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Sample records for multiphasic personality inventory

  1. Use of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 with Persons Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Danielle; Granello, Darcy Haag

    2009-01-01

    Counselors who assess persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; T. N. Butcher, W. G. Dahlstrom, J. R. Graham, A. Tellegen, & B. Kaemmer, 1989) may find scale elevations on Scales 1, 2, 3, and 8. These elevations may be due, at least in part, to specific questions on the MMPI-2 that assess…

  2. Bringing Another Perspective To Bear on the Factor Structure of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaha, John; Merydith, Scott P.; Wallbrown, Fred H.; Dowd, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    A hierarchical factor solution on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 standardization sample found a general psychopathology factor and four primary factors similar to those reported by Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, and Kaemmer (1989). (Contains 29 references and 2 tables.) (Author)

  3. Detecting Random, Partially Random, and Nonrandom Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--Adolescent Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsoneault, Terry B.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A; J. N. Butcher et al., 1992) validity scales to detect random, partially random, and nonrandom MMPI-A protocols was investigated. Investigations included the Variable Response Inconsistency scale (VRIN), F, several potentially useful new F and VRIN subscales, and…

  4. Detecting Random, Partially Random, and Nonrandom Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsoneault, Terry B.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; J. N. Butcher et al., 2001) validity scales to detect random, partially random, and nonrandom MMPI-2 protocols was investigated. Investigations included the Variable Response Inconsistency scale (VRIN), F, several potentially useful new F and VRIN subscales, and F-sub(b) - F…

  5. A Review of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) and the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) with an Emphasis on Juvenile Justice Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Linda J.; Archer, Robert P.; Forbey, Johnathan D.; Handel, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) and Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) are frequently used objective personality self-report measures. Given their widespread use, the purpose of the current study was to examine and compare the literature base for the two instruments. A comprehensive review of the…

  6. Can Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 predict response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in depressed outpatients?

    PubMed

    Kertzman, Semion; Vainder, Michael; Reznik, Ilya; Gotzlav, Yossef; Weizman, Abraham; Kotler, Moshe; Iancu, Iulian

    2012-05-01

    There is growing evidence that individual differences among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) on psychological and demographic measures may predict the therapeutic response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). In this retrospective chart review, 108 outpatients with current major depressive episodes were treated with citalopram, paroxetine, or fluvoxamine. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 were administered before and after 8 weeks of SSRIs treatment. Clinical response was defined as a 50% or greater decrease in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale total score (final visit minus baseline). This naturalistic short-term follow-up outcome study demonstrates that among depressive outpatients who responded to an 8-week trial, 57.4% achieved a good response to SSRIs. Statistical analysis showed that SSRI treatment may be 3.03 times more advantageous for MDD outpatients who are younger than 39 years. The patients with an elevated score of above 66T on the Social Introversion Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 scale are approximately 0.37 times as likely to be SSRI responders as are patients with a Social Introversion score less than 66T. Thus, it seems that in MDD outpatient age is the strongest predictor of response to SSRIs. PMID:22415223

  7. Hemispheric asymmetries of affective processing as determined by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.

    PubMed Central

    Gasparrini, W G; Satz, P; Heilman, K; Coolidge, F L

    1978-01-01

    Patients with left hemisphere disease have been noted to be depressed while those with right hemisphere disease appear indifferent. While patients with left hemisphere disease frequently have a greater cognitive deficit, patients with right hemisphere disease have difficulty in expressing affectively intoned speech. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) can demonstrate underlying affective experience and is not dependent on affectively intoned speech. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a difference in affective moods, as assessed by the MMPI, was related to laterality of lesion in patients matched for severity of cognitive and motor dysfunction. Seven of the 16 subjects with left hemisphere dysfunction and none of the eight subjects with right hemisphere dysfunction showed an elevation on the depression scale. This observation not only confirms previous clinical observations but also demonstrates that these asymmetries cannot be ascribed completely to hemisphere-related differences in cognitive deficits or expressive abilities. PMID:660213

  8. Incremental Validity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised with Mental Health Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonds, Elise C.; Handel, Richard W.; Archer, Robert P.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the incremental validity of scores from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) in a sample of mental health inpatients originally published by Archer, Griffin, and Aiduk (1995). The incremental validity of scores from the SCL-90-R primary symptom dimensions…

  9. A Comparison of the Pencil-and-Paper and Computer-Administered Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Shannon; McCallum, R. Steve

    2005-01-01

    Within the context of a counterbalanced design, 102 students from either a high school or a large Southeastern university were administered two versions of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A): a computer-administered version (CA) and a paper-and-pencil version (PAP). Time between testing sessions was approximately…

  10. The Classification Accuracy of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--Adolescent: Effects of Modifying the Normative Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Cynthia G.; Archer, Robert P.; Handel, Richard W.; Forbey, Johnathan D.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) produces a high frequency of within-normal-limits basic scale profiles for adolescents with significant clinical pathology (e.g., Archer, 2005). The current study builds on the observation that the MMPI-A normative sample included participants…

  11. Cultural Validity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Empirical Correlates: Is This the Best We Can Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jill S.; Robbins, Rockey R.; Pace, Terry M.

    2012-01-01

    This article critically reviews empirical correlates of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989), based on several validation studies conducted with different racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. A major critique of the reviewed MMPI-2 studies was focused on the use of…

  12. Using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 to Develop a Scale to Identify Test Anxiety among Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lufi, Dubi; Awwad, Abeer

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe an initial step developing a new scale to identify individuals with learning disabilities (LD) and test anxiety. Eighty-eight students answered the "Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2" (MMPI-2). The participants were drawn from the following three groups: (a) adults with LD and test…

  13. The Ability of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--2 Validity Scales To Detect Fake-Bad Responses in Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of the Infrequency-Psychopathology Scale (P. Arbisi and Y. Ben-Porath, 1995) in discriminating between groups of patients administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--2 under honest and fake-bad conditions was studied with 74 patients. Results support use of the scale in detecting malingering in psychiatric…

  14. Substance Use Scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory: An Exploration of Score Reliability via Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Christopher S.; Shields, Alan L.; Campfield, Delia; Wallace, Kim A.; Weiss, Roger D.

    2007-01-01

    Three drug and alcohol use screening scales are embedded within the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--2: the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale (MAC) and its revised version (MAC-R), the Addiction Acknowledgement Scale (AAS), and the Addiction Potential Scale (APS). The current study evaluated the reliability reporting practices among 210…

  15. Biopsychobehavioral correlates of insomnia. II. Pattern specificity and consistency with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.

    PubMed

    Kales, A; Caldwell, A B; Soldatos, C R; Bixler, E O; Kales, J D

    1983-08-01

    In a study designed to assess personality patterns of patients with chronic insomnia, a total of 528 subjects (428 insomniacs and 100 controls) completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). Comparison of the MMPI profiles of insomniacs from a semirural area and of those from an urban area, each in a completely different geographic region, showed results consistent for high levels of psychopathology as well as for specific personality patterns within and between groups. The personality patterns of insomniac subjects were remarkably homogeneous: only a few MMPI code types accounted for about one-half of each insomniac sample. The insomniac profiles were consistently characterized by the presence of neurotic depression, rumination, chronic anxiety, inhibition of emotions, and an inability to discharge anger outwardly. The results of this study confirm the original hypothesis that the handling of stresses and conflicts through an internalization of emotions leads to physiologic activation and is a major factor underlying the development and maintenance of chronic insomnia. PMID:6622623

  16. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) predictors of police officer problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Corey, David M; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictive validity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) in a sample of law enforcement officers. MMPI-2-RF scores were collected from preemployment psychological evaluations of 136 male police officers, and supervisor ratings of performance and problem behavior were subsequently obtained during the initial probationary period. The sample produced meaningfully lower and less variant substantive scale scores than the general population and the MMPI-2-RF Police Candidate comparison group, which significantly affected effect sizes for the zero-order correlations. After applying a correction for range restriction, MMPI-2-RF substantive scales demonstrated moderate to strong associations with criteria, particularly in the Emotional Dysfunction and Interpersonal Functioning domains. Relative risk ratio analyses showed that cutoffs of 45T and 50T maintained reasonable selection ratios because of the exceptionally low scores in this sample and were associated with significantly increased risk for problematic behavior. These results provide support for the predictive validity of the MMPI-2-RF substantive scales in this setting. Implications of these findings and limitations of these results are discussed. PMID:24875465

  17. Ability of Substance Abusers to Escape Detection on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in a Juvenile Correctional Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, L. A. R.; Graham, John R.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of respondents to underreport successfully on substance abuse and validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A; Butcher et al., 1992) was evaluated. Incarcerated teens (67 substance abusing, 59 non-substance abusing) completed the MMPI-A twice: once under standard instructions (SI) and once…

  18. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form in National Guard Soldiers Screening Positive for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Thuras, Paul; Reddy, Madhavi K.

    2011-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2 RF) was administered to 251 National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from deployment to Iraq. Soldiers were also administered questionnaires to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). On the basis of responses to the…

  19. Interpretive Reliability of Six Computer-Based Test Interpretation Programs for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2.

    PubMed

    Deskovitz, Mark A; Weed, Nathan C; McLaughlan, Joseph K; Williams, John E

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of six Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Second edition (MMPI-2) computer-based test interpretation (CBTI) programs was evaluated across a set of 20 commonly appearing MMPI-2 profile codetypes in clinical settings. Evaluation of CBTI reliability comprised examination of (a) interrater reliability, the degree to which raters arrive at similar inferences based on the same CBTI profile and (b) interprogram reliability, the level of agreement across different CBTI systems. Profile inferences drawn by four raters were operationalized using q-sort methodology. Results revealed no significant differences overall with regard to interrater and interprogram reliability. Some specific CBTI/profile combinations (e.g., the CBTI by Automated Assessment Associates on a within normal limits profile) and specific profiles (e.g., the 4/9 profile displayed greater interprogram reliability than the 2/4 profile) were interpreted with variable consensus (α range = .21-.95). In practice, users should consider that certain MMPI-2 profiles are interpreted more or less consensually and that some CBTIs show variable reliability depending on the profile. PMID:25944798

  20. Analysis of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form response bias indicators as suppressors or moderators in a medical setting.

    PubMed

    Wershba, Rebecca E; Locke, Dona E C; Lanyon, Richard I

    2015-06-01

    The use of response bias indicators in psychological measurement has been contentious, with debate as to whether they actually suppress or moderate the ability of substantive psychological indicators to identify the construct of interest. Suppression would indicate that predictor variables contain invalid variance that the bias indicators can suppress, while moderation would indicate differential levels of predictive validity at different levels of bias. Response bias indicators on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) [infrequent responses (F-r), infrequent somatic responses (Fs), infrequent psychopathology responses (Fp-r), adjustment validity (K-r), uncommon virtues (L-r), symptom validity (FBS-r), and Response Bias Scale (RBS)] were tested to determine whether they suppressed or moderated the ability of the Restructured Clinical Scale 1 (RC1) and Neurologic Complaints (NUC) scale to discriminate between epileptic seizures (ES) and nonepileptic seizures (NES, a conversion disorder that is often misdiagnosed as ES). The MMPI-2-RF was completed by 399 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of ES or NES via Epilepsy Monitoring Unit evaluation. Moderated logistic regression was used to test for moderation, and logistic regression was used to test for suppression. Most of the response bias variables showed a suppressor effect, but moderator effects were not found. These findings extend the use of bias indicators to a psychomedical context. PMID:25730164

  1. Minnesota multiphasic personality inventory-2-restructured form (MMPI-2-RF) predictors of violating probation after felonious crimes.

    PubMed

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Luna-Jones, Lynn; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2014-12-01

    We compared Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scores of 25 individuals convicted of felonies who violated probation within 1 year of sentencing with those of 45 similarly sentenced defendants who completed probation successfully. The sample (51 males, 19 females) ranged in age from 18 to 81 years (M = 35.2, SD = 13.8) and had 8 to 16 years of education (M = 11.7, SD = 2.1). The majority were Caucasian (85.7%), but African Americans were also represented (14.3%). Individuals in the sample were primarily convicted of mid-level felonies (F-1: 2.9%; F-2: 14.3%; F-3: 22.9%; F-4: 31.4%; F-5: 12.9%). As hypothesized, moderate to large statistically significant differences between probation completers and violators were found on several MMPI-2-RF scales, including Behavioral/Externalizing Dysfunction, Antisocial Behavior, Juvenile Conduct Problems, Substance Abuse, Aggression, Activation, and Disconstraint. Relative risk ratio analyses indicated that probationers who produced elevated scores on these scales were up to 3 times more likely to violate probation than were those with non-elevated scores. Implications of these results and limitations of our findings are discussed. PMID:25133459

  2. Associations between DSM-5 section III personality traits and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scales in a psychiatric patient sample.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jaime L; Sellbom, Martin; Ayearst, Lindsay; Quilty, Lena C; Chmielewski, Michael; Bagby, R Michael

    2015-09-01

    Our aim in the current study was to evaluate the convergence between Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5) Section III dimensional personality traits, as operationalized via the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scale scores in a psychiatric patient sample. We used a sample of 346 (171 men, 175 women) patients who were recruited through a university-affiliated psychiatric facility in Toronto, Canada. We estimated zero-order correlations between the PID-5 and MMPI-2-RF substantive scale scores, as well as a series of exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) analyses to examine how these scales converged in multivariate latent space. Results generally showed empirical convergence between the scales of these two measures that were thematically meaningful and in accordance with conceptual expectations. Correlation analyses showed significant associations between conceptually expected scales, and the highest associations tended to be between scales that were theoretically related. ESEM analyses generated evidence for distinct internalizing, externalizing, and psychoticism factors across all analyses. These findings indicate convergence between these two measures and help further elucidate the associations between dysfunctional personality traits and general psychopathology. PMID:25822829

  3. Criterion Validity and Practical Utility of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) in Assessments of Police Officer Candidates.

    PubMed

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Corey, David M; Gupton, Herbert M; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2015-01-01

    Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form scores for 145 male police officer candidates were compared with supervisor ratings of field performance and problem behaviors during their initial probationary period. Results indicated that the officers produced meaningfully lower and less variant substantive scale scores compared to the general population. After applying a statistical correction for range restriction, substantive scale scores from all domains assessed by the inventory demonstrated moderate to large correlations with performance criteria. The practical significance of these results was assessed with relative risk ratio analyses that examined the utility of specific cutoffs on scales demonstrating associations with performance criteria. PMID:25588076

  4. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) predictors of police officer problem behavior and collateral self-report test scores.

