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Sample records for multipass weld metal

  1. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  2. Effect of Ti-containing inclusions on the nucleation of acicular ferrite and mechanical properties of multipass weld metals.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Hosseini, M; Arabian, N; Rahimi, E

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, the influence of Ti-containing inclusions on the development of acicular ferrite microstructure and mechanical properties in the multipass weld metals has been studied. Shielded metal arc weld deposits were prepared by varying titanium content in the range of 0.003-0.021%. The variation in the titanium content was obtained by the addition of different amounts of titanium oxide nanoparticles to the electrode coating. The dispersion of titanium oxide nanoparticles, composition of inclusions, microstructural analysis, tensile properties and Charpy impact toughness were evaluated. As the amount of Ti-containing inclusions in the weld metal was increased, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed from the grain boundary allotriomorphic ferrite structure to acicular ferrite with the intragranular nucleation of ferrite on the Ti-containing inclusions, and the mechanical properties were improved. This improvement is attributable to the increased percentage of acicular ferrite due to the uniform dispersion of Ti-containing inclusions and the pinning force of oxide nanoparticles against the growth of allotriomorphic ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite from the austenite grain boundaries. PMID:23238108

  3. Variation in the Chemical Driving Force for Intragranular Nucleation in the Multi-pass Weld Metal of Ti-Containing High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Han, Kyutae; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Changhee

    2015-08-01

    The variation of the Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) around the inclusion during multi-pass welding of Ti-containing high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel was investigated by taking the changes in the impact toughness and microstructure into account. As-deposited weld metal specimens were prepared by single-pass, bead-in-groove welding, and reheated weld metal specimens were obtained by a thermal simulation technique. Two types of chemical compositions were prepared, mainly by controlling the Ti content in order to form two types of phases at inclusion/matrix interface: spinel and ilmenite. When the reheating thermal cycle is applied to the as-deposited weld metal, the MDZ depth varied depending on the inclusion surface phase; this could be explained by the competition of the homogenization effect and the dissolution effect, which occurred near the inclusion/matrix interface. In order to enhance the chemical driving force for intragranular nucleation in both as-deposited weld metal and reheated weld metal, the formation of ilmenite phase is recommended.

  4. Stress Engineering of Multi-pass Welds of Structural Steel to Enhance Structural Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Supriyo; Sule, Jibrin; Yakubu, Mustapha Y.

    2016-05-01

    In multi-pass welding, the weld metal and the associated heat-affected zone are subjected to repeated thermal cycling from successive deposition of filler metals. The thermal straining results into multi-mode deformation of the weld metal which causes a variably distributed residual stress field through the thickness and across the weld of a multi-pass weldment. In addition to this, the as-welded fusion zone microstructure shows dendritic formation of grains and segregation of alloying element. This may result in formation of micro-corrosion cells and the problem would aggravate in case of highly alloyed materials. Local mechanical tensioning is an effective way of elimination of the weld tensile residual stress. It has been shown that application of cold rolling is capable not only of removing the residual stress, but depending on its magnitude it may also form beneficial compressive stress state. Multi-pass structural steel welds used as structural alloy in general engineering and structural applications. Such alloys are subjected to severe in-service degradation mechanisms e.g., corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Welds and the locked-in residual stress in the welded area often initiate the defect which finally results in failure. In the present study, a multi-pass structural steel weld metal was first subjected to post-weld cold rolling which was followed by controlled heating by a fiber laser. Cold straining resulted in redistribution of the internal stress through the thickness and controlled laser processing helps in reforming of the grain structure. However, even with controlled laser, processing the residual stress is reinstated. Therefore, a strategy has been adopted to roll the metal post-laser processing so as to obtain a complete stress-free and recrystallized microstructure.

  5. Microstructure and Ductility-Dip Cracking Susceptibility of Circumferential Multipass Dissimilar Weld Between 20MND5 and Z2CND18-12NS with Ni-Base Filler Metal 52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; Duan, Zhaoling; He, Guo

    2013-10-01

    The large circumferential multipass dissimilar weld between 20MND5 steel and Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel welded with FM52 filler material was investigated in terms of the diluted composition, the grain boundary precipitation, and the ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility of the weld. The diluted composition of the weld is composed of 37 to 47 pct Ni, 21 to 24 pct Cr, and 28 to 40 pct Fe, which are inhomogeneous along the depth and over the width of the deep weld. The carbon content has a distribution in the region of the surface weld from a high level (~0.20 pct) in the zone near 20MND5 steel to a normal level (~0.03 pct) in the zone near Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel. The carbon distribution is corresponding to the grain boundary carbides. The minimum threshold strains for DDC occur in the temperature range of 1223 K to 1323 K (950 °C to 1050 °C), which are 0.5, 0.35, and 0.4 pct for the root weld, middle region, and the surface weld, respectively. The dissimilar weld has the largest susceptibility to the DDC compared to the filler metal 52 and the Inconel 690.

  6. Re-weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steels studied by multi-pass TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Oishi, M.; Koshiishi, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Anzai, H.; Saito, Y.; Kono, W.

    2002-12-01

    Weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel (SS) has been studied by multi-pass bead-on-plate and build-up tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, simulating the repair-welding of reactor components. Specimens were submerged arc welding (SAW) joint of Type 304 SS containing 0.5 appm helium (1.8 appm in the SAW weld metal). Sound welding could be obtained by one- to three-pass welding on the plates at weld heat inputs less than 1 MJ/m in the irradiated 304 SS base metal. In the case of the build-up welding of a groove, no visible defects appeared in the specimen at a heat input as low as 0.4 MJ/m. However, build-up welding at a high heat input of 1 MJ/m was prone to weld cracking, owing to the formation of helium bubbles on grain boundaries of the base metal or dendrite boundaries of pre-existing SAW weld metal, in the area within 0.6 mm from the fusion line.

  7. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A MULTILAYERED MULTIPASS FRICTION STIR WELD IN STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    Multilayered multipass friction stir welding (MM-FSW) makes it possible to use FSW to fabricate thick-section structures. In this work, MM-FSW was demonstrated on a high strength low alloy steel; ASTM A572 Grade 50. Three steel plates with thicknesses of 0.18", 0.18", 0.24" respectively were stacked and friction stir welded together to form a 0.6" thick welded structure. The welded plate was sectioned into rectangular bars transverse to the weld direction for tensile testing to evaluate mechanical properties. Digital image correlation (DIC) was employed to map the local strain fields during tensile testing. The initial failure was found to occur simultaneously at the bottom and middle layers away from the weld zone. The top layer failed last in the base metal. The failure locations were consistent among different samples tested. Also, Charpy V-notch impact tests were conducted for weld metal, heat affected zone, and the base metal at each layer as a function of temperature. The weld microstructures were characterized using optical and electron microscopy and micro-hardness mapping.

  8. Procedure for Computing Residual Stresses from Neutron Diffraction Data and its Application to Multi-Pass Dissimilar Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili; Crooker, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool for non-destructive measurement of internal residual stresses of welded structures. The conventional approach for determination of residual stresses requires the knowledge of stress-free lattice spacing a priori. For multiple-pass dissimilar metal welds common to nuclear reactor pipeline systems, the stress-free lattice parameter is a complex function of position due to the chemistry inhomogeneity in the weld region and can be challenging to determine experimentally. This paper presents a new approach to calculate the residual stress field in dissimilar welds without the use of stress-free lattice parameter. The theoretical basis takes advantage of the fact that the normal component of welding residual stresses is typically small for thin plate or pipe welds. The applicability of the new approach is examined and justified in a multi-pass dissimilar metal weld consisting of a stainless steel plate and a nickel alloy filler metal. The level of uncertainties associated with this new approach is assessed. Neutron diffraction experiment is carried out to measure the lattice spacing at various locations in the dissimilar weld. A comb-shaped specimen, electro-discharge machined from a companion weld, is used to determine the stress-free lattice spacing. The calculated results from the new approach are consistent with those from the conventional approach. The new approach is found to be a practical method for determining the two in-plane residual stress components in thin plate or pipe dissimilar metal welds.

  9. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Yu, Xinghua; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductilemore » fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.« less

  10. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Yu, Xinghua; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductile fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.

  11. Fabrication of thick multilayered steel structure using A516 Grade 70 by multipass friction stir welding

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lim, Y. C.; Sanderson, S.; Mahoney, M.; Wang, Y.; Chen, J.; David, S. A.; Feng, Z.

    2016-04-06

    Here, we fabricated a thick-sectioned multilayered steel structure by multipass friction stir welding on A516 Grade 70 steel. Tensile strength of the multilayered samples was comparable to that of the base metal. Failure was located in the base metal when a defect-free sample was tested. Charpy impact toughness was higher in the stir zone and heat affected zone than in the base metal. For higher microhardness values were found in the stir zone and heat affected zone than the base metal due to grain refinement and modification of the microstructures. As a result, improved mechanical properties compared to the basemore » metal were found in the weld zones of friction stir welded A516 Grade 70 steel.« less

  12. Defocusing Techniques for Multi-pass Laser Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karhu, Miikka; Kujanpää, Veli

    This study introduces an experimental work carried out in multi-pass laser welding with cold filler wire and laser-arc hybrid welding of thick section austenitic stainless steel. As it has been demonstrated earlier, hybrid and cold wire welding with a keyhole-mode can offer very efficient way to produce multi-pass welds in narrow gap thick section joints. However, when multi-pass welding is applied to one pass per layer method without e.g. scanning or defocusing, the used groove width needs to be very narrow in order to ensure the proper melting of groove side walls and thus to avoid lack of fusion/cold-run defects. As a consequence of the narrow groove, particularly in thick section joints, the accessibility of an arc torch or a wire nozzle into the very bottom of a groove in root pass welding can be considerably restricted. In an alternative approach described in this paper, a power density of a laser beam spot was purposely dispersed by using a defocusing technique. In groove filling experiments, a power density of defocused laser beam was kept in the range, which led the welding process towards to conduction limited regime and thus enabled to achieve broader weld cross-sections. The object was to study the feasibility of defocusing as a way to fill and bridge wider groove geometries than what can be welded with focused keyhole-mode welding with filler addition. The paper covers the results of multi-pass welding of up to 60 mm thick joints with single side preparations.

  13. Residual stresses in a multi-pass weld in an austenitic stainless steel plate before and after thermal stress relief

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.; Wang, X.L.; Hubbard, C.R.; David, S.A.

    1994-06-01

    Changes in residual stresses due to thermal stress relief were determined in a welded 1/2 in. thick 304 stainless steel plate from two residual stress maps determined with the neutron diffraction technique. The 304 stainless plate was made from two 6 {times} 12 {times} 1/2 in. pieces joined along the length by a gas tungsten arc welding process. Multi-pass welds were made with a semiautomatic welding machine employing cold-wire feed of type 308 stainless steel filler alloy. The thermal stress relief treatment consisted of heating to 1150 F, holding for one hour at temperature and then air cooling. Strain components were measured along the weld direction (longitudinal), perpendicular to the weld line in the plate (transverse), and normal to the plate. Measurements were confined to the plane bisecting the weld at the center of the plate. The strain components were converted to stresses assuming that the measured strains were along the principal axes of the strain tensor. Parameters used in the calculation were E=224 GPa and v=0.25. As-welded longitudinal stresses are compressive in the base metal and become strongly tensile through the heat affected zone and into the fusion zone. The transverse stresses follow the longitudinal trend but with a lower magnitude while the normal stresses are small throughout. The stress relief treatment reduced the magnitudes of all the stresses. In the weld zone the longitudinal stress was lowered by 30% and the spatial range of residual stresses was reduced as well.

  14. Investigation of Strength Recovery in Welds of NUCu-140 Steel Through Multipass Welding and Isothermal Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Jason T.; DuPont, John N.; Jain, Divya; Baik, Sung-Il; Seidman, David N.

    2015-11-01

    NUCu-140 is a ferritic copper precipitation-strengthened steel that is a candidate material for use in many naval and structural applications. Previous work has shown that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of NUCu-140 exhibit softening that is due to dissolution of the copper-rich precipitates. This study aims to recover the FZ and HAZ strength by re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates through either multiple weld passes or an isothermal post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). The potential use of multiple thermal cycles was investigated with HAZ simulations using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator. The HAZ simulations represented two weld thermal cycles with different combinations of peak temperatures during the initial and secondary weld passes. To investigate the potential for a PWHT for strength recovery, gas tungsten arc weld samples were isothermally heated for various times and temperatures. Microhardness measurements revealed no strength recovery in the multipass HAZ samples. The time-dependent precipitate characteristics were modeled under the HAZ thermal cycle conditions, and the results showed that the lack of strength recovery could be attributed to insufficient time for re-precipitation during the secondary weld pass. Conversely, full strength recovery in the HAZ was observed in the isothermally heat treated samples. Atom probe tomography analysis correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates during the isothermal PWHT.

  15. Thermal-microstructural analysis of multipass welding of Cr/Mo steels

    SciTech Connect

    Oddy, A.S.; McDill, J.M.J.; Braid, J.E.M.

    1996-12-31

    Full weave repair techniques for Cr/Mo steels without post-weld heat treatment are the subject of many research programs. Coupled thermal-microstructural analyses could preselect candidate welding parameters and reduce the cost and time required. In multipass welds, microstructural simulations require transient reaustenization, austenite decomposition for arbitrary thermal cycles including reheating and tempering. Finite element thermal analysis of a three-layer, weaved weld and the microstructural analysis of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) are described. Significant variation is found in properties governing reaustenization, austenite grain growth, austenite decomposition and hardness. Hardness measurements vary by up to {+-}30 HV on the same sample. Alloy differences within the allowable range lead to HAZ hardness variations of 30 HV in multipass welds. Predicted HAZ hardnesses of the three-layer weld were in good agreement with measurements. The final microstructure was also in good agreement with experiment. The predicted HAZ width was slightly wider than was measured. This difference is easily accounted for by the variation reported in weld parameters.

  16. Investigation of residual stresses in a multipass weld in 1 in. stainless steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.; Fernandez Baca, J.A.; David, S.A.; Hubbard, C.R.; Holden, T.M.; Root, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses and strains were measured in two welded 25-mm thick plates of type 304 stainless steel by the neutron diffraction. The filler metal was type 308 stainless steel and the weld zone had a two phase microstructure in which the austenitic phase lattice parameter differs from the base metal. In these circumstances stain-free samples were taken from the weld zone area for analysis of the lattice parameters and ferrite content using neutron powder diffraction. Corrections for lattice parameter variation were applied permitting the calculation of residual strains and stresses in weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. One of the two welds was examined without stress relief and the other was given a stress relief treatment consisting of vibration at a frequency below the resonant condition dudng welding. In both plates the largest residual stress component (longitudinal) is found in the fusion zone near the boundary between the weld zone and the heat affected zone. This longitudinal component is 400 {plus_minus} 50 MPa in tension. The normal stresses are generally close to zero although large fluctuations are found in the weld zone. The transverse stresses are as high as 200 MPa in the weld zone and decrease to 50 MPa {plus_minus} 40 MPa. The lattice parameter variation was equivalent to 5 {times} l0{minus}4 compressive strain and the ferrite content approached 9 percent at the center of the weld zone. Variations in residual stresses with thickness through the base metal plate were small. The treated plate and untreated plate showed nearly identical patterns of stress distribution. Differences in the measured stresses between vibratory-stress-relief treated and untreated plates fall within error bars of the stress determination in these particular 25 mm thick 300-type stainless steel plates.

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Multipass TIG-Welded AA2219 Aluminum Alloy in 3.5 wt pct NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, A.; Sreekumar, K.; Raja, V. S.

    2012-09-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the AA2219 aluminum alloy in the single-pass (SP) and multipass (MP) welded conditions was examined and compared with that of the base metal (BM) in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution using a slow-strain-rate technique (SSRT). The reduction in ductility was used as a parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of both the BM and welded joints. The results showed that the ductility ratio ( ɛ NaCl/( ɛ air) was 0.97 and 0.96, respectively, for the BM and MP welded joint, and the same was marginally reduced to 0.9 for the SP welded joint. The fractographic examination of the failed samples revealed a typical ductile cracking morphology for all the base and welded joints, indicating the good environmental cracking resistance of this alloy under all welded conditions. To understand the decrease in the ductility of the SP welded joint, preexposure SSRT followed by microstructural observations were made, which showed that the decrease in ductility ratio of the SP welded joint was caused by the electrochemical pitting that assisted the nucleation of cracks in the form of corrosion induced mechanical cracking rather than true SCC failure of the alloy. The microstructural examination and polarization tests demonstrated a clear grain boundary (GB) sensitization of the PMZ, resulting in severe galvanic corrosion of the SP weld joint, which initiated the necessary conditions for the localized corrosion and cracking along the PMZ. The absence of PMZ and a refined fusion zone (FZ) structure because of the lesser heat input and postweld heating effect improved the galvanic corrosion resistance of the MP welded joint greatly, and thus, failure occurred along the FZ.

  18. A study of narrow gap laser welding for thick plates using the multi-layer and multi-pass method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruoyang; Wang, Tianjiao; Wang, Chunming; Yan, Fei; Shao, Xinyu; Hu, Xiyuan; Li, Jianmin

    2014-12-01

    This paper details a new method that combines laser autogenous welding, laser wire filling welding and hybrid laser-GMAW welding to weld 30 mm thick plate using a multi-layer, multi-pass process. A “Y” shaped groove was used to create the joint. Research was also performed to optimize the groove size and the processing parameters. Laser autogenous welding is first used to create the backing weld. The lower, narrowest part of the groove is then welded using laser wire filling welding. Finally, the upper part of the groove is welded using laser-GMAW hybrid welding. Additionally, the wire feeding and droplet transfer behaviors are observed by high speed photography. The two main conclusions from this work are: the wire is often biased towards the side walls, resulting in a lack of fusion at the joint and the creation of other defects for larger groove sizes. Additionally, this results in the droplet transfer behavior becoming unstable, leading to a poor weld appearance for smaller groove sizes.

  19. Numerical simulation of mechanical stress relieving in a multi-pass GTA girth welded pipe flange joint to reduce IGSCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Muhammad; Abid, Muhammad

    2005-12-01

    Welding of piping components produces highly non-uniform residual stresses in the weldment which consequently affect material structural response under loading and also expedite origination/propagation of defects such as stress corrosion cracking and brittle fracture. For welding-induced residual stresses, mechanical stress relieving (MSR) is one of the mitigation techniques to improve the service life of pressure vessel components. However, its application to piping systems is rarely reported in the literature. This paper presents a two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element model of a pipe-flange joint subjected to a multi-pass girth welding followed by an MSR process. Sequentially coupled non-linear transient thermo-mechanical analysis for multi-pass gas tungsten arc welding is first performed to calculate welding residual stresses. Subsequently separate parametric studies for three different types of MSR load including internal pressure, external pressure and axial pull are performed on the pre-stressed model, and stress relieving behaviour is studied. It is concluded that both the internal pressure and axial pull have a significant effect on residual stresses on the inner surface of the joint.

  20. Effect of Multipass TIG and Activated TIG Welding Process on the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, K. C.; Balasubramanian, K. R.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Chandrasekhar, N.

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a finite element model to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of an activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated using 10 mm thickness of 316LN stainless steel plates in a single pass. To distinguish the merits of ATIG welding process, it was compared with manual multipass tungsten inert gas (MPTIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated with square butt edge configuration using an activating flux developed in-house. The MPTIG-welded joint was fabricated in thirteen passes with V-groove edge configuration. The finite element model was developed to predict the transient temperature, residual stress, and distortion of the welded joints. Also, microhardness, impact toughness, tensile strength, ferrite measurement, and microstructure were characterized. Since most of the recent publications of ATIG-welded joint was focused on the molten weld pool dynamics, this research work gives an insight on the thermo-mechanical behavior of ATIG-welded joint over MPTIG-welded joint.

  1. Alloying Elements Transition Into the Weld Metal When Using an Inventor Power Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamadaliev, R. A.; Kuskov, V. N.; Popova, A. A.; Valuev, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    The temperature distribution over the surface of the welded 12Kh18N10T steel plates using the inventor power source ARC-200 has been calculated. In order to imitate multipass welding when conducting the thermal analysis the initial temperature was changed from 298K up to 798K in 100K increments. It has been determined that alloying elements transition into the weld metal depends on temperature. Using an inventor power source facilitates a uniform distribution of alloying elements along the length and height of the weld seam.

  2. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  3. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys. PMID:23948441

  4. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  5. Development of multi-pass weld condition for high strength steel using Taguchi method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.

    1995-12-01

    The mechanical tests (tensile strength, impact toughness) are performed to develop a weld conditions for high strength steel. The effects of heat input, weld geometry (root face, root gap, groove angle), electrode type, plate thickness are experimentally analyzed using Taguchi method with an orthogonal L18(2{sup 1} {times} 3{sup 7}) array. From the experiments and the ANOVA analysis, effects of the main factors as well as the interactions between any two factors are quantitatively analyzed and the equations for the mechanical properties as functions of the weld conditions are derived.

  6. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  7. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Einerson, Carolyn J.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  8. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Inclusions and Microstructure of Ce-Added Weld Metal Coarse Grain Heat-Affected Zone in Twin-Wire Submerged-Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. F.; Yan, N.; Chen, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In high heat-input multi-pass twin-wire submerged-arc welding, weld metal of previous pass will be affected by the heat input of subsequent one and form coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ). This study focused on the effects of welding thermal cycle on the inclusions and microstructure of Ce-alloyed weld metal CGHAZ. According to the study of inclusions and microstructure of weld metal CGHAZ, it was found that the composition and type of the inclusions did not change under the effect of welding thermal cycle. Although the inclusions were coarsened slightly, the promoting ability to acicular ferrite (AF) was not deprived after thermal cycling. There are three types of AF in weld metal CGHAZ, which include oxy-sulfides of Ce inclusions-promoted AF, home-position-precipitated AF, and sympathetic AF. Results showed more than 80% of microstructure was AF, which greatly benefited the mechanical properties of weld metal CGHAZ, even though granular bainite and M-A constituents were generated.

