and spleen so...

  19. Rainbow trout resistance to bacterial cold-water disease is moderately heritable and is not adversely correlated with growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to estimate the heritabilities for and genetic correlations among resistance to bacterial cold-water disease and growth traits in a population of rainbow trout. Bacterial cold-water disease, a chronic disease of rainbow trout, is caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilu...

  20. A retrospective analysis of skin bacterial colonisation, susceptibility and resistance in atopic dermatitis and impetigo patients.

    PubMed

    Salah, Louai A; Faergemann, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and impetigo are skin conditions where bacterial colonisation and infection, especially with Staphylococcus aureus play an important role. We compared skin bacterial population, resistance patterns and choice of antimicrobial agents in patients diagnosed with AD and impetigo during 2005 and 2011 in our department. Number of positive cultures in the AD group were 40 and 53 in 2005 and 2011, with S. aureus found in 97.5% and 100%, respectively. Differences in resistance were marginal. In impetigo, S. aureus was found in all 70 patients in 2005 and all 40 patients in 2011. Antibiotic resistance to specifically fusidic acid was more common in 2005 impetigo patients (22.8%) versus 2011 (5%) (p = 0.078). The most commonly used oral antimicrobial was cefadroxil (in 57.5% and 52.8% of AD and 58.6% and 35% of impetigo patients in 2005 and 2011, respectively). Our observations confirm the high prevalence of S. aureus in both diseases and, interestingly, show a declining resistance trend in impetigo. PMID:25367860

  1. Structural Studies of Bacterial Enzymes and their Relation to Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Lauren

    2015-08-27

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β- lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes

  2. Multidrug resistance phenotypes are widespread over different bacterial taxonomic groups thriving in surface water.

    PubMed

    Narciso-da-Rocha, Carlos; Manaia, Célia M

    2016-09-01

    The environment is the original and most ancient source of the antibiotic resistance determinants that threat the human health nowadays. In the environment, water is a privileged habitat and mode of dissemination of bacteria of different origins. Freshwater bodies that cross urban areas are supposed to hold a complex mixture of both human/animal origin and strictly environmental bacteria. In this study, we were interested in unveiling the bacterial diversity in urban river transects and, simultaneously, investigate the occurrence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, in particular the multidrug resistant (MDR). With this aim, water and sediments of two rivers were sampled from an urban transect and the bacterial diversity was assessed based on 16S rRNA gene-based community analysis and, simultaneously, total heterotrophic bacteria were isolated in the presence and in the absence of antibiotics. The three predominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, in water, or Acidobacteria, in sediments. MDR bacteria were observed to belong to the predominant phyla observed in water, mostly of the classes Gamma- and Betaproteobacteria (Proteobacteria) and Sphingobacteriia and Flavobacteriia (Bacteroidetes) and belonged to genera of ubiquitous (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Stenotrophomonas) or mainly environmental (Chitinophaga, Chryseobacterium) bacteria. The observation that MDR bacteria are widespread in the environment and over distinct phylogenetic lineages has two relevant implications: i) the potential of environmental bacteria as source or facilitators for antibiotic resistance acquisition; ii) the need to complement culture-independent methods with culture-based approaches in order to identify major sources of MDR profiles. PMID:27131885

  3. Constitutive presence of antibiotic resistance genes within the bacterial community of a large subalpine lake.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; Teruggi, Alessia; Fontaneto, Diego; Bertoni, Roberto; Callieri, Cristiana; Corno, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in environmental microbial communities is of primary concern as prodromal of a potential transfer to pathogenic bacteria. Although of diverse origin, the persistence of ARGs in aquatic environments is highly influenced by anthropic activities, allowing potential control actions in well-studied environments. However, knowledge of abundance and space-time distribution of ARGs in ecosystems is still scarce. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we investigated the presence and the abundance of twelve ARGs (against tetracyclines, β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones and sulphonamides) at different sampling sites, depths and seasons, in Lake Maggiore, a large subalpine lake, and in the area of its watershed. We then evaluated the correlation between each ARG and a number of ecological parameters in the water column in the deepest part of the lake. Our results suggest the constitutive presence of at least four ARGs within the bacterial community with a high proportion of bacteria potentially resistant to tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The presence of these ARGs was independent of the total bacterial density and temperature. The dynamics of tet(A) and sulII genes were, however, positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and negatively to chlorophyll a, suggesting that the resistant microbes inhabit specific niches. These observations indicate that the lake is a reservoir of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the need of a deeper understanding of the sources of ARGs and the factors allowing their persistence in waters. PMID:26118321

  4. Overexpression of BSR1 confers broad-spectrum resistance against two bacterial diseases and two major fungal diseases in rice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Satoru; Hayashi, Nagao; Sasaya, Takahide; Mori, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    Broad-spectrum disease resistance against two or more types of pathogen species is desirable for crop improvement. In rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal bacteria of rice leaf blight, and Magnaporthe oryzae, the fungal pathogen causing rice blast, are two of the most devastating pathogens. We identified the rice BROAD-SPECTRUM RESISTANCE 1 (BSR1) gene for a BIK1-like receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase using the FOX hunting system, and demonstrated that BSR1-overexpressing (OX) rice showed strong resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xoo and the fungal pathogen, M. oryzae. Here, we report that BSR1-OX rice showed extended resistance against two other different races of Xoo, and to at least one other race of M. oryzae. In addition, the rice showed resistance to another bacterial species, Burkholderia glumae, which causes bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, and to Cochliobolus miyabeanus, another fungal species causing brown spot. Furthermore, BSR1-OX rice showed slight resistance to rice stripe disease, a major viral disease caused by rice stripe virus. Thus, we demonstrated that BSR1-OX rice shows remarkable broad-spectrum resistance to at least two major bacterial species and two major fungal species, and slight resistance to one viral pathogen. PMID:27436950

  5. Overexpression of BSR1 confers broad-spectrum resistance against two bacterial diseases and two major fungal diseases in rice

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Satoru; Hayashi, Nagao; Sasaya, Takahide; Mori, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum disease resistance against two or more types of pathogen species is desirable for crop improvement. In rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal bacteria of rice leaf blight, and Magnaporthe oryzae, the fungal pathogen causing rice blast, are two of the most devastating pathogens. We identified the rice BROAD-SPECTRUM RESISTANCE 1 (BSR1) gene for a BIK1-like receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase using the FOX hunting system, and demonstrated that BSR1-overexpressing (OX) rice showed strong resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xoo and the fungal pathogen, M. oryzae. Here, we report that BSR1-OX rice showed extended resistance against two other different races of Xoo, and to at least one other race of M. oryzae. In addition, the rice showed resistance to another bacterial species, Burkholderia glumae, which causes bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, and to Cochliobolus miyabeanus, another fungal species causing brown spot. Furthermore, BSR1-OX rice showed slight resistance to rice stripe disease, a major viral disease caused by rice stripe virus. Thus, we demonstrated that BSR1-OX rice shows remarkable broad-spectrum resistance to at least two major bacterial species and two major fungal species, and slight resistance to one viral pathogen. PMID:27436950

  6. Comparison of rhizosphere bacterial communities in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Hein, John W; Wolfe, Gordon V; Blee, Kristopher A

    2008-02-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible systemic plant defense against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens, with the potential to secrete antimicrobial compounds into the soil. However, its impact on rhizosphere bacteria is not known. In this study, we examined fingerprints of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to determine the effect of SAR on bacterial community structure and diversity. We compared Arabidopsis mutants that are constitutive and non-inducible for SAR and verified SAR activation by measuring pathogenesis-related protein activity via a beta-glucoronidase (GUS) reporter construct driven by the beta-1-3 glucanase promoter. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of MspI- and HaeIII-digested 16S rDNA to estimate bacterial rhizosphere community diversity, with Lactobacillus sp. added as internal controls. T-RFLP analysis showed a clear rhizosphere effect on community structure, and diversity analysis of both rhizosphere and bulk soil operational taxonomic units (as defined by terminal restriction fragments) using richness, Shannon-Weiner, and Simpson's diversity indices and evenness confirmed that the presence of Arabidopsis roots significantly altered bacterial communities. This effect of altered soil microbial community structure by plants was also seen upon multivariate cluster analysis of the terminal restriction fragments. We also found visible differences in the rhizosphere community fingerprints of different Arabidopsis SAR mutants; however, there was no clear decrease of rhizosphere diversity because of constitutive SAR expression. Our study suggests that SAR can alter rhizosphere bacterial communities, opening the door to further understanding and application of inducible plant defense as a driving force in structuring soil bacterial assemblages. PMID:17619212

  7. The patient's role in the spread and control of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Davey, Peter; Pagliari, C; Hayes, A

    2002-01-01

    As the ultimate consumers, patients play an important role in the emergence, spread and control of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Improved knowledge of antibiotics and the problem of resistance, as well as a better understanding of beliefs, pressures/concerns, and expectations, from both the patient's and physician's perspectives, are fundamental for controlling antibiotic use. There is growing evidence to suggest that empowering patients through implementation of patient-centered health-care strategies, such as shared decision-making, in conjunction with educational initiatives help to change attitudes and behavior, and improve access to and completion of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. This, in turn, may help to control the development and spread of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:12427207

  8. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Gerbert S.; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops. PMID:25999970

  9. Induction of bacterial antibiotic resistance by mutagenic halogenated nitrogenous disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lu; Yu, Xin; Xu, Qian; Ye, Chengsong

    2015-10-01

    Halogenated nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) raise concerns regarding their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity threatening public health. However, environmental consequence of their mutagenicity has received less attention. In this study, the effect of halogenated N-DBPs on bacterial antibiotic resistance (BAR) was investigated. After exposure to bromoacetamide (BAcAm), trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) or tribromonitromethane (TBNM), the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to both individual and multiple antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, polymyxin B, rifampin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin + gentamicin and ciprofloxacin + tetracycline) was increased, which was predominantly ascribed to the overexpression of efflux pumps. The mechanism of this effect was demonstrated to be mutagenesis through sequencing and analyzing antibiotic resistance genes. The same induction phenomena also appeared in Escherichia coli, suggesting this effect may be universal to waterborne pathogens. Therefore, more attention should be given to halogenated N-DBPs, as they could increase not only genotoxicological risks but also epidemiological risks of drinking water. PMID:26114900

  10. In vitro antibacterial potential of Eugenia jambolana seed extracts against multidrug-resistant human bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bag, Anwesa; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Pal, Nishith Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Rabi Ranjan

    2012-06-20

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible in vitro antibacterial potential of extracts of Eugenia jambolana seeds against multidrug-resistant human bacterial pathogens. Agar well diffusion and microbroth dilution assay methods were used for antibacterial susceptibility testing. Kill-kinetics study was done to know the rate and extent of bacterial killing. Phytochemical analysis and TLC-bioautography were performed by colour tests to characterize the putative compounds responsible for this antibacterial activity. Cytotoxic potential was evaluated on human erythrocytes by haemolytic assay method and acute oral toxicity study was done in mice. The plant extracts demonstrated varying degrees of strain specific antibacterial activity against all the test isolates. Further, ethyl acetate fraction obtained from fractionation of most active ethanol extract showed maximum antibacterial effect against all the test isolates. Phytochemical analysis and TLC-bioautography of ethyl acetate fraction revealed that phenolics were the major active phytoconstituents. Ethyl acetate fraction also demonstrated no haemolytic activity on human erythrocytes and no gross behavioural changes as well as toxic symptoms were observed in mice at recommended dosage level. The results provide justification for the use of E. jambolana in folk medicine to treat various infectious diseases and may contribute to the development of novel antimicrobial agents for the treatment of infections caused by these drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:22444436

  11. Bacterial Uropathogens Causing Urinary Tract Infection and Their Resistance Patterns Among Children in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Yunus; Tekkanat Tazegun, Zuhal; Aydin, Emsal; Dulger, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common problem in infants and children, as well as adults. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the most common bacterial uropathogens, their susceptibility, and resistance to antibiotics in children with UTI. Materials and Methods This study included 7,365 urine samples sent from various departments to the Kars state hospital microbiology laboratory between January 2012 and May 2014. Bacterial isolation from clinical samples was made using standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by disk diffusion, according to CLSI recommendations. Results Bacterial growth was obtained in 1,373 samples (18.5%). The percentage distributions of the isolates were as follows: Escherichia coli, 940 (68.5%); Proteus spp, 183 (13.3%); Staphylococcus spp, 85 (6.2%); Enterococcus spp, 65 (4.7%); Klebsiella, 62 (4.5%); Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 21 (1.5%); and other Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria, 17 (1.2%). UTIs were more prevalent, after two years of age, among females than males (P < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of the most common microorganisms causing infectious diseases and regional resistance patterns is important in order to determine the antimicrobial policies and infection control guidelines of hospitals. PMID:27621929