    PubMed

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Fischler, Gary L; Cappo, Bruce M; Hill, David O; Corey, David M; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2015-03-01

    The current study examined the predictive validity of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011) scores in police officer screenings. We utilized a sample of 712 police officer candidates (82.6% male) from 2 Midwestern police departments. The sample included 426 hired officers, most of whom had supervisor ratings of problem behaviors and human resource records of civilian complaints. With the full sample, we calculated zero-order correlations between MMPI-2-RF scale scores and scale scores from the California Psychological Inventory (Gough, 1956) and Inwald Personality Inventory (Inwald, 2006) by gender. In the hired sample, we correlated MMPI-2-RF scale scores with the outcome data for males only, owing to the relatively small number of hired women. Several scales demonstrated meaningful correlations with the criteria, particularly in the thought dysfunction and behavioral/externalizing dysfunction domains. After applying a correction for range restriction, the correlation coefficient magnitudes were generally in the moderate to large range. The practical implications of these findings were explored by means of risk ratio analyses, which indicated that officers who produced elevations at cutscores lower than the traditionally used 65 T-score level were as much as 10 times more likely than those scoring below the cutoff to exhibit problem behaviors. Overall, the results supported the validity of the MMPI-2-RF in this setting. Implications and limitations of this study are discussed. PMID:25383586

  5. Reliability and validity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) in evaluations of chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Scheman, Judith; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the reliability and concurrent validity of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-2-Restructured Form (2-RF) (Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011) scores in a sample of 811 chronic low back pain patients (346 males, 529 females) beginning treatment in a short-term interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation program. We calculated internal consistency coefficients, mean-item correlations, and SEM for all substantive scales, as well as zero-order correlations with collateral medical record information and self-report testing. Results indicated reliability and validity for most of the MMPI-2-RF substantive scales. Implications of these findings and limitations of this study are discussed. PMID:25436662

  6. Detecting negative response bias with the Fake Bad Scale, Response Bias Scale, and Henry-Heilbronner Index of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2.

    PubMed

    Dionysus, Kimberly E; Denney, Robert L; Halfaker, Dale A

    2011-03-01

    The 28-item Response Bias Scale (RBS) and 15-item Henry-Heilbronner Index (HHI) are new validity scales within the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2, designed to detect over-reporting of cognitive and somatic symptomology, respectively. The 43-item Lees-Haley Fake Bad Scale (FBS) was designed to detect noncredible symptom presentations within a personal injury setting. The current study examined the predictive validity of these scales in a criterion-groups design involving head-injured litigants. Archival data were collected and two groups were created using the Slick, Sherman, and Iverson ([1999]. Diagnostic criteria for malingered neurocognitive dysfunction: Proposed standards for clinical practice and research. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 13, 545-561) Criteria for Probable Negative Response Bias. Results yielded excellent to acceptable discrimination ability for the validity scales, including an area under the curve of 0.83 for FBS, 0.82 for RBS, and 0.73 for HHI. Findings suggest that the FBS, RBS, and HHI perform as well as the other validity scales in discriminating over-reporting within a head-injured litigant setting. PMID:21148668

  7. Use of Prehire Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) Police Candidate Scores to Predict Supervisor Ratings of Posthire Performance.

    PubMed

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Brewster, JoAnne; Corey, David M; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2015-08-01

    We examined associations between prehire Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scores and posthire performance ratings for a sample of 131 male police officers. Substantive scale scores in this sample were meaningfully lower than those obtained by the test's normative sample and substantially range restricted, but scores were consistent with those produced by members of the police candidate comparison group (Corey & Ben-Porath). After applying a statistical correction for range restriction, we found several associations between MMPI-2-RF substantive scale scores and supervisor ratings of job-related performance. Findings for scales from the emotional dysfunction and interpersonal functioning domains of the test were particularly strong. For example, scales assessing low positive emotions and social avoidance were associated with several criteria that may be affected by lack of engagement with one's environment and other people, including problems with routine task performance, decision making, assertiveness, conscientiousness, and social competence. Implications of these findings for assessment science and practice are discussed. PMID:25169624

  8. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF): incremental validity in predicting early postoperative outcomes in spine surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Marek, Ryan J; Block, Andrew R; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2015-03-01

    A substantial proportion of individuals who undergo surgical procedures to relieve spine pain continue to report significant pain and dysfunction after recovery. Psychopathology and patient expectations have been linked to poor results, leading to an increasing reliance on presurgical psychological screening (PPS) as part of the surgical diagnostic process. The original Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI; Hathaway & McKinley, 1943) and the MMPI-2 (Butcher, Graham, Ben-Porath, Tellegen, & Dahlstrom, 2001) were among the measures most commonly used in PPS evaluations and research. This study focuses on the newest version of the test, the MMPI-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011; Tellegen & Ben-Porath, 2008/2011) as a predictor of outcomes for spine surgery candidates. Using a sample of 172 men and 210 women who underwent a PPS, we examined the ability of MMPI-2-RF scale scores to predict early surgical outcomes independent of other presurgical risk factors identified by other means, as well as patients' presurgical expectations. MMPI-2-RF results accounted for up to 11% of additional variance in measures of early postoperative functioning. MMPI-2-RF scales that assess for emotional/internalizing problems, specifically Demoralization, measures of somatoform dysfunction, and interpersonal problems contributed most to the prediction of diminished outcome. PMID:25364871

  9. "False feigners": Examining the impact of non-content-based invalid responding on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form content-based invalid responding indicators.

    PubMed

    Burchett, Danielle; Dragon, Wendy R; Smith Holbert, Ashley M; Tarescavage, Anthony M; Mattson, Curtis A; Handel, Richard W; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2016-05-01

    Misinterpretation of non-content-based invalid (e.g., random, fixed) responding as overreporting or underreporting is likely to adversely impact test interpretation and could bias inferences about examinee intentions. We examined the impact of non-content-based invalid responding on the following Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) content-based invalid responding indicators: Infrequent Responses (F-r), Infrequent Psychopathology Responses (FP-r), Infrequent Somatic Responses (FS), Symptom Validity (FBS-r), Response Bias Scale (RBS), Uncommon Virtues (L-r), and Adjustment Validity (K-r). In 4 samples from which invalid responders were excluded, we systematically inserted increasing percentages of random, acquiescent, or counter-acquiescent item responses ranging from 0% to 100% and examined the impact that non-content-based invalid response styles had on the content-based invalid responding indicators. F-r, FP-r, FS, RBS, and L-r were susceptible to non-content-based invalid responding, whereas FBS-r and K-r were unaffected. Individuals with Variable Response Inconsistency (VRIN-r) and True Response Inconsistency (TRIN-r) elevations were removed, and the frequencies of content-based invalid responding elevations were then reexamined for false indications of feigning. Findings were consistent across samples and emphasize the need to screen for non-content-based invalid responding before screening for content-based invalid responding in the assessment of personality and psychopathology. VRIN-r and TRIN-r were useful in detecting most-but not all-cases of non-content-based invalid responding. A small but meaningful percentage of the remaining individuals were misclassified as overreporters (i.e., false feigners) by FP-r and FS. Clinicians should interpret FP-r and FS with some caution in the presence of moderate levels of non-content-based invalid responding. Post hoc examinations of scale characteristics indicated that the most

  10. A U-shaped Association between Body Mass Index and Psychological Distress on the Multiphasic Personality Inventory: Retrospective Cross-sectional Analysis of 19-year-old Men in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Kim, Jung Jun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Shin Kyoung; Roh, Sungwon; Seo, Jeong Seok

    2015-06-01

    Objective personality tests, such as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), might be more sensitive to reflect subclinical personality and be more state-dependent in an individual's lifetime, so they are good scales to predict the psychological distress regarding certain states. The aim of this study was to identify the specific pattern between body mass index (BMI) and psychological distress using the objective personality test. For this study, we investigated BMI and the Korean Military Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MPI). A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted with 19-yr-old examinees who were admitted to the Military Manpower Administration in Korea from February 2007 to January 2010. Of 1,088,107 examinees, we enrolled 771,408 subjects who were psychologically apparent healthy possible-military-service groups. Afterwards, we reviewed and analyzed directly measured BMI and MPI results. In terms of the validity scales, the faking-good subscale showed an inverted U-shaped association, and faking-bad and infrequency subscales showed a U-shaped association with BMI groups. In terms of the neurosis scales, all clinical subscales (anxiety, depression, somatization, and personality disorder) also showed a U-shaped association with BMI groups. For the psychopath scales, the schizophrenia subscale showed a U-shaped association, and the paranoia subscale showed a near-positive correlation with BMI. In conclusion, a specific U-shaped pattern was observed between BMI and the MPI in 19-yr-old men in Korea. Underweight and obesity are related to psychological distress, so supportive advice and education are needed to them. PMID:26028934

  11. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scores generated from the MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF test booklets: internal structure comparability in a sample of criminal defendants.

    PubMed

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Alosco, Michael L; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Wood, Arcangela; Luna-Jones, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the internal structure comparability of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scores derived from the MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF booklets in a sample of 320 criminal defendants (229 males and 54 females). After exclusion of invalid protocols, the final sample consisted of 96 defendants who were administered the MMPI-2-RF booklet and 83 who completed the MMPI-2. No statistically significant differences in MMPI-2-RF invalidity rates were observed between the two forms. Individuals in the final sample who completed the MMPI-2-RF did not statistically differ on demographics or referral question from those who were administered the MMPI-2 booklet. Independent t tests showed no statistically significant differences between MMPI-2-RF scores generated with the MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF booklets on the test's substantive scales. Statistically significant small differences were observed on the revised Variable Response Inconsistency (VRIN-r) and True Response Inconsistency (TRIN-r) scales. Cronbach's alpha and standard errors of measurement were approximately equal between the booklets for all MMPI-2-RF scales. Finally, MMPI-2-RF intercorrelations produced from the two forms yielded mostly small and a few medium differences, indicating that discriminant validity and test structure are maintained. Overall, our findings reflect the internal structure comparability of MMPI-2-RF scale scores generated from MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF booklets. Implications of these results and limitations of these findings are discussed. PMID:24934218

  12. The Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachar, David

    The development of the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) began with the core concept that maternal reports would provide data for child guidance evaluation and the consequent belief that maternal responses to a 600-item administration booklet could yield scales useful in determining child and family status. Two areas of weakness were found:…

  13. A critical review of objective personality inventories with sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Davis, Karen M; Archer, Robert P

    2010-12-01

    This review provides a critical analysis of the ability of multiscale inventories to distinguish between sex offender and nonoffender control groups, as well as to discriminate sex offenders from other types of offenders. In addition to expanding upon previous reviews that examined the utility of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) with this population (e.g., Levin & Stava, 1987), the current review included studies that utilized other multiscale inventories commonly used in forensic practice (i.e., MMPI-2, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III [MCMI-III], Personality Assessment Inventory) and, when possible, provides effect sizes to evaluate group differences. Based on the review, the various forms of the MMPI and MCMI are clearly the most widely used instruments in sex offender populations. The MMPI Pd scale has shown moderate to large effect sizes when distinguishing between sex offender and nonsex offender groups, but this relationship may be reflective of antisocial behavior in general rather than traits specific to sex offenders. Recommendations to standardize future research classification strategies and more effectively utilize these instruments when assessing sex offenders are also provided. PMID:20734319

  14. The Latent Structure of Multiphasic Sex Inventory-Assessed Pedophilic Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackaronis, Julia E.; Strassberg, Donald S.; Marcus, David K.

    2011-01-01

    The Multiphasic Sex Inventory (MSI; Nichols & Molinder, 1984) is a self-report measure frequently used in the assessment of sex offenders. Scores on the MSI are often used to assess levels of pedophilic interest. However, the question of whether men with pedophilia represent a unique group distinguished by their sexual interests, or whether they…

  15. A Critique of Shostrom's Personal Orientation Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland, James A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Everett Shostrom's Personal Orientation Inventory is a significant and widely used contribution to humanistic psychology and personality assessment. W. S. Zimmerman (1969) evaluated the POI and his observations led to the development of a complementary form, the POD (Personal Orientation Dimensions) and to a new test, the DOSAB (Dimensions of…

  16. The Diagnosis of Personality Disorder: A Comparison of MMPI Profile, Millon Inventory, and Clinical Judgment in a Workers' Compensation Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repko, Glenn R.; Cooper, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Investigated information derived from a group of 100 workers' compensation cases and used clinical opinion and psychological testing to determine the presence and nature of personality disorder diagnosis. Significant differences were found on both the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the Millon among the diagnostic groups of…

  17. Normal Personality Assessment in Clinical Practice: The NEO Personality Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Paul T.; McCrae, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    The NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI) is described as a measure of five factors of personality and its use in clinical assessment and treatment practice is reviewed. Data from 17 adult men and women show links between NEO-PI scales and other measures of psychopathology. (SLD)

  18. Using the Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory 2, EEGs, and clinical data to predict nonepileptic events.

    PubMed

    Schramke, Carol J; Valeri, April; Valeriano, James P; Kelly, Kevin M

    2007-11-01

    Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory 2 (MMPI-2) scale 3, duration of illness, and routine EEGs have been used to predict nonepileptic events (NEEs) with a high degree of accuracy in patients referred for video/EEG (vEEG) monitoring. This study tested the Storzbach logistic regression equation in our patients with definitive epileptic seizures (n=57) or NEEs without evidence of epileptiform activity (n=51) during vEEG monitoring, yielding an overall classification accuracy of 81%, sensitivity of 80%, and specificity of 81%. This study also replicated previous findings of significant group differences in duration (years) of spells, number of elevations on the MMPI-2, MMPI-2 elevations on scales 1, 2, 3, and 8, and incidence of the conversion valley on the MMPI-2. Our findings indicated that combined use of the MMPI-2 and clinical variables was most predictive of patients with NEEs. PMID:17904912

  19. The Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory Profiles of Depressed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Marion F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated personality styles, concerns, and behaviors of depressed adolescents using Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory (MAPI). Data from 332 high school students on Beck Depression Inventory and MAPI were reduced to 2 factors accounting for 65.1 percent of total variance, the first suggesting socially withdrawn, overtly recognizable…

  20. Construction of a Personal Autonomy Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strumpfer, D. J. W.

    The inventory contains three factural scales: independence of judgement, moral relativism, and adventurousness. The item pool was based upon descriptions of the need for autonomy (positive) and for independence (negative). The preliminary English form included the Crowne-Marlowe Social Desirability Scale, and was completed by 233 English-speaking…

  1. Confirmatory Factor Analysis on the Big 5 Personality Test Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamarulzaman, Wirawani; Nordin, Mohamad Sahari

    2012-01-01

    This paper is intended to examine the validity of Big 5 Personality test inventory of 44 questions with 5-Likert Scale measurement. Confirmatory factory analysis (CFA) was conducted to determine the good fit indices of the 5 personality types. Those types are 1) extraversion, 2) agreeableness, 3) conscientiousness, 4) openness and 5) neuroticism.…

  2. Validity of the Strong Interest Inventory: Gender and Personal Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lori D.; Borgen, Fred H.

    The gender validity of the Strong Interest Inventory's Personal Style Scales (Work Style, Learning Environment, Leadership Style, and Risk Taking/Adventure) was examined through a study of 458 female and 282 male college students at Iowa State University. The students completed the Personal Style Scales and the Adjective Check List (ACL), which is…

  3. Detection of Faking on the Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVaugh, William H.; Grow, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    Evaluated techniques for identifying faking on the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC). Undergraduate students (N=70) completed PICs on their child either faking bad, faking good, or legitimate. Results were cross-validated against a clinical sample. Results indicated a clinician cannot be certain a PIC profile is valid. (JAC)

  4. Profile Classification Strategies for the Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHorn, Allan B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explores the utility of reciprocal two-point code type classifications of Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) profiles and evaluates a second classification scheme based upon groupings of empirically and conceptually similar PIC code types. Results indicate a profile classification strategy can be usefully applied to PIC protocols. (Author)

  5. Myers-Briggs Type Inventory Personality Preferences and Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Werner; Meth, Hilda

    1989-01-01

    A study to determine if there are any relationships between the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory personality preferences and academic performance in schools of pharmacy is discussed. Differences in academic performance that could be related to gender are reported. (Author/MLW)

  6. What Does the Narcissistic Personality Inventory Really Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Robert A.; Witt, Edward A.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Trzesniewski, Kali H.; Robins, Richard W.; Kashy, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is a widely used measure of narcissism. However, debates persist about its exact factor structure with researchers proposing solutions ranging from two to seven factors. The present research aimed to clarify the factor structure of the NPI and further illuminate its nomological network. Four studies…

  7. Intelligence and Dissimulation on the Personal Orientation Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Howard N.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated whether high IQ subjects (N=18) could successfully fake good scores on the Personal Orientation Inventory (POI). Results showed that both high and low IQ subjects who were instructed to fake a good score actually scored lower on the average than did their counterparts in the standard administration. (JAC)

  8. 76 FR 42676 - Information Collection; Federal Excess Personal Property (FEPP) Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Federal Excess Personal Property (FEPP) Inventory AGENCY: Forest... Personal Property (FEPP) Inventory. DATES: Comments must be received in writing on or before September 19..., every day of the year, including holidays. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Federal Excess...

