Science.gov

Sample records for multiphase nonisothermal flows

  1. TOUGH2: A general-purpose numerical simulator for multiphase nonisothermal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1991-06-01

    Numerical simulators for multiphase fluid and heat flows in permeable media have been under development at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for more than 10 yr. Real geofluids contain noncondensible gases and dissolved solids in addition to water, and the desire to model such `compositional` systems led to the development of a flexible multicomponent, multiphase simulation architecture known as MULKOM. The design of MULKOM was based on the recognition that the mass-and energy-balance equations for multiphase fluid and heat flows in multicomponent systems have the same mathematical form, regardless of the number and nature of fluid components and phases present. Application of MULKOM to different fluid mixtures, such as water and air, or water, oil, and gas, is possible by means of appropriate `equation-of-state` (EOS) modules, which provide all thermophysical and transport parameters of the fluid mixture and the permeable medium as a function of a suitable set of primary thermodynamic variables. Investigations of thermal and hydrologic effects from emplacement of heat-generating nuclear wastes into partially water-saturated formations prompted the development and release of a specialized version of MULKOM for nonisothermal flow of water and air, named TOUGH. TOUGH is an acronym for `transport of unsaturated groundwater and heat` and is also an allusion to the tuff formations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The TOUGH2 code is intended to supersede TOUGH. It offers all the capabilities of TOUGH and includes a considerably more general subset of MULKOM modules with added capabilities. The paper briefly describes the simulation methodology and user features.

  2. Nonisothermal multiphase subsurface transport on parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.J.; Hopkins, P.L.; Shadid, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    We present a numerical method for nonisothermal, multiphase subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media. The mathematical model considers nonisothermal two-phase (liquid/gas) flow, including capillary pressure effects, binary diffusion in the gas phase, conductive, latent, and sensible heat transport. The Galerkin finite element method is used for spatial discretization, and temporal integration is accomplished via a predictor/corrector scheme. Message-passing and domain decomposition techniques are used for implementing a scalable algorithm for distributed memory parallel computers. An illustrative application is shown to demonstrate capabilities and performance.

  3. Formulation and numerical analysis of nonisothermal multiphase flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    A mathematical formulation is presented for describing the transport of air, water and energy through porous media. The development follows a continuum mechanics approach. The theory assumes the existence of various average macroscopic variables which describe the state of the system. Balance equations for mass and energy are formulated in terms of these macroscopic variables. The system is supplemented with constitutive equations relating fluxes to the state variables, and with transport property specifications. Specification of various mixing rules and thermodynamic relations completes the system of equations. A numerical simulation scheme, employing the method of lines, is described for one-dimensional flow. The numerical method is demonstrated on sample problems involving nonisothermal flow of air and water. The implementation is verified by comparison with existing numerical solutions.

  4. TOUGHREACT Version 2.0: A simulator for subsurface reactive transport under non-isothermal multiphase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.; Zhang, G.; Zheng, L.; Pruess, K.

    2010-08-01

    TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media, and was developed by introducing reactive chemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2 V2. The first version of TOUGHREACT was released to the public through the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC) in August 2004. It is among the most frequently requested of ESTSC's codes. The code has been widely used for studies in CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, nuclear waste isolation, geothermal energy development, environmental remediation, and increasingly for petroleum applications. Over the past several years, many new capabilities have been developed, which were incorporated into Version 2 of TOUGHREACT. Major additions and improvements in Version 2 are discussed here, and two application examples are presented: (1) long-term fate of injected CO{sub 2} in a storage reservoir and (2) biogeochemical cycling of metals in mining-impacted lake sediments.

  5. TOUGHREACT Version 2.0: A simulator for subsurface reactive transport under non-isothermal multiphase flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianfu; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Zhang, Guoxiang; Zheng, Liange; Pruess, Karsten

    2011-06-01

    TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media, and was developed by introducing reactive chemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2 V2. The first version of TOUGHREACT was released to the public through the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC) in August 2004. It is among the most frequently requested of ESTSC's codes. The code has been widely used for studies in CO 2 geological sequestration, nuclear waste isolation, geothermal energy development, environmental remediation, and increasingly for petroleum applications. Over the past several years, many new capabilities have been developed, which were incorporated into Version 2 of TOUGHREACT. Major additions and improvements in Version 2 are discussed here, and two application examples are presented: (1) long-term fate of injected CO 2 in a storage reservoir and (2) biogeochemical cycling of metals in mining-impacted lake sediments.

  6. Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM): A general, coupled, nonisothermal multiphase flow, reactive transport, and porous medium alteration simulator, Version 2 user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    DH Bacon; MD White; BP McGrail

    2000-03-07

    The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has been used extensively to produce nuclear materials for the US strategic defense arsenal by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double shell tanks. Liquid waste recovered from the tanks will be pretreated to separate the low-activity fraction from the high-level and transuranic wastes. Vitrification is the leading option for immobilization of these wastes, expected to produce approximately 550,000 metric tons of Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass. This total tonnage, based on nominal Na{sub 2}O oxide loading of 20% by weight, is destined for disposal in a near-surface facility. Before disposal of the immobilized waste can proceed, the DOE must approve a performance assessment, a document that described the impacts, if any, of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. Studies have shown that release rates of radionuclides from the glass waste form by reaction with water determine the impacts of the disposal action more than any other independent parameter. This report describes the latest accomplishments in the development of a computational tool, Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM), Version 2, a general, coupled non-isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport simulator. The underlying mathematics in STORM describe the rate of change of the solute concentrations of pore water in a variably saturated, non-isothermal porous medium, and the alteration of waste forms, packaging materials, backfill, and host rocks.

  7. LDRD final report: Physical simulation of nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.J.; Hopkins, P.L.; Shadid, J.N.

    1997-07-01

    This document reports on the accomplishments of a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project whose objective was to initiate a research program for developing a fundamental understanding of multiphase multicomponent subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media and to develop parallel processing computational tools for numerical simulation of such problems. The main achievement of this project was the successful development of a general-purpose, unstructured grid, multiphase thermal simulator for subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media implemented for use on massively parallel (MP) computers via message-passing and domain decomposition techniques. The numerical platform provides an excellent base for new and continuing project development in areas of current interest to SNL and the DOE complex including, subsurface nuclear waste disposal and cleanup, groundwater availability and contamination studies, fuel-spill transport for accident analysis, and DNAPL transport and remediation.

  8. Coupled modeling of non-isothermal multiphase flow, solutetransport and reactive chemistry in porous and fractured media: 1. ModelDevelopment and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-09-01

    Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposition, waste disposal sites, hydrothermal convection, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here they present a numerical simulation model, TOUGHREACT, which considers non-isothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered. The model can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions is considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, cation exchange, and surface complexation. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. The coupled model employs a sequential iteration approach with reasonable computing efficiency. The development of the governing equations and numerical approach is presented along with the discussion of the model implementation and capabilities. The model is verified for a wide range of subsurface physical and chemical processes. The model is well suited for flow and reactive transport in variably saturated porous and fractured media. In the second of this two-part paper, three applications covering a variety of problems are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model.

  9. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  10. Comprehensive Approaches to Multiphase Flows in Geophysics - Application to nonisothermal, nonhomogenous, unsteady, large-scale, turbulent dusty clouds I. Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic RANS and LES Models

    SciTech Connect

    S. Dartevelle

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this manuscript is to fully derive a geophysical multiphase model able to ''accommodate'' different multiphase turbulence approaches; viz., the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), or hybrid RANSLES. This manuscript is the first part of a larger geophysical multiphase project--lead by LANL--that aims to develop comprehensive modeling tools for large-scale, atmospheric, transient-buoyancy dusty jets and plume (e.g., plinian clouds, nuclear ''mushrooms'', ''supercell'' forest fire plumes) and for boundary-dominated geophysical multiphase gravity currents (e.g., dusty surges, diluted pyroclastic flows, dusty gravity currents in street canyons). LES is a partially deterministic approach constructed on either a spatial- or a temporal-separation between the large and small scales of the flow, whereas RANS is an entirely probabilistic approach constructed on a statistical separation between an ensemble-averaged mean and higher-order statistical moments (the so-called ''fluctuating parts''). Within this specific multiphase context, both turbulence approaches are built up upon the same phasic binary-valued ''function of presence''. This function of presence formally describes the occurrence--or not--of any phase at a given position and time and, therefore, allows to derive the same basic multiphase Navier-Stokes model for either the RANS or the LES frameworks. The only differences between these turbulence frameworks are the closures for the various ''turbulence'' terms involving the unknown variables from the fluctuating (RANS) or from the subgrid (LES) parts. Even though the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic models for RANS and LES have the same set of Partial Differential Equations, the physical interpretations of these PDEs cannot be the same, i.e., RANS models an averaged field, while LES simulates a filtered field. In this manuscript, we also demonstrate that this multiphase model fully fulfills the second law of

  11. T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-08-24

    T2Well/ECO2N is a coupled wellbore and reservoir model for simulating the dynamics of CO2 injection and leakage through wellbores. It can be seen as an extension to standard TOUGH/ECO2N V2.0, and can be applied to situations relevant to geologic CO2 storage involving upward flow (e.g., leakage) and downward flow (injection). The new simulator integrates a wellbore-reservoir system by assigning the wellbore and reservoir to two different sub-domains in which flow is controlled by appropriate physicalmore » laws. In the reservoir, we model flow using a standard multiphase Darcy flow approach. In the wellbores, we use the Drift-Flux Model and related conservation equations for describing transient two-phase non-isothermal wellbore flow of CO2-water mixtures. The mass and thermal energy balance equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with wellbore heat transmission to the surrounding rock handled either semi-analytically or numerically. The momentum balance equation for the flow in the wellbore is solved numerically with a semi-explicit scheme.« less

  12. Modeling non-isothermal multiphase multi-species reactive chemical transport in geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Tianfu Xu; Gerard, F.; Pruess, K.; Brimhall, G.

    1997-07-01

    The assessment of mineral deposits, the analysis of hydrothermal convection systems, the performance of radioactive, urban and industrial waste disposal, the study of groundwater pollution, and the understanding of natural groundwater quality patterns all require modeling tools that can consider both the transport of dissolved species as well as their interactions with solid (or other) phases in geologic media and engineered barriers. Here, a general multi-species reactive transport formulation has been developed, which is applicable to homogeneous and/or heterogeneous reactions that can proceed either subject to local equilibrium conditions or kinetic rates under non-isothermal multiphase flow conditions. Two numerical solution methods, the direct substitution approach (DSA) and sequential iteration approach (SIA) for solving the coupled complex subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes, are described. An efficient sequential iteration approach, which solves transport of solutes and chemical reactions sequentially and iteratively, is proposed for the current reactive chemical transport computer code development. The coupled flow (water, vapor, air and heat) and solute transport equations are also solved sequentially. The existing multiphase flow code TOUGH2 and geochemical code EQ3/6 are used to implement this SIA. The flow chart of the coupled code TOUGH2-EQ3/6, required modifications of the existing codes and additional subroutines needed are presented.

  13. Nonisothermal Two-Phase Porous Flow

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-21

    NORIA is a finite element program that simultaneously solves four nonlinear parabolic, partial differential equations that describe the transport of water, water vapor, air, and energy through partially saturated porous media. NORIA is designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, non-isothermal, unsaturated porous flow problems. Nearly all material properties, such as permeability, can either be set to constant values or defined as functions of the dependent and independent variables by user-supplied subroutines. The gas phase ismore » taken to be ideal. NORIA is intended to solve nonisothermal problems in which large gradients are expected in the gas pressure.« less

  14. Nonisothermal Two-Phase Porous Flow

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-21

    NORIA is a finite element program that simultaneously solves four nonlinear parabolic, partial differential equations that describe the transport of water, water vapor, air, and energy through partially saturated porous media. NORIA is designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, non-isothermal, unsaturated porous flow problems. Nearly all material properties, such as permeability, can either be set to constant values or defined as functions of the dependent and independent variables by user-supplied subroutines. The gas phase is taken to be ideal. NORIA is intended to solve nonisothermal problems in which large gradients are expected in the gas pressure.

  15. Turbulent multiphase flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements and predictions of the structure of several multiphase flows are considered. The properties of dense sprays near the exits of pressure-atomizing injectors and of noncombusting and combusting dilute dispersed flows in round-jet configurations are addressed. It is found that the properties of dense sprays exhibit structure and mixing properties similar to variable-density single-phase flows at high Reynolds numbers within the atomization regime. The degree of development and turbulence levels at the injector exit have a surprisingly large effect on the structure and mixing properties of pressure-atomized sprays, particularly when the phase densities are large. Contemporary stochastic analysis of dilute multiphase flows provides encouraging predictions of turbulent dispersion for a wide variety of jetlike flows, particle-laden jets in gases and liquids, noncondensing and condensing bubbly jets, and nonevaporating, evaporating, and combusting sprays.

  16. EOS7Cm: An improved TOUGH2 module for simulating non-isothermal multiphase and multicomponent flow in CO2-H2S-CH4-brine systems with high pressure, temperature and salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hongwu; Li, Jun; Li, Xiaochun; Jiang, Zhenjiao

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the non-isothermal multiphase and multicomponent flow in a CO2-H2S-CH4-brine system is of critical importance in projects such as CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers, natural gas extraction using CO2 as the displacement fluid, and heat extraction from hot dry rocks using CO2 as the working fluid. Numerical simulation is a necessary tool to evaluate the chemical evolution in these systems. However, an accurate thermodynamic model for CO2-H2S-CH4-brine systems appropriate for high pressure, temperature, and salinity is still lacking. This study establishes the mutual solubility model for CO2-H2S-CH4-brine systems based on the fugacity-activity method for phase equilibrium. The model can predict mutual solubilities for pressure up to 1000 bar for CO2 and CH4, and 200 bar for H2S, for temperature up to 200 °C, and for salinity up to 6 mol/kg water. We incorporated the new model into TOUGH2/EOS7C, forming a new improved module we call EOS7Cm. Compared to the original EOS7C, EOS7Cm considers the effects of H2S and covers a larger range of temperature and salinity. EOS7Cm is employed in five examples, including CO2 injection with and without impurities (CH4 and/or H2S) into deep aquifers, CH4 extraction from aquifers by CO2 injection, and heat extraction from hot dry rock. The results are compared to those from TOUGH2/ECO2N, EOS7C and CMG, agreement among which serves to verify EOS7Cm.

  17. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Sætre, C; Johansen, G A; Tjugum, S A

    2012-07-01

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (Corneliussen et al., 2005). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100 ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. PMID:22341954

  18. Assessment of interaction potential in simulating nonisothermal multiphase systems by means of lattice Boltzmann modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarghami, Ahad; Looije, Niels; Van den Akker, Harry

    2015-08-01

    The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model (PP-LBM) is a very popular model for simulating multiphase systems. In this model, phase separation occurs via a short-range attraction between different phases when the interaction potential term is properly chosen. Therefore, the potential term is expected to play a significant role in the model and to affect the accuracy and the stability of the computations. The original PP-LBM suffers from some drawbacks such as being capable of dealing with low density ratios only, thermodynamic inconsistency, and spurious velocities. In this paper, we aim to analyze the PP-LBM with the view to simulate single-component (non-)isothermal multiphase systems at large density ratios and in spite of the presence of spurious velocities. For this purpose, the performance of two popular potential terms and of various implementation schemes for these potential terms is examined. Furthermore, the effects of different parameters (i.e., equation of state, viscosity, etc.) on the simulations are evaluated, and, finally, recommendations for a proper simulation of (non-)isothermal multiphase systems are presented.

  19. TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal MultiphaseReactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated GeologicMedia

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-12-07

    TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, and pH and Eh. Interactions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here we present two examples to illustrate applicability of the program: (1) injectivity effects of mineral scaling in a fractured geothermal reservoir and (2) CO2 disposal in a deep saline aquifer.

  20. T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

    2011-02-14

    At its most basic level, the injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic CO{sub 2} storage sites involves a system comprising the wellbore and the target reservoir. The wellbore is the only conduit available to emplace CO{sub 2} into reservoirs for long-term storage. At the same time, wellbores in general have been identified as the most likely conduit for CO{sub 2} and brine leakage from geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites, especially those in sedimentary basins with historical hydrocarbon production. We have developed a coupled wellbore and reservoir model for simulating the dynamics of CO{sub 2} injection and leakage through wellbores. The model describes the following processes: (1) upward or downward wellbore flow of CO{sub 2} and variable salinity water with transition from supercritical to gaseous CO{sub 2} including Joule-Thomson cooling, (2) exsolution of CO{sub 2} from the aqueous phase as pressure drops, and (3) cross flow into or interaction with layers of surrounding rock (reservoirs). We use the Drift-Flux Model and related conservation equations for describing transient two-phase non-isothermal wellbore flow of CO{sub 2}-water mixtures under different flow regimes and interacting with surrounding rock. The mass and thermal energy balance equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with wellbore heat transmission to the surrounding rock handled either semi-analytically or numerically. The momentum balance equation for the flow in the wellbore is solved numerically with a semi-explicit scheme. This manual provides instructions for compilation and use of the new model, and presents some example problems to demonstrate its use.

  1. TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive geochemical Transport in Variable Saturated Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-05-24

    Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems, waste disposal sites, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. A comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator, TOUGHREACT, has been developed. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The program can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. Changes in porosity and permeability due to mineral dissolution and precipitation can be considered. Linear adsorption and decay can be included. For the purpose of future extensions, surface complexation by double layer model is coded in the program. Xu and Pruess (1998) developed a first version of a non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport model, TOUGHREACT, by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). Xu, Pruess, and their colleagues have applied the program to a variety of problems such as: (1) supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al, 2001), (2) caprock mineral alteration in a hydrothermal system (Xu and Pruess, 2001a), and (3) mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al, 2003b and 2004a). For modeling the coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes during

  2. A comparison of results obtained with two subsurface non-isothermal multiphase reactive transport simulators, FADES-CORE and TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect

    Juncosa Rivera, Ricardo; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-01-01

    FADES-CORE and TOUGHREACT are codes used to model the non-isothermal multiphase flow with multicomponent reactive transport in porous media. Different flow and reactive transport problems were used to compare the FADES-CORE and TOUGHREACT codes. These problems take into account the different cases of multiphase flow with and without heat transport, conservative transport, and reactive transport. Consistent results were obtained from both codes, which use different numerical methods to solve the differential equations resulting from the various physicochemical processes. Here we present the results obtained from both codes for various cases. Some results are slightly different with minor discrepancies, which have been remedied, so that both codes would be able to reproduce the same processes using the same parameters. One of the discrepancies found is related to the different calculation for thermal conductivity in heat transport, which affects the calculation of the temperatures, as well as the pH of the reaction of calcite dissolution problem modeled. Therefore it is possible to affirm that the pH is highly sensitive to temperature. Generally speaking, the comparison was concluded to be highly satisfactory, leading to the complete verification of the FADES-CORE code. However, we must keep in mind that, as there are no analytical solutions available with which to verify the codes, the TOUGHREACT code has been thoroughly corroborated, given that the only possible way to prove that the code simulation is correct, is by comparing the results obtained with both codes for the identical problems, or to validate the simulation results with actual measured data.

  3. Report on Multiphase Flow Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on a multiphase flow panel. The topics include: 1) Discussion of Priorities; 2) Critical Issues Reduced Gravity Instabilities; 3) Severely Limiting Phase Separation; 4) Severely-Limiting Phase Change; 5) Enhancements; 6) Awareness Instabilities; 7) Awareness; 8) Methods of Resolution; 9) 2008 Space Flight; 10) 2003-2008 Ground-Based Microgravity Facilities; 11) 2003-2008 Other; 12) 2009-2015 Space Flight; 13) 2009-2015 Ground-Based Microgravity Facilities; 14) 2009-2015 Other; and 15) 2016.

  4. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  5. Reactive multiphase flow simulation workshop summary

    SciTech Connect

    VanderHeyden, W.B.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop on computer simulation of reactive multiphase flow was held on May 18 and 19, 1995 in the Computational Testbed for Industry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Approximately 35 to 40 people attended the workshop. This included 21 participants from 12 companies representing the petroleum, chemical, environmental and consumer products industries, two representatives from the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies and several from Los Alamos. The dialog at the meeting suggested that reactive multiphase flow simulation represents an excellent candidate for government/industry/academia collaborative research. A white paper on a potential consortium for reactive multiphase flow with input from workshop participants will be issued separately.

  6. Multiphase Flow Analysis in Hydra-TH

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, Mark A.; Bakosi, Jozsef; Francois, Marianne M.; Lowrie, Robert B.; Nourgaliev, Robert

    2012-06-20

    This talk presents an overview of the multiphase flow efforts with Hydra-TH. The presentation begins with a definition of the requirements and design principles for multiphase flow relevant to CASL-centric problems. A brief survey of existing codes and their solution algorithms is presented before turning the model formulation selected for Hydra-TH. The issues of hyperbolicity and wellposedness are outlined, and a three candidate solution algorithms are discussed. The development status of Hydra-TH for multiphase flow is then presented with a brief summary and discussion of future directions for this work.

  7. Experimental techniques for multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Robert L.

    2008-04-01

    This review discusses experimental techniques that provide an accurate spatial and temporal measurement of the fields used to describe multiphase systems for a wide range of concentrations, velocities, and chemical constituents. Five methods are discussed: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonic pulsed Doppler velocimetry (UPDV), electrical impedance tomography (EIT), x-ray radiography, and neutron radiography. All of the techniques are capable of measuring the distribution of solids in suspensions. The most versatile technique is MRI, which can be used for spatially resolved measurements of concentration, velocity, chemical constituents, and diffusivity. The ability to measure concentration allows for the study of sedimentation and shear-induced migration. One-dimensional and two-dimensional velocity profiles have been measured with suspensions, emulsions, and a range of other complex liquids. Chemical shift MRI can discriminate between different constituents in an emulsion where diffusivity measurements allow the particle size to be determined. UPDV is an alternative technique for velocity measurement. There are some limitations regarding the ability to map complex flow fields as a result of the attenuation of the ultrasonic wave in concentrated systems that have high viscosities or where multiple scattering effects may be present. When combined with measurements of the pressure drop, both MRI and UPDV can provide local values of viscosity in pipe flow. EIT is a low cost means of measuring concentration profiles and has been used to study shear-induced migration in pipe flow. Both x-ray and neutron radiographes are used to image structures in flowing suspensions, but both require highly specialized facilities.

  8. Considerations for developing models of multiphase flow in deformable porous media.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mario J.; Stone, Charles Michael

    2008-09-01

    This document summarizes research and planning for the development of a numerical simulation capability for nonisothermal multiphase, multicomponent transport in heterogeneous deformable porous materials. Particular attention is given to describing a mathematical formulation for flow in deformable media and for numerical techniques for dealing with phase transitions. A development plan is formulated to provide a computational capability motivated by current and future needs in geosystems management for energy security.

  9. Effects of multiphase flow on corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Jepson, W.P.; Chen, H.J.

    1999-11-01

    This paper investigates the inhibition performance of a typical imidazoline based inhibitor under multiphase flow. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were carried out in a 101.6 mm I.D., 15 m long acrylic flow loop using ASTM substitute saltwater and carbon dioxide gas. This flow loop system can generate slug flow, fill pipe flow and other multiphase flow patterns. Effects of different flow conditions on inhibition performance of this typical inhibitor were examined. The system was maintained at a pressure of 0.136 MPa and a temperature of 40 C. EIS measurements for this inhibitor in a Rotating Cylinder Electrode (RCE) system were also conducted. Different equivalent circuit models were used to fit the experiment data for both the RCE and flow loop systems. The high shear stress and turbulence due to the mixing vortex and the bubble impact in multiphase flow can enhance the corrosion or reduce the inhibition performance of inhibitors.

  10. Measurement in multiphase reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    A survey is presented of diagnostic techniques and measurements made in multiphase reacting flows. The special problems encountered by the presence of liquid droplets, soot and solid particles in high temperature chemically reacting turbulent environments are outlined. The principal measurement techniques that have been tested in spray flames are spark photography, laser anemometry, thermocouples and suction probes. Spark photography provides measurement of drop size, drop size distribution, drop velocity, and angle of flight. Photographs are analysed automatically by image analysers. Photographic techniques are reliable, inexpensive and proved. Laser anemometers have been developed for simultaneous measurement of velocity and size of individual particles in sprays under conditions of vaporization and combustion. Particle/gas velocity differentials, particle Reynolds numbers, local drag coefficients and direct measurement of vaporization rates can be made by laser anemometry. Gas temperature in sprays is determined by direct in situ measurement of time constants immediately prior to measurement with compensation and signal analysis by micro-processors. Gas concentration is measured by suction probes and gas phase chromatography. Measurements of particle size, particle velocity, gas temperature, and gas concentration made in airblast and pressure atomised liquid spray flames are presented.

  11. Multiphase flow in wells and pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.P. ); Rohatgi, U.S. )

    1992-01-01

    This conference focuses primarily on multi-phase flow modeling and calculation methods for oil and gas although two papers focus more on the fluid mechanics of fluidized beds. Papers include theoretical, numerical modeling, experimental investigation, and state-of-the-art review aspects of multiphase flow. The theme of the symposium being general, the papers reflect generality of gas-liquid, liquid-solid, and gas solid flows. One paper deals with nuclear reactor safety as it relates to fluid flow through the reactor.

  12. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dannert, D.A.; Horne, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    On of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow, regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low, flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether gas/ oil, gas/water or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. This goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter. It has many advantages besides the ones previously mentioned and is in full in that chapter.

  13. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannert, David A.; Horne, Roland N.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether for gas/oil, gas/water, or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. The goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter.

  14. EDITORIAL: Measurement techniques for multiphase flows Measurement techniques for multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Murai, Yuichi

    2009-11-01

    Research on multiphase flows is very important for industrial applications, including power stations, vehicles, engines, food processing and so on. Multiphase flows originally have nonlinear features because of multiphase systems. The interaction between the phases plays a very interesting role in the flows. The nonlinear interaction causes the multiphase flows to be very complicated. Therefore techniques for measuring multiphase flows are very useful in helping to understand the nonlinear phenomena. The state-of-the-art measurement techniques were presented and discussed at the sixth International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multiphase Flows (ISMTMF2008) held in Okinawa, Japan, on 15-17 December 2008. This special feature of Measurement Science and Technology includes selected papers from ISMTMF2008. Okinawa has a long history as the Ryukyus Kingdom. China, Japan and many western Pacific countries have had cultural and economic exchanges through Okinawa for over 1000 years. Much technical and scientific information was exchanged at the symposium in Okinawa. The proceedings of ISMTMF2008 apart from these special featured papers were published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series vol. 147 (2009). We would like to express special thanks to all the contributors to the symposium and this special feature. This special feature will be a milestone in measurement techniques for multiphase flows.

  15. Turbulent Mixing of Multiphase Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Y.-N.; Ferziger, J.; Ham, F. E.; Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    Thus we conduct numerical simulations of multiphase fluids stirred by two-dimensional turbulence to assess the possibility of self-similar drop size distribution in turbulence. In our turbulence simulations, we also explore the non-diffusive limit, where molecular mobility for the interface is vanishing. Special care is needed to transport the non-diffusive interface. Numerically, we use the particle level set method to evolve the interface. Instead of using the usual methods to calculate the surface tension force from the level set function, we reconstruct the interface based on phase- field modeling, and calculate the continuum surface tension forcing from the reconstructed interface.

  16. MULTIPHASE FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiphase flow and transport of compositionally complex fluids in geologic media is of importance in a number of applied problems which have major social and economic effects. n petroleum reservoir engineering efficient recovery of energy reserves is the principal goal. nfortuna...

  17. Numerical modeling of isothermal and nonisothermal flow in unsaturated fractured rock: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruess, K.; Wang, J. S. Y.

    In recent years, considerable efforts have been made to study the feasibility of geologic disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in deep unsaturated zones in desert environments. The tuff formations at and near the Nevada Test Site, which are under consideration for this purpose, are comprised of fractured-porous material, with hydrologic properties quite different from those encountered in most previous unsaturated flow studies dealing with soils. Another difference from "conventional" unsaturated flow is that in the vicinity of the waste packages, flow is driven by high temperatures (exceeding 100°C) and large temperature gradients. The approximations developed in soil science for weakly nonisothermal flow are not applicable to this situation, and a multiphase description of flow is required, similar to approaches used in modeling of geothermal reservoirs and thermally enhanced oil recovery. The conventional approach to unsaturated flow is applicable, however, to a variety of problems relating to natural (undisturbed) and far-field flow conditions. This paper reviews recent work on numerical modeling of unsaturated flow undertaken in the context of nuclear waste isolation studies. Concepts and applications of broader interest are summarized, including the role of fractures in partially saturated flow, the response of a fractured medium to infiltration events, and a simplified description of flow based on an effective continuum approximation. It is pointed out that the heat released from the waste packages gives rise to multi-phase flow with heat pipe effects, which may have a dramatic impact on thermal and hydrologic conditions. A number of important issues are identified which have not been adequately explored. These include the possibility that liquid water may flow along the rough walls of fractures, the bulk of which is drained. Pre-existing or induced fracture coatings may have significant hydrologic effects. Large-scale moisture movement may be important to

  18. Non-isothermal dispersed phase of particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R. V. R.; Mashayek, F.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we consider, for modelling and simulation, a non-isothermal turbulent flow laden with non-evaporating spherical particles which exchange heat with the surrounding fluid and do not collide with each other during the course of their journey under the influence of the stochastic fluid drag force. In the modelling part of this study, a closed kinetic or probability density function (p.d.f.) equation is derived which describes the distribution of position x, velocity v, and temperature [theta] of the particles in the flow domain at time t. The p.d.f. equation represents the transport of the ensemble-average (denoted by [left angle bracket] [right angle bracket]) phase-space density [left angle bracket]W(x, v, [theta], t)[right angle bracket]. The process of ensemble averaging generates unknown terms, namely the phase-space diffusion current j = [beta]v[left angle bracket]u[prime prime or minute]W[right angle bracket] and the phase-space heat current h = [beta][theta][left angle bracket]t[prime prime or minute]W[right angle bracket], which pose closure problems in the kinetic equation. Here, u[prime prime or minute] and t[prime prime or minute] are the fluctuating parts of the velocity and temperature, respectively, of the fluid in the vicinity of the particle, and [beta]v and [beta][theta] are inverse of the time constants for the particle velocity and temperature, respectively. The closure problems are first solved for the case of homogeneous turbulence with uniform mean velocity and temperature for the fluid phase by using Kraichnan’s Lagrangian history direct interaction (LHDI) approximation method and then the method is generalized to the case of inhomogeneous flows. Another method, which is due to Van Kampen, is used to solve the closure problems, resulting in a closed kinetic equation identical to the equation obtained by the LHDI method. Then, the closed equation is shown to be compatible with the transformation constraint

  19. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  20. Software determines multiphase flow without meters

    SciTech Connect

    Saether, G.

