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Sample records for multimillion atom quantum

  1. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad

    Quantum dots grown by self-assembly process are typically constructed by 50,000 to 5,000,000 structural atoms which confine a small, countable number of extra electrons or holes in a space that is comparable in size to the electron wavelength. Under such conditions quantum dots can be interpreted as artificial atoms with the potential to be custom tailored to new functionality. In the past decade or so, these nanostructures have attracted significant experimental and theoretical attention in the field of nanoscience. The new and tunable optical and electrical properties of these artificial atoms have been proposed in a variety of different fields, for example in communication and computing systems, medical and quantum computing applications. Predictive and quantitative modeling and simulation of these structures can help to narrow down the vast design space to a range that is experimentally affordable and move this part of nanoscience to nano-Technology. Modeling of such quantum dots pose a formidable challenge to theoretical physicists because: (1) Strain originating from the lattice mismatch of the materials penetrates deep inside the buffer surrounding the quantum dots and require large scale (multi-million atom) simulations to correctly capture its effect on the electronic structure, (2) The interface roughness, the alloy randomness, and the atomistic granularity require the calculation of electronic structure at the atomistic scale. Most of the current or past theoretical calculations are based on continuum approach such as effective mass approximation or k.p modeling capturing either no or one of the above mentioned effects, thus missing some of the essential physics. The Objectives of this thesis are: (1) to model and simulate the experimental quantum dot topologies at the atomistic scale; (2) to theoretically explore the essential physics i.e. long range strain, linear and quadratic piezoelectricity, interband optical transition strengths, quantum confined

  2. Study of alloy disorder in quantum dots through multi-million atom simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilmeck, Gerhard; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Boykin, T. B.; Bowen, R. C.; von Allmen, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    A tight binding model which includes s, p, d, s orbitals is used to examine the electronic structures of an ensemble of dome-shaped In0.6 Ga0.4 As quantum dots. Given ensembles of identically sized quantum dots, variations in composition and configuration yield a linewidth broadening of less than 0.35 meV, much smaller than the total broadening determined from photoluminescence experiments. It is also found that the computed disorder-induced broadening is very sensitive to the applied boundary conditions, so that care must be taken to ensure proper convergence of the numerical results. Examination of local eigenenergies as functions of position shows similar convergence problems and indicates that an inaccurate resolution of the equilibrium atomic positions due to truncation of the simulation domain may be the source of the slow ground state convergence.

  3. High performance computing in biology: multimillion atom simulations of nanoscale systems.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, K Y; Tung, C-S

    2007-03-01

    Computational methods have been used in biology for sequence analysis (bioinformatics), all-atom simulation (molecular dynamics and quantum calculations), and more recently for modeling biological networks (systems biology). Of these three techniques, all-atom simulation is currently the most computationally demanding, in terms of compute load, communication speed, and memory load. Breakthroughs in electrostatic force calculation and dynamic load balancing have enabled molecular dynamics simulations of large biomolecular complexes. Here, we report simulation results for the ribosome, using approximately 2.64 million atoms, the largest all-atom biomolecular simulation published to date. Several other nano-scale systems with different numbers of atoms were studied to measure the performance of the NAMD molecular dynamics simulation program on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Q Machine. We demonstrate that multimillion atom systems represent a 'sweet spot' for the NAMD code on large supercomputers. NAMD displays an unprecedented 85% parallel scaling efficiency for the ribosome system on 1024 CPUs. We also review recent targeted molecular dynamics simulations of the ribosome that prove useful for studying conformational changes of this large biomolecular complex in atomic detail. PMID:17187988

  4. Multimillion atom simulations of dynamics of oxidation of an aluminum nanoparticle and nanoindentation on ceramics.

    PubMed

    Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv K; Nakano, Aiichiro

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a first-principles-based hierarchical simulation framework, which seamlessly integrates (1) a quantum mechanical description based on the density functional theory (DFT), (2) multilevel molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on a reactive force field (ReaxFF) that describes chemical reactions and polarization, a nonreactive force field that employs dynamic atomic charges, and an effective force field (EFF), and (3) an atomistically informed continuum model to reach macroscopic length scales. For scalable hierarchical simulations, we have developed parallel linear-scaling algorithms for (1) DFT calculation based on a divide-and-conquer algorithm on adaptive multigrids, (2) chemically reactive MD based on a fast ReaxFF (F-ReaxFF) algorithm, and (3) EFF-MD based on a space-time multiresolution MD (MRMD) algorithm. On 1920 Intel Itanium2 processors, we have demonstrated 1.4 million atom (0.12 trillion grid points) DFT, 0.56 billion atom F-ReaxFF, and 18.9 billion atom MRMD calculations, with parallel efficiency as high as 0.953. Through the use of these algorithms, multimillion atom MD simulations have been performed to study the oxidation of an aluminum nanoparticle. Structural and dynamic correlations in the oxide region are calculated as well as the evolution of charges, surface oxide thickness, diffusivities of atoms, and local stresses. In the microcanonical ensemble, the oxidizing reaction becomes explosive in both molecular and atomic oxygen environments, due to the enormous energy release associated with Al-O bonding. In the canonical ensemble, an amorphous oxide layer of a thickness of approximately 40 angstroms is formed after 466 ps, in good agreement with experiments. Simulations have been performed to study nanoindentation on crystalline, amorphous, and nanocrystalline silicon nitride and silicon carbide. Simulation on nanocrystalline silicon carbide reveals unusual deformation mechanisms in brittle nanophase materials, due to

  5. Scaling of Multimillion-Atom Biological Molecular Dynamics Simulation on a Petascale Supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Roland; Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-01-01

    A strategy is described for a fast all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of multimillion-atom biological systems on massively parallel supercomputers. The strategy is developed using benchmark systems of particular interest to bioenergy research, comprising models of cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass in an aqueous solution. The approach involves using the reaction field (RF) method for the computation of long-range electrostatic interactions, which permits efficient scaling on many thousands of cores. Although the range of applicability of the RF method for biomolecular systems remains to be demonstrated, for the benchmark systems the use of the RF produces molecular dipole moments, Kirkwood G factors, other structural properties, and mean-square fluctuations in excellent agreement with those obtained with the commonly used Particle Mesh Ewald method. With RF, three million- and five million atom biological systems scale well up to 30k cores, producing 30 ns/day. Atomistic simulations of very large systems for time scales approaching the microsecond would, therefore, appear now to be within reach.

  6. Scaling of Multimillion-Atom Biological Molecular Dynamics Simulation on a Petascale Supercomputer.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Roland; Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-10-13

    A strategy is described for a fast all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of multimillion-atom biological systems on massively parallel supercomputers. The strategy is developed using benchmark systems of particular interest to bioenergy research, comprising models of cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass in an aqueous solution. The approach involves using the reaction field (RF) method for the computation of long-range electrostatic interactions, which permits efficient scaling on many thousands of cores. Although the range of applicability of the RF method for biomolecular systems remains to be demonstrated, for the benchmark systems the use of the RF produces molecular dipole moments, Kirkwood G factors, other structural properties, and mean-square fluctuations in excellent agreement with those obtained with the commonly used Particle Mesh Ewald method. With RF, three million- and five million-atom biological systems scale well up to ∼30k cores, producing ∼30 ns/day. Atomistic simulations of very large systems for time scales approaching the microsecond would, therefore, appear now to be within reach. PMID:26631792

  7. Multimillion-to-billion atom molecular dynamics simulations of deformation, damage, nanoindentation, and fracture in silica glass and energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chun

    Multimillion-to-billion molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to study atomistic mechanisms of deformation, damage and failure in silica glass and energetic materials. The simulations are based on experimentally validated interatomic potentials and employ highly efficiently algorithms for parallel architectures. The onset of void-void interaction is investigated by performing MD simulations of amorphous silica under hydrostatic tension. The simulations reveal that nanocavities in amorphous silica (a-SiO2), which are linked to Si-O rings, play an important role in void-void coalescence and inter-void ligament failure. Nanocracks nucleated by the migration of three-fold coordinated Si and nonbridging O on ---Si-O-Si-O--- rings are observed in the multimillion MD simulations of a single void in amorphous silica subjected to a high shear rate. With the increase in shear strain, nanocracks appear on void surfaces and the voids deform into a threadlike structure. At a strain of 40%, the voids break into fragments. The results are similar to experimental and theoretical studies of bubble deformation and breakup under shear. Defects such as voids are known to be important in the detonation of energetic materials. To investigate deformation of a void in an RDX crystal under high shear rate, we have performed million-atom reactive force field (ReaxFF) MD simulations. Simulations reveal that without breaking a bond, the excess strain energy leads to translational and rotational motion of RDX molecules. At a strain of 13%, molecules with high kinetic energy collapse inward without affecting the rest of the system. MD simulations of nanoindentation in amorphous silica reveal migration of defects and their recombination in the densified plastic region under and the material pileup region around the indenter. The plastic flow of silica glass is related to the defect transport mechanism where a defect migrates a considerable distance via a chain of bond

  8. Nanoindentation of silicon nitride: A multimillion-atom molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Phillip; Omeltchenko, Andrey; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Saini, Subhash

    2003-01-01

    Nanoindentation of crystalline and amorphous silicon nitride films is studied using 10-million-atom molecular dynamics simulations. A rigid pyramid-shaped indenter tip is used. Load-displacement curves are computed and are used to derive hardness and elastic moduli of the simulated crystalline and amorphous films. Computer images of local pressure distributions and configuration snapshots show that plastic deformation in the film extends to regions far from the actual indent.

  9. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    Biological cell membranes provide mechanical stability to cells and understanding their structure, dynamics and mechanics are important biophysics problems. Experiments coupled with computational methods such as molecular dynamics (MD) have provided insight into the physics of membranes. We use long-time and large-scale MD simulations to study the structure, dynamics and mechanical behavior of membranes. We investigate shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water using MD simulations based on a reactive force field. We observe a focused jet at the onset of bubble shrinkage and a secondary shock wave upon bubble collapse. The jet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. Shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of 1 km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results. We also investigate molecular mechanisms of poration in lipid bilayers due to shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles. Our multimillion-atom MD simulations reveal that the jet impact generates shear flow of water on bilayer leaflets and pressure gradients across them. This transiently enhances the bilayer permeability by creating nanopores through which water molecules translocate rapidly across the bilayer. Effects of nanobubble size and temperature on the porosity of lipid bilayers are examined. The second research project focuses on cholesterol (CHOL) dynamics in phospholipid bilayers. Several experimental and computational studies have been performed on lipid bilayers consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and CHOL molecules. CHOL interleaflet transport (flip-flop) plays an important role in interleaflet coupling and determining CHOL flip-flop rate has been elusive. Various studies report that the rate ranges between milliseconds to seconds. We calculate CHOL flip-flop rates by

  10. Quantum transport in ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chih-Chun; Peotta, Sebastiano; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2015-12-01

    Ultracold atoms confined by engineered magnetic or optical potentials are ideal to study phenomena otherwise difficult to realize or probe in the solid state, thanks to the ability to control the atomic interaction strength, number of species, density and geometry. Here, we review quantum transport phenomena in atomic gases that mirror and can either better elucidate or show fundamental differences with respect to those observed in mesoscopic and nanoscopic systems. We discuss the significant progress in transport experiments in atomic gases, the similarities and differences between transport in cold atoms and in condensed matter systems, and survey theoretical predictions that are difficult to verify in conventional set-ups.

  11. Atom-ion quantum gate

    SciTech Connect

    Doerk, Hauke; Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Calarco, Tommaso

    2010-01-15

    Ultracold collisions of ions with neutral atoms in traps are studied. Recently, ultracold atom-ion systems have become available in experimental setups, where their quantum states can be coherently controlled. This control allows for an implementation of quantum information processing, combining the advantages of charged and neutral particles. The state-dependent dynamics that is a necessary ingredient for quantum computation schemes is provided in this case by the short-range interaction forces that depend on the hyperfine states of both particles. In this work, a theoretical description of spin-state-dependent trapped atom-ion collisions is developed in the framework of a multichannel quantum-defect theory and an effective single-channel model is formulated that reduces the complexity of the problem. Based on this description, a two-qubit phase gate between a {sup 135}Ba{sup +} ion and a {sup 87}Rb atom is simulated using a realistic combination of the singlet and triplet scattering lengths. The gate process is optimized and accelerated with the help of optimal control techniques. The result is a gate fidelity of 1-10{sup -3} within 350 mus.

  12. A linear atomic quantum coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Orany, Faisal A. A.; Wahiddin, M. R. B.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of which includes a localized atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchange of energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM) and with the atom-mode system in the second waveguide via the evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for this system and deduce its wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional coupler the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit a long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions the system can yield the results of the two-mode JCM.

  13. "Electronium": A Quantum Atomic Teaching Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an alternative atomic model to the probability model, the descriptive quantum atomic model Electronium. Discusses the way in which it is intended to support students in learning quantum-mechanical concepts. (Author/MM)

  14. Atomic physics: A milestone in quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers require many quantum bits to perform complex calculations, but devices with more than a few bits are difficult to program. A device based on five atomic quantum bits shows a way forward. See Letter p.63

  15. Remote Preparation of an Atomic Quantum Memory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Berner, Stefan; Volz, Juergen; Weber, Markus; Weinfurter, Harald

    2007-02-02

    Storage and distribution of quantum information are key elements of quantum information processing and future quantum communication networks. Here, using atom-photon entanglement as the main physical resource, we experimentally demonstrate the preparation of a distant atomic quantum memory. Applying a quantum teleportation protocol on a locally prepared state of a photonic qubit, we realized this so-called remote state preparation on a single, optically trapped {sup 87}Rb atom. We evaluated the performance of this scheme by the full tomography of the prepared atomic state, reaching an average fidelity of 82%.

  16. Programmable atom-photon quantum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christoph; Eich, Pascal; Schug, Michael; Müller, Philipp; Eschner, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We present the implementation of a programmable atom-photon quantum interface, employing a single trapped +40Ca ion and single photons. Depending on its mode of operation, the interface serves as a bidirectional atom-photon quantum-state converter, as a source of entangled atom-photon states, or as a quantum frequency converter of single photons. The interface lends itself particularly to interfacing ions with spontaneous parametric down-conversion-based single-photon or entangled-photon-pair sources.

  17. Quantum control and a novel atom-light quantum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, Poul S.; Anderson, Brian E.; Montano, Enrique; Hemmer, Daniel; Sosa Martinez, Hector; Smith, Aaron

    2014-09-01

    The emerging field of quantum engineering seeks to design and construct quantum devices for use in technological applications. To do so, one must learn to prepare a physical system in a well defined quantum state, drive it though a specified evolution, and access its final state through measurement. Historically, some of the most successful laboratory platforms with which to explore these challenges have originated in the field of quantum optics. This work reviews some of the recent advances in single- and many atom quantum control at the College of Optical Science, and their integration into a novel atom-light quantum interface.

  18. Quantum teleportation between remote atomic-ensemble quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Xiao-Fan; Li, Che-Ming; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-12-11

    Quantum teleportation and quantum memory are two crucial elements for large-scale quantum networks. With the help of prior distributed entanglement as a "quantum channel," quantum teleportation provides an intriguing means to faithfully transfer quantum states among distant locations without actual transmission of the physical carriers [Bennett CH, et al. (1993) Phys Rev Lett 70(13):1895-1899]. Quantum memory enables controlled storage and retrieval of fast-flying photonic quantum bits with stationary matter systems, which is essential to achieve the scalability required for large-scale quantum networks. Combining these two capabilities, here we realize quantum teleportation between two remote atomic-ensemble quantum memory nodes, each composed of ∼10(8) rubidium atoms and connected by a 150-m optical fiber. The spin wave state of one atomic ensemble is mapped to a propagating photon and subjected to Bell state measurements with another single photon that is entangled with the spin wave state of the other ensemble. Two-photon detection events herald the success of teleportation with an average fidelity of 88(7)%. Besides its fundamental interest as a teleportation between two remote macroscopic objects, our technique may be useful for quantum information transfer between different nodes in quantum networks and distributed quantum computing. PMID:23144222

  19. Quantum teleportation between remote atomic-ensemble quantum memories

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Xiao-Fan; Li, Che-Ming; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Quantum teleportation and quantum memory are two crucial elements for large-scale quantum networks. With the help of prior distributed entanglement as a “quantum channel,” quantum teleportation provides an intriguing means to faithfully transfer quantum states among distant locations without actual transmission of the physical carriers [Bennett CH, et al. (1993) Phys Rev Lett 70(13):1895–1899]. Quantum memory enables controlled storage and retrieval of fast-flying photonic quantum bits with stationary matter systems, which is essential to achieve the scalability required for large-scale quantum networks. Combining these two capabilities, here we realize quantum teleportation between two remote atomic-ensemble quantum memory nodes, each composed of ∼108 rubidium atoms and connected by a 150-m optical fiber. The spin wave state of one atomic ensemble is mapped to a propagating photon and subjected to Bell state measurements with another single photon that is entangled with the spin wave state of the other ensemble. Two-photon detection events herald the success of teleportation with an average fidelity of 88(7)%. Besides its fundamental interest as a teleportation between two remote macroscopic objects, our technique may be useful for quantum information transfer between different nodes in quantum networks and distributed quantum computing. PMID:23144222

  20. Individual Atoms in their Quantum Ground State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Eyal; Sompet, Pimonpan; Fung, Yin Hsien; Andersen, Mikkel F.

    2016-05-01

    An ultimate control of pure quantum states is an excellent platform for various quantum science and engineering. In this work, we perform quantum manipulation of individual Rubidium atoms in a tightly focus optical tweezer in order to cool them into their vibrational ground state via Raman sideband cooling. Our experimental scheme involves a combination of Raman sideband transitions and optical pumping of the atoms that couples two magnetic field sublevels indifferent to magnetic noise thus providing a much longer atomic coherence time compared to previous cooling schemes. By installing most of the atoms in their ground state, we managed to achieve two-dimensional cooling on the way to create a full nil entropy quantum state of single atoms and single molecules. We acknowledge the Marsden Fund, CORE and DWC for their support.

  1. Quantum magnetism of alkali Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana; Liu, Gengyuan

    2016-05-01

    We discuss a method to control dynamics in many-body spin states of 87Rb Rydberg atoms. The method permits excitation of cold gases and form ordered structures of alkali atoms. It makes use of a two-photon excitation scheme with circularly polarized and linearly chirped pulses. The method aims for controlled quantum state preparation in large ensembles. It is actual for experiments studding the spin hopping dynamics and realization of quantum random walks.

  2. Topologically Reconfigurable Atomic Lattice Quantum Metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pankaj; Mrejen, Michael; Kim, Jeongmin; Wu, Chihhui; Wang, Yuan; Rostovtsev, Yuri; Zhang, Xiang

    Metamaterials have attracted unprecedented attention owing to their exceptional light-matter interaction properties. However, harnessing metamaterial at single photon or few photon excitations is still a long way to go due to several critical challenges such as optical loss, defects to name a few. Here we introduce and theoretically demonstrate a novel platform toward quantum metamaterial, immune to aforementioned challenges, with ultra-cold neutral atoms trapped in an artificial crystal of light. Such periodic atomic density grating -an atomic lattice- exhibits extreme anisotropic optical response where it behaves like a metal in one direction but dielectric along orthogonal directions. We harness the interacting dark resonance physics to eliminate the absorption loss and demonstrate an all-optical and ultra-fast control over the photonic topological transition from a close to an open topology at the same frequency. Such atomic lattice quantum metamaterial enables dynamic manipulation of the decay rate of a quantum emitter by more than an order of magnitude. Our proposal brings together two important contemporary realm of science - cold atom physics and metamaterial for applications in both fundamental and applied science. Atomic lattice quantum metamaterial may provide new opportunities, at single or few photon level, for quantum sensing, quantum information processing with metamaterials.

  3. Quantum measurements of atoms using cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Dada, Adetunmise C.; Andersson, Erika; Jones, Martin L.; Kendon, Vivien M.; Everitt, Mark S.

    2011-04-15

    Generalized quantum measurements are an important extension of projective or von Neumann measurements in that they can be used to describe any measurement that can be implemented on a quantum system. We describe how to realize two nonstandard quantum measurements using cavity QED. The first measurement optimally and unambiguously distinguishes between two nonorthogonal quantum states. The second example is a measurement that demonstrates superadditive quantum coding gain. The experimental tools used are single-atom unitary operations effected by Ramsey pulses and two-atom Tavis-Cummings interactions. We show how the superadditive quantum coding gain is affected by errors in the field-ionization detection of atoms and that even with rather high levels of experimental imperfections, a reasonable amount of superadditivity can still be seen. To date, these types of measurements have been realized only on photons. It would be of great interest to have realizations using other physical systems. This is for fundamental reasons but also since quantum coding gain in general increases with code word length, and a realization using atoms could be more easily scaled than existing realizations using photons.

  4. Excess optical quantum noise in atomic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy; Xiao, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    Enhanced nonlinear optical response of a coherent atomic medium is the basis for many atomic sensors, and their performance is ultimately limited by the quantum fluctuations of the optical read-out. Here we demonstrate that off-resonant interactions can significantly modify the quantum noise of the optical field, even when their effect on the mean signal is negligible. We illustrate this concept by using an atomic magnetometer based on the nonlinear Faraday effect: the rotation of the light polarization is mainly determined by the resonant light-induced spin alignment, which alone does not change the photon statistics of the optical probe. Yet, we found that the minimum noise of output polarization rotation measurements is above the expected shot noise limit. This excess quantum noise is due to off-resonant coupling and grows with atomic density. We also show that the detection scheme can be modified to reduce the measured quantum noise (even below the shot-noise limit) but only at the expense of the reduced rotational sensitivity. These results show the existence of previously unnoticed factors in fundamental limitations in atomic magnetometry and could have impacts in many other atom-light based precision measurements. We acknowledge the support from AFOSR (grant FA9550-13-1-0098), NSF (grant PHY-1308281), NBRPC(973 Program Grant 2012CB921604 and 2011CB921604), and NNSFC (Grants No. 11322436).

  5. Quantum teleportation with atoms trapped in cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the quantum teleportation protocol with single atoms trapped in cavities. The scheme is based on the adiabatic passage and the polarization measurement. We show that it is possible to teleport the internal state of an atom trapped in a cavity to an atom trapped in another cavity with the success probability of 1/2 and the fidelity of 1. The scheme is resistant to a number of considerable imperfections such as the violation of the Lamb-Dicke condition, weak atom-cavity coupling, spontaneous emission, and detection inefficiency.

  6. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-22

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves. PMID:22398451

  7. First principle thousand atom quantum dot calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Li, Jingbo

    2004-03-30

    A charge patching method and an idealized surface passivation are used to calculate the single electronic states of IV-IV, III-V, II-VI semiconductor quantum dots up to a thousand atoms. This approach scales linearly and has a 1000 fold speed-up compared to direct first principle methods with a cost of eigen energy error of about 20 meV. The calculated quantum dot band gaps are parametrized for future references.

  8. A quantum gas microscope for ytterbium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-05-01

    In this talk, I report on the development of a quantum gas microscope for ytterbium (Yb) atoms. By using a dual molasses technique in which 399 nm molasses beams of the broad singlet transition are applied for fluorescence imaging and 556 nm molasses beams of the narrow intercombination transition are applied for cooling during the imaging, we successfully demonstrate site-resolved imaging of individual bosonic 174 Yb atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice with a lattice constant of 266 nm.We also apply a high resolution laser spectroscopy using the ultranarrow intercombination transition between the 1 S0 and 3 P2 states to manipulate an atom distribution in an optical lattice. We expect the demonstrated technique will similarly work for other isotopes of Yb atoms. We are also developing a different mode of an Yb quantum gas microscope.

  9. Cold atom quantum sensors for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    Quantum sensors based on cold atoms offer the opportunity to perform highly accurate measurements of physical phenomena related to time, gravity and rotation. The deployment of such technologies in the microgravity environment of space may enable further enhancement of their performance, whilst permitting the detection of these physical phenomena over much larger scales than is possible with a ground-based instrument. In this talk, I will present an overview of the activities of the UK National Quantum Hub in Sensors and Metrology in developing cold atoms technology for space. Our activities are focused in two main areas: optical clocks and atom interferometers. I will also discuss our contributions to recent initiatives including STE-QUEST and AI-GOAT, the ESA/NASA initiative aiming at an atom interferometer gravitational wave detector in space.

  10. Quantum Localization of the Kicked Rydberg Atom

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6373 ; Burgdoerfer, J.; Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6373; Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, A1040 Vienna,

    2000-03-20

    We investigate the quantum localization of the one-dimensional Rydberg atom subject to a unidirectional periodic train of impulses. For high frequencies of the train the classical system becomes chaotic and leads to fast ionization. By contrast, the quantum system is found to be remarkably stable. We find this quantum localization to be directly related to the existence of ''scars'' of the unstable periodic orbits of the system. The localization length is given by the energy excursion along the periodic orbits. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.

    2006-11-07

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schroedinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  12. Quantum and Classical Electrostatics Among Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, T. P.; Obolensky, O. I.; Ogurtsov, A. Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    Quantum theory has been unquestionably successful at describing physics at the atomic scale. However, it becomes more difficult to apply as the system size grows. On the other hand, classical physics breaks down at sufficiently short length scales but is clearly correct at larger distances. The purpose of methods such as QM/MM is to gain the advantages of both quantum and classical regimes: quantum theory should provide accuracy at the shortest scales, and classical theory, with its somewhat more tractable computational demands, allows results to be computed for systems that would be inaccessible with a purely quantum approach. This strategy will be most effective when one knows with good accuracy the length scale at which quantum calculations are no longer necessary and classical calculations are sufficient. To this end, we have performed both classical and quantum calculations for systems comprising a small number of atoms for which experimental data is also available. The classical calculations are fully exact; the quantum calculations are at the MP4(SDTQ)/aug-cc-pV5Z and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z levels. The precision of both sets of calculations along with the existence of experimental results allows us to draw conclusions about the range of utility of the respective calculations. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, NLM and utilized the computational resources of the NIH HPC Biowulf cluster.

  13. In Situ Imaging of Atomic Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chen-Lung; Chin, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    One exciting progress in recent cold atom experiments is the development of high resolution, in situ imaging techniques for atomic quantum gases.1-3 These new powerful tools provide detailed information on the distribution of atoms in a trap with resolution approaching the level of single atom and even single lattice site, and complement the welldeveloped time-of-flight method that probes the system in momentum space. In a condensed matter analogy, this technique is equivalent to locating electrons of a material in a snap shot. In situ imaging has offered a new powerful tool to study atomic gases and inspired many new research directions and ideas. In this chapter, we will describe the experimental setup of in situ absorption imaging, observables that can be extracted from the images, and new physics that can be explored with this technique.