  10. Inclusions and Microstructure of Ce-Added Weld Metal Coarse Grain Heat-Affected Zone in Twin-Wire Submerged-Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. F.; Yan, N.; Chen, Y.

    2016-04-01

    In high heat-input multi-pass twin-wire submerged-arc welding, weld metal of previous pass will be affected by the heat input of subsequent one and form coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ). This study focused on the effects of welding thermal cycle on the inclusions and microstructure of Ce-alloyed weld metal CGHAZ. According to the study of inclusions and microstructure of weld metal CGHAZ, it was found that the composition and type of the inclusions did not change under the effect of welding thermal cycle. Although the inclusions were coarsened slightly, the promoting ability to acicular ferrite (AF) was not deprived after thermal cycling. There are three types of AF in weld metal CGHAZ, which include oxy-sulfides of Ce inclusions-promoted AF, home-position-precipitated AF, and sympathetic AF. Results showed more than 80% of microstructure was AF, which greatly benefited the mechanical properties of weld metal CGHAZ, even though granular bainite and M-A constituents were generated.

  11. Toughness evaluation of a shielded metal arc carbon-manganese steel welded joint subjected to multiple post weld heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, I.S.; Teixeira, J.C.G.

    1999-12-01

    This study was part of a program to investigate the influence of multiple post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the fracture toughness and defect tolerance of a welded joint. The present work reports base metal data obtained for a quenched and tempered BS7191 Grade 450EM steel (0.10wt%C-1.08wt%Mn), weld metal data for a ferritic multipass weld obtained by shielded metal arc welding using an AWS E-9018M type electrode, and heat affected zone (HAZ) data obtained using a modified bead on groove technique for different PWHT conditions. The effect of the repeated heat treatment cycles on the mechanical properties was evaluated by hardness tests and toughness testing assessed by Charpy V-notch and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) techniques. The characterization of the microstructure was undertaken utilizing optical and electron microscopy. As fabrication codes for new equipment do not allow more than three PWHT cycles, the application of more cycles is only justifiable for old equipment when a fitness for purpose criterion is applied and these restrictions are not applicable. The results obtained are currently applied in repair work and revamps of pressure vessels and gas storage tanks.

  12. Mapping Redistribution Of Metal In Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive-tracer technique applied to map redistribution of metal caused by welding process. Surfaces of parts welded irradiated by particle-beam generators to make them slightly radioactive. Used to verify predictions of computer codes for dynamics of fluids in weld pools.

  13. Shielded Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 4. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in shielded metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety; theory, power sources, and…

  14. Wiping Metal Transfer in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that as the friction stir pin-tool moves along a weld seam the displacement of metal takes place by a wiping action at the surface of a plug of metal that rotates with the tool. The wiping model is explained and some consequences for the friction stir welding process are drawn.

  15. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Smartt, H. B.; Watkins, A. D.; Larsen, E. D.; Taylor, P. L.; Waddoups, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-by-pass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  16. Effect of Heat Treatment on Low Temperature Toughness of Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Weld Metal of Type 316L Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, H.; Fujii, H.; Tamura, M.

    2006-03-31

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered to be the candidate materials for liquid hydrogen vessels and the related equipments, and those welding parts that require high toughness at cryogenic temperature. The authors have found that the weld metal of Type 316L stainless steel processed by reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding has high toughness at cryogenic temperature, which is considered to be due to the single-pass welding process without reheating effect accompanied by multi-pass welding process.In this work, the effect of heat treatment on low temperature toughness of the RPEB weld metal of Type 316L was investigated by Charpy impact test at 77K. The absorbed energy decreased with higher temperature and longer holding time of heat treatment. The remarkable drop in the absorbed energy was found with heat treatment at 1073K for 2 hours, which is as low as that of conventional multi-pass weld metal such as tungsten inert gas welding. The observations of fracture surface and microstructure revealed that the decrease in the absorbed energy with heat treatment resulted from the precipitation of intermetallic compounds near delta-ferrite phase.

  17. Effect of Heat Treatment on Low Temperature Toughness of Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Weld Metal of Type 316L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, H.; Fujii, H.; Tamura, M.

    2006-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered to be the candidate materials for liquid hydrogen vessels and the related equipments, and those welding parts that require high toughness at cryogenic temperature. The authors have found that the weld metal of Type 316L stainless steel processed by reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding has high toughness at cryogenic temperature, which is considered to be due to the single-pass welding process without reheating effect accompanied by multi-pass welding process. In this work, the effect of heat treatment on low temperature toughness of the RPEB weld metal of Type 316L was investigated by Charpy impact test at 77K. The absorbed energy decreased with higher temperature and longer holding time of heat treatment. The remarkable drop in the absorbed energy was found with heat treatment at 1073K for 2 hours, which is as low as that of conventional multi-pass weld metal such as tungsten inert gas welding. The observations of fracture surface and microstructure revealed that the decrease in the absorbed energy with heat treatment resulted from the precipitation of intermetallic compounds near delta-ferrite phase.

  18. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries. PMID:25322246

  19. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  20. Metal Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The plastic deformation field in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is compared to that in metal cutting. A shear surface around the FSW tool analogous to the metal cutting shear plane is identified and comprises the basis of the "rotating plug" flow field model and the "wiping" model of tool interaction with weld metal. Within the context of these models: The FSW shear rate is estimated to be comparable to metal cutting shear rates. The effect of tool geometry on the FSW shear surface is discussed and related to published torque measurements. Various FS W structural features are explained, including a difference in structure of bimetallic welds when alloys on the advancing and retreating sides of the weld seam are exchanged. The joining mechanism and critical parameters of the FSW process are made clear.

  1. Disposable microcolumns with welded metal frits.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Won Jo

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the preparation of disposable microcolumns with welded metal frits for the first time. First, the bottom of glass-lined stainless-steel tubing of 30 cm length, 1.6 mm od, and 0.5 mm id was welded with a stainless-steel screen frit of 1.6 mm diameter. A micro-welding machine was used for this. Next, the column was connected to a slurry packer and packed with porous silica particles. Then, the inlet of the column was carefully welded with another frit. The column was tested for separation of a test mix composed of phenol, 2-nitrophenol, acetophenone, aceanilide, and benzamide. Another column of the same physical dimension was also prepared with frits that were not welded to the column. The chromatographic performances of the two groups of columns (welded frits versus non-welded frits) were examined. The columns of welded frits showed ca. 18% better separation efficiency (number of theoretical plates) than those of non-welded frits. PMID:26614222

  2. Changes in Precipitate Distributions and the Microstructural Evolution of P24/P91 Dissimilar Metal Welds During PWHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Karl E.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Chi, Kuangnan; Barnard, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The effect of post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) on the evolution of precipitate phases in dissimilar metal welds made between 9 pct Cr P91 alloy and 2.25 pct Cr T/P24-type weld metal has been investigated. Sections of multi-pass fusion welds were analyzed in their as welded condition and after PWHTs of 2 and 8 hour duration at 1003 K (730 °C). Thin foil specimens and carbon extraction replicas have been examined in transmission electron microscopes in order to identify precipitate phases and substantiate their distributions in close proximity to the fusion line. The findings of these studies confirm that a carbon-depleted region develops in the lower alloyed weld material, adjacent to the weld interface, during thermal processing. A corresponding carbon enriched region is formed, simultaneously, in the coarse grain heat affected zone of the P91 parent alloy. It has been demonstrated that carbon depletion from the weld alloy results in the dissolution of M7C3 and M23C6 chromium carbides. However, micro-alloying additions of vanadium and niobium which are made to both the P24 and P91 alloys facilitate the precipitation of stable, nano-scale, MX carbonitride particles. This work demonstrates that these particles, which are of key importance to the strength of ferritic creep resistant alloys, are retained in carbon-depleted regions. The microstructural stability which is conferred by their retention means that the pernicious effects of recrystallization are largely avoided.

  3. Forming Weld Lands On Metal Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Forming shoe pounds edge of newly inserted plate workpiece. After many passes of shoe and advances of plate, thick land builds up at edge. Workpiece heated to enable metal to flow without strain hardening. Proposed upset-forming process replaces relatively expensive, time-consuming, and wasteful process in which integral weld lands created by machining metal away from plates everywhere except at lands.

  4. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sarraf, Z.; Lucas, M.

    2012-08-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  5. Extended electrode technique. [gas metal arc welding of metal plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaper, V. D.; Pollack, A.

    1972-01-01

    The extended electrode technique is a unique welding process which utilizes manual gas-metal-arc (GMAW) semi-automatic equipment and close, square butt joints to effectively produce a weld. The technique takes advantage of the resistance heating of the electode extension to effect the root pass. Weldments as large as 72-X30-X2-inch have been fabricated with this technique under normal shipyard welding conditions. Mechanical properties and explosion bulge tests indicate that satisfactory results are obtained with this process. Potential savings of approximately 50 percent can be achieved in flat welding and repair of heavy structural steel members.

  6. Refractory metals welded or brazed with tungsten inert gas equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Appropriate brazing metals and temperatures facilitate the welding or brazing of base metals with tungsten inert gas equipment. The highest quality bond is obtained when TIG welding is performed in an inert atmosphere.

  7. Influence of Filler Metals in Welding Wires on the Phase and Chemical Composition of Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Osetkovskiy, I. V.; Kozyreva, O. A.; Zernin, E. A.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of filler metals used in welding wires on the phase and chemical composition of the metal, which is surfaced to mining equipment exposed to abrasive wear, has been investigated. Under a laboratory environment, samples of Mo-V-B and Cr-Mn-Mo-V wires were made. The performed experiments have revealed that fillers of the Cr-Mn-Mo-V system used in powder wire show better wear resistance of the weld metal than that of the Mn-Mo-V-B system; the absence of boron, which promotes grain refinement in the Mn-Mo-V-B system, significantly reduces wear resistance; the Mn-Mo-V-B weld metal has a finer structure than the Cr-Mn-Mo-V weld metal.

  8. Improved torch increases weld quality in refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessman, G. G.; Sprecace, R.

    1968-01-01

    Specially designed torch welds refractory metals in a vacuum purged, inert gas backfilled welding chamber /weld box/ with practically zero contamination resulting from its use. Included in the torch design is a radiation shield to protect the operators hands when welding at high amperages.

  9. Effect of Welding Heat Input on the Corrosion Resistance of Carbon Steel Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of carbon steel weld metal with three different microstructures has been systematically evaluated using electrochemical techniques with the simulated produced water containing CO2 at 90 °C. Microstructures include acicular ferrite, polygonal ferrite, and a small amount of pearlite. With welding heat input increasing, weld metal microstructure becomes more uniform. Electrochemical techniques including potentiodynamic polarization curve, linear polarization resistance, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the corrosion properties on weld joint, indicating that the best corrosion resistance corresponded to the weld metal with a polygonal ferrite microstructure, whereas the weld metal with the acicular ferrite + polygonal ferrite microstructure showed the worst corrosion resistance. The samples with high welding heat input possessed better corrosion resistance. Results were discussed in terms of crystal plane orientation, grain size, and grain boundary type found in each weld metal by electron backscatter diffraction test.

  10. Visualizing weld metal solidification using organic analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Rogers, Gary Ray

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this educational exercise are to allow the student to observe the solidification of a low melting temperature transparent crystalline organic compound that exhibits behavior similar to that of weld metal. A list of equipment and supplies and the procedure for the experiment are presented.

  11. Influence of rapid thermal cycles in multipass welding on heat-affected-zone properties in ferritic cryogenic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Shin, H.K.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    The results of both welding and weld simulation studies on 2BT-treated 9Ni steel show that multiple rapid thermal cycles have a very beneficial effect on heat-affected zone toughness at cryogenic temperatures. The metallurgical sources of toughness are, however, different from those in the furnace-treated base plate. The rapidly cycled material contains no detectable austenite phase. The alloy is grain-refined by the rapid thermal cycle, and the matrix carbon content is relieved by the formation of interlathcementite precipitates which do not destroy toughness.

  12. Apparatus For Metal/Inert-Gas Welding In Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    Metal/inert-gas welding-torch assembly operates in vacuum. Plasma generated in interior chamber and focused onto workpiece in vacuum. Pinch rollers feed wire to weld puddle. Controlled flow of plasma reduces dispersal in vacuum, preventing extinction.

  13. The effect of weld metal matching on girth weld performance. Volume 2, Experimental investigation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, R.M.

    1993-01-24

    This report provides an experimental study of the failure behavior of 11.6 mm (0.457 in) pipe segments taken from 36 inch diameter pipes containing defects in the girth weld using small scale and fatigue pre-cracked curved wide plate test specimens. The focal points of the evaluations were: to study the effect of the relative difference between pipe and weld metal yield strengths on girth weld performance; to verify the assumption that the CTOD (Crack Tip Opening Displacement) test is a reliable indicator of girth weld performance; and to evaluate the usefulness of the Charpy V notch test for predicting girth weld failure behavior. The investigations have demonstrated that it would be highly desirable to require weld metal yield strength overmatching for preventing the situation where a weak weld would have to take the applied deformations and to develop a reliable testing procedure for the determination of weld metal yield strength.

  14. Electrode formulation to reduce weld metal hydrogen and porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ibarra, S.

    1994-12-31

    Residual weld metal hydrogen is a major concern in high strength steel welding, especially when the weld is performed under high cooling rate conditions. In the case of underwater wet welding, weld metal porosity is also of importance because of the water environment. The control of both problems can be achieved by means of pyrochemical reactions in the weld pool. The hydrogen-oxygen reaction and carbon-oxygen reaction are fundamental in the control of residual hydrogen in the weld metal and the amount of gas pores entrapped. A simple model was proposed to estimate weld metal residual hydrogen content by monitoring the weld pool deoxidation reactions. Potent deoxidizers such as aluminum will first react with oxygen in the liquid weld pool, followed by other elements present such as silicon and manganese. Carbon and hydrogen will be the last ones to react with oxygen prior to the iron atoms. The Ellingham-Richardson diagram frequently applied in describing steel and iron making processes was used in the modeling. Following the sequence of deoxidation, the chemical make-up of the gas pores and the amount of each chemical species in the pores could be estimated. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen were determined to be the major components in the weld pores. To minimize the amount of weld metal porosity and residual hydrogen content, specially designed consumables that will control the oxygen potential of the weld pool must be developed.

  15. Plutonium metal and oxide container weld development and qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, R.; Horrell, D.R.; Hoth, C.W.; Pierce, S.W.; Rink, N.A.; Rivera, Y.M.; Sandoval, V.D.

    1996-01-01

    Welds were qualified for a container system to be used for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxide. Inner and outer containers are formed of standard tubing with stamped end pieces gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welded onto both ends. The weld qualification identified GTA parameters to produce a robust weld that meets the requirements of the Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-3013-94, ``Criteria for the Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides.``

  16. Effect of Activated Flux on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Residual Stresses of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduraimuthu, V.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthupandi, V.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-02-01

    A novel variant of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding called activated-TIG (A-TIG) welding, which uses a thin layer of activated flux coating applied on the joint area prior to welding, is known to enhance the depth of penetration during autogenous TIG welding and overcomes the limitation associated with TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a specific activated flux for enhancing the depth of penetration during autogeneous TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. In the current work, activated flux composition is optimized to achieve 6 mm depth of penetration in single-pass TIG welding at minimum heat input possible. Then square butt weld joints are made for 6-mm-thick and 10-mm-thick plates using the optimized flux. The effect of flux on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stresses of the A-TIG weld joint is studied by comparing it with that of the weld joints made by conventional multipass TIG welding process using matching filler wire. Welded microstructure in the A-TIG weld joint is coarser because of the higher peak temperature in A-TIG welding process compared with that of multipass TIG weld joint made by a conventional TIG welding process. Transverse strength properties of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base materials. The average toughness values of A-TIG weld joints are lower compared with that of the base metal and multipass weld joints due to the presence of δ-ferrite and inclusions in the weld metal caused by the flux. Compressive residual stresses are observed in the fusion zone of A-TIG weld joint, whereas tensile residual stresses are observed in the multipass TIG weld joint.

  17. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  18. Effect of Filler Metals on the Weldability and Mechanical Properties of Multi-pass PCGTA Weldments of AISI 316L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendranath Ramkumar, K.; Maruthi Mohan Reddy, P.; Raja Arjun, B.; Choudhary, Ayush; Srivastava, Anubhav; Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of filler metals on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of AISI 316L welds was investigated. Pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding was employed to join the AISI 316L plates using two different fillers ER2553 and ERNiCr-3. Microstructures studies showed the presence of different forms of austenite on employing ER2553 filler and formation of migrated grain boundaries at the weld zone while using ERNiCr-3 filler. Tensile studies corroborated that the tensile strength was greater for the weldments employing ER2553 filler. Charpy V-notch studies ascertained that the impact toughness was greater for ER2553 weldments as compared to the parent metal. Potentiodynamic polarization curves clearly inferred that the weld zone of ER2553 exhibited better corrosion resistance among the various coupons tested. It was concluded from the study that ER2553 exhibited better mechanical and corrosion properties and could be adopted to achieve optimal properties compared to over-alloyed filler.

  19. Microstructure Improvement in Weld Metal under the Ultrasonic Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yan; Xu, Cailu; Han, Qingyou

    2007-01-01

    When considering the operational performance of weldments in the engineering projects, the most important issues to be considered are weld metal mechanical properties, integrity of the welded joint, and weldability 1 . These issues are closely related to the microstructure of the weld metal. A significant amount of research has been carried out to alter the process variables and to use external devices to obtain microstructure control of the weldments. It has been reported that grain refined microstructure not only reduces cracking behavior of alloys including solidification cracking, cold cracking and reheat cracking, 2 - 5 but also improves the mechanical properties of the weld metal, such as toughness, ductility, strength, and fatigue life. 6, 7 Weld pool stirring, 8 arc oscillation, 9, 10 arc pulsation, 11 , and magnetic arc oscillator 12, 13 have been applied to fusion welding to refine the microstructures. This article describes initial experimental results on the use of power ultrasonic vibration to refine the microstructure of weld metals.

  20. Simulation of metal transfer and weld pool development in gas metal arc welding of thin sheet metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang

    Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is the most commonly used arc welding method in industry for joining steels and aluminum alloys. But due to the mathematical difficulties associated with the free surface motion of the molten droplet and the weld pool, the process is not well understood and the development of new welding procedures in the manufacturing industry highly depends on expensive, time-consuming and experience-based trial and error. In this dissertation, numerical methods are developed to overcome the difficulties and to simulate the metal transfer and weld pool development in the GMAW of sheet metals. The simulations are validated by experiments and used to study an industrial welding process. A numerical procedure is first developed to model the free surface motion in fusion welding processes. Thermal and electromagnetic models are integrated with the fluid models. Recommendations are made on the selection and improvement of publicly available numerical algorithms, while alternative methods are also reviewed. A model combining the enthalpy, effective-viscosity and volume-of-fluid methods is then developed to simulate the metal transfer process in globular, spray and short-circuiting transfer modes. The model not only describes the influence of gravity, electromagnetic force and surface tension on droplet profile and transfer frequency, but also models the nonisothermal phenomena such as heat transfer and phase change. The melting front motion, the droplet detachment and oscillation, the satellite formation and the fluid convection within the droplet are analyzed. It has been found that the taper formation in spray transfer is closely related to the heat input on the unmelted portion of the welding wire, and the taper formation affects the globular-spray transition by decelerating the transfer process. Experiments with a high-speed motion analyzer validate the simulation results. The model is then extended to simulate the initiation, development and

  1. Ceramic backup ring prevents undesirable weld-metal buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, G. E.

    1971-01-01

    Removable ceramic backup material butted against weld zone back prevents weld metal buildup at that site. Method is successful with manual tungsten-inert gas /TIG/ welding of 316 corrosion resistant steel /CRES/ pieces with 0.76 cm throat diameter and 1.57 cm pipe internal diameter.

  2. Shielded Metal Arc Pipe Welding. Teacher Edition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This second edition of the shielded metal arc pipe welding curriculum guide presents both basic and advanced pipe welding skills. All specifications for procedure and welder qualification are presented according to national standards. The standards also include the test position for both groove and fillet pipe welding. The guide contains three…

  3. Analysis and Comparison of Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints Between Metal Inert Gas Welding and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Guan, Yingchun; Wang, Qiang; Cong, Baoqiang; Qi, Bojin

    2015-09-01

    Surface contamination usually occurs during welding processing and it affects the welds quality largely. However, the formation of such contaminants has seldom been studied. Effort was made to study the contaminants caused by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes of aluminum alloy, respectively. SEM, FTIR and XPS analysis was carried out to investigate the microstructure as well as surface chemistry. These contaminants were found to be mainly consisting of Al2O3, MgO, carbide and chromium complexes. The difference of contaminants between MIG and TIG welds was further examined. In addition, method to minimize these contaminants was proposed.

  4. Welding, bonding, and sealing of refractory metals by vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Plating process welds, bonds, and seals refractory metals without weakening or changing the structure of the base metals. A metal halide compound in the vapor phase is decomposed to deposit filler metal on the base metal. The resulting bond is a true metal-to-metal bond.

  5. Effect of Pulse Parameters on Weld Quality in Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Kamal; Pal, Surjya K.