  12. Resistance to bacterial wilt in somatic hybrids between Solanum tuberosum and Solanum phureja.

    PubMed

    Fock, I; Collonnier, C; Purwito, A; Luisetti, J; Souvannavong, V; Vedel, F; Servaes, A; Ambroise, A; Kodja, H; Ducreux, G; Sihachakr, D

    2000-12-01

    Somatic hybrid plants were produced after protoplast electrofusion between a dihaploid potato, cv. BF15, and a wild tuber-bearing relative, Solanum phureja, with a view to transferring bacterial wilt resistance into potato lines. A total of ten putative hybrids were selected. DNA analysis using flow cytometry revealed that six were tetraploids, two mixoploids, one amphiploid and one octoploid. In the greenhouse, the putative hybrids exhibited strong vigor and were morphologically intermediate, including leaf form, flowers and tuber characteristics. The hybrid nature of the ten selected plants was confirmed by examining isoenzyme patterns for esterases and peroxidases, and analysis of RAPD and SSR markers. Analysis of chloroplast genome revealed that eight hybrids possessed chloroplast (ct) DNA of the wild species, S. phureja, and only two contained Solanum tuberosum ct type. Six hybrid clones, including five tetraploids and one amphiploid, were evaluated for resistance to bacterial wilt by using race 1 and race 3 strains of Ralstonia solanacearum, originating from Reunion Island. Inoculations were performed by an in vitro root dipping method. The cultivated potato was susceptible to both bacterial strains tested. All somatic hybrids except two were tolerant to race 1 strain, and susceptible to race 3 strain. Interestingly, the amphiploid hybrid clone showed a good tolerance to both strains. PMID:11164589

  13. Overexpression of polyphenol oxidase in transgenic tomato plants results in enhanced bacterial disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Steffens, John C

    2002-06-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.10.3.2 or EC 1.14.18.1) catalyzing the oxygen-dependent oxidation of phenols to quinones are ubiquitous among angiosperms and assumed to be involved in plant defense against pests and pathogens. In order to investigate the role of PPO in plant disease resistance, we made transgenic tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Money Maker) plants that overexpressed a potato ( Solanum tuberosum L.) PPO cDNA under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The transgenic plants expressed up to 30-fold increases in PPO transcripts and 5- to 10-fold increases in PPO activity and immunodetectable PPO. As expected, these PPO-overexpressing transgenic plants oxidized the endogenous phenolic substrate pool at a higher rate than control plants. Three independent transgenic lines were selected to assess their interaction with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. The PPO-overexpressing tomato plants exhibited a great increase in resistance to P. syringae. Compared with control plants, these transgenic lines showed less severity of disease symptoms, with over 15-fold fewer lesions, and strong inhibition of bacterial growth, with over 100-fold reduction of bacterial population in the infected leaves. These results demonstrate the importance of PPO-mediated phenolic oxidation in restricting plant disease development. PMID:12029473

  14. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of auranofin against multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods employed to discover new antibiotics are both a time-consuming and financially-taxing venture. This has led researchers to mine existing libraries of clinical molecules in order to repurpose old drugs for new applications (as antimicrobials). Such an effort led to the discovery of auranofin, a drug initially approved as an anti-rheumatic agent, which also possesses potent antibacterial activity in a clinically achievable range. The present study demonstrates auranofin’s antibacterial activity is a complex process that involves inhibition of multiple biosynthetic pathways including cell wall, DNA, and bacterial protein synthesis. We also confirmed that the lack of activity of auranofin observed against Gram-negative bacteria is due to the permeability barrier conferred by the outer membrane. Auranofin’s ability to suppress bacterial protein synthesis leads to significant reduction in the production of key methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) toxins. Additionally, auranofin is capable of eradicating intracellular MRSA present inside infected macrophage cells. Furthermore, auranofin is efficacious in a mouse model of MRSA systemic infection and significantly reduces the bacterial load in murine organs including the spleen and liver. Collectively, this study provides valuable evidence that auranofin has significant promise to be repurposed as a novel antibacterial for treatment of invasive bacterial infections. PMID:26936660

  15. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of auranofin against multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Hedrick, Victoria E; Paul, Lake N; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods employed to discover new antibiotics are both a time-consuming and financially-taxing venture. This has led researchers to mine existing libraries of clinical molecules in order to repurpose old drugs for new applications (as antimicrobials). Such an effort led to the discovery of auranofin, a drug initially approved as an anti-rheumatic agent, which also possesses potent antibacterial activity in a clinically achievable range. The present study demonstrates auranofin's antibacterial activity is a complex process that involves inhibition of multiple biosynthetic pathways including cell wall, DNA, and bacterial protein synthesis. We also confirmed that the lack of activity of auranofin observed against Gram-negative bacteria is due to the permeability barrier conferred by the outer membrane. Auranofin's ability to suppress bacterial protein synthesis leads to significant reduction in the production of key methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) toxins. Additionally, auranofin is capable of eradicating intracellular MRSA present inside infected macrophage cells. Furthermore, auranofin is efficacious in a mouse model of MRSA systemic infection and significantly reduces the bacterial load in murine organs including the spleen and liver. Collectively, this study provides valuable evidence that auranofin has significant promise to be repurposed as a novel antibacterial for treatment of invasive bacterial infections. PMID:26936660

  16. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) resistance to columnaris disease is heritable and favorably correlated with bacterial cold water disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, J P; Leeds, T D; Marancik, D P; LaPatra, S E; Wiens, G D

    2015-04-01

    Columnaris disease (CD), caused by Flavobacterium columnare, is an emerging disease affecting rainbow trout aquaculture. Objectives of this study were to 1) estimate heritability of CD resistance in a rainbow trout line (ARS-Fp-R) previously selected 4 generations for improved bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance; 2) estimate genetic correlations among CD resistance, BCWD resistance, and growth to market BW; and 3) compare CD resistance among the ARS-Fp-R, ARS-Fp-S (selected 1 generation for increased BCWD susceptibility), and ARS-Fp-C (selection control) lines. Heritability of CD resistance was estimated using data from a waterborne challenge of 44 full-sib ARS-Fp-R families produced using a paternal half-sib mating design, and genetic correlations were estimated using these data and 5 generations of BCWD resistance, 9-mo BW (approximately 0.5 kg), and 12-mo BW (approximately 1.0 kg) data from 405 ARS-Fp-R full-sib families. The CD and BCWD challenges were initiated at approximately 52 and 84 d posthatch, or approximately 650 and 1,050 degree days (°C × d), respectively. Survival of ARS-Fp-R families ranged from 0 to 48% following CD challenge and heritability estimates were similar between CD (0.17 ± 0.09) and BCWD (0.18 ± 0.03) resistance, and the genetic correlation between these 2 traits was favorable (0.35 ± 0.25). Genetic correlations were small and antagonistic (-0.15 ± 0.08 to -0.19 ± 0.24) between the 2 resistance traits and 9- and 12-mo BW. Two challenges were conducted in consecutive years to compare CD resistance among ARS-Fp-R, ARS-Fp-C, and ARS-Fp-S families. In the first challenge, ARS-Fp-R families (83% survival) had greater CD resistance than ARS-Fp-C (73.5%; P = 0.02) and ARS-Fp-S (68%; P < 0.001) families, which did not differ (P = 0.16). In the second challenge, using an approximately 2.5-fold greater challenge dose, ARS-Fp-R families exhibited greater CD resistance (56% survival) than ARS-Fp-S (38% survival; P = 0.02) families

  17. Hidden Selection of Bacterial Resistance to Fluoroquinolones In Vivo: The Case of Legionella pneumophila and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shadoud, Lubana; Almahmoud, Iyad; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jérôme; Larrat, Sylvie; Schwebel, Carole; Timsit, Jean-François; Schneider, Dominique; Maurin, Max

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are the leading cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. One dramatic issue is the emergence of microbial resistance to antibiotics which is a major public health concern. Surprisingly however, such in vivo adaptive ability has not been reported yet for many intracellular human bacterial pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila. Methods We examined 82 unrelated patients with Legionnaire's disease from which 139 respiratory specimens were sampled during hospitalization and antibiotic therapy. We both developed a real time PCR assay and used deep-sequencing approaches to detect antibiotic resistance mutations in L. pneumophila and follow their selection and fate in these samples. Findings We identified the in vivo selection of fluoroquinolone resistance mutations in L. pneumophila in two infected patients treated with these antibiotics. By investigating the mutational dynamics in patients, we showed that antibiotic resistance occurred during hospitalization most likely after fluoroquinolone treatment. Interpretation In vivo selection of antibiotic resistances in L. pneumophila may be associated with treatment failures and poor prognosis. This hidden resistance must be carefully considered in the therapeutic management of legionellosis patients and in the control of the gradual loss of effectiveness of antibiotics. PMID:26501115

  18. Impact on Bacterial Resistance of Therapeutically Nonequivalent Generics: The Case of Piperacillin-Tazobactam.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carlos A; Agudelo, Maria; Aguilar, Yudy A; Zuluaga, Andres F; Vesga, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that pharmaceutical equivalence and pharmacokinetic equivalence of generic antibiotics are necessary but not sufficient conditions to guarantee therapeutic equivalence (better called pharmacodynamic equivalence). In addition, there is scientific evidence suggesting a direct link between pharmacodynamic nonequivalence of generic vancomycin and promotion of resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. To find out if even subtle deviations from the expected pharmacodynamic behavior with respect to the innovator could favor resistance, we studied a generic product of piperacillin-tazobactam characterized by pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic equivalence but a faulty fit of Hill's Emax sigmoid model that could be interpreted as pharmacodynamic nonequivalence. We determined the impact in vivo of this generic product on the resistance of a mixed Escherichia coli population composed of ∼99% susceptible cells (ATCC 35218 strain) and a ∼1% isogenic resistant subpopulation that overproduces TEM-1 β-lactamase. After only 24 hours of treatment in the neutropenic murine thigh infection model, the generic amplified the resistant subpopulation up to 20-times compared with the innovator, following an inverted-U dose-response relationship. These findings highlight the critical role of therapeutic nonequivalence of generic antibiotics as a key factor contributing to the global problem of bacterial resistance. PMID:27191163

  19. Practical survey on antibiotic-resistant bacterial communities in livestock manure and manure-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingxiang; Wang, Ruifei; Ren, Siwei; Szoboszlay, Marton; Moe, Luke A

    2016-01-01

    Through livestock manure fertilization, antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes are transferred to agricultural soils, resulting in a high prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the soil. It is not clear, however, whether a correlation exists between resistant bacterial populations in manure and manure-amended soil. In this work, we demonstrate that the prevalence of cephalexin-, amoxicillin-, kanamycin- and gentamicin-resistant bacteria as well as bacteria simultaneously resistant to all four antibiotics was much higher in manure-amended soils than in manure-free soil. 454-pyrosequencing indicated that the ARB and multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria (MARB) in swine or chicken manure and manure-amended soil were mainly distributed among Sphingobacterium, Myroides, Enterococcus, Comamonas and unclassified Flavobacteriaceae. The genus Sphingobacterium was highly prevalent among ARB from swine manure and manure-amended soil, and was also the most dominant genus among MARB from chicken manure and manure-amended soil. Other dominant genera among ARB or MARB populations in manure samples, including Myroides, Enterococcus and Comamonas, could not be detected or were detected at very low relative abundance in manure-amended soil. The present study suggests the possibility of transfer of ARBs from livestock manures to soils and persistence of ARB in these environments. PMID:26513264

  20. Impact on Bacterial Resistance of Therapeutically Nonequivalent Generics: The Case of Piperacillin-Tazobactam

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Agudelo, Maria; Aguilar, Yudy A.; Zuluaga, Andres F.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that pharmaceutical equivalence and pharmacokinetic equivalence of generic antibiotics are necessary but not sufficient conditions to guarantee therapeutic equivalence (better called pharmacodynamic equivalence). In addition, there is scientific evidence suggesting a direct link between pharmacodynamic nonequivalence of generic vancomycin and promotion of resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. To find out if even subtle deviations from the expected pharmacodynamic behavior with respect to the innovator could favor resistance, we studied a generic product of piperacillin-tazobactam characterized by pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic equivalence but a faulty fit of Hill’s Emax sigmoid model that could be interpreted as pharmacodynamic nonequivalence. We determined the impact in vivo of this generic product on the resistance of a mixed Escherichia coli population composed of ∼99% susceptible cells (ATCC 35218 strain) and a ∼1% isogenic resistant subpopulation that overproduces TEM-1 β-lactamase. After only 24 hours of treatment in the neutropenic murine thigh infection model, the generic amplified the resistant subpopulation up to 20-times compared with the innovator, following an inverted-U dose-response relationship. These findings highlight the critical role of therapeutic nonequivalence of generic antibiotics as a key factor contributing to the global problem of bacterial resistance. PMID:27191163