  9. Examination of personality characteristics in a Turkish sample: development of Basic Personality Traits Inventory.

    PubMed

    Gençöz, Tülin; Öcül, Öznur

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the cross-cultural validity of the five-factor nature of personality. For this aim, an indigenous, psychometrically strong instrument measuring the basic personality dimensions within Turkish culture and language was developed through three consecutive studies. The first study aimed to reveal the adjectives that have been most frequently used to define people in the Turkish culture. In the second study, factor analysis of these personality characteristics revealed big five personality factors, along with the sixth factor, which had been called as the Negative Valence factor. The adjectives that most strongly represented and differentiated each factor constituted 45-item "Basic Personality Traits Inventory". Finally, in the third study, psychometric characteristics of the Basic Personality Traits Inventory were examined. Factor structure and psychometric properties of this instrument confirmed that five-factor nature of personality may not hold true in every culture. PMID:24837020

  10. Personality and Drunk Driving: Identification of DUI Types Using the Hogan Personality Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Yola; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Two hundred persons arrested for driving under the influence (DUI), 30 social drinkers, 30 depressed patients, 30 incarcerated criminals, and 30 alcoholics completed the Hogan Personality Inventory and the Court Reporting Network interview. Results clarify previous findings on DUI types and provide a basis for tailoring interventions. (SLD)

  11. Assessing Young Adolescents' Personality with the Five-Factor Personality Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendriks, A. A. Jolijn; Kuyper, Hans; Offringa, G. Johan; Van der Werf, Margaretha P. C.

    2008-01-01

    The Five-Factor Personality Inventory (FFPI) assesses a person's position on the (Dutch) psycholexically based Big Five factors: Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability, and Autonomy. FFPI factor scores are reliable and valid if ratings are made by adults. The present study yields preliminary evidence of whether young…

  12. The Effect of Response Bias on the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5).

    PubMed

    McGee Ng, Sarah A; Bagby, R Michael; Goodwin, Brandee E; Burchett, Danielle; Sellbom, Martin; Ayearst, Lindsay E; Dhillon, Sonya; Yiu, Shirley; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Baker, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    Valid self-report assessment of psychopathology relies on accurate and credible responses to test questions. There are some individuals who, in certain assessment contexts, cannot or choose not to answer in a manner typically representative of their traits or symptoms. This is referred to, most broadly, as test response bias. In this investigation, we explore the effect of response bias on the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger, Derringer, Markon, Watson, & Skodol, 2013 ), a self-report instrument designed to assess the pathological personality traits used to inform diagnosis of the personality disorders in Section III of DSM-5. A set of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008 / 2011 ) validity scales, which are used to assess and identify response bias, were employed to identify individuals who engaged in either noncredible overreporting (OR) or underreporting (UR), or who were deemed to be reporting or responding to the items in a "credible" manner-credible responding (CR). A total of 2,022 research participants (1,587 students, 435 psychiatric patients) completed the MMPI-2-RF and PID-5; following protocol screening, these participants were classified into OR, UR, or CR response groups based on MMPI-2-RF validity scale scores. Groups of students and patients in the OR group scored significantly higher on the PID-5 than those students and patients in the CR group, whereas those in the UR group scored significantly lower than those in the CR group. Although future research is needed to explore the effects of response bias on the PID-5, results from this investigation provide initial evidence suggesting that response bias influences scale elevations on this instrument. PMID:26583767

  13. Personality assessment inventory profile and predictors of elevations among dissociative disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Stadnik, Ryan D; Brand, Bethany; Savoca, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Assessing patients with dissociative disorders (DD) using personality tests is difficult. On the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 ( J. N. Butcher, W. G. Dahlstrom, J. R. Graham, A. Tellegen, & B. Kaemmer, 1989 ), DD patients often obtain elevations on multiple clinical scales as well as on validity scales that were thought to indicate exaggeration yet have been shown to be elevated among traumatized individuals, including those with DD. No research has been conducted to determine how DD patients score on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; L. C. Morey, 1991 ), which includes the symptom exaggeration scale Negative Impression (NIM) and the malingering scales Malingering Index (MAL) and Rogers Discriminant Function (RDF). The goals of this study were to document the PAI profile of dissociative identity disorder (DID) and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS) patients and to determine how the validity and Schizophrenia scales are related to other PAI scales as well as dissociation. A total of 42 inpatients with DID or DDNOS were assessed on the PAI as well as the Dissociative Experiences Scale-II. The DID/DDNOS patients were elevated on many PAI scales, including NIM and, to a lesser extent, MAL, but not RDF. Dissociation scores significantly and uniquely predicted NIM scores above and beyond Depression and Borderline Features. In addition, after we controlled for MAL and RDF, dissociation was positively associated with NIM. In contrast, after we controlled for the other 2 scales, dissociation was not related to MAL and was negatively related to RDF, indicating that RDF and, to a lesser extent, MAL are better correlates of feigning in DD patients than NIM. PMID:24060036

  14. Social desirability in personality inventories: Symptoms, diagnosis and prescribed cure

    PubMed Central

    Bäckström, Martin; Björklund, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of social desirability in personality assessment is presented. Starting with the symptoms, Study 1 showed that mean ratings of graded personality items are moderately to strongly linearly related to social desirability (Self Deception, Impression formation, and the first Principal Component), suggesting that item popularity may be a useful heuristic tool for identifying items which elicit socially desirable responding. We diagnose the cause of socially desirable responding as an interaction between the evaluative content of the item and enhancement motivation in the rater. Study 2 introduced a possible cure; evaluative neutralization of items. To test the feasibility of the method lay psychometricians (undergraduates) reformulated existing personality test items according to written instructions. The new items were indeed lower in social desirability while essentially retaining the five factor structure and reliability of the inventory. We conclude that although neutralization is no miracle cure, it is simple and has beneficial effects. PMID:23252410

  15. Development and Initial Validation of the Multicultural Personality Inventory (MPI).

    PubMed

    Ponterotto, Joseph G; Fietzer, Alexander W; Fingerhut, Esther C; Woerner, Scott; Stack, Lauren; Magaldi-Dopman, Danielle; Rust, Jonathan; Nakao, Gen; Tsai, Yu-Ting; Black, Natasha; Alba, Renaldo; Desai, Miraj; Frazier, Chantel; LaRue, Alyse; Liao, Pei-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Two studies summarize the development and initial validation of the Multicultural Personality Inventory (MPI). In Study 1, the 115-item prototype MPI was administered to 415 university students where exploratory factor analysis resulted in a 70-item, 7-factor model. In Study 2, the 70-item MPI and theoretically related companion instruments were administered to a multisite sample of 576 university students. Confirmatory factory analysis found the 7-factor structure to be a relatively good fit to the data (Comparative Fit Index =.954; root mean square error of approximation =.057), and MPI factors predicted variance in criterion variables above and beyond the variance accounted for by broad personality traits (i.e., Big Five). Study limitations and directions for further validation research are specified. PMID:24206108

  16. Confirmatory factor analysis of the revised Personal Style Inventory.

    PubMed

    Bagby, R M; Parker, J D; Joffe, R T; Schuller, D; Gilchrist, E

    1998-03-01

    The revised Personal Style Inventory (PSI) was developed to measure the sociotropy and autonomy personality dimensions; both of these dimensions are thought to confer specific vulnerabilities to the onset, maintenance, and reoccurrence of depression. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the theoretical structure that informed the construction of the PSI. Using a large sample of nonclinical participants (n = 869) and a sample of outpatients with major depression (n = 101), both the items and the subscales of the PSI decomposed into factor structures that were, overall, fair to good representations of the theoretical model. Modifications were needed at the subscale level to achieve an adequate fit for the nonclinical and clinical samples, which provide implications for both the measurement and theory of the PSI and the sociotropy and autonomy domains. PMID:9458340

  17. Development and initial standardization of Ayurveda child personality inventory

    PubMed Central

    Suchitra, S. P.; Jagan, Arati; Nagendra, H. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ayurveda inventories for prakriti (constitution) have been developed and validated for adults. Children, however, require different categories of quarter and questions, for example, to assess the intelligence, the questions can be related to their scholastic performances. Objective: To develop and standardize an inventory to assess the prakriti of the children, and to compare with Child Personality Questionnaire (CPQ). Materials and Methods: A 135-item Ayurveda child personality inventory (ACPI) scale was developed on the basis of translation of Sanskrit verses describing vataja (A), pittaja (B), and kaphaja prakriti (C) characteristics and by taking the opinions of experts (ten Ayurveda experts and three psychologists). Study was carried out in Maxwell public school, Bangalore. The scale was administered on parents of children of the age group 6-12 years. CPQ was administered on children of the age group 8-12 years. Results: The ACPI was associated with excellent internal consistency. The Cronbach's alpha for A, B, and C scales were 0.77, 0.55, and 0.84, respectively, and the Split-half reliability scores were 0.66.0.39 and 0.84, respectively. Factor validity coefficient scores on each items was above 0.5. Scores on vataja, pittaja and kaphaja scales were inversely correlated. Items of V, P, and K scales showed significant correlation (values ranging from 0.39 to 0.84) with subscales of CPQ, which indicates that Eastern and Western psychology concept have good correspondence. Conclusions: The prakrti of the children can be measured consistently by this instrument. Scores on V and P scale showed good correlation with the anxiety primary scale of CPQ. PMID:25624693

  18. Preliminary Validation of the Child Abuse Potential Inventory in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutsal, Ebru; Pasli, Figen; Isikli, Sedat; Sahin, Figen; Yilmaz, Gokce; Beyazova, Ufuk

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to provide preliminary findings on the validity of Child Abuse Potential Inventory (CAP Inventory) on Turkish sample of 23 abuser and 47 nonabuser parents. To investigate validity in two groups, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) Psychopathic Deviate (MMPI-PD) scale is also used along with CAP. The results show…

  19. STRUCTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY PERSONALITY INVENTORY FOR CHINESE COLLEGE STUDENTS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jieting; Lanza, Stephanie; Zhang, Minqiang; Su, Binyuan

    2015-06-01

    The University Personality Inventory, a mental health instrument for college students, is frequently used for screening in China. However, its unidimensionality has been questioned. This study examined its dimensions to provide more information about the specific mental problems for students at risk. Four subsamples were randomly created from a sample (N = 6,110; M age = 19.1 yr.) of students at a university in China. Principal component analysis with Promax rotation was applied on the first two subsamples to explore dimension of the inventory. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on the third subsample to verify the exploratory dimensions. Finally, the identified factors were compared to the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) to support validity, and sex differences were examined, based on the fourth subsample. Five factors were identified: Physical Symptoms, Cognitive Symptoms, Emotional Vulnerability, Social Avoidance, and Interpersonal Sensitivity, accounting for 60.3% of the variance. All the five factors were significantly correlated with the SCL-90. Women scored significantly higher than men on Cognitive Symptoms and Interpersonal Sensitivity. PMID:25933045

  20. What does the narcissistic personality inventory really measure?

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Robert A; Witt, Edward A; Donnellan, M Brent; Trzesniewski, Kali H; Robins, Richard W; Kashy, Deborah A

    2011-03-01

    The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is a widely used measure of narcissism. However, debates persist about its exact factor structure with researchers proposing solutions ranging from two to seven factors. The present research aimed to clarify the factor structure of the NPI and further illuminate its nomological network. Four studies provided support for a three-factor model consisting of the dimensions of Leadership/Authority, Grandiose Exhibitionism, and Entitlement/Exploitativeness. The Leadership/Authority dimension was generally linked to adaptive outcomes whereas the other two dimensions, particularly Entitlement/Exploitativeness, were generally linked to maladaptive outcomes. These results suggest that researchers interested in the psychological and behavioral outcomes associated with the NPI should examine correlates at the facet level. In light of the findings, we propose a hierarchical model for the structure of the NPI and provide researchers with a scoring scheme for this commonly used instrument. PMID:20876550

  1. Teaching Accounting for Inventory by Calling on Students' Personal Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briginshaw, John

    2010-01-01

    This essay seeks to give practical guidance to accounting instructors seeking to convey the difficult concepts of accounting for inventory. Techniques to convey the concepts of assumed inventory flow, inventory valuation under inflation and deflation, impairment of inventories, LIFO [Last In, First Out] liquidations and the concept of the periodic…

  2. Domains and facets: hierarchical personality assessment using the revised NEO personality inventory.

    PubMed

    Costa, P T; McCrae, R R

    1995-02-01

    Personality traits are organized hierarchically, with narrow, specific traits combining to define broad, global factors. The Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992c) assesses personality at both levels, with six specific facet scales in each of five broad domains. This article describes conceptual issues in specifying facets of a domain and reports evidence on the validity of NEO-PI-R facet scales. Facet analysis-the interpretation of a scale in terms of the specific facets with which it correlates-is illustrated using alternative measures of the five-factor model and occupational scales. Finally, the hierarchical interpretation of personality profiles is discussed. Interpretation on the domain level yields a rapid understanding of the individual interpretation of specific facet scales gives a more detailed assessment. PMID:16367732

  3. Young and Old Alcoholics: Some Personality Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLatte, Joseph G., Jr.; DeLatte, Gale M.