    2011-08-01

    The weld quality comprises bead geometry and its microstructure, which influence the mechanical properties of the weld. The coarse-grained weld microstructure, higher heat-affected zone, and lower penetration together with higher reinforcement reduce the weld service life in continuous mode gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Pulsed GMAW (P-GMAW) is an alternative method providing a better way for overcoming these afore mentioned problems. It uses a higher peak current to allow one molten droplet per pulse, and a lower background current to maintain the arc stability. Current pulsing refines the grains in weld fusion zone with increasing depth of penetration due to arc oscillations. Optimum weld joint characteristics can be achieved by controlling the pulse parameters. The process is versatile and easily automated. This brief review illustrates the effect of pulse parameters on weld quality.

  6. Diagnostics of metal inert gas and metal active gas welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-08-01

    The paper gives a review on studies on metal inert gas (MIG) and metal active gas (MAG) welding processes with the focus on diagnostics of the arc, the material transfer, and the temporal process behaviour in welding experiments. Recent findings with respect to an improved understanding of the main mechanisms in the welding arc and the welding process are summarized. This is linked to actual developments in welding arc and welding process modelling where measurements are indispensable for validation. Challenges of forthcoming studies are illustrated by means of methods under development for welding process control as well as remaining open questions with respect to arc-surface interaction and arc power balance.

  7. Energy Characterization of Short-Circuiting Transfer of Metal Droplet in Gas Metal Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Luo; Yang, Zhu; Xiaojian, Xie; Rui, Wan

    2015-08-01

    The structure-borne acoustic emission (AE) signals were detected in real time in gas metal arc (GMA) welding and pulse GMA (P-GMA) welding. According to the AE signals, the mode of short-circuiting transfer was analyzed, and the energy gradient and total energy were calculated. The calculation to the AE signals of one metal droplet transfer (MDT) showed that the energy gradient increased with increasing welding heat input not only in GMA welding but also in P-GMA welding. The energy gradient of one MDT in P-GMA welding was higher than that in GMA welding, which indicated that a high energy gradient was the basic reason for the additional vibration energy provided by pulse effect in P-GMA welding. The total energy of AE signals increased with increasing welding heat input not only in GMA welding but also in P-GMA welding. The total energy of AE signals in P-GMA welding was higher than that in GMA welding, which indicated that the additional vibration energy provided by welding pulses was the main cause of the grain structure refining in P-GMA welding. So, the results provided another means to predict the weld grain size and optimize the welding process by AE signals detected in welding.

  8. Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, M.; Schmidt, C.; McClure, J. C.; Murr, L. E.; Nunes, A. C.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flow of metal during Friction Stir Welding is clarified using a faying surface tracer and a nib frozen in place during welding. It is shown that material is transported by two processes. The first is a wiping of material from the advancing front side of the nib onto a plug of material that rotates and advances with the nib. The material undergoes a helical motion within the plug that both rotates and advances with the plug and descends in the wash of the threads on the nib and rises on the outer part of the plug. After one or more rotations, this material is sloughed off the plug in its wake, primarily on the advancing side. The second process is an entrainment of material from the front retreating side of the nib that fills in between the sloughed off pieces from the advancing side. These two processes produce material with different mechanical properties and the strength of a weld should depend on the relative importance of the processes.

  9. The corrosion behavior of Fe-Mn-Al weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidun, Daryush K.

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of a newly developed iron-base, Fe-Mn-Al austenitic, and duplex weld metal has been examined in the NACE solution consisting of 5 wt.% NaCl, 0.5 wt.% acetic acid, and the balance distilled water. The electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization, Tafel plots, linear polarization, cyclic polarization, and open-circuit potential versus time were employed. The Fe-Mn-Al weld metals did not passivate and exhibited high corrosion rates. Fe-Cr-Ni (310 and 316) weld and base metals were also examined in the NACE solution at room temperature. The 310 and 316 base metals were more resistant to corrosion than the as-welded 310 and 316 weld metals. Postweld heat treatment (PWHT) improved the corrosion performance of the Fe-Mn-Al weld metals. The corrosion resistance of Fe-Mn-Al weld metals after PWHT was still inferior to that of the 310 and 316 weld and base metals.

  10. Carbide-Free Bainitic Weld Metal: A New Concept in Welding of Armor Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Murthy, N.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Murty, B. S.; Reddy, G. M.; Rao, T. J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbide-free bainite, a fine mixture of bainitic ferrite and austenite, is a relatively recent development in steel microstructures. Apart from being very strong and tough, the microstructure is hydrogen-tolerant. These characteristics make it well-suited for weld metals. In the current work, an armor-grade quenched and tempered steel was welded such that the fusion zone developed a carbide-free bainitic microstructure. These welds showed very high joint efficiency and ballistic performance compared to those produced, as per the current industrial practice, using austenitic stainless steel fillers. Importantly, these welds showed no vulnerability to cold cracking, as verified using oblique Y-groove tests. The concept of carbide-free bainitic weld metal thus promises many useful new developments in welding of high-strength steels.

  11. Microstructure of heat resistant chromium steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrén, Hans-Olof; Cai, Guangjun; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    1995-03-01

    The microstructure of weld metals of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 5Cr-0.5Mo, 9Cr-1Mo and 12Cr-1Mo type steels was studied with electron microscopy and atom probe field ion microscopy. Many different types of carbides and nitrides precipitated during welding and post-weld heat treatment (MC, M 2C, M 3C, M 7C 3, M 23C 6, MN, M 2N). The eutectoid decomposition of retained austenite gave large aggregates of carbides which were found to be detrimental to the impact toughness of the weld metal.

  12. Localized weld metal corrosion in stainless steel water tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1995-05-25

    The rapidly developed leaks within the TFC and TFD tanks (LLNL groundwater treatment facilities) were caused by localized corrosion within the resolidified weld metal. The corrosion was initiated by the severe oxidation of the backsides of the welds which left the exposed surfaces in a condition highly susceptible to aqueous corrosion. The propagation of surface corrosion through the thickness of the welds occurred by localized corrosive attack. This localized attack was promoted by the presence of shielded aqueous environments provided by crevices at the root of the partial penetration welds. In addition to rapid corrosion of oxidized surfaces, calcium carbonate precipitation provided an additional source of physical shielding from the bulk tank environment. Qualification testing of alternate weld procedures showed that corrosion damage can be prevented in 304L stainless steel GTA welds by welding from both sides while preventing oxidation of the tank interior through the use of an inert backing gas such as argon. Corrosion resistance was also satisfactory in GMA welds in which oxidized surfaces were postweld cleaned by wire brushing and chemically passivated in nitric acid. Further improvements in corrosion resistance are expected from a Mo-containing grade of stainless steel such as type 316L, although test results were similar for type 304L sheet welded with type 308L filler metal and type 316L sheet welded with type 316L filler metal.

  13. Effects of surface active elements on weld pool fluid flow and weld penetration in gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Tsai, H. L.

    2001-06-01

    This article presents a mathematical model simulating the effects of surface tension (Maragoni effect) on weld pool fluid flow and weld penetration in spot gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Filler droplets driven by gravity, electromagnetic force, and plasma arc drag force, carrying mass, thermal energy, and momentum, periodically impinge onto the weld pool. Complicated fluid flow in the weld pool is influenced by the droplet impinging momentum, electromagnetic force, and natural convection due to temperature and concentration gradients, and by surface tension, which is a function of both temperature and concentration of a surface active element (sulfur in the present study). Although the droplet impinging momentum creates a complex fluid flow near the weld pool surface, the momentum is damped out by an “up-and-down” fluid motion. A numerical study has shown that, depending upon the droplet’s sulfur content, which is different from that in the base metal, an inward or outward surface flow of the weld pool may be created, leading to deep or shallow weld penetration. In other words, it is primarily the Marangoni effect that contributes to weld penetration in spot GMAW.

  14. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-2, Shielded Metal Arc and Oxyacetylene Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This second in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection describes the key features of the oxyacetylene and shielded metal arc welding process. The apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspections are presented. The module follows a typical format that includes the following…

  15. Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux-Cored Arc Welding. Teacher Edition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    These instructional materials are designed to improve instruction in Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and Flux-Cored Arc Welding (FCAW). The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and…

  16. Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, N. Kishore; Cross, Carl E.

    2012-06-28

    The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

  17. Process Simulation of Gas Metal Arc Welding Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-09-06

    ARCWELDER is a Windows-based application that simulates gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of steel and aluminum. The software simulates the welding process in an accurate and efficient manner, provides menu items for process parameter selection, and includes a graphical user interface with the option to animate the process. The user enters the base and electrode material, open circuit voltage, wire diameter, wire feed speed, welding speed, and standoff distance. The program computes the size andmore » shape of a square-groove or V-groove weld in the flat position. The program also computes the current, arc voltage, arc length, electrode extension, transfer of droplets, heat input, filler metal deposition, base metal dilution, and centerline cooling rate, in English or SI units. The simulation may be used to select welding parameters that lead to desired operation conditions.« less

  18. The importance of spatter formed in shielded metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Molleda, F. Mora, J.; Molleda, J.R.; Mora, E.; Mellor, B.G.

    2007-10-15

    Spatter results when droplets of liquid metal that have been ejected from the weld pool by the impact of small droplets from the covered electrode solidify and weld to the surface of the base material. The present paper studies spatter and reveals why these small droplets do not oxidise during their short trajectory and accounts for why they arrive with sufficient heat to weld to the adjacent base material. Welds were thus performed on mild steel using covered electrodes (rutile type) to obtain spatter on the adjacent base material. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray mapping were used to study the above mentioned phenomena.

  19. The influence of oxygen on the impact toughness and microstructure of steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Kuwana, Takeshi; Maie, Tsuyoshi

    1995-12-31

    A steel plate was welded in a low oxygen potential welding atmosphere. The weld metal obtained is classified in two groups on the oxygen content, very low oxygen content (less than 0.002 mass %) weld metal and relatively high oxygen content (over 0.015 mass%) weld metal. The effect of oxygen in steel weld metal on the Charpy v-notch impact values and the microstructure is investigated and discussed. Very low oxygen content steel weld metal shows superior impact toughness at 273 K as well as the well-known ``optimum oxygen`` containing steel weld metal. The very low oxygen weld metal has relatively large amounts of grain boundary ferrite and side plate ferrite microstructure, instead of upper bainite compared with the relatively high oxygen content weld metal.

  20. Application of welding science to welding engineering: A lumped parameter gas metal arc welding dynamic process model

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.E.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    We develop a model of the depth of penetration of the weld pool in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) which demonstrates interaction between the arc, filler wire and weld pool. This model is motivated by the observations of Essers and Walter which suggest a relationship between droplet momentum and penetration depth. A model of gas metal arc welding was augmented to include an improved model of mass transfer and a simple model of accelerating droplets in a plasma jet to obtain the mass and momentum of impinging droplets. The force of the droplets and depth of penetration is correlated by a dimensionless linear relation used to predict weld pool depth for a range of values of arc power and contact tip to workpiece distance. Model accuracy is examined by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the pool depth obtained from bead on plate welds of carbon steel in an argon rich shielding gas. Moreover, theoretical predictions of pool depth are compared to the results obtained from the heat conduction model due to Christensen et al. which suggest that in some cases the momentum of impinging droplets is a better indicator of the depth of the weld pool and the presence of a deep, narrow penetration.

  1. Microstructure Formation in Dissimilar Metal Welds: Electron Beam Welding of Ti/Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhradeep; Abinandanan, T. A.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio

    2016-02-01

    We present results for electron beam welding of a binary Ti/Ni dissimilar metal couple. The difference in physical properties of the base metals and metallurgical features (thermodynamics and kinetics) of the system influence both macroscopic transport and microstructure development in the weld. Microstructures near the fusion interfaces are markedly different from those inside the weld region. At the Ti side, Ti2Ni dendrites are observed to grow toward the fusion interface, while in the Ni side, layered growth of γ-Ni, Ni3Ti, and Ni3Ti + NiTi eutectic is observed. Different morphologies of the latter eutectic constitute the predominant microstructure inside the weld metal region. These results are compared and contrasted with those from laser welding of the same binary couple, and a scheme of solidification is proposed to explain the observations. This highlights notable departures from welding of similar and other dissimilar metals such as a significant asymmetry in heat transport that governs progress of solidification from each side of the couple, and a lack of unique liquidus isotherm characterizing the liquid-solid front.

  2. Effect of cooling after welding on microstructure and mechanical properties of 12 pct Cr steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, G.J.; Andren, H.O.; Svensson, L.E.

    1997-07-01

    The microstructure of three 12 pct Cr steel weld metals with different nickel and nitrogen contents was studied in as-welded condition and after postweld heat treatment with and without intercooling. Tensile strength and impact toughness of the weld metals were investigated in different postweld heat treatment conditions. In weld metals heat treated without intercooling, austenite decomposed by a eutectoid reaction that resulted in M{sub 23}C{sub 6} aggregates around retained {delta}-ferrite. Two morphologies of M{sub 2}N and MN precipitates were found in a low-dislocation {alpha}-ferrite. It was concluded that these phases were also transformed from austenite. In weld metals heat treated with intercooling, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates were smaller and more homogeneously distributed. Different MN precipitates were found in the tempered martensite. The fracture mode of the weld metals at room temperature was mainly transgranular cleavage with some fibrous fracture. Intercooling treatment improved Charpy impact toughness of the 12 pct Cr steel weld metals substantially. It was found that the important microstructural factors affecting the impact toughness of the weld metals which were heat treated without intercooling were the sizes of the {alpha}-ferrite grains, nonmetallic inclusions, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} aggregates. For the weld metals heat treated with intercooling, the factors which affect the toughness of the weld metals were the sizes of martensite packets and nonmetallic inclusions.

  3. Precipitation of Niobium Boride Phases at the Base Metal/Weld Metal Interface in Dissimilar Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Výrostková, Anna; Kepič, Ján; Homolová, Viera; Falat, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the analysis of failure mechanism in the heat affected zone is described in dissimilar weld joints between advanced martensitic steel T92 and Ni-base weld metal. The joints were treated with two different post-weld heat treatments and tested. For the creep, tensile, and Charpy impact tests, the samples with interfacially located notch were used. Moreover long term aging at 625 °C was applied before the tensile and notch toughness tests. Decohesion fractures ran along carbides at the T92 BM/WM interfaces in case of the modified PWHT, whereas type IV cracking was the prevailing failure mechanism after the classical PWHT in the creep test. In the notch tensile and Charpy impact tests, with the notch at T92 base metal/weld metal interface, fractures ran along the interface with a hard phase on the fracture surface along with the ductile dimple and brittle quasi-cleavage fracture. The phase identified as niobium boride (either NbB and/or Nb3B2) was produced during welding at the end of the solidification process. It was found in the welds regardless of the post-weld heat treatment and long-term aging.

  4. Advance in friction welding and ultrasonic welding of ceramics to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Greitmann, M.J.; Weib, R.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have joined four different ceramic materials (MgO-PSZ, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cylinders 10 mm in diameter and 50 mm in length) to the aluminum alloy Al-Si1MgMn by friction welding. Process parameters such as friction speed, axial force, burn-off and torque have been recorded continuously. For some specimens the authors recorded the temperature at the interface using thermocouples. The joints obtained were tested in tension. Fracture occurred either in the ceramic or at the interface. Heat conduction calculations to estimate the temperature distribution during welding have been conducted by the Finite Element Method (FEM), using experimental data for input. Afterwards, residual stresses introduced through thermal expansion mismatch and stresses introduced through a tensile test have been determined by FEM. Applying multiaxial Weibull statistics to the ceramic specimen, tensile strength for different geometries of the joint and different material combinations was estimated. Ultrasonic welded joints of MgO-PSZ and Steel X 4 CrNi 18-10 according to DIN EN (comparable to the US-steel AISI No. 304) could be realized using aluminum interlayers. In addition to a conventional ultrasonic welding equipment for metal welding a new molecular coldwelding technique (ultrasonic torsional welding system) was tested. In comparison to friction welding the ultrasonic welding technique results in limited deformation of the ceramic-metal joint parts and in a decreased welding time. Nevertheless a special solution must be found to the problem of tool wear and the vibration conditions.

  5. Electrical upsetting of metal sheet forms weld edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherba, E. S.

    1966-01-01

    Electric gathering of sheet stock edges forms metal sheets in the shape of gore sections with heavier edge areas that can be welded without loss of strength. The edges are gathered by progressive resistance heating and upsetting, and are formed automatically. This process avoids disturbance of the metals internal structure.

  6. Ultrasonic Butt Welding of Large Metal Plates by Shifting Welding Tip Driving Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Ueoka, Tetsugi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Ogawa, Masato; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Fujita, Yuki

    1993-05-01

    Ultrasonic butt welding of large metal plates by means of shifting the welding tip driving position at regular intervals is studied. The ultrasonic vibration source used has eight 15 kHz bolt-clamped Langevin-type lead-zircon-titanate (PZT) transducers of 60 mm diameter and is driven by a 50 kW static induction thyristor power amplifier. Aluminum plate specimens of 6 mm thickness and 100 mm to 400 mm width are joined successfully end-to-end with almost equal weld strength along the weldment. The input power required for aluminum plates is about 2.2 kW/cm2. The power required by one welding process for aluminum and copper plate specimens of 40 mm width is 4 kW/cm2.

  7. Dynamic Electrode Forces in Gas Metal Arc Welding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lawrence Anthony

    In gas metal arc welding, a low-voltage electric -arc plasma is maintained between a work-piece and a wire electrode, both of which are melted by the arc. This thesis examines the dynamic forces that affect the detachment of molten metal drops from the consumable wire electrode. Unlike drops falling from a water faucet, the drops in gas metal arc welding experience strong magnetic forces generated by the interaction of the welding current with its own magnetic field. An extensive set of clear high-speed motion images of metal drops detaching from a welding electrode was collected under a wide variety of conditions. The images are used to measure the surface tension of steel as it is found in a gas metal arc welding plasma. Impulse-response oscillations of pendent molten steel drops are also measured. A derivation of the magnetic forces acting on necking drops is performed. Numerical computations of these forces are performed by using shapes fitted to high -speed images of molten steel drops as they are ejected from the electrode by magnetic forces during short-duty -cycle current pulsing. A dynamic model of drop detachment is developed and used to study the competition between the retaining surface tension force and other forces (magnetic, gravitational, and inertial). Simulations performed with this model are compared with extensive measurements of constant-current welding images and with limited measurements of pulsed -current welding images. The comparisons indicate that the experimental magnetic forces are much less potent than the calculated magnetic forces when welding-current transients are not present. A hypothesis is advanced that internal flows are able to develop under the relatively quiescent conditions that exist during drop development in constant -current welding. An apparatus was constructed to axially vibrate the electrode as it is consumed. Experiments using inertial forces to induce drop detachment are shown. Comparisons of experimental

  8. Influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, V. B.; Mello, R. S. T.; Payão, J. C.; Paranhos, R. P. R.

    2006-06-01

    The influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metal was studied. Weld metals with different zirconium contents were obtained adding iron-zirconium alloy in the welding flux formulation. Weld metal chemical composition proved that zirconium was able to be transferred from the flux to the weld metal. The addition of zirconium refined the weld metal microstructure, increasing the acicular ferrite content. Weld metal toughness, determined by means of impact Charpy-V tests, showed that the zirconium addition is beneficial up to a content of 0.005 wt.%. Above this level, zirconium was not able to produce further microstructure refinement, although the toughness was reduced, possibly due to the formation of microconstituent such as the martensite-austenite constituent (M-A), which is considered to be deleterious to the weld metal toughness.

  9. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  10. Probing Pulsed Current Gas Metal Arc Welding for Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, S.; Kulkarni, D. V.; De, A.

    2015-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steels are commonly welded using gas tungsten arc welding process for its superior control over the rate of heat input and vaporization loss of the key alloying elements although the rate electrode deposition remains restricted. Recent developments in pulsed current gas metal arc welding have significantly improved its ability to enhance the rate of electrode deposition with a controlled heat input rate while its application for welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels is scarce. The present work reports a detailed experimental study on the pulsed current gas metal arc welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. The effect of the shielding gas, welding current, and speed on the weld bead profile, microstructure and mechanical properties are examined. The results show that the pulsed current gas metal arc welding with appropriate welding conditions can provide acceptable bead profile and mechanical properties in welds of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels.

  11. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  12. Metallic glass coating on metals plate by adjusted explosive welding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. D.; Liu, K. X.; Chen, Q. Y.; Wang, J. T.; Yan, H. H.; Li, X. J.

    2009-09-01

    Using an adjusted explosive welding technique, an aluminum plate has been coated by a Fe-based metallic glass foil in this work. Scanning electronic micrographs reveal a defect-free metallurgical bonding between the Fe-based metallic glass foil and the aluminum plate. Experimental evidence indicates that the Fe-based metallic glass foil almost retains its amorphous state and mechanical properties after the explosive welding process. Additionally, the detailed explosive welding process has been simulated by a self-developed hydro-code and the bonding mechanism has been investigated by numerical analysis. The successful welding between the Fe-based metallic glass foil and the aluminum plate provides a new way to obtain amorphous coating on general metal substrates.

  13. Effect of rhenium on the structure and properties of the weld metal of a molybdenum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyachenko, V. V.; Morozov, B. P.; Tylkina, M. A.; Savitskiy, Y. M.; Nikishanov, V. V.

    1984-01-01

    The structure and properties of welds made in molybdenum alloy VM-1 as a function of rhenium concentrations in the weld metal were studied. Rhenium was introduced into the weld using rhenium wire and tape or wires of Mo-47Re and Mo-52Re alloys. The properties of the weld metal were studied by means of metallographic techniques, electron microscopy, X-ray analysis, and autoradiography. The plasticity of the weld metal sharply was found to increase with increasing concentration of rhenium up to 50%. During welding, a decarburization process was observed which was more pronounced at higher concentrations of rhenium.