    1998-12-01

    A software package devised by Loke Inc., a member of Norway`s CorrOcean Group, is routinely calculating multiphase flows from North Sea wells by monitoring only static measurements-pressures, temperatures and other available measurement quantities. A collection of three modeling programs, the software can also control the production mix and set choke values from individual wells for optimum reservoir production. Calculated flows have proven so accurate that operators now have no need for conventional flow meters or dedicated test lines. In a tuning step taken during initial well testing, Loke establishes parameters for the mathematical models in the software. Thereafter, static measurements of pressure and temperature in the producing well or manifold are converted by the software to flow. These predictions are then used to command choke valves to regulate flow. A representation of the measurement and control scheme is shown.

  1. TOUGHREACT—A simulation program for non-isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO 2 geological sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2006-03-01

    TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, and pH and Eh. Interactions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic, and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here we present two examples to illustrate applicability of the program. The first example deals with injectivity effects of mineral scaling in a fractured geothermal reservoir. A major concern in the development of hot dry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths. Rock-fluid interactions and associated mineral dissolution and precipitation effects could have a major impact on the long-term performance of these reservoirs. We used recent European studies as a starting point to explore chemically induced effects of fluid circulation in the geothermal systems. We examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance by maintaining or even enhancing injectivity. The second TOUGHREACT application example is related to CO 2 geologic sequestration in a saline aquifer. We performed numerical simulations for a commonly encountered Gulf Coast sediment

  2. Lagrangian particle model for multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ferris, Kim F.; Meakin, Paul

    2009-10-01

    A Lagrangian particle model for multiphase multicomponent fluid flow, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), was developed and used to simulate the flow of an emulsion consisting of bubbles of a non-wetting liquid surrounded by a wetting liquid. In SPH simulations, fluids are represented by sets of particles that are used as discretization points to solve the Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics equations. In the multiphase multicomponent SPH model, a modified van der Waals equation of state is used to close the system of flow equations. The combination of the momentum conservation equation with the van der Waals equation of state results in a particle equation of motion in which the total force acting on each particle consists of many-body repulsive and viscous forces, two-body (particle-particle) attractive forces, and body forces such as gravitational forces. Similarly to molecular dynamics, for a given fluid component the combination of repulsive and attractive forces causes a phase separation. The surface tension at liquid-liquid interfaces is imposed through component dependent attractive forces. The wetting behavior of the fluids is controlled by phase dependent attractive interactions between the fluid particles and stationary particles that represent the solid phase. The dynamics of fluids away from interface is governed by purely hydrodynamic forces. Comparison with analytical solutions for static conditions and relatively simple flows demonstrates the accuracy of the SPH model.

  3. TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2008-09-29

    Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport, and chemical reactions can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. TOUGHREACT has been developed as a comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator to investigate these and other problems. A number of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. TOUGHREACT can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The code can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can take place subject to either local equilibrium or kinetic controls, with coupling to changes in porosity and permeability and capillary pressure in unsaturated systems. Chemical components can also be treated by linear adsorption and radioactive decay. The first version of the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT was developed (Xu and Pruess, 1998) by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). TOUGHREACT was further enhanced with the addition of (1) treatment of mineral-water-gas reactive-transport under boiling conditions, (2) an improved HKF activity model for aqueous species, (3) gas species diffusion coefficients calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular properties, (4) mineral reactive surface area formulations for fractured

  4. Modeling isothermal and non-isothermal flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni Languri, Ehsan

    2011-12-01

    solutions obtained after applying the stress-continuity and stress-jump boundary conditions are found to work well at low porosities, which is in contradiction with the results achieved earlier by other researchers. The traditional approach of using averaged equations in the regions of sharp gradients in porous media to describe flow and transport is theoretically untenable and perhaps inaccurate. A novel ensemble averaging method is being proposed to test the accuracy of the volume averaged or smoothed description of flows in porous media in the regions of sharp gradients. In the new method, the flow in a certain arrangement of particles (called a realization) is averaged using a small unit cell, much smaller than the REV. Then such an averaged flow variable is further averaged over a whole gamut of randomly-generated particle realizations. First the accuracy of the ensemble averaging method was tested by comparing the permeability of an artificially generated porous medium obtained by the proposed method against the permeability predicted by some established theoretical models of permeability. The proposed method was found to be quite accurate. Later the ensemble average method was applied to the open-channel porous-medium interface region characterized by a sharp gradient in the flow velocities. It was discovered that the volume averaged description of such flows, characterized by the use of the Brinkman equation along with the stress-continuity and stress-jump conditions, is quite accurate for a range of Reynolds numbers. The non-isothermal transport during flow in porous media is examined next. The main focus in this area of research is the thermal dispersion term found in the heat transfer equation for single- and dual-scale porous media. Most of the previous efforts on modeling the heat transfer phenomena in porous media were devoted to isotropic porous media. However, for the anisotropic porous media widely in many industrial applications, not much research on the

  5. Quantitative tomographic measurements of opaque multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; O'HERN,TIMOTHY J.; CECCIO,STEVEN L.

    2000-03-01

    An electrical-impedance tomography (EIT) system has been developed for quantitative measurements of radial phase distribution profiles in two-phase and three-phase vertical column flows. The EIT system is described along with the computer algorithm used for reconstructing phase volume fraction profiles. EIT measurements were validated by comparison with a gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) system. The EIT system was used to accurately measure average solid volume fractions up to 0.05 in solid-liquid flows, and radial gas volume fraction profiles in gas-liquid flows with gas volume fractions up to 0.15. In both flows, average phase volume fractions and radial volume fraction profiles from GDT and EIT were in good agreement. A minor modification to the formula used to relate conductivity data to phase volume fractions was found to improve agreement between the methods. GDT and EIT were then applied together to simultaneously measure the solid, liquid, and gas radial distributions within several vertical three-phase flows. For average solid volume fractions up to 0.30, the gas distribution for each gas flow rate was approximately independent of the amount of solids in the column. Measurements made with this EIT system demonstrate that EIT may be used successfully for noninvasive, quantitative measurements of dispersed multiphase flows.

  6. Oscillatory multiphase flow strategy for chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Milad; Jensen, Klavs F

    2016-07-19

    Continuous multiphase flow strategies are commonly employed for high-throughput parameter screening of physical, chemical, and biological processes as well as continuous preparation of a wide range of fine chemicals and micro/nano particles with processing times up to 10 min. The inter-dependency of mixing and residence times, and their direct correlation with reactor length have limited the adaptation of multiphase flow strategies for studies of processes with relatively long processing times (0.5-24 h). In this frontier article, we describe an oscillatory multiphase flow strategy to decouple mixing and residence times and enable investigation of longer timescale experiments than typically feasible with conventional continuous multiphase flow approaches. We review current oscillatory multiphase flow technologies, provide an overview of the advancements of this relatively new strategy in chemistry and biology, and close with a perspective on future opportunities. PMID:27397146

  7. Multiphase groundwater flow near cooling plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayba, D.O.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate groundwater flow near cooling plutons with a computer program that can model multiphase flow, temperatures up to 1200??C, thermal pressurization, and temperature-dependent rock properties. A series of experiments examines the effects of host-rock permeability, size and depth of pluton emplacement, single versus multiple intrusions, the influence of a caprock, and the impact of topographically driven groundwater flow. We also reproduce and evaluate some of the pioneering numerical experiments on flow around plutons. Host-rock permeability is the principal factor influencing fluid circulation and heat transfer in hydrothermal systems. The hottest and most steam-rich systems develop where permeability is of the order of 10-15 m2. Temperatures and life spans of systems decrease with increasing permeability. Conduction-dominated systems, in which permeabilities are ???10-16m2, persist longer but exhibit relatively modest increases in near-surface temperatures relative to ambient conditions. Pluton size, emplacement depth, and initial thermal conditions have less influence on hydrothermal circulation patterns but affect the extent of boiling and duration of hydrothermal systems. Topographically driven groundwater flow can significantly alter hydrothermal circulation; however, a low-permeability caprock effectively decouples the topographically and density-driven systems and stabilizes the mixing interface between them thereby defining a likely ore-forming environment.

  8. Shock Scattering in a Multiphase Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D

    2003-04-08

    Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities. Such an approach work poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. The physical original of this difficulty is traced to an inadequate model of the interfacial pressure term as it appears in the momentum and turbulence kinetic energy equations. Constraints on the form of a better model from a variety of sources are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

  9. Multiphase flows with digital and traditional microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Michael A.

    Multi-phase fluid systems are an important concept in fluid mechanics, seen every day in how fluids interact with solids, gases, and other fluids in many industrial, medical, agricultural, and other regimes. In this thesis, the development of a two-dimensional digital microfluidic device is presented, followed by the development of a two-phase microfluidic diagnostic tool designed to simulate sandstone geometries in oil reservoirs. In both instances, it is possible to take advantage of the physics involved in multiphase flows to affect positive outcomes in both. In order to make an effective droplet-based digital microfluidic device, one must be able to precisely control a number of key processes including droplet positioning, motion, coalescence, mixing, and sorting. For planar or open microfluidic devices, many of these processes have yet to be demonstrated. A suitable platform for an open system is a superhydrophobic surface, as suface characteristics are critical. Great efforts have been spent over the last decade developing hydrophobic surfaces exhibiting very large contact angles with water, and which allow for high droplet mobility. We demonstrate that sanding Teflon can produce superhydrophobic surfaces with advancing contact angles of up to 151° and contact angle hysteresis of less than 4°. We use these surfaces to characterize droplet coalescence, mixing, motion, deflection, positioning, and sorting. This research culminates with the presentation of two digital microfluidic devices: a droplet reactor/analyzer and a droplet sorter. As global energy usage increases, maximizing oil recovery from known reserves becomes a crucial multiphase challenge in order to meet the rising demand. This thesis presents the development of a microfluidic sandstone platform capable of quickly and inexpensively testing the performance of fluids with different rheological properties on the recovery of oil. Specifically, these microfluidic devices are utilized to examine how

  10. Workshop on Scientific Issues in Multiphase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    2003-01-02

    This report outlines scientific issues whose resolution will help advance and define the field of multiphase flow. It presents the findings of four study groups and of a workshop sponsored by the Program on Engineering Physics of the Department of Energy. The reason why multiphase flows are much more difficult to analyze than single phase flows is that the phases assume a large number of complicated configurations. Therefore, it should not be surprising that the understanding of why the phases configure in a certain way is the principal scientific issue. Research is needed which identifies the microphysics controlling the organization of the phases, which develops physical models for the resultant multi-scale interactions and which tests their validity in integrative experiments/theories that look at the behavior of a system. New experimental techniques and recently developed direct numerical simulations will play important roles in this endeavor. In gas-liquid flows a top priority is to develop an understanding of why the liquid phase in quasi fully-developed pipe flow changes from one configuration to another. Mixing flows offer a more complicated situation in which several patterns can exist at the same time. They introduce new physical challenges. A second priority is to provide a quantitative description of the phase distribution for selected fully-developed flows and for simple mixing flows (that could include heat transfer and phase change). Microphysical problems of interest are identified – including the coupling of molecular and macroscopic behavior that can be observed in many situations and the formation/destruction of interfaces in the coalescence/breakup of drops and bubbles. Solid-fluid flows offer a simpler system in that interfaces are not changing. However, a variety of patterns exist, that depend on the properties of the particles, their concentration and the Reynolds number characterizing the relative velocity. A top priority is the

  11. Multiphase pumps and flow meters avoid platform construction

    SciTech Connect

    Elde, J.

    1999-02-01

    One of the newest wrinkles in efficiency in BP`s Eastern Trough Area Project (ETAP) is the system for moving multiphase oil, water and gas fluids from the Machar satellite field to the Marnock Central Processing Facility (CPF). Using water-turbine-driven multiphase pumps and multiphase flow meters, the system moves fluid with no need for a production platform. In addition, BP has designed the installation so it reduces and controls water coning, thereby increasing recoverable reserves. Both subsea multiphase booster stations (SMUBS) and meters grew out of extensive development work and experience at Framo Engineering AS (Framo) in multiphase meters and multiphase pump systems for subsea installation. Multiphase meter development began in 1990 and the first subsea multiphase meters were installed in the East Spar Project in Australia in 1996. By September 1998, the meters had been operating successfully for more than 1 year. A single multiphase meter installed in Marathon`s West Brae Project has also successfully operated for more than 1 year. Subsea meters for ETAP were installed and began operating in July 1998.

  12. Comparative analysis of volumetric flow meters used for mass flow estimation in multiphase and multidensity environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, Richard; Korman, Valentin; Wiley, John T.

    2006-05-01

    Accurate and reliable multiphase flow measurements are needed for liquid propulsion systems. Existing volumetric flow meters are adequate for flow measurements with well-characterized, clean liquids and gases. However, these technologies are inadequate for multiphase environments, such as cryogenic fluids. Although, properly calibrated turbine flow meters can provide highly accurate and repeatable data, problems are still prevalent with multiphase flows. Limitations are thus placed on the applicability of intrusive turbine flow meters.

  13. Benchmark initiative on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisch, K.; Annewandter, R.; Olden, P.; Mackay, E.; Bauer, S.; Geiger, S.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers involves multiple strongly interacting processes such as multiphase flow and geomechanical deformation, which threat to the seal integrity of CO2 repositories. Coupled simulation codes are required to establish realistic prognoses of the coupled process during CO2 injection operations. International benchmark initiatives help to evaluate, to compare and to validate coupled simulation results. However, there is no published code comparison study so far focusing on the impact of coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics on the long-term integrity of repositories, which is required to obtain confidence in the predictive capabilities of reservoir simulators. We address this gap by proposing a benchmark study. A wide participation from academic and industrial institutions is sought, as the aim of building confidence in coupled simulators become more plausible with many participants. Most published benchmark studies on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes have been performed within the field of nuclear waste disposal (e.g. the DECOVALEX project), using single-phase formulation only. As regards CO2 injection scenarios, international benchmark studies have been published comparing isothermal and non-isothermal multiphase flow processes such as the code intercomparison by LBNL, the Stuttgart Benchmark study, the CLEAN benchmark approach and other initiatives. Recently, several codes have been developed or extended to simulate the coupling of hydraulic and geomechanical processes (OpenGeoSys, ELIPSE-Visage, GEM, DuMuX and others), which now enables a comprehensive code comparison. We propose four benchmark tests of increasing complexity, addressing the coupling between multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection. In the first case, a horizontal non-faulted 2D model consisting of one reservoir and one cap rock is considered, focusing on stress and strain regime changes in the storage formation and the

  14. Development of predictive simulation capability for reactive multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    VanderHeyden, W.B.; Kendrick, B.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to develop a self-sustained research program for advanced computer simulation of industrial reactive multiphase flows. The prototype research problem was a three-phase alumina precipitator used in the Bayer process, a key step in aluminum refining. Accomplishments included the development of an improved reaction mechanism of the alumina precipitation growth process, the development of an efficient methods for handling particle size distribution in multiphase flow simulation codes, the incorporation of precipitation growth and agglomeration kinetics in LANL's CFDLIB multiphase flow code library and the evaluation of multiphase turbulence closure models for bubbly flow simulations.

  15. Massively Parallel Direct Simulation of Multiphase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    COOK,BENJAMIN K.; PREECE,DALE S.; WILLIAMS,J.R.

    2000-08-10

    The authors understanding of multiphase physics and the associated predictive capability for multi-phase systems are severely limited by current continuum modeling methods and experimental approaches. This research will deliver an unprecedented modeling capability to directly simulate three-dimensional multi-phase systems at the particle-scale. The model solves the fully coupled equations of motion governing the fluid phase and the individual particles comprising the solid phase using a newly discovered, highly efficient coupled numerical method based on the discrete-element method and the Lattice-Boltzmann method. A massively parallel implementation will enable the solution of large, physically realistic systems.

  16. TOUGH2: A general-purpose numerical simulator for multiphase fluid and heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1991-05-01

    TOUGH2 is a numerical simulation program for nonisothermal flows of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The chief applications for which TOUGH2 is designed are in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal, and unsaturated zone hydrology. A successor to the TOUGH program, TOUGH2 offers added capabilities and user features, including the flexibility to handle different fluid mixtures, facilities for processing of geometric data (computational grids), and an internal version control system to ensure referenceability of code applications. This report includes a detailed description of governing equations, program architecture, and user features. Enhancements in data inputs relative to TOUGH are described, and a number of sample problems are given to illustrate code applications. 46 refs., 29 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and

  18. A model for multiphase flows through poroelastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, Goodarz; Mazaheri, Ali Reza; Smith, D.H

    2003-01-01

    A continuum model for multiphase fluid mixture flows through poroelastic media is presented. The basic conservation laws developed via a volume averaging technique are considered. Effects of phasic equilibrated forces are included in the model. Based on the thermodynamics of the multiphase mixture flows, appropriate constitutive equations are formulated. The entropy inequality is exploited, and the method of Lagrangian multiplier is used along with the phasic conservation laws to derive the constitutive equations for the phasic stress tensors, equilibrated stress vectors, and the interactions terms. The special cases of wave propagation in poroelastic media saturated with multiphase fluids, and multiphase flows through porous media, are studied. It is shown that the present theory leads to the extended Darcy’s law and contains, as a special case, Biot’s theory of saturated poroelastic media.

  19. Determination of Kinetic Parameters within a Single Nonisothermal On-Flow Experiment by Nanoliter NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gomez, M Victoria; Rodriguez, Antonio M; de la Hoz, Antonio; Jimenez-Marquez, Francisco; Fratila, Raluca M; Barneveld, Peter A; Velders, Aldrik H

    2015-10-20

    Conventional methods to determine the kinetic parameters for a certain reaction require multiple, separate isothermal experiments, resulting in time- and material-consuming processes. Here, an approach to determine the kinetic information within a single nonisothermal on-flow experiment is presented, consuming less than 10 μmol of reagents and having a total measuring time of typically 10 min. This approach makes use of a microfluidic NMR chip hyphenated to a continuous-flow microreactor and is based on the capabilities of the NMR chip to analyze subnanomole quantities of material in the 25 nL detection volume. Importantly, useful data are acquired from the microreactor platform in specific isothermal and nonisothermal frames. A model fitting the experimental data enables rapid determination of kinetic parameters, as demonstrated for a library of isoxazole and pyrazole derivatives. PMID:26383715

  20. Numerical modeling of non-isothermal gas flow and NAPL vapor transport in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pártl, Ondřej; Beneš, Michal; Frolkovič, Peter; Illangasekare, Tissa; Smits, Kathleen

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a mathematical model for the description of non-isothermal compressible flow of gas mixtures in heterogeneous porous media and we derive an efficient semi-implicit time-stepping numerical scheme for the solution of the governing equations. We experimentally estimate the order of convergence of the scheme in spatial variables and we present several computational studies that demonstrate the ability of the numerical scheme.

  1. Complementary Constrains on Component based Multiphase Flow Problems, Should It Be Implemented Locally or Globally?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow problems are numerically difficult to solve, as it often contains nonlinear Phase transition phenomena A conventional technique is to introduce the complementarity constraints where fluid properties such as liquid saturations are confined within a physically reasonable range. Based on such constraints, the mathematical model can be reformulated into a system of nonlinear partial differential equations coupled with variational inequalities. They can be then numerically handled by optimization algorithms. In this work, two different approaches utilizing the complementarity constraints based on persistent primary variables formulation[4] are implemented and investigated. The first approach proposed by Marchand et.al[1] is using "local complementary constraints", i.e. coupling the constraints with the local constitutive equations. The second approach[2],[3] , namely the "global complementary constrains", applies the constraints globally with the mass conservation equation. We will discuss how these two approaches are applied to solve non-isothermal componential multiphase flow problem with the phase change phenomenon. Several benchmarks will be presented for investigating the overall numerical performance of different approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of different models will also be concluded. References[1] E.Marchand, T.Mueller and P.Knabner. Fully coupled generalized hybrid-mixed finite element approximation of two-phase two-component flow in porous media. Part I: formulation and properties of the mathematical model, Computational Geosciences 17(2): 431-442, (2013). [2] A. Lauser, C. Hager, R. Helmig, B. Wohlmuth. A new approach for phase transitions in miscible multi-phase flow in porous media. Water Resour., 34,(2011), 957-966. [3] J. Jaffré, and A. Sboui. Henry's Law and Gas Phase Disappearance. Transp. Porous Media. 82, (2010), 521-526. [4] A. Bourgeat, M. Jurak and F. Smaï. Two-phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in

  2. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Cem Sarica; Holden Zhang

    2006-05-31

    The developments of oil and gas fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) will become more common in the future. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas, oil and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. Recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications, including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is crucial for any multiphase separation technique, either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole, to know inlet conditions such as flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. Therefore, the development of a new generation of multiphase flow predictive tools is needed. The overall objective of the proposed study is to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). In the current multiphase modeling approach, flow pattern and flow behavior (pressure gradient and phase fractions) prediction modeling are separated. Thus, different models based on different physics are employed, causing inaccuracies and discontinuities. Moreover, oil and water are treated as a pseudo single phase, ignoring the distinct characteristics of both oil and water, and often resulting in inaccurate design that leads to operational problems. In this study, a new model is being developed through a theoretical and experimental study employing a revolutionary approach. The

  3. Viscous and gravitational fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Viscous and gravitational fingering refer to flow instabilities in porous media that are triggered by adverse mobility or density ratios, respectively. These instabilities have been studied extensively in the past for (1) single-phase flow (e.g., contaminant transport in groundwater, first-contact-miscible displacement of oil by gas in hydrocarbon production), and (2) multi-phase immiscible and incompressible flow (e.g., water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection in oil reservoirs). Fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow has received much less attention, perhaps due to its high computational complexity. However, many important subsurface processes involve multiple phases that exchange species. Examples are carbon sequestration in saline aquifers and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by gas or WAG injection below the minimum miscibility pressure. In multiphase flow, relative permeabilities affect the mobility contrast for a given viscosity ratio. Phase behavior can also change local fluid properties, which can either enhance or mitigate viscous and gravitational instabilities. This work presents a detailed study of fingering behavior in compositional multiphase flow in two and three dimensions and considers the effects of (1) Fickian diffusion, (2) mechanical dispersion, (3) flow rates, (4) domain size and geometry, (5) formation heterogeneities, (6) gravity, and (7) relative permeabilities. Results show that fingering in compositional multiphase flow is profoundly different from miscible conditions and upscaling techniques used for the latter case are unlikely to be generalizable to the former.

  4. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and

  5. Experimental research of gas flows through isothermal and non-isothermal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolskiy, Yu. V.; Friedlander, O. G.

    2012-11-01

    In specialized test bench and in vacuum aerodynamic facilities VAT-2M TsAGI three types of a gas flows with observed kinetic effects were researched. Firstly, the flow through the membrane with uniform temperature was investigated. The dependence of flow rate through membranes on pressure drop across it was measured at various values of permeability. The experimental data at various flow regimes in the pores were compared with numerical data. The comparison gives the opportunity to associate the model perforated membrane with definite diameter of perforation channels and with definite permeability to each porous membrane with intricate pores. Flow rate through real and model membranes are the same ones for two limit regimes: the free-molecular regime and the Stokes ones. For experimental research of a gas flows induced by temperature difference across membrane the method of creation such temperature difference (uniform on membrane surface) was used. In this method thermoelectric effect is utilized. The dependence of thermo-transpiration flow rate and thermo-molecular pressure difference across non-isothermal membrane (for zero flow rate) on gas pressure were measured. The comparison of results of direct and indirect measurements of the velocity of thermo-transpiration was carried out. In the second case the flow rate of thermal transpiration was calculated by the experimental results on thermo-molecular pressure difference across non-isothermal membrane and the results of measurement of pressure driven flow through isothermal membrane.

  6. System for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method and system for measuring a multi-phase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multi-phase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The system for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes taking into account a pressure drop experienced by the gas phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase.

  7. Development of predictive simulation capability for reactive multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    VanderHeyden, W.B.; Kendrick, B.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a proposed three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project was terminated after the first year due to changes in funding priorities. The objective of the project was to develop a self-sustained research program for advanced computer simulation of industrial reactive multiphase flows. The prototype research problem was a three-phase alumina precipitator used in the Bayer process, a key step in aluminum refining. Accomplishments in the first year included the development of an improved reaction mechanism of the alumina precipitation growth process, the development of an efficient method for handling particle size distribution in multiphase flow simulation codes and finally the incorporation of precipitation growth and agglomeration kinetics in LANL`s CFDLIB multiphase flow code library.

  8. Studies of non-isothermal flow in saturated and partially saturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.K.; Maki, K.S.; Glass, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Coupled thermal and hydrologic flow processes in unsaturated fractured rocks are important in the evaluation of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository for high level nuclear waste. Physical and numerical experiments have been performed to investigate the behavior of non-isothermal flow in two-dimensional saturated and partially saturated porous media. The physical experiments were performed to identify non-isothermal flow fields and temperature distributions in fully saturated, half-saturated, and residually saturated two-dimensional porous media with bottom heating and top cooling. Two counter-rotating liquid-phase convective cells were observed to develop in the saturated regions of all three cases. Gas-phase convection was also evidenced in the unsaturated regions of the partially saturated experiments. TOUGH2 numerical simulations of the saturated case were found to be strongly dependent on the assumed boundary conditions of the physical system. Models including heat losses through the boundaries of the test cell produced temperature and flow fields that were in better agreement with the observed temperature and flow fields than models that assumed insulated boundary conditions. A sensitivity analysis also showed that a reduction of the bulk permeability of the porous media in the numerical simulations depressed the effect of convection, flattening the temperature profiles across the test cell.

  9. Multiphase flow parameter estimation based on laser scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendruscolo, Tiago P.; Fischer, Robert; Martelli, Cicero; Rodrigues, Rômulo L. P.; Morales, Rigoberto E. M.; da Silva, Marco J.

    2015-07-01

    The flow of multiple constituents inside a pipe or vessel, known as multiphase flow, is commonly found in many industry branches. The measurement of the individual flow rates in such flow is still a challenge, which usually requires a combination of several sensor types. However, in many applications, especially in industrial process control, it is not necessary to know the absolute flow rate of the respective phases, but rather to continuously monitor flow conditions in order to quickly detect deviations from the desired parameters. Here we show how a simple and low-cost sensor design can achieve this, by using machine-learning techniques to distinguishing the characteristic patterns of oblique laser light scattered at the phase interfaces. The sensor is capable of estimating individual phase fluxes (as well as their changes) in multiphase flows and may be applied to safety applications due to its quick response time.

  10. On fluid flow in a heterogeneous medium under nonisothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    D.W., Vasco

    2010-11-01

    An asymptotic technique, valid in the presence of smoothly-varying heterogeneity, provides explicit expressions for the velocity of a propagating pressure and temperature disturbance. The governing equations contain nonlinear terms due to the presence of temperature-dependent coefficients and due to the advection of fluids with differing temperatures. Two cases give well-defined expressions in terms of the parameters of the porous medium: the uncoupled propagation of a pressure disturbance and the propagation of a fully coupled temperature and pressure disturbance. The velocity of the coupled disturbance or front, depends upon the medium parameters and upon the change in temperature and pressure across the front. For uncoupled flow, the semi-analytic expression for the front velocity reduces to that associated with a linear diffusion equation. A comparison of the asymptotic travel time estimates with calculations from a numerical simulator indicates reasonably good agreement for both uncoupled and coupled disturbances.

  11. Studies of non-isothermal flow in saturated and partially saturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.K.; Maki, K.S.; Glass, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Physical and numerical experiments have been performed to investigate the behavior of nonisothermal flow in two-dimensional saturated and partially saturated porous media. The physical experiments were performed to identify non-isothermal flow fields and temperature distributions in fully saturated, half-saturated, and residually saturated two-dimensional porous media with bottom heating and top cooling. Two counter-rotating liquid-phase convective cells were observed to develop in the saturated regions of all three cases. Gas-phase convection was also evidenced in the unsaturated regions of the partially saturated experiments. TOUGH2 numerical simulations of the saturated case were found to be strongly dependent on the assumed boundary conditions of the physical system. Models including heat losses through the boundaries of the test cell produced temperature and flow fields that were in better agreement with the observed temperature and flow fields than models that assumed insulated boundary conditions. A sensitivity analysis also showed that a reduction of the bulk permeability of the porous media in the numerical simulations depressed the effects of convection, flattening the temperature profiles across the test cell.