    1984-01-01

    Administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory to alcoholic males (N=91). Results indicated a significant negative correlation between age and psychopathic deviance, paranoia, schizophrenia, and mania; and a significant positive correlation between age and hypochrondriasis. (LLL)

  4. The factor structure of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory.

    PubMed

    Corry, Nida; Merritt, Rebecca Davis; Mrug, Sylvie; Pamp, Barbara

    2008-11-01

    In the first study, we administered the 40-item Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI; Raskin & Terry, 1988) to 843 female and 843 male college students, most of whom were Euro-American, to comprehensively assess the NPI factor structure using confirmatory factor analysis. Initial exploratory common factor analyses (N = 724) revealed a 2-factor model (Leadership/Authority and Exhibitionism/Entitlement). Subsequently, we used confirmatory factor analysis in a separate sample (N = 724) to evaluate the Emmons (1987) 4-factor model, the Raskin and Terry (1988) 7-factor model, the Kubarych, Deary, and Austin (2004) 2- and 3-factor models, and our 2-factor model. Finally, we assessed construct validity by correlating the scale scores with the Five-factor model of personality in an independent sample (N = 238). The 2-factor models for the NPI we obtained in this study and by Kubarych et al. (2004) appeared to be the most parsimonious models, with both a good fit to the data and satisfactory internal consistency values; so they are recommended for use. However, additional NPI research is needed to rescale, modify, or omit several NPI items and develop gender-equivalent items. PMID:18925501

  5. PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT INVENTORY: PSYCHOMETRIC ANALYSES OF ITS ARGENTINEAN VERSION.

    PubMed

    Stover, Juliana B; Solano, Alejandro Castro; Liporace, Mercedes Fernández

    2015-12-01

    This psychometric analysis of the Argentinean version of the Personality Assessment Inventory employed a convenience sample of 998 non-clinical adults from Buenos Aires, Argentina, stratified by sex and age (50% men; M age = 40.4 yr., SD = 16.8; 50% women; M age = 40.7 yr., SD = 17.4; 69% were employed). For a criterion validity study, a second sample of 394 students at the University of Buenos Aires was selected (47% men; M age = 24 yr., SD = 3.7; 53% women; M age = 23.6 yr., SD = 3.4). Cronbach's αs ranged from .60 to .86, indicating adequate internal consistency. Following American, German, and Spanish studies, a first analysis on the 22 scales obtained a five-factor solution (65.3% of total variance), and a second analysis on 11 clinical scales isolated a two-factor solution (69.3% of total variance). Correlations with the Symptom Checklist-90-R provided support for criterion validity. Most of the scales and subscales showed sex differences and differences between American and Argentinean samples. Future research must add other psychometric indicators. PMID:26595301

  6. Stability and change in personality assessment: the revised NEO Personality Inventory in the year 2000.

    PubMed

    Costa, P T; McCrae, R R

    1997-02-01

    The Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) consists of 30 facet scales that define the broad domains of the Five-Factor Model of personality. No major revisions of the basic model are anticipated in the near future. Despite their popularity, social desirability and inconsistency scales will not be added to the NEO-PI-R because their validity and utility have not yet been demonstrated. Among possible changes are minor modifications in wording and more extensive adaptations for adolescents and for populations with low reading levels. Contextualized (e.g., work-related) versions of the instrument will be further explored. Many changes are more easily implemented on the computer than the print version of the instrument. PMID:9018844

  7. A test of two brief measures of grandiose narcissism: the narcissistic personality inventory-13 and the narcissistic personality inventory-16.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Brittany; Miller, Joshua D; Hoffman, Brian J; Reidy, Dennis E; Zeichner, Amos; Campbell, W Keith

    2013-12-01

    The most widely used measure of trait narcissism is the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI), which can provide both total and subscale scores. However, with a length of 40 items, this measure may not be ideal in settings in which time or participant attention may limit the types of measures that can be administered. In response, Ames, Rose, and Anderson (2006) created the NPI-16, which provides a shorter, unidimensional measure of the construct. In the present research, we examine the reliability and validity of the NPI-16 in conjunction with a new short measure of narcissism, the NPI-13, which provides both a total score and 3 subscale scores (Leadership/Authority; Grandiose Exhibitionism; Entitlement/Exploitativeness). Across 2 studies, we demonstrate that both short measures manifest good convergent and discriminant validity and adequate overall reliability. The NPI-13 may be favored over the NPI-16 because it allows for the extraction of 3 subscales, consistent with the use of its parent measure. PMID:23815119

  8. The Singer-Loomis Inventory of Personality: A Review and Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shou, Priscilla

    The Singer-Loomis Inventory of Personality (SLIP) was developed by two Jungian analysts to allow examination of personality from the perspective of Jung's typology and to solve problems perceived with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, based on Jungian dichotomies. The SLIP is designed to clarify and describe the user's personality based on the…

  9. 7 CFR 767.52 - Disposition of personal property from real estate inventory property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disposition of personal property from real estate..., personal property has been left on the real estate inventory property, the Agency will notify the former real estate owner and any known lienholders that the Agency will dispose of the personal...

  10. 7 CFR 767.52 - Disposition of personal property from real estate inventory property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disposition of personal property from real estate..., personal property has been left on the real estate inventory property, the Agency will notify the former real estate owner and any known lienholders that the Agency will dispose of the personal...

  11. 7 CFR 767.52 - Disposition of personal property from real estate inventory property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disposition of personal property from real estate..., personal property has been left on the real estate inventory property, the Agency will notify the former real estate owner and any known lienholders that the Agency will dispose of the personal...

  12. 7 CFR 767.52 - Disposition of personal property from real estate inventory property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disposition of personal property from real estate..., personal property has been left on the real estate inventory property, the Agency will notify the former real estate owner and any known lienholders that the Agency will dispose of the personal...

  13. 41 CFR 109-1.5110 - Physical inventories of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... items indicates that this action is necessary for effective property accounting, utilization, or control... property records, and with applicable financial control accounts. (j) The results of physical inventories...-INTRODUCTION 1.51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5110 Physical inventories...

  14. Age Trends and Age Norms for the NEO Personality Inventory-3 In Adolescents and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrae, Robert R.; Martin, Thomas A.; Costa, Paul T., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The NEO Personality Inventory-3 (NEO-PI-3) is a modification of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) designed to be more understandable to adolescents. Data from adults aged 21 to 91 showed that the NEO-PI-3 also functions as well or better than the NEO-PI-R in adults. Age trends from combined adolescent (n = 500) and adult (n = 635)…

  15. Response Distortion in Applications of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) in Offender Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmes, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The MMPI-2 continues to be widely used in many areas of professional forensic psychology, including the evaluation of criminal offenders for rehabilitation purposes. While many possible applications of the MMPI exist, not all are well-supported by strong empirical evidence. The origins of the scale among psychiatric populations suggest some…

  16. Personality and intentional binding: an exploratory study using the narcissistic personality inventory

    PubMed Central

    Hascalovitz, Ann (Chen); Obhi, Sukhvinder S.

    2015-01-01

    When an individual estimates the temporal interval between a voluntary action and a consequent effect, their estimates are shorter than the real duration. This perceived shortening has been termed “intentional binding”, and is often due to a shift in the perception of a voluntary action forward towards the effect and a shift in the perception of the effect back towards the action. Despite much work on binding, there is virtually no consideration of individual/personality differences and how they affect it. Narcissism is a psychological trait associated with an inflated sense of self, and individuals higher in levels of subclinical narcissism tend to see themselves as highly effective agents. Conversely, lower levels of narcissism may be associated with a reduced sense of agency. In this exploratory study, to assess whether individuals with different scores on a narcissism scale are associated with differences in intentional binding, we compared perceived times of actions and effects (tones) between participants with high, middle, and low scores on the narcissistic personality inventory (NPI). We hypothesized that participants with higher scores would show increased binding compared to participants with lower scores. We found that participants in our middle and high groups showed a similar degree of binding, which was significantly greater than the level of binding shown by participants with the lowest scores. To our knowledge, these results are the first to demonstrate that different scores on a personality scale are associated with changes in the phenomenological experience of action, and therefore underscore the importance of considering individual/personality differences in the study of volition. Our results also reinforce the notion that intentional binding is related to agency experience. PMID:25698952

  17. Personality Correlates of Marijuana Use Among Youthful Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Judith S.; Megargee, Edwin I.

    1974-01-01

    In this prison-based study four groups of youthful offenders differing in their use of marijuana are compared on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, California Psychological Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Beta. The data are compared with other investigators' data, and the implications are discussed. (Author)

  18. The Course Structure Inventory: A Classroom Personality Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Bruce; And Others

    Increasing emphasis is being given to the construct of course structure in educational research. The Course Structure Inventory (CSI) was designed to measure this construct as a unitary dimension made up of student attitudes toward varying degrees and kinds of structure (ACS). In addition to measuring ACS, the CSI has the added advantage of…

  19. The NEO Personality Inventory: Using the Five-Factor Model in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrae, Robert R.; Costa, Paul T., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI), which is based on Five-Factor Model taxonomy of personality traits. Summarizes characteristics of test, features for administration and scoring, and studies of reliability, stability, and validity. Claims NEO-PI may be particularly appropriate for use in counseling because it is brief,…

  20. The discriminant (and convergent) validity of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Crego, Cristina; Gore, Whitney L; Rojas, Stephanie L; Widiger, Thomas A

    2015-10-01

    A considerable body of research has rapidly accumulated with respect to the validity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) dimensional trait model as it is assessed by the Personality Inventory for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (PID-5; Krueger et al., 2012). This research though has not focused specifically on discriminant validity, although allusions to potentially problematic discriminant validity have been raised. The current study addressed discriminant validity, reporting for the first time the correlations among the PID-5 domain scales. Also reported are the bivariate correlations of the 25 PID-5 maladaptive trait scales with the personality domain scales of the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (Costa & McCrae, 1992), the International Personality Item Pool-NEO (Goldberg et al., 2006), the Inventory of Personal Characteristics (Almagor et al., 1995), the 5-Dimensional Personality Test (van Kampen, 2012), and the HEXACO Personality Inventory-Revised (Lee & Ashton, 2004). The results are discussed with respect to the implications of and alternative explanations for potentially problematic discriminant validity. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25894855

  1. Convergence of Personality and Interests: Meta-Analysis of the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire and the Strong Interest Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staggs, Gena D.; Larson, Lisa M.; Borgen, Fred H.

    2007-01-01

    Using meta-analysis, we revised Ackerman and Heggestad's (1997) identification of four trait complexes that propose personality and interest (P-I) linkages. Studies that had reported correlations between general and specific measures of vocational interests (Strong Interest Inventory [Strong; Hansen & Campbell, 1985; Harmon, Hansen, Borgen, &…

  2. A Descriptive Study of the Behavior and Personality Characteristics of Adolescent Runaways Using the Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Michael E.

    The phenomenon of adolescent runaway behavior is of critical concern to mental health professionals. Conceptualization, prediction, and treatment interventions are of extreme importance. This study sought to build upon prior research by using the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC). Previous research indicated that adolescent running away…

  3. Evaluating the Evidence for the General Factor of Personality across Multiple Inventories

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Donnellan, M. Brent

    2012-01-01

    A general factor of personality (GFP) has been proposed as the apex of a personality trait hierarchy that explains covariance among the lower-order factors measured by various personality inventories. In this study we evaluated the GFP hypothesis across several personality inventories, unlike most previous research in which the GFP has been derived from individual instruments in isolation. Exploratory analyses did not produce substantial evidence for the existence of a single cross-instrument higher-order factor of factors and efforts to specify a range of GFP-inspired models in a confirmatory framework led to significant estimation difficulties and poor fit to the data. Overall these results fail to support a common GFP that is positioned at the top of a personality trait hierarchy. PMID:22879686

  4. The Relationships Between Functional Potential and Omnibus Personality Inventory Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brawer, Florence B.; And Others

    Functional Potential is a concept stemming from ego psychology that describes the degree to which a subject is able to tolerate ambiguity, delay gratification, exhibit adaptive-flexibility, demonstrate goal directedness, relate to self and others, and have a clear sense of personal identity. Here, that concept has been related to the Omnibus…

  5. What Personality Inventories and Leadership Assessments Say about Aspiring Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Ed

    2006-01-01

    Improving leadership development opportunities among those likely to ascend to the principalship is a particularly effective policy response to reform advocates. But the school district level requires a deeper understanding of the individual personality preferences and leadership styles of those preparing to apply for the next round of…

  6. Preliminary Evidence Regarding the Validity of the Personal Orientation Inventory as a Measure of the Construct Self-Actualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Gary E.

    1976-01-01

    Construct validity of the Personal Orientation Inventory was investigated. A sample of graduate students were administered the inventory immediately after a stressful experience and again two weeks later after the stressful experience had been resolved. Two of the twelve inventory subscales, Self Regard and Self Acceptance showed significant…

  7. Are indigenous personality dimensions culture specific? Philippine inventories and the five-factor model.

    PubMed

    Katigbak, Marcia S; Church, A Timothy; Guanzon-Lapeña, Ma Angeles; Carlota, Annadaisy J; del, PilarGregorioH

    2002-01-01

    The authors addressed the culture specificity of indigenous personality constructs, the generalizability of the 5-factor model (FFM), and the incremental validity of indigenous measures in a collectivistic culture. Filipino college students (N = 508) completed 3 indigenous inventories and the Filipino version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). On the basis of the factor and regression analyses, they concluded that (a) most Philippine dimensions are well encompassed by the FFM and thus may not be very culture specific: (b) a few indigenous constructs are less well accounted for by the FFM: these constructs are not unknown in Western cultures, but they may be particularly salient or composed somewhat differently in the Philippines; (c) the structure of the NEO-PI-R FFM replicates well in the Philippines: and (d) Philippine inventories add modest incremental validity beyond the FFM in predicting selected culture-relevant criteria. PMID:11811638

  8. Predicting Adolescent Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome with the Personal Experience Inventory (PEI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinchfield, Randy; Winters, Ken C.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the clinical utility of the Personal Experience Inventory (PEI) Psychosocial scales to predict adolescent drug abuse treatment outcome. The role of psychosocial risk factors in predicting treatment outcome also has theoretical interest given that such factors have been associated with the development of…

  9. Faking Good and Faking Bad on the Personality Inventory for Children-Revised, Shortened Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daldin, Herman

    1985-01-01

    Examined the detection of faking good and faking bad on the Personality Inventory for Children-Revised with an outpatient mental health clinic population. Results show that faking influences all 12 clinical scales and the four broad-band scales. Detection of faking good is recommended by the use of the Lie scale and the Adjustment scale.…

  10. Taxometric Analysis of the Antisocial Features Scale of the Personality Assessment Inventory in Federal Prison Inmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Glenn D.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Magaletta, Philip R.; Geyer, Matthew D.; Duncan, Scott A.

    2007-01-01

    The Antisocial Features (ANT) scale of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) was subjected to taxometric analysis in a group of 2,135 federal prison inmates. Scores on the three ANT subscales--Antisocial Behaviors (ANT-A), Egocentricity (ANT-E), and Stimulus Seeking (ANT-S)--served as indicators in this study and were evaluated using the…

  11. Factor Structure of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI): Findings from a Large Incarcerated Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Craig S.; Malterer, Melanie B.; Newman, Joseph P.

    2008-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; S. O. Lilienfeld, 1990; S. O. Lilienfeld & B. P. Andrews, 1996) with a community sample has suggested that the PPI subscales may comprise 2 higher order factors (S. D. Benning, C. J. Patrick, B. M. Hicks, D. M. Blonigen, & R. F. Krueger, 2003). However, substantive…

  12. Establishing the Validity of the Personality Assessment Inventory Drug and Alcohol Scales in a Corrections Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patry, Marc W.; Magaletta, Philip R.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Weinman, Beth A.

    2011-01-01

    Although not originally designed for implementation in correctional settings, researchers and clinicians have begun to use the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) to assess offenders. A relatively small number of studies have made attempts to validate the alcohol and drug abuse scales of the PAI, and only a very few studies have validated those…

  13. Personal Globe Inventory: Measurement of the Spherical Model of Interests and Competence Beliefs. Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development of the Personal Globe Inventory, based on a spherical model of interests, which contains 18 scales representing people/things, data/ideas, and prestige dimensions of occupations. Discusses tests of reliability and construct validity and provides five sample interpretations of its use. (Contains 69 references.) (SK)

  14. Comparative Factor Analyses of the Personal Attributes Questionnaire and the Bem Sex-Role Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antill, John K.; Cunningham, John D.