  14. Analysis of thermal stresses and metal movement during welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraki, T.; Masubuchi, K.

    1973-01-01

    The research is reported concerning the development of a system of mathematical solutions and computer programs for one- and two-dimensional analyses for thermal stresses. Reports presented include: the investigation of thermal stress and buckling of tantalum and columbium sheet; and analysis of two dimensional thermal strains and metal movement during welding.

  15. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Metal Fabrication, Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This curriculum outline provides secondary and postsecondary instructors with detailed information on student learning outcomes for completion of the welding/metal fabrication program requirements. A program overview discusses the aims of education; secondary school philosophy; and career preparation programs and their goals, organization, and…

  16. The effect of weld stresses on weld quality. [stress fields and metal cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chihoski, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A narrow heat source raises the temperature of a spot on a solid piece of material like metal. The high temperature of the spot decreases with distance from the spot. This is true whether the heat source is an arc, a flame, an electron beam, a plasma jet, a laser beam, or any other source of intense, narrowly defined heat. Stress and strain fields around a moving heat source are organized into a coherent visible system. It is shown that five stresses act across the weld line in turn as an arc passes. Their proportions and positions are considerably altered by weld parameters or condition changes. These pushes and pulls affect the metallurgical character and integrity of the weld area even when there is no apparent difference between after-the-fact examples.

  17. The role of composition and microstructure gradients on weld metal properties and behavior: Progress report for the period of June 1, 1987 to December 31, 1987. [Fe-Al-Cr-Mn-Ni weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of weld metal compositional and microstructural gradients on phase transformations, microstructural stability, and mechanical properties are considered from a fundamental basis in weld metal alloys which are primarily austenitic (e.g., stainless steels). Models which incorporate compositional gradients are developed to predict the resulting weld metal properties. The mechanical properties of weld metals are modeled based on composite theory in which individual weld metal zones are considered as discrete elements within a composite structure. 23 figs.

  18. Stability of a pendant droplet in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.E.

    1998-07-01

    The authors develop a model of metal transfer in gas metal arc welding and compute the critical mass of a pendant droplet in order to ascertain the size and frequency of droplets detaching from the consumable metal electrode. These results are used to predict the mode of metal transfer for a range of voltage and current encompassing free flight transfer, and the transition between globular and spray transfer. This model includes an efficient method to compute the stability of a pendant droplet and the location of the liquid bridge connecting the primary droplet and the residual liquid remaining after detachment of the primary droplet.

  19. Systems to Control Molten Metal Transfer in Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonov, A. V.; Kryukov, A. V.; Gusarov, D. E.

    2015-09-01

    The paper analyzes the systems used for controlling molten wire metal droplets during the arc welding process in shielding gases. The variations for implementing the relevant systems are given, with the positive and negative aspects of such implementation taken into account. Electrical systems are currently investigated to the fullest extent possible and implemented in different power sources for pulsed welding arc. Mechanical systems are represented by different types of feeders that provide the pulsed wire feeding process. The feed mechanisms driven by electric motors and electromagnets are analyzed. In addition to the mechanical and electrical systems, the examples of combined control systems are given.

  20. Use of active shielding gases to optimize the weld metal microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoeien, M.I.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    The microstructure and properties of a structural steel weld metal are dependent on both its composition and thermal experience. With different welding heat input, preheat, plate thickness, and joint geometry, a given steel can exhibit a variety of different microstructures, from ferrite to martensite. One of the compositional variables that strongly influence steel weld metal microstructure and mechanical properties is the weld metal oxygen content. As the weld metal oxygen content increases, a change in microstructure occurs. At low concentrations of oxygen ferrite with aligned or non-aligned second phases may become predominant; slightly higher oxygen levels may result in the formation of the desired acicular ferrite; and further increase in the oxygen content promotes the formation of grain boundary ferrite. Bead-in-groove gas metal arc welding experiments were performed on HSLA steel coupons using three different welding wires and two heat inputs. A total of seventeen different argon-based shielding gas mixtures were used. Complete metallographic and chemical analyses were carried out to evaluate the weld specimens. A parameter defined as the shielding gas oxygen equivalent was developed in order to express the effects of the shielding gas composition on weld metal chemical composition and microstructure. The results showed that the shielding gas oxygen equivalent strongly influenced the pyrometallurgical reactions that occurred during welding, giving rise to significant changes in weld metal chemical composition, and thus, weld metal microstructure.

  1. Laser beam welding non-ferrous metals. (Latest citations from METADEX). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and the evaluation of laser beam welding of non-ferrous metals. Welding parameters, such as incident laser power and welding speed, are reviewed in relation to their characterization of weld microstructure. Weld examination techniques are cited, including macrophotography, light and electron microscopy, and microhardness profiling. (Contains a minimum of 170 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Quantitative metal magnetic memory reliability modeling for welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Haiyan; Dang, Yongbin; Wang, Ben; Leng, Jiancheng

    2016-03-01

    Metal magnetic memory(MMM) testing has been widely used to detect welded joints. However, load levels, environmental magnetic field, and measurement noises make the MMM data dispersive and bring difficulty to quantitative evaluation. In order to promote the development of quantitative MMM reliability assessment, a new MMM model is presented for welded joints. Steel Q235 welded specimens are tested along the longitudinal and horizontal lines by TSC-2M-8 instrument in the tensile fatigue experiments. The X-ray testing is carried out synchronously to verify the MMM results. It is found that MMM testing can detect the hidden crack earlier than X-ray testing. Moreover, the MMM gradient vector sum K vs is sensitive to the damage degree, especially at early and hidden damage stages. Considering the dispersion of MMM data, the K vs statistical law is investigated, which shows that K vs obeys Gaussian distribution. So K vs is the suitable MMM parameter to establish reliability model of welded joints. At last, the original quantitative MMM reliability model is first presented based on the improved stress strength interference theory. It is shown that the reliability degree R gradually decreases with the decreasing of the residual life ratio T, and the maximal error between prediction reliability degree R 1 and verification reliability degree R 2 is 9.15%. This presented method provides a novel tool of reliability testing and evaluating in practical engineering for welded joints.

  3. Stainless steel manual metal arc welding fumes in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kalliomäki, P L; Lakomaa, E; Kalliomäki, K; Kiilunen, M; Kivelä, R; Vaaranen, V

    1983-01-01

    Forty two male Wistar rats were exposed to manual metal arc (MMA) stainless steel (SS) welding fumes generated by an automatic welding device for "nose-only" exposure. The exposure simulated an actual MMA/SS welding environment as closely as possible. For the retention study, the duration of exposure was one hour per workday for one, two, three, of four weeks and for the clearance study four weeks. The retention and clearance of the chromium, nickel, and iron found in MMA/SS welding fumes in the rats' lungs were studied as was the distribution of the metals to other organs. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used for the multi-element chemical activation analyses. The concentrations of chromium and nickel in the blood and the urine were determined by atomic absorption method (AAS). The retention of exogenous iron was determined by a magnetic measuring method. The results indicated that the lungs were the target organs of soluble hexavalent chromates. The half times of lung clearance for Cr, Ni, and Fe were 40 +/- 4 d, 20 +/- d, and 50 +/- 10 d. When the lung clearance curves are compared, the half times of Cr and Fe lung clearance are similar but nickel disappears faster. The distribution and clearance patterns of chromium to other organs differ from those obtained after single intravenous or intratracheal injections of alkaline chromates. PMID:6830723

  4. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  5. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  6. Effect of weld metal mismatch on joint efficiency and measured fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, R.; Malik, L.; Morrison, J.

    1997-12-31

    Fracture toughness tests of deep-notched and shallow-notched SENB specimens at various sub-zero temperatures were conducted to study the effect of weld metal mismatch on measured fracture toughness. Tensile tests of cross-weld tensile specimens were also conducted to study the effect of weld metal mismatch on joint efficiency. These specimens were machined from butt welds that were fabricated with the same welding consumable and welding procedure using HSLA 100 steel plates heat treated to different tensile strengths. No significant differences were found between the joint efficiencies and ductilities of the cross-weld tensile specimens with overmatching weld metal and those of specimens with up to 9% weld metal undermatch in terms of yield strength (3% in terms of ultimate tensile strength). Furthermore, 100% joint efficiency was still achieved in the cross-weld tensile specimens with intact reinforcements and 17% undermatching weld metal in terms of yield strength (9% in terms of ultimate tensile strength). No correlation was found between the degree of weld metal mismatch and the measured fracture toughness of the SENB specimens.

  7. Microstructure, Texture, and Mechanical Property Analysis of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Saptarshi; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The present study elaborately explains the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared by varying welding speed (WS) and current simultaneously at a fixed heat input level using a 1.2-mm-diameter austenitic filler metal (AISI 316L). The overall purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation of welding conditions on: (i) Microstructural constituents using optical microscope and transmission electron microscope; (ii) Micro-texture evolution, misorientation distributions, and grain boundaries at welded regions by measuring the orientation data from electron back scattered diffraction; and (iii) Mechanical properties such as hardness and tensile strength, and their correlation with the microstructure and texture. It has been observed that the higher WS along with the higher welding current (weld metal W1) can enhance weld metal mechanical properties through alternation in microstructure and texture of the weld metal. Higher δ-ferrite formation and high-angle boundaries along with the <101> + <001> grain growth direction of the weld metal W1 were responsible for dislocation pile-ups, SFs, deformation twinning, and the induced martensite with consequent strain hardening during tensile deformation. Also, fusion boundary being the weakest link in the welded structure, failure took place mainly at this region.

  8. Creep deformation and fracture behaviour of a nitrogen-bearing type 316 stainless steel weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikala, G.; Mathew, M. D.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Mannan, S. L.

    1999-08-01

    Creep properties of a nuclear grade type 316 stainless steel (SS) weld metal containing ˜0.08 wt% of nitrogen were studied at 873 and 923 K. These properties were compared with those of a type 316 SS weld metal without nitrogen. In general, the nitrogen-bearing weld metal exhibited better creep and rupture properties. The rupture strengths of the nitrogen-containing weld metal was ˜40% higher than that for the type 316 SS weld metal at both the temperatures. The steady-state (minimum) creep rates were up to two orders of magnitude lower for the nitrogen-containing weld metal compared to 316 SS weld metal. Rupture ductility of nitrogen-containing weld metal was lower at all the test conditions; the long-term ductility at 923 K was below 5%. The differences in creep behaviour of the two weld metals are discussed with respect to the influence of nitrogen on microstructural evolution in the two weld metals.

  9. Optimization of Laser Keyhole Welding Strategies of Dissimilar Metals by FEM Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Navas, Virginia; Leunda, Josu; Lambarri, Jon; Sanz, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Laser keyhole welding of dissimilar metals has been simulated to study the effect of welding strategies (laser beam displacements and tilts) and combination of metals to be welded on final quality of the joints. Molten pool geometry and welding penetration have been studied but special attention has been paid to final joint material properties, such as microstructure/phases and hardness, and especially to the residual stress state because it greatly conditions the service life of laser-welded components. For a fixed strategy (laser beam perpendicular to the joint) austenitic to carbon steel laser welding leads to residual stresses at the joint area very similar to those obtained in austenitic to martensitic steel welding, but welding of steel to Inconel 718 results in steeper residual stress gradients and higher area at the joint with detrimental tensile stresses. Therefore, when the difference in thermo-mechanical properties of the metals to be welded is higher, the stress state generated is more detrimental for the service life of the component, and consequently more relevant is the optimization of welding strategy. In laser keyhole welding of austenitic to martensitic stainless steel and austenitic to carbon steel, the optimum welding strategy is displacing the laser beam 1 mm toward the austenitic steel. In the case of austenitic steel to Inconel welding, the optimum welding strategy consists in setting the heat source tilted 45 deg and moved 2 mm toward the austenitic steel.

  10. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Shiju; Das, C. R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  11. The temporal nature of forces acting on metal drops in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.A.; Eagar, T.W.; Lang, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    At moderate and high welding currents, the most important forces in gas metal arc welding acting on the molten electrode are magnetic forces arising from the interaction between the welding current and its own magnetic field. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. In this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown, and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of these forces from experimentally measured drop shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces as a drop detaches from the electrode.

  12. Influence of macrostructure on tensile properties of multipass SAW C-Mn steel deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongyuth, P.; Ghosh, P. K.; Gupta, P. C.; Patwardhan, A. K.; Prakash, Satya

    1993-06-01

    Blocks of 'all weld' metal were prepared by a multipass submerged arc process, using a C-Mn filler wire, at different welding currents and speeds by keeping the arc voltage constant. The variation in welding parameters was found to alter the macrostructure primarily by influencing its co-axial dendrite content. The chemical composition and hardness of the dendritic and the heat affected regions were affected little by the welding parameters. A dendrite content up to 37%, had no significant effect on the tensile properties. However an increase in it beyond 37% was found to enhance the UTS and YS and reduce percent elongation. The tensile strength was found to be a maximum in the L orientation and a minimum in the S direction. The use of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 873 K caused spheroidization of cementite there by somewhat reducing the hardness and strength. The treatment while not affecting the basic dendritic morphology reduced the observed difference in tensile properties along the L, T and S directions. Implications of the data vis-a-vis industrial applications have been discussed.

  13. TEM Observation of Martensite Layer at the Weld Interface of an A508III to Inconel 82 Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. R.; Lu, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    A lenticular martensite layer at the weld interface in an A508III/Inconel 82 dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint was studied by TEM. The martensite/weld metal boundary was observed as the fusion boundary. There was a K-S orientation relationship between martensite and weld metal. The formation of the martensite was mainly determined by the distribution of alloy elements. The martensite was responsible for the hardness peak in the DMW.

  14. The dynamic effects of metal vapour in gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidar, Jawad

    2010-04-01

    Numerical simulations for the dynamic effects of metal vapour in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) suggest that vapour from the welding droplet at the tip of the welding wire has a significant influence on the plasma properties. It is found that for the evaporation rates calculated for arcs in pure argon, the dynamic effects of metal vapour markedly cool down the plasma in the central region of the arc, leading to the formation of a low temperature zone centred on the arc axis, in agreement with experimental measurements in the literature. Radiation effects, omitted in this paper, may produce further cooling of the plasma gas. The results highlight major deficiencies in the common approach to modelling the GMAW process and suggest that accurate description of GMAW must include the influence of metal vapour on the plasma.

  15. Control of Structure in Conventional Friction Stir Welds through a Kinematic Theory of Metal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubisoff, H.A.; Schneider, J.A.; Nunes, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating pin is translated along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. Metal is prevented from flowing up the pin, which would result in plowing/cutting instead of welding, by a shoulder on the pin. In conventional FSW, the weld metal rests on an "anvil", which supports the heavy "plunge" load on the tool. In this study, both embedded tungsten wires along and copper plating on the faying surfaces were used to trace the flow of AA2219 weld metal around the C-FSW tool. The effect of tool rotational speed, travel speed, plunge load, and pin thread pitch on the resulting weld metal flow was evaluated. Plan, longitudinal, and transverse section x-ray radiographs were examined to trace the metal flow paths. The results are interpreted in terms of a kinematic theory of metal flow in FSW.

  16. Friction welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Ray, Siba P.; Rapp, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor and a ceramic electrode body connected by a friction weld between a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect such a friction weld and a portion of the metal conductor.

  17. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-04-15

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  18. [INVITED] Evaluation of process observation features for laser metal welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenner, Felix; Klämpfl, Florian; Nagulin, Konstantin Yu.; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In the present study we show how fast the fluid dynamics change when changing the laser power for different feed rates during laser metal welding. By the use of two high-speed cameras and a data acquisition system we conclude how fast we have to image the process to measure the fluid dynamics with a very high certainty. Our experiments show that not all process features which can be measured during laser welding do represent the process behavior similarly well. Despite the good visibility of the vapor plume the monitoring of its movement is less suitable as an input signal for a closed-loop control. The features measured inside the keyhole show a good correlation with changes of process parameters. Due to its low noise, the area of the keyhole opening is well suited as an input signal for a closed-loop control of the process.

  19. Effect of PTA Hardfaced Interlayer Thickness on Ballistic Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded Armor Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of armor steel welds is very poor due to the usage of low strength and low hardness austenitic stainless steel fillers, which are traditionally used to avoid hydrogen induced cracking. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of plasma transferred arc hardfaced interlayer thickness on ballistic performance of shielded metal arc welded armor steel weldments. The usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the armor grade quenched and tempered steel base metal was also considered in this study. Joints were fabricated using three different thickness (4, 5.5, and 7 mm) hardfaced middle layer by plasma transferred arc hardfacing process between the top and bottom layers of austenitic stainless steel using shielded metal arc welding process. Sandwiched joint, in addition with the buttering layer served the dual purpose of weld integrity and ballistic immunity due to the high hardness of hardfacing alloy and the energy absorbing capacity of soft backing weld deposits. This paper will provide some insight into the usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the weld integrity and plasma transferred arc hardfacing layer on ballistic performance enhancement of armor steel welds.

  20. Determination of elastoplastic mechanical properties of the weld and heat affected zone metals in tailor-welded blanks by nanoindentation test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiangdong; Guan, Yingping; Yang, Liu

    2015-09-01

    The elastoplastic mechanical properties of the weld and heat affected zone metals have comparatively major impact on the forming process of tailor-welded blanks. A few scholars investigated the elastoplastic mechanical properties of the weld and heat affected zone, but they only simply assumed that it was a uniform distribution elastoplastic material different from the base materials. Four types of tailor-welded blanks which consist of ST12 and 304 stainless steel plates are selected as the research objects, the elastoplastic mechanical properties of the tailor-welded blanks weld and heat affected zone metals are obtained based on the nanoindentation tests, and the Erichsen cupping tests are conducted by combining numerical simulation with physical experiment. The nanoindentation tests results demonstrate that the elastoplastic mechanical properties of the weld and heat affected zone metals are not only different from the base materials, but also varying between the weld metals and the heat affected zone metals. Comparing the Erichsen cupping test resulted from numerical with that from experimental method, it is found that the numerical value of Erichsen cupping test which consider the elastoplastic mechanical properties of the weld and heat affected zone metals have a good agreement with the experimental result, and the relative error is only 4.8%. The proposed research provides good solutions for the inhomogeneous elastoplastic mechanical properties of the tailor-welded blanks weld and heat affected zone metals, and improves the control performance of tailor-welded blanks forming accuracy.

  1. Effects of weld metal profile on the fatigue life of integrally reinforced weld-on fittings

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, G.E. ); Rodabaugh, E.C. , Dublin, OH )

    1994-06-01

    The cyclic fatigue life of fabricated tee intersections, including integrally reinforced weld-on fittings, has been a topic of discussion in the recent past. The discussion has centered around questions concerning the accuracy of the ASME B31.3 Code equations in calculating the stress intensification factors, (SIFs), for these types of intersection geometries. The SIF of an intersection is an indicator of the fatigue life of the intersection when it is subjected to bending moments caused by thermal, flow, or mechanically induced cyclical displacements. Schneider, Rodabaugh, and Woods concur that inaccuracies in the Code SIF equations do exist and that these equations should be revised. This report presents new Markl type SIF data on the B.W.Pipet (BWP), an integrally reinforced weld-on branch fitting, manufactured by WFI International, Inc., in Houston, Texas. The scope of this research project was to determine the influence of the installation weld metal profile of the Pipet to the run pipe on the SIF. The SIF data were then compared to calculated SIF values using equations from the American Society of Mechanical engineers (ASME) B31.1, ASME B31.3, and ASME Section 3, Subsection NC, for the purpose of determining which Code equation may be the most appropriate for calculating the SIF for these particular fittings.

  2. Effect of chemical composition and ferrite content on room temperature SCC behavior of austenitic weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Raghunatha Rao, B.; Prasad Rao, K.; Iyer, K.J.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in the welded condition especially in chemical, petrochemical, thermal power, and nuclear industries where they are subjected to stresses in corrosive environments. Since austenitic stainless steel weld metals invariably contain some delta ferrite to avoid hot cracking, the effect of ferrite on the stress corrosion cracking behavior is important. Austenitic weld metals with different alloy additions and different ferrite contents were investigated for their resistance to room temperature stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in 5 N H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] + 0.5 N NaCl solution. It was found that the delta ferrite content in the weld metals had a predominant effect on the SCC resistance. Higher ferrite contents increased the tendency for SCC. Post-weld heat treatment of weld metals resulted in the improvement of the SCC resistance.

  3. Effect of current waveforms on metal transfer in pulsed gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Chen, M. A.; Lu, Y. F.

    2005-12-01

    With new types of welding power supply based on higher performance power electronic devices and digital control techniques, advanced pulse waveforms can be produced to offer more characteristics that can be fine tuned to optimize the welding process. In this paper, pulsed current waveforms with four basic parameters and six secondary parameters are used to study the effect of waveform parameters on the mode of metal transfer in pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW-P). An experimental system is developed to sense, observe and analyse the images of droplet/wire, and the transient data of welding current and arc voltage. Experiments are conducted to study the influence of the ratio of the pulsing-current time to the droplet-detachment time as well as the droplet-detachment current level on the mode of metal transfer. Appropriate sets of welding conditions including pulse waveform and parameters are obtained to achieve the ideal transfer mode of one-droplet-per-pulse in GMAW-P.