  14. Towards a quantum network with atomic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chin-Wen

    The experiments discussed in this thesis investigate the application of atomic ensembles in building a quantum network. Specifically, the atomic ensembles refer to cesium atoms in magneto-optical traps. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to quantum networks, along with the difficulty in extending the range due to the optical loss of communication channels. Chapter 2 describes the protocol proposed by Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) for overcoming the limit of channel loss on scaling up a quantum network, exploiting relatively simple setups with atomic ensembles. The protocol introduces many capabilities and simplifies many tasks in quantum information processing with atoms and light. Chapter 3 summarizes the first step in our lab toward realizing the DLCZ protocol. In particular, we observed nonclassical correlation between two optical fields generated from one atomic ensemble. Chapter 4 is a sidetrack apart from the DLCZ protocol. We demonstrated that the atomic ensemble can be used as a conditional source of single photons. In addition to a description of the experiment, details of the simple model we used to fit the data are also included. Chapter 5 augments chapter 4 in that the temporal behavior of the nonclassical correlation is investigated. We found that the correlation decayed rapidly, which is a major obstacle for further implementation of the DLCZ protocol. Chapter 6 describes our effort to fight the fast decay of correlation observed in the experiment. A theoretical model is used to better understand the source of decoherence. Chapter 7 is the follow-up in the direction of implementing the DLCZ protocol. Two atomic ensembles located in vacuum chambers on two optical tables are entangled in a heralded fashion. The details on controlling the phases of the interferometers and data processing are elaborated. Chapter 8 is a practical proposal on how to proceed further toward realization of the DLCZ protocol. Four atomic ensembles are involved in the

  15. Quantum Synchronization of three-level atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peiru; Rey, Ana Maria; Holland, Murray

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies show that quantum synchronization, the spontaneous alignment of the quantum phase between different oscillators, can be used to build superradiant lasers with ultranarrow linewidth. We theoretically investigate the effect of quantum synchronization on many coupled three-level atoms where there are richer phase diagrams than the standard two-level system. This three-level model allows two-color ultranarrow coherent light to be produced where more than one phase must be simultaneously synchronized. Of particular interest, we study the V-type geometry that is relevant to current 87 Sr experiments in JILA. As well as the synchronization phenomenon, we explore other quantum effects such as photon correlations and squeezing. This work is supported by the DARPA QuASAR program, the NSF, and NIST.

  16. Quantum-classical electron distributions in atoms and atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, Joseph A.

    1988-01-01

    A quantum-classical approach is used to obtain the velocity distributions in atoms and positive and negative ions in both ground and excited states. In the analysis, Hartree-Fock electronic wavefunctions are used to determine the radial electron distributions, and the central-field approximation is used to study the the dynamic properties of the localized electrons. The distributions for the outer and inner shells are found to agree well with exact results obtained by numerical calculations.

  17. Quantum sized gold nanoclusters with atomic precision.

    PubMed

    Qian, Huifeng; Zhu, Manzhou; Wu, Zhikun; Jin, Rongchao

    2012-09-18

    Gold nanoparticles typically have a metallic core, and the electronic conduction band consists of quasicontinuous energy levels (i.e. spacing δ ≪ k(B)T, where k(B)T is the thermal energy at temperature T (typically room temperature) and k(B) is the Boltzmann constant). Electrons in the conduction band roam throughout the metal core, and light can collectively excite these electrons to give rise to plasmonic responses. This plasmon resonance accounts for the beautiful ruby-red color of colloidal gold first observed by Faraday back in 1857. On the other hand, when gold nanoparticles become extremely small (<2 nm in diameter), significant quantization occurs to the conduction band. These quantum-sized nanoparticles constitute a new class of nanomaterial and have received much attention in recent years. To differentiate quantum-sized nanoparticles from conventional plasmonic gold nanoparticles, researchers often refer to the ultrasmall nanoparticles as nanoclusters. In this Account, we chose several typical sizes of gold nanoclusters, including Au(25)(SR)(18), Au(38)(SR)(24), Au(102)(SR)(44), and Au(144)(SR)(60), to illustrate the novel properties of metal nanoclusters imparted by quantum size effects. In the nanocluster size regime, many of the physical and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles are fundamentally altered. Gold nanoclusters have discrete electronic energy levels as opposed to the continuous band in plasmonic nanoparticles. Quantum-sized nanoparticles also show multiple optical absorption peaks in the optical spectrum versus a single surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak at 520 nm for spherical gold nanocrystals. Although larger nanocrystals show an fcc structure, nanoclusters often have non-fcc atomic packing structures. Nanoclusters also have unique fluorescent, chiral, and magnetic properties. Due to the strong quantum confinement effect, adding or removing one gold atom significantly changes the structure and the electronic and optical

  18. Electronic Conduction through Atomic Chains, Quantum Well and Quantum Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. C.

    2011-07-01

    Charge transport is dynamically and strongly linked with atomic structure, in nanostructures. We report our ab-initio calculations on electronic transport through atomic chains and the model calculations on electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates in presence of random impurity potential in a quantum well and in a quantum wire. We computed synthesis and ballistic transport through; (a) C and Si based atomic chains attached to metallic electrodes, (b) armchair (AC), zigzag (ZZ), mixed, rotated-AC and rotated-ZZ geometries of small molecules made of 2S, 6C & 4H atoms attaching to metallic electrodes, and (c) carbon atomic chain attached to graphene electrodes. Computed results show that synthesis of various atomic chains are practically possible and their transmission coefficients are nonzero for a wide energy range. The ab-initio calculations on electronic transport have been performed with the use of Landauer-type scattering formalism formulated in terms of Grben's functions in combination with ground-state DFT. The electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates have been calculated as function of excitation energy both at zero and finite temperatures for disordered 2D and 1D systems. Our model calculations suggest that electron scattering rates in a disordered system are mainly governed by effective dimensionality of a system, carrier concentration and dynamical screening effects.

  19. Quantum-gas microscope for fermionic atoms.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Lawrence W; Nichols, Matthew A; Okan, Melih; Gersdorf, Thomas; Ramasesh, Vinay V; Bakr, Waseem S; Lompe, Thomas; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2015-05-15

    We realize a quantum-gas microscope for fermionic ^{40}K atoms trapped in an optical lattice, which allows one to probe strongly correlated fermions at the single-atom level. We combine 3D Raman sideband cooling with high-resolution optics to simultaneously cool and image individual atoms with single-lattice-site resolution at a detection fidelity above 95%. The imaging process leaves the atoms predominantly in the 3D motional ground state of their respective lattice sites, inviting the implementation of a Maxwell's demon to assemble low-entropy many-body states. Single-site-resolved imaging of fermions enables the direct observation of magnetic order, time-resolved measurements of the spread of particle correlations, and the detection of many-fermion entanglement. PMID:26024169

  20. Quantum-Gas Microscope for Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheuk, Lawrence W.; Nichols, Matthew A.; Okan, Melih; Gersdorf, Thomas; Ramasesh, Vinay V.; Bakr, Waseem S.; Lompe, Thomas; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2015-05-01

    We realize a quantum-gas microscope for fermionic 40K atoms trapped in an optical lattice, which allows one to probe strongly correlated fermions at the single-atom level. We combine 3D Raman sideband cooling with high-resolution optics to simultaneously cool and image individual atoms with single-lattice-site resolution at a detection fidelity above 95%. The imaging process leaves the atoms predominantly in the 3D motional ground state of their respective lattice sites, inviting the implementation of a Maxwell's demon to assemble low-entropy many-body states. Single-site-resolved imaging of fermions enables the direct observation of magnetic order, time-resolved measurements of the spread of particle correlations, and the detection of many-fermion entanglement.

  1. Enhanced atom interferometry through quantum information science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Mark; Benton, Brandon; Krygier, Michael; Clark, Charles

    2011-05-01

    New designs for atom interferometers can be inspired by quantum information science (QIS). QIS-inspired atom interferometer (AI) designs have the potential for producing AIs with enhanced sensitivity and robustness. We compare the sensitivity of a standard Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) Bragg AI with an AI whose design is based on the idea of decoherence-free subspaces (DFS). We studied the performance of both atom interferometers using an enhanced version of a previously developed Bragg interferometer prototyping model. This model approximates the effect on the condensate of multiple Bragg pulses separated by time delays using two elements: the effect of a single pulse and condensate evolution between pulses. The overall effect is rapidly approximated by following the steps of the interferometric process. We describe this model and then present the comparison of the performance of the M-Z interferometer with that of the DFS-inspired interferometer. Support provided by NSF grant number PHY-0758111.

  2. Enhanced atom interferometry through quantum information science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Mark; Benton, Brandon; Krygier, Michael; Clark, Charles W.

    2011-03-01

    New designs for atom interferometers can be inspired by quantum information science (QIS). QIS--inspired atom interferometer (AI) designs have the potential for producing AIs with enhanced sensitivity and robustness. We compare the sensitivity of a standard Mach--Zehnder (M--Z) Bragg AI with an AI whose design is based on the idea of decoherence--free subspaces (DFS). We studied the performance of both atom interferometers using an enhanced version of a previously developed Bragg interferometer prototyping model. This model approximates the effect on the condensate of multiple Bragg pulses separated by time delays using two elements: the effect of a single pulse and condensate evolution between pulses. The overall effect is rapidly approximated by following the steps of the interferometric process. We describe this model and then present the comparison of the performance of the M--Z interferometer with that of the DFS--inspired interferometer. Support provided by NSF grant number PHY-0758111.

  3. Quantum Gas Microscope for Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okan, Melih; Cheuk, Lawrence; Nichols, Matthew; Lawrence, Katherine; Zhang, Hao; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Strongly interacting fermions define the properties of complex matter throughout nature, from atomic nuclei and modern solid state materials to neutron stars. Ultracold atomic Fermi gases have emerged as a pristine platform for the study of many-fermion systems. In this poster we demonstrate the realization of a quantum gas microscope for fermionic 40 K atoms trapped in an optical lattice and the recent experiments which allows one to probe strongly correlated fermions at the single atom level. We combine 3D Raman sideband cooling with high- resolution optics to simultaneously cool and image individual atoms with single lattice site resolution at a detection fidelity above 95%. The imaging process leaves the atoms predominantly in the 3D motional ground state of their respective lattice sites, inviting the implementation of a Maxwell's demon to assemble low-entropy many-body states. Single-site resolved imaging of fermions enables the direct observation of magnetic order, time resolved measurements of the spread of particle correlations, and the detection of many-fermion entanglement. NSF, AFOSR-PECASE, AFOSR-MURI on Exotic Phases of Matter, ARO-MURI on Atomtronics, ONR, a Grant from the Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

  4. Quantum entanglement in multiparticle systems of two-level atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, Ram Narayan

    2011-09-15

    We propose the necessary and sufficient condition for the presence of quantum entanglement in arbitrary symmetric pure states of two-level atomic systems. We introduce a parameter to quantify quantum entanglement in such systems. We express the inherent quantum fluctuations of a composite system of two-level atoms as a sum of the quantum fluctuations of the individual constituent atoms and their correlation terms. This helps to separate out and study solely the quantum correlations among the atoms and obtain the criterion for the presence of entanglement in such multiatomic systems.

  5. Adiabatic Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Grant

    2013-03-01

    We are implementing a new platform for adiabatic quantum computation (AQC)[2] based on trapped neutral atoms whose coupling is mediated by the dipole-dipole interactions of Rydberg states. Ground state cesium atoms are dressed by laser fields in a manner conditional on the Rydberg blockade mechanism,[3,4] thereby providing the requisite entangling interactions. As a benchmark we study a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem whose solution is found in the ground state spin configuration of an Ising-like model. In collaboration with Lambert Parazzoli, Sandia National Laboratories; Aaron Hankin, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; James Chin-Wen Chou, Yuan-Yu Jau, Peter Schwindt, Cort Johnson, and George Burns, Sandia National Laboratories; Tyler Keating, Krittika Goyal, and Ivan Deutsch, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; and Andrew Landahl, Sandia National Laboratories. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  6. Bohr's Creation of his Quantum Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, John

    2013-04-01

    Fresh letters throw new light on the content and state of Bohr's mind before and during his creation of the quantum atom. His mental furniture then included the atomic models of the English school, the quantum puzzles of Continental theorists, and the results of his own studies of the electron theory of metals. It also included the poetry of Goethe, plays of Ibsen and Shakespeare, novels of Dickens, and rhapsodies of Kierkegaard and Carlyle. The mind that held these diverse ingredients together oscillated between enthusiasm and dejection during the year in which Bohr took up the problem of atomic structure. He spent most of that year in England, which separated him for extended periods from his close-knit family and friends. Correspondence with his fianc'ee, Margrethe Nørlund, soon to be published, reports his ups and downs as he adjusted to J.J. Thomson, Ernest Rutherford, the English language, and the uneven course of his work. In helping to smooth out his moods, Margrethe played an important and perhaps an enabling role in his creative process.

  7. Cold atom quantum emulation of ultrafast processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Shankari; Geiger, Zachary; Fujiwara, Kurt; Singh, Kevin; Senaratne, Ruwan; Weld, David

    2016-05-01

    Pulsed lasers are an invaluable probe of fast electron dynamics in condensed matter systems. However, despite tremendous progress, physical limitations on lasers and a lack of exact theoretical models still limit the exploration of ultrafast processes in solids. We discuss a possible complementary approach, in which lattice-trapped cold neutral atoms driven far from equilibrium are used as a quantum emulator of ultrafast physics at sub-cycle timescales. The cold atom context is in many ways a natural choice for such experiments: equilibration timescales are more than ten orders of magnitude slower than those in solids, and strong driving forces are easily produced and manipulated. Our experimental approach uses ultracold strontium in optical traps. Multiple stable isotopes and a long-lived metastable state provide control over interaction strengths, while a narrow-linewidth transition expands the typical cold-atom toolbox of readout techniques. We discuss initial efforts in quantum emulation of tunnel ionization and development of a platform for more complicated endeavors, including the study of multiple-pulse sequences and recollision processes. We acknowledge support from the NSF GRFP, the AFOSR, the ARO and DURIP program, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the University of California Office of the President.

  8. Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics For Atomic Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovich, Thomas; Biamonte, Mason; Kouri, Don

    2012-02-01

    We employ our new approach to non-relativistic supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY-QM), (J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 8202(2010)) for any number of dimensions and distinguishable particles, to treat the hydrogen atom in full three-dimensional detail. In contrast to the standard one-dimensional radial equation SUSY-QM treatment of the hydrogen atom, where the superpotential is a scalar, in a full three-dimensional treatment, it is a vector which is independent of the angular momentum quantum number. The original scalar Schr"odinger Hamiltonian operator is factored into vector ``charge'' operators: Q and Q^. Using these operators, the first sector Hamiltonian is written as H1= Q^.Q + E0^1. The second sector Hamiltonian is a tensor given by H2= Q Q^ + E0^11 and is isospectral with H1. The second sector ground state, ψ0^(2), can be used to obtain the excited state wave functions of the first sector by application of the adjoint charge operator. We then adapt the aufbau principle to show this approach can be applied to treat the helium atom.

  9. Quantum sticking of atoms on membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2014-12-01

    A continuum model for low-energy physisorption on a membrane under tension is proposed and studied with variational mean-field theory. A discontinuous change in the energy-dependent sticking coefficient is predicted under certain conditions. This singularity is a result of the bosonic orthogonality catastrophe of the vibrational states of the membrane. The energy-dependent sticking coefficient is predicted to have exponential scaling in 1 /E at energies above the singularity. The application of this model to the quantum sticking of cold hydrogen to suspended graphene is discussed. The model predicts that a beam of atomic hydrogen can be completely reflected by suspended graphene at ultralow energies.

  10. Quantum Sticking of Atoms on Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis

    2014-05-01

    A continuum model for low-energy physisorption on a membrane under tension is proposed and studied with variational mean-field theory. A discontinuous change in the energy-dependent sticking coefficient is predicted under certain conditions. This singularity is a result of the bosonic orthogonality catastrophe of the vibrational states of the membrane. The energy-dependent sticking coefficient is predicted to have exponential scaling in 1/E above the singularity. The application of this model to the quantum sticking of cold hydrogen to suspended graphene is discussed. The model predicts that a beam of atomic hydrogen can be completely reflected by suspended graphene at ultralow energies.

  11. A Green's function quantum average atom model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Starrett, Charles Edward

    2015-05-21

    A quantum average atom model is reformulated using Green's functions. This allows integrals along the real energy axis to be deformed into the complex plane. The advantage being that sharp features such as resonances and bound states are broadened by a Lorentzian with a half-width chosen for numerical convenience. An implementation of this method therefore avoids numerically challenging resonance tracking and the search for weakly bound states, without changing the physical content or results of the model. A straightforward implementation results in up to a factor of 5 speed-up relative to an optimized orbital based code.

  12. Trapping atoms using nanoscale quantum vacuum forces

    PubMed Central

    Chang, D. E.; Sinha, K.; Taylor, J. M.; Kimble, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum vacuum forces dictate the interaction between individual atoms and dielectric surfaces at nanoscale distances. For example, their large strengths typically overwhelm externally applied forces, which makes it challenging to controllably interface cold atoms with nearby nanophotonic systems. Here we theoretically show that it is possible to tailor the vacuum forces themselves to provide strong trapping potentials. Our proposed trapping scheme takes advantage of the attractive ground-state potential and adiabatic dressing with an excited state whose potential is engineered to be resonantly enhanced and repulsive. This procedure yields a strong metastable trap, with the fraction of excited-state population scaling inversely with the quality factor of the resonance of the dielectric structure. We analyse realistic limitations to the trap lifetime and discuss possible applications that might emerge from the large trap depths and nanoscale confinement. PMID:25008119

  13. Apparatus for fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry and quantum pumping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivory, M. K.; Ziltz, A.; Field, J.; Aubin, S.

    2010-03-01

    We present the current state of an apparatus designed to create and manipulate ultracold bosonic and fermionic Rb and K isotopes for a fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry, microwave trapping, and quantum pumping experiments. Quantum pumping is a phenomenon which can precisely control bias-less flow of single electrons in a circuit. Using ultracold atoms on atom chips, we can test theoretical predictions which have not yet been verified due to experimental difficulties in solid state systems. The apparatus design consists of a magneto-optical trap, magnetic transport system, atom chip, and optical dipole trap. We have demonstrated basic laser cooling and trapping and are working towards transport of the collected atoms to the atom chip for cooling to quantum degeneracy. Once quantum degeneracy is achieved at the chip, micro-magnetic reservoirs of ultracold atoms connected by a 1D ``wire'' create a circuit for various quantum pumping schemes. These schemes are also more broadly applicable to atomtronics experiments.

  14. Control of atomic spin squeezing via quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xuping; Ling, Yang; Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2016-06-01

    We propose a scheme to generate and control atomic spin squeezing via atomic coherence induced by the strong coupling and probe fields in the Λ-type electromagnetically-induced-transparency configuration in an atomic ensemble. Manipulation of squeezing of the two components in the plane orthogonal to the mean atomic spin direction and generation of nearly perfect squeezing in either component can be achieved by varying the relative intensities of the coupling and probe fields. This method provides a flexible and convenient way to create and control atomic spin squeezing, which may find potential applications in high-precision atomic-physics measurement, quantum coherent control, and quantum information processing.

  15. Coherent quantum depletion of an interacting atom condensate.

    PubMed

    Kira, M

    2015-01-01

    Sufficiently strong interactions promote coherent quantum transitions in spite of thermalization and losses, which are the adversaries of delicate effects such as reversibility and correlations. In atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), strong atom-atom interactions can eject atoms from the BEC to the normal component, yielding quantum depletion instead of temperature depletion. A recent experiment has already been verified to overcome losses. Here I show that it also achieves coherent quantum-depletion dynamics in a BEC swept fast enough from weak to strong atom-atom interactions. The elementary coherent process first excites the normal component into a liquid state that evolves into a spherical shell state, where the atom occupation peaks at a finite momentum to shield 50% of the BEC atoms from annihilation. The identified coherent processes resemble ultrafast semiconductor excitations expanding the scope of BEC explorations to many-body non-equilibrium studies. PMID:25767044

  16. Steady state quantum discord for circularly accelerated atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiawei; Yu, Hongwei

    2015-12-01

    We study, in the framework of open quantum systems, the dynamics of quantum entanglement and quantum discord of two mutually independent circularly accelerated two-level atoms in interaction with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar fields in the Minkowski vacuum. We assume that the two atoms rotate synchronically with their separation perpendicular to the rotating plane. The time evolution of the quantum entanglement and quantum discord of the two-atom system is investigated. For a maximally entangled initial state, the entanglement measured by concurrence diminishes to zero within a finite time, while the quantum discord can either decrease monotonically to an asymptotic value or diminish to zero at first and then followed by a revival depending on whether the initial state is antisymmetric or symmetric. When both of the two atoms are initially excited, the generation of quantum entanglement shows a delayed feature, while quantum discord is created immediately. Remarkably, the quantum discord for such a circularly accelerated two-atom system takes a nonvanishing value in the steady state, and this is distinct from what happens in both the linear acceleration case and the case of static atoms immersed in a thermal bath.

  17. Geometric quantum discord of a Jaynes-Cummings atom and an isolated atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Wen-Chao; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hua-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We studied the geometric quantum discord of a quantum system consisting of a Jaynes-Cummings (JC) atom, a cavity and an isolated atom. The analytical expressions of the geometric quantum discord for two atoms, every atom with a cavity and the total system were obtained. We showed that the geometric quantum discord is not always zero when the entanglement falls to zero for a two-atom subsystem; the geometric measurement of the quantum discord of the total system developed periodically with a single frequency if the initial two-atom state was not entangled, otherwise, it oscillated with two or four frequencies according to whether the cavity was initially empty or not, respectively.

  18. Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structures and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrides, Constantinos

    This dissertation consists of topics in two related areas of research that together provide quantum mechanical descriptions of atomic and molecular interactions and reactions. The first is the ab initio electronic structure calculation that provides the atomic and molecular interaction potential, including the long-range potential. The second is the quantum theory of interactions that uses such potentials to understand scattering, long-range molecules, and reactions. In ab initio electronic structure calculations, we present results of dynamic polarizabilities for a variety of atoms and molecules, and the long-range dispersion coefficients for a number of atom-atom and atom-molecule cases. We also present results of a potential energy surface for the triatomic lithium-ytterbium-lithium system, aimed at understanding the related chemical reactions. In the quantum theory of interactions, we present a multichannel quantum-defect theory (MQDT) for atomic interactions in a magnetic field. This subject, which is complex especially for atoms with hyperfine structure, is essential for the understanding and the realization of control and tuning of atomic interactions by a magnetic field: a key feature that has popularized cold atom physics in its investigations of few-body and many-body quantum systems. Through the example of LiK, we show how MQDT provides a systematic and an efficient understanding of atomic interaction in a magnetic field, especially magnetic Feshbach resonances in nonzero partial waves.

  19. Quantum Pumping with Ultracold Atoms on Microchips: Fermions versus Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Kunal K.; Aubin, Seth

    2009-09-18

    We present a design for simulating quantum pumping of electrons in a mesoscopic circuit with ultracold atoms in a micromagnetic chip trap. We calculate theoretical results for quantum pumping of both bosons and fermions, identifying differences and common features, including geometric behavior and resonance transmission. We analyze the feasibility of experiments with bosonic {sup 87}Rb and fermionic {sup 40}K atoms with an emphasis on reliable atomic current measurements.

  20. Quantum Teleportation of High-dimensional Atomic Momenta State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qurban, Misbah; Abbas, Tasawar; Rameez-ul-Islam; Ikram, Manzoor

    2016-06-01

    Atomic momenta states of the neutral atoms are known to be decoherence resistant and therefore present a viable solution for most of the quantum information tasks including the quantum teleportation. We present a systematic protocol for the teleportation of high-dimensional quantized momenta atomic states to the field state inside the cavities by applying standard cavity QED techniques. The proposal can be executed under prevailing experimental scenario.

  1. Universal quantum gates for atomic systems assisted by Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Zhang, Mei

    2015-08-01

    Both cavity quantum electrodynamics and photons are promising candidates for quantum information processing. Here we present two efficient schemes for universal quantum gates, that is, Fredkin gates and \\sqrt{\\text{SWAP}} gates on atomic systems, assisted by Faraday rotation catalyzed by an auxiliary single photon. These gates are achieved by successfully reflecting an auxiliary single photon from an optical cavity with a single-trapped atom. They do not require additional qubits and they only need some linear-optical elements besides the nonlinear interaction between the flying photon and the atoms in the optical cavities. Moreover, these two universal quantum gates are robust. A high fidelity can be achieved in our schemes with current experimental technology. They may be very useful in quantum information processing in future, with the great progress on controlling atomic systems.

  2. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms.

    PubMed

    Kómár, P; Topcu, T; Kessler, E M; Derevianko, A; Vuletić, V; Ye, J; Lukin, M D

    2016-08-01

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles. PMID:27541452

  3. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kómár, P.; Topcu, T.; Kessler, E. M.; Derevianko, A.; Vuletić, V.; Ye, J.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles.

  4. Quantum Sticking of Atomic Hydrogen to Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanting; Doherty, Adam; Geragotelis, Andrew; Clougherty, Dennis

    2013-03-01

    We consider the low-energy behavior of the sticking probability of atomic hydrogen to suspended graphene. For energy transfer through the flexural modes of graphene, we find that the inelastic coupling falls in the subOhmic regime. Thus the effects of low-frequency fluctuations of the graphene sheet are crucially important for quantum sticking. We analytically solve for the low-energy asymptotic behavior of the sticking coefficient using a variational mean-field method [D.P. Clougherty and Y. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 120401 (2012)]. We find that as a result of strong coupling to the low-frequency flexural modes of graphene, a new scaling law results. For suspended graphene at finite temperature, we find that at a critical incident energy, the sticking probability drops discontinuously; below this critical energy, the sticking probability is suppressed by the orthogonality catastrophe. We compare our nonperturbative variational results to those obtained by using Fermi's golden rule. We gratefully acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation under DMR-1062966.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo for atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, R.N.