    1982-01-01

    Compared the Personal Attributes Questionnaire (PAQ) and the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) as measures of androgyny. Results showed that femininty (Concern for Others) and masculinity (Dominance) accounted for most of the variance, but for PAQ, clusters of male- and female-valued items (i.e., Extroversion and Insecurity) formed subsidiary factors.…

  15. A Factor Analysis of the Bem Sex Role Inventory and the Personal Attributes Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Namok; Jenkins, Stephen J.

    This study investigated the dimensions of sex role orientation measured by the revised Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI; S. Bem, 1974) and the revised Personal Attributes Questionnaire (PAQ; J. Spence, R. Helmreich, and J. Strapp, 1975). Participants were 651 undergraduates in introductory psychology courses. The sample was approximately 50% male and…

  16. USER'S GUIDE TO THE PERSONAL COMPUTER VERSION OF THE BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORY SYSTEM (PC-BEIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Personal Computer Version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS) has been developed to allow users to estimate hourly emissions of biogenic non-methane hydrocarbon emissions for any county in the contiguous United States. PC-BEIS has been compiled using Microsof...

  17. Personality Assessment Inventory Profiles of Deployed Combat Troops: An Empirical Investigation of Normative Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morey, Leslie C.; Lowmaster, Sara E.; Coldren, Rodney L.; Kelly, Mark P.; Parish, Robert V.; Russell, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the normative scores and psychometric properties of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) within a non-treatment-seeking sample of soldiers deployed to combat zones in Iraq, compared with a sample of community adults matched with respect to age and gender. Results indicate the scores and properties of…

  18. Australian Validation of the Hierarchical Personality Inventory for Children (HiPIC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, Laura; Watt, Dianne; Roodenburg, John

    2014-01-01

    The Hierarchical Personality Inventory for Children (HiPIC) is a developmentally appropriate parent-report measure of the Five Factor Model (FFM) that has been validated in several European languages but only recently in English. The English translation of the HiPIC was evaluated in an Australian context. Parent-rated HiPIC scores were obtained…

  19. The Factorial and Predictive Validities of a Revised Measure of Zaichkowsky's Personal Involvement Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, J. Michael; McQuarrie, Edward F.

    1987-01-01

    A shortened version of Zaichkowsky's 20-item Personal Involvement Inventory was created, removing four items which might be difficult to understand for noncollege-educated populations. The 16-item modified version had acceptable internal consistency; test-retest reliability; and factorial and predictive validity. (Author/GDC)

  20. Inwald Personality Inventory (IPI) and Inwald Survey 3 (IS3): Hilson Research Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilson Research Inc., Kew Gardens, NY.

    Abstracts, titles, and sources are given for documents concerning the Inwald Personality Inventory (IPI) and Inwald Survey 3 (IS3). The following titles are included: (1) "Five-Year Follow-Up Study of Departmental Terminations as Predicted by 16 Preemployment Psychological Indicators"; (2) "The Predictive Validity of Psychological Testing and Peer…

  1. External Validation of the Cognitive Triad of the Personality Inventory for Children: Cautions on Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Brett L.; Spruill, Jean

    1987-01-01

    Assessed validity of the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT) as criterion instruments. The cognitive triad of the PIC was minimally correlated with all intelligence quotient measures and significantly correlated only for reading and…

  2. Evaluation of Age, Sex, and Race Bias in the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Rex B.; Lachar, David

    1992-01-01

    Whether the external validity of the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) was moderated by age, sex, or race was studied using 1,333 children and adolescents referred for mental health services. Race and sex generally did not moderate the relation of PIC scales to symptom checklists. Some relationships were age modified. (SLD)

  3. Screening Preschoolers with Special Problems: Use of the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, P. A.; Lachar, David

    The Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) is an objectively scored, multidimensional measure of child and adolescent behavior, affect, and cognitive ability and can be completed by parents. The overall goal of this project was to evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the PIC as a screening device for use with preschool populations. The…

  4. Screening for Malingering in a Criminal-Forensic Sample with the Personality Assessment Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boccaccini, Marcus T.; Murrie, Daniel C.; Duncan, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined how overreporting of psychopathology indices on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; L. C. Morey, 1991) performed as screening measures for malingering in a sample of 166 defendants undergoing pretrial court-ordered evaluations in the federal criminal justice system. Using results from the Structured…

  5. Spanish Version of the Savings Inventory-Revised: Adaptation, Psychometric Properties, and Relationship to Personality Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortella-Feliu, Miquel; Fullana, Miquel A.; Caseras, Xavier; Andion, Oscar; Torrubia, Rafael; Mataix-Cols, David

    2006-01-01

    The factor structure, psychometric properties, and relationship with personality variables of a Spanish version of the Savings Inventory-Revised (SI-R) are investigated in a sample of 381 undergraduate students. A maximum likelihood factor analysis suggests a three-factor structure, which is similar but not identical to that of the original…

  6. 41 CFR 109-1.5110 - Physical inventories of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Physical inventories of personal property. 109-1.5110 Section 109-1.5110 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL...

  7. 41 CFR 109-1.5110 - Physical inventories of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Physical inventories of personal property. 109-1.5110 Section 109-1.5110 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL...

  8. 48 CFR 1852.245-78 - Physical inventory of capital personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Physical inventory of capital personal property. 1852.245-78 Section 1852.245-78 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... conditions in either (1) or (2) of this paragraph are met. (1) The Contractor utilizes an electronic...

  9. 48 CFR 1852.245-78 - Physical inventory of capital personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Physical inventory of capital personal property. 1852.245-78 Section 1852.245-78 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... conditions in either (1) or (2) of this paragraph are met. (1) The Contractor utilizes an electronic...

  10. 48 CFR 1852.245-78 - Physical inventory of capital personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Physical inventory of capital personal property. 1852.245-78 Section 1852.245-78 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... conditions in either (1) or (2) of this paragraph are met. (1) The Contractor utilizes an electronic...

  11. 48 CFR 1852.245-78 - Physical inventory of capital personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Physical inventory of capital personal property. 1852.245-78 Section 1852.245-78 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... conditions in either (1) or (2) of this paragraph are met. (1) The Contractor utilizes an electronic...

  12. Development and Validation of the Personal Strengths Inventory Using Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liau, Albert Kienfie; Chow, Daryl; Tan, Teck Kiang; Senf, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the reliability and validity of the scores on a brief strengths-based assessment, the 22-item Personal Strengths Inventory (PSI). In Study 1, findings from exploratory factor analysis of 410 adolescents provided evidence for a five-factor solution--social competence (four items), emotional awareness (five…

  13. The Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised in a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzieblo, Katarzyna; Verschuere, Bruno; Van den Bussche, Eva; Crombez, Geert

    2010-01-01

    Research on the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R) has revealed two factors: Fearless Dominance, and Self-Centered Impulsivity. This study examined the validity of these PPI-R factors in a community sample (N = 675). First, confirmatory factor analyses did not support the two-factor structure. Second, the PPI-R factors showed good…

  14. Concurrent Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory with Offender and Community Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malterer, Melanie B.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Neumann, Craig S.; Newman, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    The Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) is a frequently used and well-validated measure of psychopathy but is relatively time-intensive and expensive to administer. The Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) is a self-report measure that provides a less time-intensive and less expensive method for identifying psychopathic individuals. Using…

  15. Construct Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory Two-Factor Model with Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Christopher J.; Edens, John F.; Poythress, Norman G.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Benning, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    Much of the research on psychopathy has treated it as a unitary construct operationalized by total scores on one (or more) measures. More recent studies on the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) suggest the existence of two distinct facets of psychopathy with unique external correlates. Here, the authors report reanalyses of two offender…

  16. Effect of Knowledge About Self-Actualization on Faking the Personal Orientation Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jeffrey A.; Olczak, Paul V.

    1976-01-01

    The study factorially manipulated instructions (fake bad, be honest again control, fake good) and knowledge of self-actualization (naive, knowledgeable) to determine whether knowledge affects ability to create poor impressions or create good impressions in comparison with appropriate controls on the Personal Orientation Inventory (POI). (Author)

  17. Factorial Invariance of the Personal Strengths Inventory-2 for Children and Adolescents across School Level and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liau, Albert K.; Tan, Teck Kiang; Li, Dongdong; Khoo, Angeline

    2012-01-01

    As the Personal Strengths Inventory (PSI) was developed to assess the strengths of adolescents, the Personal Strengths Inventory-2 (PSI-2) was developed so that children could be assessed as well. The present study examined whether the five-factor structure of the PSI would be demonstrated with the PSI-2 and whether the same measurement structure…

  18. Psychometric Properties of Scores on the French and Korean Versions of the Hexaco Personality Inventory. Validity Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boies, Kathleen; Yoo, Tae-Yong; Ebacher, Annik; Lee, Kibeom; Ashton, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    Recent lexical studies of personality structure suggest that there are six independent major dimensions of personality. The HEXACO Personality Inventory (HEXACO-PI), a new questionnaire that measures these six lexically derived personality constructs, was examined in two different cultural contexts using samples of 149 Francophone and 211 Korean…

  19. Personality Characteristics of Child Abusing Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Clyde; And Others

    A study involving 22 fathers and 21 mothers was conducted to explore several personality characteristics of child abusive parents which may set them apart from nonabusive peers. A social history was taken, and each parent completed both the Motivation Analysis Test (MAT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). Among findings…

  20. Personality and Treatment Effectiveness in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skoog, Dagna K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared pre- and posttreatment Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory profiles of female inpatients (N=12) with anorexia nervosa. Results showed change after treatment, and found that pretreatment profiles obtained at a different hospital were remarkably similar, which suggests a common constellation of personality characteristics in…

  1. Associations between belief in conspiracy theories and the maladaptive personality traits of the personality inventory for DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Weis, Laura; Lay, Alixe; Barron, David; Furnham, Adrian

    2016-02-28

    Conspiracy theories can be treated as both rational narratives of the world as well as outcomes of underlying maladaptive traits. Here, we examined associations between belief in conspiracy theories and individual differences in personality disorders. An Internet-based sample (N=259) completed measures of belief in conspiracy theories and the 25 facets of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). Preliminary analyses showed no significant differences in belief in conspiracy theories across participant sex, ethnicity, and education. Regression analyses showed that the PID-5 facets of Unusual Beliefs and Experiences and, to a lesser extent, Suspiciousness, significantly predicted belief in conspiracy theories. These findings highlight a role for maladaptive personality traits in understanding belief in conspiracy theories, but require further investigation. PMID:26776299

  2. The Concurrent and Incremental Validity of the Trauma Symptom Inventory in Women Reporting Histories of Sexual Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Nelson, Nathaniel W.

    2010-01-01

    The Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI), Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), and Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS) were administered to 71 women who reported histories of childhood and/or adult sexual maltreatment and 25 women who did not report a history of victimization. The TSI validity scales were not effective in identifying…

  3. Typus melancholicus and the Temperament and Character Inventory personality dimensions in patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Sato, T; Takahashi, T; Narita, T; Hirano, S; Goto, M

    2000-04-01

    Although many clinical studies have been conducted to determine the etiological role and clinical implications of typus melancholicus for unipolar depression, maladaptive personality features in depressive patients have not been well described. This study explores typus melancholicus, as measured by the rigidity subscale of the Munich Personality Test, and maladaptive personality features, as measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), in 131 remitted patients with DSM-IV major depression and 154 normal controls. The patients reported significantly higher scores on rigidity and harm avoidance and significantly lower scores on self-directedness and cooperativeness. Only 23.6% of the variance of the rigidity scale was explained by the variance of the seven TCI scales, in which only persistence was significantly correlated positively to rigidity. Cluster analysis identified four subgroups, two of which were characterized by a high rigidity score. One of these two subgroups showed no maladaptive personality features, as measured by the TCI, while the other showed high harm avoidance and low self-directedness. These results indicate that the personality of depressive patients is characterized not only by typus melancholicus but also by maladaptive personality features, that typus melancholicus is not well represented by any TCI scale, and that typus melancholicus and maladaptive personality features can coexist in some depressive patients. PMID:10803813

  4. Incremental Validity of the MMPI-2 PSY-5 Scales in Assessing Self-Reported Personality Disorder Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wygant, Dustin B.; Sellbom, Martin; Graham, John R.; Schenk, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Personality Psychopathology-Five (PSY-5) scales were developed to measure abnormal personality symptomatology. The present study examines the incremental validity of the PSY-5 scales beyond the clinical and content scales in assessing criteria associated with personality disorders. The…

  5. Development of a Response Inconsistency Scale for the Personality Inventory for DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Jared W; Webb, Christopher; Peterson, Destiny; Roussin, Lindsey; Flanagan, Elizabeth H

    2016-01-01

    The advent of a dimensional model of personality disorder included in DSM-5 has necessitated the development of a new measurement scheme, specifically a self-report questionnaire termed the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger, Derringer, Markon, Watson, & Skodol, 2012 ). However, there are many threats to the validity of a self-report measure, including response inconsistency. This study outlines the development of an inconsistency scale for the PID-5. Across both college student and clinical samples, the inconsistency scale was able to reliably differentiate real from random responding. Random responses led to increased scores on the PID-5 facets, indicating the importance of detecting inconsistent responding prior to test interpretation. Thus, this inconsistency scale could be of use to researchers and clinicians in detecting inconsistent responses to this new personality disorder measure. PMID:27049169

  6. Relationships Among the Edwards Personality Inventory Scales, the Edwards Personality Preference Schedule, and the Personality Research Form Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Allen L.; Abbott, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the degree to which the EPPS and PRF scales are correlated with the EPI scales, and also to determine the degree to which the scales in all three inventories are measuring the same common traits. (Author)

  7. The Construct Validity of the Dutch Personality Inventory for DSM-5 Personality Disorders (PID-5) in a Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Bastiaens, Tim; Claes, Laurence; Smits, Dirk; De Clercq, Barbara; De Fruyt, Filip; Rossi, Gina; Vanwalleghem, Dominique; Vermote, Rudi; Lowyck, Benedicte; Claes, Stephan; De Hert, Marc

    2016-02-01

    The factor structure and the convergent validity of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), a self-report questionnaire designed to measure personality pathology as advocated in the fifth edition, Section III of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), are already demonstrated in general population samples, but need replication in clinical samples. In 240 Flemish inpatients, we examined the factor structure of the PID-5 by means of exploratory structural equation modeling. Additionally, we investigated differences in PID-5 higher order domain scores according to gender, age and educational level, and explored convergent and discriminant validity by relating the PID-5 with the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire and by comparing PID-5 scores of inpatients with and without a DSM-IV categorical personality disorder diagnosis. Our results confirmed the original five-factor structure of the PID-5. The reliability and the convergent and discriminant validity of the PID-5 proved to be adequate. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:25736039

  8. Development and Validation of Triarchic Construct Scales from the Psychopathic Personality Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jason R.; Drislane, Laura E.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Morano, Mario; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Poythress, Norman G.