  4. Temperature field acquisition during gas metal arc welding using thermocouples, thermography and fibre Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, P. M. G. P.; Frazão, O.; Tavares, S. M. O.; de Figueiredo, M. A. V.; Restivo, M. T.; Santos, J. L.; de Castro, P. M. S. T.

    2007-03-01

    The paper presents the application of temperature acquisition systems integrating thermocouples, a thermographic camera and fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process, MIG (metal inert gas) welding type. Efficient procedures to use FBG sensors and thermocouples were developed. The paper presents and compares measurements made in welded plates of aluminium alloy 6082-T6. Tests were performed in both plate surfaces and good agreement between the three techniques was found.

  5. Metal cutting analogy for establishing Friction Stir Welding process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Sylvester Allen

    A friction stir weld (FSW) is a solid state joining operation whose processing parameters are currently determined by lengthy trial and error methods. To implement FSWing rapidly in various applications will require an approach for predicting process parameters based on the physics of the process. Based on hot working conditions for metals, a kinematic model has been proposed for calculating the shear strain and shear strain rates during the FSW process, validation of the proposed model with direct measuring is difficult however. Since the shear strain and shear strain rates predicted for the FSW process, are similar to those predicted in metal cutting, validation of the FSW algorithms with microstructural studies of metal chips may be possible leading to the ability to predict FSW processing parameters.

  6. Diffusion welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Vasudevan, Asuri K.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor diffusion welded to a portion of a ceramic electrode body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

  7. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Z. H.; Liao, S. M.; Tsai, H. L.

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  8. Numerical simulation of humping phenomenon in high speed gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ji; Wu, Chuan-Song

    2011-06-01

    It is of great significance to obtain a thorough understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for humping bead phenomenon in high speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) in order to raise welding efficiency. Experiments were conducted to observe the weld pool behaviors in high speed GMAW, and it was found that both the severely deformed weld pool surface and strong backward flowing play a dominant role in humping bead formation. In this study, a mathematical model is developed to quantitatively analyze the forming mechanism of humping beads for high speed GMAW through considering both the momentum and heat content distribution of the backward flowing molten metal inside the weld pool. The transient development of temperature profiles in the weld pool with severe deformation demonstrates the humping bead forming process under some welding conditions. The predicted and measured humping bead dimensions are in agreement.

  9. Detection of hydrogen attack in base metal and weld HAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Birring, A.S.; Elliot, J.; Hsiao, C.P.

    1995-12-01

    Hydrogen attack is known to occur in C-1/2Mo steels operating at high temperature and pressure in the hydrogen environment. The attack occurs in the base metal as well as in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) of vessels and pipes. Hydrogen attack reduces the strength and toughness of steel and, if left undetected, can lead to component failure. Failures can be avoided by timely application of reliable and sensitive nondestructive techniques. Ultrasonic techniques were developed and applied to detect hydrogen attack in both the base metal and weld HAZ attack. Ultrasonic backscatter and velocity ratio techniques were applied for detection of base metal attack. These techniques are, however, not suitable for detection of HAZ attack. Conventional shear wave examination is currently used for HAZ inspection. This method can detect large cracks but is not sensitive to detect microcracks produced by hydrogen attack. A combination of two techniques was developed for detection of HAZ attack. These techniques are: contact focused angle beam S-wave and pitch-catch L-wave. The first technique focuses the beam using an acoustic lens while the second technique uses the intersection point of the two pitch-catch beam axes to illuminate the HAZ zone. Both the focused and pitch-catch techniques were applied on samples with simulated HAZ attack. The techniques were successful in detecting simulated attack.

  10. Multipass optical parametric amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Jeys, T.H.

    1996-08-01

    A compact, low-threshold, multipass optical parametric amplifier has been developed for the conversion of short-pulse (360-ps) 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser radiation into eye-safe 1572-nm radiation for laser ranging and radar applications. The amplifier had a threshold pump power of as low as 45{mu}J, and at three to four times this threshold pump power the amplifier converted 30{percent} of the input 1064-nm radiation into 1572-nm output radiation. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  11. Promising HE for explosive welding of thin metallic foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deribas, A. A.; Mikhaylov, A. L.; Titova, N. N.; Zocher, Marvin A.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental results are presented on the development of a high explosive (HE) suitable for the welding of thin metallic foils. The explosive is formed from a mixture of brisant HE (RDX or PETN) and an inert material, namely sodium bicarbonate. Sodium bicarbonate releases a rather large quantity of gas during decomposition, the effects of which are discussed. Measurements of detonation velocity and critical thickness for specific mixture combinations are presented. It is shown that particle size (of the RDX or PETN component) has a significant effect upon detonation velocity and critical thickness. Compositions were developed which have a stable detonation velocity ~2 km/s with a layer thickness ~ 2 mm.

  12. Analysis of thermal stresses and metal movement during welding. I - Analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraki, T.; Masubuchi, K.; Bryan, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    This is the first part of a study of thermal stresses and metal movement during welding. This part discusses analysis of two-dimensional thermal stresses and metal movement during bead-on-plate and butt welding. A finite-element formulation has been derived, based on the variational principle. The formulation includes temperature dependence of material properties as well as the yield criterion.

  13. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Information The NRC published DG-1279 in the Federal Register on October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60479), for a 60-day... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.''...

  14. Fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steel weld metal at 4 K

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1984-08-01

    Selection of the welding processess and weld filler metals for fabrication of a large toroidal superconducting magnet is described. Data available in the literature are collected and compared with data generated in this study for three welding processes, shielded metal arc (SMA), gas tungsten arc (GTA), and flux cored arc (FCA) welds had the highest fracture toughness as measured by K/sub Ic/ estimated from J/sub Ic/. The SMA and FCA welds had about the same toughness, below the GTA values but above the average from the literature. The fracture mode for all three processes was typified by ductile dimples. The fracture morphology of the FCA weld specimens was influenced by the solidification substructure, and small particles were found to be nucleation sites for void formation, especially for the GTA welds. All three welding processes were deemed adequate for the intended service and were used to fabricate the large magnet. A trunnion-type turning fixture eliminated the need for welding in the vertical and overhead positions. The GTA process was used for all root passes, and the horizontal welds were filled by the SMA process. Over 80% of the welds were done in the flat position with the FCA process, and its high deposition rate and ease of operation are credited with contributing greatly to the success of the effort.

  15. Reflection of illumination laser from gas metal arc weld pool surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoji; Zhang, Yu Ming

    2009-11-01

    The weld pool is the core of the welding process where complex welding phenomena originate. Skilled welders acquire their process feedback primarily from the weld pool. Observation and measurement of the three-dimensional weld pool surface thus play a fundamental role in understanding and future control of complex welding processes. To this end, a laser line is projected onto the weld pool surface in pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and an imaging plane is used to intercept its reflection from the weld pool surface. Resultant images of the reflected laser are analyzed and it is found that the weld pool surface in GMAW does specularly reflect the projected laser as in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Hence, the weld pool surface in GMAW is also specular and it is in principle possible that it may be observed and measured by projecting a laser pattern and then intercepting and imaging the reflection from it. Due to high frequencies of surface fluctuations, GMAW requires a relatively short time to image the reflected laser.

  16. Effect of Boric Acid Concentration on Viscosity of Slag and Property of Weld Metal Obtained from Underwater Wet Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ning; Guo, Wei; Xu, Changsheng; Du, Yongpeng; Feng, Jicai

    2015-06-01

    Underwater wet welding is a crucial repair and maintenance technology for nuclear plant. A boric acid environment raises a new challenge for the underwater welding maintenance of nuclear plant. This paper places emphasis on studying the influence of a boric acid environment in nuclear plant on the underwater welding process. Several groups of underwater wet welding experiments have been conducted in boric acid aqueous solution with different concentration (0-35000 ppm). The viscosity of the welding slag and the mechanical properties of welds, such as the hardness, strength, and elongation, have been studied. The results show that with increasing boric acid concentration, the viscosity of the slag decreases first and then increases at a lower temperature (less than 1441 °C). However, when the temperature is above 1480 °C, the differences between the viscosity measurements become less pronounced, and the viscosity tends to a constant value. The hardness and ductility of the joints can be enhanced significantly, and the maximum strength of the weld metal can be reached at 2300 ppm.

  17. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Process for Maximum Ballistic Limit in MIL A46100 Steel Welded All-Metal Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our recently developed multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the process optimization for the attainment of maximum ballistic limit within the weld. The original model consists of six modules, each dedicated to handling a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) electro-dynamics of the welding gun; (b) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler metal consumable electrode to the weld; (c) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (d) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; (e) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties; and (f) spatial distribution of the material ballistic limit. In the present work, the model is upgraded through the introduction of the seventh module in recognition of the fact that identification of the optimum GMAW process parameters relative to the attainment of the maximum ballistic limit within the weld region entails the use of advanced optimization and statistical sensitivity analysis methods and tools. The upgraded GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler metal electrodes made of the same material. The predictions of the upgraded GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt weld are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  18. Submerged arc flux welding with CaF/sub 2/-CaO-SiO/sub 2/ fluxes: Possible electrochemical effects on weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.; Blander, M.; Indacochea, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Compositional changes of weld metal from welds made by submerged arc flux welding of steel using CaF/sub 2/-CaO-SiO/sub 2/ fluxes are consistent with an electrochemical mechanism in which the filler wire is anodically oxidized to form oxides and fluorides, and metals are cathodically deposited at the weld pool-flux interface. This speculative mechanism, if proven by further detailed studies, could make it possible to predict fluxes which will improve the quality of welds. 10 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. In situ observations of weld pool solidification using transparent metal-analog systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, R.; David, S. A.; Eshelman, M. A.; Vitek, J. M.; Babu, S. S.; Hong, T.; DebRoy, T.

    2003-04-01

    The dynamics of weld solidification were observed in situ using a laser welding process on transparent organic materials systems. Succinonitrile was used to simulate a pure metal system and succinonitrile with 1.2 wt. % acetone was used to simulate an alloy system. Observed weld pool shapes in succinonitrile were in good agreement with theoretical heat transfer calculations. The dynamics of weld pool shape in the succinonitrile-acetone system were related to complex interactions between grain orientation, grain selection, and dendrite orientations, which depend strongly on welding speed. An increase in welding speed leads to a transition from a steady-state to a nonsteady-state weld pool shape. Several other phenomena, including epitaxial growth, grain selection process, grain boundary melting, and porosity formation, were also observed.

  20. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding.

    PubMed

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10-20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  1. Fracture mechanics characterization of welds: Fatigue life analysis of notches at welds: J(sub Ic) fracture toughness tests for weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, John H.

    1995-03-01

    In this report two methods of fracture analysis of welds will be emphasized, one addressing fatigue life testing and analysis of notches at welds, and the other addressing the final fracture of the welded component and the fracture toughness tests used to characterize final fracture. These fatigue and fracture methods will be described by referring to recent work from the technical literature and from the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center, primarily fracture case study and fracture test method development investigations. A brief general summary will be given of fatigue and fracture methods and concepts that have application to welded structures. Specific fatigue crack initiation tests and analysis methods will be presented, using example results from a welded stainless steel box beam of a cannon carriage. Recent improvements and simplifications in J.integral fracture toughness tests will be described, particularly those related to welds. Fracture toughness measurements for various stainless steel weld metals and heat treatments will also be described.

  2. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  3. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Haghshenas, M.; Nguyen, T.; Galloway, J.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  4. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-06-30

    Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.

  5. Visualization of hump formation in high-speed gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Zhong, L. M.; Gao, J. Q.

    2009-11-01

    The hump bead is a typical weld defect observed in high-speed welding. Its occurrence limits the improvement of welding productivity. Visualization of hump formation during high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is helpful in the better understanding of the humping phenomena so that effective measures can be taken to suppress or decrease the tendency of hump formation and achieve higher productivity welding. In this study, an experimental system was developed to implement vision-based observation of the weld pool behavior during high-speed GMAW. Considering the weld pool characteristics in high-speed welding, a narrow band-pass and neutral density filter was equipped for the CCD camera, the suitable exposure time was selected and side view orientation of the CCD camera was employed. The events that took place at the rear portion of the weld pools were imaged during the welding processes with and without hump bead formation, respectively. It was found that the variation of the weld pool surface height and the solid-liquid interface at the pool trailing with time shows some useful information to judge whether the humping phenomenon occurs or not.

  6. Determinants of occupational exposure to metals by gas metal arc welding and risk management measures: a biomonitoring study.

    PubMed

    Persoons, Renaud; Arnoux, Damien; Monssu, Théodora; Culié, Olivier; Roche, Gaëlle; Duffaud, Béatrice; Chalaye, Denis; Maitre, Anne

    2014-12-01

    Welding fumes contain various toxic metals including chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and manganese (Mn). An assessment of the risk to health of local and systemic exposure to welding fumes requires the assessment of both external and internal doses. The aims of this study were to test the relevance in small and medium sized enterprises of a biomonitoring strategy based on urine spot-samples, to characterize the factors influencing the internal doses of metals in gas metal arc welders and to recommend effective risk management measures. 137 welders were recruited and urinary levels of metals were measured by ICP-MS on post-shift samples collected at the end of the working week. Cr, Ni and Mn mean concentrations (respectively 0.43, 1.69 and 0.27 μg/g creatinine) were well below occupational health guidance values, but still higher than background levels observed in the general population, confirming the absorption of metals generated in welding fumes. Both welding parameters (nature of base metal, welding technique) and working conditions (confinement, welding and grinding durations, mechanical ventilation and welding experience) were predictive of occupational exposure. Our results confirm the interest of biomonitoring for assessing health risks and recommending risk management measures for welders. PMID:25223250

  7. Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation

    SciTech Connect

    Schempp, Philipp; Tang, Z.; Cross, Carl E.; Seefeld, T.; Pittner, A.; Rethmeier, M.

    2012-06-28

    The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

  8. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  9. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  10. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  11. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  12. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  13. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  14. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  15. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  16. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  17. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  18. Characterization of Defocused Electron Beams and Welds in Stainless Steel and Refractory Metals using the Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W

    2009-01-23

    As the first part of a project to compare new generation, continuous wave, laser welding technology to traditional electron beam welding technology, electron beam welds were made on commercially pure vanadium refractory metal and 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel. The electron beam welds were made while employing EB diagnostics to fully characterize the beams so that direct comparisons could be made between electron beam and laser beams and the welds that each process produces.

  19. Development of welded metal bellows having minimum effective diameter change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henschel, J. K.; Stevens, J. B.; Harvey, A. C.; Howland, J. S.; Rhee, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    A program of analysis, design, and fabrication was conducted to develop welded metal bellows having a minimum change in effective diameter for cryogenic turbomachinery face seal applications. Linear analysis of the principle types of bellows provided identification of concepts capable of meeting basic operation requirements. For the 6-inch (.152 m) mean diameter, 1.5-inch free length bellows studied, nonlinear analysis showed that opposed and nested toroidal bellows plates stiffened by means of alternating stiffener rings were capable of maintaining constant effective diameter within 0.3% and 0.1% respectively under the operating conditions of interest. Changes in effective diameter were due principally to bellows axial deflection with pressure differential having a lesser influence. Fabrication problems associated with joining the thin bellows plates to the relatively heavy stiffener rings were encountered and precluded assembly and testing of a bellows core. Fabrication problems are summarized and recommended fabrication methods for future effort are presented.

  20. Atom-probe investigation of precipitation in 12% Cr steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guang-Jun; Lundin, Lars; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    1994-03-01

    The microstructure of two types of 12% Cr steel weld metals, one with the composition of a common 12% Cr steel and the other with a higher nitrogen content, was studied using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and APFIM (atom-probe field-ion microscopy) in post-weld heat-treated condition. The microstructure of the 12% Cr weld metals consisted of tempered martensite, retained δ-ferrite, an irregular low-dislocation α-ferrite and precipitates. Precipitates in the weld metals were dominantly M 23C 6 on different boundaries. Plate-like and fine cubic MN and M 2N were found inside the α-ferrite. APFIM analysis showed that M 23C 6 was almost a pure carbide and MN was almost a pure nitride. Carbon and nitrogen in the weld metals mainly existed in the precipitates. High nitrogen content did not change the composition of the precipitates, but increased the quantity of nitrides. Therefore, in the high nitrogen weld metal, the content of strong nitride-forming elements in the matrix decreased. These results are important in order to understand the strengthening mechanism of the high Cr steel weld metals, as well as of other high Cr heat-resistant steels.

  1. Comparison of joint designs for laser welding of cast metal plates and wrought wires.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yasuko; Nomoto, Rie; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare joint designs for the laser welding of cast metal plates and wrought wire, and to evaluate the welded area internally using X-ray micro-focus computerized tomography (micro-CT). Cast metal plates (Ti, Co-Cr) and wrought wires (Ti, Co-Cr) were welded using similar metals. The specimens were welded using four joint designs in which the wrought wires and the parent metals were welded directly (two designs) or the wrought wires were welded to the groove of the parent metal from one or both sides (n = 5). The porosity and gap in the welded area were evaluated by micro-CT, and the maximum tensile load of the welded specimens was measured with a universal testing machine. An element analysis was conducted using an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. The statistical analysis of the results was performed using Bonferroni's multiple comparisons (α = 0.05). The results included that all the specimens fractured at the wrought wire when subjected to tensile testing, although there were specimens that exhibited gaps due to the joint design. The wrought wires were affected by laser irradiation and observed to melt together and onto the filler metal. Both Mo and Sn elements found in the wrought wire were detected in the filler metal of the Ti specimens, and Ni was detected in the filler metal of the Co-Cr specimens. The four joint designs simulating the designs used clinically were confirmed to have adequate joint strength provided by laser welding. PMID:22080283

  2. High power x-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1999-01-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10.sup.4 watts/cm.sup.2 and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  3. The role of composition and microstructure gradients on weld metal properties and behavior: Progress report, 1 January 1988--31 December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of weld metal compositional and microstructural gradients on phase transformation, microstructural stability, and mechanical properties are considered from a fundamental basis in weld metal alloys which are primarily austenitic (e.g., stainless steels). Models which incorporate compositional gradients are developed to predict the resulting weld metal properties and behavior. The mechanical properties of weld metal are modeled based on composite theory in which individual weld metal zones are considered as discrete elements within a composite structure. 17 refs., 28 figs.

  4. Novel concepts in weld metal science: Role of gradients and composite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties are being investigated. Crack propagation is solidified alloy structures is being characterized as to solidification orientation and the profile of the compositional variations. The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a compositional gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Special techniques to produce laboratory samples with microstructures which simulate the composition and microstructure gradients in solidified weld metal are used, along with appropriate mathematical models, to evaluate the properties of the composite weld metals. The composite modeling techniques are being applied to describe the effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties in Ni-Cu alloys. The development of metal matrix composition weld deposits on austenitic stainless steels has been studied. The particulate metal matrix composites were produced with ceramic or refractory metal powder filled cored wire, which was gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welded.

  5. High-cycle Fatigue Properties of Alloy718 Base Metal and Electron Beam Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Nagashima, Nobuo; Sumiyoshi, Hideshi; Ogata, Toshio; Nagao, Naoki

    High-cycle fatigue properties of Alloy 718 plate and its electron beam (EB) welded joint were investigated at 293 K and 77 K under uniaxial loading. At 293 K, the high-cycle fatigue strength of the EB welded joint with the post heat treatment exhibited somewhat lower values than that of the base metal. The fatigue strengths of both samples basically increased at 77 K. However, in longer life region, the EB welded joint fractured from a blow hole formed in the welded zone, resulting in almost the same fatigue strength at 107 cycles as that at 293 K.

  6. Simulation on friction taper plug welding of AA6063-20Gr metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Nithin, Abeyram M.

    2016-05-01

    Friction taper plug welding a variant of friction welding is useful in welding of similar and dissimilar materials. It could be used for joining of composites to metals in sophisticated aerospace applications. In the present work numerical simulation of friction taper plug welding process is carried out using finite element based software. Graphite reinforced AA6063 is modelled using the software ANSYS 15.0 and temperature distribution is predicted. Effect of friction time on temperature distribution is numerically investigated. When the friction time is increased to 30 seconds, the tapered part of plug gets detached and fills the hole in the AA6063 plate perfectly.

  7. Structural stability of super duplex stainless weld metals and its dependence on tungsten and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, J.-O.; Huhtala, T.; Jonsson, P.; Karlsson, L.; Wilson, A.

    1996-08-01

    Three different superduplex stainless weld metals have been produced using manual metal arc welding under identical welding conditions. The concentration of the alloying elements tungsten and copper corresponded to the concentrations in commercial superduplex stainless steels (SDSS). Aging experiments in the temperature range 700 °C to 1110 °C showed that the formation of intermetallic phase was enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal and also dissolved at higher temperatures compared with tungsten-poor and tungsten-free weld metals. It could be inferred from time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams produced in the present investigation that the critical cooling rate to avoid 1 wt pct of intermetallic phase was 2 times faster for tungsten-rich weld metal. Microanalysis in combination with thermodynamic calculations showed that tungsten was accommodated in χ phase, thereby decreasing the free energy. Experimental evidence supports the view that the formation of intermetallic phase is enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal, owing to easier nucleation of nonequilibrium χ phase compared with σ phase. The formation of secondary austenite (γ2) during welding was modeled using the thermodynamic computer program Thermo-Calc. Satisfactory agreement between theory and practice was obtained. Thermo-Calc was capable of predicting observed lower concentrations of chromium and nitrogen in γ2 compared with primary austenite. The volume fraction of γ2 was found to be significantly higher in tungsten-rich and tungsten + copper containing weld metal. The results could be explained by a higher driving force for precipitation of γ2 in these.

  8. The effect of baking treatments on E9018-B3 manual metal arc welding consumables

    SciTech Connect

    Fazackerley, W.; Gee, R.