  12. Modeling the multiphase flow in a dense medium cyclone

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Chu, K.W.; Yu, A.B.; Vince, A.

    2009-04-15

    A mathematical model is proposed to describe the multiphase flow in a dense-medium cyclone (DMC). In this model, the volume of fluid multiphase model is first used to determine the shape and position of the air core, and then the mixture multiphase model is employed to describe the flow of the dense medium (comprising finely ground magnetite in water) and the air core, where the turbulence is described by the Reynolds stress model. The results of fluid flow are finally used in the simulation of coal particle flow described by the stochastic Lagrangian particle tracking model. The validity of the proposed approach is verified by the reasonably good agreement between the measured and predicted results under different conditions. The flow features in a DMC are then examined in terms of factors such as flow field, pressure drop, particle trajectories, and separation efficiency. The results are used to explain the key characteristics of flow in DMCs, such as the origin of a short-circuit flow, the flow pattern, and the motion of coal particles. Moreover, the so-called surging phenomenon is examined in relation to the instability of fluid flow. The model offers a convenient method to investigate the effects of variables related to geometrical and operational conditions on the performance of DMCs.

  13. FINITE-ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE IMMISCIBLE FLOW THROUGH SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equation...

  14. Calculation of mass transfer in multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Gopal, M.

    1998-12-31

    This paper summarizes the results of mass transfer mechanisms under disturbed liquid-gas flow in 10 cm diameter pipe using electrochemical limiting current density and potentiostatic noise technique. The solution used is potassium ferro/ferricyanide dissolve in 1.3 N sodium hydroxide system. Mass transfer coefficients in full pipe flow and slug flow are obtained. The relationship between mass transfer coefficient with full pipe flow velocities and with slug flow Froude numbers are studied. The impact of bubbles in slugs on the mass transfer coefficient is revealed, The impact of flow disturbance, including weld beads and pits, are discussed for both full pipe flow and slug flow.

  15. Multiphase Modeling of Flow, Transport, and Biodegradation in a Mesoscale Landfill Bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2002-02-01

    The need to control gas and leachate production and minimize refuse volume in municipal solid waste landfills has motivated the development of landfill simulation models to predict and design optimal treatment processes. We have developed a multiphase and multicomponent nonisothermal module called T2LBM for the three-dimensional TOUGH2 flow and transport simulator. T2LBM can be used to simulate aerobic or anaerobic biodegradation of municipal solid waste and the associated flow and transport of gas and liquid through the refuse mass. Acetic acid is used as a proxy for all biodegradable substrates in the refuse. T2LBM incorporates a Monod kinetic rate law for the biodegradation of acetic acid by either aerobic or anaerobic microbes as controlled by the local oxygen concentration. We have verified the model against published data, and applied it to our own mesoscale laboratory aerobic landfill bioreactor experiments. We observe spatial variability of flow and biodegradation consistent with permeability heterogeneity and the geometry of the radial grid. The model is capable of matching results of a shut-in test where the respiration of the system is measured over time.

  16. Rarefied gas flow in a rectangular enclosure induced by non-isothermal walls

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Manuel; Tatsios, Giorgos; Valougeorgis, Dimitris; Stefanov, Stefan

    2014-05-15

    The flow of a rarefied gas in a rectangular enclosure due to the non-isothermal walls with no synergetic contributions from external force fields is investigated. The top and bottom walls are maintained at constant but different temperatures and along the lateral walls a linear temperature profile is assumed. Modeling is based on the direct numerical solution of the Shakhov kinetic equation and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Solving the problem both deterministically and stochastically allows a systematic comparison and verification of the results as well as the exploitation of the numerical advantages of each approach in the investigation of the involved flow and heat transfer phenomena. The thermally induced flow is simulated in terms of three dimensionless parameters characterizing the problem, namely, the reference Knudsen number, the temperature ratio of the bottom over the top plates, and the enclosure aspect ratio. Their effect on the flow configuration and bulk quantities is thoroughly examined. Along the side walls, the gas flows at small Knudsen numbers from cold-to-hot, while as the Knudsen number is increased the gas flows from hot-to-cold and the thermally induced flow configuration becomes more complex. These flow patterns with the hot-to-cold flow to be extended to the whole length of the non-isothermal side walls may exist even at small temperature differences and then, they are enhanced as the temperature difference between the top and bottom plates is increased. The cavity aspect ratio also influences this flow configuration and the hot-to-cold flow is becoming more dominant as the depth compared to the width of the cavity is increased. To further analyze the flow patterns a novel solution decomposition into ballistic and collision parts is introduced. This is achieved by accordingly modifying the indexing process of the typical DSMC algorithm. The contribution of each part of the solution is separately examined and a physical

  17. Toward an improved understanding of multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccino, Julia C.; Gray, William G.; Ferrand, Lin A.

    1998-08-01

    Physical description of multiphase flow in porous media ideally should be based on conservation principles. In practice, however, Darcy's law is employed as the foundation of multiphase flow studies. Darcy's law is an empirical surrogate for momentum conservation based on data obtained from experimental study of one-dimensional single-phase flow. In its original form [Darcy, 1856], Darcy's law contained a single, constant coefficient that depended on the properties of the medium. Since 1856, Darcy's relation has been heuristically and progressively altered by allowing this coefficient to be a spatially dependent, nonlinear function of fluid and solid phase properties, particularly of the quantities of these phases within the flow system. The shortcoming of this approach is that the governing flow equation is obtained by enhancing a simple empirical coefficient with complex functional dependencies rather than by simplifying general conservation principles. As a result, some of the important physical phenomena are not properly accounted for. Also, some assumptions intrinsic to the equations are overlooked, making accurate simulation more of an art than an entirely scientific exercise. A more general and more theoretically appealing approach to the derivation of conservation principles for multiphase flow has been evolving over the last 30 years. This approach employs a mathematical procedure for deriving conservation principles at the length scale of interest, followed by imposition of thermodynamic constraints to restrict the generality of these expressions. The product of this approach is a set of balance equations that provides a framework in which the assumptions inherent in a hypothesized model of multiphase flow are clearly stated. Requirements for more comprehensive and physically complete models can then be specified.

  18. Applying uncertainty quantification to multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, A; Garg, R; Tong, C; Shahnam, M; Guenther, C

    2013-07-01

    Multiphase computational fluid dynamics plays a major role in design and optimization of fossil fuel based reactors. There is a growing interest in accounting for the influence of uncertainties associated with physical systems to increase the reliability of computational simulation based engineering analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has recently undertaken an initiative to characterize uncertainties associated with computer simulation of reacting multiphase flows encountered in energy producing systems such as a coal gasifier. The current work presents the preliminary results in applying non-intrusive parametric uncertainty quantification and propagation techniques with NETL's open-source multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX. For this purpose an open-source uncertainty quantification toolkit, PSUADE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been interfaced with MFIX software. In this study, the sources of uncertainty associated with numerical approximation and model form have been neglected, and only the model input parametric uncertainty with forward propagation has been investigated by constructing a surrogate model based on data-fitted response surface for a multiphase flow demonstration problem. Monte Carlo simulation was employed for forward propagation of the aleatory type input uncertainties. Several insights gained based on the outcome of these simulations are presented such as how inadequate characterization of uncertainties can affect the reliability of the prediction results. Also a global sensitivity study using Sobol' indices was performed to better understand the contribution of input parameters to the variability observed in response variable.

  19. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Tulsa Fluid Flow

    2008-08-31

    The developments of fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) is a common occurrence. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas-oil-and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of the hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. The recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is very crucial to any multiphase separation technique that is employed either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole to know inlet conditions such as the flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. The overall objective was to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict the flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). The project was conducted in two periods. In Period 1 (four years), gas-oil-water flow in pipes were investigated to understand the fundamental physical mechanisms describing the interaction between the gas-oil-water phases under flowing conditions, and a unified model was developed utilizing a novel modeling approach. A gas-oil-water pipe flow database including field and laboratory data was formed in Period 2 (one year). The database was utilized in model performance demonstration. Period 1 primarily consisted of the development of a unified model and software to predict the gas-oil-water flow, and experimental studies of the gas-oil-water project, including flow behavior description and

  20. Multiphase flow of miscible liquids: jets and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Travis W.; Logia, Alison N.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2015-05-01

    Drops and jets of liquids that are miscible with the surrounding bulk liquid are present in many processes from cleaning surfaces with the aid of liquid soaps to the creation of biocompatible implants for drug delivery. Although the interactions of immiscible drops and jets show similarities to miscible systems, the small, transient interfacial tension associated with miscible systems create distinct outcomes such as intricate droplet shapes and breakup resistant jets. Experiments have been conducted to understand several basic multiphase flow problems involving miscible liquids. Using high-speed imaging of the morphological evolution of the flows, we have been able to show that these processes are controlled by interfacial tensions. Further multiphase flows include investigating miscible jets, which allow the creation of fibers from inelastic materials that are otherwise difficult to process due to capillary breakup. This work shows that stabilization from the diminishing interfacial tensions of the miscible jets allows various elongated morphologies to be formed.

  1. Nonisothermal Flow of a Reactive Fluid with Simultaneous Impregnation of a Porous Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Consideration is given to the nonisothermal filling of a plane cavity with a Newtonian chemically reactive fluid with simultaneous impregnation of a porous layer. Flow in the plane cavity is described by noninertial Navier-Stokes equations, and in the porous layer, by the Darcy equation; flow in the region adjacent to the boundary between the fluid and the porous layer is defined using the Brinkman equation. The viscosity is taken to be dependent on temperature and on the extent to which the chemical reaction proceeds. A single-temperature model is used as the energy equation. Temperature fields in the region of a channel and in the porous layer are interrelated by conjugate fourth-kind boundary conditions. An example of determining the maximum allowable molding time is shown.

  2. Numerical modeling of a compressible multiphase flow through a nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielska, Urszula; Rabinovitch, Jason; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2012-11-01

    New thermodynamic cycles developed for more efficient low temperature resource utilization can increase the net power production from geothermal resources and sensible waste heat recovery by 20-40%, compared to the traditional organic Rankine cycle. These improved systems consist of a pump, a liquid heat exchanger, a two-phase turbine, and a condenser. The two-phase turbine is used to extract energy from a high speed multiphase fluid and consists of a nozzle and an axial impulse rotor. In order to model and optimize the fluid flow through this part of the system an analysis of two-phase flow through a specially designed convergent-divergent nozzle has to be conducted. To characterize the flow behavior, a quasi-one-dimensional steady-state model of the multiphase fluid flow through a nozzle has been constructed. A numerical code capturing dense compressible multiphase flow under subsonic and supersonic conditions and the coupling between both liquid and gas phases has been developed. The output of the code delivers data vital for the performance optimization of the two-phase nozzle.

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of Disperse Multiphase High-Speed Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Nourgaliev, R R; Dinh, T N; Theofanous, T G; Koning, J M; Greenman, R M; Nakafuji, G T

    2004-02-17

    A recently introduced Level-Set-based Cartesian Grid (LSCG) Characteristics-Based Matching (CBM) method is applied for direct numerical simulation of shock-induced dispersal of solid material. The method incorporates the latest advancements in the level set technology and characteristics-based numerical methods for solution of hyperbolic conservation laws and boundary treatment. The LSCG/CBM provides unique capabilities to simulate complex fluid-solid (particulate) multiphase flows under high-speed flow conditions and taking into account particle-particle elastic and viscoelastic collisions. The particular emphasis of the present study is placed on importance of appropriate modeling of particle-particle collisions, which are demonstrated to crucially influence the global behavior of high-speed multiphase particulate flows. The results of computations reveal the richness and complexity of flow structures in compressible disperse systems, due to dynamic formation of shocks and contact discontinuities, which provide an additional long-range interaction mechanism in dispersed high-speed multiphase flows.

  4. A 3-D nonisothermal flow simulation and pulling force model for injection pultrusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Ibrahim

    1998-12-01

    Injected Pultrusion (IP) is an efficient way of producing high quality, low cost, high volume and constant cross-section polymeric composites. This process has been developed recently, and the efforts to optimize it are still underway. This work is related to the development of a 3-D non-isothermal flow model for the IP processes. The governing equations for transport of mass, momentum and, energy are formulated by using a local volume averaging approach, and the Finite Element/Control Volume method is used to solve the system of equations numerically. The chemical species balance equation is solved in the Lagrangian frame of reference whereas the energy equation is solved using Galerkin, SU (Streamline Upwind), and SUPG (Streamline Upwind Petrov Galerkin) approaches. By varying degrees of freedom and the flow rates of the resin, it is shown that at high Peclet numbers the SUPG formulation performs better than the SU and the Galerkin methods in all cases. The 3-D model predictions for degree of cure and temperature are compared with a one dimensional analytical solution and the results are found satisfactory. Moreover, by varying the Brinkman Number, it is shown that the effect of viscous dissipation is insignificant. The 3-D flow simulations have been carried out for both thin and thick parts and the results are compared with the 2-D model. It is shown that for thick parts 2-D simulations render erroneous results. The effect of changing permeability on the flow fronts is also addressed. The effect of increasing taper angle on the model prediction is also investigated. A parametric study is conducted to isolate optimum conditions for both isothermal and non-isothermal cases using a straight rectangular die and a die with a tapered inlet. Finally, a simple pulling force model is developed and the pulling force required to pull the carbon-epoxy fiber resin system is estimated for dies of varying tapered inlet.

  5. Multiphase flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basagaoglu, H.; Meakin, P.; Green, C.T.; Mathew, M.

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with fluid-fluid and solid-fluid interaction potentials was used to study gravity-driven flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections. Simulated scenarios included fluid dripping from a fracture aperture, two-phase flow through intersecting fractures and thin-film flow on smooth and undulating solid surfaces. Qualitative comparisons with recently published experimental findings indicate that for these scenarios the LB model captured the underlying physics reasonably well.

  6. Multiphase Flow: The Gravity of the Situation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, Geoffrey F.

    1996-01-01

    A brief survey is presented of flow patterns in two-phase, gas-liquid flows at normal and microgravity, the differences between them being explored. It seems that the flow patterns in zero gravity are in general much simpler than those in normal gravity with only three main regimes (namely bubbly, slug and annular flows) being observed. Each of these three regimes is then reviewed, with particular reference to identification of areas of study where investigation of flows at microgravity might not only be interesting in themselves, but also throw light on mechanisms at normal earth gravity. In bubbly flow, the main area of interest seems to be that of bubble coalescence. In slug flow, the extension of simple displacement experiments to the zero gravity case would appear to be a useful option, supplemented by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. For annular flow, the most interesting area appears to be the study of the mechanisms of disturbance waves; it should be possible to extend the region of investigation of the onset and behavior of these waves to much low gas velocities where measurements are clearly much easier.

  7. A Virtual Reality Technique for Multi-phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loth, Eric; Sherman, William; Auman, Aric; Navarro, Christopher

    2004-04-01

    A virtual reality (VR) technique has been developed to allow user immersion (stereo-graphic rendering, user tracking and object interactivity) in generic unsteady three-dimensional multi-phase flow data sets. This article describes the structure and logic used to design and construct a VR technique that employs a multi-phase flow-field computed a priori as an input (i.e. simulations are conducted beforehand with a researcher's multi-phase CFD code). The input field for this flow visualization is divided into two parts: the Eulerian three-dimensional grid nodes and velocities for the continuous fluid properties (specified using conventional TECLOT data format) and the Lagrangian time-history trajectory files for the dispersed fluid. While tracking the dispersed phase trajectories as animated spheres of adjustable size and number, the continuous-phase flow can be simultaneously rendered with velocity vectors, iso-contour surfaces and planar flood-contour maps of different variables. The geometric and notional view of the combined visualization of both phases is interactively controlled throughout a user session. The resulting technique is demonstrated with a 3-D unsteady data set of Lagrangian particles dispersing in a Eulerian description of a turbulent boundary layer, stemming from a direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  8. Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

    2001-02-13

    This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

  9. Multiphase Flow Modeling of Biofuel Production Processes

    SciTech Connect

    D. Gaston; D. P. Guillen; J. Tester

    2011-06-01

    As part of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Secure Energy Initiative, the INL is performing research in areas that are vital to ensuring clean, secure energy supplies for the future. The INL Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. HYTEST involves producing liquid fuels in a Hybrid Energy System (HES) by integrating carbon-based (i.e., bio-mass, oil-shale, etc.) with non-carbon based energy sources (i.e., wind energy, hydro, geothermal, nuclear, etc.). Advances in process development, control and modeling are the unifying vision for HES. This paper describes new modeling tools and methodologies to simulate advanced energy processes. Needs are emerging that require advanced computational modeling of multiphase reacting systems in the energy arena, driven by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, which requires production of 36 billion gal/yr of biofuels by 2022, with 21 billion gal of this as advanced biofuels. Advanced biofuels derived from microalgal biomass have the potential to help achieve the 21 billion gal mandate, as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Production of biofuels from microalgae is receiving considerable interest due to their potentially high oil yields (around 600 gal/acre). Microalgae have a high lipid content (up to 50%) and grow 10 to 100 times faster than terrestrial plants. The use of environmentally friendly alternatives to solvents and reagents commonly employed in reaction and phase separation processes is being explored. This is accomplished through the use of hydrothermal technologies, which are chemical and physical transformations in high-temperature (200-600 C), high-pressure (5-40 MPa) liquid or supercritical water. Figure 1 shows a simplified diagram of the production of biofuels from algae. Hydrothermal processing has significant

  10. Multiphase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1995-02-01

    The major goal of this research project was to improve the understanding of the gas-oil two-phase flow in fractured porous media. In addition, miscible displacement was studied to evaluate its promise for enhanced recovery.

  11. Multiphase flow modeling in centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Adelmann, S; Schwienheer, C; Schembecker, G

    2011-09-01

    The separation efficiency in Centrifugal Partition Chromatography (CPC) depends on selection of a suitable biphasic solvent system (distribution ratio, selectivity factor, sample solubility) and is influenced by hydrodynamics in the chambers. Especially the stationary phase retention, the interfacial area for mass transfer and the flow pattern (backmixing) are important parameters. Their relationship with physical properties, operating parameters and chamber geometry is not completely understood and predictions are hardly possible. Experimental flow visualization is expensive and two-dimensional only. Therefore we simulated the flow pattern using a volume-of-fluid (VOF) method, which was implemented in OpenFOAM®. For the three-dimensional simulation of a rotating FCPC®-chamber, gravitational centrifugal and Coriolis forces were added to the conservation equation. For experimental validation the flow pattern of different solvent systems was visualized with an optical measurement system. The amount of mobile phase in a chamber was calculated from gray scale values of videos recorded by an image processing routine in ImageJ®. To visualize the flow of the stationary phase polyethylene particles were used to perform a qualitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis. We found a good agreement between flow patterns and velocity profiles of experiments and simulations. By using the model we found that increasing the chamber depth leads to higher specific interfacial area. Additionally a circular flow in the stationary phase was identified that lowers the interfacial area because it pushes the jet of mobile phase to the chamber wall. The Coriolis force alone gives the impulse for this behavior. As a result the model is easier to handle than experiments and allows 3D prediction of hydrodynamics in the chamber. Additionally it can be used for optimizing geometry and operating parameters for given physical properties of solvent systems. PMID:21324465

  12. State-of-the-art methods for multiphase flow pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, C.J.; Barry, J.J.; Rothe, P.H.

    1989-08-01

    This report is the culmination of work on Design Methods for Multiphase Flow in Gas Pipelines'' sponsored by the Pipeline Research Committee of the American Gas Association on projects PR 172--609 and PR 172--904. Results from a series of projects to obtain pipeline data in the field, collect operating pipeline data, perform key laboratory experiments at prototypical conditions (large pipe size and high gas density), and to develop and recommend design methods over the past several years have been synthesized to create this report. Technical supervision of these projects has been provided by the Two-Phase Flow Supervisory Committee. This report concisely documents the state of the art in two-phase flow methods, in a manner suitable for use by analysts who want to develop computerized methods to perform the multiphase calculations. This document updates a previous report prepared approximately four years ago (Crowley and Rothe, 1986). Detailed background discussion of the development and selection of the multiphase models is presented in Volume 3 of that reference.

  13. Non-isothermal water flow in the vadose zone of arid and semi-arid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallants, Dirk; Gerke, Kirill; Cook, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In desert environments thermally-driven vapour flow can be an important component of the total water flux in soils. As such, vapour flow can have considerable impact on recharge estimation, with small errors in soil water flow rates resulting in relatively larger errors in the recharge estimates since recharge is a very small fraction of rainfall. The additional effects of vegetation and temperature contributions may also impact soil water movement and thus calculated recharge rates in arid and semi-arid vadose zones. Currently most methods for estimating large-scale recharge rates do not consider these various processes, which adds an unknown degree of uncertainty to recharge estimation. The HYDRUS-1D numerical simulator was used to simulate coupled isothermal liquid, isothermal vapour, non-isothermal liquid and vapour flow, and heat flow in deep variably saturated vadose zones. The considered climatic conditions are characteristic of central Australia with approximate mean annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration rates of 300 and 3000 mm, respectively. A time series of 130 years of daily climate data provides the upper boundary conditions. Groundwater recharge under highly erratic rainfall conditions is hypothesized to be primarily episodic and linked to flood events which may be significant only once every few years. The combined effect of vegetation and temperature on water flow and soil water redistribution is discussed for both vegetated and bare soils.

  14. APPROXIMATE MULTIPHASE FLOW MODELING BY CHARACTERISTIC METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flow of petroleum hydrocarbons, organic solvents and other liquids that are immiscible with water presents the nation with some of the most difficult subsurface remediation problems. One aspect of contaminant transport associated releases of such liquids is the transport as a...

  15. Impact of normal stress on multiphase flow through rough fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves da Silva Junior, J.; Kang, P. K.; Yang, Z.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow and transport through geologic fractures plays a key role in several areas such as groundwater hydrology, geothermal energy, oil and gas production, CO2 sequestration and nuclear waste disposal. High-permeability zones associated with fracture corridors often serve as fast fluid conduits for both single and multiphase flow in otherwise low-permeability media. When multiphase flow occurs, the presence of one phase interferes with the flow of the other phase, resulting in complex displacement patterns through the fracture, and macroscopic descriptors (such as fracture-scale capillary pressure and relative permeability) that depend on the phase concentration of both phases. Here, we investigate the impact of normal stress on single and multiphase flow through rough-walled fractures: (1) we generate synthetic aperture fields that honor the fractal roughness structure observed in real fractures; (2) we model the effect of normal stress on the fracture aperture geometry by solving the contact problem between fracture walls; and (3) we use invasion percolation with trapping to model immiscible fluid displacement and then compute relative permeability numerically for each stress scenario. Our results indicate that normal stress increases the amount of contact area in the fracture wall, which results in an increase of the tortuosity of the available path for fluid displacement. Increasing normal stress results in low relative permeability for the wetting phase due to a decrease of the available path for fluid flow, and therefore a small amount of non-wetting fluid has a large impact on the flow of the wetting fluid. We find that the relative permeability of the non-wetting fluid shows less variation with stress than the wetting fluid, and that both fluids exhibit strong phase interference at intermediate saturations. Finally, we show early results from our experimental work currently underway to validate the modeling results.

  16. Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-01

    MFIX is a general-purpose hydrodynamic model that describes chemical reactions and heat transfer in dense or dilute fluid-solids flows, flows typically occurring in energy conversion and chemical processing reactors. With such information, the engineer can visualize the conditions in the reactor, conduct parametric studies and what-if experiments, and, thereby, assist in the design process. MFIX has the following modeling capabilities: mass and momentum balance equations for gas and multiple solids phases; a gas phase andmore » two solids phase energy equation; an arbitrary number of species balance equations for each of the phases; granular stress equations based on kinetic theory and frictional flow theory; a user-defined chemistry subroutine; three-dimensional Cartesin or cylindrical coordinate systems; nonuniform mesh size; impermeable and semi-permeable internal surfaces; user-friendly input data file; multiple, single-precision, binary direct-access output files that minimize disk storage and accelerate data retrieval; extensive error reporting; post-processors for creating animations and for extracting and manipulating output data.« less

  17. Direct and inverse modeling of multiphase flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.

    1995-10-01

    A modeling study is presented which demonstrates how the combination of simulation and optimization techniques can be used to improve the design of a multi-component remediation system. A series of computer codes has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to solve forward and inverse problems in groundwater hydrology. Simulations of non-isothermal, three-phase flow of volatile organic compounds in three-dimensional heterogeneous media were performed. Inverse modeling capabilities have been developed which can be used for both automatic model calibration and optimization of remediation schemes. In this study, we discuss a sequence of simulations to demonstrate the potential use of numerical models to design and analyze cleanup of a contaminated aquifer.

  18. Preconditioning methods for ideal and multiphase fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashish

    The objective of this study is to develop a preconditioning method for ideal and multiphase multispecies compressible fluid flow solver using homogeneous equilibrium mixture model. The mathematical model for fluid flow going through phase change uses density and temperature in the formulation, where the density represents the multiphase mixture density. The change of phase of the fluid is then explicitly determined using the equation of state of the fluid, which only requires temperature and mixture density. The method developed is based on a finite-volume framework in which the numerical fluxes are computed using Roe's approximate Riemann solver and the modified Harten, Lax and Van-leer scheme (HLLC). All speed Roe and HLLC flux based schemes have been developed either by using preconditioning or by directly modifying dissipation to reduce the effect of acoustic speed in its numerical dissipation when Mach number decreases. Preconditioning proposed by Briley, Taylor and Whitfield, Eriksson and Turkel are studied in this research, where as low dissipation schemes proposed by Rieper and Thornber, Mosedale, Drikakis, Youngs and Williams are also considered. Various preconditioners are evaluated in terms of development, performance, accuracy and limitations in simulations at various Mach numbers. A generalized preconditioner is derived which possesses well conditioned eigensystem for multiphase multispecies flow simulations. Validation and verification of the solution procedure are carried out on several small model problems with comparison to experimental, theoretical, and other numerical results. Preconditioning methods are evaluated using three basic geometries; 1) bump in a channel 2) flow over a NACA0012 airfoil and 3) flow over a cylinder, which are then compared with theoretical and numerical results. Multiphase capabilities of the solver are evaluated in cryogenic and non-cryogenic conditions. For cryogenic conditions the solver is evaluated by predicting

  19. A kinetic model for corrosion and precipitation in non-isothermal LBE flow loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, By Xiaoyi; Li, Ning; Mineev, Mark

    2001-08-01

    A kinetic model was developed to estimate the corrosion/precipitation rate in a non-isothermal liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) flow loop. The model was based on solving the mass transport equation with the assumptions that convective transport dominates in the longitudinal flow direction and diffusion dominates in the transverse direction. The species concentration at wall is assumed to be determined either by the solubility of species in LBE in the absence of oxygen or by the reduction reaction of the protective oxide film when active oxygen control is applied. Analyses show that the corrosion/precipitation rate depends on the flow velocity, the species diffusion rate, the oxygen concentration in LBE, as well as the temperature distribution along a loop. Active oxygen control can significantly reduce the corrosion/precipitation of the structural materials. It is shown that the highest corrosion/precipitation does not necessarily locate at places with the highest/lowest temperature. For a material testing loop being constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the highest corrosion occurs at the end of the heater zone, while the highest precipitation occurs in the return flow in the recuperator.

  20. Non-isothermal electro-osmotic flow in a microchannel with charge-modulated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Oscar; Sanchez, Salvador; Mendez, Federico

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we present an theoretical analysis of a nonisothermal electro-osmotic flow of a Newtonian fluid over charge-modulated surfaces in a microchannel. Here, the heating in the microchannel is due to the Joule effect caused by the imposition of an external electric field. The study is conducted through the use of perturbation techniques and is validated by means of numerical simulations. We consider that both, viscosity and electrical conductivity of the fluid are temperature-dependent; therefore, in order to determine the heat transfer process and the corresponding effects on the flow field, the governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy and electric potential have to be solved in a coupled manner. The principal obtained results evidence that the flow patterns are perturbed in a noticeable manner in comparison with the isothernal case. Our results may be used for increasing microfluidics mixing by conjugating thermal effects with the use of charge-modulated surfaces. This work has been supported by the research grants no. 220900 of Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT) and 20150919 of SIP-IPN at Mexico. F. Méndez acknowledges also the economical support of PAPIIT-UNAM under contract number IN112215.

  1. A monolithic FEM-multigrid solver for non-isothermal incompressible flow on general meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damanik, H.; Hron, J.; Ouazzi, A.; Turek, S.

    2009-06-01

    We present special numerical simulation methods for non-isothermal incompressible viscous fluids which are based on LBB-stable FEM discretization techniques together with monolithic multigrid solvers. For time discretization, we apply the fully implicit Crank-Nicolson scheme of 2nd order accuracy while we utilize the high order Q2P1 finite element pair for discretization in space which can be applied on general meshes together with local grid refinement strategies including hanging nodes. To treat the nonlinearities in each time step as well as for direct steady approaches, the resulting discrete systems are solved via a Newton method based on divided differences to calculate explicitly the Jacobian matrices. In each nonlinear step, the coupled linear subproblems are solved simultaneously for all quantities by means of a monolithic multigrid method with local multilevel pressure Schur complement smoothers of Vanka type. For validation and evaluation of the presented methodology, we perform the MIT benchmark 2001 [M.A. Christon, P.M. Gresho, S.B. Sutton, Computational predictability of natural convection flows in enclosures, in: First MIT Conference on Computational Fluid and Solid Mechanics, vol. 40, Elsevier, 2001, pp. 1465-1468] of natural convection flow in enclosures to compare our results with respect to accuracy and efficiency. Additionally, we simulate problems with temperature and shear dependent viscosity and analyze the effect of an additional dissipation term inside the energy equation. Moreover, we discuss how these FEM-multigrid techniques can be extended to monolithic approaches for viscoelastic flow problems.