    1989-11-01

    The diffusion quantum Monte Carlo with fixed nodes (QMC) approach has been employed in studying energy-eigenstates for 1--4 electron systems. Previous work employing the diffusion QMC technique yielded energies of high quality for H{sub 2}, LiH, Li{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O. Here, the range of calculations with this new approach has been extended to include additional first-row atoms and molecules. In addition, improvements in the previously computed fixed-node energies of LiH, Li{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O have been obtained using more accurate trial functions. All computations were performed within, but are not limited to, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. In our computations, the effects of variation of Monte Carlo parameters on the QMC solution of the Schroedinger equation were studied extensively. These parameters include the time step, renormalization time and nodal structure. These studies have been very useful in determining which choices of such parameters will yield accurate QMC energies most efficiently. Generally, very accurate energies (90--100% of the correlation energy is obtained) have been computed with single-determinant trail functions multiplied by simple correlation functions. Improvements in accuracy should be readily obtained using more complex trial functions.

  6. Quantum-mechanical transport equation for atomic systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical transport equation (QMTE) is derived which should be applicable to a wide range of problems involving the interaction of radiation with atoms or molecules which are also subject to collisions with perturber atoms. The equation follows the time evolution of the macroscopic atomic density matrix elements of atoms located at classical position R and moving with classical velocity v. It is quantum mechanical in the sense that all collision kernels or rates which appear have been obtained from a quantum-mechanical theory and, as such, properly take into account the energy-level variations and velocity changes of the active (emitting or absorbing) atom produced in collisions with perturber atoms. The present formulation is better suited to problems involving high-intensity external fields, such as those encountered in laser physics.

  7. Coherent quantum depletion of an interacting atom condensate

    PubMed Central

    Kira, M.

    2015-01-01

    Sufficiently strong interactions promote coherent quantum transitions in spite of thermalization and losses, which are the adversaries of delicate effects such as reversibility and correlations. In atomic Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs), strong atom–atom interactions can eject atoms from the BEC to the normal component, yielding quantum depletion instead of temperature depletion. A recent experiment has already been verified to overcome losses. Here I show that it also achieves coherent quantum-depletion dynamics in a BEC swept fast enough from weak to strong atom–atom interactions. The elementary coherent process first excites the normal component into a liquid state that evolves into a spherical shell state, where the atom occupation peaks at a finite momentum to shield 50% of the BEC atoms from annihilation. The identified coherent processes resemble ultrafast semiconductor excitations expanding the scope of BEC explorations to many-body non-equilibrium studies. PMID:25767044

  8. Nanophotonic quantum phase switch with a single atom.

    PubMed

    Tiecke, T G; Thompson, J D; de Leon, N P; Liu, L R; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2014-04-10

    By analogy to transistors in classical electronic circuits, quantum optical switches are important elements of quantum circuits and quantum networks. Operated at the fundamental limit where a single quantum of light or matter controls another field or material system, such a switch may enable applications such as long-distance quantum communication, distributed quantum information processing and metrology, and the exploration of novel quantum states of matter. Here, by strongly coupling a photon to a single atom trapped in the near field of a nanoscale photonic crystal cavity, we realize a system in which a single atom switches the phase of a photon and a single photon modifies the atom's phase. We experimentally demonstrate an atom-induced optical phase shift that is nonlinear at the two-photon level, a photon number router that separates individual photons and photon pairs into different output modes, and a single-photon switch in which a single 'gate' photon controls the propagation of a subsequent probe field. These techniques pave the way to integrated quantum nanophotonic networks involving multiple atomic nodes connected by guided light. PMID:24717513

  9. A quantum network with atoms and photons (QNET-AP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Ronald E.; Lee, Patricia; Deacon, Keith S.; Tunick, Arnold; Quraishi, Qudsia; Stack, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Enabling secure communication, unparalleled computing capabilities, and fundamental nonlocality physics exploration, the development of quantum repeaters is the key quantum information processing technology advance needed for implementing real world quantum networks beyond the laboratory environment. Currently, components exist for intra-laboratory quantum networks but no system exists for connecting distant ( 1 km ) quantum memories in the real world. We present a physics analysis of quantum repeater network designs for intracity optical fiber connections between nodes based on atomic memories and linear optics. Long distances will necessitate the use of (1) two-photon Hong-Ou-Mandel style interference between atomic ensembles for entanglement swapping, and (2) photonic qubit wavelength conversion between atomic emissions and photons at telecommunication wavelengths in fiber. We report on our experimental progress towards implementing A Quantum Network with Atoms and Photons (QNET-AP), a quantum repeater network test-bed, between the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland (UMD).

  10. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, S. N.; Moiseev, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks.

  11. Voltage-controlled quantum light from an atomically thin semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Goodfellow, Kenneth M.; Beams, Ryan; Vamivakas, A. Nick

    2015-06-01

    Although semiconductor defects can often be detrimental to device performance, they are also responsible for the breadth of functionality exhibited by modern optoelectronic devices. Artificially engineered defects (so-called quantum dots) or naturally occurring defects in solids are currently being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to high-resolution metrology. In parallel, the quantum confinement exhibited by atomically thin materials (semi-metals, semiconductors and insulators) has ushered in an era of flatland optoelectronics whose full potential is still being articulated. In this Letter we demonstrate the possibility of leveraging the atomically thin semiconductor tungsten diselenide (WSe2) as a host for quantum dot-like defects. We report that this previously unexplored solid-state quantum emitter in WSe2 generates single photons with emission properties that can be controlled via the application of external d.c. electric and magnetic fields. These new optically active quantum dots exhibit excited-state lifetimes on the order of 1 ns and remarkably large excitonic g-factors of 10. It is anticipated that WSe2 quantum dots will provide a novel platform for integrated solid-state quantum photonics and quantum information processing, as well as a rich condensed-matter physics playground with which to explore the coupling of quantum dots and atomically thin semiconductors.

  12. Quantum Atomic Clock Synchronization: An Entangled Concept of Nonlocal Simultaneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, D.; Dowling, J.; Williams, C.; Jozsa, R.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that two spatially separated parties (Alice and Bob) can utilize shared prior quantum entanglement, as well as a classical information channel, to establish a synchronized pair of atomic clocks.

  13. The Quantum Atomic Model "Electronium": A Successful Teaching Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the quantum atomic model Electronium. Outlines the Bremen teaching approach in which this model is used, and analyzes the learning of two students as they progress through the teaching unit. (Author/MM)

  14. Quantum Electrodynamics Effects in Heavy Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaev, V. M.; Andreev, O. V.; Bondarev, A. I.; Glazov, D. A.; Kozhedub, Y. S.; Maiorova, A. V.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Plunien, G.; Volotka, A. V.

    2011-05-11

    Quantum electrodynamics theory of heavy ions and atoms is considered. The current status of calculations of the binding energies, the hyperfine splitting and g factor values in heavy few-electron ions is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental data. A special attention is focused on tests of quantum electrodynamics in strong electromagnetic fields and on determination of the fundamental constants. Recent progress in calculations of the parity nonconservation effects with heavy atoms and ions is also reported.

  15. Single-Atom Single-Photon Quantum Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehring, David; Bochmann, Joerg; Muecke, Martin; Specht, Holger; Weber, Bernhard; Wilk, Tatjana; Rempe, Gerhard

    2008-05-01

    By combining atom trapping techniques and cavity cooling schemes we are able to trap a single neutral atom inside a high-finesse cavity for several tens of seconds. We show that our coupled atom-cavity system can be used to generate single photons in a controlled way. With our long trapping times and high single-photon production efficiency, the non-classical properties of the emitted light can be shown in the photon correlations of a single atom. In a similar atom-cavity setup, we investigate the interface between atoms and photons by entangling a single atom with a single photon emitted into the cavity and by further mapping the quantum state of the atom onto a second single photon. These schemes are intrinsically deterministic and establish the basic element required to realize a distributed quantum network with individual atoms at rest as quantum memories and single flying photons as quantum messengers. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the European Union SCALA and CONQUEST programs. D. L. M. acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  16. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  17. Processing quantum information with relativistic motion of atoms.

    PubMed

    Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; Aasen, David; Kempf, Achim

    2013-04-19

    We show that particle detectors, such as two-level atoms, in noninertial motion (or in gravitational fields) could be used to build quantum gates for the processing of quantum information. Concretely, we show that through suitably chosen noninertial trajectories of the detectors the interaction Hamiltonian's time dependence can be modulated to yield arbitrary rotations in the Bloch sphere due to relativistic quantum effects. PMID:23679587

  18. A Quantum Model of Atoms (the Energy Levels of Atoms).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafie, Francois

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the model for all atoms which was developed on the same basis as Bohr's model for the hydrogen atom. Calculates the radii and the energies of the orbits. Demonstrates how the model obeys the de Broglie's hypothesis that the moving electron exhibits both wave and particle properties. (Author/ASK)

  19. Quantum Communication between Atomic Ensembles Using Coherent Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lu-Ming; Cirac, J. I.; Zoller, P.; Polzik, E. S.

    2000-12-01

    Protocols for quantum communication between massive particles, such as atoms, are usually based on making use of nonclassical light, and/or superhigh finesse optical cavities are normally needed to enhance interaction between atoms and photons. We demonstrate a remarkable result: by using only coherent light, entanglement can be generated between distant free space atomic ensembles, and an unknown quantum state can thus be teleported from one to another. Neither nonclassical light nor cavities are needed in the scheme, which greatly simplifies its experimental implementation.

  20. Atomically precise, coupled quantum dots fabricated by cleaved edge overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegscheider, W.; Schedelbeck, G.; Bichler, M.; Abstreiter, G.

    Recent progress in the fabrication of quantum dots by molecular beam epitaxy along three directions in space is reviewed. The optical properties of different sample structures consisting of individual quantum dots, pairs of coupled dots as well as of linear arrays of dots are studied by microscopic photoluminescence spectroscopy. The high degree of control over shape, composition and position of the 7×7×7 nm3 size GaAs quantum dots, which form at the intesection of three orthogonal quantum wells, allows a detailed investigation of the influence of coupling between almost identical zero-dimensional objects. In contrast to the inhomogeneously broadened quantum well and quantum wire signals originating from the complex twofold cleaved edge overgrowth structure, the photoluminescence spetrum of an individual quantum dot exhibits a single sharp line (full width at half maximum <70μeV) almost free of background signal. Microscopic photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy directly reveals the discreteness of the energy levels of the zero-dimensional structures and justifies the denomination "artificial atoms" for the quantum dots. It is further demonstrated that an "artifical molecule", characterized by the existence of bonding and antibonding states can be assembled from two of such "artificial atoms". The coupling strength between the "artificial atoms" is adjusted by the "interatomic" distance and is reflected in the energetic separation of the bonding and antibonding levels and the linewidths of the corresponding interband transitions.

  1. Towards scalable quantum communication using atomic ensembles and light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Mikhail

    2002-03-01

    One of the challenges in experimental quantum information science involves reliable transport (communication) of quantum bits over long distances under realistic conditions involving decoherence and noise. Photons are the fastest and simplest carriers of quantum information since they interact weakly with environment, but they are difficult to localize and store. It appears that an ideal solution would be to store and process quantum information in matter (i.e. nodes of quantum memory), and to communicate between these nodes using photons. In this talk we discuss how quantum optical techniques can be used to accomplish this goal using atomic ensembles and light as tools. In particular, we describe a fast and robust mechanism for quantum state transfer between light fields and atoms. This is achieved by adiabatically reducing the group velocity of propagating light to zero, thereby ``trapping'' the photon states in atomic ensembles. We describe the basic principles of this technique as well as our recent experimental progress toward realization of these ideas. We then describe how these techniques can be used to implement scalable technique for long-distance quantum communication in realistic noisy channels.

  2. Quantum chaos of atoms in a resonant cavity.

    PubMed

    Berman, G. P.; Bulgakov, E. N.; Zaslavsky, G. M.

    1992-04-01

    A system of atoms interacting with a radiation field in a resonant cavity is studied under conditions when the dynamics in the classical limit is stochastic. This situation is called quantum chaos. Equations of motion are obtained for the quantum-mechanical expectation values which take into account the quantum correlation functions. It is shown that in a situation corresponding to quantum chaos, the quantum corrections grow exponentially, making the evolution of the system essentially quantal after a certain time tau( variant Planck's over 2pi ) has elapsed. Analytical and numerical analysis show that in this regime the time tau( variant Planck's over 2pi ) obeys the logarithmic law tau( variant Planck's over 2pi ) approximately ln N (N is the number of atoms), and not the law tau( variant Planck's over 2pi ) approximately N(alpha) (alpha is a certain constant of order unity), as would be the case in the absence of chaos. PMID:12779972

  3. Scalable neutral atom quantum computing with MEMS micromirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoernschild, Caleb; Lu, Felix; Ryu, Hoon; Feng, Michael; Kim, Jungsang

    2010-03-01

    In order to realize a useful atom-based quantum computer, a means to efficiently distribute critical laser resources to multiple trap locations is essential. Optical micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) can provide the scalability, flexibility, and stability needed to help bridge the gap between fundamental demonstrations of quantum gates to large scale quantum computing of multiple qubits. Using controllable, broadband micromirrors, an arbitrary atom in a 1, 2, or 3 dimensional optical lattice can be addressed with a single laser source. It is straightforward to scale this base system to address n arbitrary set of atoms simultaneously using n laser sources. We explore on-demand addressability of individual atoms trapped in a 1D lattice, as well as investigate the effect the micromirrors have on the laser beam quality and phase stability.

  4. Quantum metrology with a scanning probe atom interferometer.

    PubMed

    Ockeloen, Caspar F; Schmied, Roman; Riedel, Max F; Treutlein, Philipp

    2013-10-01

    We use a small Bose-Einstein condensate on an atom chip as an interferometric scanning probe to map out a microwave field near the chip surface with a few micrometers resolution. With the use of entanglement between the atoms, our interferometer overcomes the standard quantum limit of interferometry by 4 dB and maintains enhanced performance for interrogation times up to 10 ms. This corresponds to a microwave magnetic field sensitivity of 77 pT/√Hz in a probe volume of 20 μm(3). Quantum metrology with entangled atoms is useful in measurements with high spatial resolution, since the atom number in the probe volume is limited by collisional loss. High-resolution measurements of microwave near fields, as demonstrated here, are important for the development of integrated microwave circuits for quantum information processing and applications in communication technology. PMID:24138235

  5. A computational toolbox for quantum and atomic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sze M.

    1999-08-01

    A collection of routines is described which largely automates the process of generating the quantum mechanical equations of motion for problems involving systems with relatively few degrees of freedom. Their use allows the user to adopt a high-level approach to writing simulation programs which concentrates on the physics of the problem, rather than on the details of the solution. Examples are taken from the fields of quantum and atomic optics, but the toolbox is also useful for problems involving quantum information and in teaching quantum mechanics. The toolbox has been implemented using the Matlab programming language, but the ideas may be applied to any other object-oriented language.

  6. Quantum walks and quantum simulations with Bloch-oscillating spinor atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Witthaut, D.

    2010-09-15

    We propose a scheme for the realization of a quantum walker and a quantum simulator for the Dirac equation with ultracold spinor atoms in driven optical lattices. A precise control of the dynamics of the atomic matter wave can be realized using time-dependent external forces. If the force depends on the spin state of the atoms, the dynamics will entangle the inner and outer degrees of freedom, which offers unique opportunities for quantum information and quantum simulation. Here we introduce a method to realize a quantum walker based on the state-dependent transport of spinor atoms and a coherent driving of the internal state. In the limit of weak driving the dynamics are equivalent to that of a Dirac particle in 1+1 dimensions. Thus it becomes possible to simulate relativistic effects such as Zitterbewegung and Klein tunneling.

  7. Scalable quantum information processing with photons and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jian-Wei

    Over the past three decades, the promises of super-fast quantum computing and secure quantum cryptography have spurred a world-wide interest in quantum information, generating fascinating quantum technologies for coherent manipulation of individual quantum systems. However, the distance of fiber-based quantum communications is limited due to intrinsic fiber loss and decreasing of entanglement quality. Moreover, probabilistic single-photon source and entanglement source demand exponentially increased overheads for scalable quantum information processing. To overcome these problems, we are taking two paths in parallel: quantum repeaters and through satellite. We used the decoy-state QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon source, and used the measurement-device-independent QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon detectors--two main loopholes in quantum cryptograph. Based on these techniques, we are now building world's biggest quantum secure communication backbone, from Beijing to Shanghai, with a distance exceeding 2000 km. Meanwhile, we are developing practically useful quantum repeaters that combine entanglement swapping, entanglement purification, and quantum memory for the ultra-long distance quantum communication. The second line is satellite-based global quantum communication, taking advantage of the negligible photon loss and decoherence in the atmosphere. We realized teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100 km, and later on a rapidly moving platform. We are also making efforts toward the generation of multiphoton entanglement and its use in teleportation of multiple properties of a single quantum particle, topological error correction, quantum algorithms for solving systems of linear equations and machine learning. Finally, I will talk about our recent experiments on quantum simulations on ultracold atoms. On the one hand, by applying an optical Raman lattice technique, we realized a two-dimensional spin-obit (SO

  8. Single-Atom Gating of Quantum State Superpositions

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-04-28

    The ultimate miniaturization of electronic devices will likely require local and coherent control of single electronic wavefunctions. Wavefunctions exist within both physical real space and an abstract state space with a simple geometric interpretation: this state space - or Hilbert space - is spanned by mutually orthogonal state vectors corresponding to the quantized degrees of freedom of the real-space system. Measurement of superpositions is akin to accessing the direction of a vector in Hilbert space, determining an angle of rotation equivalent to quantum phase. Here we show that an individual atom inside a designed quantum corral1 can control this angle, producing arbitrary coherent superpositions of spatial quantum states. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and nanostructures assembled atom-by-atom we demonstrate how single spins and quantum mirages can be harnessed to image the superposition of two electronic states. We also present a straightforward method to determine the atom path enacting phase rotations between any desired state vectors. A single atom thus becomes a real-space handle for an abstract Hilbert space, providing a simple technique for coherent quantum state manipulation at the spatial limit of condensed matter.

  9. A quantum interface between single atoms and nanophotonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jeffrey Douglas

    Strong interactions between light and atoms at the single-quantum level are an important ingredient for quantum technologies, as well as for studies of fundamental effects in quantum optics. This thesis describes the development of a novel experimental platform that allows for trapping a single rubidium atom in the evanescent mode of a nano-fabricated optical cavity with sub-wavelength dimensions. By virtue of their small size, these cavities provide extremely large atom-photon coupling strengths and good prospects for scalability and integration into complex quantum optical circuits. Positioning the atom near the nano-structure is accomplished using a scanning optical tweezer dipole trap. As a first application, we have demonstrated a coherent optical switch, where a single gate photon controls the propagation of many subsequent signal photons, with the interaction mediated by the atom and cavity. We have also shown that the optical response of the combined atom-cavity system is nonlinear at the level of one or two photons.

  10. Quasieigenstate coalescence in an atom-cavity quantum composite.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngwoon; Kang, Sungsam; Lim, Sooin; Kim, Wookrae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2010-04-16

    We report the first direct observation of an exceptional point (EP) in an open quantum composite of a single atom and a high-Q cavity mode. The atom-cavity coupling constant was made a continuous variable by utilizing the multisublevel nature of a single rubidium atom when it is optimally coupled to the cavity mode. The spectroscopic properties of quasieigenstates of the atom-cavity composite were experimentally investigated near the EP. Branch-point singularity of quasieigenenergies was observed and its 4pi symmetry was demonstrated. Consequently, the cavity transmission at the quasieigenstate was observed to exhibit a critical behavior at the EP. PMID:20481988

  11. Generation of atom-light entanglement in an optical cavity for quantum enhanced atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haine, Simon A.; Lau, Wing Yung Sarah

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the generation of atom-light entanglement via Raman superradiance in an optical cavity, and show how this can be used to enhance the sensitivity of atom interferometry. We model a realistic optical cavity, and show that by careful temporal shaping of the optical local oscillator used to measure the light emitted from the cavity, information in the optical mode can be combined with the signal from the atom interferometer to reduce the quantum noise, and thus increase the sensitivity. It was found in Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 053002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.053002 that an atomic "seed" was required in order to reduce spontaneous emission and allow for single mode behavior of the device. In this paper we find that the optical cavity reduces the need for an atomic seed, which allows for stronger atom-light correlations and a greater level of quantum enhancement.

  12. Quantum galvanometer by interfacing a vibrating nanowire and cold atoms.

    PubMed

    Kálmán, O; Kiss, T; Fortágh, J; Domokos, P

    2012-01-11

    We evaluate the coupling of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of ultracold, paramagnetic atoms to the magnetic field of the current in a mechanically vibrating carbon nanotube within the frame of a full quantum theory. We find that the interaction is strong enough to sense quantum features of the nanowire current noise spectrum by means of hyperfine-state-selective atom counting. Such a nondestructive measurement of the electric current via its magnetic field corresponds to the classical galvanometer scheme, extended to the quantum regime of charge transport. The calculated high sensitivity of the interaction in the nanowire-BEC hybrid systems opens up the possibility of quantum control, which may be further extended to include other relevant degrees of freedom. PMID:22112048

  13. Planar quantum squeezing and atom interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    He, Q. Y.; Drummond, P. D.; Reid, M. D.; Peng Shiguo

    2011-08-15

    We obtain a lower bound on the sum of two orthogonal spin component variances in a plane. This gives a planar uncertainty relation which holds even when the Heisenberg relation is not useful. We investigate the asymptotic, large-J limit and derive the properties of the planar quantum squeezed states that saturate this uncertainty relation. These states extend the concept of spin squeezing to any two conjugate spin directions. We show that planar quantum squeezing can be achieved experimentally as the ground state of a Bose-Einstein condensate in two coupled potential wells with a critical attractive interaction. These states reduce interferometric phase noise at all phase angles simultaneously. This is useful for one-shot interferometric phase measurements where the measured phase is completely unknown. Our results can also be used to derive entanglement criteria for multiple spins J at separated sites, with applications in quantum information.

  14. Quantum Chemical Topology: Knowledgeable atoms in peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The need to improve atomistic biomolecular force fields remains acute. Fortunately, the abundance of contemporary computing power enables an overhaul of the architecture of current force fields, which typically base their electrostatics on fixed atomic partial charges. We discuss the principles behind the electrostatics of a more realistic force field under construction, called QCTFF. At the heart of QCTFF lies the so-called topological atom, which is a malleable box, whose shape and electrostatics changes in response to a changing environment. This response is captured by a machine learning method called Kriging. Kriging directly predicts each multipole moment of a given atom (i.e. the output) from the coordinates of the nuclei surrounding this atom (i.e. the input). This procedure yields accurate interatomic electrostatic energies, which form the basis for future-proof progress in force field design.

  15. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    From simple interference fringes, over molecular wave packets, to nonlinear optical patterns - the fundamental interaction between light and matter leads to the formation of structures in many areas of atomic and optical physics. Sophisticated technology in experimental quantum optics, as well as modern computational tools available to theorists, have led to spectacular achievements in the investigation of quantum structures. This special issue is dedicated to recent developments in this area. It presents a selection of examples where quantum dynamics, fluctuations, and coherence generate structures in time or in space or where such structures are observed experimentally. The examples range from coherence phenomena in condensed matter, over atoms in optical structures, entanglement in light and matter, to quantum patterns in nonlinear optics and quantum imaging. The combination of such seemingly diverse subjects formed the basis of a successful European TMR network, "Quantum Structures" (visit http://cnqo.phys.strath.ac.uk/~gianluca/QSTRUCT/). This special issue partly re.ects the results and collaborations of the network, going however well beyond its scope by including contributions from a global community and from many related topics which were not addressed directly in the network. The aim of this issue is to present side by side these di.erent topics, all of which are loosely summarized under quantum structures, to highlight their common aspects, their di.erences, and the progress which resulted from the mutual exchange of results, methods, and knowledge. To guide the reader, we have organized the articles into subsections which follow a rough division into structures in material systems and structures in optical .elds. Nevertheless, in the following introduction we point out connections between the contributions which go beyond these usual criteria, thus highlighting the truly interdisciplinary nature of quantum structures. Much of the progress in atom optics

  16. Topological quantum memory interfacing atomic and superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, ZhengYuan; Yin, ZhangQi; Chen, Yan; Wang, ZiDan; Zhu, ShiLiang

    2016-06-01

    We propose a scheme to manipulate a topological spin qubit which is realized with cold atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. In particular, by introducing a quantum opto-electro-mechanical interface, we are able to first transfer a superconducting qubit state to an atomic qubit state and then to store it into the topological spin qubit. In this way, an efficient topological quantum memory could be constructed for the superconducting qubit. Therefore, we can consolidate the advantages of both the noise resistance of the topological qubits and the scalability of the superconducting qubits in this hybrid architecture.

  17. Quantum Information Science with Single Atoms and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) offers powerful possibilities for the deterministic control of atom-photon interactions quantum by quantum [1]. Indeed, modern experiments in cavity QED have achieved the exceptional circumstance of strong coupling, for which single quanta can profoundly impact the dynamics of the atom-cavity system. The diverse accomplishments of this field set the stage for advances into yet broader frontiers in quantum information science for which cavity QED offers unique advantages, including the creation of quantum networks [2]. The primary technical challenge on the road toward such scientific goals is the need to trap and localize atoms within a cavity in a setting suitable for strong coupling. Two separate experiments in our group have achieved significant milestones in this quest, namely the real-time trapping and tracking of single atoms in cavity QED [3-5]. In one experiment, an atom is trapped by an auxiliary field that functions as a far-detuned dipole-force trap (FORT) [3,4], with trap lifetime 3s, which should be compared to the nanosecond time scale for internal dynamics of the atom-cavity system. In a second experiment, we rely upon light forces at the single-photon level to trap a single atom within the cavity mode [5]. As illustrated by the movies available at http://www.its.caltech.edu/ qoptics/atomorbits/, these reconstructions reveal single atoms bound in orbit by the mechanical forces associated with single photons, and realize a new form of microscopy. Over the duration of the observation, the sensitivity is near the standard quantum limit for sensing the motion of a Cesium atom. This work is supported by the NSF, by the Caltech MURI for Quantum Networks administered by the ARO, and by the ONR. 1. For a review, see contributions in the Special Issue of Physica Scripta T76 (1998). 2. J. I. Cirac, S. J. van Enk, P. Zoller, H. J. Kimble, and H. Mabuchi, Physica Scripta T76, 223 (1998). 3. J. Ye, D. W. Vernooy, and H. J

  18. Probing quantum phases of ultracold atoms in optical lattices by transmission spectra in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-05-01

    Studies of ultracold gases in optical lattices provide a means for testing fundamental and application-oriented quantum many-body concepts of condensed-matter physics in well controllable atomic systems; examples include strongly correlated phases and quantum-information processing. Standard methods to observe quantum properties of Bose-Einstein condensates are based on matter-wave interference between atoms released from traps, a method that ultimately destroys the system. Here, we propose a new approach on the basis of optical measurements that conserves the number of atoms. We prove that atomic quantum statistics can be mapped on transmission spectra of high-Q cavities, where atoms create a quantum refractive index. This can be useful for studying phase transitions-for example, between Mott insulator and superfluid states-as various phases show qualitatively distinct light scattering. Joining the paradigms of cavity quantum electrodynamics and ultracold gases could enable conceptually new investigations of both light and matter at ultimate quantum levels. We predict effects accessible in experiments that recently became possible.