    1996-12-31

    For the comparison and assessment of steel welding consumables, standard tests involving small model welds are widely used to determine diffusible hydrogen contents. The lowest scale normally quoted is less than 5 ml/100 g deposited metal (e.g., BS5135:1984 Scale D). However, due to industry`s demands for lower hydrogen levels for critical applications, it is now proposed to sub-divide this scale at around 2--3 ml/100 g. This has led to further development by consumable manufacturers in order to meet the new specification. Traditionally, reductions in potential hydrogen levels in manual metal arc welding consumables have been achieved by improved flux formulations and silicate binder systems. However, there is little published work on the effect of electrode baking treatments. A development program has been employed to study the effect of baking treatments on E9018-B3 type manual metal arc welding consumables. This type of welding consumable is used extensively in the initial fabrication and in the repair and maintenance of power generation plant, where significant risk of HAZ hydrogen cracking exists. These treatments have been assessed using standard tests for weld metal hydrogen content and weld metal composition.

  9. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The safety issue has been raised with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal could detach and come in contact with astronauts and burn through the fabric of the astronauts' Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding in space. Molten metal detachments from either the weld/cut substrate or weld wire could present harm to a astronaut if the detachment was to burn through the fabric of the EMU. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The primary molten metal detachment concerns were those cases of molten metal separation from the metal surface due to metal cutting, weld pool splashing, entrainment and release of molten metal due to filler wire snap-out from the weld puddle, and molten metal accumulation and release from the end of the weld wire. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were developed for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. The surface tension represents the force opposing the liquid metal drop from detaching whereas the weight of the liquid metal droplet represents a force that is tending to detach the molten metal drop. Theoretical calculations have indicated that only a small amount of energy is required to detach a liquid metal drop; however, much of the energy of an impact is absorbed in the sample or weld plate before it reaches the metal drop on the cut edge or surface. The tendency for detachment is directly proportional to the weld pool radius and metal density and inversely proportional to the surface

  10. Preventing Technique of Metal Deposition on Optical Devices in Space Diode Laser Welding for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suita, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Kenji; Ohtani, Masato; Shobako, Shinichiro; Terajima, Noboru; Hiraoka, Nobuaki

    In future space developments, the welding in space may be required for the repairs of the ISS and the constructions of lunar base and space structures. The authors have studied the space Gas Hollow Tungsten Arc (GHTA) welding process since 1993. This paper describes the results for space applying the space Diode Laser (DL) welding process which the authors proposed in 2002. It is necessary to prevent the metal deposition on optical devices in order to utilize the space DL welding process in space. The authors studied the preventing technique of metal deposition which covered optical devices with the nozzle and blew the shielding gas out from nozzle outlet. The metal deposition can be reduced by supplying the nozzle with inert gas and blowing the gas out from nozzle outlet. The shielding gas argon perfectly prevents the metal deposition on optical devices when argon pressurizes the nozzle to over 19.9 Pa and spouts out from the nozzle outlet.

  11. 3D display and image processing system for metal bellows welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min-Chul; Son, Jung-Young

    2010-04-01

    Industrial welded metal Bellows is in shape of flexible pipeline. The most common form of bellows is as pairs of washer-shaped discs of thin sheet metal stamped from strip stock. Performing arc welding operation may cause dangerous accidents and bad smells. Furthermore, in the process of welding operation, workers have to observe the object directly through microscope adjusting the vertical and horizontal positions of welding rod tip and the bellows fixed on the jig, respectively. Welding looking through microscope makes workers feel tired. To improve working environment that workers sit in an uncomfortable position and productivity we introduced 3D display and image processing. Main purpose of the system is not only to maximize the efficiency of industrial productivity with accuracy but also to keep the safety standards with the full automation of work by distant remote controlling.

  12. Microstructural development due to long-term aging and ion irradiation behavior in weld metals of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Ikeda, S.; Hamada, S.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-10-01

    In a candidate austenitic stainless steel (316F) for fusion reactor structural materials, irradiation behavior of the weld metal produced by electron-beam welding (containing 7.9 vol% δ-ferrite) was investigated in terms of microstructural development. The densities of interstitial clusters in the γ-phase of the weld metal irradiated with He-ions at 673 and 773 K were about four times larger than those in 316F. Voids were formed in the δ-ferrite of the weld irradiated at 773 K. The number of clusters decreased in the weld metal (γ-phase) aged at 773 to 973 K, compared with that in the as-welded metal. The change in cluster density could be attributed to a Ni concentration increase in the γ-phase of the weld metal during aging.

  13. Welding Stainless Steels and Refractory Metals Using Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave Nd:YAG Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Pong, R; Gauthier, M D

    2004-09-27

    This report provides an overview of a series of developmental welding studies performed on a 2.2 kW Rofin Sinar DY-022 Diode Pumped Continuous Wave (CW) Nd:YAG welder at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Several materials systems, ranging from refractory metals, such as commercially pure tantalum and vanadium, to austenitic stainless steels, including both 304L and 21-6-9 grades, are examined. Power input and travel speed are systematically varied during the welding of each materials system, and the width, depth, and cross sectional area of the resulting weld fusion zones are measured. These individual studies are undertaken in order to characterize the response of the welder to changes in these welding parameters for a range of materials and to determine the maximum depth of penetration of which this welder is capable in each materials system. The maximum weld depths, which are on the order of 5.4 mm, are observed in the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel at the maximum laser power setting (2200 W) and a slow travel speed (6.4 mm/sec). The next highest weld depth is observed in the 304L stainless steel, followed by that observed in the vanadium and, finally, in the tantalum. Porosity, which is attributed to the collapse of the keyhole during welding, is also observed in the welds produced in tantalum, vanadium, and 304L stainless steel. Only the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel welds displayed little or no porosity over the range of welding parameters. Comparisons with similar laser welding systems are also made for several of these same materials systems. When compared with the welds produced by these other systems, the LLNL system typically produces welds of an equivalent or slightly higher depth.

  14. Deviation of longitudinal and shear waves in austenitic stainless steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    One of the difficulties associated with the ultrasonic inspection of stainless steel weld metal is the deviation of the ultrasonic beams. This can lead to errors in determining both the location and size of reflectors. The present paper compares experimental and theoretical data related to beam steering for longitudinal and shear waves in a sample of 308 SS weld metal. Agreement between predicted and measured beam deviations is generally good. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed.

  15. Prevention of chi and sigma phases formation in aged 16-8-2 weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Type 16-8-2 weld filler metal (16 wt-% Cr, 8 wt-% Ni, 2 wt-% Mo, nominally) is commonly used to weld Type 316 stainless steel base metal. Suitable control of composition can prevent formation of embrittling phases. The chi phase can be eliminated by adjusting the molybdenum content. The /delta/-ferrite-/sigma/ phase transformation can be prevented by suitably adjusting the carbon-plus-nitrogen content. The mechanism of this behavior is discussed. 14 refs.

  16. Investigation of dissimilar metal welds by energy-resolved neutron imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Ganguly, Supriyo; Meco, Sonia M.; Pardal, Goncalo R.; Shinohara, Takenao; Feller, W. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    A nondestructive study of the internal structure and compositional gradient of dissimilar metal-alloy welds through energy-resolved neutron imaging is described in this paper. The ability of neutrons to penetrate thick metal objects (up to several cm) provides a unique possibility to examine samples which are opaque to other conventional techniques. The presence of Bragg edges in the measured neutron transmission spectra can be used to characterize the internal residual strain within the samples and some microstructural features, e.g. texture within the grains, while neutron resonance absorption provides the possibility to map the degree of uniformity in mixing of the participating alloys and intermetallic formation within the welds. In addition, voids and other defects can be revealed by the variation of neutron attenuation across the samples. This paper demonstrates the potential of neutron energy-resolved imaging to measure all these characteristics simultaneously in a single experiment with sub-mm spatial resolution. Two dissimilar alloy welds are used in this study: Al autogenously laser welded to steel, and Ti gas metal arc welded (GMAW) to stainless steel using Cu as a filler alloy. The cold metal transfer variant of the GMAW process was used in joining the Ti to the stainless steel in order to minimize the heat input. The distributions of the lattice parameter and texture variation in these welds as well as the presence of voids and defects in the melt region are mapped across the welds. The depth of the thermal front in the Al–steel weld is clearly resolved and could be used to optimize the welding process. A highly textured structure is revealed in the Ti to stainless steel joint where copper was used as a filler wire. The limited diffusion of Ti into the weld region is also verified by the resonance absorption. PMID:27504075

  17. Factors affecting the impact toughness of low carbon bainitic weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J.M.; Vassilaros, M.; Fox, A.

    1996-12-31

    Welds were produced using the GMA and GTA welding processes with 100% argon and 95% argon-5% CO{sub 2} shielding gases. This resulted in different microstructures and varying levels of strength, chemistry and toughness. The factors affecting CVN impact toughness were determined. The resulting toughness was dependent upon the strength, carbon content, the average size and amount of non-metallic inclusions, and metallurgical structure. Improvement in toughness occurred with decreasing strength, carbon content, inclusion size, volume fraction of inclusions, and amount of as deposited columnar structure. When these factors were minimized, the low carbon bainitic weld metal exhibited toughness behavior similar to that of tempered martensite.

  18. CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE OF ALLOY 152 AND 52 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2009-12-01

    The crack growth response of alloy 152 and 52 weld metals has been measured in simulated PWR primary water at both high (325-350 C) and low (50 C) temperatures. Tests were performed on samples machined from alloy 152 or 52 mockup welds. Propagation rates under cycle + hold and constant K conditions at high temperatures show stable, but extremely low SCC growth rates. The most significant intergranular cracking occurred during cycling at 50 C, particularly for the alloy 152 weld metal at high stress intensity.

  19. Microstructure evaluation in low alloy steel weld metal from convective heat transfer calculations in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mundra, K.; DebRoy, T.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Heat transfer and fluid flow during manual metal arc welding of low alloy steels were investigated by solving the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in three dimensions. Cooling rates were calculated at various locations in the weldment. Calculated cooling rates were coupled with an existing phase transformation model to predict percentages of acicular, allotriomorphic, and Widmanstaetten ferrites in various low alloy steel welds containing different concentration of V and Mn. Computed microstructures were in good agreement with experiment, indicating promise for predicting weld metal microstructure from the fundamentals of transport phenomena.

  20. Repair welding of heavy-section steel components in LWRs. Volume 1. Summary report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Feldstein, J.G.

    1984-07-01

    A program was carried out to develop an alternative weld repair procedure to the half bead technique suitable for in-service repair of nuclear reactor pressure vessel components without subsequent post weld heat treatment. The new weld repair procedure uses conventional machining for defect excavation/cavity preparation and the cold wire gas tungsten-arc process as the weld method. A controlled heat input, multi-pass welding procedure produces excellent grain refinement and tempering of the base metal HAZ without the necessity for grinding the first layer. The cavity preparation and weld repair processes combined with the elimination of grinding gives a significant advantage to the implementation of this new repair procedure in a radioactive environment. Both old and new repair procedures are capable of producing repair weldments having material properties adequate for service in nuclear pressure boundary components. Testing did show that the as-welded, shielded metal-arc weld metal deposited by the half bead technique exhibits a significant reduction in fracture toughness at approximately 450/sup 0/F due to a strain aging mechanism. The weld metal chosen for the alternate repair procedure was selected to mitigate this effect.

  1. Bond formation in ultrasonically welded aluminum sheet metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkosz, Daniel Edward

    Ultrasonic welding (USW), a solid state joining technology, has been used to bond aluminum alloys commonly used in the automotive industry. Bonding occurs due to USW's high frequency (˜20 kHz) in-plane vibration of sample interfaces while being held under moderate clamp pressure normal to the plane of vibration. Vibration and clamp pressure are transmitted into bond formation via contact with a weld-tip. To better understand how weld-tip geometry affected bond formation, experiments were conducted to quantify how tip geometry influenced plastic deformation characteristics between fully welded coupons of 0.9mm thick AA6111-T4 aluminum alloy. Weld-interface microstructure features were documented by optical microscopy and features quantified in a 19 point matrix. Correlation between microstructure features, such as rolling-wakes, and resulting weld bond strengths of more than 3.0kN is made. Weld zone microstructure features appear to result from deformation at and severe migration of the original weld interface during USW. To confirm this hypothesis, intrinsic and extrinsic markers were employed to monitor weld interface deformation characteristics. Various physical and analytical techniques were used in conjunction with these markers to show that joining of "like" and "dislike" aluminum samples is achieved through mechanical mixing of mating interfaces and not by elemental diffusion. It is also hypothesized that severe deformation of the original interface would result in areas of high residual strain within a formed weld zone. To investigate this and the influence that tip geometry may have on residual strain, fully welded samples were annealed at 500°C for a controlled period of time and recovery, recrystallization and grain growth characteristics were monitored. In all welds, initial recrystallization and grain growth occurred at the outer ends of weld zones and along weld interfaces where the most turbulent mixing and grain size reduction was observed

  2. Picosecond laser welding of optical to metal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard M.; Troughton, Michael; Chen, Jinanyong; Elder, Ian; Thomson, Robert R.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    We report on practical, industrially relevant, welding of optical components to themselves and aluminum alloy components. Weld formation is achieved through the tight focusing of a 5.9ps, 400kHz Trumpf laser operating at 1030nm. By selecting suitable surface preparation, clamping and laser parameters, the plasma can be confined, even with comparatively rough surfaces, by exploiting the melt properties of the glass. The short interaction time allows for a permanent weld to form between the two materials with heating limited to a region ~300 µm across. Practical application of these weld structures is typically limited due to the induced stress within the glass and, critically, the issues surrounding post-weld thermal expansion. We report on the measured strength of the weld, with a particular emphasis on laser parameters and surface preparation.

  3. Method and apparatus for holding two separate metal pieces together for welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, S. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method of holding two separate metal pieces together for welding is described including the steps of overlapping a portion of one of the metal pieces on a portion of the other metal piece, encasing the overlapping metal piece in a compressible device, drawing the compressible device into an enclosure, and compressing a portion of the compressible device around the overlapping portions of the metal pieces for holding the metal pieces under constant and equal pressure during welding. The preferred apparatus for performing the method utilizes a support mechanism to support the two separate metal pieces in an overlapping configuration; a compressible device surrounding the support mechanism and at least one of the metal pieces, and a compressing device surrounding the compressible device for compressing the compressible device around the overlapping portions of the metal pieces, thus providing constant and equal pressure at all points on the overlapping portions of the metal pieces.

  4. The Impact of Teaching Oxy-Fuel Welding on Gas Metal Arc Welding Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sgro, Sergio D.; Field, Dennis W.; Freeman, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Industrial technology programs around the country must be sensitive to the demands of manufacturing and industry as they continue to replace "vocational" curriculum with high-tech alternatives. This article examines whether or not teaching oxyacetylene welding in the industrial technology classroom is required to learn arc welding processes. The…

  5. Hydrogen Assisted Crack in Dissimilar Metal Welds for Subsea Service under Cathodic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Desmond

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are routinely used in the oil and gas industries for structural joining of high strength steels in order to eliminate the need for post weld heat treatment (PWHT) after field welding. There have been reported catastrophic failures in these DMWs, particularly the AISI 8630 steel - Alloy 625 DMW combination, during subsea service while under cathodic protection (CP). This is due to local embrittlement that occurs in susceptible microstructures that are present at the weld fusion boundary region. This type of cracking is known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) and it is influenced by base/filler metal combination, and welding and PWHT procedures. DMWs of two material combinations (8630 steel -- Alloy 625 and F22 steel -- Alloy 625), produced with two welding procedures (BS1 and BS3) in as welded and PWHT conditions were investigated in this study. The main objectives included: 1) evaluation of the effect of materials composition, welding and PWHT procedures on the gradients of composition, microstructure, and properties in the dissimilar transition region and on the susceptibility to HAC; 2) investigation of the influence of microstructure on the HAC failure mechanism and identification of microstructural constituents acting as crack nucleation and propagation sites; 3) assessment of the applicability of two-step PWHT to improve the resistance to HAC in DMWs; 4) establishment of non-failure criterion for the delayed hydrogen cracking test (DHCT) that is applicable for qualification of DMWs for subsea service under cathodic protection (CP).

  6. Real-time sensing and monitoring in robotic gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Gao, J. Q.; Hu, J. K.

    2007-01-01

    A real-time monitoring system is developed for detecting abnormal conditions in robotic gas metal arc welding. The butt-joint test pieces with simulated large gaps are used to intentionally introduce step disturbance of welding conditions. During the welding process, the welding voltage and current signals are sampled and processed on-line to extract the characteristic information reflecting the process quality. After the first statistical processing, it is found that seven statistical parameters (the mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding voltage; the mean, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding current) show variations during the step disturbance. Through the second statistical processing of the means of the welding voltage for subgroups of continuous measurement, the statistical control chart is obtained, and an SPC (statistical process control)-based on-line identifying method is developed. Ten robotic welding experiments are conducted to verify the real-time monitoring system. It is found that the correct identification rates for normal and abnormal welding conditions are 100% and 95%, respectively.

  7. Use of plasma arc welding process to combat hydrogen metallic disbonding of austenitic stainless steel claddings

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, O.A. ); Steklov, O.I.; Alexeev, A.V. )

    1993-11-01

    A separation type crack, metallic disbonding, occurred between austenitic stainless steel weld metal cladding and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo base metal in the hydrodesulfurizing reactor of an oil refining plant. For stainless steel cladding, the submerged arc welding (SAW) process with a strip electrode is usually applied, but the authors experimented with the plasma arc welding (PAW) process with hot wire electrode for the cladding. The metallic disbonding is considered to be attributed to hydrogen accumulation at the transition zone and has been generally studied on a laboratory scale using an autoclave. The authors used a electrolytic hydrogen charging technique for the sake of experimental simplicity and made a comparison with the results for gaseous hydrogen charging. The main conclusions obtained were follows: The PAW stainless steel weld metal cladding is more resistant to metallic disbonding with the PAW process is explained by the desirable microstructure and properties of the first layer of weld metal at the transition zone. Electrolytic hydrogen charging pretty well reproduces the results of autoclave gas phase charging.

  8. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 409 Grade Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Shanmugam, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behavior of the gas metal arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single ‘V’ butt welded joints. Center cracked tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behavior. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  9. Characterization of tool wear and weld optimization in the friction-stir welding of cast aluminum 359+20% SiC metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, G.J.; Murr, L.E

    2004-03-15

    Tool wear for threaded steel pin tools declines with decreasing rotation speed and increasing traverse or weld speeds for the friction-stir welding (FSW) of Al 359+20% SiC metal-matrix composite (MMC). Less than 10% tool wear occurs when the threaded tool erodes to a self-optimized shape resembling a pseudo-hour glass at weld traverse distances in excess of 3 m. There is only a 7% reduction in the SiC mean particle size in the weld zone for self-optimized pin tools with no threads as compared with a 25% variation for threaded tools wearing significantly at the start of welding. The weld zone becomes more homogeneous for efficient welding with self-optimized tools, and there is a reduction in the weld zone grain size due to dynamic recrystallization, which facilitates the solid-state flow. Transmission electron microscopy shows little difference in the dislocation density from the base material to the weld zone, but there is a propensity of dislocation loops in the weld zone. The weld zone is observed to harden by as much as 30%, in contrast to the base material, as a consequence of the recrystallized grain size reduction and the SiC particles distributed therein.

  10. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    N. Jerred; L. Zirker; I. Charit; J. Cole; M. Frary; D. Butt; M. Meyer; K. L. Murty

    2010-10-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400oC has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  11. A two-dimensional thermomechanical simulation of a gas metal arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, A.R.

    1990-08-01

    A low heat input gas metal arc (GMA) weld overlay process is being investigated as a possible means to repair Savannah River nuclear reactor tanks in the event cracks are detected in the reactor walls. Two-dimensional thermomechanical simulations of a GMA welding process were performed using the finite element code ABAQUS to assist in the design of the upcoming weld experiments on helium-charged specimens. The thermal model correlated well with existing test data, i.e., fusion zone depth and thermocouple data. In addition, numerical results revealed that after cool-down the final deformation of the workpiece was qualitatively similar to the shape observed experimentally. Based on these analyses, conservative recommendations were made for the workpiece dimensions, weld pass spacing, and thermomechanical boundary conditions to ensure the experiments would be as representative as possible of welding on the reactor walls. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Welding Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Welding fabrication and welding processes were studied. The following research projects are reported: (1) welding fabrication; (2) residual stresses and distortion in structural weldments in high strength steels; (3) improvement of reliability of welding by in process sensing and control (development of smart welding machines for girth welding of pipes); (4) development of fully automated and integrated welding systems for marine applications; (5) advancement of welding technology; (6) research on metal working by high power laser (7) flux development; (8) heat and fluid flow; (9) mechanical properties developments.

  13. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Zirker; Craig Tyler

    2010-08-01

    Engineers from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have demonstrated an innovative method for seal or pinch welding stainless steel tubing. Sometimes a tube has fuel or contamination that must be contained, or the tube needs to be shortened or cut for handling, and the tube needs to have a guaranteed sealed weld that is both quick and easy. This technique was demonstrated in a laboratory using a resistance welding system with specially designed electrodes to ensure a tube end is seal welded or if a long tube is to be shortened, the severed ends are seal welded. The unique electrodes design is integral to achieving the sealed ends. This process could readily be adapted for robotic--remote handling or for contact handling in a glovebox or hood.