  1. Interspecific bacterial sensing through airborne signals modulates locomotion and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-sun; Lee, Soohyun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria use chemical signals to sense each other and to regulate various physiological functions. Although it is known that some airborne volatile organic compounds function as bacterial signalling molecules, their identities and effects on global gene expression and bacterial physiological processes remain largely unknown. Here we perform microarray analyses of Escherichia coli exposed to volatile organic compounds emitted from Bacillus subtilis. We find that 2,3-butanedione and glyoxylic acid mediate global changes in gene expression related to motility and antibiotic resistance. Volatile organic compound-dependent phenotypes are conserved among bacteria and are regulated by the previously uncharacterized ypdB gene product through the downstream transcription factors soxS, rpoS or yjhU. These results strongly suggest that bacteria use airborne volatile organic compounds to sense other bacteria and to change master regulatory gene activity to adapt. PMID:23651997

  2. Proteomics As a Tool for Studying Bacterial Virulence and Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Llarena, Francisco J.; Bou, Germán

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic studies have improved our understanding of the microbial world. The most recent advances in this field have helped us to explore aspects beyond genomics. For example, by studying proteins and their regulation, researchers now understand how some pathogenic bacteria have adapted to the lethal actions of antibiotics. Proteomics has also advanced our knowledge of mechanisms of bacterial virulence and some important aspects of how bacteria interact with human cells and, thus, of the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. This review article addresses these issues in some of the most important human pathogens. It also reports some applications of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry that may be important for the diagnosis of bacterial resistance in clinical laboratories in the future. The reported advances will enable new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to be developed in the fight against some of the most lethal bacteria affecting humans. PMID:27065974

  3. Gene Expression Variability Underlies Adaptive Resistance in Phenotypically Heterogeneous Bacterial Populations.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Keesha E; Otoupal, Peter B; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-11-13

    The root cause of the antibiotic resistance crisis is the ability of bacteria to evolve resistance to a multitude of antibiotics and other environmental toxins. The regulation of adaptation is difficult to pinpoint due to extensive phenotypic heterogeneity arising during evolution. Here, we investigate the mechanisms underlying general bacterial adaptation by evolving wild-type Escherichia coli populations to dissimilar chemical toxins. We demonstrate the presence of extensive inter- and intrapopulation phenotypic heterogeneity across adapted populations in multiple traits, including minimum inhibitory concentration, growth rate, and lag time. To search for a common response across the heterogeneous adapted populations, we measured gene expression in three stress-response networks: the mar regulon, the general stress response, and the SOS response. While few genes were differentially expressed, clustering revealed that interpopulation gene expression variability in adapted populations was distinct from that of unadapted populations. Notably, we observed both increases and decreases in gene expression variability upon adaptation. Sequencing select genes revealed that the observed gene expression trends are not necessarily attributable to genetic changes. To further explore the connection between gene expression variability and adaptation, we propagated single-gene knockout and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) interference strains and quantified impact on adaptation to antibiotics. We identified significant correlations that suggest genes with low expression variability have greater impact on adaptation. This study provides evidence that gene expression variability can be used as an indicator of bacterial adaptive resistance, even in the face of the pervasive phenotypic heterogeneity underlying adaptation. PMID:27623410

  4. Parallel Loss-of-Function at the RPM1 Bacterial Resistance Locus in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Laura; Atwell, Susanna; Grant, Murray; Holub, Eric B.

    2012-01-01

    Dimorphism at the Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola 1 (RPM1) locus is well documented in natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana and has been portrayed as a long-term balanced polymorphism. The haplotype from resistant plants contains the RPM1 gene, which enables these plants to recognize at least two structurally unrelated bacterial effector proteins (AvrB and AvrRpm1) from bacterial crop pathogens. A complete deletion of the RPM1 coding sequence has been interpreted as a single event resulting in susceptibility in these individuals. Consequently, the ability to revert to resistance or for alternative R-gene specificities to evolve at this locus has also been lost in these individuals. Our survey of variation at the RPM1 locus in a large species-wide sample of A. thaliana has revealed four new loss-of-function alleles that contain most of the intervening sequence of the RPM1 open reading frame. Multiple loss-of-function alleles may have originated due to the reported intrinsic cost to plants expressing the RPM1 protein. The frequency and geographic distribution of rpm1 alleles observed in our survey indicate the parallel origin and maintenance of these loss-of-function mutations and reveal a more complex history of natural selection at this locus than previously thought. PMID:23272006

  5. New insights in the bacterial spore resistance to extreme terrestrial and extraterrestrial factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Ralf; Horneck, Gerda; Reitz, Guenther

    Based on their unique resistance to various space parameters, Bacillus endospores are one of the model systems used for astrobiological studies. The extremely high resistance of bacterial endospores to environmental stress factors has intrigued researchers since long time and many characteristic spore features, especially those involved in the protection of spore DNA, have already been uncovered. The disclosure of the complete genomic sequence of Bacillus subtilis 168, one of the often used astrobiological model system, and the rapid development of tran-scriptional microarray techniques have opened new opportunities of gaining further insights in the enigma of spore resistance. Spores of B. subtilis were exposed to various extreme ter-restrial and extraterrestrial stressors to reach a better understanding of the DNA protection and repair strategies, which them to cope with the induced DNA damage. Following physical stress factors of environmental importance -either on Earth or in space -were selected for this thesis: (i) mono-and polychromatic UV radiation, (ii) ionizing radiation, (iii) exposure to ultrahigh vacuum; and (iv) high shock pressures simulating meteorite impacts. To reach a most comprehensive understanding of spore resistance to those harsh terrestrial or simulated extraterrestrial conditions, a standardized experimental protocol of the preparation and ana-lyzing methods was established including the determination of the following spore responses: (i) survival, (ii) induced mutations, (iii) DNA damage, (iv) role of different repair pathways by use of a set of repair deficient mutants, and (v) transcriptional responses during spore germi-nation by use of genome-wide transcriptome analyses and confirmation by RT-PCR. From this comprehensive set of data on spore resistance to a variety of environmental stress parameters a model of a "built-in" transcriptional program of bacterial spores in response to DNA damaging treatments to ensure DNA restoration

  6. Baby leaf lettuce germplasm enhancement: developing diverse populations with resistance to bacterial leaf spot caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baby leaf lettuce cultivars with resistance to bacterial leaf spot (BLS) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians (Xcv) are needed to reduce crop losses. The objectives of this research were to assess the genetic diversity for BLS resistance in baby leaf lettuce cultivars and to select early gen...

  7. Evidence of major genes affecting bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of complex segregation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. We previously detected genetic variation for BCWD resistance in our rainbow trout population, and a family-based selection program to improve resistance was initiated at the NCCCWA in 2005. The main objec...

  8. Evidence of major genes affecting resistance to bacterial cold water disease in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of segregation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. We previously detected genetic variation for BCWD resistance in our rainbow trout population, and a family-based selection program to improve resistance was initiated at the National Center for Cool and Col...

  9. Increasing antibiotic resistance in preservative-tolerant bacterial strains isolated from cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Orús, Pilar; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Leranoz, Sonia; Berlanga, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the microbiological quality, consumer safety and organoleptic properties of cosmetic products, manufacturers need to comply with defined standards using several preservatives and disinfectants. A drawback regarding the use of these preservatives is the possibility of generating cross-insusceptibility to other disinfectants or preservatives, as well as cross resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms of Enterobacter gergoviae, Pseudomonas putida and Burkholderia cepacia that are involved in recurrent contamination in cosmetic products containing preservatives. Diminished susceptibility to formaldehyde-donors was detected in isolates but not to other preservatives commonly used in the cosmetics industry, although increasing resistance to different antibiotics (β-lactams, quinolones, rifampicin, and tetracycline) was demonstrated in these strains when compared with the wild-type strain. The outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanism activities responsible for the resistance trait were evaluated. The development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms due to the selective pressure from preservatives included in cosmetic products could be a risk for the emergence and spread of bacterial resistance in the environment. Nevertheless, the large contribution of disinfection and preservation cannot be denied in cosmetic products. PMID:26415667

  10. Effect of the osmotic conditions during sporulation on the subsequent resistance of bacterial spores.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thi Minh, Hue; Guyot, Stéphane; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Gervais, Patrick

    2008-08-01

    The causes of Bacillus spore resistance remain unclear. Many structures including a highly compact envelope, low hydration of the protoplast, high concentrations of Ca-chelated dipicolinic acid, and the presence of small acid-soluble spore proteins seem to contribute to resistance. To evaluate the role of internal protoplast composition and hydration, spores of Bacillus subtilis were produced at different osmotic pressures corresponding to water activities of 0.993 (standard), 0.970, and 0.950, using the two depressors (glycerol or NaCl). Sporulation of Bacillus subtilis was slower and reduced in quantity when the water activity was low, taking 4, 10, and 17 days for 0.993, 0.970, and 0.950 water activity, respectively. The spores produced at lower water activity were smaller and could germinate on agar medium at lower water activity than on standard spores. They were also more sensitive to heat (97 degrees C for 5-60 min) than the standard spores but their resistance to high hydrostatic pressure (350 MPa at 40 degrees C for 20 min to 4 h) was not altered. Our results showed that the water activity of the sporulation medium significantly affects spore properties including size, germination capacity, and resistance to heat but has no role in bacterial spore resistance to high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:18506440

  11. RESULTS OF THE SEPTEMBER 1997 DOE/EPA DEMONSTRATION OF MULTIMETAL CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In September 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) co-sponsored a demonstration of several multimetal continuous emission monitos (CEMs). The demonstration, performed at the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air P...

  12. Utilization of an automated multimeter calibration system by the Rocky Flats Standards Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wickoff, B.; Stant, R.S.; Brown, G.R. Jr.

    1982-09-10

    The Physical Metrology Laboratory (PML) of the Rocky Flats (RF) Standards Laboratory, like many other standards laboratories, was inundated during the past decade with the vast variety of new digital multimeters. These multimeters were produced by several companies, and required accurate calibrations and certification to support the requirements at the Rocky Flats Plant. The need to automate the calibration and certification process accurately was vividly indicated by a time study of performing the process manually, for both the digital and the analog multimeters, in the PML Reference Standards Laboratory. By using an automated calibration system, approximately 90% of these calibrations could be completed in the Physical Metrology Support Laboratories with a reduction of 50% or more in hours required for the calibrations. With these specific requirements and other specifications deemed necessary, the automated calibration systems for digital and analog multimeters were purchased. Two Fluke 5101B Calibrators with Fluke 5220A Transconductance Amplifiers and two printers were procured for use by the Physical Metrology Support Laboratories. There operation and performance are described.

  13. Utilization of an automated multimeter calibration system by the Rocky Flats Standards Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickoff, B.; Stand, R. S.; Brown, G. R., Jr.; Riordan, G. A.; Delaney, I. C.

    1982-09-01

    The time required to calibrate multimeters was reduced by 75%. Using the calibration system and programmed tape, a Fluke 8050A is calibrated in less than 1/2 hour compared to approximately 2 hours using conventional methods and standards. Most possible sources of human error introduced by recording the setting of instruments and errors from repetitive computations were eliminated.