  19. Quantum Logic with Cavity Photons From Single Atoms.

    PubMed

    Holleczek, Annemarie; Barter, Oliver; Rubenok, Allison; Dilley, Jerome; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B R; Langfahl-Klabes, Gunnar; Marshall, Graham D; Sparrow, Chris; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Poulios, Konstantinos; Kuhn, Axel; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate quantum logic using narrow linewidth photons that are produced with an a priori nonprobabilistic scheme from a single ^{87}Rb atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity. We use a controlled-not gate integrated into a photonic chip to entangle these photons, and we observe nonclassical correlations between photon detection events separated by periods exceeding the travel time across the chip by 3 orders of magnitude. This enables quantum technology that will use the properties of both narrow-band single photon sources and integrated quantum photonics. PMID:27447506

  20. Quantum Logic with Cavity Photons From Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleczek, Annemarie; Barter, Oliver; Rubenok, Allison; Dilley, Jerome; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B. R.; Langfahl-Klabes, Gunnar; Marshall, Graham D.; Sparrow, Chris; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Poulios, Konstantinos; Kuhn, Axel; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate quantum logic using narrow linewidth photons that are produced with an a priori nonprobabilistic scheme from a single 87Rb atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity. We use a controlled-not gate integrated into a photonic chip to entangle these photons, and we observe nonclassical correlations between photon detection events separated by periods exceeding the travel time across the chip by 3 orders of magnitude. This enables quantum technology that will use the properties of both narrow-band single photon sources and integrated quantum photonics.

  1. Analysis of an Atom-Optical Architecture for Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, Simon J.; Stephens, Ashley M.; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    Quantum technology based on photons has emerged as one of the most promising platforms for quantum information processing, having already been used in proof-of-principle demonstrations of quantum communication and quantum computation. However, the scalability of this technology depends on the successful integration of experimentally feasible devices in an architecture that tolerates realistic errors and imperfections. Here, we analyse an atom-optical architecture for quantum computation designed to meet the requirements of scalability. The architecture is based on a modular atom-cavity device that provides an effective photon-photon interaction, allowing for the rapid, deterministic preparation of a large class of entangled states. We begin our analysis at the physical level, where we outline the experimental cavity quantum electrodynamics requirements of the basic device. Then, we describe how a scalable network of these devices can be used to prepare a three-dimensional topological cluster state, sufficient for universal fault-tolerant quantum computation. We conclude at the application level, where we estimate the system-level requirements of the architecture executing an algorithm compiled for compatibility with the topological cluster state.

  2. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, A. A.; Granroth, G. E.; Abernathy, D. L.; Stone, M. B.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Stocks, G. M.; Nagler, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreement with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Overall, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.

  3. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Samolyuk, German D.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nagler, Stephen E.

    2016-01-19

    High energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreementmore » with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Lastly, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.« less

  4. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Samolyuk, German D.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nagler, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    High energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreement with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Lastly, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.

  5. Quantum state control of trapped Holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, James; Yip, Christopher; Milner, William; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey; Saffman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Neutral Holmium with its large number of hyperfine ground states provides a promising approach for collective encoding of a multi-qubit register. A prerequisite for collective encoding is the ability to prepare different states in the 128 state hyperfine ground manifold. We report progress towards optical pumping and control of the hyperfine Zeeman state of trapped Ho atoms. Atoms are transferred from a 410.5 nm MOT into a 455 nm optical dipole trap. The atoms can be optically pumped using light driving the ground 6s2 , F = 11 to 6 s 6 p ,F' = 11 transition together with a F = 10 to F' = 11 repumper. Microwave fields are then used to drive transitions to hyperfine levels with 4 <= F <= 11 . Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  6. A hybrid quantum system of ultracold atoms and trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sias, Carlo; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Zipkes, Christoph; Koehl, Michael; AMOP Team

    2011-05-01

    In the last decades, trapped ions and ultracold atoms have emerged as exceptionally controllable experimental systems to investigate fundamental physics, ranging from quantum information science to simulations of condensed matter models. Even though they share some common grounds in experimental techniques, such as laser cooling, ion trapping and atom trapping have developed very much independently, and only little cross-pollination has been seen. In our experiment we study how cold atoms can be combined with single trapped ions to create a new hybrid quantum system with tailored properties. We have deterministically placed a single ion into an atomic Bose Einstein condensate and demonstrated independent control over the two components within the hybrid system. We have studied the fundamental interaction processes and observed sympathetic cooling of the single ion by the condensate. Additionally, we have characterized elastic and inelastic atom- ion collisions and measured the energy-dependent reaction rate constants. Our experiment paves the way for coupling atomic quantum many-body states to an independently controllable single-particle, giving access to a wealth of novel physics and to completely new detection and manipulation techniques.

  7. Quantum stability and magic lengths of metal atom wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lan, Haiping; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Niu, Qian; Yang, Jinlong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-06-01

    Metal atom wires represent an important class of nanomaterials in the development of future electronic devices and other functional applications. Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we carry out a systematic study of the quantum stability of freestanding atom wires consisting of prototypical metal elements with s -, s p -, and s d -valence electrons. We explore how the quantum mechanically confined motion and local bonding of the valence electrons in these different wire systems can dictate their overall structural stability and find that the formation energy of essentially all the wires oscillates with respect to their length measured by the number n of atoms contained in the wires, establishing the existence of highly preferred (or magic) lengths. Furthermore, different wire classes exhibit distinctively different oscillatory characteristics and quantum stabilities. Alkali metal wires possessing an unpaired s valence electron per atom exhibit simple damped even-odd oscillations. In contrast, Al and Ga wires containing three s2p1 valence electrons per atom generally display much larger and undamped even-odd energy oscillations due to stronger local bonding of the p orbitals. Among the noble metals, the s -dominant Ag wires behave similarly to the linear alkali metal wires, while Au and Pt wires distinctly prefer to be structurally zigzagged due to strong relativistic effects. These findings are discussed in connection with existing experiments and should also be instrumental in future experimental realization of different metal atom wires in freestanding or supported environments with desirable functionalities.

  8. Interplay of weak interactions in the atom-by-atom condensation of xenon within quantum boxes.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Sylwia; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Kawai, Shigeki; Ivas, Toni; Nowakowski, Jan; Fatayer, Shadi; Wäckerlin, Christian; Nijs, Thomas; Meyer, Ernst; Björk, Jonas; Stöhr, Meike; Gade, Lutz H; Jung, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Condensation processes are of key importance in nature and play a fundamental role in chemistry and physics. Owing to size effects at the nanoscale, it is conceptually desired to experimentally probe the dependence of condensate structure on the number of constituents one by one. Here we present an approach to study a condensation process atom-by-atom with the scanning tunnelling microscope, which provides a direct real-space access with atomic precision to the aggregates formed in atomically defined 'quantum boxes'. Our analysis reveals the subtle interplay of competing directional and nondirectional interactions in the emergence of structure and provides unprecedented input for the structural comparison with quantum mechanical models. This approach focuses on-but is not limited to-the model case of xenon condensation and goes significantly beyond the well-established statistical size analysis of clusters in atomic or molecular beams by mass spectrometry. PMID:25608225

  9. Interplay of weak interactions in the atom-by-atom condensation of xenon within quantum boxes

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowska, Sylwia; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Kawai, Shigeki; Ivas, Toni; Nowakowski, Jan; Fatayer, Shadi; Wäckerlin, Christian; Nijs, Thomas; Meyer, Ernst; Björk, Jonas; Stöhr, Meike; Gade, Lutz H.; Jung, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Condensation processes are of key importance in nature and play a fundamental role in chemistry and physics. Owing to size effects at the nanoscale, it is conceptually desired to experimentally probe the dependence of condensate structure on the number of constituents one by one. Here we present an approach to study a condensation process atom-by-atom with the scanning tunnelling microscope, which provides a direct real-space access with atomic precision to the aggregates formed in atomically defined ‘quantum boxes’. Our analysis reveals the subtle interplay of competing directional and nondirectional interactions in the emergence of structure and provides unprecedented input for the structural comparison with quantum mechanical models. This approach focuses on—but is not limited to—the model case of xenon condensation and goes significantly beyond the well-established statistical size analysis of clusters in atomic or molecular beams by mass spectrometry. PMID:25608225

  10. Interplay of weak interactions in the atom-by-atom condensation of xenon within quantum boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowska, Sylwia; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Kawai, Shigeki; Ivas, Toni; Nowakowski, Jan; Fatayer, Shadi; Wäckerlin, Christian; Nijs, Thomas; Meyer, Ernst; Björk, Jonas; Stöhr, Meike; Gade, Lutz H.; Jung, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Condensation processes are of key importance in nature and play a fundamental role in chemistry and physics. Owing to size effects at the nanoscale, it is conceptually desired to experimentally probe the dependence of condensate structure on the number of constituents one by one. Here we present an approach to study a condensation process atom-by-atom with the scanning tunnelling microscope, which provides a direct real-space access with atomic precision to the aggregates formed in atomically defined ‘quantum boxes’. Our analysis reveals the subtle interplay of competing directional and nondirectional interactions in the emergence of structure and provides unprecedented input for the structural comparison with quantum mechanical models. This approach focuses on—but is not limited to—the model case of xenon condensation and goes significantly beyond the well-established statistical size analysis of clusters in atomic or molecular beams by mass spectrometry.

  11. Gradient Echo Quantum Memory in Warm Atomic Vapor

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Olivier; Hosseini, Mahdi; Sparkes, Ben M.; Everett, Jesse L.; Higginbottom, Daniel; Campbell, Geoff T.; Lam, Ping Koy; Buchler, Ben C.

    2013-01-01

    Gradient echo memory (GEM) is a protocol for storing optical quantum states of light in atomic ensembles. The primary motivation for such a technology is that quantum key distribution (QKD), which uses Heisenberg uncertainty to guarantee security of cryptographic keys, is limited in transmission distance. The development of a quantum repeater is a possible path to extend QKD range, but a repeater will need a quantum memory. In our experiments we use a gas of rubidium 87 vapor that is contained in a warm gas cell. This makes the scheme particularly simple. It is also a highly versatile scheme that enables in-memory refinement of the stored state, such as frequency shifting and bandwidth manipulation. The basis of the GEM protocol is to absorb the light into an ensemble of atoms that has been prepared in a magnetic field gradient. The reversal of this gradient leads to rephasing of the atomic polarization and thus recall of the stored optical state. We will outline how we prepare the atoms and this gradient and also describe some of the pitfalls that need to be avoided, in particular four-wave mixing, which can give rise to optical gain. PMID:24300586

  12. Long-distance quantum networks using ultra-cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmeyer, Neal; Li, Xiao; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    The generation of entanglement between distantly located quantum memories via frequency converted single photons could enable many applications in quantum networking, including quantum teleportation, distributed quantum computing and potentially distributed precision timing. A quantum network with three or more nodes has yet to be demonstrated and moreover hybrid networks leverage advantages of different platforms. With an existing memory at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), based on weak Raman scattering in a Rb magneto-optical trap, we are building a second node at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), connected to ARL by a 13 km optical fiber. The second node will be a higher photon-rate node based on Rydberg excitations of a Rb ensemble in an optical dipole trap (N. Solmeyer et al., arXiv:1511.00025) and the first node will be upgraded to a Rydberg system soon. In the near term, we plan to generate entanglement between the second and a third node, based on a similar experimental setup, 100 m away at the JQI. For the ARL-JQI link we are presently working on quantum frequency conversion from IR photons to telecom wavelengths. Separately, we are pursuing frequency conversion from 493 nm photons to 780 nm to be used in a hybrid quantum network between ions and neutral atoms.

  13. Early atomic models - from mechanical to quantum (1904-1913)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baily, C.

    2013-01-01

    A complete history of early atomic models would fill volumes, but a reasonably coherent tale of the path from mechanical atoms to the quantum can be told by focusing on the relevant work of three great contributors to atomic physics, in the critically important years between 1904 and 1913: J.J. Thomson, Ernest Rutherford and Niels Bohr. We first examine the origins of Thomson's mechanical atomic models, from his ethereal vortex atoms in the early 1880's, to the myriad "corpuscular" atoms he proposed following the discovery of the electron in 1897. Beyond qualitative predictions for the periodicity of the elements, the application of Thomson's atoms to problems in scattering and absorption led to quantitative predictions that were confirmed by experiments with high-velocity electrons traversing thin sheets of metal. Still, the much more massive and energetic α-particles being studied by Rutherford were better suited for exploring the interior of the atom, and careful measurements on the angular dependence of their scattering eventually allowed him to infer the existence of an atomic nucleus. Niels Bohr was particularly troubled by the radiative instability inherent to any mechanical atom, and succeeded in 1913 where others had failed in the prediction of emission spectra, by making two bold hypotheses that were in contradiction to the laws of classical physics, but necessary in order to account for experimental facts.

  14. Quantum Coherence between Two Atoms beyond Q=10{sup 15}

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C. W.; Hume, D. B.; Thorpe, M. J.; Wineland, D. J.; Rosenband, T.

    2011-04-22

    We place two atoms in quantum superposition states and observe coherent phase evolution for 3.4x10{sup 15} cycles. Correlation signals from the two atoms yield information about their relative phase even after the probe radiation has decohered. This technique allowed a frequency comparison of two {sup 27}Al{sup +} ions with fractional uncertainty 3.7{sub -0.8}{sup +1.0}x10{sup -16}/{radical}({tau}/s). Two measures of the Q factor are reported: The Q factor derived from quantum coherence is 3.4{sub -1.1}{sup +2.4}x10{sup 16}, and the spectroscopic Q factor for a Ramsey time of 3 s is 6.7x10{sup 15}. We demonstrate a method to detect the individual quantum states of two Al{sup +} ions in a Mg{sup +}-Al{sup +}-Al{sup +} linear ion chain without spatially resolving the ions.

  15. Generalized Kronig-Penney model for ultracold atomic quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negretti, A.; Gerritsma, R.; Idziaszek, Z.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Calarco, T.

    2014-10-01

    We study the properties of a quantum particle interacting with a one-dimensional structure of equidistant scattering centers. We derive an analytical expression for the dispersion relation and for the Bloch functions in the presence of both even and odd scattering waves within the pseudopotential approximation. This generalizes the well-known solid-state physics textbook result known as the Kronig-Penney model. Our generalized model can be used to describe systems such as degenerate Fermi gases interacting with ions or with another neutral atomic species confined in an optical lattice, thus enabling the investigation of polaron or Kondo physics within a simple formalism. We focus our attention on the specific atom-ion system and compare our findings with quantum defect theory. Excellent agreement is obtained within the regime of validity of the pseudopotential approximation. This enables us to derive a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian for a degenerate quantum Bose gas in a linear chain of ions.

  16. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    From simple interference fringes, over molecular wave packets, to nonlinear optical patterns - the fundamental interaction between light and matter leads to the formation of structures in many areas of atomic and optical physics. Sophisticated technology in experimental quantum optics, as well as modern computational tools available to theorists, have led to spectacular achievements in the investigation of quantum structures. This special issue is dedicated to recent developments in this area. It presents a selection of examples where quantum dynamics, fluctuations, and coherence generate structures in time or in space or where such structures are observed experimentally. The examples range from coherence phenomena in condensed matter, over atoms in optical structures, entanglement in light and matter, to quantum patterns in nonlinear optics and quantum imaging. The combination of such seemingly diverse subjects formed the basis of a successful European TMR network, "Quantum Structures" (visit http://cnqo.phys.strath.ac.uk/~gianluca/QSTRUCT/). This special issue partly re.ects the results and collaborations of the network, going however well beyond its scope by including contributions from a global community and from many related topics which were not addressed directly in the network. The aim of this issue is to present side by side these di.erent topics, all of which are loosely summarized under quantum structures, to highlight their common aspects, their di.erences, and the progress which resulted from the mutual exchange of results, methods, and knowledge. To guide the reader, we have organized the articles into subsections which follow a rough division into structures in material systems and structures in optical .elds. Nevertheless, in the following introduction we point out connections between the contributions which go beyond these usual criteria, thus highlighting the truly interdisciplinary nature of quantum structures. Much of the progress in atom optics

  17. Quantum oscillations of nitrogen atoms in uranium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Aczel, Adam A; Granroth, Garrett E; MacDougall, Gregory J; Buyers, W. J. L.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Samolyuk, German D; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nagler, Stephen E

    2012-01-01

    The vibrational excitations of crystalline solids corresponding to acoustic or optic one phonon modes appear as sharp features in measurements such as neutron spectroscopy. In contrast, many-phonon excitations generally produce a complicated, weak, and featureless response. Here we present time-of-flight neutron scattering measurements for the binary solid uranium nitride (UN), showing well-defined, equally-spaced, high energy vibrational modes in addition to the usual phonons. The spectrum is that of a single atom, isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator and characterizes independent motions of light nitrogen atoms, each found in an octahedral cage of heavy uranium atoms. This is an unexpected and beautiful experimental realization of one of the fundamental, exactly-solvable problems in quantum mechanics. There are also practical implications, as the oscillator modes must be accounted for in the design of generation IV nuclear reactors that plan to use UN as a fuel.

  18. Maximal atom-photon entanglement in a double- quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordi, Zeinab; Ghanbari, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2015-06-01

    The atom-photon entanglement of a dressed atom and its spontaneous emission in a double- closed-loop atomic system is studied under multi-photon resonance condition. It is shown that even in the absence of quantum interference due to the spontaneous emission, the von Neumann entropy is phase-sensitive and it can be controlled by either intensity or relative phase of the applied fields. It is demonstrated that for the special case of Rabi frequency of the applied fields, the system is maximally entangled. Moreover, an open-loop configuration is considered, and it is shown that the degree of entanglement can be controlled by intensity of the applied fields. Furthermore, in electromagnetically induced transparency condition, the system is disentangled. Such a system can be used for quantum information processing via entanglement using optical switching.

  19. Atomic Quantum Gases in Kagomé Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, L.; Baranov, M. A.; Cirac, J. I.; Everts, H.-U.; Fehrmann, H.; Lewenstein, M.

    2004-07-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of creating and controlling an ideal and trimerized optical Kagomé lattice, and study the low temperature physics of various atomic gases in such lattices. In the trimerized Kagomé lattice, a Bose gas exhibits a Mott transition with fractional filling factors, whereas a spinless interacting Fermi gas at 2/3 filling behaves as a quantum magnet on a triangular lattice. Finally, a Fermi-Fermi mixture at half-filling for both components represents a frustrated quantum antiferromagnet with a resonating-valence-bond ground state and quantum spin liquid behavior dominated by a continuous spectrum of singlet and triplet excitations. We discuss the method of preparing and observing such a quantum spin liquid employing molecular Bose condensates.

  20. Nonlinear spectroscopic effects in quantum gases induced by atom-atom interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Safonov, A. I. Safonova, I. I.; Yasnikov, I. S.

    2013-05-15

    We consider nonlinear spectroscopic effects-interaction-enhanced double resonance and spectrum instability-that appear in ultracold quantum gases owing to collisional frequency shift of atomic transitions and, consequently, due to the dependence of the frequencies on the population of various internal states of the particles. Special emphasis is put to two simplest cases, (a) the gas of two-level atoms and (b) double resonance in a gas of three-level bosons, in which the probe transition frequency remains constant.

  1. Photonic Quantum Logic with Narrowband Light from Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenok, Allison; Holleczek, Annemarie; Barter, Oliver; Dilley, Jerome; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B. R.; Langfahl-Klabes, Gunnar; Kuhn, Axel; Sparrow, Chris; Marshall, Graham D.; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Poulios, Konstantinos; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    Atom-cavity sources of narrowband photons are a promising candidate for the future development of quantum technologies. Likewise, integrated photonic circuits have established themselves as a fore-running contender in quantum computing, security, and communication. Here we report on recent achievements to interface these two technologies: Atom-cavity sources coupled to integrated photonic circuits. Using narrow linewidth photons emitted from a single 87 Rb atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity we demonstrate the successful operation of an integrated control-not gate. Furthermore, we are able to verify the generation of post-selected entanglement upon successful operation of the gate. We are able to see non-classical correlations in detection events that are up to three orders of magnitude farther apart than the time needed for light to travel across the chip. Our hybrid approach will facilitate the future development of technologies that benefit from the advantages of both integrated quantum circuits and atom-cavity photon sources. Now at: National Physics Laboratory.

  2. Construction of a single atom trap for quantum information protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Duke Physics Department Team

    2016-05-01

    The field of quantum information science addresses outstanding problems such as achieving fundamentally secure communication and solving computationally hard problems. Great progress has been made in the field, particularly using photons coupled to ions and super conducting qubits. Neutral atoms are also interesting for these applications and though the technology for control of neutrals lags behind that of trapped ions, they offer some key advantages: primarily coupling to optical frequencies closer to the telecom band than trapped ions or superconducting qubits. Here we report progress on constructing a single atom trap for 87 Rb. This system is a promising platform for studying the technical problems facing neutral atom quantum computing. For example, most protocols destroy the trap when reading out the neutral atom's state; we will investigate an alternative non-destructive state detection scheme. We detail the experimental systems involved and the challenges addressed in trapping a single atom. All of our hardware components are off the shelf and relatively inexpensive. Unlike many other systems, we place a high numerical aperture lens inside our vacuum system to increase photon collection efficiency. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the ARO through Grant # W911NF1520047.

  3. Four-Dimensional Quantum Hall Effect with Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, H. M.; Zilberberg, O.; Ozawa, T.; Carusotto, I.; Goldman, N.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a realistic scheme to detect the 4D quantum Hall effect using ultracold atoms. Based on contemporary technology, motion along a synthetic fourth dimension can be accomplished through controlled transitions between internal states of atoms arranged in a 3D optical lattice. From a semiclassical analysis, we identify the linear and nonlinear quantized current responses of our 4D model, relating these to the topology of the Bloch bands. We then propose experimental protocols, based on current or center-of-mass-drift measurements, to extract the topological second Chern number. Our proposal sets the stage for the exploration of novel topological phases in higher dimensions.

  4. Efficient teleportation between remote single-atom quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Nölleke, Christian; Neuzner, Andreas; Reiserer, Andreas; Hahn, Carolin; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate teleportation of quantum bits between two single atoms in distant laboratories. Using a time-resolved photonic Bell-state measurement, we achieve a teleportation fidelity of (88.0 ± 1.5)%, largely determined by our entanglement fidelity. The low photon collection efficiency in free space is overcome by trapping each atom in an optical cavity. The resulting success probability of 0.1% is almost 5 orders of magnitude larger than in previous experiments with remote material qubits. It is mainly limited by photon propagation and detection losses and can be enhanced with a cavity-based deterministic Bell-state measurement. PMID:25166964

  5. Cold atom simulation of interacting relativistic quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Cirac, J Ignacio; Maraner, Paolo; Pachos, Jiannis K

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate that Dirac fermions self-interacting or coupled to dynamic scalar fields can emerge in the low energy sector of designed bosonic and fermionic cold atom systems. We illustrate this with two examples defined in two spacetime dimensions. The first one is the self-interacting Thirring model. The second one is a model of Dirac fermions coupled to a dynamic scalar field that gives rise to the Gross-Neveu model. The proposed cold atom experiments can be used to probe spectral or correlation properties of interacting quantum field theories thereby presenting an alternative to lattice gauge theory simulations. PMID:21231152

  6. Sequential double Auger decay in atoms: A quantum informatic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, S.; Chandra, N.

    2009-05-01

    We theoretically show that the process of inner-shell photoionization in an atom A, followed by the spontaneous sequential emission of two Auger electrons, produces various kinds of spin-entangled states of three flying electronic qubits. All properties of these states are completely pre-determined by the total spin quantum numbers of the electronic states of four atomic species (i.e., A, A, A, A) participating in this process in the Russell-Saunders coupling. These tripartite states are readily characterized experimentally by measuring only energies of the three emitted electrons, without requiring any entanglement witness or other such protocols.

  7. Mesoscopic Rydberg Impurity in an Atomic Quantum Gas.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Richard; Sadeghpour, H R; Demler, E

    2016-03-11

    Giant impurity excitations are powerful probes for exploring new regimes of far out of equilibrium dynamics in few- and many-body quantum systems, and in situ observations of correlations. Motivated by recent experimental progress in spectroscopic studies of Rydberg excitations in ultracold atoms, we develop a new theoretical approach for describing multiscale dynamics of Rydberg excitations in quantum Bose gases. We find that the crossover from few- to many-body dynamics manifests in a dramatic change in spectral profile from resolved molecular lines to broad Gaussian distributions representing a superpolaronic state in which many atoms bind to the Rydberg impurity. We discuss signatures of this crossover in the temperature and density dependence of the spectra. PMID:27015490

  8. Mesoscopic Rydberg Impurity in an Atomic Quantum Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Richard; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Demler, E.

    2016-03-01

    Giant impurity excitations are powerful probes for exploring new regimes of far out of equilibrium dynamics in few- and many-body quantum systems, and in situ observations of correlations. Motivated by recent experimental progress in spectroscopic studies of Rydberg excitations in ultracold atoms, we develop a new theoretical approach for describing multiscale dynamics of Rydberg excitations in quantum Bose gases. We find that the crossover from few- to many-body dynamics manifests in a dramatic change in spectral profile from resolved molecular lines to broad Gaussian distributions representing a superpolaronic state in which many atoms bind to the Rydberg impurity. We discuss signatures of this crossover in the temperature and density dependence of the spectra.