  2. Interface effects on multiphase flows in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Duan Z

    2008-01-01

    Most models for multiphase flows in a porous medium are based on the straightforward extension of Darcy's law, in which each fluid phase is driven by its own pressure gradient. The pressure difference between the phases is thought to be an effect of surface tension and is called capillary pressure. Independent of Darcy's law, for liquid imbibition processes in a porous material, diffusion models are sometime used. In this paper, an ensemble phase averaging technique for continuous multi phase flows is applied to derive averaged equations and to examine the validity of the commonly used models. The closure for the averaged equations is quite complicated for general multiphase flows in a porous material. For flows with a small ratio of the characteristic length of the phase interfaces to the macroscopic length, the closure relations can be simplified significantly by an approximation with a second order error in the length ratio. The approximation reveals the information of the length scale separation obscured during the ensemble averaging process, and leads to an equation system similar to Darcy's law, but with additional terms. Based on interactions on phase interfaces, relations among closure quantities are studied.

  3. Experimental research of multiphase flow with cavitation in the nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozubkova, Milada; Bojko, Marian; Jablonska, Jana; Homa, Dorota; Tůma, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with the problems of cavitation in water flow in the nozzle. The area of research is divided into two directions (experimental and numerical research). During the experimental research the equipment with the nozzle is under the measurement and basic physical quantities such as pressure and volume flow rate are recorded. In the following phase measuring of noise which is generated during flow through the nozzle in the area of cavitation is measured at various operating conditions of the pump. In the second part the appropriate multiphase mathematical model including the consideration of cavitation is defined. Boundary conditions for numerical simulation are defined on the basis of experimental measurements. Undissolved air in the flow is taken into account to obtain pressure distribution in accordance to measured one. Results of the numerical simulation are presented by means of basic current quantities such as pressure, velocity and volume fractions of each phase. The conclusions obtained from experimental research of cavitation were applied to modify the multiphase mathematical model.

  4. Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows

    SciTech Connect

    Edited by Guenther, Chris; Garg, Rahul

    2013-08-19

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a workshop on non-Newtonian multiphase slurry at NETL’s Morgantown campus August 19 and 20, 2013. The objective of this special two-day meeting of 20-30 invited experts from industry, National Labs and academia was to identify and address technical issues associated with handling non-Newtonian multiphase slurries across various facilities managed by DOE. Particular emphasis during this workshop was placed on applications managed by the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The workshop was preceded by two webinars wherein personnel from ORP and NETL provided background information on the Hanford WTP project and discussed the critical design challenges facing this project. In non-Newtonian fluids, viscosity is not constant and exhibits a complex dependence on applied shear stress or deformation. Many applications under EM’s tank farm mission involve non-Newtonian slurries that are multiphase in nature; tank farm storage and handling, slurry transport, and mixing all involve multiphase flow dynamics, which require an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for rheological changes in non-Newtonian multiphase slurries (NNMS). To discuss the issues in predicting the behavior of NNMS, the workshop focused on two topic areas: (1) State-of-the-art in non-Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Flow, and (2) Scaling up with Confidence and Ensuring Safe and Reliable Long-Term Operation.

  5. Flow field velocity measurements for non-isothermal systems. [of chemically reactive flow inside fused silica CVD reactor vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. J.; Hyer, P. V.; Culotta, P. W.; Clark, I. O.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental techniques which can be potentially utilized to measure the gas velocity fields in nonisothermal CVD systems both in ground-based and space-based investigations are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of a three-component laser velocimetry (LV) system that was adapted specifically for quantitative determination of the mixed convective flows in a chamber for crystal growth and film formation by CVD are discussed. Data from a horizontal research CVD reactor indicate that current models for the effects of thermophoretic force are not adequate to predict the thermophoretic bias in arbitrary flow configurations. It is concluded that LV techniques are capable of characterizing the fluid dynamics of a CVD reactor at typical growth temperatures. Thermal effects are shown to dominate and stabilize the fluid dynamics of the reactor. Heating of the susceptor increases the gas velocities parallel to the face of a slanted susceptor by up to a factor of five.

  6. Interfacial Pressures and Shocks in a Multiphase Flow mix Model

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D E

    2004-10-01

    Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities [2, 3]. Such an approach works poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. I suggest that this difficulty can be overcome by adding an additional source to the turbulence kinetic energy equation. A variety of constraints on such a source are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

  7. Investigation of instability of displacement front in non-isothermal flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syulyukina, Natalia; Pergament, Anna

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the issues of front instability arising in non-isothermal flow displacement processes. The problem of two-phase flow of immiscible fluids, oil and water, is considered, including sources and dependence of viscosity on temperature. Three-dimensional problem with perturbation close to the injection well was considered to find the characteristic scale of the instability. As a result of numerical calculations, theoretical studies on the development of the instability due to the fact that the viscosity of the displacing fluid is less than the viscosity of the displaced have been confirmed. The influence of temperature on the evolution of the instability was considered. For this purpose, the dependence of oil viscosity on temperature has been added to the problem. Numerical calculations were carried out for different values of temperature and it was shown that with increasing of production rate. Thus, it has been demonstrated that the selection of the optimal temperature for injected fluids a possible way for stimulation of oil production also delaying the field water-flooding. This work was supporting by the RFBR grant 12-01-00793-a.

  8. Surface tension and buoyancy-driven flow in a non-isothermal liquid bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Alexander, J. I. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq equations governing the transport of momentum, mass and heat in a nonisothermal liquid bridge with a temperature-dependent surface tension are solved using a vorticity-stream-function formulation together with a nonorthogonal coordinate transformation. The equations are discretized using a pseudo-unsteady semi-implicit finite difference scheme and are solved by the ADI method. A Picard-type iteration is adopted which consists of inner and outer iterative processes. The outer iteration is used to update the shape of the free surface. Two schemes have been used for the outer iteration; both use the force balance normal to the free surface as the distinguished boundary condition. The first scheme involves successive approximation by the direct solution of the distinguished boundary condition. The second scheme uses the artificial force imbalance between the fluid pressure, viscous and capillary forces at the free surface which arises when the boundary condition for force balance normal to the surface is not satisfied. This artificial imbalance is then used to change the surface shape until the distinguished boundary condition is satisfied. These schemes have been used to examine a variety of model liquid bridge situations including purely thermocapillary-driven flow situations and mixed thermocapillary- and bouyancy-driven flow.

  9. Multiphase Flow of Immiscible Fluids on Unstructured Moving Meshes.

    PubMed

    Misztal, Marek K; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam; Fursund, Jens; Christensen, Brian Bunch; Bærentzen, J Andreas; Bridson, Robert

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted by a majority of fluid simulation techniques that use tetrahedral meshes. We characterize fluid simulation as an optimization problem allowing for full coupling of the pressure and velocity fields and the incorporation of a second-order surface energy. We introduce a preconditioner based on the diagonal Schur complement and solve our optimization on the GPU. We provide the results of parameter studies as well as a performance analysis of our method, together with suggestions for performance optimization. PMID:23836703

  10. Multiphase flow of immiscible fluids on unstructured moving meshes.

    PubMed

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam; Fursund, Jens; Christensen, Brian Bunch; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Bridson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted by a majority of fluid simulation techniques that use tetrahedral meshes. We characterize fluid simulation as an optimization problem allowing for full coupling of the pressure and velocity fields and the incorporation of a second-order surface energy. We introduce a preconditioner based on the diagonal Schur complement and solve our optimization on the GPU. We provide the results of parameter studies as well as a performance analysis of our method, together with suggestions for performance optimization. PMID:24201322

  11. A Pressure Based Multi-Fluid Algorithm for Multiphase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, P. J.; Zhang, W. P.; Lei, G. D.; Zhu, M. G.

    A new finite volume-based numerical algorithm for predicting multiphase flow phenomena is presented. The method is formulated on an orthogonal coordinate system in collocated primitive variables. The SIMPLE-like algorithms are based on the prediction and correction procedure, and they are extended for all speed range. The object of the present work is to extent single phase SIMPLE algorithm to multiphase flow. The overview of the algorithm is described and relevant numerical issues are discussed extensively, including implicit process of the moment interaction with “partial elimination” (of the drag term), introduction of under-relaxation factor, formulation of momentum interpolation, and pressure correction equation. This model is based on the k-ɛ model assumed that the turbulence is dictated by the continuous phase. Thus only the transport equation for the continuous phase turbulence energy kc needed to be solved while a algebraic turbulence model is used for dispersed phase. The present author also designed a general program with FORTRAN90 program language for the new algorithm based on the household code General Transport Equation Analyzer (GTEA). The performance of the new method is assessed by solving a 3D bubbly two-phase flow in a vertical pipe. A good agreement is achieved between the numerical result and experimental data in the literature.

  12. Equations and simulations for multiphase compressible gas-dust flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oran, Elaine; Houim, Ryan

    2014-11-01

    Dust-gas multiphase flows are important in physical scenarios such as dust explosions in coal mines, asteroid impact disturbing lunar regolith, and soft aircraft landings dispersing desert or beach sand. In these cases, the gas flow regime can range from highly subsonic and nearly incompressible to supersonic and shock-laden flow, the grain packing can range from fully packed to completely dispersed, and both the gas and the dust can range from chemically inert to highly exothermic. To cover the necessary parameter range in a single model, we solve coupled sets of Navier-Stokes equations describing the background gas and the dust. As an example, a reactive-dust explosion that results in a type of shock-flame complex is described and discussed. Sponsored by the University of Maryland through Minta Martin Endowment Funds in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, and through the Glenn L. Martin Institute Chaired Professorship at the A. James Clark School of Engineering.

  13. Weakly nonlinear stability analysis of non-isothermal Poiseuille flow in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Manish K.; Bera, P.

    2015-06-01

    A weakly nonlinear stability theory in terms of Landau equation is developed to analyze the nonlinear saturation of stably stratified non-isothermal Poiseuille flow in a vertical channel. The results are presented with respect to fluids: mercury, gases, liquids, and heavy oils. The weakly nonlinear stability results predict only the supercritical instability, in agreement with the published result [Y. C. Chen and J. N. Chung, "A direct numerical simulation of K and H-type flow transition in heated vertical channel," Comput. Fluids 32, 795-822 (2003)] based on direct numerical simulation. Apart from this, the influence of nonlinear interaction among different superimposed waves on the heat transfer rate, real part of wavespeed, and friction coefficient on the wall is also investigated. A substantial enhancement (reduction) in heat transfer rate (friction coefficient) is found for liquids and heavy oils from the basic state beyond the critical Rayleigh number. The amplitude analysis indicates that the equilibrium amplitude decreases on increasing the value of Reynolds number. However, in the case of mercury, influence of nonlinear interaction on the variation of equilibrium amplitude, heat transfer rate, wavespeed, as well as friction coefficient is complex and subtle. The analysis of the nonlinear energy spectra for the disturbance also supports the supercritical instability at and beyond the critical point. Finally, the effect of superimposed waves on the pattern of secondary flow, based on linear stability theory, is also studied. It has been found that the impact of nonlinear interaction of waves on the pattern of secondary flow for mercury is weak compared to gases, which is the consequence of negligible modification in the buoyant production of disturbance kinetic energy of the mercury.

  14. Modeling oceanic multiphase flow by using Lagrangian particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    While the density of seawater is basically determined by its temperature, salinity and pressure, the effective density becomes higher when the water mass contains suspended sediment. On the other hands, effective density declines when water mass contains fine scale materials of lower density such as bubbles and ice crystals. Such density anomaly induced by small scale materials suspended in water masses sometimes plays important roles in the sub-mesoscale ocean physics. To simulate these small scale oceanic multiphase flow, a new modeling framework using an online Lagrangian particle tracking method is developed. A Lagrangian particle tracking method has substantial advantages such as an explicit treatment of buoyancy force acting on each individual particle, no numerical diffusion and dissipation, high dynamic range and an ability to track the history and each individual particle. However, its numerical cost causes difficulty when we try to simulate a large number of particles. In the present study we implement a numerically efficient particle tracking scheme using linked-list data structure, which is coupled with a nonhydrostatic dynamical core. This newly developed model successfully reproduces characteristics of some interesting small scale multiphase processes, for example hyperpycnal flow (a sediment-rich river water plume trapped at ocean floor) and grease ice cover (a slurry mixture of frazil ice crystals and seawater).

  15. Hot-wire calibration in a nonisothermal incompressible pressure variant flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Nowlin, Scott R.; Eaton, Frank D.; Bishop, Kenneth P.; McCrae, Kimberley A.

    1999-08-01

    The calibration procedure for a hot-wire anemometer system operating in a non-isothermal pressure-variant flow field is presented. Sensing of atmospheric velocity and temperature fluctuations from an altitude-variant platform using hot- wire anemometry equipment operating in both constant- temperature and constant-current modes requires calibration for velocity, temperature, and atmospheric pressure variations. Calibration tests to provide the range of velocity, temperature and pressure variations anticipated during Air Force Research Lab, Directed Energy Directorate- sponsored kite/tethered-balloon experiments were conducted and the result of these tests presented. The calibration tests were performed by placing the kite/tethered-balloon sensor package on a vehicle and driving from Kirtland AFB, NM to the top of Sandia Crest, a 10678 ft mountain range to the east of Albuquerque, NM. By varying the velocity of the van and conducting the test at different times of the day, variations in velocity, temperature and pressure within the range of those encountered during the kite/tethered-balloon experiments were obtained. The method of collapsing the calibration data is presented. Problems associated with collecting hot-wire anemometry data in a non-laboratory environment are discussed. Example data sets of temperature and velocity collected during the kite/tethered-balloon experiments are presented.

  16. Advanced tomographic flow diagnostics for opaque multiphase fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, J.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Adkins, D.R.; Jackson, N.B.; Shollenberger, K.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents the work performed for the ``Advanced Tomographic Flow Diagnostics for Opaque Multiphase Fluids`` LDRD (Laboratory-Directed Research and Development) project and is presented as the fulfillment of the LDRD reporting requirement. Dispersed multiphase flows, particularly gas-liquid flows, are industrially important to the chemical and applied-energy industries, where bubble-column reactors are employed for chemical synthesis and waste treatment. Due to the large range of length scales (10{sup {minus}6}-10{sup 1}m) inherent in real systems, direct numerical simulation is not possible at present, so computational simulations are forced to use models of subgrid-scale processes, the accuracy of which strongly impacts simulation fidelity. The development and validation of such subgrid-scale models requires data sets at representative conditions. The ideal measurement techniques would provide spatially and temporally resolved full-field measurements of the distributions of all phases, their velocity fields, and additional associated quantities such as pressure and temperature. No technique or set of techniques is known that satisfies this requirement. In this study, efforts are focused on characterizing the spatial distribution of the phases in two-phase gas-liquid flow and in three-phase gas-liquid-solid flow. Due to its industrial importance, the bubble-column geometry is selected for diagnostics development and assessment. Two bubble-column testbeds are utilized: one at laboratory scale and one close to industrial scale. Several techniques for measuring the phase distributions at conditions of industrial interest are examined: level-rise measurements, differential-pressure measurements, bulk electrical impedance measurements, electrical bubble probes, x-ray tomography, gamma-densitometry tomography, and electrical impedance tomography.

  17. Multiple light scattering methods for multiphase flow diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevadeordal, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Multiphase flows of gases and liquids containing droplets, bubbles, or particulates present light scattering imaging challenges due to the interference from each phase, such as secondary reflections, extinctions, absorptions, and refractions. These factors often prevent the unambiguous detection of each phase and also produce undesired beam steering. The effects can be especially complex in presence of dense phases, multispecies flows, and high pressure environments. This investigation reports new methods for overcoming these effects for quantitative measurements of velocity, density, and temperature fields. The methods are based on light scattering techniques combining Mie and filtered Rayleigh scattering and light extinction analyses and measurements. The optical layout is designed to perform multiple property measurements with improved signal from each phase via laser spectral and polarization characterization, etalon decontamination, and use of multiple wavelengths and imaging detectors.

  18. Non-isothermal flow in low permeable porous media: A comparison of Richards' and two-phase flow approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Rutqvist, J.; Gorke, U.-J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Kolditz, O.

    2010-03-15

    The present work compares the performance of two alternative flow models for the simulation of thermal-hydraulic coupled processes in low permeable porous media: non-isothermal Richards and two-phase flow concepts. Both models take vaporization processes into account: however, the Richards model neglects dynamic pressure variations and bulk flow of the gaseous phase. For the comparison of the two approaches first published data from a laboratory experiment is studied involving thermally driven moisture flow in a partially saturated bentonite sample. Then a benchmark test of longer-term thermal-hydraulic behavior in the engineered barrier system of a geological nuclear waste repository is analyzed (DECOVALEX project). It was found that both models can be used to reproduce the vaporization process if the intrinsic permeability is relative high. However, when a thermal-hydraulic coupled problem has the same low intrinsic permeability for both the liquid and the gas phase, only the two-phase flow approach provides reasonable results.

  19. Mixing and Demixing Processes in Multiphase Flows With Application to Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Rand (Editor); Schafer, Charles F. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    A workshop on transport processes in multiphase flow was held at the Marshall Space Flight Center on February 25 and 26, 1988. The program, abstracts and text of the presentations at this workshop are presented. The objective of the workshop was to enhance our understanding of mass, momentum, and energy transport processes in laminar and turbulent multiphase shear flows in combustion and propulsion environments.

  20. Online recognition of the multiphase flow regime and study of slug flow in pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liejin, Guo; Bofeng, Bai; Liang, Zhao; Xin, Wang; Hanyang, Gu

    2009-02-01

    Multiphase flow is the phenomenon existing widely in nature, daily life, as well as petroleum and chemical engineering industrial fields. The interface structure among multiphase and their movement are complicated, which distribute random and heterogeneously in the spatial and temporal scales and have multivalue of the flow structure and state[1]. Flow regime is defined as the macro feature about the multiphase interface structure and its distribution, which is an important feature to describe multiphase flow. The energy and mass transport mechanism differ much for each flow regimes. It is necessary to solve the flow regime recognition to get a clear understanding of the physical phenomena and their mechanism of multiphase flow. And the flow regime is one of the main factors affecting the online measurement accuracy of phase fraction, flow rate and other phase parameters. Therefore, it is of great scientific and technological importance to develop new principles and methods of multiphase flow regime online recognition, and of great industrial background. In this paper, the key reasons that the present method cannot be used to solve the industrial multiphase flow pattern recognition are clarified firstly. Then the prerequisite to realize the online recognition of multiphase flow regime is analyzed, and the recognition rules for partial flow pattern are obtained based on the massive experimental data. The standard templates for every flow regime feature are calculated with self-organization cluster algorithm. The multi-sensor data fusion method is proposed to realize the online recognition of multiphase flow regime with the pressure and differential pressure signals, which overcomes the severe influence of fluid flow velocity and the oil fraction on the recognition. The online recognition method is tested in the practice, which has less than 10 percent measurement error. The method takes advantages of high confidence, good fault tolerance and less requirement of

  1. Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Beñat; Afonso, Juan Carlos; Zlotnik, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow (MPMCRF) controls a number of important complex geodynamic/geochemical problems, such as melt generation and percolation, metasomatism, rheological weakening, magmatic differentiation, ore emplacement, and fractionation of chemical elements, to name a few. These interacting processes occur over very different spatial and temporal scales and under very different physico-chemical conditions. Therefore, there is a strong motivation in geodynamics for investigating the equations governing MPMCRF, their mathematical structure and properties, and the numerical techniques necessary to obtain reliable and accurate results. In this contribution we present results from a novel numerical framework to solve multiscale MPMCRF problems in geodynamic contexts. Our approach is based on the effective tracking of the most basic building blocks: internal energy and chemical composition. This is achieved through the combination of rigorous solutions to the conservation equations (mass, energy and momentum) for each dynamic phase (instead of the more common "mixture-type" approach) and the transport equation for the chemical species, within the context of classical irreversible thermodynamics. Interfacial processes such as phase changes, chemical diffusion+reaction, and surface tension effects are explicitly incorporated in the context of ensemble averaging. Phase assemblages, mineral and melt compositions, and all other physical parameters of multi-phase systems are obtained through dynamic free-energy minimization procedures.

  2. Inhibition of slug front corrosion in multiphase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.J.; Jepson, W.P.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion at the slug front at the bottom of a pipeline is identified as one of the worst cases of corrosion occurring in the pipeline which carries unprocessed multiphase production with a high level of CO{sub 2} gas. One objective of the study in recommending a subsea completion to shore was to determine if commercial corrosion inhibitors can control this type of corrosion using carbon steel pipeline. Thus, inhibitors which showed excellent performance in the lab using the Rotating Cylinder Electrode system (RCE) were further evaluated to confirm their performance in a flow loop simulating the test conditions predicted from the flow modeling for the proposed pipeline. The performance profile of two commercial inhibitors were determined in a 4 in. flow loop at 7O C, 100 psig CO{sub 2} partial pressure in corrosive brines with or without ethylene glycol and/or light hydrocarbon. Results showed that the carbon steel pipeline could be adequately protected at low temperature using a commercial corrosion inhibitor to meet the designed life of the pipeline. Ethylene glycol, which is used in the pipeline to prevent hydrate formation, reduces the corrosivity of the brine and gives no effect on inhibitor performance under the slug flow conditions. A good agreement in inhibitor performance was observed between the flow loop and the RCE testing. The uninhibited corrosion rate of the test brine in this study is in good agreement with the predicted value using deWaard and Williams correlation for CO{sub 2} corrosion.

  3. Multicomponent, multiphase flow in porous media with temperature variation

    SciTech Connect

    Wingard, J.S.; Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1990-10-01

    Recovery of hydrocarbons from porous media is an ongoing concern. Advanced techniques augment conventional recovery methods by injecting fluids that favorably interact with the oil. These fluids interact with the oil by energy transfer, in the case of steam injection, or by mass transfer, as in a miscible gas flood. Often both thermal and compositional considerations are important. An understanding of these injection methods requires knowledge of how temperature variations, phase equilibrium and multiphase flow in porous media interact. The material balance for each component and energy balance are cast as a system of non-strictly hyperbolic partial differential equations. This system of equations is solved using the method of characteristics. The model takes into account the phase behavior by using the Peng-Robinson equation of state to partition the individual components into different phases. Temperature effects are accounted for by the energy balance. Flow effects are modelled by using fractional flow curves and a Stone's three phase relative permeability model. Three problems are discussed. The first problem eliminates the phase behavior aspect of the problem by studying the flow of a single component as it undergoes an isothermal phase change. The second couples the effects of temperature and flow behavior by including a second component that is immiscible with the original component. Phase behavior is added by using a set of three partially miscible components that partition into two or three separate phases. 66 refs., 54 figs., 14 tabs.

  4. Numerical solution of an optimal control problem governed by three-phase non-isothermal flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirbekov, Nurlan M.; Baigereyev, Dossan R.

    2016-08-01

    The paper focuses on the numerical implementation of a model optimal control problem governed by equations of three-phase non-isothermal flow in porous media. The objective is to achieve preassigned temperature distribution along the reservoir at a given time of development by controlling mass flow rate of heat transfer agent on the injection well. The problem of optimal control is formulated, the adjoint problem is presented, and an algorithm for the numerical solution is proposed. Results of computational experiments are presented for a test problem.

  5. Numerical modeling of Non-isothermal two-phase two-component flow process with phase change phenomena in the porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Shao, H.; Thullner, M.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    In applications of Deep Geothermal reservoirs, thermal recovery processes, and contaminated groundwater sites, the multiphase multicomponent flow and transport processes are often considered the most important underlying physical process. In particular, the behavior of phase appearance and disappearance is the critical to the performance of many geo-reservoirs, and great interests exit in the scientific community to simulate this coupled process. This work is devoted to the modeling and simulation of two-phase, two components flow and transport in the porous medium, whereas the phase change behavior in non-isothermal conditions is considered. In this work, we have implemented the algorithm developed by Marchand, et al., into the open source scientific software OpenGeoSys. The governing equation is formulated in terms of molar fraction of the light component and mean pressure as the persistent primary variables, which leads to a fully coupled nonlinear PDE system. One of the important advantages of this approach is avoiding the primary variables switching between single phase and two phase zones, so that this uniform system can be applied to describe the behavior of phase change. On the other hand, due to the number of unkown variables closure relationships are also formulated to close the whole equation system by using the approach of complementarity constrains. For the numerical technical scheme: The standard Galerkin Finite element method is applied for space discretization, while a fully implicit scheme for the time discretization, and Newton-Raphson method is utilized for the global linearization, as well as the closure relationship. This model is verified based on one test case developed to simulate the heat pipe problem. This benchmark involves two-phase two-component flow in saturated/unsaturated porous media under non-isothermal condition, including phase change and mineral-water geochemical reactive transport processes. The simulation results will be

  6. On the lattice Boltzmann method for multiphase flows with large density ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Pitsch, Heinz

    2015-12-01

    An analysis of the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for multiphase flows with large density ratios is presented. It is shown that for incompressible, multiphase LB methods, the divergence-free condition is not satisfied within the formal accuracy of the LB method, when the density ratio between the two phases is large enough. The discrete differentiation-by-parts rule is responsible for this error. A new multiphase LB method to resolve this issue is proposed.

  7. Convection in Multiphase Fluid Flows Using Lattice Boltzmann Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, L.; Perlekar, P.; Sbragaglia, M.; Toschi, F.

    2012-03-01

    We present high-resolution numerical simulations of convection in multiphase flows (boiling) using a novel algorithm based on a lattice Boltzmann method. We first study the thermodynamical and kinematic properties of the algorithm. Then, we perform a series of 3D numerical simulations changing the mean properties in the phase diagram and compare convection with and without phase coexistence at Rayleigh number Ra˜107. We show that in the presence of nucleating bubbles non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq effects develop, the mean temperature profile becomes asymmetric, and heat-transfer and heat-transfer fluctuations are enhanced, at all Ra studied. We also show that small-scale properties of velocity and temperature fields are strongly affected by the presence of the buoyant bubble leading to high non-Gaussian profiles in the bulk.

  8. PArallel Reacting Multiphase FLOw Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-06-01

    PARMFLO is a parallel multiphase reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. It can perform steady or unsteady simulations in three space dimensions. It is intended for use in engineering CFD analysis of industrial flow system components. Its parallel processing capabilities allow it to be applied to problems that use at least an order of magnitude more computational cells than the number that can be used on a typical single processor workstation (about 106 cellsmore » in parallel processing mode versus about io cells in serial processing mode). Alternately, by spreading the work of a CFD problem that could be run on a single workstation over a group of computers on a network, it can bring the runtime down by an order of magnitude or more (typically from many days to less than one day). The software was implemented using the industry standard Message-Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition in one spatial direction. The phases of a flow problem may include an ideal gas mixture with an arbitrary number of chemical species, and dispersed droplet and particle phases. Regions of porous media may also be included within the domain. The porous media may be packed beds, foams, or monolith catalyst supports. With these features, the code is especially suited to analysis of mixing of reactants in the inlet chamber of catalytic reactors coupled to computation of product yields that result from the flow of the mixture through the catalyst coaled support structure.« less

  9. PArallel Reacting Multiphase FLOw Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lottes, Steven A.

    2002-06-01

    PARMFLO is a parallel multiphase reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. It can perform steady or unsteady simulations in three space dimensions. It is intended for use in engineering CFD analysis of industrial flow system components. Its parallel processing capabilities allow it to be applied to problems that use at least an order of magnitude more computational cells than the number that can be used on a typical single processor workstation (about 106 cells in parallel processing mode versus about io cells in serial processing mode). Alternately, by spreading the work of a CFD problem that could be run on a single workstation over a group of computers on a network, it can bring the runtime down by an order of magnitude or more (typically from many days to less than one day). The software was implemented using the industry standard Message-Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition in one spatial direction. The phases of a flow problem may include an ideal gas mixture with an arbitrary number of chemical species, and dispersed droplet and particle phases. Regions of porous media may also be included within the domain. The porous media may be packed beds, foams, or monolith catalyst supports. With these features, the code is especially suited to analysis of mixing of reactants in the inlet chamber of catalytic reactors coupled to computation of product yields that result from the flow of the mixture through the catalyst coaled support structure.

  10. Multiphase Flow Technology Impacts on Thermal Control Systems for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John; Sankovic, John; Lekan, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The Two-Phase Flow Facility (TPHIFFy) Project focused on bridging the critical knowledge gap by developing and demonstrating critical multiphase fluid products for advanced life support, thermal management and power conversion systems that are required to enable the Vision for Space Exploration. Safety and reliability of future systems will be enhanced by addressing critical microgravity fluid physics issues associated with flow boiling, condensation, phase separation, and system stability. The project included concept development, normal gravity testing, and reduced gravity aircraft flight campaigns, in preparation for the development of a space flight experiment implementation. Data will be utilized to develop predictive models that could be used for system design and operation. A single fluid, two-phase closed thermodynamic loop test bed was designed, assembled and tested. The major components in this test bed include: a boiler, a condenser, a phase separator and a circulating pump. The test loop was instrumented with flow meters, thermocouples, pressure transducers and both high speed and normal speed video cameras. A low boiling point surrogate fluid, FC-72, was selected based on scaling analyses using preliminary designs for operational systems. Preliminary results are presented which include flow regime transitions and some observations regarding system stability.