  14. Community-acquired multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Naha, Sowjanya; Naha, Kushal; Acharya, Vasudev; Hande, H Manjunath; Vivek, G

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cases of bacterial endocarditis secondary to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. In both cases, the diagnosis was made in accordance with the modified Duke's criteria and confirmed by histopathological analysis. Furthermore, in both instances there were no identifiable sources of bacteraemia and no history of contact with hospital or other medical services prior to the onset of symptoms. The patients were managed in similar fashion with prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention and made complete recoveries. These cases highlight Gram-negative organisms as potential agents for endocarditis, as well as expose the dissemination of such multidrug-resistant bacteria into the community. The application of an integrated medical and surgical approach and therapeutic dilemmas encountered in managing these cases are described. PMID:25096655

  15. Origin and Proliferation of Multiple-Drug Resistance in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiao-Han; Cohen, Ted; Grad, Yonatan H.; Hanage, William P.; O'Brien, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Many studies report the high prevalence of multiply drug-resistant (MDR) strains. Because MDR infections are often significantly harder and more expensive to treat, they represent a growing public health threat. However, for different pathogens, different underlying mechanisms are traditionally used to explain these observations, and it is unclear whether each bacterial taxon has its own mechanism(s) for multidrug resistance or whether there are common mechanisms between distantly related pathogens. In this review, we provide a systematic overview of the causes of the excess of MDR infections and define testable predictions made by each hypothetical mechanism, including experimental, epidemiological, population genomic, and other tests of these hypotheses. Better understanding the cause(s) of the excess of MDR is the first step to rational design of more effective interventions to prevent the origin and/or proliferation of MDR. PMID:25652543

  16. Prevalence of antibacterial resistant bacterial contaminants from mobile phones of hospital inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Vinod Kumar, B.; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Jerah, Ahmed Ali; Hakami, Othman M.; Eltigani, Magdeldin; Bidwai, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phones contaminated with bacteria may act as fomites. Antibiotic resistant bacterial contamination of mobile phones of inpatients was studied. One hundred and six samples were collected from mobile phones of patients admitted in various hospitals in Jazan province of Saudi Arabia. Eighty-nine (83.9%) out of 106 mobile phones were found to be contaminated with bacteria. Fifty-two (49.0%) coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 12 (11.3%) Staphylococcus aureus, 7 (6.6%) Enterobacter cloacae, 3 (2.83%) Pseudomonas stutzeri, 3 (2.83%) Sphingomonas paucimobilis, 2 (1.8%) Enterococcus faecalis and 10 (9.4%) aerobic spore bearers were isolated. All the isolated bacteria were found to be resistant to various antibiotics. Hence, regular disinfection of mobile phones of hospital inpatients is advised. PMID:25292217

  17. Prevalence of antibacterial resistant bacterial contaminants from mobile phones of hospital inpatients.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, B; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Jerah, Ahmed Ali; Hakami, Othman M; Eltigani, Magdeldin; Bidwai, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phones contaminated with bacteria may act as fomites. Antibiotic resistant bacterial contamination of mobile phones of inpatients was studied. One hundred and six samples were collected from mobile phones of patients admitted in various hospitals in Jazan province of Saudi Arabia. Eighty-nine (83.9%) out of 106 mobile phones were found to be contaminated with bacteria. Fifty-two (49.0%) coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 12 (11.3%) Staphylococcus aureus, 7 (6.6%) Enterobacter cloacae, 3 (2.83%) Pseudomonas stutzeri, 3 (2.83%) Sphingomonas paucimobilis, 2 (1.8%) Enterococcus faecalis and 10 (9.4%) aerobic spore bearers were isolated. All the isolated bacteria were found to be resistant to various antibiotics. Hence, regular disinfection of mobile phones of hospital inpatients is advised. PMID:25292217

  18. Interactions of Antibiotics and Methanolic Crude Extracts of Afzelia Africana (Smith.) Against Drug Resistance Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Aiyegoro, Olayinka; Adewusi, Adekanmi; Oyedemi, Sunday; Akinpelu, David; Okoh, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Infection due to multidrug resistance pathogens is difficult to manage due to bacterial virulence factors and because of a relatively limited choice of antimicrobial agents. Thus, it is imperative to discover fresh antimicrobials or new practices that are effective for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by drug-resistant microorganisms. The objective of this experiment is to investigate for synergistic outcomes when crude methanolic extract of the stem bark of Afzelia africana and antibiotics were combined against a panel of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains that have been implicated in infections. Standard microbiological protocols were used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the extract and antibiotics, as well as to investigate the effect of combinations of the methanolic extract of A. africana stem bark and selected antibiotics using the time-kill assay method. The extract of Afzelia africana exhibited antibacterial activities against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria made up of environmental and standard strains at a screening concentration of 5 mg/mL. The MICs of the crude extracts and the antibiotics varied between 1 μg/mL and 5.0 mg/mL. Overall, synergistic response constituted about 63.79% of all manner of combinations of extract and antibiotics against all test organisms; antagonism was not detected among the 176 tests carried out. The extract from A. africana stem bark showed potentials of synergy in combination with antibiotics against strains of pathogenic bacteria. The detection of synergy between the extract and antibiotics demonstrates the potential of this plant as a source of antibiotic resistance modulating compounds. PMID:21845091

  19. Resistance of bacterial biofilms formed on stainless steel surface to disinfecting agent.

    PubMed

    Królasik, Joanna; Zakowska, Zofia; Krepska, Milena; Klimek, Leszek

    2010-01-01

    The natural ability of microorganisms for adhesion and biofilm formation on various surfaces is one of the factors causing the inefficiency of a disinfection agent, despite its proven activity in vitro. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of disinfecting substances on bacterial biofilms formed on stainless steel surface. A universally applied disinfecting agent was used in the tests. Bacterial strains: Listeria innocua, Pseudomonas putida, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus hominis strains, were isolated from food contact surfaces, after a cleaning and disinfection process. The disinfecting agent was a commercially available acid specimen based on hydrogen peroxide and peroxyacetic acid, the substance that was designed for food industry usage. Model tests were carried out on biofilm formed on stainless steel (type 304, no 4 finish). Biofilms were recorded by electron scanning microscope. The disinfecting agent in usable concentration, 0.5% and during 10 minutes was ineffective for biofilms. The reduction of cells in biofilms was only 1-2 logarithmic cycles. The use of the agent in higher concentration--1% for 30 minutes caused reduction of cell number by around 5 logarithmic cycles only in the case of one microorganism, M. luteus. For other types: L. innocua, P. putida, S. hominis, the requirements placed on disinfecting agents were not fulfilled. The results of experiments proved that bacterial biofilms are resistant to the disinfectant applied in its operational parameters. Disinfecting effectiveness was achieved after twofold increase of the agent's concentration. PMID:21466046

  20. Monitoring bacterial growth using tunable resistive pulse sensing with a pore-based technique.

    PubMed

    Yu, Allen C S; Loo, Jacky F C; Yu, Samuel; Kong, S K; Chan, Ting-Fung

    2014-01-01

    A novel bacterial growth monitoring method using a tunable resistive pulse sensor (TRPS) system is introduced in this study for accurate and sensitive measurement of cell size and cell concentration simultaneously. Two model bacterial strains, Bacillus subtilis str.168 (BSU168) and Escherichia coli str.DH5α (DH5α), were chosen for benchmarking the growth-monitoring performance of the system. Results showed that the technique of TRPS is sensitive and accurate relative to widely used methods, with a lower detection limit of cell concentration measurement of 5 × 10⁵ cells/ml; at the same time, the mean coefficient of variation from TRPS was within 2 %. The growth of BSU168 and DH5α in liquid cultures was studied by TRPS, optical density (OD), and colony plating. Compared to OD measurement, TRPS-measured concentration correlates better with colony plating (R = 0.85 vs. R = 0.72), which is often regarded as the gold standard of cell concentration determination. General agreement was also observed by comparing TRPS-derived cell volume measurements and those determined from microscopy. We have demonstrated that TRPS is a reliable method for bacterial growth monitoring, where the study of both cell volume and cell concentration are needed to provide further details about the physical aspects of cell dynamics in real time. PMID:24287933

  1. Bacterial Spectrum and Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Ocular Infection: Differences between External and Intraocular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Yang, Qian; Tan, Yiwei; Lin, Liping; Huang, Qiang; Wu, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the differences of microbial spectrum and antibiotic resistance patterns between external and intraocular bacterial infections in an eye hospital in South China. A total of 737 bacteria isolates from suspected ocular infections were included in this retrospective study covering the period 2010–2013. The organisms cultured from the ocular surface (cornea, conjunctiva) accounted for the majority of the isolates (82.77%, n = 610), followed by the intraocular (aqueous humor, vitreous fluid), which accounted for 17.23% (n = 127). The top three species accounting for the external ocular infections were S. epidermidis (35.25%), P. aeruginosa (8.03%), and S. simulans (4.43%). The top three species for the intraocular infections were S. epidermidis (14.96%), S. hominis (8.66%), and B. subtilis (7.87%). The bacteria from the external ocular surface were more sensitive to neomycin, while those from the intraocular specimens were more sensitive to levofloxacin (P < 0.01). Multidrug resistance was found in 89 bacteria (12.08%), including isolates from both external (13.28%) and intraocular samples (6.30%). The results of this study indicate that the bacteria spectrum of external and intraocular infections is variable in the setting. A high percentage of bacterial organisms were found to be primarily susceptible to neomycin for external infection and levofloxacin for intraocular infection. PMID:26576294

  2. Prevalence of plasmid mediated pesticide resistant bacterial assemblages in crop fields.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, S; Murali, M

    2010-11-01

    Three crop fields namely paddy sugarcane and tomato exposed to bavistin [Methyl (1H-benzimidazol-2-yl) carbomate], monocrotophos[Dimethyl(E)-1-methyl-2-(methyl-carbamoyl) vinyl phosphate] and kinado plus [(EZ)-2-chloro-3-dimethoxyphosphinoyloxy-X1, X1-diethylbut-2-enamide], respectively were chosen for the present investigation to know the bacterial population and degradation of pesticides. The chemical nature of the soil and water samples from the pesticide contaminated fields was analysed along with counting of the total heterotrophic bacteria (THB), Staphylococci and Enterococcci population. Mean calcium, phosphate and biological oxygen demand were maximum in tomato field water Field water recorded maximum phophate and silicate content, whereas, sugarcane field water elicited maximum dissolved oxygen content. On the other hand, available phosphate and exchangeable potassium were maximum is sugarcane field soil. Significant variations in the bacterial population were evident between the treatments in sugarcane field soil and tomato field water exposed to monocrotophos and kinado plus, respectively In addition, significant variations between THB, Staphlyococci and Enterococci population were also evinced in both the sugarcane andtomato fields. The dominant pesticide resistant bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa harboured plasmids and the resistant trait observed were found to be plasmid borne. PMID:21506482

  3. Alkylaminoquinolines inhibit the bacterial antibiotic efflux pump in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Malléa, Monique; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Alibert-Franco, Sandrine; Brouant, Pierre; Barbe, Jacques; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Over the last decade, MDR (multidrug resistance) has increased worldwide in microbial pathogens by efflux mechanisms, leading to treatment failures in human infections. Several Gram-negative bacteria efflux pumps have been described. These proteinaceous channels are capable of expelling structurally different drugs across the envelope and conferring antibiotic resistance in various bacterial pathogens. Combating antibiotic resistance is an urgency and the blocking of efflux pumps is an attractive response to the emergence of MDR phenotypes in infectious bacteria. In the present study, various alkylaminoquinolines were tested as potential inhibitors of drug transporters. We showed that alkylaminoquinolines are capable of restoring susceptibilities to structurally unrelated antibiotics in clinical isolates of MDR Gram-negative bacteria. Antibiotic efflux studies indicated that 7-nitro-8-methyl-4-[2'-(piperidino)ethyl]aminoquinoline acts as an inhibitor of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump and restores a high level of intracellular drug concentration. Inhibitory activity of this alkylaminoquinoline is observed on clinical isolates showing different resistance phenotypes. PMID:12959639

  4. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs

    PubMed Central

    SOARES, Geisla Mary Silva; FIGUEIREDO, Luciene Cristina; FAVERI, Marcelo; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; DUARTE, Poliana Mendes; FERES, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibiotics most commonly used in the periodontal treatment (i.e. penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide and metronidazole) and the main mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs. Antimicrobial resistance can be classified into three groups: intrinsic, mutational and acquired. Penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin are broad-spectrum drugs, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Bacterial resistance to penicillin may occur due to diminished permeability of the bacterial cell to the antibiotic; alteration of the penicillin-binding proteins, or production of β-lactamases. However, a very small proportion of the subgingival microbiota is resistant to penicillins. Bacteria become resistant to tetracyclines or macrolides by limiting their access to the cell, by altering the ribosome in order to prevent effective binding of the drug, or by producing tetracycline/macrolide-inactivating enzymes. Periodontal pathogens may become resistant to these drugs. Finally, metronidazole can be considered a prodrug in the sense that it requires metabolic activation by strict anaerobe microorganisms. Acquired resistance to this drug has rarely been reported. Due to these low rates of resistance and to its high activity against the gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species, metronidazole is a promising drug for treating periodontal infections. PMID:22858695

  5. Arabidopsis dual resistance proteins, both RPS4 and RRS1, are required for resistance to bacterial wilt in transgenic Brassica crops

    PubMed Central

    Narusaka, Mari; Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial wilt phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is a serious soil-borne disease that attacks several economically important plants worldwide, including Brassicaceae. Previous studies indicate that recognition of avirulence (Avr)-effector PopP2 by resistance (R) protein, RRS1-R, and physical interaction between RRS1-R and PopP2 in the nucleus are required for resistance. Of late, we showed that a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana TIR-NLR proteins, RRS1 and RPS4, function together in disease resistance against multiple pathogen isolates. Here, we report that dual R proteins, RRS1 and RPS4, from A. thaliana ecotype Wassilewskija confer resistance to bacterial wilt in transgenic Brassica crops. For practical applications, this finding may provide a new strategy for developing disease resistant plants that express R genes from other plants. PMID:25763492

  6. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial community composition and antibiotic resistance genes in a wastewater treatment plant and its receiving surface water.