  9. From rotating atomic rings to quantum Hall states

    PubMed Central

    Roncaglia, M.; Rizzi, M.; Dalibard, J.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable efforts are currently devoted to the preparation of ultracold neutral atoms in the strongly correlated quantum Hall regime. However, the necessary angular momentum is very large and in experiments with rotating traps this means spinning frequencies extremely near to the deconfinement limit; consequently, the required control on parameters turns out to be too stringent. Here we propose instead to follow a dynamic path starting from the gas initially confined in a rotating ring. The large moment of inertia of the ring-shaped fluid facilitates the access to large angular momenta, corresponding to giant vortex states. The trapping potential is then adiabatically transformed into a harmonic confinement, which brings the interacting atomic gas in the desired quantum-Hall regime. We provide numerical evidence that for a broad range of initial angular frequencies, the giant-vortex state is adiabatically connected to the bosonic ν = 1/2 Laughlin state. PMID:22355562

  10. Rapid cooling to quantum degeneracy in dynamically shaped atom traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Richard; Green, Alaina; Bowler, Ryan; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-04-01

    We report on a general method for the rapid production of quantum degenerate gases. Using 174Yb, we achieve an experimental cycle time as low as 1.6-1.8 s for the production of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of (0.5 -1 ) ×105 atoms. While laser cooling to 30 μ K proceeds in a standard way, evaporative cooling is highly optimized by performing it in an optical trap that is dynamically shaped by utilizing the time-averaged potential of a single laser beam moving rapidly in one dimension. We also produce large (>106 ) atom number BECs and successfully model the evaporation dynamics over more than three orders of magnitude in phase space density. Our method provides a simple and general approach to solving the problem of long production times of quantum degenerate gases.

  11. Atomic electron energies including relativistic effects and quantum electrodynamic corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, M.; Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Huang, K. N.; Mark, H.

    1977-01-01

    Atomic electron energies have been calculated relativistically. Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions served as zeroth-order eigenfunctions to compute the expectation of the total Hamiltonian. A first order correction to the local approximation was thus included. Quantum-electrodynamic corrections were made. For all orbitals in all atoms with 2 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 106, the following quantities are listed: total energies, electron kinetic energies, electron-nucleus potential energies, electron-electron potential energies consisting of electrostatic and Breit interaction (magnetic and retardation) terms, and vacuum polarization energies. These results will serve for detailed comparison of calculations based on other approaches. The magnitude of quantum electrodynamic corrections is exhibited quantitatively for each state.

  12. Designing Frustrated Quantum Magnets with Laser-Dressed Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaetzle, Alexander W.; Dalmonte, Marcello; Nath, Rejish; Gross, Christian; Bloch, Immanuel; Zoller, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We show how a broad class of lattice spin-1 /2 models with angular- and distance-dependent couplings can be realized with cold alkali atoms stored in optical or magnetic trap arrays. The effective spin-1 /2 is represented by a pair of atomic ground states, and spin-spin interactions are obtained by admixing van der Waals interactions between fine-structure split Rydberg states with laser light. The strengths of the diagonal spin interactions as well as the "flip-flop," and "flip-flip" and "flop-flop" interactions can be tuned by exploiting quantum interference, thus realizing different spin symmetries. The resulting energy scales of interactions compare well with typical temperatures and decoherence time scales, making the exploration of exotic forms of quantum magnetism, including emergent gauge theories and compass models, accessible within state-of-the-art experiments.

  13. Designing frustrated quantum magnets with laser-dressed Rydberg atoms.

    PubMed

    Glaetzle, Alexander W; Dalmonte, Marcello; Nath, Rejish; Gross, Christian; Bloch, Immanuel; Zoller, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We show how a broad class of lattice spin-1/2 models with angular- and distance-dependent couplings can be realized with cold alkali atoms stored in optical or magnetic trap arrays. The effective spin-1/2 is represented by a pair of atomic ground states, and spin-spin interactions are obtained by admixing van der Waals interactions between fine-structure split Rydberg states with laser light. The strengths of the diagonal spin interactions as well as the "flip-flop," and "flip-flip" and "flop-flop" interactions can be tuned by exploiting quantum interference, thus realizing different spin symmetries. The resulting energy scales of interactions compare well with typical temperatures and decoherence time scales, making the exploration of exotic forms of quantum magnetism, including emergent gauge theories and compass models, accessible within state-of-the-art experiments. PMID:25978228

  14. Quantum entanglement for helium atom in the Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Fang, Te-Kuei; Ho, Yew Kam

    2015-03-15

    In the present work, we present an investigation on quantum entanglement of the two-electron helium atom immersed in weakly coupled Debye plasmas, modeled by the Debye-Hückel, or screened Coulomb, potential to mimic the interaction between two charged particles inside the plasma. Quantum entanglement is related to correlation effects in a multi-particle system. In a bipartite system, a measurement made on one of the two entangled particles affects the outcome of the other particle, even if such two particles are far apart. Employing wave functions constructed with configuration interaction B-spline basis, we have quantified von Neumann entropy and linear entropy for a series of He {sup 1,3}S{sup e} and {sup 1,3}P{sup o} states in plasma-embedded helium atom.

  15. Experiments with Ultracold Quantum-degenerate Fermionic Lithium Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Experimental methods of laser and evaporative cooling, used in the production of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates have recently been extended to realize quantum degeneracy in trapped Fermi gases. Fermi gases are a new rich system to explore the implications of Pauli exclusion on scattering properties of the system, and ultimately fermionic superfluidity. We have produced a new macroscopic quantum system, in which a degenerate Li-6 Fermi gas coexists with a large and stable Na-23 BEC. This was accomplished using inter-species sympathetic cooling of fermionic 6Li in a thermal bath of bosonic Na-23. We have achieved high numbers of both fermions (less than 10(exp 5) and bosons (less than 10(exp 6), and Li-6 quantum degeneracy corresponding to one half of the Fermi temperature. This is the first time that a Fermi sea was produced with a condensate as a "refrigerator".

  16. Charge transport and localization in atomically coherent quantum dot solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, Kevin; Yang, Jun; Savitzky, Benjamin H.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Wise, Frank; Hanrath, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxial attachment of quantum dots into ordered superlattices enables the synthesis of quasi-two-dimensional materials that theoretically exhibit features such as Dirac cones and topological states, and have major potential for unprecedented optoelectronic devices. Initial studies found that disorder in these structures causes localization of electrons within a few lattice constants, and highlight the critical need for precise structural characterization and systematic assessment of the effects of disorder on transport. Here we fabricated superlattices with the quantum dots registered to within a single atomic bond length (limited by the polydispersity of the quantum dot building blocks), but missing a fraction (20%) of the epitaxial connections. Calculations of the electronic structure including the measured disorder account for the electron localization inferred from transport measurements. The calculations also show that improvement of the epitaxial connections will lead to completely delocalized electrons and may enable the observation of the remarkable properties predicted for these materials.

  17. Electronic Structure of Helium Atom in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanta, K. Saha; Bhattacharyya, S.; T. K., Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Bound and resonance states of helium atom have been investigated inside a quantum dot by using explicitly correlated Hylleraas type basis set within the framework of stabilization method. To be specific, precise energy eigenvalues of bound 1sns (1Se) (n = 1-6) states and the resonance parameters i.e. positions and widths of 1Se states due to 2sns (n = 2-5) and 2pnp (n = 2-5) configurations of confined helium below N = 2 ionization threshold of He+ have been estimated. The two-parameter (Depth and Width) finite oscillator potential is used to represent the confining potential due to the quantum dot. It has been explicitly demonstrated that the electronic structural properties become sensitive functions of the dot size. It is observed from the calculations of ionization potential that the stability of an impurity ion within a quantum dot may be manipulated by varying the confinement parameters. A possibility of controlling the autoionization lifetime of doubly excited states of two-electron ions by tuning the width of the quantum cavity is also discussed here. TKM Gratefully Acknowledges Financial Support under Grant No. 37(3)/14/27/2014-BRNS from the Department of Atomic Energy, BRNS, Government of India. SB Acknowledges Financial Support under Grant No. PSW-160/14-15(ERO) from University Grants Commission, Government of India

  18. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  19. Long-distance quantum communication with neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Razavi, Mohsen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2006-04-15

    The architecture proposed by Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) for long-distance quantum communication with atomic ensembles is analyzed. Its fidelity and throughput in entanglement distribution, entanglement swapping, and quantum teleportation is derived within a framework that accounts for multiple excitations in the ensembles as well as loss and asymmetries in the channel. The DLCZ performance metrics that are obtained are compared to the corresponding results for the trapped-atom quantum communication architecture that has been proposed by a team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Northwestern University (MIT and NU). Both systems are found to be capable of high-fidelity entanglement distribution. However, the DLCZ scheme only provides conditional teleportation and repeater operation, whereas the MIT-NU architecture affords full Bell-state measurements on its trapped atoms. Moreover, it is shown that achieving unity conditional fidelity in DLCZ teleportation and repeater operation requires ideal photon-number resolving detectors. The maximum conditional fidelities for DLCZ teleportation and repeater operation that can be realized with nonresolving detectors are 1/2 and 2/3, respectively.

  20. Cold atoms in cavity QED for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernooy, David William

    2000-11-01

    The new field of quantum information science has exploded into virtually every area of modern physics because of the promise it holds for understanding physical limits to communication, computation and more generally the processing of information. Remarkably, this has come concomitantly with stunning successes at integrating laser cooling and trapping techniques with high finesse microresonators. A regime where some of the new theoretical ideas may be experimentally tested in the particular setting of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) has now been reached. This thesis contains three inter-related parts. First, work with microspheres as a possible next generation microcavity is presented, including both successful attempts to push the limits of their quality factors in the near infrared and first experimental results at atomic interaction with the mode of the sphere at the one-photon level. The unique properties of these resonators led to some theoretical investigations of the atom-field interaction emphasizing the quantization of the atomic center of mass degrees of freedom. This has been largely unexplored both theoretically and experimentally to this point, yet remains an extremely important aspect of most serious implementations of quantum information processing in the setting of optical cavity QED. Finally, the emphasis of the last part of this thesis is on an attempt at intracavity atomic localization in the laboratory. Results to date include the first ever trapping of single atoms inside a high finesse microresonator. The techniques and capabilities developed en route to this achievement should form the experimental backbone for future work in optical cavity QED.

  1. The Quantum World of Ultra-Cold Atoms and Light - Book 1: Foundations of Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Crispin; Zoller, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Abstract The Table of Contents is as follows: * I - THE PHYSICAL BACKGROUND * 1. Controlling the Quantum World * 1.1 Quantum Optics * 1.2 Quantum Information * 2. Describing the Quantum World * 2.1 Classical Stochastic Processes * 2.2. Theoretical Quantum Optics * 2.3. Quantum Stochastic Methods * 2.4. Ultra-Cold Atoms * II - CLASSICAL STOCHASTIC METHODS * 3. Physics in a Noisy World * 3.1. Brownian Motion and the Thermal Origin of Noise * 3.2. Brownian Motion, Friction, Noise and Temperature * 3.3. Measurement in a Fluctuating System * 4. Stochastic Differential Equations * 4.1. Ito Stochastic Differential Equation * 4.2. The Fokker-Planck Equation * 4.3. The Stratonovich Stochastic Differential Equation * 4.4. Systems with Many Variables * 4.5. Numerical Simulation of Stochastic Differential Equations * 5. The Fokker-Planck Equation * 5.1. Fokker-Planck Equation in One Dimension * 5.2. Eigenfunctions of the Fokker-Planck Equation * 5.3. Many-Variable Fokker-Planck Equations * 6. Master Equations and Jump Processes * 6.1. The Master Equation * 7. Applications of Random Processes * 7.1. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Process * 7.2. Johnson Noise * 7.3. Complex Variable Oscillator Processes * 8. The Markov Limit * 8.1. The White Noise Limit * 8.2. Interpretation and Generalizations of the White Noise Limit * 8.3. Linear Non-Markovian Stochastic Differential Equations * 9. Adiabatic Elimination of Fast Variables * 9.1 Slow and Fast Variables * 9.2. Other Applications of the Adiabatic Elimination Method * III - FIELDS, QUANTA AND ATOMS * 10. Ideal Bose and Fermi Systems * 10.1. The Quantum Gas * 10.2. Thermal States * 10.3. Fluctuations in the Ideal Bose Gas * 10.4. Bosonic Quantum Gaussian Systems * 10.5. Coherent States * 10.6. Fluctuations in Systems of Fermions * 10.7. Two-Level Systems and Pauli Matrices * 11. Quantum Fields * 11.1 Kinds of Quantum Field * 11.2 Coherence and Correlation Functions * 12. Atoms, Light and their Interaction * 12.1. Interaction with the

  2. An architecture for quantum computation with magnetically trapped Holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffman, Mark; Hostetter, James; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Outstanding challenges for scalable neutral atom quantum computation include correction of atom loss due to collisions with untrapped background gas, reduction of crosstalk during state preparation and measurement due to scattering of near resonant light, and the need to improve quantum gate fidelity. We present a scalable architecture based on loading single Holmium atoms into an array of Ioffe-Pritchard traps. The traps are formed by grids of superconducting wires giving a trap array with 40 μm period, suitable for entanglement via long range Rydberg gates. The states | F = 5 , M = 5 > and | F = 7 , M = 7 > provide a magic trapping condition at a low field of 3.5 G for long coherence time qubit encoding. The F = 11 level will be used for state preparation and measurement. The availability of different states for encoding, gate operations, and measurement, spectroscopically isolates the different operations and will prevent crosstalk to neighboring qubits. Operation in a cryogenic environment with ultra low pressure will increase atom lifetime and Rydberg gate fidelity by reduction of blackbody induced Rydberg decay. We will present a complete description of the architecture including estimates of achievable performance metrics. Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  3. Influence of realistic atom wall potentials in quantum reflection traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madroñero, Javier; Friedrich, Harald

    2007-02-01

    We study the influence of atom-surface interactions close to the surface on the confinement properties in a recently proposed model [A. Jurisch and H. Friedrich, Phys. Lett. A 349, 230 (2006)] for quantum reflection traps and test the reliability of the sharp-step approximation used there. Accurate numerical calculations show a dependence of the surviving particle fraction on characteristic potential lengths determined by the behavior of the interaction in the limits r→0 and r→∞ of the atom-surface distance r . For interactions dominated by the retarded potential proportional to 1/r4 we find that the simplified sharp-step potential reproduces the behavior of the trapped atoms well, both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  4. Quantum interference in a driven two-level atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficek, Z.; Rudolph, T.

    1999-12-01

    We show that a dynamical suppression of spontaneous emission, predicted for a three-level atom [S.-Y. Zhu and M. O. Scully, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 388 (1996)] can occur in a two-level atom driven by a polychromatic field. We find that the quantum interference, responsible for the cancellation of spontaneous emission, appears between different channels of transitions among the dressed states of the driven atom. We discuss the effect for bichromatic and trichromatic (amplitude-modulated) fields and find that these two cases lead to the cancellation of spontaneous emission in different parts of the fluorescence spectrum. Our system has the advantage of being easily accessible by current experiments.

  5. Observing the Quantum Spin Hall Effect with Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishnav, J. Y.; Stanescu, Tudor D.; Clark, Charles W.; Galitski, Victor

    2009-03-01

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) state is a topologically nontrivial state of matter proposed to exist in certain 2-D systems with spin-orbit coupling. While the electronic states of a QSH insulator are gapped in the bulk, a QSH insulator is characterized by gapless edge states of different spins which counterpropagate at a given edge; the spin is correlated with the direction of propagation. Recent proposals ootnotetextT. D. Stanescu, C. Zhang, V. Galitski, Physical Review Letters 99, 110403 (2007), J. Y. Vaishnav, Charles W. Clark, Physical Review Letters 100, 153002 (2008). suggest that synthetic spin-orbit couplings can be created for cold atoms moving in spatially varying light fields. Here, we identify an optical lattice setup which generates an effective QSH effect for cold, multilevel atoms. We also discuss methods for experimental detection of the atomic QSH effect.

  6. Approaching the quantum limit for plasmonics: linear atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Garnett W.

    2016-07-01

    Optical excitations in atomic-scale materials can be strongly mixed, with contributions from both single-particle transitions and collective response. This complicates the quantum description of these excitations, because there is no clear way to define their quantization. To develop a quantum theory for these optical excitations, they must first be characterized so that single-particle-like and collective excitations can be identified. Linear atomic chains, such as atom chains on surfaces, linear arrays of dopant atoms in semiconductors, or linear molecules, provide ideal testbeds for studying collective excitations in small atomic-scale systems. We use exact diagonalization to study the many-body excitations of finite (10 to 25) linear atomic chains described by a simplified model Hamiltonian. Exact diagonalization results can be very different from the density functional theory (DFT) results usually obtained. Highly correlated, multiexcitonic states, strongly dependent on the electron–electron interaction strength, dominate the exact spectral and optical response but are not present in DFT excitation spectra. The ubiquitous presence of excitonic many-body states in the spectra makes it hard to identify plasmonic excitations. A combination of criteria involving a many-body state’s transfer dipole moment, balance, transfer charge, dynamical response, and induced-charge distribution do strongly suggest which many-body states should be considered as plasmonic. This analysis can be used to reveal the few plasmonic many-body states hidden in the dense spectrum of low-energy single-particle-like states and many higher-energy excitonic-like states. These excitonic states are the predominant excitation because of the many possible ways to develop local correlations.

  7. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  8. Quantum jumps in a two-level atom: Simple theories versus quantum trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, H. M.; Toombes, G. E.

    1999-09-01

    A strongly driven (Ω>>γ) two-level atom relaxes towards an equilibrium state ρ which is almost completely mixed. One interpretation of this state is that it represents an ensemble average, and that an individual atom is at any time in one of the eigenstates of ρ. The theory of Teich and Mahler [Phys. Rev. A 45, 3300 (1992)] makes this interpretation concrete, with an individual atom jumping stochastically between the two eigenstates when a photon is emitted. The dressed-atom theory is also supposed to describe the quantum jumps of an individual atom due to photoemissions. But the two pictures are contradictory because the dressed states of the atom are almost orthogonal to the eigenstates of ρ. In this paper we investigate three ways of measuring the field radiated by the atom, which attempt to reproduce the simple quantum jump dynamics of the dressed state or Teich and Mahler models. These are spectral detection (using optical filters), two-state jumps (using adaptive homodyne detection), and orthogonal jumps (another adaptive homodyne scheme). We find that the three schemes closely mimic the jumps of the dressed-state model, with errors of order 34(γ/Ω)2/3, 14(γ/Ω)2, and 34(γ/Ω)2, respectively. The significance of this result to the program of environmentally induced superselection is discussed.

  9. Resonance fluorescence and quantum jumps in single atoms: Testing the randomness of quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Erber, T.; Hammerling, P.; Hockney, G.; Porrati, M.; Putterman, S.

    1989-03-01

    When a single trapped /sup 198/Hg/sup +/ ion is illuminated by two lasers,each tuned to an approximate transition, the resulting fluorescence switches/ital on/ and /ital off/ in a series of pulses resembling a bistable telegraph.This intermittent fluorescence can also be obtained by optical pumpingwith a single laser. Quantum jumps between successive atomic levels may betraced directly with multiple-resonance fluorescence. Atomic transition ratesand photon antibunching distributions can be inferred from the pulse statisticsand compared with quantum theory. Stochastic tests also indicate that thequantum telegraphs are good random number generators. During periods whenthe fluorescence is switched /ital off/, the radiationless atomic currentsthat generate the telegraph signals can be adjusted by varying the laserillumination: if this coherent evolution of the wave functions is sustainedover sufficiently long time intervals, novel /ital interactive/ precisionmeasurements, near the limits of the time-energy uncertainty relations, arepossible./copyright/ 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

  10. Quantum gases in optical lattices : the atomic Mott insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosten, D.

    2004-09-01

    An optical lattice is a periodic potential for atoms, created using a standing wave pattern of light. Due to the interaction between the light and the atoms, the atoms are attracted to either the nodes or the anti-nodes of the standing wave, depending on the exact wave lenght of the light. This means that if such a lattice is loaded with a sufficiently high number of ultracold atoms, a periodic array of atoms is obtained, we an interatomic distance of a few tenths of a micrometer. In order to obtain such a high number of cold atoms, one first has to create a so-called Bose-Einstein condensate. When an optical lattice is loaded from a Bose-Einstein condensate, it is possible to create a system in which every atom is in the lowest band of the lattice and there is on average one atom in each lattice site. Because the lattice potential is created with laser light, the depth of the lattice can easily be tuned by changing the intensity of the laser. When the intensity of the laser light is low, the atoms can tunnel from one site to the next. Due to this tunneling, the gas of atoms in the lattice will remain superfluid. However, if the intensity of the laser light is increased to above a certain critical value, a quantum phase transition occurs to a so-called Mott insulator. In this state, the atoms can no longer tunnel due to the fact that the on-site interaction between atoms becomes more important then the tunneling probability. In this PhD thesis, a description is given of the experimental setup that is being constructed in our group to create these systems in our lab. Also, a theoretical description is given of these systems and several important quantities our derived, such as the gap of the Mott-insulating state. Furthermore, an experiment is proposed that can be used to accurately measure this gap.

  11. Quantum Metrology with Lattice-Confined Ultracold SR Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, A. D.; Campbell, G. K.; Blatt, S.; Boyd, M. M.; Martin, M. J.; Nicholson, T. L.; Swallows, M.; Thomsen, J. W.; Fortier, T.; Oates, C. W.; Diddams, S. A.; Lemke, N. D.; Barber, Z.; Porsev, S. G.; Ye, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Quantum state engineering of ultracold matter and precise control of optical fields have together allowed accurate measurement of light-matter interactions for applications in precision tests of fundamental physics. State-of-the-art lasers maintain optical phase coherence over one second. Optical frequency combs distribute this optical phase coherence across the entire visible and infrared parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, leading to the direct visualization and measurement of light ripples. At the same time, ultracold atoms confined in an optical lattice with zero differential ac Stark shift between two clock states allow us to minimize quantum decoherence while strengthening the clock signal. For 87Sr, we achieve a resonance quality factor > 2.4 × 1014 on the 1S0 - 3P0 doubly forbidden clock transition at 698 nm [1]. The uncertainty of this new clock has reached 1 × 10-16 and its instability approaches 1 × 10-15 at 1 s [2]. These developments represent a remarkable convergence of ultracold atoms, laser stabilization, and ultrafast science. Further improvements are still tantalizing, with quantum measurement and precision metrology combining forces to explore the next frontier.

  12. Operating Spin Echo in the Quantum Regime for an Atomic-Ensemble Quantum Memory.

    PubMed

    Rui, Jun; Jiang, Yan; Yang, Sheng-Jun; Zhao, Bo; Bao, Xiao-Hui; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-09-25

    Spin echo is a powerful technique to extend atomic or nuclear coherence times by overcoming the dephasing due to inhomogeneous broadenings. However, there are disputes about the feasibility of applying this technique to an ensemble-based quantum memory at the single-quanta level. In this experimental study, we find that noise due to imperfections of the rephasing pulses has both intense superradiant and weak isotropic parts. By properly arranging the beam directions and optimizing the pulse fidelities, we successfully manage to operate the spin echo technique in the quantum regime by observing nonclassical photon-photon correlations as well as the quantum behavior of retrieved photons. Our work for the first time demonstrates the feasibility of harnessing the spin echo method to extend the lifetime of ensemble-based quantum memories at the single-quanta level. PMID:26451551

  13. Continuous Measurement Quantum State Tomography of Atomic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofrio Almeida, Carlos A.

    Quantum state tomography is a fundamental tool in quantum information processing tasks. It allows us to estimate the state of a quantum system by measuring different observables on many identically prepared copies of the system. Usually, one makes projective measurements of an "informationally complete" set of observables and repeats them enough times so that good estimates of their expectation values are obtained. This is, in general, a very time-consuming task that requires a large number of measurements. There are, however, systems in which the data acquisition can be done more efficiently. In fact, an ensemble of quantum systems can be prepared and manipulated by external fields while being continuously probed collectively, producing enough information to estimate its state. This provides a basis for continuous measurement quantum tomography, and is the main topic of this dissertation. This method, based on weak continuous measurement, has the advantage of being fast, accurate, and almost nonperturbative. In this work, we present a extensive discussion and a generalization of the protocol proposed in [1], which was experimentally achieved in [2] using cold cesium atoms. In this protocol, an ensemble of identically prepared systems is collectively probed and controlled in a time-dependent manner so as to create an informationally complete continuous measurement record. The measurement history is then inverted to determine the state at the initial time. To achieve this, we use two different estimation methods: the widely used maximum likelihood and the novel compressed sensing algorithms. The general formalism is applied to the case of reconstruction of the quantum state encoded in the magnetic sub-levels of a large-spin alkali atom, 133Cs. We extend the applicability of the protocol in [1] to the more ambitious case of reconstruction of states in the full 16-dimensional electronic-ground subspace ( F = 3, F = 4), controlled by microwaves and radio

  14. A Rydberg atom-photon-superconductor quantum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, J. A.; Booth, D. W.; Beck, M. A.; Pritchard, J. D.; Xia, T.; McDermott, R.; Saffman, M.; UW Hybrid QC Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid quantum computation bridges disparate quantum technologies in order to achieve fast gates with long coherence times. Our implementation combines superconducting circuit-QED with singly trapped Rydberg atoms. Introducing typical AMO techniques into cryogenic environments required the development of several novel approaches that we will discuss in our talk. Our current experiment involves trapping cesium atoms inside a 4 K cryostat, transporting them first horizontally and then vertically up to a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. After transport we use a novel two-photon Rydberg excitation via the 6S1 / 2 --> 5D5 / 2 quadrupole transition to enable direct excitation of nP3 / 2 states for strong electric-dipole coupling to the cavity. This excitation scheme significantly reduces the Doppler mismatch compared to previous two-photon excitation schemes to enable high fidelity operations. First optical spectroscopy and Rabi oscillation results will be shown along with microwave cavity coupling data. Experimental and theoretical efforts toward increasing fidelity of our operations by minimizing sensitivity of the Rydberg atoms to stray external electric fields will be discussed. This work is supported by an ARO DURIP award.

  15. Towards experimental quantum-field tomography with ultracold atoms

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, A.; Friesdorf, M.; Langen, T.; Rauer, B.; Schweigler, T.; Hübener, R.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Riofrío, C.A.; Eisert, J.