    2014-01-01

    The Triarchic model of psychopathy describes this complex condition in terms of distinct phenotypic components of boldness, meanness, and disinhibition. Brief self-report scales designed specifically to index these psychopathy facets have thus far demonstrated promising construct validity. The present study sought to develop and validate scales for assessing facets of the Triarchic model using items from a well-validated existing measure of psychopathy—the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI). A consensus rating approach was used to identify PPI items relevant to each Triarchic facet, and the convergent and discriminant validity of the resulting PPI-based Triarchic scales were evaluated in relation to multiple criterion variables (i.e., other psychopathy inventories, antisocial personality disorder features, personality traits, psychosocial functioning) in offender and non-offender samples. The PPI-based Triarchic scales showed good internal consistency and related to criterion variables in ways consistent with predictions based on the Triarchic model. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for conceptualization and assessment of psychopathy. PMID:24447280

  9. The Utility and Comparative Incremental Validity of the MMPI-2 and Trauma Symptom Inventory Validity Scales in the Detection of Feigned PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efendov, Adele A.; Sellbom, Martin; Bagby, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the comparative predictive capacity of the Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) Atypical Response Scale (ATR) and the standard set of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) fake-bad validity scales (i.e., F, F[subscript B[prime

  10. Factors of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory: Criterion-Related Validity and Relationship to the BIS/BAS and Five-Factor Models of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Scott R.; Benning, Stephen D.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Thompson, Angela; Thurston, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Psychopathy is a personality disorder that includes interpersonal-affective and antisocial deviance features. The Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) contains two underlying factors (fearless dominance and impulsive antisociality) that may differentially tap these two sets of features. In a mixed-gender sample of undergraduates and prisoners,…

  11. Career Pathing among General Administrative and Support Services Employees Based on Holland?s Typology of Personality Theory and Personal Style Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Catalino N.

    2009-01-01

    The study is about the prevailing differences, commonalities and significant contributions of the career pathing among the general administrative and support services employees based on Holland's Typology of Personality Theory and Personal Style Inventory of selected higher educational institutions in Metro Manila.

  12. Assessment of Borderline Personality Features in Population Samples: Is the Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features Scale Measurement Invariant across Sex and Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moor, Marleen H. M.; Distel, Marijn A.; Trull, Timothy J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2009-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is more often diagnosed in women than in men, and symptoms tend to decline with age. Using a large community sample, the authors investigated whether sex and age differences in four main features of BPD, measured with the "Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features" scale (PAI-BOR; Morey, 1991), are…

  13. The Relationships of Certain Personality and Demographic Variables to Success in Vocational Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Dunham H.; Lester, James T.

    The role of certain personality and intellectual factors in the vocational adjustment of a sample of 133 vocational rehabilitation clients with a variety of problems was investigated. All subjects were administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), the Rorschach, the Kuder Personal Preference Record, and the Wechsler Adult…

  14. Psychometric and Structural Analysis of the MMPI-2 Personality Psychopathology Five (PSY-5) Facet Subscales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilty, Lena C.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Personality Psychopathology Five (PSY-5) is a model of personality psychopathology assessed in adult populations with a set of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) scales. The authors examine the reliability and validity of recently developed lower-order facet subscales for each of these five domains, with an emphasis on…

  15. An Empirical Study of the Personality Characteristics of Internet Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomak, Sheri; Weschler, Frederick S.; Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Virden, Thomas; Nademin, Mahsaw Elicia

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated the personality characteristics and psychopathology of internet sex offenders (ISOs) using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Second Edition (MMPI-2) to determine whether ISO personality profiles are different to those of general sex offenders (GSOs; e.g. child molesters and rapists). The ISOs consisted of…

  16. Ten aspects of the Big Five in the Personality Inventory for DSM-5.

    PubMed

    DeYoung, Colin G; Carey, Bridget E; Krueger, Robert F; Ross, Scott R

    2016-04-01

    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) includes a dimensional model of personality pathology, operationalized in the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), with 25 facets grouped into 5 higher order factors resembling the Big Five personality dimensions. The present study tested how well these 25 facets could be integrated with the 10-factor structure of traits within the Big Five that is operationalized by the Big Five Aspect Scales (BFAS). In 2 healthy adult samples, 10-factor solutions largely confirmed our hypothesis that each of the 10 BFAS would be the highest loading BFAS on 1 and only 1 factor. Varying numbers of PID-5 scales were additional markers of each factor, and the overall factor structure in the first sample was well replicated in the second. Our results allow Cybernetic Big Five Theory (CB5T) to be brought to bear on manifestations of personality disorder, because CB5T offers mechanistic explanations of the 10 factors measured by the BFAS. Future research, therefore, may begin to test hypotheses derived from CB5T regarding the mechanisms that are dysfunctional in specific personality disorders. PMID:27032017

  17. 10 Aspects of the Big Five in the Personality Inventory for DSM-5

    PubMed Central

    DeYoung, Colin. G.; Carey, Bridget E.; Krueger, Robert F.; Ross, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    DSM-5 includes a dimensional model of personality pathology, operationalized in the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), with 25 facets grouped into five higher-order factors resembling the Big Five personality dimensions. The present study tested how well these 25 facets could be integrated with the 10-factor structure of traits within the Big Five that is operationalized by the Big Five Aspect Scales (BFAS). In two healthy adult samples, 10-factor solutions largely confirmed our hypothesis that each of the 10 BFAS scales would be the highest loading BFAS scale on one and only one factor. Varying numbers of PID-5 scales were additional markers of each factor, and the overall factor structure in the first sample was well replicated in the second. Our results allow Cybernetic Big Five Theory (CB5T) to be brought to bear on manifestations of personality disorder, because CB5T offers mechanistic explanations of the 10 factors measured by the BFAS. Future research, therefore, may begin to test hypotheses derived from CB5T regarding the mechanisms that are dysfunctional in specific personality disorders. PMID:27032017

  18. Maternal Personality Characteristics on the MMPI and Infant Attachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Mary J.

    This study examined the relationship between maternal personality factors, as measured by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and the development of the attachment relationship. The subjects were 45 firstborn 12-month-olds and their mothers. The sample was preponderantly white, middle class, and married. Mothers completed the…

  19. Personality Differences between Successfully and Unsuccessfully Treated Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biasco, Frank; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined personality differences in 71 residents in a community drug abuse program, using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Results showed successfully treated patients tended to be more aware of their problems and realize a greater need for help. They were slightly more depressed, suspicious, and anxious than unsuccessful patients.…

  20. Identifying the Presence, Severity, and Chronicity of Psychopathological Behaviors Associated with Adolescent Runaways Using the Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Michael E.; And Others

    An extensive review of the adolescent runaway literature indicated inconsistent findings regarding the presence, severity, and chronicity of psychopathological behavior among this high-risk group. Three experiments were conducted to address these issues using one personality measure, the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC). The results of the…

  1. Profile Analyses of the Personality Assessment Inventory Following Military-Related Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jan E.; Cooper, Douglas B.; Reid, Matthew W.; Tate, David F.; Lange, Rael T.

    2015-01-01

    Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) profiles were examined in 160 U.S. service members (SMs) following mild–severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants who sustained a mild TBI had significantly higher PAI scores than those with moderate–severe TBI on eight of the nine clinical scales examined. A two-step cluster analysis identified four PAI profiles, heuristically labeled “High Distress”, “Moderate Distress”, “Somatic Distress,” and “No Distress”. Postconcussive and posttraumatic stress symptom severity was highest for the High Distress group, followed by the Somatic and Moderate Distress groups, and the No Distress group. Profile groups differed in age, ethnicity, rank, and TBI severity. Findings indicate that meaningful patterns of behavioral and personality characteristics can be detected in active duty military SMs following TBI, which may prove useful in selecting the most efficacious rehabilitation strategies. PMID:25857403

  2. Elucidating the Construct Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory Triarchic Scales.

    PubMed

    Sellbom, Martin; Wygant, Dustin B; Drislane, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to replicate and extend Hall and colleagues' (2014) work on developing and validating scales from the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) to index the triarchic psychopathy constructs of boldness, meanness, and disinhibition. This study also extended Hall et al.'s initial findings by including the PPI Revised (PPI-R). A community sample (n = 240) weighted toward subclinical psychopathy traits and a male prison sample (n = 160) were used for this study. Results indicated that PPI-Boldness, PPI-Meanness, and PPI-Disinhibition converged with other psychopathy, personality, and behavioral criteria in ways conceptually expected from the perspective of the triarchic psychopathy model, including showing very strong convergent and discriminant validity with their Triarchic Psychopathy Measure counterparts. These findings further enhance the utility of the PPI and PPI-R in measuring these constructs. PMID:25325407

  3. Rotation to Maximize the Construct Validity of Factors in the NEO Personality Inventory.

    PubMed

    McCrae, R R; Costa, P T

    1989-01-01

    The NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI) consists of 5 global domain and 18 specific facet scales developed to measure aspects of the five major dimensions of normal personality. To obtain optimal measures of these five dimensions from the NEO-PI scales, a method for the orthogonal rotation of principal components to maximize the convergent and discriminant validity of the rotated factors (validimax rotation) is proposed and applied to NEO-PI factors. Self-report data from 983 men and women were used to obtain the factors, and six alternative operationalizations of the five-factor model were used as external criteria to guide rotation. The rotation obtained was cross-validated on peer and spouse ratings on the NEO-PI, and in a second sample. NEO-PI domain scales, varimax factors, and validimax factors all showed evidence of construct validity, but validimax factors were somewhat superior, especially as measures of Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. PMID:26794299

  4. Beyond the big five: the Dark Triad and the supernumerary personality inventory.

    PubMed

    Veselka, Livia; Schermer, Julie Aitken; Vernon, Philip A

    2011-04-01

    The Dark Triad of personality, comprising Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy, was investigated in relation to the Supernumerary Personality Inventory (SPI) traits, because both sets of variables are predominantly distinct from the Big Five model of personality. Correlational and principal factor analyses were conducted to assess the relations between the Dark Triad and SPI traits. Multivariate behavioral genetic model-fitting analyses were also conducted to determine the correlated genetic and/or environmental underpinnings of the observed phenotypic correlations. Participants were 358 monozygotic and 98 same-sex dizygotic adult twin pairs from North America. As predicted, results revealed significant correlations between the Dark Triad and most SPI traits, and these correlations were primarily attributable to common genetic and non-shared environmental factors, except in the case of Machiavellianism, where shared environmental effects emerged. Three correlated factors were extracted during joint factor analysis of the Dark Triad and SPI traits, as well as a heritable general factor of personality - results that clarified the structure of the Dark Triad construct. It is concluded that the Dark Triad represents an exploitative and antisocial construct that extends beyond the Big Five model and shares a theoretical space with the SPI traits. PMID:21425898

  5. Establishing the validity and reliability of the Project Talent Personality Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Pozzebon, Julie; Damian, Rodica I.; Hill, Patrick L.; Lin, Yuchen; Lapham, Susan; Roberts, Brent W.

    2013-01-01

    Project Talent is a national longitudinal study that started in 1960. The original sample included over 440,000 students, which amounted to a 5% representative sample of high school students across the United States. Previous research has not yet established the validity and reliability of the personality measure used in this study, that is, the Project Talent Personality Inventory (PTPI). Given the potential interest and use of the PTPI in forthcoming research, the goals of the present paper were to establish (a) the construct and predictive validity and (b) the internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the PTPI. This information will be valuable to researchers who might be interested in using the PTPI to predict life course outcomes, such as mortality, occupational success, relationship success, and health. Study 1 found that the 10 sub-scales of the PTPI showed good internal consistency reliability, as well as good construct and predictive validity. With the use of several modern personality measures, we showed how the 10 PTPI scales can be mapped onto the Big Five personality traits, and we examined their relations with health, well-being, and life satisfaction outcomes. Study 2 found that the 10 PTPI scales showed good test-retest reliability. Together, these findings allow researchers to better understand and use the PTPI scales, as they are available in Project Talent. PMID:24399984

  6. Does True Neurocognitive Dysfunction Contribute to Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2nd Edition-Restructured Form Cognitive Validity Scale Scores?

    PubMed

    Martin, Phillip K; Schroeder, Ryan W; Heinrichs, Robin J; Baade, Lyle E

    2015-08-01

    Previous research has demonstrated RBS and FBS-r to identify non-credible reporters of cognitive symptoms, but the extent that these scales might be influenced by true neurocognitive dysfunction has not been previously studied. The present study examined the relationship between these cognitive validity scales and neurocognitive performance across seven domains of cognitive functioning, both before and after controlling for PVT status in 120 individuals referred for neuropsychological evaluations. Variance in RBS, but not FBS-r, was significantly accounted for by neurocognitive test performance across most cognitive domains. After controlling for PVT status, however, relationships between neurocognitive test performance and validity scales were no longer significant for RBS, and remained non-significant for FBS-r. Additionally, PVT failure accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in both RBS and FBS-r. Results support both the convergent and discriminant validity of RBS and FBS-r. As neither scale was impacted by true neurocognitive dysfunction, these findings provide further support for the use of RBS and FBS-r in neuropsychological evaluations. PMID:26051870

  7. Examining the correlates of the coldheartedness factor of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised.

    PubMed

    Berg, Joanna M; Hecht, Lisa K; Latzman, Robert D; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2015-12-01

    Coldheartedness is a subscale of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R) that does not load onto either of the PPI-R's two traditional higher order factors (Fearless Dominance [FD] and Self-Centered Impulsivity [SCI]). As a result, it has been omitted from analyses in many studies. However, owing to Coldheartedness's associations with lack of empathy, guilt, and deep-seated social emotions, this subscale may be highly relevant to the construct of psychopathy. In a sample of 1,158 undergraduates, we attempted to clarify Coldheartedness's correlates within the context of a nomological network of psychopathology and personality; in addition, we examined Coldheartedness's contributions to psychopathy above and beyond FD and SCI. Coldheartedness demonstrated negative correlations with the Big Five personality factors, mixed correlations with indices of impulsivity, and largely negative correlations with measures of depression and anxiety. Regressions suggested that Coldheartedness displays substantial overlap with both FD and SCI but also contains psychologically important unique variance. Although the nature of this variance requires clarification, further research and perhaps an expansion of the Coldheartedness subscale may move the field toward a clearer understanding of the construct assessed by this measure. PMID:25915788

  8. The Psychometric Properties of the French Version of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5

    PubMed Central

    Roskam, Isabelle; Galdiolo, Sarah; Hansenne, Michel; Massoudi, Koorosh; Rossier, Jérôme; Gicquel, Ludovic; Rolland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the publication of DSM-5, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) has been proposed as a new dimensional assessment tool for personality disorders. This instrument includes a pool of 220 items organized around 25 facets included in a five-factor second-order domain structure. The examination of the replicability of the trait structure across methods and populations is of primary importance. In view of this need, the main objective of the current study was to validate the French version of the PID-5 among French-speaking adults from a European community sample (N=2,532). In particular, the assumption of unidimensionality of the 25 facet and the five domain scales was tested, as well as the extent to which the five-factor structure of the PID-5 and the DSM-5 personality trait hierarchical structure are replicated in the current sample. The results support the assumption of unidimensionality of both the facets and the domains. Exploratory factor and hierarchical analyses replicated the five-factor structure as initially proposed in the PID-5. PMID:26193699

  9. Collateral Report of Psychopathy: Convergent and Divergent Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Short Form

    PubMed Central

    Iyican, Susan; Sommer, Johannah M.; Kini, Sheetal; Babcock, Julia C.