  11. Thermodynamic characterization of polymeric materials subjected to non-isothermal flows: Experiment, theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Tudor Constantin

    Frictional or viscous heating phenomena are found in virtually every industrial operation dealing with processing of polymeric materials. This work is aimed at addressing some of the existing shortcomings in modeling non-isothermal polymer flowing processes. Specifically, existing theories suggest that when a polymer melt is subjected to deformation, its internal energy changes very little compared to its conformational entropy. This statement forms the definition of the Theory of Purely Entropic Elasticity (PEE) applied to polymer melts. Under the auspices of this theory, the temperature evolution equation for modeling the polymer melt under an applied deformation is greatly simplified. In this study, using a combination of experimental measurements, continuum-based computer modeling and molecular simulation techniques, the validity of this theory is tested for a wide range of processing conditions. First, we present experimental evidence that this theory is only valid for low deformation regimes. Furthermore, using molecular theory, a direct correlation is found between the relaxation characteristics of the polymer and the flow regime where this theory stops being valid. We present a new and improved form of the temperature equation containing an extra term previously neglected under the PEE assumption, followed by a recipe for evaluating the extra term. The corrected temperature equation is found to give more accurate predictions for the temperature profiles in the high flow rate regimes, in excellent agreement with our experimental measurements. Next, in order to gain a molecular-level understanding of our experimental findings, a series of polydisperse linear alkane systems with average chain lengths between 24 and 78 carbon atoms are modeled with an applied "orienting field" using a highly efficient non-equilibrium Monte Carlo scheme. Our simulation results appear to substantiate our experimental findings. The internal energy change of the oriented

  12. Multiphase ferrofluid flows for micro-particle focusing and separation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ran; Wang, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Ferrofluids have demonstrated great potential for a variety of manipulations of diamagnetic (or non-magnetic) micro-particles/cells in microfluidics, including sorting, focusing, and enriching. By utilizing size dependent magnetophoresis velocity, most of the existing techniques employ single phase ferrofluids to push the particles towards the channel walls. In this work, we demonstrate a novel strategy for focusing and separating diamagnetic micro-particles by using the laminar fluid interface of two co-flowing fluids-a ferrofluid and a non-magnetic fluid. Next to the microfluidic channel, microscale magnets are fabricated to generate strong localized magnetic field gradients and forces. Due to the magnetic force, diamagnetic particles suspended in the ferrofluid phase migrate across the ferrofluid stream at the size-dependent velocities. Because of the low Reynolds number and high Péclet number associated with the flow, the fluid interface is sharp and stable. When the micro-particles migrate to the interface, they are accumulated near the interface, resulting in effective focusing and separation of particles. We investigated several factors that affect the focusing and separation efficiency, including susceptibility of the ferrofluid, distance between the microfluidic channel and microscale magnet, and width of the microfluidic channel. This concept can be extended to multiple fluid interfaces. For example, a complete separation of micro-particles was demonstrated by using a three-stream multiphase flow configuration. PMID:27190567

  13. Towards a Modern Theory of Multiphase Filtration Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    An alternative theoretical model of joint filtration flow of immiscible incompressible fluids is presented. The model takes into account relaxation processes due to the interchange of the fluids between pores of difference sizes which is driven by capillary forces. The fluids occupy connected regions in a four-dimensional space formed by three coordinates and the pore length scale. When the fluid exchange between pores of given sizes is effected by way of successive flow through pores of all the intermediate sizes, the pressure within each region is governed by a hyperbolic equation, the role of time being played by the pore linear scale. Pressure jumps across hypersurfaces separating the regions equal corresponding values of the capillary pressure. A supplementary condition at any such hypersurface requires the speed of its displacement in the four-dimensional space to coincide with the normal velocity components of both the adjoining fluids. As a result, a principally new statement of multiphase filtration flow problems is gained with allowance for capillary relaxation in the porous space.

  14. Rheological flow laws for multiphase magmas: An empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Mattia; Cordonnier, Benoît; Ulmer, Peter; Caricchi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The physical properties of magmas play a fundamental role in controlling the eruptive dynamics of volcanoes. Magmas are multiphase mixtures of crystals and gas bubbles suspended in a silicate melt and, to date, no flow laws describe their rheological behaviour. In this study we present a set of equations quantifying the flow of high-viscosity (> 105 Pa·s) silica-rich multiphase magmas, containing both crystals (24-65 vol.%) and gas bubbles (9-12 vol.%). Flow laws were obtained using deformation experiments performed at high temperature (673-1023 K) and pressure (200-250 MPa) over a range of strain-rates (5 · 10- 6 s- 1 to 4 · 10- 3 s- 1), conditions that are relevant for volcanic conduit processes of silica-rich systems ranging from crystal-rich lava domes to crystal-poor obsidian flows. We propose flow laws in which stress exponent, activation energy, and pre-exponential factor depend on a parameter that includes the volume fraction of weak phases (i.e. melt and gas bubbles) present in the magma. The bubble volume fraction has opposing effects depending on the relative crystal volume fraction: at low crystallinity bubble deformation generates gas connectivity and permeability pathways, whereas at high crystallinity bubbles do not connect and act as "lubricant" objects during strain localisation within shear bands. We show that such difference in the evolution of texture is mainly controlled by the strain-rate (i.e. the local stress within shear bands) at which the experiments are performed, and affect the empirical parameters used for the flow laws. At low crystallinity (< 44 vol.%) we observe an increase of viscosity with increasing strain-rate, while at high crystallinity (> 44 vol.%) the viscosity decreases with increasing strain-rate. Because these behaviours are also associated with modifications of sample textures during the experiment and, thus, are not purely the result of different deformation rates, we refer to "apparent shear-thickening" and

  15. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  16. Simulations of soluble surfactants in 3D multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradoglu, Metin; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2014-10-01

    A finite-difference/front-tracking method is developed for simulations of soluble surfactants in 3D multiphase flows. The interfacial and bulk surfactant concentration evolution equations are solved fully coupled with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. A non-linear equation of state is used to relate interfacial surface tension to surfactant concentration at the interface. Simple test cases are designed to validate different parts of the numerical algorithm and the computational results are found to be in a good agreement with the analytical solutions. The numerical algorithm is parallelized using a domain-decomposition method. It is then applied to study the effects of soluble surfactants on the motion of buoyancy-driven bubbles in a straight square channel in nearly undeformable (spherical) and deformable (ellipsoidal) regimes. Finally the method is used to examine the effects of soluble surfactants on the lateral migration of bubbles in a pressure-driven channel flow. It is found that surfactant-induced Marangoni stresses counteract the shear-induced lift force and can reverse the lateral bubble migration completely, i.e., the contaminated bubble drifts away from the channel wall and stabilizes at the center of the channel when the surfactant-induced Marangoni stresses are sufficiently large.

  17. Simulation of Multiphase FLOW at the Pore Scale: Doable, Useful?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchelepi, H.; Abu AlSaud, M.; Soulaine, C.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss the shotcomings of Darcy-scale formulations and constitutive relations for (unstable) immiscible multiphase flow in natural porous media, and we argue for a more rigorous connection between the Darcy-scale representation and the pore-scale dynamics. We then discuss the challenges associated with so-called Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) at the pore scale. The emphasis is on contact-line dynamics for non-zero contact angles. We argue that accurate description of the (1) fluid-fluid and (2) fluid-fluid-solid contact lines, as well as, (3) the hysteretic ‎behavior of immiscible displacement processes are needed before claims that Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of pore-scale physics is doable. Then, we describe our early attempts to devise a hybrid level-set and volume-of-fluid approach to model the evolution of sharp immiscible interfaces in natural porous media. We also discuss the challenges associated with the translation of two-phase flow dynamics to "Darcy" scales.

  18. Laser velocimeter measurements of multiphase flow of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Chen, R.C.; Bhunia, S.

    1989-01-01

    A unique refractive index matched facility for studying solid-liquid multiphase flow has been developed. The refractive index matching of the solid and the liquid allows the use of non-intrusive Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) to measure the solid and the liquid velocities. These measurements will be useful in developing a better understanding of solid-liquid flows, especially solid-liquid and solid-solid interactions. Silica gel and 50% sodium iodide solution in water (refractive index {approx}1.443) are used as the refractive index matched solid and liquid respectively. A two color back scatter mode LDV is used for making velocity measurements. Tests were conducted in solid-liquid slurries with volumetric solid concentration levels of 5% and 15% in the Reynolds number (Re) range of 400 to 9200. Silica gel particles of mean diameter 40 microns were used. Measurements included mapping of the solid and liquid velocities and obtaining the pressure drop data. Signal processing technique utilizing histogram of velocity measurements made at a point and signal amplitude discrimination was successfully used for differentiating between solid and liquid velocities. 34 refs., 61 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Multiphase flow in complex fracture apertures under a wide range of flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Meakin, Paul; McCreery, Gleen E.; McEligot, Donald; Rothman, Daniel H.

    2005-06-01

    The primary purpose of this project is to use a combination of computer modeling and laboratory experiments to obtain a better understanding of multiphase flow in geometrically complex fracture apertures under a wide range of flow conditions. Because most traditional grid-based numeral methods perform poorly for multiphase flows with complex dynamic interfaces due to problems such as artificial interface broadening, grid entanglement, loss or gain of mass and their inability to handle fluid-fluid-solid contact line dynamics, the modeling component of the program relies primarily on particle based methods. In particle based models, the fluid-fluid interfaces move as the particles representing the fluids move--there is no need for explicit interface tracking, and no artificial front broadening. In addition, the fluid-fluid-solid contact line dynamics is also handled automatically by adjusting the interactions between the fluid particles and the particles used to represent solid boundaries. However, it can be difficult to select fluid-particle/solid-particle interactions that reproduce the wetting behaviors observed in experimental or natural systems. Because, different model approaches have characteristic strengths and weaknesses, three different classes of particle-based models (lattice Boltzmann, dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics) are being employed in this program. This will allow us to achieve our objective of simulating multiphase flow under a wide range of flow conditions for a wide range of fluid properties.

  20. Investigation of hydrate formation and transportability in multiphase flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Giovanny A.

    The oil and gas industry is moving towards offshore developments in more challenging environments, where evaluating hydrate plugging risks to avoid operational/safety hazards becomes more difficult (Sloan, 2005). Even though mechanistic models for hydrate plug formation have been developed, components for a full comprehensive model are still missing. Prior to this work, research efforts were focused on flowing hydrate particles with relatively little research on hydrate accumulation, leaving hydrate deposition in multiphase flow an unexplored subject. The focus of this thesis was to better understand hydrate deposition as a form of accumu- lation in pipelines. To incorporate the multiphase flow effect, hydrate formation experiments were carried out at varying water cut (WC) from 15 to 100 vol.%, liquid loading (LL) from 50 to 85 vol.%, mixture velocity (vmix) from 0.75 to 3 m/s, for three fluids systems (100 % WC, water in Conroe crude oil emulsions and King Ranch condensate + water) on the ExxonMobil flowloop (4 in. nominal size and 314 ft. long) at Friendswood, TX. For the 100 % WC flowloop tests, hydrate particle distribution transitions beyond a critical hydrate volume concentration, observed values were between 8.2 to 29.4 vol.%, causing a sudden increase in pressure drop (DP). A revised correlation of the transition as a function of Reynolds number and liquid loading was developed. For Conroe emulsions, DP starts increasing at higher hydrate concentrations than King Ranch condensate, many times at 10 vol.%. Experiments with King Ranch show higher relative DP (10 to 25) than Conroe (2 to 10) performed at the same vmix and LL. Cohesive force measurements between cyclopentane hydrate particles were reduced from a value of 3.32 mN/m to 1.26 mN/m when 6 wt.% Conroe was used and to 0.41 mN/m when 5 wt.% Caratinga crude oil was used; similar values were obtained when extracted asphaltenes were used. King Ranch condensate (11 wt.%) did not significantly change the

  1. Investigation of hydrate formation and transportability in multiphase flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Giovanny A.

    The oil and gas industry is moving towards offshore developments in more challenging environments, where evaluating hydrate plugging risks to avoid operational/safety hazards becomes more difficult (Sloan, 2005). Even though mechanistic models for hydrate plug formation have been developed, components for a full comprehensive model are still missing. Prior to this work, research efforts were focused on flowing hydrate particles with relatively little research on hydrate accumulation, leaving hydrate deposition in multiphase flow an unexplored subject. The focus of this thesis was to better understand hydrate deposition as a form of accumu- lation in pipelines. To incorporate the multiphase flow effect, hydrate formation experiments were carried out at varying water cut (WC) from 15 to 100 vol.%, liquid loading (LL) from 50 to 85 vol.%, mixture velocity (vmix) from 0.75 to 3 m/s, for three fluids systems (100 % WC, water in Conroe crude oil emulsions and King Ranch condensate + water) on the ExxonMobil flowloop (4 in. nominal size and 314 ft. long) at Friendswood, TX. For the 100 % WC flowloop tests, hydrate particle distribution transitions beyond a critical hydrate volume concentration, observed values were between 8.2 to 29.4 vol.%, causing a sudden increase in pressure drop (DP). A revised correlation of the transition as a function of Reynolds number and liquid loading was developed. For Conroe emulsions, DP starts increasing at higher hydrate concentrations than King Ranch condensate, many times at 10 vol.%. Experiments with King Ranch show higher relative DP (10 to 25) than Conroe (2 to 10) performed at the same vmix and LL. Cohesive force measurements between cyclopentane hydrate particles were reduced from a value of 3.32 mN/m to 1.26 mN/m when 6 wt.% Conroe was used and to 0.41 mN/m when 5 wt.% Caratinga crude oil was used; similar values were obtained when extracted asphaltenes were used. King Ranch condensate (11 wt.%) did not significantly change the

  2. Azo Dyes and Their Interfacial Activity: Implications for Multiphase Flow Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-04-21

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media (Neustadter 1984; Tuck et al. 1988). For instance, several dimensionless numbers have been developed to express important force ratios applicable to multiphase flow in porous media (Morrow and Songkran 1981; Chatzis and Morrow 1984; Wardlaw 1988; Pennell et al. 1996; Dawson and Roberts 1997). These force ratios emphasize the importance of interfacial properties. Our objectives are to provide chemical information regarding the dyes commonly used in multiphase flow visualization studies and to show the surface chemistry effects of the most commonly used dye, Sudan IV, in the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system

  3. Compressible flow of a multiphase fluid between two vessels:

    SciTech Connect

    Chenoweth, D.R. ); Paolucci, S. . Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-06-01

    The transfer of a multiphase fluid from a high pressure vessel to one initially at lower pressure is investigated. The fluid is composed of two phases which do not undergo any change. The phases consist of an ideal gas, and solid particles (or liquid droplets) having constant density. The mixture is assumed to be stagnant and always perfectly mixed as well as at thermal equilibrium in each constant volume vessel. The fluid also remains homogeneous and at equilibrium while flowing between vessels. The transport properties of the mixture are taken to be zero. One important finding is that the expanding mixture or pseduo-fluid behaves similar to a polytropic Abel-Noble gas. The mixture thermodymanic properties, the end state in each vessel at pressure equilibrium, the critical parameters, and time dependent results are given for the adiabatic and isothermal limiting cases. The results include both initially sonic and initially subsonic transfer. No mathematical restriction is placed on the particle concentration, although some limiting results are given for small particle volume fraction. The mass transferred at adiabatic pressure equilibrium can be significantly less than that when thermal equilibrium is also reached. Furthermore, the adiabatic pressure equilibrium level may not be the same as that obtained at thermal equilibrium, even when all initial temperatures are the same. Finally, it is shown that the transfer times can be very slow compared to those of a pure gas due to the large reduction possible in the mixture sound speed. 18 refs.

  4. Constitutive Relationships and Models in Continuum Theories of Multiphase Flows. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Rand (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    In April, 1989, a workshop on constitutive relationships and models in continuum theories of multiphase flows was held at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics of constitutive relationships for the partial or per phase stresses, including the concept of solid phase pressure are discussed. Models used for the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between the phases in a multiphase flow are also discussed. The program, abstracts, and texts of the presentations from the workshop are included.

  5. Statistical analysis on the signals monitoring multiphase flow patterns in pipeline-riser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jing; Guo, Liejin

    2013-07-01

    The signals monitoring petroleum transmission pipeline in offshore oil industry usually contain abundant information about the multiphase flow on flow assurance which includes the avoidance of most undesirable flow pattern. Therefore, extracting reliable features form these signals to analyze is an alternative way to examine the potential risks to oil platform. This paper is focused on characterizing multiphase flow patterns in pipeline-riser system that is often appeared in offshore oil industry and finding an objective criterion to describe the transition of flow patterns. Statistical analysis on pressure signal at the riser top is proposed, instead of normal prediction method based on inlet and outlet flow conditions which could not be easily determined during most situations. Besides, machine learning method (least square supported vector machine) is also performed to classify automatically the different flow patterns. The experiment results from a small-scale loop show that the proposed method is effective for analyzing the multiphase flow pattern.

  6. Multidimensional tensor array analysis of multiphase flow during a hydrodynamic ram event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingenfelter, A.; Liu, D.

    2015-12-01

    Flow visualization is necessary to characterize the fluid flow properties during a hydrodynamic ram event. The multiphase flow during a hydrodynamic ram event can make traditional image processing techniques such as contrast feature detection and PIV difficult. By stacking the imagery to form a multidimensional tensor array, feature detection to determine flow field velocities are visualized.

  7. Multiphase Flow Modeling - Validation and Application CRADA MC94-019, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Madhava Syamlal; Philip A. Nicoletti

    1995-08-31

    For the development and validation of multiphase flow modeling capability, a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) is in effect between Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) and Fluent Inc. To validate the Fluent multiphase model, several simulations were conducted at METC and the results were compared with the results of MFIX, a multiphase flow code developed at METC, and with experimental data. The results of these validation studies will be presented. In addition, the application of multiphase flow modeling will be illustrated by presenting the results of simulations of a filter back- flushing and a fluidized bed coal gasifier. These simulations were conducted only with MFIX, since certain features needed in these simulations will be available only in the next release of Fluent.

  8. Withdrawal and drainage of thin film flow of a generalized Oldroyd-B fluid on non-isothermal cylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Saif; Ullah, Arshad; Iqbal, Mohsan

    2015-12-01

    This investigation deals with analytical solutions of thin film flow for withdrawal and drainage of an incompressible generalized Oldroyd-B fluid on a vertical cylinder under the influence of non-isothermal effects. The derived solutions are presented under series form for velocity profile, temperature distribution, volume flux, average film velocity and shear stress in both cases. These solutions satisfy both the governing equations and all imposed initial and boundary conditions. The corresponding exact solutions for Newtonian fluid are also obtained as a special case of our derived solutions. Moreover, solutions for generalized Maxwell fluid and Power Law model, performing the same motion, can be obtained as limiting cases of our general solutions. The influence of pertinent parameters on the fluid motion is also underlined by graphical illustration.

  9. PREFACE: The 6th International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Murai, Yuichi

    2009-02-01

    Research on multi-phase flows is very important for industrial applications, including power stations, vehicles, engines, food processing, and so on. Also, from the environmental viewpoint, multi-phase flows need to be investigated to overcome global warming. Multi-phase flows originally have non-linear features because they are multi-phased. The interaction between the phases plays a very interesting role in the flows. The non-linear interaction causes the multi-phase flows to be very difficult to understand phenomena. The International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multi-phase Flows (ISMTMF) is a unique symposium. The target of the symposium is to exchange the state-of-the-art knowledge on the measurement techniques for non-linear multi-phase flows. Measurement technique is the key technology to understanding non-linear phenomena. The ISMTMF began in 1995 in Nanjing, China. The symposium has continuously been held every two or three years. The ISMTMF-2008 was held in Okinawa, Japan as the 6th symposium of ISMTMF on 15-17 December 2008. Okinawa has a long history as the Ryukyus Kingdom. China and Japan have had cultural and economic exchanges through Okinawa for more than 1000 years. Please enjoy Okinawa and experience its history to enhance our international communication. The present symposium was attended by 124 participants, the program included 107 contributions with 5 plenary lectures, 2 keynote lectures, and 100 oral regular paper presentations. The topics include, besides the ordinary measurement techniques for multiphase flows, acoustic and electric sensors, bubbles and microbubbles, computed tomography, gas-liquid interface, laser-imaging and PIV, oil/coal/drop and spray, solid and powder, spectral and multi-physics. This volume includes the presented papers at ISMTMF-2008. In addition to this volume, ten selected papers will be published in a special issue of Measurement Science and Technology. We would like to express special thanks to all

  10. Multiphase Flow in Complex Fracture Apertures under a Wide Range of Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel H. Rothman

    2006-12-12

    A better understanding of multiphase flow through fractures requires knowledge of the detailed physics of interfacial flows at the microscopic pore scale. The objective of our project was to develop tools for the simulation of such phenomena. Complementary work was performed by a group led by Dr.~Paul Meakin of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Our focus was on the lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method. In particular, we studied both the statics and dynamics of contact lines where two fluids (wetting and non-wetting) meet solid boundaries. Previous work had noted deficiencies in the way LB methods simulate such interfaces. Our work resulted in significant algorithmic improvements that alleviated these deficiencies. As a result, we were able to study in detail the behavior of the dynamic contact angle in flow through capillary tubes. Our simulations revealed that our LB method reproduces the correct scaling of the dynamic contact angle with respect to velocity, viscosity, and surface tension, without specification of an artificial slip length. Further study allowed us to identify the microscopic origin of the dynamic contact angle in LB methods. These results serve to delineate the range of applicability of multiphase LB methods to flows through complex geometries.

  11. Preliminary flashing multiphase flow analysis with application to letdown valves in coal-conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L. J.; Khan, A. A.

    1982-09-01

    As part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's technical support to large coal liquefaction projects, attempts have been made to (1) develop the methodology for characterizing and predicting multicomponent, multiphase, non-Newtonian flow behavior within letdown valves and devices, and (2) analyze the fluid flow in the entire letdown region of the process. An engineering model that can be used in the analysis of multicomponent, multiphase, flashing, flowing systems has been developed. A preliminary version of a user-oriented computer code for this model has been developed and is fully described.

  12. Comparison of Frameworks for Next Generation Multiphase Flow Solver, MFIX: A Group Decision-Making Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, Aytekin; Pannala, Sreekanth; Syamlal, M; O'Brien, T. J.; Gel, Esma

    2007-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations have emerged as a powerful tool for understanding multiphase flows that occur in a wide range of engineering applications and natural processes. A multiphase CFD code called MFIX has been under development at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) since the 1980s for modeling multiphase flows that occur in fossil fuel reactors. CFD codes such as MFIX are equipped with a number of numerical algorithms to solve a large set of coupled partial differential equations over three-dimensional grids consisting of hundreds of thousands of cells on parallel computers. Currently, the next generation version of MFIX is under development with the goal of building a multiphase problem solving environment (PSE) that would facilitate the simple reuse of modern software components by application scientists. Several open-source frameworks were evaluated to identify the best-suited framework for the multiphase PSE. There are many requirements for the multiphase PSE, and each of these open-source frameworks offers functionalities that satisfy the requirements to varying extents. Therefore, matching the requirements and the functionalities is not a simple task and requires a systematic and quantitative decision making procedure. We present a multi-criteria decision making approach to determining a major system design decision, and demonstrate its application on the framework selection problem.

  13. Numerical Simulation of the Multiphase Flow in the Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Dian-Qiao; Lei, Hong; He, Ji-Cheng

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of gas-liquid multiphase flow behavior in the Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) system is of great significance to clarify the circulation flow rate, decarburization, and inclusion removal with a reliable description. Thus, based on the separate model of injecting gas behavior, a novel mathematical model of multiphase flow has been developed to give the distribution of gas holdup in the RH system. The numerical results show that the predicted circulation flow rates, the predicted flow velocities, and the predicted mixing times agree with the measured results in a water model and that the predicted tracer concentration curve agrees with the results obtained in an actual RH system. With a lower lifting gas flow rate, the rising gas bubbles are concentrated near the wall; with a higher lifting gas flow rate, gas bubbles can reach the center of the up-snorkel. A critical lifting gas flow rate is used to obtain the maximum circulation flow rate.

  14. Non-isothermal flow through a rotating straight duct with wide range of rotational and pressure driven parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahiduzzaman, Mohammad; Alam, Md. Mahmud; Ferdows, M.; Sivasankaran, S.

    2013-10-01

    Numerical study is performed to investigate the Non-isothermal flow in a rotating straight duct under various flow conditions. Spectral method is applied as a main tool for the numerical technique, where the Chebyshev polynomial, the Collocation methods, the Arc-length method and the Newton-Raphson method are also used as secondary tools. The characteristics of the flow mentioned above are described here. The incompressible viscous steady Non-isothermal flow through a straight duct of rectangular cross-section rotating at a constant angular velocity about the center of the duct cross-section is investigated numerically to examine the combined effects of Rotation parameter (Coriolis force), Grashof number (parameter which is used in heat, transfer studies involving free, forced or natural convection and is equql to , where L is the characteristic length, ρ the density, g the acceleration due to gravity, β the thermal expansion coefficient, Δ T the temperature difference, μ the viscosity and ν the kinematic viscosity of the fluid. The expansion coefficient β is a measure of the rate at which the volume V of the fluid changes with temperature at a given pressure P), Prandtl number, aspect ratio and Pressure-driven parameter (centrifugal force) on the flow. We examine the structures in case of rotation of the duct axis and the Pressure-driven parameter with large aspect ratio where other parameters are fixed. The calculations are carried out for 0 ≤ T r ≤ 300, 2 ≤ γ ≤ 6, G r = 100, P r = 7.0 and 0 ≤ P r ≤ 800 by applying the Spectral method. When Ω > 0 and the rotation is in the same direction as the Coriolis force enforces the centrifugal force, multiple solutions of Non-symmetric the secondary flow patterns with 10-vortex (maximum) are obtained in case of T r = 100 and 150 with large aspect ratio. The intense of the temperature field is very strong near the heated wall in all cases. Finally, the overall solutions of the problems considered in

  15. Using a multiphase flow code to model the coupled effects of repository consolidation and multiphase brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.; Webb, S.W.

    1995-10-01

    Long-term repository assessment must consider the processes of (1) gas generation, (2) room closure and expansions due to salt creep, and (3) multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the complex coupling between these three processes. The mechanical creep closure code SANCHO was used to simulate the closure of a single, perfectly sealed disposal room filled with water and backfill. SANCHO uses constitutive models to describe salt creep, waste consolidation, and backfill consolidation, Five different gas-generation rate histories were simulated, differentiated by a rate multiplier, f, which ranged from 0.0 (no gas generation) to 1.0 (expected gas generation under brine-dominated conditions). The results of the SANCHO f-series simulations provide a relationship between gas generation, room closure, and room pressure for a perfectly sealed room. Several methods for coupling this relationship with multiphase fluid flow into and out of a room were examined. Two of the methods are described.

  16. Exploring the origins of turbulence in multiphase flow using compressed sensing MRI.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Alexander B; Holland, Daniel J; Sederman, Andrew J; Gladden, Lynn F

    2012-06-29

    Ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging, employing spiral reciprocal space sampling and compressed sensing image reconstruction, is used to acquire velocity maps of the liquid phase in gas-liquid multiphase flows. Velocity maps were acquired at a rate of 188 frames per second. The method enables quantitative characterization of the wake dynamics of single bubbles and bubble swarms. To illustrate this, we use the new technique to demonstrate the role of bubble wake vorticity in driving bubble secondary motions, and in governing the structure of turbulence in multiphase flows. PMID:23004990

  17. Exploring the Origins of Turbulence in Multiphase Flow Using Compressed Sensing MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayler, Alexander B.; Holland, Daniel J.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2012-06-01

    Ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging, employing spiral reciprocal space sampling and compressed sensing image reconstruction, is used to acquire velocity maps of the liquid phase in gas-liquid multiphase flows. Velocity maps were acquired at a rate of 188 frames per second. The method enables quantitative characterization of the wake dynamics of single bubbles and bubble swarms. To illustrate this, we use the new technique to demonstrate the role of bubble wake vorticity in driving bubble secondary motions, and in governing the structure of turbulence in multiphase flows.

  18. A Computational Model of Coupled Multiphase Flow and Geomechanics to Study Fault Slip and Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Jha, B.

    2014-12-01

    The coupling between subsurface flow and geomechanical deformation is critical in the assessment of the environmental impacts of groundwater use, underground liquid waste disposal, geologic storage of carbon dioxide, and exploitation of shale gas reserves. In particular, seismicity induced by fluid injection and withdrawal has emerged as a central element of the scientific discussion around subsurface technologies that tap into water and energy resources. Here we present a new computational approach to model coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics of faulted reservoirs. We represent faults as surfaces embedded in a three-dimensional medium by using zero-thickness interface elements to accurately model fault slip under dynamically evolving fluid pressure and fault strength. We incorporate the effect of fluid pressures from multiphase flow in the mechanical stability of faults and employ a rigorous formulation of nonlinear multiphase geomechanics that is capable of handling strong capillary effects. We develop a numerical simulation tool by coupling a multiphase flow simulator with a mechanics simulator, using the unconditionally stable fixed-stress scheme for the sequential solution of two-way coupling between flow and geomechanics. We validate our modeling approach using several synthetic, but realistic, test cases that illustrate the onset and evolution of earthquakes from fluid injection and withdrawal. We also present the application of the coupled flow-geomechanics simulation technology to the post mortem analysis of the Mw=5.1, May 2011 Lorca earthquake in south-east Spain, and assess the potential that the earthquake was induced by groundwater extraction.