    PubMed

    Tang, Junying; Bu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Huang, Kailong; He, Xiwei; Ye, Lin; Shan, Zhengjun; Ren, Hongqiang

    2016-10-01

    The presence of pathogenic bacteria and the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) may pose big risks to the rivers that receive the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, we investigated the changes of bacterial community and ARGs along treatment processes of one WWTP, and examined the effects of the effluent discharge on the bacterial community and ARGs in the receiving river. Pyrosequencing was applied to reveal bacterial community composition including potential bacterial pathogen, and Illumina high-throughput sequencing was used for profiling ARGs. The results showed that the WWTP had good removal efficiency on potential pathogenic bacteria (especially Arcobacter butzleri) and ARGs. Moreover, the bacterial communities of downstream and upstream of the river showed no significant difference. However, the increase in the abundance of potential pathogens and ARGs at effluent outfall was observed, indicating that WWTP effluent might contribute to the dissemination of potential pathogenic bacteria and ARGs in the receiving river. PMID:27340885

  7. Violacein as a genetically-controlled, enzymatically amplified and photobleaching-resistant chromophore for optoacoustic bacterial imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Sigmund, Felix; Reber, Josefine; Luís Deán-Ben, Xosé; Glasl, Sarah; Kneipp, Moritz; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in genetically expressed reporters for in vivo studies of bacterial colonization in the context of infectious disease research, studies of the bacterial microbiome or cancer imaging and treatment. To empower non-invasive high-resolution bacterial tracking with deep tissue penetration, we herein use the genetically controlled biosynthesis of the deep-purple pigment Violacein as a photobleaching-resistant chromophore label for in vivo optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging in the near-infrared range. We demonstrate that Violacein-producing bacteria can be imaged with high contrast-to-noise in strongly vascularized xenografted murine tumors and further observe that Violacein shows anti-tumoral activity. Our experiments thus identify Violacein as a robust bacterial label for non-invasive optoacoustic imaging with high potential for basic research and future theranostic applications in bacterial tumor targeting. PMID:26091543

  8. Violacein as a genetically-controlled, enzymatically amplified and photobleaching-resistant chromophore for optoacoustic bacterial imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Sigmund, Felix; Reber, Josefine; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Glasl, Sarah; Kneipp, Moritz; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in genetically expressed reporters for in vivo studies of bacterial colonization in the context of infectious disease research, studies of the bacterial microbiome or cancer imaging and treatment. To empower non-invasive high-resolution bacterial tracking with deep tissue penetration, we herein use the genetically controlled biosynthesis of the deep-purple pigment Violacein as a photobleaching-resistant chromophore label for in vivo optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging in the near-infrared range. We demonstrate that Violacein-producing bacteria can be imaged with high contrast-to-noise in strongly vascularized xenografted murine tumors and further observe that Violacein shows anti-tumoral activity. Our experiments thus identify Violacein as a robust bacterial label for non-invasive optoacoustic imaging with high potential for basic research and future theranostic applications in bacterial tumor targeting. PMID:26091543

  9. Mutations in the Bacterial Ribosomal Protein L3 and Their Association with Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Klitgaard, Rasmus N.; Ntokou, Eleni; Nørgaard, Katrine; Biltoft, Daniel; Hansen, Lykke H.; Trædholm, Nicolai M.; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of antibiotics bind to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) in the large subunit of the bacterial ribosome. Resistance to these groups of antibiotics has often been linked with mutations or methylations of the 23S rRNA. In recent years, there has been a rise in the number of studies where mutations have been found in the ribosomal protein L3 in bacterial strains resistant to PTC-targeting antibiotics but there is often no evidence that these mutations actually confer antibiotic resistance. In this study, a plasmid exchange system was used to replace plasmid-carried wild-type genes with mutated L3 genes in a chromosomal L3 deletion strain. In this way, the essential L3 gene is available for the bacteria while allowing replacement of the wild type with mutated L3 genes. This enables investigation of the effect of single mutations in Escherichia coli without a wild-type L3 background. Ten plasmid-carried mutated L3 genes were constructed, and their effect on growth and antibiotic susceptibility was investigated. Additionally, computational modeling of the impact of L3 mutations in E. coli was used to assess changes in 50S structure and antibiotic binding. All mutations are placed in the loops of L3 near the PTC. Growth data show that 9 of the 10 mutations were well accepted in E. coli, although some of them came with a fitness cost. Only one of the mutants exhibited reduced susceptibility to linezolid, while five exhibited reduced susceptibility to tiamulin. PMID:25845869

  10. Screening foods for processing-resistant bacterial spores and characterization of a pressure- and heat-resistant Bacillus licheniformis isolate.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Juhee; Balasubramaniam, V M

    2014-06-01

    This study was carried out to isolate pressure- and heat-resistant indicator spores from selected food matrices (black pepper, red pepper, garlic, and potato peel). Food samples were processed under various thermal (90 to 105°C) and pressure (700 MPa) combination conditions, and surviving microorganisms were isolated. An isolate from red pepper powder, Bacillus licheniformis, was highly resistant to pressure-thermal treatments. Spores of the isolate in deionized water were subjected to the combination treatments of pressure (0.1 to 700 MPa) and heat (90 to 121°C). Compared with the thermal treatment, the combined pressure-thermal treatments considerably reduced the numbers of B. licheniformis spores to less than 1.0 log CFU/g at 700 MPa plus 105°C and at 300 to 700 MPa plus 121°C. The inactivation kinetic parameters of the isolated B. licheniformis spores were estimated using linear and nonlinear models. Within the range of the experimental conditions tested, the pressure sensitivity (zP) of the spores decreased with increasing temperature (up to 121°C), and the temperature sensitivity (zT) was maximum at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa). These results will be useful for developing a combined pressure-thermal inactivation kinetics database for various bacterial spores. PMID:24853517

  11. Tetracycline Antibiotics: Mode of Action, Applications, Molecular Biology, and Epidemiology of Bacterial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Ian; Roberts, Marilyn

    2001-01-01

    Tetracyclines were discovered in the 1940s and exhibited activity against a wide range of microorganisms including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, chlamydiae, mycoplasmas, rickettsiae, and protozoan parasites. They are inexpensive antibiotics, which have been used extensively in the prophlylaxis and therapy of human and animal infections and also at subtherapeutic levels in animal feed as growth promoters. The first tetracycline-resistant bacterium, Shigella dysenteriae, was isolated in 1953. Tetracycline resistance now occurs in an increasing number of pathogenic, opportunistic, and commensal bacteria. The presence of tetracycline-resistant pathogens limits the use of these agents in treatment of disease. Tetracycline resistance is often due to the acquisition of new genes, which code for energy-dependent efflux of tetracyclines or for a protein that protects bacterial ribosomes from the action of tetracyclines. Many of these genes are associated with mobile plasmids or transposons and can be distinguished from each other using molecular methods including DNA-DNA hybridization with oligonucleotide probes and DNA sequencing. A limited number of bacteria acquire resistance by mutations, which alter the permeability of the outer membrane porins and/or lipopolysaccharides in the outer membrane, change the regulation of innate efflux systems, or alter the 16S rRNA. New tetracycline derivatives are being examined, although their role in treatment is not clear. Changing the use of tetracyclines in human and animal health as well as in food production is needed if we are to continue to use this class of broad-spectrum antimicrobials through the present century. PMID:11381101

  12. The importance of lag time extension in determining bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Qiu, Yong; Shi, Hanchang; Yin, Huabing

    2016-05-10

    It is widely appreciated that widespread antibiotic resistance has significantly reduced the utility of today's antibiotics. Many antibiotics now fail to cure infectious diseases, although they are classified as effective bactericidal agents based on antibiotic susceptibility tests. Here, via kinetic growth assays, we evaluated the effects of 12 commonly used antibiotics on the lag phase of a range of pure environmental isolates and of sludge bacterial communities with a high diversity. We show that an extended lag phase offers bacteria survival advantages and promotes regrowth upon the removal of antibiotics. By utilizing both lag phase extension and IC50, the killing efficiency of an antibiotic on a strain or a community can be easily revealed. Interestingly, for several strains of relevance to endemic nosocomial infections (e.g. Acinetobacter sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and the diverse sludge communities, tetracycline and quinolone antibiotics are most likely to be resisted via extended lag phase. This discovery is significant from a clinical point view since underestimation of bacteria resistance can lead to the recurrence of diseases. PMID:27077143

  13. Resistance to a bacterial parasite in the crustacean Daphnia magna shows Mendelian segregation with dominance.

    PubMed

    Luijckx, P; Fienberg, H; Duneau, D; Ebert, D

    2012-05-01

    The influence of host and parasite genetic background on infection outcome is a topic of great interest because of its pertinence to theoretical issues in evolutionary biology. In the present study, we use a classical genetics approach to examine the mode of inheritance of infection outcome in the crustacean Daphnia magna when exposed to the bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa. In contrast to previous studies in this system, we use a clone of P. ramosa, not field isolates, which allows for a more definitive interpretation of results. We test parental, F1, F2, backcross and selfed parental clones (total 284 genotypes) for susceptibility against a clone of P. ramosa using two different methods, infection trials and the recently developed attachment test. We find that D. magna clones reliably exhibit either complete resistance or complete susceptibility to P. ramosa clone C1 and that resistance is dominant, and inherited in a pattern consistent with Mendelian segregation of a single-locus with two alleles. The finding of a single host locus controlling susceptibility to P. ramosa suggests that the previously observed genotype-genotype interactions in this system have a simple genetic basis. This has important implications for the outcome of host-parasite co-evolution. Our results add to the growing body of evidence that resistance to parasites in invertebrates is mostly coded by one or few loci with dominance. PMID:22167056

  14. Rapid emergence of quinolone resistance in cirrhotic patients treated with norfloxacin to prevent spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dupeyron, C; Mangeney, N; Sedrati, L; Campillo, B; Fouet, P; Leluan, G

    1994-01-01

    We carried out quantitative culturing of stools from 31 hospitalized alcoholic patients with cirrhosis and ascites, before treatment with 400 mg of norfloxacin per day, weekly for the first month, and then every 2 weeks thereafter for 15 to 229 days (median, 54 days). Members of the family Enterobacteriaceae virtually disappeared from the stools (< 10(2)/g), but treatment had little effect on enterococci. No selection of resistant organisms occurred in 15 patients, but the remaining 16 patients developed fecal organisms resistant to fluoroquinolones between days 14 and 43 of treatment (median, 25 days). Staphylococcus aureus was isolated four times, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were isolated six times, Citrobacter freundii was isolated four times, Enterobacter cloacae was isolated three times, Klebsiella oxytoca was isolated twice, Proteus rettgeri was isolated once, and untypeable streptococci were isolated six times. Some isolates persisted, while others were transient (one to seven consecutively positive cultures). The MICs of four quinolones (nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin) were determined by use of experimental microwell strips (ATB CMI; Biomerieux S.A.). All the strains isolated before treatment were susceptible to the four quinolones, with low MICs, whereas those isolated during norfloxacin treatment were highly resistant. Long-term norfloxacin administration thus carries a risk of disturbing the bacterial ecology in these patients, suggesting that digestive decontamination should no longer be prescribed routinely to cirrhotic patients with ascites. PMID:8192461

  15. Characterization of copper-resistant bacteria and bacterial communities from copper-polluted agricultural soils of central Chile