  14. A Comparison of Weld-Repaired and Base Metal for Inconel 718 and CRES 321 at Cryogenic and Room Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Willard, Scott A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted to characterize the performance of Inconel 718 and CRES 321 welds, weld heat-affect-zone and parent metal at room temperature laboratory air and liquid nitrogen (-196oC) environments. The results of this study were required to predict the damage tolerance behavior of proposed orbiter main engine hydrogen fuel liner weld repairs. Experimental results show that the room and cryogenic temperature fatigue crack growth characteristics of both alloys are not significantly degraded by the weld repair process. However, both Inconel 718 and CRES 321 exhibited lower apparent toughness within the weld repair region compared to the parent metal.

  15. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of shielded metal arc-welded dissimilar joints comprising duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Muthupandi, V.; Sivan, V.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Dietzel, W.

    2006-12-01

    This work describes the results of an investigation on a dissimilar weld joint comprising a boiler-grade low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel (DSS). Welds produced by shielded metal arc-welding with two different electrodes (an austenitic and a duplex grade) were examined for their microstructural features and properties. The welds were found to have overmatching mechanical properties. Although the general corrosion resistance of the weld metals was good, their pitting resistance was found to be inferior when compared with the DSS base material.

  16. Chemical composition effect on VVER-1000 RPV weld metal thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B. A.; Chernobaeva, A. A.; Erak, D. Yu; Kuleshova, E. A.; Zhurko, D. A.; Papina, V. B.; Skundin, M. A.; Maltsev, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    Temperature and fast neutron flux simultaneously affect the material of welded joints of reactor pressure vessels under irradiation. Understanding thermal aging effects on the weld metal allows for an explanation of the mechanisms that govern an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the reactor pressure vessel materials under long term irradiation at operation temperature. This paper reports on new results and reassessment of the VVER-1000 weld metal surveillance specimen database performed at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute". The current database of VVER-1000 weld metal thermal aging at 310-320 °C includes 50 transition temperature values with the maximum holding time of 208,896 h. The updated database completed with the information on intergranular fracture shear and phosphorous content in the grain boundaries has allowed us to propose a new mechanism of VVER-1000 weld materials thermal aging at 310-320 °C and develop models of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift for VVER-1000 weld metal during a long-term exposure at 310-320 °C.

  17. Development of an intelligent system for cooling rate and fill control in GMAW. [Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)

    SciTech Connect

    Einerson, C.J.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.; Taylor, P.L. ); Moore, K.L. )

    1992-01-01

    A control strategy for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is developed in which the welding system detects certain existing conditions and adjusts the process in accordance to pre-specified rules. This strategy is used to control the reinforcement and weld bead centerline cooling rate during welding. Relationships between heat and mass transfer rates to the base metal and the required electrode speed and welding speed for specific open circuit voltages are taught to a artificial neural network. Control rules are programmed into a fuzzy logic system. TRADITOINAL CONTROL OF THE GMAW PROCESS is based on the use of explicit welding procedures detailing allowable parameter ranges on a pass by pass basis for a given weld. The present work is an exploration of a completely different approach to welding control. In this work the objectives are to produce welds having desired weld bead reinforcements while maintaining the weld bead centerline cooling rate at preselected values. The need for this specific control is related to fabrication requirements for specific types of pressure vessels. The control strategy involves measuring weld joint transverse cross-sectional area ahead of the welding torch and the weld bead centerline cooling rate behind the weld pool, both by means of video (2), calculating the required process parameters necessary to obtain the needed heat and mass transfer rates (in appropriate dimensions) by means of an artificial neural network, and controlling the heat transfer rate by means of a fuzzy logic controller (3). The result is a welding machine that senses the welding conditions and responds to those conditions on the basis of logical rules, as opposed to producing a weld based on a specific procedure.

  18. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  19. Rapid detection of transition metals in welding fumes using paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Cate, David M; Nanthasurasak, Pavisara; Riwkulkajorn, Pornpak; L'Orange, Christian; Henry, Charles S; Volckens, John

    2014-05-01

    Metals in particulate matter (PM) are considered a driving factor for many pathologies. Despite the hazards associated with particulate metals, personal exposures for at-risk workers are rarely assessed due to the cost and effort associated with monitoring. As a result, routine exposure assessments are performed for only a small fraction of the exposed workforce. The objective of this research was to evaluate a relatively new technology, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs), for measuring the metals content in welding fumes. Fumes from three common welding techniques (shielded metal arc, metal inert gas, and tungsten inert gas welding) were sampled in two welding shops. Concentrations of acid-extractable Fe, Cu, Ni, and Cr were measured and independently verified using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Results from the µPAD sensors agreed well with ICP-OES analysis; the two methods gave statistically similar results in >80% of the samples analyzed. Analytical costs for the µPAD technique were ~50 times lower than market-rate costs with ICP-OES. Further, the µPAD method was capable of providing same-day results (as opposed several weeks for ICP laboratory analysis). Results of this work suggest that µPAD sensors are a viable, yet inexpensive alternative to traditional analytic methods for transition metals in welding fume PM. These sensors have potential to enable substantially higher levels of hazard surveillance for a given resource cost, especially in resource-limited environments. PMID:24515892

  20. Rapid Detection of Transition Metals in Welding Fumes Using Paper-Based Analytical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Volckens, John

    2014-01-01

    Metals in particulate matter (PM) are considered a driving factor for many pathologies. Despite the hazards associated with particulate metals, personal exposures for at-risk workers are rarely assessed due to the cost and effort associated with monitoring. As a result, routine exposure assessments are performed for only a small fraction of the exposed workforce. The objective of this research was to evaluate a relatively new technology, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs), for measuring the metals content in welding fumes. Fumes from three common welding techniques (shielded metal arc, metal inert gas, and tungsten inert gas welding) were sampled in two welding shops. Concentrations of acid-extractable Fe, Cu, Ni, and Cr were measured and independently verified using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Results from the µPAD sensors agreed well with ICP-OES analysis; the two methods gave statistically similar results in >80% of the samples analyzed. Analytical costs for the µPAD technique were ~50 times lower than market-rate costs with ICP-OES. Further, the µPAD method was capable of providing same-day results (as opposed several weeks for ICP laboratory analysis). Results of this work suggest that µPAD sensors are a viable, yet inexpensive alternative to traditional analytic methods for transition metals in welding fume PM. These sensors have potential to enable substantially higher levels of hazard surveillance for a given resource cost, especially in resource-limited environments. PMID:24515892

  1. Microstructure of Ti6Al4V weld metal and simulated HAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Kivineva, E.; Hannerz, N.E.; Sjoeberg, R.

    1995-12-31

    TIG and plasma arc welding were performed on 3.2 mm thick plate of Ti6Al4V (ASTM Grade 5). The welds were studied for mechanical properties in the as welded as well as in the post weld heat treated condition. Plasma arc welding was conducted with and without external copper cooling devices. It appears that TIG-welding resulted in rather large {beta} grains the mean size being 830 {micro}m depending probably on the excessive heat input involved in the process. The smallest weld metal {beta}-grain size 375 {micro}m was obtained by plasma arc with water-cooled copper blocks. The heat affected zone grain size was studied by Gleeble simulation with peak temperature 1,400 C, The cooling time {Delta}t8/5 was permutated from 10 to 300 sec. The slowest cooling time {Delta}t8/5=300 see resulted in a {beta} grain size of 515 {micro}m. At the more rapid cooling times a martensitic structure in the large {beta} grains was obtained, but a Widmanstaetten substructure is also formed at slower cooling. Moreover grain boundary {alpha} is precipitated at the slowest cooling times {Delta}t8/5=300 sec. To obtain the desired toughness properties it appears that post weld heat treatment would be necessary unless a very low heat input is employed.

  2. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  3. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  4. Irradiation effects on base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Alamo, A.; Seran, J.L.; Rabouille, O.; Brachet, J.C.; Maillard, A.; Touron, H.; Royer, J.

    1996-12-31

    9Cr martensitic steels are being developed for core components (wrapper tubes) of fast breeder reactors as well as for fusion reactor structures. Here, the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior of base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel have been studied. Two types of weldments have been produced by TIG and electron beam techniques. Half of samples have been post-weld heat treated to produce a stress-relieved structure. The irradiation has been conducted in the Phenix reactor to doses of 63--65 dpa in the temperature range 450--459 C. The characterization of the welds, before and after irradiation, includes metallographic observations, hardness measurements, tensile and Charpy tests. It is shown that the mechanical properties of the welds after irradiation are in general similar to the characteristics obtained on the base metal, which is little affected by neutron irradiation.

  5. In-Situ Measurement of Metal Drop Temperature in GMA Short-Circuiting Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yoshinori; Onda, Masahiko; Nagaki, Hayato; Ohji, Takayoshi

    Temperatures of metal drop in GMA short-circuiting welding process were in-situ measured using newly developed instrument designed on the basis of two-color pyrometry, which consisted of optical lenses, interference filters for two colors and two sets of high sensitive CCD cameras with fast shutter. In order to avoid radiation from arc plasma, temperature measurement was carried out immediately after molten drop at electrode wire tip was contacted with weld pool and arc was extinguished. Welding current in arcing period was adjusted from 50 A to 250 A using experimental power source in Ar + 20%CO2 mixture gas shielded GMA welding with mild steel wire of 1.2 mm in diameter. It is shown through in-situ measurement that average temperature of metal drop ranges from 2200 K to 2700 K, depending on level and period of arc current governing electrode wire melting.

  6. Direct welding of glass and metal by 1  kHz femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua

    2015-10-20

    In the welding process between similar or dissimilar materials, inserting an intermediate layer and pressure assistance are usually thought to be necessary. In this paper, the direct welding between alumina-silicate glass and metal (aluminum, copper, and steel), under exposure from 1 kHz femtosecond laser pulses without any auxiliary processes, is demonstrated. The micron/nanometer-sized metal particles induced by laser ablation were considered to act as the adhesive in the welding process. The welding parameters were optimized by varying the pulse energy and the translation velocity of the sample. The shear joining strength characterized by a shear force testing equipment was as high as 2.34 MPa. This direct bonding technology has potential for applications in medical devices, sensors, and photovoltaic devices. PMID:26560385

  7. Weld metal hydrogen cracking behavior, toughness, and microstructure in 9% Cr 1% Mo steels

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, A.M. Panton-Kent, R.; Gooch, T.G.

    1994-12-31

    The use of 9%Cr 1%Mo steels, within various industries is increasing. The modification of the standard composition by the addition of V, Nb, and N improves the high temperature strength and creep properties. Development of welding conditions is dominated by the avoidance of hydrogen cracking while ensuring adequate mechanical properties and minimizing subcritical HAZ softening. This study was designed to evaluate compositional effects on MMA and electron beam (EB) weld metal properties and compare the weld metal hydrogen cracking sensitivity of the modified and standard grades. In comparing the hydrogen cracking sensitivity of the 9% Cr 1%Mo steels, the effect of welding and PWHT conditions on {delta}-ferrite development and SCHAZ softening were studied. An EB weld was incorporated in this study and assessment made of the CTOD behavior and microstructural development. Standard and modified grades exhibited similar hydrogen cracking sensitivity. The {delta}-ferrite content depended on welding conditions and composition. The ferrite factor gave a better indication of final ferrite content than Cr-equivalent. Softening in the SCHAZ was minimized by decreasing arc energy and preheat. The study indicates that modified grades can be welded using the procedures for standard grades. Charpy toughness was unaffected by 0.02{emdash}0.09%Nb or the PWHT schedules employed. increased Nb reduced the fracture toughness following extended PWHT.

  8. Microstructural Evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT Weld Metal for Clad Carbon Steel Linepipe Joints: A Comparator Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltin, Charles A.; Galloway, Alexander M.; Mweemba, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Microstructural evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT filler metals, used for the fusion welding of clad carbon steel linepipe, has been investigated and compared. The effects of iron dilution from the linepipe parent material on the elemental segregation potential of the filler metal chemistry have been considered. The results obtained provide significant evidence to support the view that, in Inconel 686CPT weld metal, the segregation of tungsten is a function of the level of iron dilution from the parent material. The data presented indicate that the incoherent phase precipitated in the Inconel 686CPT weld metal has a morphology that is dependent on tungsten enrichment and, therefore, iron dilution. Furthermore, in the same weld metal, a continuous network of finer precipitates was observed. The Charpy impact toughness of each filler metal was evaluated, and the results highlighted the superior impact toughness of the Inconel 625 weld metal over that of Inconel 686CPT.

  9. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  10. Development of filler metals for welding of iron aluminide alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, G.M.; Scott, J.L.

    1995-06-29

    Attempts were made to develop a coating formulation for shielded metal arc (SMA) welding electrodes for iron aluminide alloys. Core wires of various compositions were produced by aspiration casting at ORNL and coating formulation development was conducted by Devasco, Inc. It was found that, except for weld deposit compositions containing less than 10 weight % aluminum, all weld deposits exhibited extensive cold cracking and/or porosity. It was concluded that current coating formulation technology limits successful iron aluminide deposits to less than 10 weight % aluminum.

  11. Study of the possibility of using solar radiant energy for welding and brazing metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvernyakov, V. S.; Frantsevich, I. N.; Pasichnyy, V. V.; Shiganov, N. A.; Korunov, Y. I.; Kasich-Pilipenko, I. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The solar spectrum at the surface of the earth is analyzed. A facility for creating concentrated solar radiant energy flux is described, and data on its energetic capabilities are presented. The technology of solar welding by the fusion technique and joining by high-temperature brazing is examined. The use of concentrated solar radiant energy for welding and brazing metals and alloys is shown. The results of mechanical tests and microscopic and macroscopic studies are presented.

  12. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-26

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld. 5 figs.

  13. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld.

  14. Micro-hardness measurement and micro-structure characterization of T91 weld metal irradiated in SINQ Target-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X.; Dai, Y.

    2005-08-01

    This work is concerned with the micro-structure and mechanical behavior of T91 weld metal before and after an irradiation in SINQ Target-3. Optical and TEM observations and micro-hardness tests were performed to identify the irradiation effects. Before irradiation, the micro-structure of the T91 weld metals consisted of mainly tempered martensite and retained ferrite area. Precipitates in the weld metal are predominately M 7C 3 carbides, and few M 23C 6 particles are observed along the martensitic lath and primary austenite grain boundaries. The dislocation density in the weld metal is much higher than that in the base metal. The main feature of the irradiated micro-structure of the weld metal are small defects (black dots) and faulted Frank interstitial loops at lower irradiation temperature and a high density of helium bubbles appear at higher irradiation dose and temperature. The results are comparable with those of the T91 base metal irradiated under the same condition in the previous work. The weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ) show much higher hardness than the base metal before irradiation, showing that no post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) has been applied to the weld metal. Irradiation hardening increases with irradiation dose below 10 dpa, but decreases at higher dose, which might be related to the transformation of M 7C 3 precipitates to M 23C 6 at higher irradiation temperatures.

  15. Evolution of weld metal microstructure in shielded metal arc welding of X70 HSLA steel with cellulosic electrodes: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomashchi, Reza Costin, Walter; Kurji, Rahim

    2015-09-15

    The microstructure of weld joint in X70 line pipe steel resulted from shielded metal arc welding with E6010 cellulosic electrodes is characterized using optical and electron microscopy. A range of ferritic morphologies have been identified ranging from polygonal inter- and intra-prior austenite grains allotriomorphic, idiomorphic ferrites to Widmanstätten, acicular and bainitic ferrites. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis using Image Quality (IQ) and Inverse Pole Figure (IPF) maps through superimposition of IQ and IPF maps and measurement of percentages of high and low angle grain boundaries was identified to assist in differentiation of acicular ferrite from Widmanstätten and bainitic ferrite morphologies. In addition two types of pearlitic structures were identified. There was no martensite detected in this weld structure. The morphology, size and chemistry of non-metallic inclusions are also discussed briefly. - Highlights: • Application of EBSD reveals orientation relationships in a range of phases for shielded metal arc welding of HSLA steel. • Nucleation sites of various ferrite morphologies identified • Formation of upper and lower bainite and their morphologies.

  16. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  17. Numerical Simulation on Joining of Ceramics with Metal by Friction Welding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesudoss Hynes, N. Rajesh; Nagaraj, P.; Basil, S. Joshua

    The joining of ceramic and metals can be done by different techniques such as ultrasonic joining, brazing, transient liquid phase diffusion bonding, and friction welding. Friction Welding is a solid state joining process that generates heat through mechanical friction between a moving workpiece and a stationary component. In this article, numerical simulation on thermal analysis of friction welded ceramic/metal joint has been carried out by using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software. The finite element analysis helps in better understanding of the friction welding process of joining ceramics with metals and it is important to calculate temperature and stress fields during the welding process. Based on the obtained temperature distribution the graphs were plotted between the lengths of the joint corresponding to the temperatures. To increase the wettability, aluminium sheet was used as an interlayer. Hence, numerical simulation of friction welding process is done by varying the interlayer sheet thickness. Transient thermal analysis had been carried out for each cases and temperature distribution was studied. From the simulation studies, it is found that the increase in interlayer thickness reduces the heat affected zone and eventually improves the joint efficiency of alumina/aluminum alloy joints.

  18. Room-Temperature Chemical Welding and Sintering of Metallic Nanostructures by Capillary Condensation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Soo; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2016-06-01

    Room-temperature welding and sintering of metal nanostructures, nanoparticles and nanowires, by capillary condensation of chemical vapors have successfully been demonstrated. Nanoscale gaps or capillaries that are abundant in layers of metal nanostructures have been found to be the preferred sites for the condensation of chemically oxidizing vapor, H2O2 in this work. The partial dissolution and resolidification at such nanogaps completes the welding/sintering of metal nanostructures within ∼10 min at room-temperature, while other parts of nanostructures remain almost intact due to negligible amount of condensation on there. The welded networks of Ag nanowires have shown much improved performances, such as high electrical conductivity, mechanical flexibility, optical transparency, and chemical stability. Chemically sintered layers of metal nanoparticles, such as Ag, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Co, have also shown orders of magnitude increase in electrical conductivity and improved environmental stability, compared to nontreated ones. Pertinent mechanisms involved in the chemical welding/sintering process have been discussed. Room-temperature welding and sintering of metal nanostructures demonstrated here may find widespread application in diverse fields, such as displays, deformable electronics, wearable heaters, and so forth. PMID:27159354

  19. Effects of current on droplet generation and arc plasma in gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Tsai, H. L.

    2006-09-01

    In gas metal arc welding (GMAW), a technology using pulsed currents has been employed to achieve the one-droplet-per-pulse (ODPP) metal transfer mode with the advantages of low average currents, a stable and controllable droplet generation, and reduced spatter. In this paper, a comprehensive model was developed to study the effects of different current profiles on the droplet formation, plasma generation, metal transfer, and weld pool dynamics in GMAW. Five types of welding currents were studied, including two constant currents and three wave form currents. In each type, the transient temperature and velocity distributions of the arc plasma and the molten metal, and the shapes of the droplet and the weld pool were calculated. The results showed that a higher current generates smaller droplets, higher droplet frequency, and higher electromagnetic force that becomes the dominant factor detaching the droplet from the electrode tip. The model has demonstrated that a stable ODPP metal transfer mode can be achieved by choosing a current with proper wave form for given welding conditions.

  20. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  1. Influencing the arc and the mechanical properties of the weld metal in GMA-welding processes by additive elements on the wire electrode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesling, V.; Schram, A.; Müller, T.; Treutler, K.

    2016-03-01

    Under the premise of an increasing scarcity of raw materials and increasing demands on construction materials, the mechanical properties of steels and its joints are gaining highly important. In particular high- and highest-strength steels are getting in the focus of the research and the manufacturing industry. To the same extent, the requirements for filler metals are increasing as well. At present, these low-alloy materials are protected by a copper coating (<1μm) against corrosion. In addition, the coating realizes a good ohmic contact and good sliding properties between the welding machine and the wire during the welding process. By exchanging the copper with other elements it should be possible to change the mechanical properties of the weld metal and the arc stability during gas metal arc welding processes and keep the basic functions of the coating nearly untouched. On a laboratory scale solid wire electrodes with coatings of various elements and compounds such as titanium oxide were made and processed with a Gas Metal Arc Welding process. During the processing a different process behavior between the wire electrodes, coated and original, could be observed. The influences ranges from greater/shorter arc-length over increasing/decreasing droplets to larger/smaller arc foot point. Furthermore, the weld metal of the coated electrodes has significantly different mechanical and technological characteristics as the weld metal from the copper coated ground wire. The yield strength and tensile strength can be increased by up to 50%. In addition, the chemical composition of the weld metal was influenced by the application of coatings with layer thicknesses to 15 microns in the lower percentage range (up to about 3%). Another effect of the coating is a modified penetration. The normally occurring “argon finger” can be suppressed or enhanced by the choice of the coating. With the help of the presented studies it will be shown that Gas Metal Arc Welding processes

  2. Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, A.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Montgomery, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    A conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) butt-joining process has been modeled using a two-way fully coupled, transient, thermal-mechanical finite-element procedure. To achieve two-way thermal-mechanical coupling, the work of plastic deformation resulting from potentially high thermal stresses is allowed to be dissipated in the form of heat, and the mechanical material model of the workpiece and the weld is made temperature dependent. Heat losses from the deposited filler-metal are accounted for by considering conduction to the adjoining workpieces as well as natural convection and radiation to the surroundings. The newly constructed GMAW process model is then applied, in conjunction with the basic material physical-metallurgy, to a prototypical high-hardness armor martensitic steel (MIL A46100). The main outcome of this procedure is the prediction of the spatial distribution of various crystalline phases within the weld and the heat-affected zone regions, as a function of the GMAW process parameters. The newly developed GMAW process model is validated by comparing its predictions with available open-literature experimental and computational data.