  19. Experimental and Computational Study of Multiphase Flow Hydrodynamics in 2D Trickle Bed Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, H.; Ben Salem, I.; Kurnia, J. C.; Rabbani, S.; Shamim, T.; Sassi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Trickle bed reactors are largely used in the refining processes. Co-current heavy oil and hydrogen gas flow downward on catalytic particle bed. Fine particles in the heavy oil and/or soot formed by the exothermic catalytic reactions deposit on the bed and clog the flow channels. This work is funded by the refining company of Abu Dhabi and aims at mitigating pressure buildup due to fine deposition in the TBR. In this work, we focus on meso-scale experimental and computational investigations of the interplay between flow regimes and the various parameters that affect them. A 2D experimental apparatus has been built to investigate the flow regimes with an average pore diameter close to the values encountered in trickle beds. A parametric study is done for the development of flow regimes and the transition between them when the geometry and arrangement of the particles within the porous medium are varied. Liquid and gas flow velocities have also been varied to capture the different flow regimes. Real time images of the multiphase flow are captured using a high speed camera, which were then used to characterize the transition between the different flow regimes. A diffused light source was used behind the 2D Trickle Bed Reactor to enhance visualizations. Experimental data shows very good agreement with the published literature. The computational study focuses on the hydrodynamics of multiphase flow and to identify the flow regime developed inside TBRs using the ANSYS Fluent Software package. Multiphase flow inside TBRs is investigated using the "discrete particle" approach together with Volume of Fluid (VoF) multiphase flow modeling. The effect of the bed particle diameter, spacing, and arrangement are presented that may be used to provide guidelines for designing trickle bed reactors.

  20. Progress in the Development of Compressible, Multiphase Flow Modeling Capability for Nuclear Reactor Flow Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; F. Petitpas; E. Daniel; O. Le Metayer; S. Gavrilyuk; N. Dovetta

    2008-10-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. Within the context of multiphase flows, two bubble-dynamic phenomena – boiling (heterogeneous) and flashing or cavitation (homogeneous boiling), with bubble collapse, are technologically very important to nuclear reactor systems. The main difference between boiling and flashing is that bubble growth (and collapse) in boiling is inhibited by limitations on the heat transfer at the interface, whereas bubble growth (and collapse) in flashing is limited primarily by inertial effects in the surrounding liquid. The flashing process tends to be far more explosive (and implosive), and is more violent and damaging (at least in the near term) than the bubble dynamics of boiling. However, other problematic phenomena, such as crud deposition, appear to be intimately connecting with the boiling process. In reality, these two processes share many details.

  1. Local volume-time averaged equations of motion for dispersed, turbulent, multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.; Slattery, J.C.

    1980-11-01

    In most flows of liquids and their vapors, the phases are dispersed randomly in both space and time. These dispersed flows can be described only statistically or in terms of averages. Local volume-time averaging is used here to derive a self-consistent set of equations governing momentum and energy transfer in dispersed, turbulent, multiphase flows. The empiricisms required for use with these equations are the subject of current research.

  2. Characterization of non-Darcy multiphase flow in petroleum bearing formations. Annual status report, May 14, 1991--May 13, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.D.; Civan, F.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this research are: Develop a proper theoretical model for characterizing non-Darcy multi-phase flow in petroleum bearing formations. Develop an experimental technique for measuring non-Darcy flow coefficients under multiphase flow at insitu reservoir conditions. Develop dimensional consistent correlations to express the non-Darcy flow coefficient as a function of rock and fluid properties for consolidated and unconsolidated porous media. The research accomplished during the period May 1991--May 1992 focused upon theoretical and experimental studies of multiphase non-Darcy flow in porous media.

  3. Investigating the effect of external water on magma ascent dynamics with a new multiphase flow numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Neri, A.; La Spina, G.; Clarke, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    The study of deposits produced by explosive eruptions of Campi Flegrei and Vesuvio suggests that important phases of these events have been characterized by a significant interaction of magma with external water. Despite that, the influence of external water on eruption dynamics and its potential hazard have not been studied in depth. In this work we adopted a 1D non-isothermal multi-phase flow model describing the dynamics of magma ascent inside a volcanic conduit. The new model is based on the theory of thermodynamically compatible systems that allows formulation of the governing transport equations as a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations in conservative form. The model represents a significant advance with respect to previous simplified descriptions of the magma ascent dynamics in that it: 1) is capable of treating both dilute and dense flow regimes; 2) describes flow above and below the fragmentation level in a coupled and consistent way; 3) quantifies the interaction between the two phases forming the magmatic mixture (both in the bubbly-flow and gas-particle regimes) with two distinct pressures and velocities; 4) accounts for disequilibrium crystallization and degassing; 5) treats the dissolved water as a separate phase with its own equation of state and; 6) allows for instantaneous or delayed vaporization of the external water from an aquifer. Here we investigate, through a sensitivity analysis, the role of different system parameters, in particular those related to the inflow of non-magmatic volatiles, in controlling vent conditions and eruptive style for conditions representative of Plinian (e.g. Agnano Monte Spina) eruptions at Campi Flegrei. Model results show that mass flux at the vent is primarily controlled by the quantity of engulfed external water, when this inflow occurs below the fragmentation level, whereas small changes in mass flux are produced when the interaction occurs above the fragmentation level. In particular it is worth

  4. Multiphase flow and phase change in microgravity: Fundamental research and strategic research for exploration of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    2003-01-01

    NASA is preparing to undertake science-driven exploration missions. The NASA Exploration Team's vision is a cascade of stepping stones. The stepping-stone will build the technical capabilities needed for each step with multi-use technologies and capabilities. An Agency-wide technology investment and development program is necessary to implement the vision. The NASA Exploration Team has identified a number of areas where significant advances are needed to overcome all engineering and medical barriers to the expansion of human space exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. Closed-loop life support systems and advanced propulsion and power technologies are among the areas requiring significant advances from the current state-of-the-art. Studies conducted by the National Academy of Science's National Research Council and Workshops organized by NASA have shown that multiphase flow and phase change play a crucial role in many of these advanced technology concepts. Lack of understanding of multiphase flow, phase change, and interfacial phenomena in the microgravity environment has been a major hurdle. An understanding of multiphase flow and phase change in microgravity is, therefore, critical to advancing many technologies needed. Recognizing this, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) has initiated a strategic research thrust to augment the ongoing fundamental research in fluid physics and transport phenomena discipline with research especially aimed at understanding key multiphase flow related issues in propulsion, power, thermal control, and closed-loop advanced life support systems. A plan for integrated theoretical and experimental research that has the highest probability of providing data, predictive tools, and models needed by the systems developers to incorporate highly promising multiphase-based technologies is currently in preparation. This plan is being developed with inputs from scientific community, NASA mission planners and industry personnel

  5. Some Specific CASL Requirements for Advanced Multiphase Flow Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry

    2010-11-01

    Because of the diversity of physical phenomena occuring in boiling, flashing, and bubble collapse, and of the length and time scales of LWR systems, it is imperative that the models have the following features: • Both vapor and liquid phases (and noncondensible phases, if present) must be treated as compressible. • Models must be mathematically and numerically well-posed. • The models methodology must be multi-scale. A fundamental derivation of the multiphase governing equation system, that should be used as a basis for advanced multiphase modeling in LWR coolant systems, is given in the Appendix using the ensemble averaging method. The remainder of this work focuses specifically on the compressible, well-posed, and multi-scale requirements of advanced simulation methods for these LWR coolant systems, because without these are the most fundamental aspects, without which widespread advancement cannot be claimed. Because of the expense of developing multiple special-purpose codes and the inherent inability to couple information from the multiple, separate length- and time-scales, efforts within CASL should be focused toward development of a multi-scale approaches to solve those multiphase flow problems relevant to LWR design and safety analysis. Efforts should be aimed at developing well-designed unified physical/mathematical and high-resolution numerical models for compressible, all-speed multiphase flows spanning: (1) Well-posed general mixture level (true multiphase) models for fast transient situations and safety analysis, (2) DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation)-like models to resolve interface level phenmena like flashing and boiling flows, and critical heat flux determination (necessarily including conjugate heat transfer), and (3) Multi-scale methods to resolve both (1) and (2) automatically, depending upon specified mesh resolution, and to couple different flow models (single-phase, multiphase with several velocities and pressures, multiphase with single

  6. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of multiphase fluid flow in microchannels and microchannel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Moubin; Meakin, Paul; Huang, Hai

    2007-03-01

    Multiphase fluid motion in microchannels and microchannel networks involves complicated fluid dynamics and is fundamentally important to diverse practical engineering applications such as ink-jet printing, DNA and protein micro-/nano-arraying, and fabrication of particles and capsules for controlled release of medicines. This paper presented the simulations of multiphase fluid motion in microchannels and microchannel networks using a modified dissipative particle dynamics method that employs a new conservative particle-particle interaction combining short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions to simulate multiphase systems. This new conservative particle-particle interaction allows the behavior of multiphase systems consisting of gases, liquids, and solids to be simulated. Three numerical examples that are closely related to engineering applications were simulated. These examples involve multiple fluid motions in (i) a simple microchannel within two parallel plates; (ii) an inverted Y-shaped microchannel junction consisting of a vertical channel that divides into two branch channels with the same aperture; and (iii) a microchannel network. The numerical results obtained by using DPD agreed well with those from other sources, and clearly demonstrated the potential value of this DPD method for modeling and analyzing multiphase flow in microchannels and microchannel networks.

  7. Modelling of fluid-structure interaction with multiphase viscous flows using an immersed-body method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Xiang, J.; Fang, F.; Pavlidis, D.; Latham, J.-P.; Pain, C. C.

    2016-09-01

    An immersed-body method is developed here to model fluid-structure interaction for multiphase viscous flows. It does this by coupling a finite element multiphase fluid model and a combined finite-discrete element solid model. A coupling term containing the fluid stresses is introduced within a thin shell mesh surrounding the solid surface. The thin shell mesh acts as a numerical delta function in order to help apply the solid-fluid boundary conditions. When used with an advanced interface capturing method, the immersed-body method has the capability to solve problems with fluid-solid interfaces in the presence of multiphase fluid-fluid interfaces. Importantly, the solid-fluid coupling terms are treated implicitly to enable larger time steps to be used. This two-way coupling method has been validated by three numerical test cases: a free falling cylinder in a fluid at rest, elastic membrane and a collapsing column of water moving an initially stationary solid square. A fourth simulation example is of a water-air interface with a floating solid square being moved around by complex hydrodynamic flows including wave breaking. The results show that the immersed-body method is an effective approach for two-way solid-fluid coupling in multiphase viscous flows.

  8. Experimental and computational analysis of pressure response in a multiphase flow loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Munzarin; Amin, Al; Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Imtiaz, Syed

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of multiphase fluid flow in pipes are useful to understand fluid mechanics encountered in the oil and gas industries. In the present day oil and gas exploration is successively inducing subsea operation in the deep sea and arctic condition. During the transport of petroleum products, understanding the fluid dynamics inside the pipe network is important for flow assurance. In this case the information regarding static and dynamic pressure response, pressure loss, optimum flow rate, pipe diameter etc. are the important parameter for flow assurance. The principal aim of this research is to represents computational analysis and experimental analysis of multi-phase (L/G) in a pipe network. This computational study considers a two-phase fluid flow through a horizontal flow loop with at different Reynolds number in order to determine the pressure distribution, frictional pressure loss profiles by volume of fluid (VOF) method. However, numerical simulations are validated with the experimental data. The experiment is conducted in 76.20 mm ID transparent circular pipe using water and air in the flow loop. Static pressure transducers are used to measure local pressure response in multiphase pipeline.

  9. Optical diagnostics for turbulent and multiphase flows: Particle image velocimetry and photorefractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Shagam, R.N.; Blanchat, T.K.; Chu, T.Y.; Tassin-Leger, A.L.; Henderson, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project ``Optical Diagnostics for Turbulent and Multiphase Flows.`` Advanced optical diagnostics have been investigated and developed for flow field measurements, including capabilities for measurement in turbulent, multiphase, and heated flows. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) includes several techniques for measurement of instantaneous flow field velocities and associated turbulence quantities. Nonlinear photorefractive optical materials have been investigated for the possibility of measuring turbulence quantities (turbulent spectrum) more directly. The two-dimensional PIV techniques developed under this LDRD were shown to work well, and were compared with more traditional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Three-dimensional PIV techniques were developed and tested, but due to several experimental difficulties were not as successful. The photorefractive techniques were tested, and both potential capabilities and possible problem areas were elucidated.

  10. Preface: Recent Advances in Modeling Multiphase Flow and Transportwith the TOUGH Family of Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2007-11-15

    A symposium on research carried out using the TOUGH family of numerical codes was held from May 15 to 17, 2006, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This special issue of the 'Vadose Zone Journal' contains revised and expanded versions of a selected set of papers presented at this symposium (TOUGH Symposium 2006; http://esd.lbl.gov/TOUGHsymposium), all of which focus on multiphase flow, including flow in the vadose zone.

  11. Forcing scheme in pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Luo, K H; Li, X J

    2012-07-01

    The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is a widely used multiphase model in the LB community. In this model, an interaction force, which is usually implemented via a forcing scheme, is employed to mimic the molecular interactions that cause phase segregation. The forcing scheme is therefore expected to play an important role in the pseudoepotential LB model. In this paper, we aim to address some key issues about forcing schemes in the pseudopotential LB model. First, theoretical and numerical analyses will be made for Shan-Chen's forcing scheme [Shan and Chen, Phys. Rev. E 47, 1815 (1993)] and the exact-difference-method forcing scheme [Kupershtokh et al., Comput. Math. Appl. 58, 965 (2009)]. The nature of these two schemes and their recovered macroscopic equations will be shown. Second, through a theoretical analysis, we will reveal the physics behind the phenomenon that different forcing schemes exhibit different performances in the pseudopotential LB model. Moreover, based on the analysis, we will present an improved forcing scheme and numerically demonstrate that the improved scheme can be treated as an alternative approach to achieving thermodynamic consistency in the pseudopotential LB model. PMID:23005565

  12. Direct simulation of multi-phase MHD flows on an unstructured Cartesian adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Ni, Ming-Jiu

    2014-08-01

    An approach for direct simulation of the multi-phase magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flows has been developed in the present study on an unstructured Cartesian adaptive system. The approach is based on the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method for capturing the interface with the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) technique used to well resolve the interface and the boundary layer. The Lorentz force is calculated using the consistent and conservative scheme, which is specially designed on a Cartesian adaptive mesh to conserve the physical conservation laws. The continuous-surface-tension (CSF) formulation is adopted for surface tension calculation. Moreover, the interfacial flows driven by thermal Marangoni effects at multifluid interfaces are also studied with a special numerical treatment presented. The method is able to simulate bubble motion in liquid metal under magnetic field irrespective of high density ratio and electric conductivity ratio. The proposed scheme for multi-phase MHD flows is validated by experimental results as well as analytical solutions.

  13. Characterization and modeling of multiphase flow in structured microreactors: a post microreactor case study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Shi, Yanxiang; Abolhasani, Milad; Jensen, Klavs F

    2015-08-01

    We study microreactors with internal fields of posts as typical examples of structured microreactors to elucidate flow fields and their implications for mass transfer. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) visualization combined with image analysis is used to systematically quantify key features such as interfacial area, phase holdup and the characteristics of the post-wetting layer. The subsequent mass transport analysis yields insight into how the posts contribute to the overall enhanced mass transfer performance compared to open channels, and provides predictions of mass transfer performance under varying operating conditions. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of multiphase flow using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method are in good agreement with experimentally observed multiphase flows. PMID:26126496

  14. Pattern formation in multiphase flow through porous media: continuum models and phase diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon capture and geologic storage, dissociation of methane hydrates in permafrost, infiltration of water in soil, and enhanced oil recovery, are some relevant examples of multiphase flow in porous media. While flow instabilities and pattern formation play a central role in these processes, our ability to describe them using mathematical models has been hampered by the lack of a macroscopic theory that explains the patterns observed in experimental and field conditions. We propose a new approach —phase-field modeling— to advance our fundamental understanding of multiphase porous media flow. The basic tenet, with origins in the mathematical description of solidification processes, is that the energy of the system is a function of the inhomogeneous distribution of fluid phases in the pore space, and should account for the presence of macroscopic interfaces. We present numerical simulations and compare our predictions with experimental observations. Numerical simulation of viscous fingering in a Hele-Shaw cell using the proposed phase-field modeling approach

  15. The application of single particle hydrodynamics in continuum models of multiphase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Rand

    1988-01-01

    A review of the application of single particle hydrodynamics in models for the exchange of interphase momentum in continuum models of multiphase flow is presented. Considered are the equations of motion for a laminar, mechanical two phase flow. Inherent to this theory is a model for the interphase exchange of momentum due to drag between the dispersed particulate and continuous fluid phases. In addition, applications of two phase flow theory to de-mixing flows require the modeling of interphase momentum exchange due to lift forces. The applications of single particle analysis in deriving models for drag and lift are examined.

  16. A method for incorporating equilibrium chemical reactions into multiphase flow models for CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaltink, Maarten W.; Vilarrasa, Victor; De Gaspari, Francesca; Silva, Orlando; Carrera, Jesús; Rötting, Tobias S.

    2013-12-01

    CO2 injection and storage in deep saline aquifers involves many coupled processes, including multiphase flow, heat and mass transport, rock deformation and mineral precipitation and dissolution. Coupling is especially critical in carbonate aquifers, where minerals will tend to dissolve in response to the dissolution of CO2 into the brine. The resulting neutralization will drive further dissolution of both CO2 and calcite. This suggests that large cavities may be formed and that proper simulation may require full coupling of reactive transport and multiphase flow. We show that solving the latter may suffice whenever two requirements are met: (1) all reactions can be assumed to occur in equilibrium and (2) the chemical system can be calculated as a function of the state variables of the multiphase flow model (i.e., liquid and gas pressure, and temperature). We redefine the components of multiphase flow codes (traditionally, water and CO2), so that they are conservative for all reactions of the chemical system. This requires modifying the traditional constitutive relationships of the multiphase flow codes, but yields the concentrations of all species and all reaction rates by simply performing speciation and mass balance calculations at the end of each time step. We applied this method to the H2O-CO2-Na-Cl-CaCO3 system, so as to model CO2 injection into a carbonate aquifer containing brine. Results were very similar to those obtained with traditional formulations, which implies that full coupling of reactive transport and multi-phase flow is not really needed for this kind of systems, but the resulting simplifications may make it advisable even for cases where the above requirements are not met. Regarding the behavior of carbonate rocks, we find that porosity development near the injection well is small because of the low solubility of calcite. Moreover, dissolution concentrates at the front of the advancing CO2 plume because the brine below the plume tends to reach

  17. Advanced Multi-Phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  18. Advanced multi-phase flow CFD model development for solid rocket motor flowfield analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-07-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  19. Noninvasive characterization of a flowing multiphase fluid using ultrasonic interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2003-11-11

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  20. Noninvasive Characterization Of A Flowing Multiphase Fluid Using Ultrasonic Interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2005-05-10

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  1. Noninvasive characterization of a flowing multiphase fluid using ultrasonic interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  2. Multiphase flow modeling of landslide induced impulse wave by VOF method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, J.; Shin, C.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations of impulse waves induced by landslides are carried out using a multiphase modeling approach. The three-dimensional filtered Navier-Stokes equations are used for reproduces the propagation and interaction of Newtonian water wave and non-Newtonian debris flow along the bottom. A multiphase volume of fluid (VOF) method is employed for tracking of fluid interfaces. The governing equations are solved by a second-order-accurate in space and time, finite volume methods and the no-slip conditions are applied for all solid wall. The turbulent shear stress is calculated the Smagorinsky model and the non-Newtonian behavior of debris flow is computed by the Hershel-Bulkley fluid model. The multiphase flow model is applied to reproduce the laboratory measurements of Fritz (Pure Appl. Geophys., 166, 153, 2009) who experimentally investigated the propagation of impulse wave induced by the 1958 Lituya Bay Landslide. The numerical results shows that the proper treatment of the non-Newtonian behavior of debris flow is essential to reproduce its head speed and shape which control the deformation and propagation of the resulting impulse wave.

  3. Laboratory setup and results of experiments on two-dimensional multiphase flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, J.F. ); Graham, D.N.; Schiegg, H.O. )

    1990-10-01

    In the event of an accidental release into earth's subsurface of an immiscible organic liquid, such as a petroleum hydrocarbon or chlorinated organic solvent, the spatial and temporal distribution of the organic liquid is of great interest when considering efforts to prevent groundwater contamination or restore contaminated groundwater. An accurate prediction of immiscible organic liquid migration requires the incorporation of relevant physical principles in models of multiphase flow in porous media; these physical principles must be determined from physical experiments. This report presents a series of such experiments performed during the 1970s at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland. The experiments were designed to study the transient, two-dimensional displacement of three immiscible fluids in a porous medium. This experimental study appears to be the most detailed published to date. The data obtained from these experiments are suitable for the validation and test calibration of multiphase flow codes. 73 refs., 140 figs.

  4. Development of a mechanistic model for predicting corrosion rate in multiphase oil/water/gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Gopal, M.; Jepson, W.P.

    1997-09-01

    A mechanistic model has been developed to predict corrosion rates in multiphase (water/oil/CO{sub 2}) flow conditions. The model takes into account electrochemistry, reaction kinetics, and, mass transport effects. This paper describes the equations used to determine pH and bulk concentrations of various ions, which are then used to calculate the mass transfer rates to the corrosion surface. The result includes the determination of the mass transfer coefficients of various ionic species and corrosion rates. Details of relations used for determination of mass transfer coefficients for multiphase flows, and rates of electrochemical reaction kinetics are discussed and predicted results are compared with experimental observations. Agreement between model results and experimental data is good.

  5. Towards Multiphase Periodic Boundary Conditions with Flow Rate Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawko, Robert; Thompson, Chris P.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a solver for a two-phase, stratified flow with periodic boundary conditions. Governing equations are supplemented with a specification of constant mass fluxes for each phase. The method allows an estimate steady state phase fraction and pressure drop in the streamwise direction. The analytical solution for two-phase laminar flow is presented and serves as a validation of the numerical technique. For turbulent conditions, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations are employed and closed with a two-equation model. Experimental data is taken as a reference for the purpose of validation. In both flow conditions the method delivers accurate results although in the case of turbulent flow it requires the specification of interfacial viscosity showing that a direct generalisation of two-equation model is unsatisfactory. Further research avenues are outlined.

  6. Modelling of multiphase flow in ironmaking blast furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X.F.; Yu, A.B.; Burgess, J.M.; Pinson, D.; Chew, S.; Zulli, P.

    2009-01-15

    A mathematical model for the four-phase (gas, powder, liquid, and solids) flow in a two-dimensional ironmaking blast furnace is presented by extending the existing two-fluid flow models. The model describes the motion of gas, solid, and powder phases, based on the continuum approach, and implements the so-called force balance model for the flow of liquids, such as metal and slag in a blast furnace. The model results demonstrate a solid stagnant zone and dense powder hold-up region, as well as a dense liquid flow region that exists in the lower part of a blast furnace, which are consistent with the experimental observations reported in the literature. The simulation is extended to investigate the effects of packing properties and operational conditions on the flow and the volume fraction distribution of each phase in a blast furnace. It is found that solid movement has a significant effect on powder holdup distribution. Small solid particles and low porosity distribution are predicted to affect the fluid flow considerably, and this can cause deterioration in bed permeability. The dynamic powder holdup in a furnace increases significantly with the increase of powder diameter. The findings should be useful to better understand and control blast furnace operations.

  7. Non-isothermal rimming flow with the effects of surface shear and droplet impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, E. D.; Hibberd, S.; Power, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present a mathematical model for the flow and temperature in a thin liquid film flow coating the inside of a cylinder driven at the surface by an air shear and distributed flux of liquid droplets with liquid removal through a region of the cylinder wall. Modelling is motivated by the industrial application of droplet-cooling of thin oil films in aero-engine bearing chambers where films may be fast-moving which involve significant inertia and heat convection. To account for these effects, we allow the Reynolds and Péclet numbers of the film to be sufficiently large that they persist at leading-order in the thin-film limit. We adopt a Karman-Pohlhausen integral approach of boundary layer theory to extend previous studies to include surface droplet impact and cooling. Example numerical results are presented to illustrate how inertial effects and the impacting droplets influence film dynamics. Thermal characteristics of a selection of flows subject to droplet cooling are investigated.

  8. VOF Method for Simulation of Multiphase Incompressible Flows with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. P.; Ni, M. J.; Ma, H. Y.

    2011-09-01

    A volume-of-fluid method for simulation of incompressible multiphase flows with phase change is studied. We have simulated a series of processes of the vapor bubble deformation in a three-dimensional film boiling using volume of fluid (VOF) method, which include the generation, detachment and rising deformation of the bubble. Our numerical results show that the VOF method is a useful method to handle complex deformation of the liquid-vapor interface during film boiling.

  9. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    DOEpatents

    Apley, Walter J.; Cliff, William C.; Creer, James M.

    1984-01-01

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  10. Method and system for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2001-01-01

    An improved method and system for measuring a multiphase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multiphase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The method for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes certain steps. The first step is calculating a gas density for the gas flow. The next two steps are finding a normalized gas mass flow rate through the venturi and computing a gas mass flow rate. The following step is estimating the gas velocity in the venturi tube throat. The next step is calculating the pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase between the upstream pressure measuring point and the pressure measuring point in the venturi throat. Another step is estimating the liquid velocity in the venturi throat using the calculated pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase. Then the friction is computed between the liquid phase and a wall in the venturi tube. Finally, the total mass flow rate based on measured pressure in the venturi throat is calculated, and the mass flow rate of the liquid phase is calculated from the difference of the total mass flow rate and the gas mass flow rate.

  11. Development of an Efficient Meso- scale Multi-phase Flow Solver in Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taehun

    2015-10-20

    The proposed research aims at formulating a predictive high-order Lattice Boltzmann Equation for multi-phase flows relevant to nuclear energy related application - namely, saturated and sub-cooled boiling in reactors, and liquid- liquid mixing and extraction for fuel cycle separation. An efficient flow solver will be developed based on the Finite Element based Lattice Boltzmann Method (FE- LBM), accounting for phase-change heat transfer and capable of treating multiple phases over length scales from the submicron to the meter. A thermal LBM will be developed in order to handle adjustable Prandtl number, arbitrary specific heat ratio, a wide range of temperature variations, better numerical stability during liquid-vapor phase change, and full thermo-hydrodynamic consistency. Two-phase FE-LBM will be extended to liquid–liquid–gas multi-phase flows for application to high-fidelity simulations building up from the meso-scale up to the equipment sub-component scale. While several relevant applications exist, the initial applications for demonstration of the efficient methods to be developed as part of this project include numerical investigations of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomena in nuclear reactor fuel bundles, and liquid-liquid mixing and interfacial area generation for liquid-liquid separations. In addition, targeted experiments will be conducted for validation of this advanced multi-phase model.

  12. Simulation of Inviscid Compressible Multi-Phase Flow with Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelleners, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Condensation of vapours in rapid expansions of compressible gases is investigated. In the case of high temperature gradients the condensation will start at conditions well away from thermodynamic equilibrium of the fluid. In those cases homogeneous condensation is dominant over heterogeneous condensation. The present work is concerned with development of a simulation tool for computation of high speed compressible flows with homogeneous condensation. The resulting ow solver should preferably be accurate and robust to be used for simulation of industrial flows in general geometries.

  13. A Three-Dimensional Vortex Sheet Method for Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Mark; Dahm, Werner; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2002-11-01

    Previous work on a three-dimensional vortex-in-cell method is extended to include baroclinic vorticity generation in flows with large density ratios. A vortex sheet discretization is used both to maintain the boundary between different fluids or fluid phases, and to provide for a divergence-free vorticity field at all times. Automatic insertion and deletion of triangular elements allow the vortex sheet to maintain its connectivity and resolution during the simulation, despite extensive stretching of the material surface. The VIC grid provides regularization, and the simulation is inviscid at resolved scales. Computational results for flows with weak and strong density variations are presented.

  14. Multiphase flow through porous media: an adaptive control volume finite element formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Tollit, B.; Gorman, G.; Neethling, S.; Pain, C.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate modeling of multiphase flow in porous media is of great importance in a wide range of applications in science and engineering. We have developed a numerical scheme which employs an implicit pressure explicit saturation (IMPES) algorithm for the temporal discretization of the governing equations. The saturation equation is spatially discretized using a node centered control volume method on an unstructured finite element mesh. The face values are determined through an upwind scheme. The pressure equation is spatially discretized using a continuous control volume finite element method (CV-FEM) to achieve consistency with the discrete saturation equation. The numerical simulation is implemented in Fluidity, an open source and general purpose fluid simulator capable of solving a number of different governing equations for fluid flow and accompanying field equations on arbitrary unstructured meshes. The model is verified against the Buckley-Leverett problem where a quasi-analytical solution is available. We discuss the accuracy and the order of convergence of the scheme. We demonstrate the scheme for modeling multiphase flow in a synthetic heterogeneous porous medium along with the use of anisotropic mesh adaptivity to control local solution errors and increase computational efficiency. The adaptive method is also used to simulate two-phase flow in heap leaching, an industrial mining process, where the flow of the leaching solution is gravitationally dominated. Finally we describe the extension of the developed numerical scheme for simulation of flow in multiscale fractured porous media and its capability to model the multiscale characterization of flow in full scale.