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper mining has led to Cu pollution in agricultural soils. In this report, the effects of Cu pollution on bacterial communities of agricultural soils from Valparaiso region, central Chile, were studied. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the 16S rRNA genes was used for the characterization of bacterial communities from Cu-polluted and non-polluted soils. Cu-resistant bacterial strains were isolated from Cu-polluted soils and characterized. Results DGGE showed a similar high number of bands and banding pattern of the bacterial communities from Cu-polluted and non-polluted soils. The presence of copA genes encoding the multi-copper oxidase that confers Cu-resistance in bacteria was detected by PCR in metagenomic DNA from the three Cu-polluted soils, but not in the non-polluted soil. The number of Cu-tolerant heterotrophic cultivable bacteria was significantly higher in Cu-polluted soils than in the non-polluted soil. Ninety two Cu-resistant bacterial strains were isolated from three Cu-polluted agricultural soils. Five isolated strains showed high resistance to copper (MIC ranged from 3.1 to 4.7 mM) and also resistance to other heavy metals. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicate that these isolates belong to the genera Sphingomonas, Stenotrophomonas and Arthrobacter. The Sphingomonas sp. strains O12, A32 and A55 and Stenotrophomonas sp. C21 possess plasmids containing the Cu-resistance copA genes. Arthrobacter sp. O4 possesses the copA gene, but plasmids were not detected in this strain. The amino acid sequences of CopA from Sphingomonas isolates (O12, A32 and A55), Stenotrophomonas strain (C21) and Arthrobacter strain (O4) are closely related to CopA from Sphingomonas, Stenotrophomonas and Arthrobacter strains, respectively. Conclusions This study suggests that bacterial communities of agricultural soils from central Chile exposed to long-term Cu-pollution have been adapted by acquiring Cu genetic determinants. Five bacterial isolates

  16. Adaptation of the cecal bacterial microbiome of growing pigs in response to resistant starch type 4.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Mann, Evelyne; Grüll, Dietmar; Molnar, Timea; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-12-01

    Resistant starch (RS) exacerbates health benefits on the host via modulation of the gut bacterial community. By far, these effects have been less well explored for RS of type 4. This study aimed at gaining a community-wide insight into the impact of enzymatically modified starch (EMS) on the cecal microbiota and hindgut fermentation in growing pigs. Castrated male pigs (n = 12/diet; 29-kg body weight) were fed diets with either 70% EMS or control starch for 10 days. The bacterial profile of each cecal sample was determined by sequencing of the V345 region of the 16S rRNA gene using the Illumina MiSeq platform. EMS diet reduced short-chain fatty acid concentrations in cecum and proximal colon compared to the control diet. Linear discriminant analyses and K means clustering indicated diet-specific cecal community profiles, whereby diversity and species richness were not different among diets. Pigs showed host-specific variation in their most abundant phyla, Firmicutes (55%), Proteobacteria (35%), and Bacteroidetes (10%). The EMS diet decreased abundance of Ruminococcus, Parasutterella, Bilophila, Enterococcus, and Lactobacillus operational taxonomic units (OTU), whereas Meniscus and Actinobacillus OTU were increased compared to those with the control diet (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR confirmed results for host effect on Enterobacteriaceae and diet effect on members of the Lactobacillus group. The presence of less cecal short-chain fatty acids and the imputed metabolic functions of the cecal microbiome suggested that EMS was less degradable for cecal bacteria than the control starch. The present EMS effects on the bacterial community profiles were different than the previously reported RS effects and can be linked to the chemical structure of EMS. PMID:26431973

  17. Adaptation of the Cecal Bacterial Microbiome of Growing Pigs in Response to Resistant Starch Type 4

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Mann, Evelyne; Grüll, Dietmar; Molnar, Timea; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-01-01

    Resistant starch (RS) exacerbates health benefits on the host via modulation of the gut bacterial community. By far, these effects have been less well explored for RS of type 4. This study aimed at gaining a community-wide insight into the impact of enzymatically modified starch (EMS) on the cecal microbiota and hindgut fermentation in growing pigs. Castrated male pigs (n = 12/diet; 29-kg body weight) were fed diets with either 70% EMS or control starch for 10 days. The bacterial profile of each cecal sample was determined by sequencing of the V345 region of the 16S rRNA gene using the Illumina MiSeq platform. EMS diet reduced short-chain fatty acid concentrations in cecum and proximal colon compared to the control diet. Linear discriminant analyses and K means clustering indicated diet-specific cecal community profiles, whereby diversity and species richness were not different among diets. Pigs showed host-specific variation in their most abundant phyla, Firmicutes (55%), Proteobacteria (35%), and Bacteroidetes (10%). The EMS diet decreased abundance of Ruminococcus, Parasutterella, Bilophila, Enterococcus, and Lactobacillus operational taxonomic units (OTU), whereas Meniscus and Actinobacillus OTU were increased compared to those with the control diet (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR confirmed results for host effect on Enterobacteriaceae and diet effect on members of the Lactobacillus group. The presence of less cecal short-chain fatty acids and the imputed metabolic functions of the cecal microbiome suggested that EMS was less degradable for cecal bacteria than the control starch. The present EMS effects on the bacterial community profiles were different than the previously reported RS effects and can be linked to the chemical structure of EMS. PMID:26431973

  18. Field evaluation of the bacterial volatile derivative 3-pentanol in priming for induced resistance in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Kyung; Song, Geun Cheol; Yi, Hwe-Su; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2014-08-01

    Plants are defended from attack by emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can act directly against pathogens and herbivores or indirectly by recruiting natural enemies of herbivores. However, microbial VOC have been less investigated as potential triggers of plant systemic defense responses against pathogens in the field. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain IN937a, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that colonizes plant tissues, stimulates induced systemic resistance (ISR) via its emission of VOCs. We investigated the ISR capacity of VOCs and derivatives collected from strain IN937a against bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in pepper. Of 15 bacterial VOCs and their derivatives, 3-pentanol, which is a C8 amyl alcohol reported to be a component of sex pheromones in insects, was selected for further investigation. Pathogens were infiltrated into pepper leaves 10, 20, 30, and 40 days after treatment and transplantation to the field. Disease severity was assessed 7 days after transplantation. Treatment with 3-pentanol significantly reduced disease severity caused by X. axonopodis and naturally occurring Cucumber mosaic virus in field trials over 2 years. We used quantitative real-time polymerase chain analysis to examine Pathogenesis-Related genes associated with salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene defense signaling. The expression of Capsicum annuum Pathogenesis-Related protein 1 (CaPR1), CaPR2, and Ca protease inhibitor2 (CaPIN2) increased in field-grown pepper plants treated with 3-pentanol. Taken together, our results show that 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance by priming SA and JA signaling in pepper under field conditions. PMID:25149655

  19. Aminomethyl spectinomycins as therapeutics for drug-resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, David F; Waidyarachchi, Samanthi L; Madhura, Dora B; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Jiuyu; Abdelrahman, Yasser M; Singh, Aman P; Duscha, Stefan; Rathi, Chetan; Lee, Robin B; Belland, Robert J; Meibohm, Bernd; Rosch, Jason W; Böttger, Erik C; Lee, Richard E

    2015-05-20

    The antibiotic spectinomycin is a potent inhibitor of bacterial protein synthesis with a unique mechanism of action and an excellent safety index, but it lacks antibacterial activity against most clinically important pathogens. A series of N-benzyl-substituted 3'-(R)-3'-aminomethyl-3'-hydroxy spectinomycins was developed on the basis of a computational analysis of the aminomethyl spectinomycin binding site and structure-guided synthesis. These compounds had ribosomal inhibition values comparable to spectinomycin but showed increased potency against the common respiratory tract pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Legionella pneumophila, and Moraxella catarrhalis, as well as the sexually transmitted bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Non-ribosome-binding 3'-(S) isomers of the lead compounds demonstrated weak inhibitory activity in in vitro protein translation assays and poor antibacterial activity, indicating that the antibacterial activity of the series remains on target against the ribosome. Compounds also demonstrated no mammalian cytotoxicity, improved microsomal stability, and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rats. The lead compound from the series exhibited excellent chemical stability superior to spectinomycin; no interaction with a panel of human receptors and drug metabolism enzymes, suggesting low potential for adverse reactions or drug-drug interactions in vivo; activity in vitro against a panel of penicillin-, macrolide-, and cephalosporin-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates; and the ability to cure mice of fatal pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Together, these studies indicate that N-benzyl aminomethyl spectinomycins are suitable for further development to treat drug-resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections. PMID:25995221

  20. Aminomethyl Spectinomycins as Novel Therapeutics for Drug Resistant Respiratory Tract and Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Madhura, Dora B.; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Jiuyu; Abdelrahman, Yasser M.; Singh, Aman P.; Duscha, Stefan; Rathi, Chetan; Lee, Robin B.; Belland, Robert J.; Meibohm, Bernd; Rosch, Jason W.; Böttger, Erik C.; Lee, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The antibiotic spectinomycin is a potent inhibitor of bacterial protein synthesis with a unique mechanism of action and an excellent safety index, but it lacks antibacterial activity against most clinically important pathogens. A novel series of N-benzyl substituted 3'-(R)- 3'-aminomethyl-3'-hydroxy spectinomycins was developed based on a computational analysis of the aminomethyl spectinomycin binding site and structure guided synthesis. These compounds had ribosomal inhibition values comparable to spectinomycin but showed increased potency against common respiratory tract pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Legionella pneumophila, and Moraxella catarrhalis as well as the sexually transmitted bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Non-ribosome binding 3'-(S) isomers of the leads demonstrated weak inhibitory activity in in vitro protein translation assays and poor antibacterial activity, indicating that the antibacterial activity of the series remains on target. In addition to improved antibacterial potency, compounds also demonstrated no mammalian cytotoxicity, improved microsomal stability, and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rats. The lead compound from the series, compound 1, exhibited excellent chemical stability, which was superior to spectinomycin and had no significant interaction with a panel of human receptors and drug metabolism enzymes suggesting low potential for adverse reactions or drug-drug interactions in vivo. Compound 1 was active in vitro against a panel of penicillin, macrolide, and cephalosporin resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates and cured mice of fatal pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Together, these studies indicate N-benzyl aminomethyl spectinomycins possess suitable properties for further development as novel antibacterial agents to treat drug resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections. PMID:25995221

  1. Resistance of a novel root canal sealer to bacterial ingress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Padachey, N; Patel, V; Santerre, P; Cvitkovitch, D; Lawrence, H P; Friedman, S

    2000-11-01

    A dentin-bonding root canal sealer (ZUT) has been developed, consisting of an experimental glass ionomer cement (KT-308) and an antimicrobial silver-containing zeolite (0.2% by weight). This in vitro study evaluated the ability of ZUT used with or without gutta-percha, to resist bacterial ingress of Enterococcus faecalis over a period of 90 days. Canals of 80 single-rooted teeth were prepared with apical patency and filled as follows (n = 10): KT-308 alone; KT-308 with a single gutta-percha cone (SCGP); ZUT alone; ZUT with SCGP; AH26 alone; AH26 with SCGP; positive control-no root canal filling; and negative control-no root canal filling, with the apices of this group sealed with C&B Metabond cement. Teeth were coated with nail polish except for the apical 2 mm, and each tooth was sealed in a 4-ml glass vial, with an 18-gauge needle inserted through the vial cover and bonded into the pulp chamber with C&B Metabond cement. After sterilization with 2.5 Mrad gamma-radiation, Brain Heart Infusion broth with phenol red was injected into each vial. An inoculum of E. faecalis was pipetted through the needle into the pulp chamber every 5 days, and the broth was monitored daily for color change and turbidity. When change occurred, the broth was cultured for growth of E. faecalis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the log-rank test revealed no significant differences among the three sealers used. The presence of gutta-percha, however, significantly improved resistance to bacterial ingress through obturated root canals (X, p < 0.05). Under the conditions of this study, the hypothesized advantage of ZUT (0.2% zeolite) was not demonstrated. PMID:11469295

  2. Development of candidate gene markers associated to common bacterial blight resistance in common bean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chun; Yu, Kangfu; Xie, Weilong; Perry, Gregory; Navabi, Alireza; Pauls, K Peter; Miklas, Phillip N; Fourie, Deidré

    2012-11-01

    Common bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap), is a major yield-limiting factor of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production around the world. Two major CBB-resistant quantitative trait loci (QTL), linked to the sequence characterized amplified region markers BC420 and SU91, are located at chromosomes 6 and 8, respectively. Using map-based cloning approach, four bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the BC420-QTL locus and one BAC clone containing SU91 were sequenced by Roche 454 technique and subsequently assembled using merged assemblies from three different programs. Based on the quality of the assembly, only the sequences of BAC 32H6 and 4K7 were used for candidate gene marker (CGM) development and candidate gene (CG) selection. For the BC420-QTL locus, 21 novel genes were predicted in silico by FGENESH using Medicago gene model, whereas 16 genes were identified in the SU91-QTL locus. For each putative gene, one or more primer pairs were designed and tested in the contrasting near isogenic lines. Overall, six and nine polymorphic markers were found in the SU91- and BC420-QTL loci, respectively. Afterwards, association mapping was conducted in a breeding population of 395 dry bean lines to discover marker-trait associations. Two CGMs per each locus showed better association with CBB resistance than the BC420 and SU91 markers, which include BC420-CG10B and BC420-CG14 for BC420_QTL locus, and SU91-CG10 and SU91-CG11 for SU91_QTL locus. The strong associations between CBB resistance and the CGs 10 and 14 from BC420_QTL locus and the CGs 10 and 11 from SU91_QTL locus indicate that the genes 10 and 14 from the BC420 locus are potential CGs underlying the BC420_QTL locus, whereas the genes 10 and 11 from the SU91 locus are potential CGs underlying the SU91_QTL locus. The superiority of SU91-CG11 was further validated in a recombinant inbred line population Sanilac × OAC 09-3. Thus, co-dominant CGMs, BC420-CG14 and