    2015-01-01

    Psychopathy is a personality syndrome comprised of interpersonal, affective, and behavioral features that has emerged as a correlate of intimate partner violence perpetration. One commonly used self-report measure of psychopathy is the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Short Form. The current study employed a multi-trait, multi-method approach to test convergent and discriminant validity of the measure in partner-violent couples by comparing males’ self-report of psychopathy to the informant report of their female partner (N = 114). It was hypothesized that the female partner-report of the male’s psychopathy would be highly correlated with the male report of his own psychopathy, thus providing evidence for the construct validity and interrater reliability of the PPI-SF. Analyses found that male and female reports were correlated significantly on the two major factors of the PPI-SF. Furthermore, the female-report explained a significant amount of variance over and above men’s self-report on PAI scales designed to indicate antisocial personality traits. PMID:26213500

  10. STRUCTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY PERSONALITY INVENTORY FOR CHINESE COLLEGE STUDENTS1,2

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIETING; LANZA, STEPHANIE; ZHANG, MINQIANG; SU, BINYUAN

    2016-01-01

    Summary The University Personality Inventory, a mental health instrument for college students, is frequently used for screening in China. However, its unidimensionality has been questioned. This study examined its dimensions to provide more information about the specific mental problems for students at risk. Four subsamples were randomly created from a sample (N = 6,110; M age = 19.1 yr.) of students at a university in China. Principal component analysis with Promax rotation was applied on the first two subsamples to explore dimension of the inventory. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on the third subsample to verify the exploratory dimensions. Finally, the identified factors were compared to the Sympton Checklist–90 (SCL–90) to support validity, and sex differences were examined, based on the fourth subsample. Five factors were identified: Physical Symptoms, Cognitive Symptoms, Emotional Vulnerability, Social Avoidance, and Interpersonal Sensitivity, accounting for 60.3% of the variance. All the five factors were significantly correlated with the SCL–90. Women significantly scored higher than men on Cognitive Symptoms and Interpersonal Sensitivity. PMID:25933045

  11. Examining the impact of gender on the factor structure of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised.

    PubMed

    Anestis, Joye C; Caron, Kelly M; Carbonell, Joyce L

    2011-09-01

    Research on the factor structure of psychopathy has yielded mixed results, supporting anywhere from one to three factors. Additionally, most of this research has used all-male samples, and the possibility of structural invariance across gender has not been examined. Using a mixed-gender sample of 360 undergraduates, the factor structure of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised was examined using confirmatory factor analysis and multiple group analysis. One-, two-, and three-factor models were tested and compared with each other. When males and females were combined, none of the three models provided adequate fit to the data. Multiple group analyses revealed partial invariance across gender for all three models. Model comparison criteria supported use of both the one- and two-factor models, taking into account variable factor structure across gender. The importance of considering structural differences based on biological sex when assessing psychopathic traits is discussed. PMID:21490056

  12. Predicting law enforcement officer job performance with the Personality Assessment Inventory.

    PubMed

    Lowmaster, Sara E; Morey, Leslie C

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the descriptive and predictive characteristics of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) in a sample of 85 law enforcement officer candidates. Descriptive results indicate that mean PAI full-scale and subscale scores are consistently lower than normative community sample scores, with some exceptions noted typically associated with defensive responding. Predictive validity was examined by relating PAI full-scale and subscale scores to supervisor ratings in the areas of job performance, integrity problems, and abuse of disability status. Modest correlations were observed for all domains; however, predictive validity was moderated by defensive response style, with greater predictive validity observed among less defensive responders. These results suggest that the PAI's full scales and subscales are able to predict law enforcement officers' performance, but their utility is appreciably improved when taken in the context of indicators of defensive responding. PMID:22224672

  13. Simulation of traumatic brain injury symptoms on the Personality Assessment Inventory: an analogue study.

    PubMed

    Keiski, Michelle A; Shore, Douglas L; Hamilton, Joanna M; Malec, James F

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the operating characteristics of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) validity scales in distinguishing simulators feigning symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while completing the PAI (n = 84) from a clinical sample of patients with TBI who achieved adequate scores on performance validity tests (n = 112). The simulators were divided into two groups: (a) Specific Simulators feigning cognitive and somatic symptoms only or (b) Global Simulators feigning cognitive, somatic, and psychiatric symptoms. The PAI overreporting scales were indeed sensitive to the simulation of TBI symptoms in this analogue design. However, these scales were less sensitive to the feigning of somatic and cognitive TBI symptoms than the feigning of a broad range of cognitive, somatic, and emotional symptoms often associated with TBI. The relationships of TBI simulation to consistency and underreporting scales are also explored. PMID:24965838

  14. A Comparison of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and the Psychological Screening Inventory in a Delinquent Sample and a Comparison Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGurk, Barry J.; Bolton, Neil

    1981-01-01

    Compared the scores of reformatory inmates and technical college students on the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and the Psychological Screening Inventory. Two factors accounted for most of the variance. Neuroticism was common to both groups. The second factor in the delinquent group was extraversion. (Author/JAC)

  15. The Validity and Utility of the Positive Presentation Management and Negative Presentation Management Scales for the Revised NEO Personality Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellbom, Martin; Bagby, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Schinka, Kinder, and Kremer developed "validity" scales for the "Revised NEO Personality Inventory" (NEO PI-R; Costa & McCrae) to detect underreporting--the Positive Presentation Management (PPM) Scale and overreporting--the Negative Presentation Management (NPM) Scale. In this investigation, the clinical utility of these scales was examined using…

  16. 26 CFR 1.1059A-1 - Limitation on taxpayer's basis or inventory cost in property imported from related persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitation on taxpayer's basis or inventory cost in property imported from related persons. 1.1059A-1 Section 1.1059A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Rules § 1.1059A-1 Limitation...

  17. HEREDITARY FACTORS IN NORMAL PERSONALITY TRAITS (AS MEASURED BY INVENTORIES). LOUISVILLE TWIN STUDY, RESEARCH REPORT NUMBER 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VANDENBERG, STEVEN G.

    RESEARCH ON HEREDITARY FACTORS IN NORMAL PERSONALITY TRAITS, AS MEASURED BY INVENTORIES, HAS BEEN LIMITED BY THE FOLLOWING FACTORS--(1) DATA DRAWN FROM ADOLESCENT, NOT ADULT, TWINS, (2) OMISSION OF MENTALLY ILL TWINS, (3) SMALL SIZE OF SAMPLES, (4) VARIABILITY STUDIED ONLY WITHIN FAMILY, (5) SMALL, ISOLATED, UNCOORDINATED STUDIES, AND (6) PROBLEMS…

  18. Is the Narcissistic Personality Inventory Still Relevant? A Test of Independent Grandiosity and Entitlement Scales in the Assessment of Narcissism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joshua D.; Price, Joanna; Campbell, W. Keith

    2012-01-01

    Some scholars have called for the replacement of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) with more narrow scales measuring grandiosity and entitlement instead. In the current study, the authors examined the relations among the NPI and measures of grandiosity and entitlement, as well as in relation to a measure of the Five-Factor Model (FFM).…

  19. Validity of a Configural Interpretation of the Intellectual Screening and Achievement Scales of the Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Thomas S.; Welsh, M. Cay

    1981-01-01

    The ratings of the Achievement and Intellectual Screening scales of the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) are compared with scores on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT) to determine the efficacy of using the PIC as an index of children's performance on such measures.…

  20. USER'S GUIDE TO THE PERSONAL COMPUTER VERSION OF THE BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORY SYSTEM (PC-BEIS2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a user's guide for an updated Personal Computer version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS2), allowing users to estimate hourly emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and soil nitrogen oxide emissions for any county in the contig...

  1. Hierarchical Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Revised Personal Style Inventory: Evidence for the Multidimensionality Problem of Perfectionism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Sehee; Lee, Min-Kyu

    2001-01-01

    Examined the factor structure of the revised Personal Style Inventory (C. Robins, J. Ladd, and A. Luten, 1990) through hierarchical factor analysis using data from 574 college students in Korea. Found a hierarchical model specifying perfectionism as associated with both hierarchical factors (Autonomy and Sociotropy) to be the best fitting. (SLD)

  2. A Comparison of the Psychometric Properties of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory Full-Length and Short-Form Versions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Rebecca M.; Sellbom, Martin; Lilienfeld, Scott O.

    2012-01-01

    The Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) has shown promising construct validity as a measure of psychopathy. Because of its relative efficiency, a short-form version of the PPI (PPI-SF) was developed and has proven useful in many psychopathy studies. The validity of the PPI-SF, however, has not been thoroughly examined, and no studies have…

  3. The Five-Factor Personality Inventory as a Measure of the Five-Factor Model: Belgian, American, and Hungarian Comparisons with the NEO-PI-R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Fruyt, Filip; McCrae, Robert R.; Szirmak, Zsofia; Nagy, Janos

    2004-01-01

    The lexically based Five-Factor Personality Inventory (FFPI) was correlated with the factors and facets of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) in Belgian (N = 265), American (N = 116), and Hungarian (N = 320) samples. Results were similar across the three cultures. Analysis of orthogonalized FFPI factors showed that three of…

  4. Personality Characteristics of Adolescents with Hallucinogen, Methamphetamine, and Cannabis Dependence: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Glen A.; Daiss, Doyle D.

    2005-01-01

    A comparison of personality factors on scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) was conducted with a sample of adolescents referred to a residential substance abuse treatment program. A total of sixty adolescents identified with hallucinogen (n = 20), cannabis (n = 20), or methamphetamine (n = 20) as their drug…

  5. Personality Factors Associated with the Decision to Accept or Reject Mobility Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, K.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Adventitiously blind adults (n=79) who had accepted mobility training were compared to 60 subjects who had rejected training. Personality profiles varied significantly between groups on seven scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory: psychasthenia; schizophrenia; psychopathic deviate; depression; hypomania; paranoia; and…

  6. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Persons With Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Homaifar, Beeta Y.; Brenner, Lisa A.; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Harwood, Jeri F.; Thompson, Caitlin; Filley, Christopher M.; Kelly, James P.; Adler, Lawrence E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to examine the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) sample using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to determine how well the BDI-II identifies depression. An ROC curve allows for analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of a diagnostic test using various cutoff points to determine the number of true positives, true negatives, false positives, and false negatives. Design This was a secondary analysis of data gathered from an observational study. We examined BDI-II scores in a sample of 52 veterans with remote histories of TBI. Setting This study was completed at a Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center. Participants Participants were veterans eligible to receive VA health care services. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Outcome measures included the BDI-II and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-IV). Results We generated an ROC curve to determine how well the BDI-II identifies depression using the SCID-IV as the criterion standard for diagnosing depression, defined here as a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Results indicated a cutoff score of at least 19 if one has a mild TBI or at least 35 if one has a moderate or severe TBI. These scores maximize sensitivity (87%) and specificity (79%). Conclusions Clinicians working with persons with TBI can use the BDI-II to determine whether depressive symptoms warrant further assessment. PMID:19345782

  7. Gender-responsiveness in corrections: Estimating female inmate misconduct risk using the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI).

    PubMed

    Davidson, Megan; Sorensen, Jon R; Reidy, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Proper inmate assessment is critical to correctional management and institutional security. While many instruments have been developed to assist with this process, most of these tools have not been validated using samples of female inmates although distinct gender differences have been identified in the inmate population in terms of adaptation and misconduct. The Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) is a multiscale measure of psychopathology that is being increasingly utilized in the correctional setting to assist with the inmate classification process. The current study contributes to the dearth of literature surrounding gender-responsive inmate classification by utilizing a sample of 2,000 female inmates to examine the incremental and predictive validity of the PAI in association with general and assaultive disciplinary infractions. Findings from this study reveal that the PAI scales presenting the strongest relationship to general and assaultive disciplinary infractions among this female sample included Aggression (AGG), Antisocial Features (ANT), Paranoia (PAR), and the Violence Potential Index (VPI). Moreover, findings derived from this study suggest that certain PAI measures, specifically ARD-T, DRU, and more general substance abuse and mental health indicators may be useful in gender-responsive assessments during the female inmate classification process. PMID:26436333

  8. Personality Assessment Inventory scores as predictors of misconduct, recidivism, and violence: A meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Brett O; Boccaccini, Marcus T; Bitting, Brian S; Edens, John F

    2015-06-01

    More than 30 studies have examined the ability of scores on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991, 2007) to predict violence or misconduct. The Antisocial Features (ANT), Aggression (AGG), and Violence Potential Index (VPI) Scales of the PAI, in particular, have received substantial attention as predictors of institutional infractions and criminal recidivism. The current study used meta-analysis to provide a comprehensive review of the ability of scores on these and other PAI scales to predict misbehavior. Scores on the ANT (d = .26 to .39) and AGG (d = .23 to .40) scales consistently emerged as small to moderate predictors of misbehavior. Effects tended to be larger in correctional than treatment settings (e.g., ANT d = .44 vs. .20), for institutional misconduct than recidivism (e.g., AGG d = .37 vs. .23), and for institutional misconduct studies with follow up periods of at least 1.5 years (e.g., ANT d = .46). Overall, findings provide support for the predictive validity of multiple PAI scales. PMID:25528162

  9. Personality Processes Reflected in Client Vocal Style and Rorschach Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Laura North; Gaylin, Ned L.

    1973-01-01

    Vocal style was proposed as a useful variable with which to classify groups of clients in order to study the differential effects of various therapeutic maneuvers. Relationships between voice quality ratings in early psychotherapy interviews and pretherapy Rorschach and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory scores were investigated in order…

  10. Rehabilitation Counseling Outcome of Multi-Disabled Persons: Comparison of Success and Failure Groups Using the MMPI and Demographic Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.

    This research investigated the capacity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) to differentiate multi-disabled persons who had become successfully rehabilitated from those who had not. It was expected that the overall MMPI profile of unsuccessful rehabilitants would reflect a greater degree of psychological maladjustment than…

  11. Use of the MMPI-I in Identifying Personality Characteristics of Anorexia Nervosa, Restrictor Subtype: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regardie, Cynthia Ramos

    In recent decades, the incidence of eating disorders has sharply increased. This paper reviews literature published between 1969 through 1992 which addresses personality characteristics of individuals with anorexia nervosa, restrictor subtype, utilizing the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-I). The current literature and research…

  12. Trait-based assessment of borderline personality disorder using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory: Phenotypic and genetic support.

    PubMed

    Few, Lauren R; Miller, Joshua D; Grant, Julia D; Maples, Jessica; Trull, Timothy J; Nelson, Elliot C; Oltmanns, Thomas F; Martin, Nicholas G; Lynskey, Michael T; Agrawal, Arpana

    2016-01-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 28(1) of Psychological Assessment (see record 2015-54029-001). The FFI-BPD values for Sample 3 in Table 2 should read 1.42 (0.44), 0.83.] The aim of the current study was to examine the reliability and validity of a trait-based assessment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Correlations between the Five-Factor Inventory-BPD composite (FFI-BPD) and explicit measures of BPD were examined across 6 samples, including undergraduate, community, and clinical samples. The median correlation was .60, which was nearly identical to the correlation between measures of BPD and a BPD composite generated from the full Revised NEO Personality Inventory (i.e., NEO-BPD; r = .61). Correlations between FFI-BPD and relevant measures of psychiatric symptomatology and etiology (e.g., childhood abuse, drug use, depression, and personality disorders) were also examined and compared to those generated using explicit measures of BPD and NEO-BPD. As expected, the FFI-BPD composite correlated most strongly with measures associated with high levels of Neuroticism, such as depression, anxiety, and emotion dysregulation, and the pattern of correlations generated using the FFI-BPD was highly similar to those generated using explicit measures of BPD and NEO-BPD. Finally, genetic analyses estimated that FFI-BPD is 44% heritable, which is comparable to meta-analytic research examining genetics associated with BPD, and revealed that 71% of the genetic influences are shared between FFI-BPD and a self-report measure assessing BPD (Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline subscale; Morey, 1991). Generally, these results support the use of FFI-BPD as a reasonable proxy for BPD, which has considerable implications, particularly for potential gene-finding efforts in large, epidemiological datasets that include the NEO FFI. PMID:25984635

  13. The South African Personality Inventory (SAPI): a culture-informed instrument for the country's main ethnocultural groups.