  15. Modification of Fracture Apertures by Reactive Multiphase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Sheets, J.; Li, Q.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Cole, D. R.; Jun, Y. S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical interactions during the withdrawal/injection of fluids into the subsurface can modify fracture apertures through dissolution and/or precipitation of minerals. Modification of fracture apertures during reactive flow is strongly affected by non-reactive, non-wetting fluids that limit the fracture surface area and void volume that can be affected by reactive phases. We present results on the effect of a non-reactive, non-wetting phase during reactive flow on the distribution of precipitates and channelization caused by dissolution in fractures. Transparent acrylic casts of a fracture in Austin chalk were used to image mineral precipitation during reactive flow. Initially, the fracture was saturated with a solution of 0.6mol/L NaHCO3 and 0.00085mol/L NaCl. Then, both the aqueous NaHCO3 - NaCl and a solution containing 3mol/L CaCl2 were pumped into the sample (0.5 ml/min) for 2 hrs. When the two solutions mix inside the fracture, CaCO3 precipitates form and CO2 bubbles are generated. CO2 bubbles affect the amount of precipitation. X-ray CT data show that precipitate thickness varies within the fracture, occurs on both fracture surfaces and also bridges the surfaces. In the test, where a CO2 bubble filled a void, precipitation did not occur. If the CO2 bubble was smaller than the pore, thin films of precipitates occurred on the fracture surfaces above and below the bubble. While fracture apertures controlled the mixing of the fluids, CO2 bubbles affected the thickness and distribution of the precipitates. From our numerical study, channelization in a fracture is affected by the presence of a non-wetting non-reactive phase (e.g. gas) during dissolution. A modified Navier-Stokes approach was used to calculate fluxes through spatially correlated aperture distributions as a function of gas saturation. Dissolution was taken to be proportional to flux. For gas saturations < 15%, channelization occurred along the dominant flow path. However, for gas saturations >25

  16. Frictional Fluid Dynamics and Plug Formation in Multiphase Millifluidic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazer, Guillaume; Sandnes, Bjørnar; Ayaz, Monem; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik Grude

    2016-07-01

    We study experimentally the flow and patterning of a granular suspension displaced by air inside a narrow tube. The invading air-liquid interface accumulates a plug of granular material that clogs the tube due to friction with the confining walls. The gas percolates through the static plug once the gas pressure exceeds the pore capillary entry pressure of the packed grains, and a moving accumulation front is reestablished at the far side of the plug. The process repeats, such that the advancing interface leaves a trail of plugs in its wake. Further, we show that the system undergoes a fluidization transition—and complete evacuation of the granular suspension—when the liquid withdrawal rate increases beyond a critical value. An analytical model of the stability condition for the granular accumulation predicts the flow regime.

  17. Multiphase ferrofluid flows for micro-particle sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ran; Wang, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Utilizing negative magnetophoresis, ferrofluids have demonstrated great potential for sorting nonmagnetic micro-particles by size. Most of the existing techniques use single phase ferrofluids by pushing micro-particles to channel walls; the sorting speed is thus hindered. We demonstrate a novel sorting strategy by co-flowing a ferrofluid and a non-magnetic fluid in microchannels. Due to the magnetic force, the particles migrate across the ferrofluid stream at size-dependent velocities as they travel downstream. The laminar interface between the two fluids functions as a virtual boundary to accumulate particles, resulting in effective separation of particles. A stable and sharp interface is important to the success of this sorting technique. We investigate several factors that affect sorting efficiency, including magnetic field, susceptibility difference of the fluids, flow velocity, and channel geometry.

  18. Frictional Fluid Dynamics and Plug Formation in Multiphase Millifluidic Flow.

    PubMed

    Dumazer, Guillaume; Sandnes, Bjørnar; Ayaz, Monem; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik Grude

    2016-07-01

    We study experimentally the flow and patterning of a granular suspension displaced by air inside a narrow tube. The invading air-liquid interface accumulates a plug of granular material that clogs the tube due to friction with the confining walls. The gas percolates through the static plug once the gas pressure exceeds the pore capillary entry pressure of the packed grains, and a moving accumulation front is reestablished at the far side of the plug. The process repeats, such that the advancing interface leaves a trail of plugs in its wake. Further, we show that the system undergoes a fluidization transition-and complete evacuation of the granular suspension-when the liquid withdrawal rate increases beyond a critical value. An analytical model of the stability condition for the granular accumulation predicts the flow regime. PMID:27447527

  19. Are upwind techniques in multi-phase flow models necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.-H.; Boettcher, N.; Wang, W.; Kolditz, O.

    2011-09-10

    Two alternatives of primary variables are compared for two-phase flow in heterogeneous media by solving fully established benchmarks. The first combination utilizes pressure of the wetting fluid and saturation of the non-wetting fluid as primary variables, while the second employs capillary pressure of the wetting fluid and pressure of the non-wetting fluid. While the standard Galerkin finite element method (SGFEM) is known to fail in the physical reproduction of two-phase flow in heterogeneous media (unless employing a fully upwind correction), the second scheme with capillary pressure as a primary variable without applying an upwind technique produces correct physical fluid behaviour in heterogeneous media, as observed from experiments.

  20. Stochastic Rotation Dynamics simulations of wetting multi-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Brinkmann, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Multi-color Stochastic Rotation Dynamics (SRDmc) has been introduced by Inoue et al. [1,2] as a particle based simulation method to study the flow of emulsion droplets in non-wetting microchannels. In this work, we extend the multi-color method to also account for different wetting conditions. This is achieved by assigning the color information not only to fluid particles but also to virtual wall particles that are required to enforce proper no-slip boundary conditions. To extend the scope of the original SRDmc algorithm to e.g. immiscible two-phase flow with viscosity contrast we implement an angular momentum conserving scheme (SRD+mc). We perform extensive benchmark simulations to show that a mono-phase SRDmc fluid exhibits bulk properties identical to a standard SRD fluid and that SRDmc fluids are applicable to a wide range of immiscible two-phase flows. To quantify the adhesion of a SRD+mc fluid in contact to the walls we measure the apparent contact angle from sessile droplets in mechanical equilibrium. For a further verification of our wettability implementation we compare the dewetting of a liquid film from a wetting stripe to experimental and numerical studies of interfacial morphologies on chemically structured surfaces.

  1. Multiphase flow models of biogels from crawling cells to bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, N. G.; Guy, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews multiphase descriptions of the fluid mechanics of cytoplasm in crawling cells and growing bacterial biofilms. These two systems involve gels, which are mixtures composed of a polymer network permeated by water. The fluid mechanics of these systems is essential to their biological function and structure. Their mathematical descriptions must account for the mechanics of the polymer, the water, and the interaction between these two phases. This review focuses on multiphase flow models because this framework is natural for including the relative motion between the phases, the exchange of material between phases, and the additional stresses within the network that arise from nonspecific chemical interactions and the action of molecular motors. These models have been successful in accounting for how different forces are generated and transmitted to achieve cell motion and biofilm growth and they have demonstrated how emergent structures develop though the interactions of the two phases. A short description of multiphase flow models of tumor growth is included to highlight the flexibility of the model in describing diverse biological applications. PMID:20676304

  2. Grayscale lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase heterogeneous flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Gerald G.

    2016-06-01

    The grayscale lattice Boltzmann (LB) model has been recently developed to model single-phase fluid flow through heterogeneous porous media. Flow is allowed in each voxel but the degree of flow depends on that voxel's resistivity to fluid motion. Here we extend the grayscale LB model to multiphase, immiscible flow. The new model is outlined and then applied to a number of test cases, which show good agreement with theory. This method is subsequently used to model the important case where each voxel may have a different resistance to each particular fluid that is passing through it. Finally, the method is applied to model fluid flow through real porous media to demonstrate its capability. Both the capillary and viscous flow regimes are recovered in these simulations.

  3. Grayscale lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase heterogeneous flow through porous media.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gerald G

    2016-06-01

    The grayscale lattice Boltzmann (LB) model has been recently developed to model single-phase fluid flow through heterogeneous porous media. Flow is allowed in each voxel but the degree of flow depends on that voxel's resistivity to fluid motion. Here we extend the grayscale LB model to multiphase, immiscible flow. The new model is outlined and then applied to a number of test cases, which show good agreement with theory. This method is subsequently used to model the important case where each voxel may have a different resistance to each particular fluid that is passing through it. Finally, the method is applied to model fluid flow through real porous media to demonstrate its capability. Both the capillary and viscous flow regimes are recovered in these simulations. PMID:27415381

  4. Computational modeling for multiphase flows with spacecraft application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzgoren, Eray; Singh, Rajkeshar; Sim, Jaeheon; Shyy, Wei

    2007-05-01

    Many engineering applications involve interactions between solid, gas and liquid phases under normal or micro-gravity conditions. Numerical simulations of such fluid flows need to track the location and the shape of the fluid interface as part of the solution. The merits and basic characteristics of various approaches for numerical computations of interfacial fluid dynamics are reviewed. The computational challenges include: (i) the algorithmic complexity for handling irregularly shaped moving boundaries that can experience merger and break-up; (ii) resolution refinement techniques to maintain desirable resolution of length scales, in accordance with the evolving fluid dynamics; (iii) data structure needed to support identification of the interface and satisfaction of the physical laws in the bulk fluids as well as around the phase boundaries; and (iv) efficient parallel processing techniques required for practical engineering analysis. The present review focuses on these issues related to the Lagrangian-Eulerian approach, utilizing the immersed boundary method with marker-based tracking, as the main framework for interfacial flow computations on Cartesian grids. Specifically, we offer in-depth discussion of the organization and layout of the mesh systems for both fluid and interface representations, local adaptive refinement on two-dimensional/three-dimensional (2D/3D) Cartesian grids, and multi-level domain decomposition method that utilizes Hilbert space filling curves for parallel processing strategy. The effectiveness of individual components and overall algorithm are presented using various tests such as, binary drop-collision computations to highlight grid adaptation and interface tracking algorithms to handle complex interface behavior, and bubble/droplet placed in a vortex field with various density/viscosity ratios across interfaces to address load balancing and scalability aspects of parallel computing. A time-dependent draining flow problem motivated by

  5. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-08-01

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semianalytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface.

  6. Consistent and conservative framework for incompressible multiphase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owkes, Mark; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    We present a computational methodology for convection that handles discontinuities with second order accuracy and maintains conservation to machine precision. We use this method in the context of an incompressible gas-liquid flow to transport the phase interface, momentum, and scalars. Using the same methodology for all the variables ensures discretely consistent transport, which is necessary for robust and accurate simulations of turbulent atomizing flows with high-density ratios. The method achieves conservative transport by computing consistent fluxes on a refined mesh, which ensures all conserved quantities are fluxed with the same discretization. Additionally, the method seamlessly couples semi-Lagrangian fluxes used near the interface with finite difference fluxes used away from the interface. The semi-Lagrangian fluxes are three-dimensional, un-split, and conservatively handle discontinuities. Careful construction of the fluxes ensures they are divergence-free and no gaps or overlaps form between neighbors. We have tested and used the scheme for many cases and demonstrate a simulation of an atomizing liquid jet.

  7. Massively parallel simulations of multiphase flows using Lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrenholz, Benjamin

    2010-03-01

    In the last two decades the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has matured as an alternative and efficient numerical scheme for the simulation of fluid flows and transport problems. Unlike conventional numerical schemes based on discretizations of macroscopic continuum equations, the LBM is based on microscopic models and mesoscopic kinetic equations. The fundamental idea of the LBM is to construct simplified kinetic models that incorporate the essential physics of microscopic or mesoscopic processes so that the macroscopic averaged properties obey the desired macroscopic equations. Especially applications involving interfacial dynamics, complex and/or changing boundaries and complicated constitutive relationships which can be derived from a microscopic picture are suitable for the LBM. In this talk a modified and optimized version of a Gunstensen color model is presented to describe the dynamics of the fluid/fluid interface where the flow field is based on a multi-relaxation-time model. Based on that modeling approach validation studies of contact line motion are shown. Due to the fact that the LB method generally needs only nearest neighbor information, the algorithm is an ideal candidate for parallelization. Hence, it is possible to perform efficient simulations in complex geometries at a large scale by massively parallel computations. Here, the results of drainage and imbibition (Degree of Freedom > 2E11) in natural porous media gained from microtomography methods are presented. Those fully resolved pore scale simulations are essential for a better understanding of the physical processes in porous media and therefore important for the determination of constitutive relationships.

  8. Modeling and Numerical Challenges in Eulerian-Lagrangian Computations of Shock-driven Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diggs, Angela; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the numerical methods required for particle-gas and particle-particle interactions in Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations of multiphase flow. Local volume fraction as seen by each particle is the quantity of foremost importance in modeling and evaluating such interactions. We consider a general multiphase flow with a distribution of particles inside a fluid flow discretized on an Eulerian grid. Particle volume fraction is needed both as a Lagrangian quantity associated with each particle and also as an Eulerian quantity associated with the flow. In Eulerian Projection (EP) methods, the volume fraction is first obtained within each cell as an Eulerian quantity and then interpolated to each particle. In Lagrangian Projection (LP) methods, the particle volume fraction is obtained at each particle and then projected onto the Eulerian grid. Traditionally, EP methods are used in multiphase flow, but sub-grid resolution can be obtained through use of LP methods. By evaluating the total error and its components we compare the performance of EP and LP methods. The standard von Neumann error analysis technique has been adapted for rigorous evaluation of rate of convergence. The methods presented can be extended to obtain accurate field representations of other Lagrangian quantities. Most importantly, we will show that such careful attention to numerical methodologies is needed in order to capture complex shock interaction with a bed of particles. Supported by U.S. Department of Defense SMART Program and the U.S. Department of Energy PSAAP-II program under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  9. A Stochastic Differential Equation Approach To Multiphase Flow In Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D.; Russell, T.

    2003-12-01

    The motivation for using stochastic differential equations in multiphase flow systems stems from our work in developing an upscaling methodology for single phase flow. The long term goals of this project include: I. Extending this work to a nonlinear upscaling methodology II. Developing a macro-scale stochastic theory of multiphase flow and transport that accounts for micro-scale heterogeneities and interfaces. In this talk, we present a stochastic differential equation approach to multiphase flow, a typical example of which is flow in the unsaturated domain. Specifically, a two phase problem is studied which consists of a wetting phase and a non-wetting phase. The approach given results in a nonlinear stochastic differential equation describing the position of the non-wetting phase fluid particle. Our fundamental assumption is that the flow of fluid particles is described by a stochastic process and that the positions of the fluid particles over time are governed by the law of the process. It is this law which we seek to determine. The nonlinearity in the stochastic differential equation arises because both the drift and diffusion coefficients depend on the volumetric fraction of the phase which in turn depends on the position of the fluid particles in the experimental domain. The concept of a fluid particle is central to the development of the model described in this talk. Expressions for both saturation and volumetric fraction are developed using the fluid particle concept. Darcy's law and the continuity equation are then used to derive a Fokker-Planck equation using these expressions. The Ito calculus is then applied to derive a stochastic differential equation for the non-wetting phase. This equation has both drift and diffusion terms which depend on the volumetric fraction of the non-wetting phase. Standard stochastic theories based on the Ito calculus and the Wiener process and the equivalent Fokker-Planck PDE's are typically used to model dispersion

  10. Modelling merging and fragmentation in multiphase flows with SURFER

    SciTech Connect

    Lafaurie, B. ); Nardone, C.; Scardovelli, R.; Zanetti, G. ); Zaleski, S. )

    1994-07-01

    We introduce a new numerical method, called [open quotes]SURFER,[close quotes] for the simulation of two- and three-dimensional flows with several fluid phases and free interfaces between them. We consider incompressible fluids obeying the Navier-Stokes equation with Newtonian viscosity in the bulk of each phase. Capillary forces are taken into account even when interfaces merge or break up. Fluid interfaces are advanced in time using an exactly volume conserving variant of the volume of fluid algorithm, thus allowing for full symmetry between fluid phases. The Navier-Stokes equation is solved using staggered finite differences on a MAC grid and a split-explicit time differencing scheme, while incompressibility is enforced using an iterative multigrid Poisson solver. Capillary effects are represented as a stress tensor computed from gradients of the volume fraction function. This formulation is completely independent of the topology of interfaces and relatively easy to implement in 3D. It also allows exact momentum conservation in the discretized algorithm. Numerical spurious effects or [open quotes]parasite currents[close quotes] are noticed and compared to similar effects in Boltzmann lattice gas methods for immiscible fluids. Simulations of droplets pairs colliding in 2D and in 3D are shown. Interface reconnection is performed easily, despite the large value of capillary forces during reconnection. 22 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Pore-Scale Modeling of Reactive-Multiphase-Buoyant Flow for Carbon Capture and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, S.; Cunningham, J. A.; Trotz, M.; Thomas, M. W.; Stewart, M.

    2010-12-01

    Physical and geochemical processes at multiple scales are yet to be understood for the storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aquifers and the concomitant mitigation of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. In deep saline aquifers, the pores in the potential aquifers for CO2 storage are initially filled with saline water (brine). The entrapment of brine in pores after injection of CO2 is controlled by capillary forces and by the inertial force driving CO2 inside the carbonate aquifer. The entrapped/residual brine will be a site for geochemical reactions which could alter the pore network and/or the permeability of the formation. Therefore, the pore-scale understanding of displacement of resident brine by CO2 is critical to evaluate the storage efficiency of carbonate aquifers and to quantify any dissolution or precipitation of minerals (e.g., gypsum, calcite, dolomite). In this project, we have developed a multiphase flow model, based on the lattice Boltzmann equation, that can describe pore-scale displacement of brine by invading CO2. The multiphase flow model is applied to three different pore networks saturated with brine. The amount of brine trapped after invasion of the domain by CO2 is strongly dependent on the pore network. We also examine the effects of CO2 density and viscosity (which depend on formation temperature and pressure) on the amount of entrapped brine. Only by resolving the flow at the pore scale can we predict the residual brine saturation and other parameters which control CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. Future work will focus on coupling the pore-scale multiphase flow model to a chemistry model to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation.

  12. Evaluation of methods for calculating volume fraction in Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diggs, Angela; Balachandar, S.

    2016-05-01

    The present work addresses numerical methods required to compute particle volume fraction or number density. Local volume fraction of the lth particle, αl, is the quantity of foremost importance in calculating the gas-mediated particle-particle interaction effect in multiphase flows. A general multiphase flow with a distribution of Lagrangian particles inside a fluid flow discretized on an Eulerian grid is considered. Particle volume fraction is needed both as a Lagrangian quantity associated with each particle and also as an Eulerian quantity associated with the grid cell for Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations. In Grid-Based (GB) methods the particle volume fraction is first obtained within each grid cell as an Eulerian quantity and then the local particle volume fraction associated with any Lagrangian particle can be obtained from interpolation. The second class of methods presented are Particle-Based (PB) methods, where particle volume fraction will first be obtained at each particle as a Lagrangian quantity, which then can be projected onto the Eulerian grid. Traditionally, the GB methods are used in multiphase flow, but sub-grid resolution can be obtained through use of the PB methods. By evaluating the total error, and its discretization, bias and statistical error components, the performance of the different PB methods is compared against several common GB methods of calculating volume fraction. The standard von Neumann error analysis technique has been adapted for evaluation of rate of convergence of the different methods. The discussion and error analysis presented focus on the volume fraction calculation, but the methods can be extended to obtain field representations of other Lagrangian quantities, such as particle velocity and temperature.

  13. Multiphase flow experiments, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the water - gas - solute movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Ma, X.; Su, N.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of water and solute into and through the vadose zone is, in essence, an issue of immiscible displacement in pore-space network of a soil. Therefore, multiphase flow and transport in porous media, referring to three medium: air, water, and the solute, pose one of the largest unresolved challenges for porous medium fluid seepage. However, this phenomenon has always been largely neglected. It is expected that a reliable analysis model of the multi-phase flow in soil can truly reflect the process of natural movement about the infiltration, which is impossible to be observed directly. In such cases, geophysical applications of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides the opportunity to measure the water movements into soils directly over a large scale from tiny pore to regional scale, accordingly enable it available both on the laboratory and on the field. In addition, the NMR provides useful information about the pore space properties. In this study, we proposed both laboratory and field experiments to measure the multi-phase flow parameters, together with optimize the model in computer programming based on the fractional partial differential equations (fPDE). In addition, we establish, for the first time, an infiltration model including solute flowing with water, which has huge influence on agriculture and soil environment pollution. Afterwards, with data collected from experiments, we simulate the model and analyze the spatial variability of parameters. Simulations are also conducted according to the model to evaluate the effects of airflow on water infiltration and other effects such as solute and absorption. It has significant meaning to oxygen irrigation aiming to higher crop yield, and shed more light into the dam slope stability. In summary, our framework is a first-time model added in solute to have a mathematic analysis with the fPDE and more instructive to agriculture activities.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulation of Boiling Multiphase Flows: State-of-the-Art, Modeling, Algorithmic and Computer Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Nourgaliev R.; Knoll D.; Mousseau V.; Berry R.

    2007-04-01

    The state-of-the-art for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of boiling multiphase flows is reviewed, focussing on potential of available computational techniques, the level of current success for their applications to model several basic flow regimes (film, pool-nucleate and wall-nucleate boiling -- FB, PNB and WNB, respectively). Then, we discuss multiphysics and multiscale nature of practical boiling flows in LWR reactors, requiring high-fidelity treatment of interfacial dynamics, phase-change, hydrodynamics, compressibility, heat transfer, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry of liquid/vapor and fluid/solid-wall interfaces. Finally, we outline the framework for the {\\sf Fervent} code, being developed at INL for DNS of reactor-relevant boiling multiphase flows, with the purpose of gaining insight into the physics of multiphase flow regimes, and generating a basis for effective-field modeling in terms of its formulation and closure laws.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Dynamic Contact Angles and Contact Lines in Multiphase Flows using Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendota, Premchand

    Many physical phenomena and industrial applications involve multiphase fluid flows and hence it is of high importance to be able to simulate various aspects of these flows accurately. The Dynamic Contact Angles (DCA) and the contact lines at the wall boundaries are a couple of such important aspects. In the past few decades, many mathematical models were developed for predicting the contact angles of the inter-face with the wall boundary under various flow conditions. These models are used to incorporate the physics of DCA and contact line motion in numerical simulations using various interface capturing/tracking techniques. In the current thesis, a simple approach to incorporate the static and dynamic contact angle boundary conditions using the level set method is developed and implemented in multiphase CFD codes, LIT (Level set Interface Tracking) (Herrmann (2008)) and NGA (flow solver) (Desjardins et al (2008)). Various DCA models and associated boundary conditions are reviewed. In addition, numerical aspects such as the occurrence of a stress singularity at the contact lines and grid convergence of macroscopic interface shape are dealt with in the context of the level set approach.

  16. An open-source toolbox for multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgue, P.; Soulaine, C.; Franc, J.; Guibert, R.; Debenest, G.

    2015-02-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media provides a wide range of applications: from the environmental understanding (aquifer, site-pollution) to industrial process improvements (oil production, waste management). Modeling of such flows involves specific volume-averaged equations and therefore specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. In this work, we develop a toolbox for modeling multiphase flow in porous media with OpenFOAM®, an open-source platform for CFD. The underlying idea of this approach is to provide an easily adaptable tool that can be used in further studies to test new mathematical models or numerical methods. The package provides the most common effective properties models of the literature (relative permeability, capillary pressure) and specific boundary conditions related to porous media flows. To validate this package, solvers based on the IMplicit Pressure Explicit Saturation (IMPES) method are developed in the toolbox. The numerical validation is performed by comparison with analytical solutions on academic cases. Then, a satisfactory parallel efficiency of the solver is shown on a more complex configuration.

  17. Simulation of three-component fluid flows using the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Tang, G. H.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we extend the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver, which was proposed in [1] for simulating incompressible flows of binary fluids based on two-component Cahn-Hilliard model, to three-component fluid flows. In the present method, the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver is applied to solve for the flow field and the three-component Cahn-Hilliard model is used to predict the evolution of the interfaces. The proposed method is first validated through the classical problem of simulation of partial spreading of a liquid lens between the other two components. Numerical results of interface shapes and contact angles agree well with theoretical solutions. After that, to further demonstrate the capability of the present method, several numerical examples of three-component fluid flows are presented, including a bubble rising across a fluid-fluid interface, single droplet falling through a fluid-fluid interface, the collision-coalescence of two droplets, and the non-contact collision of two droplets. It is shown that the present method can successfully handle complex interactions among three components.

  18. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    2001-05-29

    This report is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

  19. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2001-08-07

    This project is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

  20. Density and Cavitating Flow Results from a Full-Scale Optical Multiphase Cryogenic Flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin

    2007-01-01

    Liquid propulsion systems are hampered by poor flow measurements. The measurement of flow directly impacts safe motor operations, performance parameters as well as providing feedback from ground testing and developmental work. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in an effort to improve propulsion sensor technology, has developed an all optical flow meter that directly measures the density of the fluid. The full-scale sensor was tested in a transient, multiphase liquid nitrogen fluid environment. Comparison with traditional density models shows excellent agreement with fluid density with an error of approximately 0.8%. Further evaluation shows the sensor is able to detect cavitation or bubbles in the flow stream and separate out their resulting effects in fluid density.

  1. Effect of multiphase slug flow on the stability of corrosion product layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, M.; Rajappa, S.

    1999-11-01

    Corrosion experiments were carried out under iron carbonate scale-forming conditions in a large diameter, multiphase flow system. Both oil/water and oil/water/gas slug flows were studied at pressures up to 0.79 MPa and temperatures of 60 C and 80 C. It was found that with increasing iron concentration, the corrosion rates were reduced to negligible values in oil/water flows. However, significant corrosion was seen in slug flow with clear evidence of damage to the corrosion product layer due to impact and possible collapse of gas bubbles and a considerable reduction in the layer thickness. Details of corrosion rates and corrosion coupon surface analysis are presented.

  2. Review of multiphase flow and pollutant transport models for the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, C.T.; Mitchell. P.J.

    1986-11-01

    This report provides a review of the physical processes, geochemical reactions, and microbiological kinetics that interact to determine the migration and fate of these pollutants. This review of processes and reactions provides a background from which codes for the analysis of contaminant migration and fate can be evaluated. Single codes representing classes of pollutant migration problems are cited to show how commonly employed and publicly available codes are not always applicable to the complex problems of multiphase fluid flow and pollutant migration. This review provides guidance on selecting and using codes; it also provides recommendations for development work needed to address deficiencies identified in existing models, codes, and data bases.

  3. Evaluation of multi-phase heat transfer and droplet evaporation in petroleum cracking flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.; Zhou, C.Q.

    1996-04-01

    A computer code ICRKFLO was used to simulate the multiphase reacting flow of fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) riser reactors. The simulation provided a fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics and heat transfer processes in an FCC riser reactor, critical to the development of a new high performance unit. The code was able to make predictions that are in good agreement with available pilot-scale test data. Computational results indicate that the heat transfer and droplet evaporation processes have a significant impact on the performance of a pilot-scale FCC unit. The impact could become even greater on scale-up units.

  4. Large Eddy Simulation of a Cavitating Multiphase Flow for Liquid Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailloux, M.; Helie, J.; Reveillon, J.; Demoulin, F. X.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a numerical method for modelling a compressible multiphase flow that involves phase transition between liquid and vapour in the context of gasoline injection. A discontinuous compressible two fluid mixture based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) implementation is employed to represent the phases of liquid, vapour and air. The mass transfer between phases is modelled by standard models such as Kunz or Schnerr-Sauer but including the presence of air in the gas phase. Turbulence is modelled using a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach to catch instationnarities and coherent structures. Eventually the modelling approach matches favourably experimental data concerning the effect of cavitation on atomisation process.

  5. Lattice-gas models of phase separation: interfaces, phase transitions, and multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, D.H. ); Zaleski, S. )

    1994-10-01

    Momentum-conserving lattice gases are simple, discrete, microscopic models of fluids. This review describes their hydrodynamics, with particular attention given to the derivation of macroscopic constitutive equations from microscopic dynamics. Lattice-gas models of phase separation receive special emphasis. The current understanding of phase transitions in these momentum-conserving models is reviewed; included in this discussion is a summary of the dynamical properties of interfaces. Because the phase-separation models are microscopically time irreversible, interesting questions are raised about their relationship to real fluid mixtures. Simulation of certain complex-fluid problems, such as multiphase flow through porous media and the interaction of phase transitions with hydrodynamics, is illustrated.

  6. Wave dispersion and attenuation in viscoelastic isotropic media containing multiphase flow and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Yang, DingHui; Nie, JianXin

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce the complex modulus to express the viscoelasticity of a medium. According to the correspondence principle, the Biot-Squirt (BISQ) equations in the steady-state case are presented for the space-frequency domain described by solid displacements and fluid pressure in a homogeneous viscoelastic medium. The effective bulk modulus of a multiphase flow is computed by the Voigt formula, and the characteristic squirt-flow length is revised for the gas-included case. We then build a viscoelastic BISQ model containing a multiphase flow. Through using this model, wave dispersion and attenuation are studied in a medium with low porosity and low permeability. Furthermore, this model is applied to observed interwell seismic data. Analysis of these data reveals that the viscoelastic parameter tan δ is not a constant. Thus, we present a linear frequency-dependent function in the interwell seismic frequency range to express tan δ. This improves the fit between the observed data and theoretical results.

  7. A Numerical Study of Mesh Adaptivity in Multiphase Flows with Non-Newtonian Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, James; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhihua; Alberini, Federico; Simmons, Mark; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    We present an investigation into the computational efficiency benefits of dynamic mesh adaptivity in the numerical simulation of transient multiphase fluid flow problems involving Non-Newtonian fluids. Such fluids appear in a range of industrial applications, from printing inks to toothpastes and introduce new challenges for mesh adaptivity due to the additional ``memory'' of viscoelastic fluids. Nevertheless, the multiscale nature of these flows implies huge potential benefits for a successful implementation. The study is performed using the open source package Fluidity, which couples an unstructured mesh control volume finite element solver for the multiphase Navier-Stokes equations to a dynamic anisotropic mesh adaptivity algorithm, based on estimated solution interpolation error criteria, and conservative mesh-to-mesh interpolation routine. The code is applied to problems involving rheologies ranging from simple Newtonian to shear-thinning to viscoelastic materials and verified against experimental data for various industrial and microfluidic flows. This work was undertaken as part of the EPSRC MEMPHIS programme grant EP/K003976/1.