  3. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-11-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days of full-scale manure vermicomposting. On day 6, the abundances of genes encoding tetracycline resistance [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)] were reduced (P < 0.05), while those of genes encoding sulfonamide resistance (sul1 and sul2) were increased (P < 0.05) when normalized to 16S rRNA. The abundances of tetracycline resistance genes were correlated (P < 0.05) with the changing concentrations of tetracyclines in the manure. The overall diversity and richness of the bacteria significantly decreased during vermicomposting, accompanied by a 100 times increase in the relative abundance of Flavobacteriaceae spp. Variations in the abundances of ARGs were correlated with the changing microbial community structure and the relative abundances of the family Ruminococcaceae, class Bacilli, or phylum Proteobacteria. Vermicomposting, as a waste management practice, can reduce the overall abundance of ARGs. More research is warranted to assess the use of this waste management practice as a measure to attenuate the dissemination of antimicrobial residues and ARGs from livestock production before vermicompost can be safely used as biofertilizer in agroecosystems. PMID:26296728

  4. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A.; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang

    2015-01-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days of full-scale manure vermicomposting. On day 6, the abundances of genes encoding tetracycline resistance [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)] were reduced (P < 0.05), while those of genes encoding sulfonamide resistance (sul1 and sul2) were increased (P < 0.05) when normalized to 16S rRNA. The abundances of tetracycline resistance genes were correlated (P < 0.05) with the changing concentrations of tetracyclines in the manure. The overall diversity and richness of the bacteria significantly decreased during vermicomposting, accompanied by a 100 times increase in the relative abundance of Flavobacteriaceae spp. Variations in the abundances of ARGs were correlated with the changing microbial community structure and the relative abundances of the family Ruminococcaceae, class Bacilli, or phylum Proteobacteria. Vermicomposting, as a waste management practice, can reduce the overall abundance of ARGs. More research is warranted to assess the use of this waste management practice as a measure to attenuate the dissemination of antimicrobial residues and ARGs from livestock production before vermicompost can be safely used as biofertilizer in agroecosystems. PMID:26296728

  5. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections after liver transplantation: An ever-growing challenge

    PubMed Central

    Santoro-Lopes, Guilherme; de Gouvêa, Erika Ferraz

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among solid organ transplant recipients. Over the last two decades, various multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens have emerged as relevant causes of infection in this population. Although this fact reflects the spread of MDR pathogens in health care facilities worldwide, several factors relating to the care of transplant donor candidates and recipients render these patients particularly prone to the acquisition of MDR bacteria and increase the likelihood of MDR infectious outbreaks in transplant units. The awareness of this high vulnerability of transplant recipients to infection leads to the more frequent use of broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic therapy, which further contributes to the selection of drug resistance. This vicious cycle is difficult to avoid and leads to a scenario of increased complexity and narrowed therapeutic options. Infection by MDR pathogens is more frequently associated with a failure to start appropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy. The lack of appropriate treatment may contribute to the high mortality occurring in transplant recipients with MDR infections. Furthermore, high therapeutic failure rates have been observed in patients infected with extensively-resistant pathogens, such as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, for which optimal treatment remains undefined. In such a context, the careful implementation of preventive strategies is of utmost importance to minimize the negative impact that MDR infections may have on the outcome of liver transplant recipients. This article reviews the current literature regarding the incidence and outcome of MDR infections in liver transplant recipients, and summarizes current preventive and therapeutic recommendations. PMID:24876740

  6. The evolution of bacterial resistance against bacteriophages in the horse chestnut phyllosphere is general across both space and time.

    PubMed

    Koskella, Britt; Parr, Nicole

    2015-08-19

    Insight to the spatial and temporal scales of coevolution is key to predicting the outcome of host-parasite interactions and spread of disease. For bacteria infecting long-lived hosts, selection to overcome host defences is just one factor shaping the course of evolution; populations will also be competing with other microbial species and will themselves be facing infection by bacteriophage viruses. Here, we examine the temporal and spatial patterns of bacterial adaptation against natural phage populations from within leaves of horse chestnut trees. Using a time-shift experiment with both sympatric and allopatric phages from either contemporary or earlier points in the season, we demonstrate that bacterial resistance is higher against phages from the past, regardless of spatial sympatry or how much earlier in the season phages were collected. Similarly, we show that future bacterial hosts are more resistant to both sympatric and allopatric phages than contemporary bacterial hosts. Together, our results suggest the evolution of relatively general bacterial resistance against phages in nature and are contrasting to previously observed patterns of phage adaptation to bacteria from the same tree hosts over the same time frame, indicating a potential asymmetry in coevolutionary dynamics. PMID:26150663

  7. The evolution of bacterial resistance against bacteriophages in the horse chestnut phyllosphere is general across both space and time

    PubMed Central

    Koskella, Britt; Parr, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Insight to the spatial and temporal scales of coevolution is key to predicting the outcome of host–parasite interactions and spread of disease. For bacteria infecting long-lived hosts, selection to overcome host defences is just one factor shaping the course of evolution; populations will also be competing with other microbial species and will themselves be facing infection by bacteriophage viruses. Here, we examine the temporal and spatial patterns of bacterial adaptation against natural phage populations from within leaves of horse chestnut trees. Using a time-shift experiment with both sympatric and allopatric phages from either contemporary or earlier points in the season, we demonstrate that bacterial resistance is higher against phages from the past, regardless of spatial sympatry or how much earlier in the season phages were collected. Similarly, we show that future bacterial hosts are more resistant to both sympatric and allopatric phages than contemporary bacterial hosts. Together, our results suggest the evolution of relatively general bacterial resistance against phages in nature and are contrasting to previously observed patterns of phage adaptation to bacteria from the same tree hosts over the same time frame, indicating a potential asymmetry in coevolutionary dynamics. PMID:26150663

  8. Appraising contemporary strategies to combat multidrug resistant gram-negative bacterial infections--proceedings and data from the Gram-Negative Resistance Summit.

    PubMed

    Kollef, Marin H; Golan, Yoav; Micek, Scott T; Shorr, Andrew F; Restrepo, Marcos I

    2011-09-01

    The emerging problem of antibiotic resistance, especially among Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), has become a serious threat to global public health. Very few new antibacterial classes with activity against antibiotic-resistant GNB have been brought to market. Renewed and growing attention to the development of novel compounds targeting antibiotic-resistant GNB, as well as a better understanding of strategies aimed at preventing the spread of resistant bacterial strains and preserving the efficacy of existing antibiotic agents, has occurred. The Gram-Negative Resistance Summit convened national opinion leaders for the purpose of analyzing current literature, epidemiologic trends, clinical trial data, therapeutic options, and treatment guidelines related to the management of antibiotic-resistant GNB infections. After an in-depth analysis, the Summit investigators were surveyed with regard to 4 clinical practice statements. The results then were compared with the same survey completed by 138 infectious disease and critical care physicians and are the basis of this article. PMID:21868447

  9. Assessment of anaerobic bacterial diversity and its effects on anaerobic system stability and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the link between anaerobic bacterial diversity and, the biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and assessed how amending antibiotic combination and increasing concentration of antibiotics in a stepwise fashion influences the development of resistance genes in anaerobic reactors. The biodegradation, sorption and occurrence of the known antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of erythromycin and tetracycline were investigated using the processes of UV-HPLC and qPCR analysis respectively. Ion Torrent sequencing was used to detect microbial community changes in response to the addition of antibiotics. The overall results indicated that changes in the structure of a microbial community lead to changes in biodegradation capacity, sorption of antibiotics combinations and occurrence of ARGs. The enhanced biodegradation efficiency appeared to generate variations in the structure of the bacterial community. The results suggested that controlling the ultimate Gram-negative bacterial community, especially Acinetobacter-related populations, may promote the successful biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and reduce the occurrence of ARGs. PMID:26897411

  10. Two independent QTL in dry bean conditioning resistance to common bacterial blight express recessive epistasis when combined

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bacterial blight (CBB) caused by (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli) is a major seed-borne disease limiting commercial yield and disease-free seed production of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) worldwide. Genetic resistance is the most effective control method but is difficult to incorporate b...

  11. Evaluation of triticale accessions for resistance to wheat bacterial leaf streak caused by Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacterium Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa (Xtu) causes bacterial leaf streak (BLS) on wheat and other small grains. Several triticale accessions were reported to possess high levels of resistance to wheat Xtu strains. In this study, we evaluated a worldwide collection of 502 triticale acces...

  12. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA) pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods. PMID:25565273

  13. Development of practical diagnostic methods for monitoring rice bacterial panicle blight disease and evaluation of rice germplasm for resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was initiated to understand Burkholderia glumae, the major causal agent for bacterial panicle blight disease of rice; to develop practical diagnostic methods for monitoring the disease; and to evaluate rice germplasm for resistance. Burkholderia glumae was frequently isolated from infected p...

  14. Development of practical diagnostic methods for monitoring rice bacterial panicle blight disease and evaluation of rice germplasm for resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was initiated to understand Burkholderia glumae (major causal agent for bacterial panicle blight disease of rice) to develop practical diagnostic methods for monitoring the disease; and to evaluate rice germplasm for resistance. B. glumae was frequently isolated from symptomatic panicles on...

  15. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphism markers associated with bacterial cold water disease resistance and spleen size in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is one of the frequent causes of elevated mortality in salmonid aquaculture. Previously, we identified and validated microsatellites associated with QTL (quantitative trait loci) for BCWD resistance and spleen size in rainbow trout. The objective of this study was...

  16. Yeast Cell Wall Extract Induces Disease Resistance against Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica Crop

    PubMed Central

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA) pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods. PMID:25565273

  17. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphism markers associated with bacterial cold water disease resistance and spleen size in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is one of the frequent causes of elevated mortality in salmonid aquaculture. Previously, we identified and validated microsatellite markers associated with QTL (quantitative trait loci) for BCWD resistance and spleen size in rainbow trout. The objective of this st...

  18. Association mapping of quantitative trait loci responsible for resistance to Bacterial Leaf Streak and Spot Blotch in spring wheat landraces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf streak (BLS), caused by Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa, and spot blotch (SB), caused by Cochliobolus sativus are two major diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Planting resistant cultivars is the best approach to manage these diseases and identifying new sources of resistan...

  19. Registration of Common Bacterial Blight, Rust and Bean Common Mosaic Resistant Great Northern Bean Germplasm Line ABC - Weihing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Great northern common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm line ABC-Weihing was developed specifically for enhanced resistance to common bacterial blight (CBB), a major disease of common bean caused by the seedborne bacteria Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (Xcp) and the brown-pigmented variant...