    2015-01-01

    The experimental realization of large-scale many-body systems in atomic-optical architectures has seen immense progress in recent years, rendering full tomography tools for state identification inefficient, especially for continuous systems. To work with these emerging physical platforms, new technologies for state identification are required. Here we present first steps towards efficient experimental quantum-field tomography. Our procedure is based on the continuous analogues of matrix-product states, ubiquitous in condensed-matter theory. These states naturally incorporate the locality present in realistic physical settings and are thus prime candidates for describing the physics of locally interacting quantum fields. To experimentally demonstrate the power of our procedure, we quench a one-dimensional Bose gas by a transversal split and use our method for a partial quantum-field reconstruction of the far-from-equilibrium states of this system. We expect our technique to play an important role in future studies of continuous quantum many-body systems. PMID:26138511

  16. Cold-atom Realization of the Quantum Kapitza Pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Kurt; Senaratne, Ruwan; Geiger, Zach; Rajagopal, Shankari; Singh, Kevin; Weld, David; Weld Group Team

    2015-05-01

    The Kapitza pendulum is perhaps the most famous example of dynamic stabilization in a classical single-particle system. When the pivot of a rigid pendulum is modulated in a certain range of amplitude and frequency, a new stable equilibrium appears in the upward-pointing configuration. Extensions of Kapitza stabilization to the quantum many-body regime remain completely unexplored. We report on progress towards realization of a quantum Kapitza pendulum using lithium atoms in a modulated optical lattice, and discuss prospects for mapping the dynamical phase diagram. Tunable quantum Kapitza pendula could enable a variety of exciting research directions, including investigation of the role of strong interactions, possible applications of controllable stabilization, and advances in our understanding of unconventional dynamical behavior in many-body quantum systems. We acknowledge support from the ONR (award N00014-14-1-0805), the ARO and the PECASE program (award W911NF-14-1-0154), the AFOSR (award FA9550-12-1-0305), and the Alfred P. Sloan foundation (grant BR2013-110).

  17. Non-Abelian quantum holonomy of hydrogenlike atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mousolou, Vahid Azimi; Canali, Carlo M.; Sjoeqvist, Erik

    2011-09-15

    We study the Uhlmann holonomy [Rep. Math. Phys. 24, 229 (1986)] of quantum states for hydrogenlike atoms where the intrinsic spin and orbital angular momentum are coupled by the spin-orbit interaction and are subject to a slowly varying magnetic field. We show that the holonomy for the orbital angular momentum and spin subsystems is non-Abelian while the holonomy of the whole system is Abelian. Quantum entanglement in the states of the whole system is crucially related to the non-Abelian gauge structure of the subsystems. We analyze the phase of the Wilson loop variable associated with the Uhlmann holonomy and find a relation between the phase of the whole system and corresponding marginal phases. Based on the results for the model system, we provide evidence that the phase of the Wilson loop variable and the mixed-state geometric phase [E. Sjoeqvist et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2845 (2000).] are generally inequivalent.

  18. Energies of the first row atoms from quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Brown, M D; Trail, J R; Ríos, P López; Needs, R J

    2007-06-14

    All-electron variational and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the ground state energies of the first row atoms (from Li to Ne) are reported. The authors use trial wave functions of four types: single-determinant Slater-Jastrow wave functions, multideterminant Slater-Jastrow wave functions, single-determinant Slater-Jastrow wave functions with backflow transformations, and multideterminant Slater-Jastrow wave functions with backflow transformations. At the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo level and using their multideterminant Slater-Jastrow wave functions with backflow transformations, they recover 99% or more of the correlation energies for Li, Be, B, C, N, and Ne, 97% for O, and 98% for F. PMID:17581047

  19. Hybrid apparatus for Bose-Einstein condensation and cavity quantum electrodynamics: Single atom detection in quantum degenerate gases

    SciTech Connect

    Oettl, Anton; Ritter, Stephan; Koehl, Michael; Esslinger, Tilman

    2006-06-15

    We present and characterize an experimental system in which we achieve the integration of an ultrahigh finesse optical cavity with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The conceptually novel design of the apparatus for the production of BECs features nested vacuum chambers and an in vacuo magnetic transport configuration. It grants large scale spatial access to the BEC for samples and probes via a modular and exchangeable ''science platform.'' We are able to produce {sup 87}Rb condensates of 5x10{sup 6} atoms and to output couple continuous atom lasers. The cavity is mounted on the science platform on top of a vibration isolation system. The optical cavity works in the strong coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics and serves as a quantum optical detector for single atoms. This system enables us to study atom optics on a single particle level and to further develop the field of quantum atom optics. We describe the technological modules and the operation of the combined BEC cavity apparatus. Its performance is characterized by single atom detection measurements for thermal and quantum degenerate atomic beams. The atom laser provides a fast and controllable supply of atoms coupling with the cavity mode and allows for an efficient study of atom field interactions in the strong coupling regime. Moreover, the high detection efficiency for quantum degenerate atoms distinguishes the cavity as a sensitive and weakly invasive probe for cold atomic clouds.

  20. Quantum manifestations of chaos in elastic atom-surface scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Guantes, R.; Miret-Artes, S.; Borondo, F.

    2001-06-15

    Quantum manifestations of chaos in the diffraction of atoms from corrugated surfaces, for a range of initial conditions easily attainable in scattering experiments, are presented and discussed. The appearance of strong oscillations in diffraction patterns is shown to be directly related to the presence of classical chaos and threshold effects. We also show that the autocorrelation function for some of the collision S-matrix elements over incident angles is sensitive to the character, hyperbolic or nonhyperbolic, of the underlying chaotic dynamics, in agreement with general semiclassical arguments for unbound chaotic systems.

  1. Effects of quantum coherence and interference in atoms near nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhayal, Suman; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2016-04-01

    Optical properties of ensembles of realistic quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic systems are studied by using adequate models that can take into account full atomic geometry. In particular, the coherent effects such as forming "dark states," optical pumping, coherent Raman scattering, and the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) are revisited in the presence of metallic nanoparticles. It is shown that the dark states are still formed but they have more complicated structure, and the optical pumping and the STIRAP cannot be employed in the vicinity of plasmonic nanostructures. Also, there is a huge difference in the behavior of the local atomic polarization and the atomic polarization averaged over an ensemble of atoms homogeneously spread near nanoparticles. The average polarization is strictly related to the polarization induced by the external field, while the local polarization can be very different from the one induced by the external field. This is important for the excitation of single molecules, e.g., different components of scattering from single molecules can be used for their efficient detection.

  2. Atomic and molecular quantum gases in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2007-06-01

    We report on recent progress in preparing and manipulating ultracold atomic and molecular ensembles in a 3D optical lattice. Starting from an atomic ^87Rb condensate which is adiabatically loaded into a 3D optical lattice we can control the state and dynamics of the gas on the quantum level with the help of static magnetic fields, radio-frequency and laser radiation and a Feshbach resonance. For example, we can produce a pure molecular ensemble of Rb2 Feshbach molecules in the lattice [1] and can coherently transfer it to a more deeply molecular bound state via STIRAP [2] or radio-frequency transitions. Besides possible applications for investigating molecular collisions and producing ultracold molecules in the vibrational ground state, this can also be used for spectroscopic precision measurements of molecular levels. Besides studying chemically bound molecules, optical lattices also allow for forming a novel kind of stable bound state of two atoms which is based on repulsion rather than attraction between the particles [3]. We will explain how these lattice-induced repulsively bound atom pairs come about and discuss their interesting properties. [1] G. Thalhammer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050402 (2006). [2] K. Winkler, cond-mat/0611222 [3] K. Winkler et al., Nature 441, 853, (2006).

  3. Single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases: a review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Ott, Herwig

    2016-05-01

    The recent advances in single atom detection and manipulation in experiments with ultracold quantum gases are reviewed. The discussion starts with the basic principles of trapping, cooling and detecting single ions and atoms. The realization of single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases is presented in detail and the employed methods, which are based on light scattering, electron scattering, field ionization and direct neutral particle detection are discussed. The microscopic coherent manipulation of single atoms in a quantum gas is also covered. Various examples are given in order to highlight the power of these approaches to study many-body quantum systems. PMID:27093632

  4. Single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Herwig

    2016-05-01

    The recent advances in single atom detection and manipulation in experiments with ultracold quantum gases are reviewed. The discussion starts with the basic principles of trapping, cooling and detecting single ions and atoms. The realization of single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases is presented in detail and the employed methods, which are based on light scattering, electron scattering, field ionization and direct neutral particle detection are discussed. The microscopic coherent manipulation of single atoms in a quantum gas is also covered. Various examples are given in order to highlight the power of these approaches to study many-body quantum systems.

  5. A mesoscopic Rydberg impurity in an atomic quantum gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Richard; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Demler, Eugene

    2016-05-01

    Impurity problems have been at the forefront of research in condensed matter physics for several decades. In this talk, we show that Rydberg impurity excitations in ultracold quantum gases present a new frontier in impurity research. Here vastly different energy scales compete, signified in deeply bound Rydberg molecules of mesoscopic size. This situation poses a new challenge for theoretical physics and necessitates the confluence of methods ranging from mesoscopic to atomic physics. In our work, we develop a novel many-body theory for the non-equilibrium dynamics of giant impurity excitations Bose gases. Such single Rydberg impurity excitations have recently been observed, and we demonstrate that the observations can be understood from our theoretical approach which incorporates atomic and many-body theory. The crossover from few-body dynamics to quantum many-body collective behavior - manifest in the appearance of a novel superpolaronic state - is elucidated in our unified functional determinant approach, valid at zero and finite temperature. The time-dependent formalism is not restricted to Rydberg systems but can be generally applied to impurities in bosonic and fermionic environments and opens new possibilities to study impurity dynamics in mesoscopic systems.

  6. Quantum Control of Atomic Hydrogen Using Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingjun; Red, Eddie; Wynn, Albert, III; Weatherford, Charles

    2007-06-01

    A method for the ab initio simulation of STIRAP (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) [1,2] laser quantum control of the energy level poulations of atomic ions will be described. The method employs a new algorithm for the solution of the time- dependent Schr"odinger equation which avoids the time-propagator and uses spectral elements in time with a spectral spatial basis.[3] This results in a set of coupled simultaneous equations and is thus an implicit stable procedure. In order to treat the continuum problem (ionization), a complex absorbing potential is used. The spectral spatial basis used is the Coulomb Sturmians.[4] As an initial application, the control of the levels of atomic hydrogen will be presented. [1] S.A. Rice and M. Zhao, Optical Control of Molecular Dynamics, Wiley, New York, 2000. [2] M. Shapiro and P. Brumer, Principles of the Quantum Control of Molecular Processes, Wiley, New York, 2003. [3] C.A. Weatherford, E. Red, and A. Wynn III, J. Mol. Structure (Theochem) 592, 47 (2002). [4] J. Avery, Hyperspherical Harmonics and Generalized Sturmians, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 2000.

  7. Atomic spin chains as testing ground for quantum magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, Sander

    2015-03-01

    The field of quantum magnetism aims to capture the rich emergent physics that arises when multiple spins interact, in terms of elementary models such as the spin 1/2 Heisenberg chain. Experimental platforms to verify these models are rare and generally do not provide the possibility to detect spin correlations locally. In my lab we use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to design and build artificial spin lattices with atomic precision. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy enables us to identify the ground state and probe spin excitations as a function of system size, location inside the lattice and coupling parameter values. Two types of collective excitations that play a role in many dynamic magnetic processes are spin waves (magnons) and spinons. Our experiments enable us to study both types of excitations. First, we have been able to map the standing spin wave modes of a ferromagnetic bit of six atoms, and to determine their role in the collective reversal process of the bit (Spinelli et al., Nature Materials 2014). More recently, we have crafted antiferromagnetic spin 1/2 XXZ chains, which allow us to observe spinon excitations, as well as the stepwise transition to a fully aligned phase beyond the critical magnetic field (Toskovic et al., in preparation). These findings create a promising experimental environment for putting quantum magnetic models to the test. Research funded by NWO and FOM.

  8. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom embedded in dense quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2013-08-15

    Scattering of positrons from the ground state of hydrogen atoms embedded in dense quantum plasma has been investigated by applying a formulation of the three-body collision problem in the form of coupled multi-channel two-body Lippmann-Schwinger equations. The interactions among the charged particles in dense quantum plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Variationally determined hydrogenic wave function has been employed to calculate the partial-wave scattering amplitude. Plasma screening effects on various possible mode of fragmentation of the system e{sup +}+H(1s) during the collision, such as 1s→1s and 2s→2s elastic collisions, 1s→2s excitation, positronium formation, elastic proton-positronium collisions, have been reported in the energy range 13.6-350 eV. Furthermore, a comparison has been made on the plasma screening effect of a dense quantum plasma with that of a weakly coupled plasma for which the plasma screening effect has been represented by the Debye model. Our results for the unscreened case are in fair agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  9. Clustering of ions at atomic dimensions in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Padma K.; Eliasson, Bengt; Eliasson

    2013-08-01

    By means of particle simulations of the equations of motion for ions interacting among themselves under the influence of newly discovered Shukla-Eliasson attractive force (SEAF) in a dense quantum plasma, we demonstrate that the SEAF can bring ions closer at atomic dimensions. We present simulation results of the dynamics of an ensemble of ions in the presence of the SEAF without and with confining external potentials and collisions between ions and degenerate electrons. Our particle simulations reveal that under the SEAF, ions attract each other, come closer, and form ionic clusters in the bath of degenerate electrons that shield ions. Furthermore, an external confining potential produces robust ion clusters that can have cigar- and ball-like shapes, which remain stable when the confining potential is removed. The stability of ion clusters is discussed. Our results may have applications to solid density plasmas (density exceeding 1023 per cm3), where the electrons will be degenerate and quantum forces due to the electron recoil effect caused by the overlapping of electron wave functions and electron tunneling through the Bohm potential, electron-exchange and electron-exchange and electron correlations associated with electron-1/2 spin effect, and the quantum statistical pressure of the degenerate electrons play a decisive role.

  10. Quantum Mechanics Based Multiscale Modeling of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang

    2013-03-01

    We present two quantum mechanics based multiscale approaches that can simulate extended defects in metals accurately and efficiently. The first approach (QCDFT) can treat multimillion atoms effectively via density functional theory (DFT). The method is an extension of the original quasicontinuum approach with DFT as its sole energetic formulation. The second method (QM/MM) has to do with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics coupling based on the constrained density functional theory, which provides an exact framework for a self-consistent quantum mechanical embedding. Several important materials problems will be addressed using the multiscale modeling approaches, including hydrogen-assisted cracking in Al, magnetism-controlled dislocation properties in Fe and Si pipe diffusion along Al dislocation core. We acknowledge the support from the Office of Navel Research and the Army Research Office.

  11. Atom Interferometry with Ultracold Quantum Gases in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason; D'Incao, Jose; Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Yu, Nan

    2015-05-01

    Precision atom interferometers (AI) in space promise exciting technical capabilities for fundamental physics research, with proposals including unprecedented tests of the weak equivalence principle, precision measurements of the fine structure and gravitational constants, and detection of gravity waves and dark energy. Consequently, multiple AI-based missions have been proposed to NASA, including a dual-atomic-species interferometer that is to be integrated into the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) onboard the International Space Station. In this talk, I will discuss our plans and preparation at JPL for the proposed flight experiments to use the CAL facility to study the leading-order systematics expected to corrupt future high-precision measurements of fundamental physics with AIs in microgravity. The project centers on the physics of pairwise interactions and molecular dynamics in these quantum systems as a means to overcome uncontrolled shifts associated with the gravity gradient and few-particle collisions. We will further utilize the CAL AI for proof-of-principle tests of systematic mitigation and phase-readout techniques for use in the next-generation of precision metrology experiments based on AIs in microgravity. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  12. Valence atom with bohmian quantum potential: the golden ratio approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The alternative quantum mechanical description of total energy given by Bohmian theory was merged with the concept of the golden ratio and its appearance as the Heisenberg imbalance to provide a new density-based description of the valence atomic state and reactivity charge with the aim of clarifying their features with respect to the so-called DFT ground state and critical charge, respectively. Results The results, based on the so-called double variational algorithm for chemical spaces of reactivity, are fundamental and, among other issues regarding chemical bonding, solve the existing paradox of using a cubic parabola to describe a quadratic charge dependency. Conclusions Overall, the paper provides a qualitative-quantitative explanation of chemical reactivity based on more than half of an electronic pair in bonding, and provide new, more realistic values for the so-called “universal” electronegativity and chemical hardness of atomic systems engaged in reactivity (analogous to the atoms-in-molecules framework). PMID:23146157

  13. Information-holding quantum router of single photons using natural atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guo-An; Cai, Qing-Yu; Chen, Ai-Xi

    2016-04-01

    In a quantum network, a quantum router can play a key role that involves exchanging quantum information (quantum states) among different parties. In this paper, we propose a single-photon quantum router by using a four-level atom that is embedded in quantum multi-channels, which are composed of coupled-resonator waveguides. Single photons can be guided from one quantum channel to another by controlling an on-demand classical field. The fidelity of the routing atom recovers to a maximum after a time evolution cycle of the system; thus, the fidelity of the information-carrying single photon reaches unit at the same time. For the first time, we demonstrate that quantum information carried by single photons can be perfectly held after a quantum router.

  14. Quasideterministic generation of maximally entangled states of two mesoscopic atomic ensembles by adiabatic quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lisi, Antonio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Vitali, David

    2005-09-15

    We introduce an efficient, quasideterministic scheme to generate maximally entangled states of two atomic ensembles. The scheme is based on quantum nondemolition measurements of total atomic populations and on adiabatic quantum feedback conditioned by the measurements outputs. The high efficiency of the scheme is tested and confirmed numerically for ideal photodetection as well as in the presence of losses.

  15. Cold atom quantum emulation with ultracold lithium and strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Shankari; Senaratne, Ruwan; Geiger, Zachary; Fujiwara, Kurt; Singh, Kevin; Weld, David

    2016-05-01

    We discuss progress towards cold atom quantum emulation of nonequilibrium dynamics in optical lattices, focusing on quasiperiodic and strongly-driven systems using lithium and strontium. Tunable interactions in lithium Grant access to an added dimension of parameter space to explore in such systems, which could uncover rich physics. The high nuclear spin of fermionic strontium presents opportunities to study interactions in spin-dependent lattices and develop novel cooling techniques. We also describe construction of a single-site resolution imaging chamber for strontium, including a novel bio-inspired imaging scheme that makes use of a dark metastable state. We acknowledge support from the AFOSR, the ONR, the ARO and the PECASE and DURIP programs, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the NSF GRFP, and the University of California Office of the President.

  16. Cavity-based quantum networks with single atoms and optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiserer, Andreas; Rempe, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    Distributed quantum networks will allow users to perform tasks and to interact in ways which are not possible with present-day technology. Their implementation is a key challenge for quantum science and requires the development of stationary quantum nodes that can send and receive as well as store and process quantum information locally. The nodes are connected by quantum channels for flying information carriers, i.e., photons. These channels serve both to directly exchange quantum information between nodes and to distribute entanglement over the whole network. In order to scale such networks to many particles and long distances, an efficient interface between the nodes and the channels is required. This article describes the cavity-based approach to this goal, with an emphasis on experimental systems in which single atoms are trapped in and coupled to optical resonators. Besides being conceptually appealing, this approach is promising for quantum networks on larger scales, as it gives access to long qubit coherence times and high light-matter coupling efficiencies. Thus, it allows one to generate entangled photons on the push of a button, to reversibly map the quantum state of a photon onto an atom, to transfer and teleport quantum states between remote atoms, to entangle distant atoms, to detect optical photons nondestructively, to perform entangling quantum gates between an atom and one or several photons, and even provides a route toward efficient heralded quantum memories for future repeaters. The presented general protocols and the identification of key parameters are applicable to other experimental systems.

  17. Dynamic sensitivity of photon-dressed atomic ensemble with quantum criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jinfeng; Kuang Leman; Li Yong; Liao Jieqiao; Sun, C. P.

    2009-12-15

    We study the dynamic sensitivity of an atomic ensemble dressed by a single-mode cavity field (called a photon-dressed atomic ensemble), which is described by the Dicke model near the quantum critical point. It is shown that when an extra atom in a pure initial state passes through the cavity, the photon-dressed atomic ensemble will experience a quantum phase transition showing an explicit sudden change in its dynamics characterized by the Loschmidt echo of this quantum critical system. With such dynamic sensitivity, the Dicke model can resemble the cloud chamber for detecting a flying particle by the enhanced trajectory due to the classical phase transition.

  18. Permanent magnetic lattices for ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Saeed; Kieu, Tien D.; Sidorov, Andrei; Hannaford, Peter

    2006-02-01

    We propose the use of periodic arrays of permanent magnetic films for producing magnetic lattices of microtraps for confining, manipulating and controlling small clouds of ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases. Using analytical expressions and numerical calculations we show that periodic arrays of magnetic films can produce one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetic lattices with non-zero potential minima, allowing ultracold atoms to be trapped without losses due to spin flips. In particular, we show that two crossed layers of periodic arrays of parallel rectangular magnets plus bias fields, or a single layer of periodic arrays of square-shaped magnets with three different thicknesses plus bias fields, can produce 2D magnetic lattices of microtraps having non-zero potential minima and controllable trap depth. For arrays with micron-scale periodicity, the magnetic microtraps can have very large trap depths (~0.5 mK for the realistic parameters chosen for the 2D lattice) and very tight confinement.

  19. Quantum degenerate atomic gases in controlled optical lattice potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemelke, Nathan D.

    2007-12-01

    Since the achievement of Bose Einstein condensation in cold atomic gases, mean-field treatments of the condensed phase have provided an excellent description for the static and dynamic properties observed in experiments. Recent experimental efforts have focused on studying deviations from mean-field behavior. I will describe work on two experiments which introduce controlled single particle degeneracies with time-dependent optical potentials, aiming to induce correlated motion and nontrivial statistics in the gas. In the first experiment, an optical lattice with locally rotating site potentials is produced to investigate fractional quantum Hall effects (FQHE) in rotating Bose gases. Here, the necessary gauge potential is provided by the rotating reference frame of the gas, which, in direct analogy to the electronic system, organizes single particle states into degenerate Landau levels. At low temperatures the repulsive interaction provided by elastic scattering is expected to produce ground states with structure nearly identical to those in the FQHE. I will discuss how these effects are made experimentally feasible by working at small particle numbers in the tight trapping potentials of an optical lattice, and present first results on the use of photoassociation to probe correlation in this system. In the second experiment, a vibrated optical lattice potential alters the single-particle dispersion underlying a condensed Bose gas and offers tailored phase-matching for nonlinear atom optical processes. I will demonstrate how this leads to parametric instability in the condensed gas, and draw analogy to an optical parametric oscillator operating above threshold.

  20. Quantum Correlation of Two Entangled Atoms Interacting with the Binomial Optical Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tang-Kun; Tao, Yu; Shan, Chuan-Jia; Liu, Ji-bing

    2016-05-01

    Quantum correlations of two atoms in a system of two entangled atoms interacting with the binomial optical field are investigated. In eight different initial states of the two atoms, the influence of the strength of the dipole-dipole interaction, probabilities of a the Bernoulli trial and particle number of the binomial optical field on the temporal evolution of the geometrical quantum discord between two atoms are discussed. The result shows that two atoms always exist the correlation for different parameters. In addition, when and only when the two atoms are initially in the maximally entangled state, the temporal evolution of geometrical quantum discord is not affected by the parameters, and always keep in the degree of geometrical quantum discord that is a fixed value.

  1. Quantum atom-heteronuclear molecule dark state: Role of population imbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Hui; Cui Shuai

    2010-08-15

    Recently, the finite-number effect of initial atoms in coherent atom-molecule conversion was investigated by Zhao et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 010401 (2008)]. Here, by extending to the atom-heteronuclear molecule dark state, we find that the initial populations imbalance of the atoms plays a significant role in quantum conversion rate and adiabatic fidelity. In particular, even for the finite total number of imbalanced two-species atoms, the mean-field conversion rate, contrary to the general belief, still can be remarkably close to the exact quantum results.

  2. Quantum control of d-dimensional quantum systems with application to alkali atomic spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Seth

    In this dissertation I analyze Hamiltonian control of d-dimensional quantum systems as realized in alkali atomic spins. Alkali atoms provide an ideal platform for studies of quantum control due to the extreme precision with which the control fields are characterized as well as their isolation from their environment. In many cases, studies into the control of atomic spins restrict attention to a 2-dimesional subspace in order to consider qubit control. The geometry of quantum 2-level systems is much simpler than for any larger dimensional Hilbert space, and so control techniques for qubits often are not applicable to larger systems. In reality, atoms have many internal levels. It seems a shame to throw away most of our Hilbert space when it could in principle be used for encoding information and performing error correction. This work develops some of the tools necessary to control these large atomic spins. Quantum control theory has some very generic properties that have previously been explored in the literature, notably in the work from the Rabitz group. I provide a review of this literature, showing that while the landscape topology of quantum control problems is relatively independent of physical platform, different optimization techniques are required to find optimal controls depending on the particular control task. To this end I have developed two optimal control algorithms for finding unitary maps for the problems of: "state preparation" where we require only that a single fiducial state us taken to a particular target state and "unitary construction" where the entire map is specified. State mapping turns out to be a simple problem to solve and is amenable to a gradient search method. This protocol is not feasible for the task of finding full unitary maps, but I show how we can weave state mappings together to form full unitary maps. This construction of unitary maps is efficient in the dimension of the Hilbert space. The particular system I have used for

  3. Proposal for a telecom quantum repeater with single atoms in optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Niemietz, Dominik; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Quantum repeaters hold the promise to enable long-distance quantum communication via entanglement generation over arbitrary distances. Single atoms in optical cavities have been shown to be ideally suited for the experimental realization of many tasks in quantum communication. To utilize these systems for a quantum repeater, it would be desirable to operate them at telecom wavelengths. We propose to use a cascaded scheme employing transitions at telecom wavelengths between excited states of alkali atoms for entanglement generation between a single photon at telecom wavelength and a single atom at the crossing point of two cavity modes. A cavity-assisted quantum gate can be used for entanglement swapping. We estimate the performance of these systems using numerical simulations based on experimental parameters obtained for CO2 laser-machined fiber cavities in our laboratory. Finally, we show that a quantum repeater employing the aforementioned scheme and current technology could outperform corresponding schemes based on direct transmission.

  4. Quantum-projection-noise-limited interferometry with coherent atoms in a Ramsey-type setup

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, D.; McDonald, G.; Debs, J. E.; Figl, C.; Altin, P. A.; Bachor, H.-A.; Robins, N. P.; Close, J. D.

    2010-04-15

    Every measurement of the population in an uncorrelated ensemble of two-level systems is limited by what is known as the quantum projection noise limit. Here, we present quantum-projection-noise-limited performance of a Ramsey-type interferometer using freely propagating coherent atoms. The experimental setup is based on an electro-optic modulator in an inherently stable Sagnac interferometer, optically coupling the two interfering atomic states via a two-photon Raman transition. Going beyond the quantum projection noise limit requires the use of reduced quantum uncertainty (squeezed) states. The experiment described demonstrates atom interferometry at the fundamental noise level and allows the observation of possible squeezing effects in an atom laser, potentially leading to improved sensitivity in atom interferometers.