  3. Modelling of gas-metal arc welding taking into account metal vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnick, M.; Fuessel, U.; Hertel, M.; Haessler, M.; Spille-Kohoff, A.; Murphy, A. B.

    2010-11-01

    The most advanced numerical models of gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) neglect vaporization of metal, and assume an argon atmosphere for the arc region, as is also common practice for models of gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW). These models predict temperatures above 20 000 K and a temperature distribution similar to GTAW arcs. However, spectroscopic temperature measurements in GMAW arcs demonstrate much lower arc temperatures. In contrast to measurements of GTAW arcs, they have shown the presence of a central local minimum of the radial temperature distribution. This paper presents a GMAW model that takes into account metal vapour and that is able to predict the local central minimum in the radial distributions of temperature and electric current density. The influence of different values for the net radiative emission coefficient of iron vapour, which vary by up to a factor of hundred, is examined. It is shown that these net emission coefficients cause differences in the magnitudes, but not in the overall trends, of the radial distribution of temperature and current density. Further, the influence of the metal vaporization rate is investigated. We present evidence that, for higher vaporization rates, the central flow velocity inside the arc is decreased and can even change direction so that it is directed from the workpiece towards the wire, although the outer plasma flow is still directed towards the workpiece. In support of this thesis, we have attempted to reproduce the measurements of Zielińska et al for spray-transfer mode GMAW numerically, and have obtained reasonable agreement.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Resistance Spot Welding for Sheet Metals Used in Automotive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Min

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) is used for the fabrication of sheet metal assemblies. The major advantages of spot welding are high speed and adaptability for automation in high-volume and/or high-rate production. Despite these advantages, resistance spot welding suffers from a major problem of inconsistent quality from weld to weld. This problem results from both the complexity of the basic process as well as from numerous sources of variability, noise, and errors. Any or all of these complicate automation, reduce weld quality, demand over welding and drive up production costs. For this reason, ensuring weld quality has been and remains a major challenge and goal. The objective of this research is to explore the phenomenon of how changes in a controllable parameter of % heat input affect a measurable output signal indicative of strength and weld quality for various sheet steels used in the automotive industry. The approach of this research is to create a relationship between a key process input variable and the key process output of a quality weld. The input parameter chosen is % heat input, as this directly effects the size and strength of the resulting weld. The output chosen is electrode displacement, as this has been shown to accurately reflect the formation and growth of a weld nugget. A series of experiments was conducted to explore how changes of % heat input and process variations affect the electrode displacement curve for various sheet steels used in the automotive industry. Experimental results show that the electrode displacement increased when higher % heat input was applied. Weld nugget starts to grow when electrode velocity cube changes from positive to negative. Characteristic electrode displacement curves were developed for process variations. A poor part fit-up condition shifted the electrode displacement curve to the right as a result of a smaller weld nugget being formed. Worn electrode lowers the electrode displacement curve. For bare steel

  5. Microstructural Characterization and Mechanical Properties Analysis of Weld Metals with Two Ni Contents During Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Da-yong; Han, Xiu-lin; Tian, Hong-tao; Liao, Bo; Xiao, Fu-ren

    2015-05-01

    This study designed post-weld heat treatments, including reheating and tempering, associated with hot bending to investigate the microstructures, toughness, and hardness of two weld metals with different Ni contents (<1 wt pct level). The results indicated that a high Ni content decreased the ferrite transformation temperature and increased the proportion of acicular ferrite (AF). Furthermore, a high Ni content promoted the martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent formation after reheating. The promotion of the M/A formation increased the number of cementite particles, and accelerated cementite coarsening during tempering. The large-angle grain boundary density from the AF improved the toughness despite the negative effect of cementite. The strengthening contributions were calculated, and the grain refinement was the greatest. The high Ni content decreased the effective grain size with a 2 deg tolerance angle, thus enhancing the grain refinement contribution.

  6. Effects of the laser beam superficial heat treatment on the gas Tungsten arc Ti-6al-4v welded metal microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiculescu, I.; Dontu, Octavian; Geanta, V.; Ganatsios, S.

    2008-03-01

    The microstructure of the weld and the extent to which it is different from the thermo-mechanically processed base material is strongly influenced by the thermal cycle of welding. The mechanical properties of composite weld structures in titanium alloys depend on structural characteristics of each region (weld, base material and heat affected area), influenced by the specific thermal cycle imposed during welding and the subsequent post-weld heat treatment. In order to improve the as-welded metal toughness and ductility, the welded metal was subjected to various post weld laser heat treatments, above and below beta transus temperature in a shielding atmosphere of pure argon. Standard micro-hardness measurements and tensile strength techniques showed higher mechanical properties of the heat treated samples in different conditions with respect to the base metal. Metallographic investigations attribute this to the formation of α'phases in heat treated material, especially in the weld metal.

  7. Toenail metal concentration as a biomarker of occupational welding fume exposure

    PubMed Central

    Grashow, Rachel; Zhang, Jinming; Fang, Shona C.; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Christiani, David C.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    In populations exposed to heavy metals, there are few biomarkers that capture intermediate exposure windows. We sought to determine the correlation between toenail metal concentrations and prior 12 month work activity in welders with variable, metal-rich, welding fume exposures. Forty-eight participants, recruited through a local union, provided 69 sets of toenail clippings. Union-supplied and worker verified personal work histories were used to quantify hours welded and respirator use. Toenail samples were digested and analyzed for lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni) and arsenic (As) using ICP-MS. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to examine the correlation between toenail metal concentrations. Using mixed models to account for multiple participation times, we divided hours welded into three-month intervals and examined how weld hours correlated with log-transformed toenail Pb, Mn, Cd, Ni and As concentrations. Highest concentrations were found for Ni, followed by Mn, Pb and As, and Cd. All of the metals were significantly correlated with one another (rho range=0.28–0.51), with the exception of Ni and As (rho=0.20, p=0.17). Using mixed models adjusted for age, respirator use, smoking status and BMI, we found that Mn was associated with weld hours 7–9 months prior to clipping (p = 0.003), Pb was associated with weld hours 10–12 months prior to clipping (p=0.03) and over the entire year (p=0.04). Cd was associated with weld hours 10–12 months prior to clipping (p=0.05), and also with the previous year’s total hours welded (p=0.02). The association between Ni and weld hours 7–9 months prior to clipping approached significance (p=0.06). Toenail metal concentrations were not associated with the long-term exposure metric, years as a welder. Results suggest Mn, Pb, and Cd may have particular windows of relevant exposure that reflect work activity. In a population with variable exposure, toenails may serve as useful biomarkers for

  8. Toenail metal concentration as a biomarker of occupational welding fume exposure.

    PubMed

    Grashow, Rachel; Zhang, Jinming; Fang, Shona C; Weisskopf, Marc G; Christiani, David C; Cavallari, Jennifer M

    2014-01-01

    In populations exposed to heavy metals, there are few biomarkers that capture intermediate exposure windows. We sought to determine the correlation between toenail metal concentrations and prior 12-month work activity in welders with variable, metal-rich, welding fume exposures. Forty-eight participants, recruited through a local union, provided 69 sets of toenail clippings. Union-supplied and worker-verified personal work histories were used to quantify hours welded and respirator use. Toenail samples were digested and analyzed for lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), and arsenic (As) using ICP-MS. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to examine the correlation between toenail metal concentrations. Using mixed models to account for multiple participation times, we divided hours welded into three-month intervals and examined how weld hours correlated with log-transformed toenail Pb, Mn, Cd, Ni, and As concentrations. Highest concentrations were found for Ni, followed by Mn, Pb and As, and Cd. All the metals were significantly correlated with one another (rho range = 0.28-0.51), with the exception of Ni and As (rho = 0.20, p = 0.17). Using mixed models adjusted for age, respirator use, smoking status, and BMI, we found that Mn was associated with weld hours 7-9 months prior to clipping (p = 0.003), Pb was associated with weld hours 10-12 months prior to clipping (p = 0.03) and over the entire year (p = 0.04). Cd was associated with weld hours 10-12 months prior to clipping (p = 0.05), and also with the previous year's total hours welded (p = 0.02). The association between Ni and weld hours 7-9 months prior to clipping approached significance (p = 0.06). Toenail metal concentrations were not associated with the long-term exposure metric, years as a welder. Results suggest Mn, Pb, and Cd may have particular windows of relevant exposure that reflect work activity. In a population with variable exposure, toenails may serve as useful biomarkers

  9. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  10. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  11. Explosive Welding of Aluminum, Titanium and Zirconium to Copper Sheet Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegazy, A. A.; Mote, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The main material properties affecting the explosive weldability of a certain metal combination are the yield strength, the ductility, the density and the sonic velocity of the two metals. Successful welding of the metal combination depends mainly on the correct choice of the explosive welding parameters; i.e., the stand off distance, the weight of the explosive charge relative to the weight of the flyer plate and the detonation velocity of the explosive. Based on the measured and the handbook values of the properties of interest, the explosive welding parameters were calculated and the arrangements for the explosive welding of the Al alloy 6061-T6, titanium and zirconium to OFHC copper were determined. The relatively small sheet metal thickness (1/8") and the fact that the thickness of the explosive layer must exceed a certain minimum value were considered during the determination of the explosive welding conditions. The results of the metallographic investigations and the measurements of the shear strength at the interface demonstrate the usefulness of these calculations to minimize the number of experimental trials.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of weld metals 182, 72, and 308L

    SciTech Connect

    Sarver, J.M. . Research and Development Div.)

    1992-08-01

    A laboratory test program was conducted to compare the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of three weld metals in two boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. Tests were performed on compact tension specimens produced from Alloy 316L plates welded with weld metal 182, 308L, or 72. The specimens were notched, side-grooved, and precracked such that all crack growth would occur in weld metal. The specimens were notched to four different depths to allow several stress intensities to be studied at one time. Daisy-chained strings of specimens were loaded via the internal autoclave pressure. Tests were performed in a normal operating BWR environment and a BWR environment faulted with sulfate and oxygen. Test temperature was 550{degrees}F and test pressures ranged from 1200 to 2900 psi. Due to the specimen loading arrangement, varying the autoclave pressure changed the stress intensity on the specimens. Crack growth was monitored using a computer-automated potential drop (PD) system. A computer program was written which sequentially recorded PD and reference PD data, and calculated crack lengths and stress intensities for all the specimen. The crack growth rate was calculated for each specimen after every exposure. Plots of da/dt versusK were constructed for each weld metal in both environments. Following the test exposure, all the specimens were fractured and the fracture faces were examined. The visual examination results were then comparedto the PD-calculated crack lengths and stress intensities.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of weld metals 182, 72, and 308L. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sarver, J.M.

    1992-08-01

    A laboratory test program was conducted to compare the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of three weld metals in two boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. Tests were performed on compact tension specimens produced from Alloy 316L plates welded with weld metal 182, 308L, or 72. The specimens were notched, side-grooved, and precracked such that all crack growth would occur in weld metal. The specimens were notched to four different depths to allow several stress intensities to be studied at one time. Daisy-chained strings of specimens were loaded via the internal autoclave pressure. Tests were performed in a normal operating BWR environment and a BWR environment faulted with sulfate and oxygen. Test temperature was 550{degrees}F and test pressures ranged from 1200 to 2900 psi. Due to the specimen loading arrangement, varying the autoclave pressure changed the stress intensity on the specimens. Crack growth was monitored using a computer-automated potential drop (PD) system. A computer program was written which sequentially recorded PD and reference PD data, and calculated crack lengths and stress intensities for all the specimen. The crack growth rate was calculated for each specimen after every exposure. Plots of da/dt versusK were constructed for each weld metal in both environments. Following the test exposure, all the specimens were fractured and the fracture faces were examined. The visual examination results were then comparedto the PD-calculated crack lengths and stress intensities.

  14. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding

    PubMed Central

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10–20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  15. Study of gas tungsten arc welding procedures for tantalum alloy T-111 (Ta-8 W-2Hf) plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. E.; Kesterson, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Methods of eliminating or reducing underbread cracking in multipass GTA welds in thick T-111 plate were studied. Single V butt welds prepared using experimental filler metal compositions and standard weld procedures resulted in only moderate success in reducing underbread cracking. Subsequent procedural changes incorporating manual welding, slower weld speeds, and three or fewer fill passes resulted in crack-free single V welds only when the filler metal was free of hafnium. The double V joint design with successive fill passes on opposite sides of the joint produced excellent welds. The quality of each weld was determined metallographically since the cracking, when present, was very slight and undetectable using standard NDT techniques. Tensile and bend tests were performed on selected weldments. The inherent filler metal strength and the joint geometry determined the strength of the weldment. Hardness and electron beam microprobe traverses were made on selected specimens with the result that significant filler metal-base metal dilution as well as hafnium segregation was detected. A tentative explanation of T-111 plate underbread cracking is presented based on the intrinsic effects of hafnium in the weldment.

  16. Metal nanoparticles and IR laser applications in medicine for biotissue ablation and welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalayan, A. A.; Israelyan, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biotissue by using metal and hybrid metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. A nanosecond YAG:Nd laser of wavelength 1064 nm has been used for synthesis of metal NPs. The Ag, Au, Cu, Ti and Ni, as well as Au–Ag and Au–Cu hybrid metal colloidal NPs were formed in a liquid medium. The diagnostic technique of second harmonic generation (SHG) has been applied to determine the biotissue ablation area after IR laser irradiation. The effectiveness of biotissue ablation was 4–5 times larger in the case of a tissue sample colored with metal NPs than for an uncolored sample. IR laser welding has been demonstrated for deep-located biotissue layers colored by metal NPs.

  17. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  18. Method of beam welding metallic parts together and apparatus for doing same

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Sommer, R.G.

    1985-11-29

    This method provides for temporarily clamping a metallic piece to one side of a metallic plate while leaving the opposite side of the plate exposed, and providing a heat conductive heat sink body configured to engage the adjacent portions of such one side of the plate and the piece at all regions proximate to but not at the interface between these components. The exposed side of such plate is then subjected to an electron welding beam, in exact registry with but opposite to the piece. The electron welding beam is supplied with adequate energy for penetrating through the plate, across the interface, and into the piece, whereby the electron welding beam produces molten material from both the plate and the piece in the region of the interface. The molten material flows into any interstices that may exist in the interface, and upon cooling solidifies to provide a welded joint between the plate and piece, where the interface was, virtually without any interstices. The heat sink material prevents the molten material from extrucing beyond what was the interface, to provide a clean welded joint. The heat sink body also mechanically holds the plate and piece together prior to the actual welding.

  19. Method of beam welding metallic parts together and apparatus for doing same

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Edward F.; Cassidy, Dale A.; Sommer, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    The disclosed method provides for temporarily clamping a metallic piece to one side of a metallic plate while leaving the opposite side of the plate exposed, and providing a heat conductive heat sink body configured to engage the adjacent portions of such one side of the plate and the piece at all regions proximate to but not at the interface between these components. Such exposed side of such plate is then subjected to an electron welding beam, in exact registry with but opposite to the piece. The electron welding beam is supplied with adequate energy for penetrating through the plate, across the interface, and into the piece, whereby the electron welding beam produces molten material from both the plate and the piece in the region of the interface. The molten material flows into any interstices that may exist in the interface, and upon cooling solidifies to provide a welded joint between the plate and piece, where the interface was, virtually without any interstices. The heat sink material prevents the molten material from extruding beyond what was the interface, to provide a clean welded joint. The heat sink body also mechanically holds the plate and piece together prior to the actual welding.

  20. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  1. Design of a vision sensor for monitoring microplasma arc welding of metal bellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenzeng

    2005-02-01

    Metal bellows is one of important components for mechanical sealing. Because the seam is very thin, and its spatial position is strictly limited, it is very difficult to observe the welding seam in order to control the variables of welding in real-time, the welding quality can not usually be guaranteed under the traditional technology. A novel approach is proposed, which is able to provide an amplificatory and clear image of the micro-plasma welding seam observed from better perspective, then output the image to computer and process it so that the variables of welding can be controlled in real-time. A special optical sensor has been designed and realized according to the approach. The principle and main technologies of the sensor is described in detail. The results of applying the system in practice approved the approach is successful. The welding quality of the inner circle of metal bellows, as well as the working condition of welder has been improved after the system is applied.

  2. Influence of Solute Content and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement of Aluminum Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schempp, Philipp; Cross, Carl Edward; Pittner, Andreas; Rethmeier, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Grain refinement provides an important possibility to enhance the mechanical properties ( e.g., strength and ductility) and the weldability (susceptibility to solidification cracking) of aluminum weld metal. In the current study, a filler metal consisting of aluminum base metal and different amounts of commercial grain refiner Al Ti5B1 was produced. The filler metal was then deposited in the base metal and fused in a GTA welding process. Additions of titanium and boron reduced the weld metal mean grain size considerably and resulted in a transition from columnar to equiaxed grain shape ( CET). In commercial pure aluminum (Alloy 1050A), the grain-refining efficiency was higher than that in the Al alloys 6082 and 5083. Different welding and solidification parameters influenced the grain size response only slightly. Furthermore, the observed grain-size reduction was analyzed by means of the undercooling parameter P and the growth restriction parameter Q, which revealed the influence of solute elements and nucleant particles on grain size.

  3. Characterization of the structural details of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Ji, Hui-jun; Liu, Peng; Wang, Peng; Lu, Feng-gui; Gao, Yu-lai

    2014-06-01

    The existence of residual austenite in weld metal plays an important role in determining the properties and dimensional accuracy of welded rotors. An effective corrosive agent and the metallographic etching process were developed to clearly reveal the characteristics of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor. Moreover, the details of the distribution, shape, length, length-to-width ratio, and the content of residual austenite were systematically characterized using the Image-Pro Plus image analysis software. The results revealed that the area fraction of residual austenite was approximately 6.3% in the observed weld seam; the average area, length, and length-to-width ratio of dispersed residual austenite were quantitatively evaluated to be (5.5 ± 0.1) μm2, (5.0 ± 0.1) μm, and (2.2 ± 0.1), respectively. The newly developed corrosive agent and etching method offer an appropriate approach to characterize residual austenite in the weld metal of welded rotors in detail.

  4. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in δ-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Eun Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of δ-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at δ-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within δ-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a Johnson–Mehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: • Precipitation of σ and χ phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) • Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed • Johnson-Mehl–type equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors • Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  5. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken...

  8. Gas Metal Arc /GMA/ weld torch proximity control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkes, E. D.

    1969-01-01

    Adjustable transducer probe, which is attached to a welding torch and maintains a preset touch-to-work distance, accurately follows irregular surfaces, is less sensitive to heat and static interference, and has more positive response because of electro-mechanical control.

  9. Laser welding aluminum without filler metal using continuous wave and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bransch, H.N.

    1994-12-31

    A problem with automotive aluminum tubing applications, particularly for air conditioning heat exchanger assemblies, is terminating the tube reliably and inexpensively. An alternative to upsetting and mchining threads to the tube end is welding a nut (made from a stronger, easily machinable alloy such as Al 5456 or Al 6061) to lengths of tubing (made from a softer alloy such as Al 3003). Laser welding was investigated in order to reduce heat input and increase process speeds copared to brazing or gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Nd:YAG lasers were selected as beam source because of better absorptivity of the wavelength compared to CO{sub 2} lasers and simplified tooling with fiber optic beam delivery. It wa determined that a pulsed Nd:YAG laser produced 1.0 mm penetration at 0.3 m/min with 400 W average power, and 1.0 mm penetration at 0.75 m/min with 1000 W average power, however, an Al 4047 filler metal was required to eliminate solidification cracking. A 1900 W CW laser could weld the Al 3003 tube to the Al 5456 nut without filler metal, however, there was insufficient penetration (0.25 mm) to meet the mechanical and hermeticity requirements. To enhance penetration, but still reduce the tendency for hot cracking, the 1900 W average power beam was sine wave modulated from 400 W to 3600 W at 250 Hz and usd to weld the Al 3003 directly to the Al 5456. These parameters produced 1.2 mm penetration at 1.2 m/min without significant cracking and without using a filler metal. In addition, the welds passed all hermeticity and tensile strength tests. This combination of materials, joint design, and laser parameters produced tube assemblies that passed a leak check (300 psi nitrogen in 60{degrees}C water for 1 min) and tensile (tube breakage 100 mm from the joint, 5.2 kN tensile strength).

  10. Effect of alloying on microstructure and precipitate evolution in ferritic weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Badri Kannan

    The effect of alloying on the microstructure of ferritic weld metal produced with an self-shielded flux cored arc welding process (FCAW-S) has been studied. The welding electrode has a flux core that is intentionally alloyed with strong deoxidizers and denitriding elements such as aluminum, titanium and zirconium in addition to austenite formers such as manganese and nickel. This results in formation of microstructure consisting of carbide free bainite, retained austenite and twinned martensite. The work focuses on characterization of the microstructures and the precipitates formed during solidification and the allotropic phase transformation of the weld metal. Aluminum, manganese and nickel have significant solubility in iron while aluminum, titanium and zirconium have very strong affinity for nitrogen and oxygen. The effect of these alloying elements on the phase transformation and precipitation of oxides and nitrides have been studied with various characterization techniques. In-situ X-ray synchrotron diffraction has been used to characterize the solidification path and the effect of heating and cooling rates on microstructure evolution. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in conjunction with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to study the effect of micro-alloying additions on inclusion evolution. The formation of core-shell structure of oxide/nitride is identified as being key to improvement in toughness of the weld metal. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in combination with Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been employed to study the effect of alloying on austenite to ferrite transformation modes. The prevention of twinned martensite has been identified to be key to improving ductility for achieving high strength weld metal.