  20. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K.; Vicente, João B.; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  1. Resistance and resilience responses of a range of soil eukaryote and bacterial taxa to fungicide application

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Christopher C.; Hilton, Sally; Semple, Kirk T.; Bending, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    The application of plant protection products has the potential to significantly affect soil microbial community structure and function. However, the extent to which soil microbial communities from different trophic levels exhibit resistance and resilience to such compounds remains poorly understood. The resistance and resilience responses of a range of microbial communities (bacteria, fungi, archaea, pseudomonads, and nematodes) to different concentrations of the strobilurin fungicide, azoxystrobin were studied. A significant concentration-dependent decrease, and subsequent recovery in soil dehydrogenase activity was recorded, but no significant impact on total microbial biomass was observed. Impacts on specific microbial communities were studied using small subunit (SSU) rRNA terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling using soil DNA and RNA. The application of azoxystrobin significantly affected fungal and nematode community structure and diversity but had no impact on other communities. Community impacts were more pronounced in the RNA-derived T-RFLP profiles than in the DNA-derived profiles. qPCR confirmed that azoxystrobin application significantly reduced fungal, but not bacterial, SSU rRNA gene copy number. Azoxystrobin application reduced the prevalence of ascomycete fungi, but increased the relative abundance of zygomycetes. Azoxystrobin amendment also reduced the relative abundance of nematodes in the order Enoplia, but stimulated a large increase in the relative abundance of nematodes from the order Araeolaimida. PMID:25048906

  2. Nucleotide Diversity Analysis of Three Major Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Bimolata, Waikhom; Kumar, Anirudh; M, Sai Kiran Reddy; Sundaram, Raman Meenakshi; Laha, Gouri Sankar; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence polymorphisms among R gene alleles influence the process of co-evolutionary interaction between host and pathogen by shaping the response of host plants towards invading pathogens. Here, we present the DNA sequence polymorphisms and diversities present among natural alleles of three rice bacterial blight resistance genes, Xa21, Xa26 and xa5. The diversity was examined across different wild relatives and cultivars of Oryza species. Functional significance of selected alleles was evaluated through semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real time PCR. The greatest nucleotide diversity and singleton variable sites (SVS) were present in Xa26 (π = 0.01958; SVS = 182) followed by xa5 and Xa21 alleles. The highest frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in Xa21 alleles and least in xa5. Transition bias was observed in all the genes and ‘G’ to ‘A’ transitions were more favored than other form of transitions. Neutrality tests failed to show the presence of selection at these loci, though negative Tajima’s D values indicate the presence of a rare form of polymorphisms. At the interspecies level, O. nivara exhibited more diversity than O. sativa. We have also identified two nearly identical resistant alleles of xa5 and two sequentially identical alleles of Xa21. The alleles of xa5 showed basal levels of expression while Xa21 alleles were functionally not expressed. PMID:25807168

  3. Resistance and resilience responses of a range of soil eukaryote and bacterial taxa to fungicide application.

    PubMed

    Howell, Christopher C; Hilton, Sally; Semple, Kirk T; Bending, Gary D

    2014-10-01

    The application of plant protection products has the potential to significantly affect soil microbial community structure and function. However, the extent to which soil microbial communities from different trophic levels exhibit resistance and resilience to such compounds remains poorly understood. The resistance and resilience responses of a range of microbial communities (bacteria, fungi, archaea, pseudomonads, and nematodes) to different concentrations of the strobilurin fungicide, azoxystrobin were studied. A significant concentration-dependent decrease, and subsequent recovery in soil dehydrogenase activity was recorded, but no significant impact on total microbial biomass was observed. Impacts on specific microbial communities were studied using small subunit (SSU) rRNA terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling using soil DNA and RNA. The application of azoxystrobin significantly affected fungal and nematode community structure and diversity but had no impact on other communities. Community impacts were more pronounced in the RNA-derived T-RFLP profiles than in the DNA-derived profiles. qPCR confirmed that azoxystrobin application significantly reduced fungal, but not bacterial, SSU rRNA gene copy number. Azoxystrobin application reduced the prevalence of ascomycete fungi, but increased the relative abundance of zygomycetes. Azoxystrobin amendment also reduced the relative abundance of nematodes in the order Enoplia, but stimulated a large increase in the relative abundance of nematodes from the order Araeolaimida. PMID:25048906

  4. Caenorhabditis elegans Bacterial Pathogen Resistant bus-4 Mutants Produce Altered Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Lisa M.; Mizanur, Rahman M.; Jankowska, Ewa; Hodgkin, Jonathan; O′Rourke, Delia; Stroud, Dave; Ghosh, Salil; Cipollo, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Caenorabditis elegans bus-4 glycosyltransferase mutants are resistant to infection by Microbacterium nematophilum, Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and have altered susceptibility to two Leucobacter species Verde1 and Verde2. Our objective in this study was to define the glycosylation changes leading to this phenotype to better understand how these changes lead to pathogen resistance. We performed MALDI-TOF MS, tandem MS and GC/MS experiments to reveal fine structural detail for the bus-4 N- and O-glycan pools. We observed dramatic changes in O-glycans and moderate ones in N-glycan pools compared to the parent strain. Ce core-I glycans, the nematode's mucin glycan equivalent, were doubled in abundance, halved in charge and bore shifts in terminal substitutions. The fucosyl O-glycans, Ce core-II and neutral fucosyl forms, were also increased in abundance as were fucosyl N-glycans. Quantitative expression analysis revealed that two mucins, let-653 and osm-8, were upregulated nearly 40 fold and also revealed was a dramatic increase in GDP-Man 4,6 dehydratease expression. We performed detailed lectin binding studies that showed changes in glycoconjugates in the surface coat, cuticle surface and intestine. The combined changes in cell surface glycoconjugate distribution, increased abundance and altered properties of mucin provide an environment where likely the above pathogens are not exposed to normal glycoconjugate dependent cues leading to barriers to these bacterial infections. PMID:25296196

  5. Assessment of Relationship Between Bacterial Stripe Resistance And Leaf Protein Bands In Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Varieties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talei, D.; Fotokian, M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial stripe as a new rice disease in Iran is more frequent nowadays. The objective of this study was to assessment of resistance in rice varieties together with evaluating of zymogram bands resulted from SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. For this purpose, 30 lines were tested in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The analysis of variance showed that there was significant difference between genotypes for resistance. Mean compare based on field results revealed that Domsiyah had the lowest resistance while Nemat and 7162 demonstrated the highest resistance. Laboratory results showed that there were significant difference between protein bands resulted from sensitive and resistance verities. Twenty bands were observed through SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. The 9th and 12th bands were found in sensitive varieties while were not in resistance genotypes. According to the results of this study, 7162 variety can be considered as the sources of resistance in breeding programs. Meanwhile attending to existence of 9th and 12th bands in sensitive varieties, resistance against bacterial stripe of rice maybe influenced by absence of these proteins.

  6. Interaction of common bacterial blight bacteria with disease resistance quantitative trait loci in common bean.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Robert W; Singh, Shree P; Gilbertson, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    Common bacterial blight (CBB) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli and X. fuscans subsp. fuscans, and is the most important bacterial disease of this crop in many regions of the world. In 2005 and 2006, dark red kidney bean fields in a major bean-growing region in central Wisconsin were surveyed for CBB incidence and representative symptomatic leaves collected. Xanthomonad-like bacteria were isolated from these leaves and characterized based upon phenotypic (colony) characteristics, pathogenicity on common bean, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with X. campestris pv. phaseoli- and X. fuscans subsp. fuscans-specific primers, and repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) and 16S-28S ribosomal RNA spacer region sequence analyses. Of 348 isolates that were characterized, 293 were identified as common blight bacteria (i.e., pathogenic on common bean and positive in PCR tests with the X. campestris pv. phaseoli- and X. fuscans subsp. fuscans-specific primers), whereas the other isolates were nonpathogenic xanthomonads. Most (98%) of the pathogenic xanthomonads were X. campestris pv. phaseoli, consistent with the association of this bacterium with CBB in large-seeded bean cultivars of the Andean gene pool. Two types of X. campestris pv. phaseoli were involved with CBB in this region: typical X. campestris pv. phaseoli (P) isolates with yellow mucoid colonies, no brown pigment production, and a typical X. campestris pv. phaseoli rep-PCR fingerprint (60% of strains); and a new phenotype and genotype (Px) with an X. campestris pv. phaseoli-type fingerprint and less mucoid colonies that produced brown pigment (40% of strains). In addition, a small number of X. fuscans subsp. fuscans strains, representing a new genotype (FH), were isolated from two fields in 2005. Representative P and Px X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains, an FH X. fuscans subsp. fuscans strain, plus five previously characterized X. campestris pv. phaseoli and X

  7. Atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet induced bacterial inactivation in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet is designed to inactivate bacteria in aqueous media in direct and indirect exposure modes of treatment. The resistive barrier plasma jet is designed to operate at both dc and standard 50-60 Hz low frequency ac power input and the ambient air at 50% humidity level was used as the operating gas. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma jet were analyzed and the operating frequency of the discharge was measured to be 20 kHz and the plasma power was measured to be 26 W. The plasma jet rotational temperatures (Trot) are obtained from the optical emission spectra, from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the Spectra Air (SPECAIR) simulation spectra. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were measured using optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzers, for direct and indirect treatment modes. The nitric oxides (NO) were observed to be the predominant long lived reactive nitrogen species produced by the plasma. Three different bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), and Neisseria meningitidis (Gram-negative) were suspended in an aqueous media and treated by the resistive barrier air plasma jet in direct and indirect exposure modes. The results show that a near complete bacterial inactivation was achieved within 120 s for both direct and indirect plasma treatment of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. Conversely, a partial inactivation of N. meningitidis was observed by 120 s direct plasma exposure and insignificant inactivation was observed for the indirect plasma exposure treatment. Plasma induced shifts in N. meningitidis gene expression was analyzed using pilC gene expression as a representative gene and the results showed a reduction in the expression of the pilC gene compared to untreated samples suggesting that the observed protection against NO may be regulated by other genes.

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Salvadora persica L. (Miswak) Extracts against Multidrug Resistant Bacterial Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ayed, Mohamed Saeed Zayed; Asaad, Ahmed Morad; Qureshi, Mohamed Ansar; Attia, Hany Goda; AlMarrani, Abduljabbar Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Much effort has focused on examining the inhibitory effect of Salvadora persica (miswak) on oral microorganisms, but information concerning its antibacterial activity against other human pathogens, particularly multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates, is scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the in vitro antibacterial activities of Salvadora persica L. extracts against 10 MDR bacterial clinical isolates other than oral pathogens. The antibacterial activity of aqueous and methanol miswak extracts was assessed using the agar dilution and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. Overall, the 400 mg/mL of miswak extract was the most effective on all strains. The methanol extract exhibited a stronger antibacterial activity against Gram-negative (3.3–13.6 mm) than Gram-positive (1.8–8.3 mm) bacteria. The lowest MIC value was seen for E. coli (0.39, 1.56 µg/mL), followed by Streptococcus pyogenes (1.56 µg/mL). The highest MIC value (6.25, 12.5 µg/mL) was recorded for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Acinetobacter baumannii, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the moderate to strong antibacterial activity of miswak extracts against all tested MDR-pathogens. Methanol extract appears to be a potent antimicrobial agent that could be considered as complementary and alternative medicine against resistant pathogens. Further studies on a large number of MDR organisms are necessary to investigate and standardize the inhibitory effect of miswak extracts against these emerging pathogens. PMID:26904146

  9. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Koike, Tatsuya; Takada, Hideshige; Newman, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3, and tet(M), in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP) in South Africa. There was no correlation between antibiotic concentrations and ARGs, suggesting the targeted ARGs are spread in a wide area without connection to selection pressure. Among sul genes, sul1 and sul2 were major genes in the total (over 10(-2) copies/16S) and colony forming bacteria assemblages (∼10(-1) copies/16S). In urban waters, the sul3 gene was mostly not detectable in total and culturable assemblages, suggesting sul3 is not abundant. tet(M) was found in natural assemblages with 10(-3) copies/16S level in STP, but was not detected in colony forming bacteria, suggesting the non-culturable (yet-to-be cultured) bacterial community in urban surface waters and STP effluent possess the tet(M) gene. Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistant (SMX(r)) and oxytetracycline (OTC) resistant (OTC(r)) bacterial communities in urban waters possessed not only sul1 and sul2 but also sul3 and tet(M) genes. These genes are widely distributed in SMX(r) and OTC(r) bacteria. In conclusion, urban river and estuarine water and STP effluent in the Durban area were highly contaminated with ARGs, and the yet-to-be cultured bacterial community may act as a non-visible ARG reservoir in certain situations. PMID:26300864

  10. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Koike, Tatsuya; Takada, Hideshige; Newman, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3, and tet(M), in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP) in South Africa. There was no correlation between antibiotic concentrations and ARGs, suggesting the targeted ARGs are spread in a wide area without connection to selection pressure. Among sul genes, sul1 and sul2 were major genes in the total (over 10-2 copies/16S) and colony forming bacteria assemblages (∼10-1 copies/16S). In urban waters, the sul3 gene was mostly not detectable in total and culturable assemblages, suggesting sul3 is not abundant. tet(M) was found in natural assemblages with 10-3 copies/16S level in STP, but was not detected in colony forming bacteria, suggesting the non-culturable (yet-to-be cultured) bacterial community in urban surface waters and STP effluent possess the tet(M) gene. Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistant (SMXr) and oxytetracycline (OTC) resistant (OTCr) bacterial communities in urban waters possessed not only sul1 and sul2 but also sul3 and tet(M) genes. These genes are widely distributed in SMXr and OTCr bacteria. In conclusion, urban river and estuarine water and STP effluent in the Durban area were highly contaminated with ARGs, and the yet-to-be cultured bacterial community may act as a non-visible ARG reservoir in certain situations. PMID:26300864