  5. A quantum gas microscope for detecting single atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Waseem S; Gillen, Jonathon I; Peng, Amy; Fölling, Simon; Greiner, Markus

    2009-11-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in creating complex atomic many-body quantum systems. One approach is to use macroscopic, effectively thermodynamic ensembles of ultracold atoms to create quantum gases and strongly correlated states of matter, and to analyse the bulk properties of the ensemble. For example, bosonic and fermionic atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice can be used for quantum simulations of solid-state models. The opposite approach is to build up microscopic quantum systems atom-by-atom, with complete control over all degrees of freedom. The atoms or ions act as qubits and allow the realization of quantum gates, with the goal of creating highly controllable quantum information systems. Until now, the macroscopic and microscopic strategies have been fairly disconnected. Here we present a quantum gas 'microscope' that bridges the two approaches, realizing a system in which atoms of a macroscopic ensemble are detected individually and a complete set of degrees of freedom for each of them is determined through preparation and measurement. By implementing a high-resolution optical imaging system, single atoms are detected with near-unity fidelity on individual sites of a Hubbard-regime optical lattice. The lattice itself is generated by projecting a holographic mask through the imaging system. It has an arbitrary geometry, chosen to support both strong tunnel coupling between lattice sites and strong on-site confinement. Our approach can be used to directly detect strongly correlated states of matter; in the context of condensed matter simulation, this corresponds to the detection of individual electrons in the simulated crystal. Also, the quantum gas microscope may enable addressing and read-out of large-scale quantum information systems based on ultracold atoms. PMID:19890326

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  7. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in dense quantum plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-11-15

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1 s → nlm excitations of hydrogen by positron impact, for arbitrary n, l, m, in dense quantum plasma has been investigated using a distorted wave theory which includes screened dipole polarization potential. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogen wave function, it has been possible to obtain the distorted wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made to explore the structure of differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1 s → nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions in dense quantum plasma is the first reported in the literature.

  8. Heralded Storage of a Photonic Quantum Bit in a Single Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalb, Norbert; Reiserer, Andreas; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2015-06-01

    Combining techniques of cavity quantum electrodynamics, quantum measurement, and quantum feedback, we have realized the heralded transfer of a polarization qubit from a photon onto a single atom with 39% efficiency and 86% fidelity. The reverse process, namely, qubit transfer from the atom onto a given photon, is demonstrated with 88% fidelity and an estimated efficiency of up to 69%. In contrast to previous work based on two-photon interference, our scheme is robust against photon arrival-time jitter and achieves much higher efficiencies. Thus, it constitutes a key step toward the implementation of a long-distance quantum network.

  9. Coverage-dependent quantum versus classical scattering of thermal neon atoms from Li/Cu(100).

    PubMed

    Maclaren, D A; Huang, C; Levi, A C; Allison, W

    2008-09-01

    We show that subtle variations in surface structure can enhance quantum scattering and quench atom-surface energy transfer. The scattering of thermal energy neon atoms from a lithium overlayer on a copper substrate switches between a classical regime, dominated by multiphonon interactions, and a quantum regime, dominated by elastic diffraction. The transition is achieved by simple tailoring of the lithium coverage and quantum scattering dominates only in the narrow coverage range of theta=0.3-0.6 ML. The results are described qualitatively using a modified Debye-Waller model that incorporates an approximate quantum treatment of the adsorbate-substrate vibration. PMID:19044885

  10. Light-scattering detection of quantum phases of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Jinwu; Zhang, J. M.; Liu, W. M.; Zhang Keye; Li Yan; Zhang Weiping

    2011-05-15

    Ultracold atoms loaded on optical lattices can provide unprecedented experimental systems for the quantum simulations and manipulations of many quantum phases. However, so far, how to detect these quantum phases effectively remains an outstanding challenge. Here, we show that the optical Bragg scattering of cold atoms loaded on optical lattices can be used to detect many quantum phases, which include not only the conventional superfluid and Mott insulating phases, but also other important phases, such as various kinds of charge density wave (CDW), valence bond solid (VBS), CDW supersolid (CDW-SS) and Valence bond supersolid (VB-SS).

  11. Heralded Storage of a Photonic Quantum Bit in a Single Atom.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Norbert; Reiserer, Andreas; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2015-06-01

    Combining techniques of cavity quantum electrodynamics, quantum measurement, and quantum feedback, we have realized the heralded transfer of a polarization qubit from a photon onto a single atom with 39% efficiency and 86% fidelity. The reverse process, namely, qubit transfer from the atom onto a given photon, is demonstrated with 88% fidelity and an estimated efficiency of up to 69%. In contrast to previous work based on two-photon interference, our scheme is robust against photon arrival-time jitter and achieves much higher efficiencies. Thus, it constitutes a key step toward the implementation of a long-distance quantum network. PMID:26196608

  12. Transport spectroscopy of a graphene quantum dot fabricated by atomic force microscope nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puddy, R. K.; Chua, C. J.; Buitelaar, M. R.

    2013-10-01

    We report low-temperature transport spectroscopy of a graphene quantum dot fabricated by atomic force microscope nanolithography. The excellent spatial resolution of the atomic force microscope allows us to reliably fabricate quantum dots with short constrictions of less than 15 nm in length. Transport measurements demonstrate that the device is dominated by a single quantum dot over a wide gate range. The electron spin system of the quantum dot is investigated by applying an in-plane magnetic field. The results are consistent with a Landé g-factor ˜2 but no regular spin filling sequence is observed, most likely due to disorder.

  13. Quantum controlled-phase-flip gate between a flying optical photon and a Rydberg atomic ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Y. M.; Lin, G. W.; Xia, Keyu; Lin, X. M.; Niu, Y. P.; Gong, S. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum controlled-phase-flip (CPF) gate between a flying photon qubit and a stationary atomic qubit could allow the linking of distant computational nodes in a quantum network. Here we present a scheme to realize quantum CPF gate between a flying optical photon and an atomic ensemble based on cavity input-output process and Rydberg blockade. When a flying single-photon pulse is reflected off the cavity containing a Rydberg atomic ensemble, the dark resonance and Rydberg blockade induce a conditional phase shift for the photon pulse, thus we can achieve the CPF gate between the photon and the atomic ensemble. Assisted by Rydberg blockade interaction, our scheme works in the N-atoms strong-coupling regime and significantly relaxes the requirement of strong coupling of single atom to photon in the optical cavity. PMID:25966448

  14. Protecting quantum coherence of two-level atoms from vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaobao; Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of open quantum systems, we study the dynamics of a static polarizable two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field and explore under which conditions the coherence of the open quantum system is unaffected by the environment. For both a single-qubit and two-qubit systems, we find that the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise when the atom interacts with a non-boundary electromagnetic field. However, with the presence of a boundary, the dynamical conditions for the insusceptible of quantum coherence are fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transversely polarizable. Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction.

  15. Lars Onsager Prize Talk: Quantum fluids: from liquid helium to cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethick, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    The study of quantum liquids has led to ideas and concepts of broad applicability. I shall illustrate this by examples from the physics of liquid helium-3, heavy-fermion compounds, quark-gluon plasmas and cold atomic gases.

  16. The Correspondence Principle and the Founding of the Atomic Quantum Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hua-Xiang

    1995-01-01

    Presents a brief historical review and a discussion of the Bohr theory aimed at helping readers understand more completely the development of atomic quantum physics and comprehend more precisely and profoundly the essence of the correspondence principle. (JRH)

  17. Grover search algorithm with Rydberg-blockaded atoms: quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, David; Saffman, Mark; Mølmer, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    We consider the Grover search algorithm implementation for a quantum register of size N={2}k using k (or k+1) microwave- and laser-driven Rydberg-blockaded atoms, following the proposal by Mølmer et al (2011 J. Phys. B 44 184016). We suggest some simplifications for the microwave and laser couplings, and analyze the performance of the algorithm for up to k = 4 multilevel atoms under realistic experimental conditions using quantum stochastic (Monte Carlo) wavefunction simulations.

  18. Engineering steady three-atom singlet states via quantum-jump-based feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiao-Qiang; Zheng, Tai-Yu; Zhang, Shou

    2012-04-01

    A scheme is presented for generating steady three-atom singlet states via three V-type atoms interacting with a strongly dissipative two-mode cavity. The local quantum feedback control is applied based on quantum-jump detection to make the target state fidelity as high as possible. This scheme is insensitive to detection inefficiencies since it only delays the time at which stationarity is achieved. Nevertheless, the spontaneous emission plays a negative role in the current system.

  19. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  20. Transfer of quantum correlations from light to atoms in the case of irreversible evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbachev, V. N.; Trubilko, A. I.

    2010-10-15

    We consider the irreversible dynamics of two two-level atoms that interact with a bipartite broad-band electromagnetic field in an entangled state that forms a heat bath with a quantum correlation. Using Ito's stochastic integration technique, we have derived a kinetic equation for atoms and found their steady state, which turns out to be inseparable and leads to a violation of Bell's inequalities. The application of the atomic state found as a quantum channel for teleportation is considered. We have calculated the channel quality or fidelity that determines the possibilities for using the channel, in particular, characterizes its security. The process of teleportation by means of a quantum channel formed by an entangled heat bath is considered. Comparison of two (atomic and light) channels has shown that they have different properties with regard to separability and identical properties with regard to nonlocality. This means that nonlocality can be completely transferred from light to atoms.

  1. Quantum Correlations of Two Two-level Atoms Interacting with a Single Mode Vacuum Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ke; Fang, Mao-Fa

    2015-04-01

    The quantum correlations (QC) of two two-level atoms interacting with a single mode vacuum field are investigated. The relationship between the quantum discord (QD) and the entanglement of formation (EOF), the influence of the atomic dipole-dipole interaction along with two-atom initial states on QC of two atoms are discussed. The results indicate that when two-atom is initially in an entangled state, QD is consistent with EOF. Compared with the quantumness of correlations, the latter is always larger than the former, and the larger the initial QE, the larger the QD. Meanwhile, there is no occurrence of sudden death phenomenon of QC throughout the temporal evolution. Moreover, QD is more robust than QE under strong dipole-dipole interaction, and then the relative stable QC resources can be achieved.

  2. Non-local correlation and quantum discord in two atoms in the non-degenerate model

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.-B.A.

    2012-12-15

    By using geometric quantum discord (GQD) and measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN), quantum correlation is investigated for two atoms in the non-degenerate two-photon Tavis-Cummings model. It is shown that there is no asymptotic decay for MIN while asymptotic decay exists for GQD. Quantum correlations can be strengthened by introducing the dipole-dipole interaction. The evolvement period of quantum correlation gets shorter with the increase in the dipole-dipole parameter. It is found that there exists not only quantum nonlocality without entanglement but also quantum nonlocality without quantum discord. Also, the MIN and GQD are raised rather than entanglement, and also with weak initial entanglement, there are MIN and entanglement in a interval of death quantum discord. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Geometric quantum discord (GQD) and measurement induced nonlocality (MIN) are used to investigate the correlations of two two-level atoms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is no asymptotic decay for MIN while asymptotic decay exists for GQD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum correlations can be strengthened by introducing the dipole-dipole interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There exists not only quantum nonlocality without entanglement but also without discord. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak initial entanglement leads to MIN and entanglement in intervals of death discord.

  3. A quantum gate between a flying optical photon and a single trapped atom.

    PubMed

    Reiserer, Andreas; Kalb, Norbert; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2014-04-10

    The steady increase in control over individual quantum systems supports the promotion of a quantum technology that could provide functionalities beyond those of any classical device. Two particularly promising applications have been explored during the past decade: photon-based quantum communication, which guarantees unbreakable encryption but which still has to be scaled to high rates over large distances, and quantum computation, which will fundamentally enhance computability if it can be scaled to a large number of quantum bits (qubits). It was realized early on that a hybrid system of light qubits and matter qubits could solve the scalability problem of each field--that of communication by use of quantum repeaters, and that of computation by use of an optical interconnect between smaller quantum processors. To this end, the development of a robust two-qubit gate that allows the linking of distant computational nodes is "a pressing challenge". Here we demonstrate such a quantum gate between the spin state of a single trapped atom and the polarization state of an optical photon contained in a faint laser pulse. The gate mechanism presented is deterministic and robust, and is expected to be applicable to almost any matter qubit. It is based on reflection of the photonic qubit from a cavity that provides strong light-matter coupling. To demonstrate its versatility, we use the quantum gate to create atom-photon, atom-photon-photon and photon-photon entangled states from separable input states. We expect our experiment to enable various applications, including the generation of atomic and photonic cluster states and Schrödinger-cat states, deterministic photonic Bell-state measurements, scalable quantum computation and quantum communication using a redundant quantum parity code. PMID:24717512

  4. Atomic Fermi-Bose Mixtures in Inhomogeneous and Random Lattices: From Fermi Glass to Quantum Spin Glass and Quantum Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpera, A.; Kantian, A.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Zakrzewski, J.; Lewenstein, M.

    2004-07-01

    We investigate strongly interacting atomic Fermi-Bose mixtures in inhomogeneous and random optical lattices. We derive an effective Hamiltonian for the system and discuss its low temperature physics. We demonstrate the possibility of controlling the interactions at local level in inhomogeneous but regular lattices. Such a control leads to the achievement of Fermi glass, quantum Fermi spin-glass, and quantum percolation regimes involving bare and/or composite fermions in random lattices.

  5. Controlling Atomic, Solid-State and Hybrid Systems for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullans, Michael John

    Quantum information science involves the use of precise control over quantum systems to explore new technologies. However, as quantum systems are scaled up they require an ever deeper understanding of many-body physics to achieve the required degree of control. Current experiments are entering a regime which requires active control of a mesoscopic number of coupled quantum systems or quantum bits (qubits). This thesis describes several approaches to this goal and shows how mesoscopic quantum systems can be controlled and utilized for quantum information tasks. The first system we consider is the nuclear spin environment of GaAs double quantum dots containing two electrons. We show that the through appropriate control of dynamic nuclear polarization one can prepare the nuclear spin environment in three distinct collective quantum states which are useful for quantum information processing with electron spin qubits. We then investigate a hybrid system in which an optical lattice is formed in the near field scattering off an array of metallic nanoparticles by utilizing the plasmonic resonance of the nanoparticles. We show that such a system would realize new regimes of dense, ultra-cold quantum matter and can be used to create a quantum network of atoms and plasmons. Finally we investigate quantum nonlinear optical systems. We show that the intrinsic nonlinearity for plasmons in graphene can be large enough to make a quantum gate for single photons. We also consider two nonlinear optical systems based on ultracold gases of atoms. In one case, we demonstrate an all-optical single photon switch using cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) and slow light. In the second case, we study few photon physics in strongly interacting Rydberg polariton systems, where we demonstrate the existence of two and three photon bound states and study their properties.

  6. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits.

    PubMed

    Debnath, S; Linke, N M; Figgatt, C; Landsman, K A; Wright, K; Monroe, C

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels. PMID:27488798

  7. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Wright, K.; Monroe, C.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch–Jozsa and Bernstein–Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  8. Progress toward observation of quantum interference of currents in an Atom SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Changhyun; Samson, E. Carlo; Boshier, Malcolm

    2016-05-01

    Quantum interference of currents was first observed in a superconducting loop with two Josephson junctions, leading to the name ``SQUID'' for this device. This interference effect has been used to develop extremely sensitive magnetometers. The Atom SQUID, an analogous device based on ultracold atoms, has been developed recently to study SQUID physics in a device offering a better understanding of the underlying microscopic dynamics. Although many exciting experiments have been done with Atom SQUIDs, the quantum interference of currents has not yet been observed. In analogy with the SQUID magnetometer, it should be possible to use the quantum interference effect in an Atom SQUID to measure rotation, which may lead to the development of a sensitive gyroscope. In a previous experiment, we showed Josephson effects with an atom SQUID by observing the change from the dc Josephson regime to the ac Josephson regime by measurement of the critical atom number for this transition. Quantum interference should cause this critical atom number to vary with rotation rate. We have simulated this system with the Gross-Pitaevski Equation and found the expected oscillatory change of the critical atom number. We will present this simulation result and report the current status of our experiment to

  9. Quantum phase transitions of atom-molecule Bose mixtures in a double-well potential.

    PubMed

    Relaño, A; Dukelsky, J; Pérez-Fernández, P; Arias, J M

    2014-10-01

    The ground state and spectral properties of Bose gases in double-well potentials are studied in two different scenarios: (i) an interacting atomic Bose gas, and (ii) a mixture of an atomic gas interacting with diatomic molecules. A ground state second-order quantum phase transition is observed in both scenarios. For large attractive values of the atom-atom interaction, the ground state is degenerate. For repulsive and small attractive interaction, the ground state is not degenerate and is well approximated by a boson coherent state. Both systems depict an excited state quantum phase transition. In both cases, a critical energy separates a region in which all the energy levels are degenerate in pairs, from another region in which there are no degeneracies. For the atomic system, the critical point displays a singularity in the density of states, whereas this behavior is largely smoothed for the mixed atom-molecule system. PMID:25375470

  10. An integrated quantum repeater at telecom wavelength with single atoms in optical fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Quantum repeaters promise to enable quantum networks over global distances by circumventing the exponential decrease in success probability inherent in direct photon transmission. We propose a realistic, functionally integrated quantum-repeater implementation based on single atoms in optical cavities. Entanglement is directly generated between the single-atom quantum memory and a photon at telecom wavelength. The latter is collected with high efficiency and adjustable temporal and spectral properties into a spatially well-defined cavity mode. It is heralded by a near-infrared photon emitted from a second, orthogonal cavity. Entanglement between two remote quantum memories can be generated via an optical Bell-state measurement, while we propose entanglement swapping based on a highly efficient, cavity-assisted atom-atom gate. Our quantum-repeater scheme eliminates any requirement for wavelength conversion such that only a single system is needed at each node. We investigate a particular implementation with rubidium and realistic parameters for Fabry-Perot cavities based on hbox {CO}_2 laser-machined optical fibers. We show that the scheme enables the implementation of a rather simple quantum repeater that outperforms direct entanglement generation over large distances and does not require any improvements in technology beyond the state of the art.

  11. Nanoscale phosphorus atom arrays created using STM for the fabrication of a silicon based quantum computer.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, J. L.; Schofield, S. R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Clark, R. G.; Dzurak, A. S.; Curson, N. J.; Kane, B. E.; McAlpine, N. S.; Hawley, M. E.; Brown, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computers offer the promise of formidable computational power for certain tasks. Of the various possible physical implementations of such a device, silicon based architectures are attractive for their scalability and ease of integration with existing silicon technology. These designs use either the electron or nuclear spin state of single donor atoms to store quantum information. Here we describe a strategy to fabricate an array of single phosphorus atoms in silicon for the construction of such a silicon based quantum computer. We demonstrate the controlled placement of single phosphorus bearing molecules on a silicon surface. This has been achieved by patterning a hydrogen mono-layer 'resist' with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and exposing the patterned surface to phosphine (PH3) molecules. We also describe preliminary studies into a process to incorporate these surface phosphorus atoms into the silicon crystal at the array sites. Keywords: Quantum computing, nanotechriology scanning turincling microscopy, hydrogen lithography

  12. Mesoscopic atomic entanglement for precision measurements beyond the standard quantum limit

    PubMed Central

    Appel, J.; Windpassinger, P. J.; Oblak, D.; Hoff, U. B.; Kjærgaard, N.; Polzik, E. S.

    2009-01-01

    Squeezing of quantum fluctuations by means of entanglement is a well-recognized goal in the field of quantum information science and precision measurements. In particular, squeezing the fluctuations via entanglement between 2-level atoms can improve the precision of sensing, clocks, metrology, and spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate 3.4 dB of metrologically relevant squeezing and entanglement for ≳ 105 cold caesium atoms via a quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement on the atom clock levels. We show that there is an optimal degree of decoherence induced by the quantum measurement which maximizes the generated entanglement. A 2-color QND scheme used in this paper is shown to have a number of advantages for entanglement generation as compared with a single-color QND measurement. PMID:19541646

  13. Exploring Quantum Degenerate Bose-Fermi Mixtures Toward Cooper Pairing of Fermionic Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Deborah Jin

    2011-04-20

    We have been exploring interaction dynamics in an ultracold, trapped gas of bosonic and fermionic atoms. Investigation of this new class of quantum degenerate gases concentrates on interaction dominated phenomena such as sympathetic cooling, phase separation, excitations, Feshbach resonances, and the effects of quantum degeneracy. In addition to exploring these new phenomena, we seek to understand and ultimately control the interactions in the gas. In particular, effective interactions between the fermionic atoms will be explored in the context of the longer term goal of realizing Cooper pairing of atoms.

  14. Cavity-Enhanced Light Scattering in Optical Lattices to Probe Atomic Quantum Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-03-09

    Different quantum states of atoms in optical lattices can be nondestructively monitored by off-resonant collective light scattering into a cavity. Angle resolved measurements of photon number and variance give information about atom-number fluctuations and pair correlations without single-site access. Observation at angles of diffraction minima provides information on quantum fluctuations insensitive to classical noise. For transverse probing, no photon is scattered into a cavity from a Mott insulator phase, while the photon number is proportional to the atom number for a superfluid.

  15. Bragg scattering as a probe of atomic wave functions and quantum phase transitions in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios A; Puentes, Graciana; Pritchard, David E; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Weld, David M

    2011-10-21

    We have observed Bragg scattering of photons from quantum degenerate ^{87}Rb atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Bragg scattered light directly probes the microscopic crystal structure and atomic wave function whose position and momentum width is Heisenberg limited. The spatial coherence of the wave function leads to revivals in the Bragg scattered light due to the atomic Talbot effect. The decay of revivals across the superfluid to Mott insulator transition indicates the loss of superfluid coherence. PMID:22107532

  16. Some reflections on the role of semi-classical atomic models in the teaching and learning of introductory quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Colm

    2016-03-01

    The role of "semi-classical" (Bohr-Sommerfeld) and "semi-quantum-mechanical" (atomic orbital) models in the context of the teaching of atomic theory is considered. It is suggested that an appropriate treatment of such models can serve as a useful adjunct to quantum mechanical study of atomic systems.

  17. Entanglement distillation for quantum communication network with atomic-ensemble memories.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jian; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-10-01

    Atomic ensembles are effective memory nodes for quantum communication network due to the long coherence time and the collective enhancement effect for the nonlinear interaction between an ensemble and a photon. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving the entanglement distillation for nonlocal atomic ensembles by the input-output process of a single photon as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We give an optimal entanglement concentration protocol (ECP) for two-atomic-ensemble systems in a partially entangled pure state with known parameters and an efficient ECP for the systems in an unknown partially entangled pure state with a nondestructive parity-check detector (PCD). For the systems in a mixed entangled state, we introduce an entanglement purification protocol with PCDs. These entanglement distillation protocols have high fidelity and efficiency with current experimental techniques, and they are useful for quantum communication network with atomic-ensemble memories. PMID:25321967

  18. Long-range quantum gate via Rydberg states of atoms in a thermal microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sárkány, Lőrinc; Fortágh, József; Petrosyan, David

    2015-09-01

    We propose an implementation of a universal quantum gate between pairs of spatially separated atoms in a microwave cavity at finite temperature. The gate results from reversible laser excitation of Rydberg states of atoms interacting with each other via exchange of virtual photons through a common cavity mode. Quantum interference of different transition paths between the two-atom ground and double-excited Rydberg states makes both the transition amplitude and resonance largely insensitive to the excitations in the microwave cavity quantum bus which can therefore be in any superposition or mixture of photon number states. Our scheme for attaining ultra-long-range interactions and entanglement also applies to mesoscopic atomic ensembles in the Rydberg blockade regime and is scalable to many ensembles trapped within a centimeter-sized microwave resonator.

  19. Quantum treatment of two-stage sub-Doppler laser cooling of magnesium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Bonert, A. E.; Il'enkov, R. Ya.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Deep laser cooling of 24Mg atoms has been theoretically studied. We propose a two-stage sub-Doppler cooling strategy using electrodipole transition 3 3P2→3 3D3 (λ =383.8 nm). The first stage implies exploiting magneto-optical trap with σ+ and σ- light beams, while at the second stage lin ⊥ lin molasses is used. We focus on achieving a large number of ultracold atoms (Teff<10 μ K ) in a cold-atomic cloud. The calculations have been based on quantum treatment, taking into full account the recoil effect and beyond many widely used approximations. Steady-state values of average kinetic energy and linear momentum distributions of cold atoms have been analyzed for various light-field intensities and frequency detunings. The results of conducted quantum analysis have been significantly different from the results achieved under a semiclassical approximation based on the Fokker-Planck equation. The second cooling stage allows achieving sufficiently lower kinetic energies of the atomic cloud as well as increased fraction of ultracold atoms at certain conditions compared to the first one. We hope that the obtained results can help in overcoming current experimental problems in deep cooling of 24Mg atoms by means of laser field. Cold magnesium atoms cooled in a large amount to several μ K are of huge interest to, for example, quantum metrology and to other many-body cold-atoms physics.

  20. Quantum properties of an atom in a cavity constructed by topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wei; Yang, Zi-xin; Li, Gao-xiang

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the spontaneous decay of an atom in a cavity constructed by topological insulators. The method of Green’s function in stratified cavities has been used and expressions of atomic decay rates in two directions parallel and perpendicular to cavity mirrors are derived. It is shown that when an atom is embedded closely to a topological insulator with a strong axion field, the spontaneous decay of the dipole parallel to the surface will be suppressed due to the high anisotropy of the vacuum. The appearance of indirect quantum interference of two orthogonal dipoles representing the different decay channels of a Zeeman atom has also been revealed. It is found that when the cavity length is less than half the wave length in a vacuum—wherever the Zeeman atom is located in the cavity—spontaneous decay of the dipole parallel to the mirror is deeply suppressed while decay through the dipole perpendicular to the mirror is enhanced. As expected, strong quantum interference between the two decay channels is observed. In particular, when the axion field is strong enough, the maximum quantum interference can be generated between two orthogonal dipoles, which is consistent with the phenomenon that appears in cavities constructed by perfect mirrors. By taking loss of material into account, the results show that atomic decay through dissipation dominates when the atom is quite close to the mirror and leads to the destruction of quantum interference in a small region.

  1. First-principles quantum simulations of dissociation of molecular condensates: Atom correlations in momentum space

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C. M.; Schwenn, P. E.; Kheruntsyan, K. V.