  8. Electrochemical methods for monitoring performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Gopal, M.

    1999-07-01

    The corrosion inhibitor is the main tool for preventing internal corrosion in carbon steel pipelines, which are used to transport multiphase mixtures from oil production. This paper presents results of an imidazoline based inhibitor using the Electrochemical Noise (ECN) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) techniques in a multiphase flow pipeline. ECN and EIS measurements were made simultaneously in a 101.6mm I.D., 15m long acrylic pipeline using saltwater and carbon dioxide mixtures. Full pipe flow was studied for liquid velocity of 1.25 m/s and slug flow for Froude numbers 6 and 9. Experiments were carried out at a constant pressure of 136kPa and temperature of 40 C. The ECN signals and EIS spectra of blank and inhibition tests were obtained. The ECN technique is able to monitor the inhibitor film formation continuously. The current noise fluctuation is correlated to the corrosion rate for both blank test and inhibitor test. The higher current fluctuation indicates higher corrosion rates. Different EIS spectra were obtained for blank and inhibitor studies. The simple charge transfer process was seen to occur for blank tests while charge transfer and diffusion processes were taking place under inhibitor effects.

  9. Fast multiphase MR imaging of aqueductal CSF flow: 2. Study in patients with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Mascalchi, M; Ciraolo, L; Bucciolini, M; Inzitari, D; Arnetoli, G; Dal Pozzo, G

    1990-05-01

    The signal intensity in the region corresponding to the cerebral aqueduct was evaluated in three patients with noncommunicating tension hydrocephalus (caused by aqueductal obstruction in two and type I Arnold-Chiari malformation in the other), seven patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus (three of whom subsequently underwent successful shunting), and 10 patients with ex vacuo (atrophic) hydrocephalus. A gradient-echo MR sequence, called fast multiphase imaging, was used. Serial images corresponding to different phases of the cardiac cycle were acquired. No flow-related enhancement was observed over the entire cardiac cycle in the patients with noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus showed a higher aqueductal CSF signal intensity, consistent with increased systolic flow rates, than patients with ex vacuo hydrocephalus. When comparing the above two groups of patients with a control group of healthy volunteers, significantly higher and lower values of the (mean) maximum aqueductal signal intensity were found in the normal-pressure hydrocephalus patients and the ex vacuo hydrocephalus patients, respectively. Fast multiphase MR evaluation of aqueductal CSF flow may help to differentiate patients with different types of hydrocephalus. PMID:2112327

  10. Numerical models of caldera deformation: Effects of multiphase and multicomponent hydrothermal fluid flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ground surface displacement (GSD) in large calderas is often interpreted as resulting from magma intrusion at depth. Recent advances in geodetic measurements of GSD, notably interferometric synthetic aperture radar, reveal complex and multifaceted deformation patterns that often require complex source models to explain the observed GSD. Although hydrothermal fluids have been discussed as a possible deformation agent, very few quantitative studies addressing the effects of multiphase flow on crustal mechanics have been attempted. Recent increases in the power and availability of computing resources allow robust quantitative assessment of the complex time-variant thermal interplay between aqueous fluid flow and crustal deformation. We carry out numerical simulations of multiphase (liquid-gas), multicomponent (H 2O-CO2) hydrothermal fluid flow and poroelastic deformation using a range of realistic physical parameters and processes. Hydrothermal fluid injection, circulation, and gas formation can generate complex, temporally and spatially varying patterns of GSD, with deformation rates, magnitudes, and geometries (including subsidence) similar to those observed in several large calderas. The potential for both rapid and gradual deformation resulting from magma-derived fluids suggests that hydrothermal fluid circulation may help explain deformation episodes at calderas that have not culminated in magmatic eruption.

  11. A Coupled Model of Multiphase Flow, Reactive Biogeochemical Transport, Thermal Transport and Geo-Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. H.; Yeh, G. T.

    2015-12-01

    In this investigation, a coupled model of multiphase flow, reactive biogeochemical transport, thermal transport and geo-mechanics in subsurface media is presented. It iteratively solves the mass conservation equation for fluid flow, thermal transport equation for temperature, reactive biogeochemical transport equations for concentration distributions, and solid momentum equation for displacement with successive linearization algorithm. With species-based equations of state, density of a phase in the system is obtained by summing up concentrations of all species. This circumvents the problem of having to use empirical functions. Moreover, reaction rates of all species are incorporated in mass conservation equation for fluid flow. Formation enthalpy of all species is included in the law of energy conservation as a source-sink term. Finite element methods are used to discretize the governing equations. Numerical experiments are presented to examine the accuracy and robustness of the proposed model. The results demonstrate the feasibility and capability of present model in subsurface media.

  12. Algebraic dynamic multilevel (ADM) method for fully implicit simulations of multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusini, Matteo; van Kruijsdijk, Cor; Hajibeygi, Hadi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the development of an algebraic dynamic multilevel method (ADM) for fully implicit simulations of multiphase flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media. Built on the fine-scale fully implicit (FIM) discrete system, ADM constructs a multilevel FIM system describing the coupled process on a dynamically defined grid of hierarchical nested topology. The multilevel adaptive resolution is determined at each time step on the basis of an error criterion. Once the grid resolution is established, ADM employs sequences of restriction and prolongation operators in order to map the FIM system across the considered resolutions. Several choices can be considered for prolongation (interpolation) operators, e.g., constant, bilinear and multiscale basis functions, all of which form partition of unity. The adaptive multilevel restriction operators, on the other hand, are constructed using a finite-volume scheme. This ensures mass conservation of the ADM solutions, and as such, the stability and accuracy of the simulations with multiphase transport. For several homogeneous and heterogeneous test cases, it is shown that ADM applies only a small fraction of the full FIM fine-scale grid cells in order to provide accurate solutions. The sensitivity of the solutions with respect to the employed fraction of grid cells (determined automatically based on the threshold value of the error criterion) is investigated for all test cases. ADM is a significant step forward in the application of dynamic local grid refinement methods, in the sense that it is algebraic, allows for systematic mapping across different scales, and applicable to heterogeneous test cases without any upscaling of fine-scale high resolution quantities. It also develops a novel multilevel multiscale method for FIM multiphase flow simulations in natural subsurface formations.

  13. ON THE INCLUSION OF THE INTERFACIAL AREA BETWEEN PHASES IN THE PHYSICAL AND MATHEMATICAL DESCRIPTION OF SUBSURFACE MULTIPHASE FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A distinguishing feature of multi-phase subsurface flow in comparison to single phase flow is the existence of fluid-fluid interfaces. These interfaces define phase boundaries at the pore scale and influence overall system behavior in many important ways. For example, fluid-fluid...

  14. DENSE MULTIPHASE FLOW SIMULATION: CONTINUUM MODEL FOR POLY-DISPERSED SYSTEMS USING KINETIC THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Moses Bogere

    2011-08-31

    The overall objective of the project was to verify the applicability of the FCMOM approach to the kinetic equations describing the particle flow dynamics. For monodispersed systems the fundamental equation governing the particle flow dynamics is the Boltzmann equation. During the project, the FCMOM was successfully applied to several homogeneous and in-homogeneous problems in different flow regimes, demonstrating that the FCMOM has the potential to be used to solve efficiently the Boltzmann equation. However, some relevant issues still need to be resolved, i.e. the homogeneous cooling problem (inelastic particles cases) and the transition between different regimes. In this report, the results obtained in homogeneous conditions are discussed first. Then a discussion of the validation results for in-homogeneous conditions is provided. And finally, a discussion will be provided about the transition between different regimes. Alongside the work on development of FCMOM approach studies were undertaken in order to provide insights into anisotropy or particles kinetics in riser hydrodynamics. This report includes results of studies of multiphase flow with unequal granular temperatures and analysis of momentum re-distribution in risers due to particle-particle and fluid-particle interactions. The study of multiphase flow with unequal granular temperatures entailed both simulation and experimental studies of two particles sizes in a riser and, a brief discussion of what was accomplished will be provided. And finally, a discussion of the analysis done on momentum re-distribution of gas-particles flow in risers will be provided. In particular a discussion of the remaining work needed in order to improve accuracy and predictability of riser hydrodynamics based on two-fluid models and how they can be used to model segregation in risers.

  15. THC-MP: High performance numerical simulation of reactive transport and multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaohui; Li, Weishan; Tian, Hailong; Li, Hongliang; Xu, Haixiao; Xu, Tianfu

    2015-07-01

    The numerical simulation of multiphase flow and reactive transport in the porous media on complex subsurface problem is a computationally intensive application. To meet the increasingly computational requirements, this paper presents a parallel computing method and architecture. Derived from TOUGHREACT that is a well-established code for simulating subsurface multi-phase flow and reactive transport problems, we developed a high performance computing THC-MP based on massive parallel computer, which extends greatly on the computational capability for the original code. The domain decomposition method was applied to the coupled numerical computing procedure in the THC-MP. We designed the distributed data structure, implemented the data initialization and exchange between the computing nodes and the core solving module using the hybrid parallel iterative and direct solver. Numerical accuracy of the THC-MP was verified through a CO2 injection-induced reactive transport problem by comparing the results obtained from the parallel computing and sequential computing (original code). Execution efficiency and code scalability were examined through field scale carbon sequestration applications on the multicore cluster. The results demonstrate successfully the enhanced performance using the THC-MP on parallel computing facilities.

  16. A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II: Artificial heat exchanges for multiphase shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Petitpas, Fabien; Franquet, Erwin; Saurel, Richard . E-mail: Richard.Saurel@polytech.univ-mrs.fr; Le Metayer, Olivier

    2007-08-10

    The relaxation-projection method developed in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, E. Franquet, E. Daniel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part I: The numerical equation of state for the Euler equations, J. Comput. Phys. (2007) 822-845] is extended to the non-conservative hyperbolic multiphase flow model of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration to detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024]. This model has the ability to treat multi-temperatures mixtures evolving with a single pressure and velocity and is particularly interesting for the computation of interface problems with compressible materials as well as wave propagation in heterogeneous mixtures. The non-conservative character of this model poses however computational challenges in the presence of shocks. The first issue is related to the Riemann problem resolution that necessitates shock jump conditions. Thanks to the Rankine-Hugoniot relations proposed and validated in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, J. Massoni, S. Gavrilyuk, Shock jump conditions for multiphase mixtures with stiff mechanical relaxation, Shock Waves 16 (3) (2007) 209-232] exact and approximate 2-shocks Riemann solvers are derived. However, the Riemann solver is only a part of a numerical scheme and non-conservative variables pose extra difficulties for the projection or cell average of the solution. It is shown that conventional Godunov schemes are unable to converge to the exact solution for strong multiphase shocks. This is due to the incorrect partition of the energies or entropies in the cell averaged mixture. To circumvent this difficulty a specific Lagrangian scheme is developed. The correct partition of the energies is achieved by using an artificial heat exchange in the shock layer. With the help of an asymptotic analysis this heat exchange takes a similar form as

  17. Effects of Gravity and Shear on the Dynamics and Stability of Particulate and Multiphase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangani, Ashor S.

    1996-01-01

    The main objectives of this project are to understand the differing particulate and multiphase flow behaviors that will occur in space and in Earth's gravity. More specifically, the project is concerned with understanding the effect of shear and gravity on two relatively ideal suspensions with significant inertial effects. The first is a gas-solid suspension at small Reynolds numbers and finite Stokes numbers. In this type of suspensions the inertia of the particle phase is significant while the hydrodynamic interactions are dominated by viscous forces in the suspending fluid. The other is a bubble suspension at small Weber and large Reynolds numbers. The hydrodynamic interactions in such suspensions are dominated by the inertial effects in the suspending fluid, but these inertial interactions can be described using potential flow theory. Our main objective is to examine the effects of shear and gravity on the average properties and stability of these two suspensions.

  18. Adaptive mesh refinement and multilevel iteration for multiphase, multicomponent flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    An adaptive local mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm originally developed for unsteady gas dynamics is extended to multi-phase flow in porous media. Within the AMR framework, we combine specialized numerical methods to treat the different aspects of the partial differential equations. Multi-level iteration and domain decomposition techniques are incorporated to accommodate elliptic/parabolic behavior. High-resolution shock capturing schemes are used in the time integration of the hyperbolic mass conservation equations. When combined with AMR, these numerical schemes provide high resolution locally in a more efficient manner than if they were applied on a uniformly fine computational mesh. We will discuss the interplay of physical, mathematical, and numerical concerns in the application of adaptive mesh refinement to flow in porous media problems of practical interest.

  19. Fast high-resolution prediction of multi-phase flow in fractured formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, George Shu Heng; Finsterle, Stefan; Zhang, Yingqi

    2016-02-01

    The success of a thermal water flood for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) depends on a detailed representation of the geometrical and hydraulic properties of the fracture network, which induces discrete, channelized flow behavior. The resulting high-resolution model is typically computationally very demanding. Here, we use the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition Mapping Method to reconstruct high-resolution solutions based on efficient low-resolution solutions. The method requires training a reduced order model (ROM) using high- and low-resolution solutions determined for a relatively short simulation time. For a cyclic EOR operation, the oil production rate and the heterogeneous structure of the oil saturation are accurately reproduced even after 105 cycles, reducing the computational cost by at least 85%. The method described is general and can be potentially utilized with any multiphase flow model.

  20. The Effect of Surface Treated Nanoparticles on Single and Multi-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, D. A.; Aminzadeh, B.; Chung, D.; Zhang, X.; Wung, R.; Huh, C.; Bryant, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Surface treated nanoparticles have been suggested to be an additive to CO2 storage scenarios. This is because 1) the nanoparticles have been shown to freely transport through permeable media, and 2) the nanoparticles can stabilize a CO2 in water foam by adhering to the surface of CO2 bubbles/droplets preventing their coalescence. In terms of storage, The formation of CO2 foam will limit the CO2 mobility which can potentially help limit the CO2 leakage. Here, we will show how nanoparticles in porous media can have many interesting properties in single and multi-phase flow. For multi-phase CO2, we have performed experiments where high pressure liquid CO2 displaces brine and vice versa with and without nanoparticles in the brine. We measure the displacement pattern and in-situ CO2 saturation using CT scanning and measure the pressure drop using pressure transducers. We find that the flow is less preferential and the pressure drop is greater than when nanoparticles are present. This suggest the formation of in-situ foam/emulsion. We also show that on a brine chase, the residual saturation of CO2 is greater in the presence of nanoparticles. In terms of nanoparticle transport, it is observed that nanoparticles accumulate at the front of a brine/octane displacement. We hypothesize that this occurs due to the nanoparticles being size excluded from portions of the pore-space. To determine if this occurs in single phase flow, we have also performed experiments single-phase flow with the nanoparticles and tracer. We find that the nanoparticles arrive roughly 5% faster than the tracer. This also has implications for the positioning of nanoparticles in the pore space and how this can change the effective viscosity of the nanoparticle suspension.

  1. Methane hydrate induced permeability modification for multiphase flow in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2011-08-01

    An experimental study was performed using X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning to capture three-dimensional (3-D) methane hydrate distributions and potential discrete flow pathways in a sand pack sample. A numerical study was also performed to develop and analyze empirical relations that describe the impacts of hydrate accumulation habits within pore space (e.g., pore filling or grain cementing) on multiphase fluid migration. In the experimental study, water was injected into a hydrate-bearing sand sample that was monitored using an X-ray CT scanner. The CT images were converted into numerical grid elements, providing intrinsic sample data including porosity and phase saturations. The impacts of hydrate accumulation were examined by adapting empirical relations into the flow simulations as additional relations governing the evolution of absolute permeability of hydrate bearing sediment with hydrate deposition. The impacts of pore space hydrate accumulation habits on fluid migration were examined by comparing numerical predictions with experimentally measured water saturation distributions and breakthrough curves. A model case with 3-D heterogeneous initial conditions (hydrate saturation, porosity, and water saturation) and pore body-preferred hydrate accumulations best captured water migration behavior through the hydrate-bearing sample observed in the experiment. In the best matching model, absolute permeability in the hydrate bearing sample does not decrease significantly with increasing hydrate saturation until hydrate saturation reaches about 40%, after which it drops rapidly, and complete blockage of flow through the sample can occur as hydrate accumulations approach 70%. The result highlights the importance of permeability modification due to hydrate accumulation habits when predicting multiphase flow through high-saturation, reservoir quality hydrate-bearing sediments.

  2. Modeling of multiphase flow with solidification and chemical reaction in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jiuan

    Understanding of multiphase flow and related heat transfer and chemical reactions are the keys to increase the productivity and efficiency in industrial processes. The objective of this thesis is to utilize the computational approaches to investigate the multiphase flow and its application in the materials processes, especially in the following two areas: directional solidification, and pyrolysis and synthesis. In this thesis, numerical simulations will be performed for crystal growth of several III-V and II-VI compounds. The effects of Prandtl and Grashof numbers on the axial temperature profile, the solidification interface shape, and melt flow are investigated. For the material with high Prandtl and Grashof numbers, temperature field and growth interface will be significantly influenced by melt flow, resulting in the complicated temperature distribution and curved interface shape, so it will encounter tremendous difficulty using a traditional Bridgman growth system. A new design is proposed to reduce the melt convection. The geometric configuration of top cold and bottom hot in the melt will dramatically reduce the melt convection. The new design has been employed to simulate the melt flow and heat transfer in crystal growth with large Prandtl and Grashof numbers and the design parameters have been adjusted. Over 90% of commercial solar cells are made from silicon and directional solidification system is the one of the most important method to produce multi-crystalline silicon ingots due to its tolerance to feedstock impurities and lower manufacturing cost. A numerical model is developed to simulate the silicon ingot directional solidification process. Temperature distribution and solidification interface location are presented. Heat transfer and solidification analysis are performed to determine the energy efficiency of the silicon production furnace. Possible improvements are identified. The silicon growth process is controlled by adjusting heating power and

  3. Application of a geocentrifuge and sterolithographically fabricated apertures to multiphase flow in complex fracture apertures.

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn E. McCreery; Robert D. Stedtfeld; Alan T. Stadler; Daphne L. Stoner; Paul Meakin

    2005-09-01

    A geotechnical centrifuge was used to investigate unsaturated multiphase fluid flow in synthetic fracture apertures under a variety of flow conditions. The geocentrifuge subjected the fluids to centrifugal forces allowing the Bond number to be systematically changed without adjusting the fracture aperture of the fluids. The fracture models were based on the concept that surfaces generated by the fracture of brittle geomaterials have a self-affine fractal geometry. The synthetic fracture surfaces were fabricated from a transparent epoxy photopolymer using sterolithography, and fluid flow through the transparent fracture models was monitored by an optical image acquisition system. Aperture widths were chosen to be representative of the wide range of geological fractures in the vesicular basalt that lies beneath the Idaho Nation Laboratory (INL). Transitions between different flow regimes were observed as the acceleration was changed under constant flow conditions. The experiments showed the transition between straight and meandering rivulets in smooth walled apertures (aperture width = 0.508 mm), the dependence of the rivulet width on acceleration in rough walled fracture apertures (average aperture width = 0.25 mm), unstable meandering flow in rough walled apertures at high acceleration (20g) and the narrowing of the wetted region with increasing acceleration during the penetration of water into an aperture filled with wetted particles (0.875 mm diameter glass spheres).

  4. Multiphase reacting flow modeling of singlet oxygen generators for chemical oxygen iodine lasers.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Hewett, Kevin B.; Madden, Timothy J.; Musson, Lawrence Cale

    2008-08-01

    Singlet oxygen generators are multiphase flow chemical reactors used to generate energetic oxygen to be used as a fuel for chemical oxygen iodine lasers. In this paper, a theoretical model of the generator is presented along with its solutions over ranges of parameter space and oxygen maximizing optimizations. The singlet oxygen generator (SOG) is a low-pressure, multiphase flow chemical reactor that is used to produce molecular oxygen in an electronically excited state, i.e. singlet delta oxygen. The primary product of the reactor, the energetic oxygen, is used in a stage immediately succeeding the SOG to dissociate and energize iodine. The gas mixture including the iodine is accelerated to a supersonic speed and lased. Thus the SOG is the fuel generator for the chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL). The COIL has important application for both military purposes--it was developed by the US Air Force in the 1970s--and, as the infrared beam is readily absorbed by metals, industrial cutting and drilling. The SOG appears in various configurations, but the one in focus here is a crossflow droplet generator SOG. A gas consisting of molecular chlorine and a diluent, usually helium, is pumped through a roughly rectangular channel. An aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide and potassium hydroxide is pumped through small holes into the channel and perpendicular to the direction of the gas flow. So doing causes the solution to become aerosolized. Dissociation of the potassium hydroxide draws a proton from the hydrogen peroxide generating an HO{sub 2} radical in the liquid. Chlorine diffuses into the liquid and reacts with the HO{sub 2} ion producing the singlet delta oxygen; some of the oxygen diffuses back into the gas phase. The focus of this work is to generate a predictive multiphase flow model of the SOG in order to optimize its design. The equations solved are the so-called Eulerian-Eulerian form of the multiphase flow Navier-Stokes equations wherein one set of the

  5. Multiphase flow modelling of explosive volcanic eruptions using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christian T.; Collins, Gareth S.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Kramer, Stephan C.

    2014-05-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions generate highly energetic plumes of hot gas and ash particles that produce diagnostic deposits and pose an extreme environmental hazard. The formation, dispersion and collapse of these volcanic plumes are complex multiscale processes that are extremely challenging to simulate numerically. Accurate description of particle and droplet aggregation, movement and settling requires a model capable of capturing the dynamics on a range of scales (from cm to km) and a model that can correctly describe the important multiphase interactions that take place. However, even the most advanced models of eruption dynamics to date are restricted by the fixed mesh-based approaches that they employ. The research presented herein describes the development of a compressible multiphase flow model within Fluidity, a combined finite element / control volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. Fluidity adopts a state-of-the-art adaptive unstructured mesh-based approach to discretise the domain and focus numerical resolution only in areas important to the dynamics, while decreasing resolution where it is not needed as a simulation progresses. This allows the accurate but economical representation of the flow dynamics throughout time, and potentially allows large multi-scale problems to become tractable in complex 3D domains. The multiphase flow model is verified with the method of manufactured solutions, and validated by simulating published gas-solid shock tube experiments and comparing the numerical results against pressure gauge data. The application of the model considers an idealised 7 km by 7 km domain in which the violent eruption of hot gas and volcanic ash high into the atmosphere is simulated. Although the simulations do not correspond to a particular eruption case study, the key flow features observed in a typical explosive eruption event are successfully captured. These include a shock wave resulting

  6. Pore-Scale Modeling of Reactive-Multiphase Flow for Carbon Capture and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, S.; Cunningham, J. A.; Trotz, M.; Thomas, M. W.; Stewart, M.

    2011-12-01

    Physical and geochemical processes at multiple scales are yet to be understood for the storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aquifers and the concomitant mitigation of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. In deep saline aquifers, the pores in the potential aquifers for CO2 storage are initially filled with saline water (brine). The entrapment of brine in pores after injection of CO2 is controlled by capillary forces and by the inertial force driving CO2 inside the carbonate aquifer. The entrapped/residual brine will be a site for geochemical reactions which could alter the pore network and/or the permeability of the formation. Therefore, the pore-scale understanding of displacement of resident brine by CO2 is critical to evaluate the storage efficiency of carbonate aquifers and to quantify any dissolution or precipitation of minerals (e.g., gypsum, calcite, dolomite). In this project, we have developed a multiphase flow model, based on the lattice Boltzmann equation, which can describe pore-scale displacement of brine by invading CO2. We also examine the effects of CO2 density and viscosity (which depend on formation temperature and pressure) on the amount of entrapped brine. Only by resolving the flow at the pore scale can we predict the residual brine saturation and other parameters which control CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. The rock is assumed to consist of only calcite minerals. The multiphase flow model is coupled with the diffusion model and the geochemical reaction model to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation. The amount of brine trapped after invasion of the domain by CO2 is strongly dependent on the pore network and viscosity ratio between brine and CO2. The pH drops to 3.0 in brine after injection of CO2 and dissolution of calcite occurs where CO2, brine and mineral comes in contact.

  7. Coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics analysis of the 2011 Lorca earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B.; Hager, B. H.; Juanes, R.; Bechor, N.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new approach for modeling coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics of faulted reservoirs. We couple a flow simulator with a mechanics simulator using the unconditionally stable fixed-stress sequential solution scheme [Kim et al, 2011]. We model faults as surfaces of discontinuity using interface elements [Aagaard et al, 2008]. This allows us to model stick-slip behavior on the fault surface for dynamically evolving fault strength. We employ a rigorous formulation of nonlinear multiphase geomechanics [Coussy, 1995], which is based on the increment in mass of fluid phases instead of the traditional, and less accurate, scheme based on the change in porosity. Our nonlinear formulation is capable of handling strong capillarity and large changes in saturation in the reservoir. To account for the effect of surface stresses along fluid-fluid interfaces, we use the equivalent pore pressure in the definition of the multiphase effective stress [Coussy et al, 1998; Kim et al, 2013]. We use our simulation tool to study the 2011 Lorca earthquake [Gonzalez et al, 2012], which has received much attention because of its potential anthropogenic triggering (long-term groundwater withdrawal leading to slip along the regional Alhama de Murcia fault). Our coupled fluid flow and geomechanics approach to model fault slip allowed us to take a fresh look at this seismic event, which to date has only been analyzed using simple elastic dislocation models and point source solutions. Using a three-dimensional model of the Lorca region, we simulate the groundwater withdrawal and subsequent unloading of the basin over the period of interest (1960-2010). We find that groundwater withdrawal leads to unloading of the crust and changes in the stress across the impermeable fault plane. Our analysis suggests that the combination of these two factors played a critical role in inducing the fault slip that ultimately led to the Lorca earthquake. Aagaard, B. T., M. G. Knepley, and C. A

  8. Trial of a gamma-ray multiphase flow meter on the west kingfish oil platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, P. E.; Roach, G. J.; Stewart, D.; Watt, J. S.; Zastawny, H. W.; Ellis, W. K.

    1995-12-01

    The γ-ray multiphase flow meter (MFM) developed by CSIRO determines the flow rates of oil, water and gas in pipelines from oil wells. It is based on two specialized γ-ray transmission gauges mounted on a pipe carrying the full flow of oil. water and gas. One gauge uses γ-ray transmission and the other dual energy γ-ray transmission (DUET). This paper describes a trial of the MFM, undertaken by CSIRO and Esso Australia Ltd, on the West Kingfish offshore oil platform, Bass Strait, Australia. The trial is the most comprehensive platform trial of a MFM ever undertaken, involving measurements on 20 wells over a period of 18 weeks. The relative errors in flow determination were 3.9% for liquids, 7.6% for gas, 7.9% for oil, and 5.2% for water. Water cut was determined to 3.3%. These relative errors include errors due to the MFM and due to the separator and its output meters. The West Kingfish trial and two earlier field trials, demonstrate that, after calibration, the MFM measures flow rates and water cut accurately and performs reliably. CSIRO now expect to appoint a commercial licensee to further industrialize the equipment, manufacture and market the MFM.

  9. Theoretical analysis of multiphase flow during oil-well drilling by a conservative model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas-Lopez, Ruben

    2005-11-01

    In order to decrease cost and improve drilling operations is necessary a better understood of the flow mechanisms. Therefore, it was carried out a multiphase conservative model that includes three mass equations and a momentum equation. Also, the measured geothermal gradient is utilized by state equations for estimating physical properties of the phases flowing. The mathematical model is solved by numerical conservative schemes. It is used to analyze the interaction among solid-liquid-gas phases. The circulating system consists as follow, the circulating fluid is pumped downward into the drilling pipe until the bottom of the open hole then it flows through the drill bit, and at this point formation cuttings are incorporated to the circulating fluid and carried upward to the surface. The mixture returns up to the surface by an annular flow area. The real operational conditions are fed to conservative model and the results are matched up to field measurements in several oil wells. Mainly, flow rates, drilling rate, well and tool geometries are data to estimate the profiles of pressure, mixture density, equivalent circulating density, gas fraction and solid carrying capacity. Even though the problem is very complex, the model describes, properly, the hydrodynamics of drilling techniques applied at oil fields. *Authors want to thank to Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo and Petroleos Mexicanos for supporting this research.

  10. Field trial of a gamma-ray multiphase flow meter on Thevenard Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, G. J.; Watt, J. S.; Zastawny, H. W.; Hartley, P. E.; Ellis, W. K.

    1995-02-01

    A multiphase flow meter (MFM) for the determination of the flow rates of oil, water and gas in oil well production pipelines has been trialed at Thevenard Island on Australia's North-West Shelf. The flow meter is based on two γ-ray transmission gauges mounted on a pipe carrying the full flow of oil, water and gas. Measurements were made with two MFMs mounted on a test pipeline linking the test manifold and the test separator. One was mounted on a vertical (upflow) pipeline, and the other on, in different phases of the trial, a vertical (downflow) section of the pipeline and two different horizontal positions. The MFMs measured flows of oil, water and gas from eight single wells and up to 17 commingled flows of two or more wells. These flows were in the range of 6570 33,500 BPD for liquids and 1200 4500 MSCF/D for gas. Water cut ranged from 25% to 95.6%. The MFM mounted on the vertical upflow pipeline determined the flow rates to 4.0% relative for liquids, 7.5% for oil, 4.5% for water and 7.9% for gas. Water cut was determined to 3.6% relative. The MFM mounted on the vertical downflow pipeline determined flow rates to 3.3% relative for liquids, 6.1% for oil, 4.5% for water and 7.7% for gas. Water cut was determined to 3.7%. These relative errors include both separator and MFM errors.