    2006-09-15

    We investigate the quantum many-body dynamics of dissociation of a Bose-Einstein condensate of molecular dimers into pairs of constituent bosonic atoms and analyze the resulting atom-atom correlations. The quantum fields of both the molecules and atoms are simulated from first principles in three dimensions using the positive-P representation method. This allows us to provide an exact treatment of the molecular field depletion and s-wave scattering interactions between the particles, as well as to extend the analysis to nonuniform systems. In the simplest uniform case, we find that the major source of atom-atom decorrelation is atom-atom recombination which produces molecules outside the initially occupied condensate mode. The unwanted molecules are formed from dissociated atom pairs with nonopposite momenta. The net effect of this process--which becomes increasingly significant for dissociation durations corresponding to more than about 40% conversion--is to reduce the atom-atom correlations. In addition, for nonuniform systems we find that mode mixing due to inhomogeneity can result in further degradation of the correlation signal. We characterize the correlation strength via the degree of squeezing of particle number-difference fluctuations in a certain momentum-space volume and show that the correlation strength can be increased if the signals are binned into larger counting volumes.

  2. Ultracold atoms coupled to micro- and nanomechanical oscillators: towards hybrid quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treutlein, Philipp

    2009-05-01

    Micro- and nanomechanical oscillators are presently approaching the quantum regime, driven by the continuous improvement of techniques to read out and cool mechanical motion. For trapped ultracold atoms, a rich toolbox of quantum control techniques already exists. By coupling mechanical oscillators to ultracold atoms, hybrid quantum systems could be formed, in which the atoms are used to cool, read out, and coherently manipulate the oscillators' state. In our work, we investigate different coupling mechanisms between ultracold atoms and mechanical oscillators. In a first experiment, we use atom-surface forces to couple the vibrations of a mechanical cantilever to the motion of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a magnetic microtrap on a chip. The atoms are trapped at sub-micrometer distance from the cantilever surface. We make use of the coupling to read out the cantilever vibrations with the atoms. Coupling via surface forces could be employed to couple atoms to molecular-scale oscillators such as carbon nanotubes. In a second experiment, we investigate coupling via a 1D optical lattice that is formed by a laser beam retroreflected from the cantilever tip. The optical lattice serves as a transfer rod which couples vibrations of the cantilever to the atoms and vice versa. Finally, we investigate magnetic coupling between the spin of ultracold atoms and the vibrations of a nanoscale cantilever with a magnetic tip. Theoretical investigations show that at low temperatures, the backaction of the atoms onto the cantilever is significant and the system represents a mechanical analog of cavity quantum electrodynamics in the strong coupling regime.

  3. Light absorption during alkali atom-noble gas atom interactions at thermal energies: a quantum dynamics treatment.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2006-10-21

    The absorption of light during atomic collisions is treated by coupling electronic excitations, treated quantum mechanically, to the motion of the nuclei described within a short de Broglie wavelength approximation, using a density matrix approach. The time-dependent electric dipole of the system provides the intensity of light absorption in a treatment valid for transient phenomena, and the Fourier transform of time-dependent intensities gives absorption spectra that are very sensitive to details of the interaction potentials of excited diatomic states. We consider several sets of atomic expansion functions and atomic pseudopotentials, and introduce new parametrizations to provide light absorption spectra in good agreement with experimentally measured and ab initio calculated spectra. To this end, we describe the electronic excitation of the valence electron of excited alkali atoms in collisions with noble gas atoms with a procedure that combines l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials, including two- and three-body polarization terms, and a treatment of the dynamics based on the eikonal approximation of atomic motions and time-dependent molecular orbitals. We present results for the collision induced absorption spectra in the Li-He system at 720 K, which display both atomic and molecular transition intensities. PMID:17059261

  4. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with a Rydberg-blocked atomic ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Guerlin, Christine; Brion, Etienne; Esslinger, Tilman; Moelmer, Klaus

    2010-11-15

    The realization of a Jaynes-Cummings model in the optical domain is proposed for an atomic ensemble. The scheme exploits the collective coupling of the atoms to a quantized cavity mode and the nonlinearity introduced by coupling to high-lying Rydberg states. A two-photon transition resonantly couples the single-atom ground state |g> to a Rydberg state |e> via a nonresonant intermediate state |i>, but due to the interaction between Rydberg atoms only a single atom can be resonantly excited in the ensemble. This restricts the state space of the ensemble to the collective ground state |G> and the collectively excited state |E> with a single Rydberg excitation distributed evenly on all atoms. The collectively enhanced coupling of all atoms to the cavity field with coherent coupling strengths which are much larger than the decay rates in the system leads to the strong coupling regime of the resulting effective Jaynes-Cummings model. We use numerical simulations to show that the cavity transmission can be used to reveal detailed properties of the Jaynes-Cummings ladder of excited states and that the atomic nonlinearity gives rise to highly nontrivial photon emission from the cavity. Finally, we suggest that the absence of interactions between remote Rydberg atoms may, due to a combinatorial effect, induce a cavity-assisted excitation blockade whose range is larger than the typical Rydberg dipole-dipole interaction length.

  5. Quantum state transfer between atomic ensembles trapped in separate cavities via adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Ling; Chen, Mei-Feng

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new approach for quantum state transfer (QST) between atomic ensembles separately trapped in two distant cavities connected by an optical fiber via adiabatic passage. The three-level Λ-type atoms in each ensemble dispersively interact with the nonresonant classical field and cavity mode. By choosing appropriate parameters of the system, the effective Hamiltonian describes two atomic ensembles interacting with “the same cavity mode” and has a dark state. Consequently, the QST between atomic ensembles can be implemented via adiabatic passage. Numerical calculations show that the scheme is robust against moderate fluctuations of the experimental parameters. In addition, the effect of decoherence can be suppressed effectively. The idea provides a scalable way to an atomic-ensemble-based quantum network, which may be reachable with currently available technology. Project supported by the Funding (type B) from the Fujian Education Department, China (Grant No. JB13261).

  6. Probing the quantum vacuum with an artificial atom in front of a mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, I.-C.; Kockum, A. F.; Tornberg, L.; Pourkabirian, A.; Johansson, G.; Delsing, P.; Wilson, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum fluctuations of the vacuum are both a surprising and fundamental phenomenon of nature. Understood as virtual photons, they still have a very real impact, for instance, in the Casimir effects and the lifetimes of atoms. Engineering vacuum fluctuations is therefore becoming increasingly important to emerging technologies. Here, we shape vacuum fluctuations using a superconducting circuit analogue of a mirror, creating regions in space where they are suppressed. Moving an artificial atom through these regions and measuring the spontaneous emission lifetime of the atom provides us with the spectral density of the vacuum fluctuations. Using the paradigm of waveguide quantum electrodynamics, we significantly improve over previous studies of the interaction of an atom with its mirror image, observing a spectral density as low as 0.02 quanta, a factor of 50 below the mirrorless result. This demonstrates that we can hide the atom from the vacuum, even though it is exposed in free space.

  7. Universal quantum gates for photon-atom hybrid systems assisted by bad cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan-Yu; Liu, Qian; Wei, Hai-Rui; Li, Tao; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-04-01

    We present two deterministic schemes for constructing a CNOT gate and a Toffoli gate on photon-atom and photon-atom-atom hybrid quantum systems assisted by bad cavities, respectively. They are achieved by cavity-assisted photon scattering and work in the intermediate coupling region with bad cavities, which relaxes the difficulty of their implementation in experiment. Also, bad cavities are feasible for fast quantum operations and reading out information. Compared with previous works, our schemes do not need any auxiliary qubits and measurements. Moreover, the schematic setups for these gates are simple, especially that for our Toffoli gate as only a quarter wave packet is used to interact the photon with each of the atoms every time. These atom-cavity systems can be used as the quantum nodes in long-distance quantum communication as their relatively long coherence time is suitable for multi-time operations between the photon and the system. Our calculations show that the average fidelities and efficiencies of our two universal hybrid quantum gates are high with current experimental technology.

  8. Universal quantum gates for photon-atom hybrid systems assisted by bad cavities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guan-Yu; Liu, Qian; Wei, Hai-Rui; Li, Tao; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We present two deterministic schemes for constructing a CNOT gate and a Toffoli gate on photon-atom and photon-atom-atom hybrid quantum systems assisted by bad cavities, respectively. They are achieved by cavity-assisted photon scattering and work in the intermediate coupling region with bad cavities, which relaxes the difficulty of their implementation in experiment. Also, bad cavities are feasible for fast quantum operations and reading out information. Compared with previous works, our schemes do not need any auxiliary qubits and measurements. Moreover, the schematic setups for these gates are simple, especially that for our Toffoli gate as only a quarter wave packet is used to interact the photon with each of the atoms every time. These atom-cavity systems can be used as the quantum nodes in long-distance quantum communication as their relatively long coherence time is suitable for multi-time operations between the photon and the system. Our calculations show that the average fidelities and efficiencies of our two universal hybrid quantum gates are high with current experimental technology. PMID:27067992

  9. Universal quantum gates for photon-atom hybrid systems assisted by bad cavities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan-Yu; Liu, Qian; Wei, Hai-Rui; Li, Tao; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We present two deterministic schemes for constructing a CNOT gate and a Toffoli gate on photon-atom and photon-atom-atom hybrid quantum systems assisted by bad cavities, respectively. They are achieved by cavity-assisted photon scattering and work in the intermediate coupling region with bad cavities, which relaxes the difficulty of their implementation in experiment. Also, bad cavities are feasible for fast quantum operations and reading out information. Compared with previous works, our schemes do not need any auxiliary qubits and measurements. Moreover, the schematic setups for these gates are simple, especially that for our Toffoli gate as only a quarter wave packet is used to interact the photon with each of the atoms every time. These atom-cavity systems can be used as the quantum nodes in long-distance quantum communication as their relatively long coherence time is suitable for multi-time operations between the photon and the system. Our calculations show that the average fidelities and efficiencies of our two universal hybrid quantum gates are high with current experimental technology. PMID:27067992

  10. Quantum coherence and entanglement control for atom-cavity systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Wenchong

    Coherence and entanglement play a significant role in the quantum theory. Ideal quantum systems, "closed" to the outside world, remain quantum forever and thus manage to retain coherence and entanglement. Real quantum systems, however, are open to the environment and are therefore susceptible to the phenomenon of decoherence and disentanglement which are major hindrances to the effectiveness of quantum information processing tasks. In this thesis we have theoretically studied the evolution of coherence and entanglement in quantum systems coupled to various environments. We have also studied ways and means of controlling the decay of coherence and entanglement. We have studied the exact qubit entanglement dynamics of some interesting initial states coupled to a high-Q cavity containing zero photon, one photon, two photons and many photons respectively. We have found that an initially correlated environmental state can serve as an enhancer for entanglement decay or generation processes. More precisely, we have demonstrated that the degree of entanglement, including its collapse as well as its revival times, can be significantly modified by the correlated structure of the environmental modes. We have also studied dynamical decoupling (DD) technique --- a prominent strategy of controlling decoherence and preserving entanglement in open quantum systems. We have analyzed several DD control methods applied to qubit systems that can eliminate the system-environment coupling and prolong the quantum coherence time. Particularly, we have proposed a new DD sequence consisting a set of designed control operators that can universally protected an unknown qutrit state against colored phase and amplitude environment noises. In addition, in a non-Markovian regime, we have reformulated the quantum state diffusion (QSD) equation to incorporate the effect of the external control fields. Without any assumptions on the system-environment coupling and the size of environment, we have

  11. A two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid produced by an atomic simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model

    PubMed Central

    Po, Hoi Chun; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Bosons have a natural instinct to condense at zero temperature. It is a long-standing challenge to create a high-dimensional quantum liquid that does not exhibit long-range order at the ground state, as either extreme experimental parameters or sophisticated designs of microscopic Hamiltonians are required for suppressing the condensation. Here we show that synthetic gauge fields for ultracold atoms, using either the Raman scheme or shaken lattices, provide physicists a simple and practical scheme to produce a two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid at the ground state. This quantum liquid arises at a critical Lifshitz point, where a two-dimensional quartic dispersion emerges in the momentum space, and many fundamental properties of two-dimensional bosons are changed in its proximity. Such an ideal simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model allows experimentalists to directly visualize and explore the deconfinement transition of topological excitations, an intriguing phenomenon that is difficult to access in other systems. PMID:26268154

  12. Quantum Cloning of an Unknown 2-Atom State via Entangled Cluster States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.-z.; Zhong, F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presented a scheme for cloning a 2-atom state in the QED cavity with the help of Victor who is the state's preparer. The cloning scheme has two steps. In the first step, the scheme requires probabilistic teleportation of a 2-atom state that is unknown in advance, and uses a 4-atom cluster state as quantum channel. In the second step, perfect copies of the 2-atom entangled state may be realized with the assistance of Victor. The finding is that our scheme has two outstanding advantages: it is not sensitive to the cavity decay, and Bell state is easy to identify.

  13. Entanglement and quantum state transfer between two atoms trapped in two indirectly coupled cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Shen, Li-Tuo; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2016-05-01

    We propose a one-step scheme for implementing entanglement generation and the quantum state transfer between two atomic qubits trapped in two different cavities that are not directly coupled to each other. The process is realized through engineering an effective asymmetric X-Y interaction for the two atoms involved in the gate operation and an auxiliary atom trapped in an intermediate cavity, induced by virtually manipulating the atomic excited states and photons. We study the validity of the scheme as well as the influences of the dissipation by numerical simulation and demonstrate that it is robust against decoherence.

  14. Quantum Cloning of an Unknown 2-Atom State via Entangled Cluster States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.-z.; Zhong, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presented a scheme for cloning a 2-atom state in the QED cavity with the help of Victor who is the state's preparer. The cloning scheme has two steps. In the first step, the scheme requires probabilistic teleportation of a 2-atom state that is unknown in advance, and uses a 4-atom cluster state as quantum channel. In the second step, perfect copies of the 2-atom entangled state may be realized with the assistance of Victor. The finding is that our scheme has two outstanding advantages: it is not sensitive to the cavity decay, and Bell state is easy to identify.

  15. Collective cavity quantum electrodynamics with multiple atomic levels

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Kyle J.; Baden, Markus P.; Barrett, Murray D.

    2011-09-15

    We study the transmission spectra of ultracold rubidium atoms coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity. Under weak probing with {pi}-polarized light, the linear response of the system is that of a collective spin with multiple levels coupled to a single mode of the cavity. By varying the atom number, we change the collective coupling of the system. We observe the change in transmission spectra when going from a regime where the collective coupling is much smaller than the separation of the atomic levels to a regime where both are of comparable size. The observations are in good agreement with a reduced model we developed for our system.

  16. Phase conjugation of a quantum-degenerate atomic fermion beam.

    PubMed

    Search, Chris P; Meystre, Pierre

    2003-09-01

    We discuss the possibility of phase conjugation of an atomic Fermi field via nonlinear wave mixing in an ultracold gas. It is shown that for a beam of fermions incident on an atomic phase-conjugate mirror, a time-reversed backward propagating fermionic beam is generated similar to the case in nonlinear optics. By adopting an operational definition of the phase, we show that it is possible to infer the presence of the phase-conjugate field by the loss of the interference pattern in an atomic interferometer. PMID:14525466

  17. Information-recycling beam splitters for quantum enhanced atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Haine, S A

    2013-02-01

    We propose a scheme to significantly enhance the sensitivity of atom interferometry performed with Bose-Einstein condensates. When an optical two-photon Raman transition is used to split the condensate into two modes, some information about the number of atoms in one of the modes is contained in one of the optical modes. We introduce a simple model to describe this process, and find that by processing this information in an appropriate way, the phase sensitivity of atom interferometry can be enhanced by more than a factor of 10 for realistic parameters. PMID:23414016

  18. Demonstration of a Neutral Atom Controlled-NOT Quantum Gate

    SciTech Connect

    Isenhower, L.; Urban, E.; Zhang, X. L.; Gill, A. T.; Henage, T.; Johnson, T. A.; Walker, T. G.; Saffman, M.

    2010-01-08

    We present the first demonstration of a CNOT gate between two individually addressed neutral atoms. Our implementation of the CNOT uses Rydberg blockade interactions between neutral atoms held in optical traps separated by >8 {mu}m. Using two different gate protocols we measure CNOT fidelities of F=0.73 and 0.72 based on truth table probabilities. The gate was used to generate Bell states with fidelity F=0.48+-0.06. After correcting for atom loss we obtain an a posteriori entanglement fidelity of F=0.58.

  19. Spin dynamics of an individual Cr atom in a semiconductor quantum dot under optical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A.; Utsumi, H.; Boukari, H.; Kuroda, S.; Besombes, L.

    2016-08-01

    We studied the spin dynamics of a Cr atom incorporated in a II-VI semiconductor quantum dot using photon correlation techniques. We used recently developed singly Cr-doped CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots to access the spin of an individual magnetic atom. Auto-correlation of the photons emitted by the quantum dot under continuous wave optical excitation reveals fluctuations of the localized spin with a timescale in the 10 ns range. Cross-correlation gives quantitative transfer time between Cr spin states. A calculation of the time dependence of the spin levels population in Cr-doped quantum dots shows that the observed spin dynamics is dominated by the exciton-Cr interaction. These measurements also provide a lower bound in the 20 ns range for the intrinsic Cr spin relaxation time.

  20. Quantum gas microscopy with spin, atom-number, and multilayer readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Philipp M.; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M. Eric; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Atom- and site-resolved experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide a powerful platform for the simulation of strongly correlated materials. In this Rapid Communication, we present a toolbox for the preparation, control, and site-resolved detection of a tunnel-coupled bilayer degenerate quantum gas. Using a collisional blockade, we engineer occupation-dependent interplane transport which enables us to circumvent light-assisted pair loss during imaging and count n =0 to n =3 atoms per site. We obtain the first number- and site-resolved images of the Mott insulator "wedding cake" structure and observe the emergence of antiferromagnetic ordering across a magnetic quantum phase transition. We are further able to employ the bilayer system for spin-resolved readout of a mixture of two hyperfine states. This work opens the door to direct detection of entanglement and Kosterlitz-Thouless-type phase dynamics, as well as studies of coupled planar quantum materials.

  1. Rydberg excitation assisted light shift blockade in Rb atoms for realizing a collective state quantum bit and quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yanfei; Kim, May E.; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2014-10-01

    Previously, we had proposed the technique of light shift imbalance induced blockade which leads to a condition where a collection of non-interacting atoms under laser excitation remains combined to a superposition of the ground and the fist excited states, thus realizing a collective state quantum bit which in turn can be used to realize a quantum computer. In this paper, we show first that the light shift imbalance by itself is actually not enough to produce such a blockade, and explain the reason by the limitation of our previous analysis had reached this constraint. We then show that by introducing Rydberg interaction, it is possible to achieve such a blockade for a wide range of parameters. Analytic arguments used to establish these results are confirmed by numerical simulations. The fidelity of coupled quantum gates based on such collective state qubits is highly insensitive to the exact number of atoms in the ensemble. As such, this approach may prove be viable for scalable quantum computing based on neutral atoms.

  2. Accurate energies of the He atom with undergraduate quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massé, Robert C.; Walker, Thad G.

    2015-08-01

    Estimating the energies and splitting of the 1s2s singlet and triplet states of helium is a classic exercise in quantum perturbation theory but yields only qualitatively correct results. Using a six-line computer program, the 1s2s energies calculated by matrix diagonalization using a seven-state basis improve the results to 0.4% error or better. This is an effective and practical illustration of the quantitative power of quantum mechanics, at a level accessible to undergraduate students.

  3. Light scattering from ultracold atoms in optical lattices as an optical probe of quantum statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-11-15

    We study off-resonant collective light scattering from ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Scattering from different atomic quantum states creates different quantum states of the scattered light, which can be distinguished by measurements of the spatial intensity distribution, quadrature variances, photon statistics, or spectral measurements. In particular, angle-resolved intensity measurements reflect global statistics of atoms (total number of radiating atoms) as well as local statistical quantities (single-site statistics even without optical access to a single site) and pair correlations between different sites. As a striking example we consider scattering from transversally illuminated atoms into an optical cavity mode. For the Mott-insulator state, similar to classical diffraction, the number of photons scattered into a cavity is zero due to destructive interference, while for the superfluid state it is nonzero and proportional to the number of atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that light scattering into a standing-wave cavity has a nontrivial angle dependence, including the appearance of narrow features at angles, where classical diffraction predicts zero. The measurement procedure corresponds to the quantum nondemolition measurement of various atomic variables by observing light.

  4. Quantum transmission of atoms through a slab of superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Williams, C D H; Wyatt, A F G

    2003-08-22

    We describe a measurement of the transmission probability of 4He atoms through a freely suspended slab of superfluid 4He at low temperatures. In our experiment the slab is realized by using an array of parallel cylindrical holes of diameter 51 microm in a glass disc of thickness 190 microm. By controlling the chemical potential, the holes can be made to fill or empty with liquid, and the surface curvature varied. We have measured the transmission of atom beams, generated by a thin-film heater and detected with a sensitive bolometer, through this structure. The results show that the dominant transmission channel is atom-R+ roton-atom with a probability p approximately 0.12 and that R+ rotons can undergo total internal reflection at the free liquid surfaces. PMID:14525250

  5. Quantum phase transitions in an interacting atom-molecule boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, G.; Foerster, A.; Mattei, E.; Dahmen, S. R.; Links, J.

    2010-06-15

    We study the quantum phase transitions of a model that describes the interconversion of interacting bosonic atoms and molecules. Using a classical analysis, we identify a threshold coupling line separating a molecular phase and a mixed phase. Through studies of the energy gap, von Neumann entanglement entropy, and fidelity, we give evidence that this line is associated with a boundary line in the ground-state phase diagram of the quantum system.

  6. Transfer behavior of quantum states between atoms in photonic crystal coupled cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2010-03-01

    In this article, we discuss the one-excitation dynamics of a quantum system consisting of two two-level atoms each interacting with one of two coupled single-mode cavities via spontaneous emission. When the atoms and cavities are tuned into resonance, a wide variety of time-evolution behaviors can be realized by modulating the atom-cavity coupling strength g and the cavity-cavity hopping strength λ. The dynamics is solved rigorously via the eigenproblem of an ordinary coupled linear system and simple analytical solutions are derived at several extreme situations of g and λ. In the large hopping limit where g≪λ, the behavior of the system is the linear superposition of a fast and slow periodic oscillation. The quantum state transfers from one atom to the other atom accompanied with weak excitation of the cavity mode. In the large coupling limit where g≫λ, the time-evolution behavior of the system is characterized by the usual slowly varying carrier envelope superimposed upon a fast and violent oscillation. At a certain instant, the energy is fully transferred from the one quantum subsystem to the other. When the two interaction strengths are comparable in magnitude, the dynamics acts as a continuous pulse having irregular frequency and line shape of peaks and valleys, and the complicated time-evolution behaviors are ascribed to the violent competition between all the one-excitation quantum states. The coupled quantum system of atoms and cavities makes a good model to study cavity quantum electrodynamics with great freedoms of many-body interaction.

  7. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  8. Quantum fuel with multilevel atomic coherence for ultrahigh specific work in a photonic Carnot engine.

    PubMed

    Türkpençe, Deniz; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate scaling of work and efficiency of a photonic Carnot engine with a number of quantum coherent resources. Specifically, we consider a generalization of the "phaseonium fuel" for the photonic Carnot engine, which was first introduced as a three-level atom with two lower states in a quantum coherent superposition by M. O. Scully, M. Suhail Zubairy, G. S. Agarwal, and H. Walther [Science 299, 862 (2003)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1078955], to the case of N+1 level atoms with N coherent lower levels. We take into account atomic relaxation and dephasing as well as the cavity loss and derive a coarse-grained master equation to evaluate the work and efficiency analytically. Analytical results are verified by microscopic numerical examination of the thermalization dynamics. We find that efficiency and work scale quadratically with the number of quantum coherent levels. Quantum coherence boost to the specific energy (work output per unit mass of the resource) is a profound fundamental difference of quantum fuel from classical resources. We consider typical modern resonator set ups and conclude that multilevel phaseonium fuel can be utilized to overcome the decoherence in available systems. Preparation of the atomic coherences and the associated cost of coherence are analyzed and the engine operation within the bounds of the second law is verified. Our results bring the photonic Carnot engines much closer to the capabilities of current resonator technologies. PMID:26871061

  9. Geometry-Induced Memory Effects in Isolated Quantum Systems: Cold-Atom Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chen-Yen; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Memory effects result from the history-dependent behavior of a system, are abundant in our daily life, and have broad applications. Here, we explore the possibilities of generating memory effects in simple isolated quantum systems. By utilizing geometrical effects from a class of lattices supporting flatbands consisting of localized states, memory effects could be observed in ultracold atoms in optical lattices. As the optical lattice continuously transforms from a triangular lattice into a kagome lattice with a flatband, history-dependent density distributions manifest quantum memory effects even in noninteracting systems, including fermionic as well as bosonic systems, in the proper ranges of temperatures. Rapid growth of ultracold technology predicts a bright future for quantum memory-effect systems, and here two prototypical applications of geometry-induced quantum memory effects are proposed: A cold-atom-based accelerometer using an atomic differentiator to record the mechanical change rate of a coupled probe, and an atomic quantum memory cell for storing information with write-in and readout schemes.

  10. Quantum fuel with multilevel atomic coherence for ultrahigh specific work in a photonic Carnot engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkpençe, Deniz; Müstecaplıoǧlu, Özgür E.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate scaling of work and efficiency of a photonic Carnot engine with a number of quantum coherent resources. Specifically, we consider a generalization of the "phaseonium fuel" for the photonic Carnot engine, which was first introduced as a three-level atom with two lower states in a quantum coherent superposition by M. O. Scully, M. Suhail Zubairy, G. S. Agarwal, and H. Walther [Science 299, 862 (2003), 10.1126/science.1078955], to the case of N +1 level atoms with N coherent lower levels. We take into account atomic relaxation and dephasing as well as the cavity loss and derive a coarse-grained master equation to evaluate the work and efficiency analytically. Analytical results are verified by microscopic numerical examination of the thermalization dynamics. We find that efficiency and work scale quadratically with the number of quantum coherent levels. Quantum coherence boost to the specific energy (work output per unit mass of the resource) is a profound fundamental difference of quantum fuel from classical resources. We consider typical modern resonator set ups and conclude that multilevel phaseonium fuel can be utilized to overcome the decoherence in available systems. Preparation of the atomic coherences and the associated cost of coherence are analyzed and the engine operation within the bounds of the second law is verified. Our results bring the photonic Carnot engines much closer to the capabilities of current resonator technologies.