    PubMed

    Fetvadjiev, Velichko H; Meiring, Deon; van de Vijver, Fons J R; Nel, J Alewyn; Hill, Carin

    2015-09-01

    We present the development and the underlying structure of a personality inventory for the main ethnocultural groups of South Africa, using an emic-etic approach. The South African Personality Inventory (SAPI) was developed based on an extensive qualitative study of the implicit personality conceptions in the country's 11 official languages (Nel et al., 2012). Items were generated and selected (to a final set of 146) with a continuous focus on cultural adequacy and translatability. Students and community adults (671 Blacks, 198 Coloreds, 104 Indians, and 391 Whites) completed the inventory. A 6-dimensional structure (comprising a positive and a negative Social-Relational factor, Neuroticism, Extraversion, Conscientiousness, and Openness) was equivalent across groups and replicated in an independent sample of 139 Black and 270 White students. The SAPI correlated highly overall with impression-management aspects, but lower with lying aspects of social desirability. The SAPI social-relational factors were distinguishable from the Big Five in a joint factor analysis; the multiple correlations with the Big Five were .64 (positive) and .51 (negative social-relational). Implications and suggestions for emic-etic instrument and model development are discussed. PMID:25602691

  14. 41 CFR 109-1.5110 - Physical inventories of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the normal wall-to-wall method. The sampling methods employed must be statistically valid and approved... acceptable results, the wall-to-wall method shall be used to complete the inventories. (l) Physical... sampling methods are used, a wall-to-wall inventory is required no less frequently than every three...

  15. 41 CFR 109-1.5110 - Physical inventories of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the normal wall-to-wall method. The sampling methods employed must be statistically valid and approved... acceptable results, the wall-to-wall method shall be used to complete the inventories. (l) Physical... sampling methods are used, a wall-to-wall inventory is required no less frequently than every three...

  16. Liking of personal names, self-esteem, and the Big Five Inventory.

    PubMed

    Marlar, Misty R; Joubert, Charles E

    2002-10-01

    76 university students responded to the Big Five Inventory, the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory, and rated how much they liked their first and middle names. Self-esteem positively correlated with scores on Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Extraversion and negatively with Neuroticism. Liking of one's first name correlated positively with scores on Conscientiousness only. PMID:12416828

  17. Personality Assessment Inventory Internalizing and Externalizing Structure in Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Associations with Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E.; Dennis, Paul A.; Elbogen, Eric B.; Clancy, Carolina P.; Hertzberg, Michael A.; Beckham, Jean C.; Calhoun, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with aggressive behavior in veterans, and difficulty controlling aggressive urges has been identified as a primary postdeployment readjustment concern. Yet only a fraction of veterans with PTSD commit violent acts. The goals of this study were to (1) examine the higher-order factor structure of Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) scales in a sample of U.S. military veterans seeking treatment for PTSD; and (2) to evaluate the incremental validity of higher-order latent factors of the PAI over PTSD symptom severity in modeling aggression. The study sample included male U.S. Vietnam (n = 433) and Iraq/Afghanistan (n = 165) veterans who were seeking treatment for PTSD at an outpatient Veterans Affairs (VA) clinic. Measures included the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale, the PAI, and the Conflict Tactics Scale. The sample was randomly split into two equal subsamples (n’s = 299) to allow for cross-validation of statistically derived factors. Parallel analysis, variable clustering analysis, and confirmatory factor analyses were used to evaluate the factor structure, and regression was used to examine the association of factor scores with self-reports of aggression over the past year. Three factors were identified: internalizing, externalizing, and substance abuse. Externalizing explained unique variance in aggression beyond PTSD symptom severity and demographic factors, while internalizing and substance abuse did not. Service era was unrelated to reports of aggression. The constructs of internalizing versus externalizing dimensions of PTSD may have utility in identifying characteristics of combat veterans in the greatest need of treatment to help manage aggressive urges. PMID:25131806

  18. Constructing a short form of the hierarchical personality inventory for children (HiPIC): the HiPIC-30.

    PubMed

    Vollrath, Margarete E; Hampson, Sarah E; Torgersen, Svenn

    2016-05-01

    Children's personality traits are invaluable predictors of concurrent and later mental and physical health. Several validated longer inventories for assessing the widely recognized Five-Factor Model of personality in children are available, but short forms are scarce. This study aimed at constructing a 30-item form of the 144-item Hierarchical Personality Inventory for Children (HiPIC) (Mervielde & De Fruyt, ). Participants were 1543 children aged 6-12 years (sample 1) and 3895 children aged 8 years (sample 2). Sample 1 completed the full HiPIC, from which we constructed the HiPIC-30, and the Child Behaviour Checklist (Achenbach, ). Sample 2 completed the HiPIC-30. The HiPIC-30 personality domains correlated over r = .90 with the full HiPIC domains, had good Cronbach's alphas and correlated similarly with CBCL behaviour problems and gender as the full HiPIC. The factor structures of the HiPIC-30 were convergent across samples, but the imagination factor was not clear-cut. We conclude that the HiPIC-30 is a reliable and valid questionnaire for the Five-Factor personality traits in children. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27120426

  19. The comparative validity of 11 modern personality inventories: predictions of behavioral acts, informant reports, and clinical indicators.

    PubMed

    Grucza, Richard A; Goldberg, Lewis R

    2007-10-01

    In science, multiple measures of the same constructs can be useful, but they are unlikely to all be equally valid indicators. In psychological assessment, the many popular personality inventories available in the marketplace also may be useful, but their comparative validity has long remained unassessed. This is the first comprehensive comparison of 11 such multiscale instruments against each of three types of criteria: clusters of behavioral acts, descriptions by knowledgeable informants, and clinical indicators potentially associated with various types of psychopathology. Using 1,000 bootstrap resampling analyses from a sample of roughly 700 adult research participants, we assess the relative predictability of each criterion and the comparative validity of each inventory. Although there was a wide range of criterion predictability, most inventories exhibited quite similar cross-validities when averaged across all three types of criteria. On the other hand, there were important differences between inventories in their predictive capabilities for particular criteria. We discuss the factors that lead to differential validity across predictors and criteria. PMID:17764394

  20. 7 CFR 767.52 - Disposition of personal property from real estate inventory property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Property of value may be sold at a public sale. (b) Reclaiming personal property. The owner or lienholder... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposition of personal property from real estate... Property Abandonment and Personal Property Removal § 767.52 Disposition of personal property from...

  1. [Validation of the French version of the revised Personal Style Inventory (revised Personal Style Inventory, PSI-II, Robins et al., 1994)].

    PubMed

    Loas, G; Verrier, A; Gayant, C; Dhee-Perot, P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the validity and reliability of the French version of the PSI-II. The PSI-II is a self-rating scale divided into two subscales containing each 24 items and rating sociotropy and autonomy. 202 university students (170 females, 32 males) with a mean age of 21.54 years (sd = 4.16) were included. They filled out the PSI-II and the Interpersonal Dependency Inventory (IDI). The construct validity was explored using an exploratory principal components analysis followed by an orthogonal varimax rotation. The results had shown a three-factor solution with a "sociotropy" factor and two "autonomy" factors. The Cronbach alpha coefficients were respectively 0.83 and 0.72 for the sociotropy and autonomy subscales. The Pearson correlations between the PSI-II and IDI subscales showed significant correlation first between the sociotropy subscale and the two subscales of the IDI rating dependency, the values were respectively 0.67 (p < 0.001) and 0.44 (p < 0.001), and secondly between the autonomy subscales of the PSI-II and IDI, the value was 0.39 (p < 0.001). The sociotropy subscale items correlated significantly with the total score of the subscale with a mean of 0.46. 23 items of the autonomy subscale correlated with the total score with a mean of 0.36. The sociotropy and autonomy scores were respectively 93.98 (sd = 14.22) and 84.55 (sd = 11.69). The French version of the PSI-II had satisfactory metrological parameters and allows to study sociotropy and autonomy in French population. PMID:9559301

  2. The Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality for Youth (SNAP-Y): a new measure for assessing adolescent personality and personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Linde, Jennifer A; Stringer, Deborah; Simms, Leonard J; Clark, Lee Anna

    2013-08-01

    The Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality-Youth Version (SNAP-Y) is a new, reliable self-report questionnaire that assesses 15 personality traits relevant to both normal-range personality and the alternative DSM-5 model for personality disorder. Community adolescents, 12 to 18 years old (N = 364), completed the SNAP-Y; 347 also completed the Big Five Inventory-Adolescent, 144 provided 2-week retest data, and 128 others completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent. Outpatient adolescents (N = 103) completed the SNAP-Y, and 97 also completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent. The SNAP-Y demonstrated strong psychometric properties, and structural, convergent, discriminant, and external validities. Consistent with the continuity of personality, results paralleled those in adult and college samples using the adult Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality-Second Edition (SNAP-2), from which the SNAP-Y derives and which has established validity in personality-trait assessment across the normal-abnormal continuum. The SNAP-Y thus provides a new, clinically useful instrument to assess personality traits and personality pathology in adolescents. PMID:23794180

  3. Dimensions, Patterns, and Personality Correlates of Drug Abuse in an Offender Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Terrill R.

    1978-01-01

    Drug abuse scores from prisoners resulted in two factors describing lifetime use of cannabis versus opiates. Analysis of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) profiles versus drug abuse patterns indicated moderate, unidimensional relationship between variables. MMPI profiles of opiate users were similar to those identified in research…

  4. Premorbid Personality Differentiation of Cancer and Noncancer Groups: A Test of the Hypothesis of Cancer Proneness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dattore, Patrick J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory scores yielded significant discriminations between cancer and noncancer groups. The group with cancer was significantly separated from the noncancer group on the basis of lower scores on Byrne's Repression-Sensitization scale (greater repression) and on the Depression scale of the MMPI (less…

  5. MMPI-2 Personality Profiles of High-Functioning Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozonoff, Sally; Garcia, Nicanor; Clark, Elaine; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2005-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Second Edition was administered to 20 adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who fell in the average to above average range of intelligence and 24 age-, intelligence-, and gender-matched college students. Large group differences, with the ASD group scoring higher, were found on the L validity…

  6. The MMPI-2: A New Standard for Personality Assessment and Research in Counseling Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, James N.; Graham, John R.

    1994-01-01

    Highlights the application of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) in college counseling, couples counseling, medical problem assessment, military applications, personnel screening programs, and other areas. Provides a general description of the MMPI-2, discusses continuity of MMPI and MMPI-2 scales, and describes new scales…

  7. The Satter Eating Competence Inventory for Low-income persons is a valid measure of eating competence for persons of higher socioeconomic position.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Eating competence is an important behavioral construct, shown to be associated with healthful lifestyle practices, including dietary quality, weight management, physical activity, and sleep duration. A 16-item instrument to measure eating competence, the Satter Eating Competence Inventory was previously validated in a general sample and subsequently, a 16-item instrument was developed to address specific concerns of low-income persons; 12 items were common to both instruments. The purpose of this study was to determine if the low-income version could be applied to a general audience, simplifying intervention evaluation and facilitating cross-study comparison. Both surveys were fully completed by 127 parents (89% white; 35.8 ± 5.3 y; 86% college graduates; 51% eating competent) of preschool-age children; 96 of whom were not considered low-income. Cognitive interviews with 14 parents of varying eating competence levels clarified and confirmed findings. Scores were highly correlated (r = .98) and only 2 of the 96 were not congruently classified for eating competence. Mean difference between the two versions was .24 ± 1.55. The general audience version explained 95% of the variance in the low-income version score. Findings support the low-income version of the Satter Eating Competence Inventory for general audience use as the Satter Eating Competence Inventory 2.0. PMID:25558022

  8. The Personality Assessment Inventory as a Proxy for the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised: Testing the Incremental Validity and Cross-Sample Robustness of the Antisocial Features Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Kevin S.; Guy, Laura S.; Edens, John F.; Boer, Douglas P.; Hamilton, Jennine

    2007-01-01

    The Personality Assessment Inventory's (PAI's) ability to predict psychopathic personality features, as assessed by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), was examined. To investigate whether the PAI Antisocial Features (ANT) Scale and subscales possessed incremental validity beyond other theoretically relevant PAI scales, optimized regression…

  9. Clinical Utility of the Cross-Cultural (Chinese) Personality Assessment Inventory (CPAI-2) in the Assessment of Substance Use Disorders among Chinese Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Fanny M.; Cheung, Shu Fai; Leung, Freedom

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the clinical utility of the Cross-Cultural (Chinese) Personality Inventory (CPAI-2) in differentiating the personality characteristics of Chinese men with substance use disorders from other psychiatric patients and normal control participants. The CPAI-2 profile of 121 Chinese men with substance use disorders was contrasted…

  10. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  11. 7 CFR 1955.62 - Removal and disposition of nonsecurity personal property from inventory real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... items of value which do not customarily pass with title to the real estate, such as furniture, personal... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Removal and disposition of nonsecurity personal...) PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Management of Property § 1955.62 Removal and disposition of nonsecurity...

  12. Evaluation of the Psychoneurotic Tendencies Risk Using the Woodworth Mathews Personality Inventory in Non-Institutionalized Persons

    PubMed Central

    PÎRLOG, M.C.; RADA, CORNELIA; PREJBEANU, ILEANA; CARA, MONICA LAURA

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Multiple factors of vulnerability may lead to development of abnormal social behaviour and to important psychiatric diseases. The psychopathological characteristics present at individual level can lead to a pattern of population groups that are subject to developing mental illness risks. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Multidisciplinary study (2009-2011) to assessing the current situation of mental health and identifying population risk groups for developing psychiatric disorders in a non-institutionalised population. We used the Woodworth Mathews Inventory (76 items) to a randomly selected sample of 1,200 men and women, residents in urban and rural areas. RESULTS: The extreme scores for emotiveness had a frequency more than triple for women, and we found a similar situation for obsessive-neurasthenic and depressive tendencies. People aging over 35 years had a double score (limit and poignancy) for depression than younger people, meanwhile correlation between age under 35 years and instability and antisocial tendencies is highly statistically significant (p<0.001), the frequency of extreme scores being almost double than in the older people. CONCLUSIONS: Female gender has a vulnerability for develop depressive and emotional disorders and age over 35 is also significant correlated with depressive tendencies. Younger people (under 35 years) are predisposed for pathological antisocial behaviour, fact revealed by the high scores for instability and antisocial tendencies. It is necessary to develop a program focused on the two risk categories to prevent the possible occurrence of psychiatric disorders. PMID:25729602

  13. An examination of the three components of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory: Profile comparisons and tests of moderation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joshua D; Maples-Keller, Jessica L; Lynam, Donald R

    2016-06-01

    There are a number of prominent trait-based models and assessments of psychopathy that posit the existence of a varying number of central traits, which differ in their relation to one another and the degree to which they manifest similar empirical networks. In the current study (N = 347), we examined Lilienfeld's popular 3-factor model and measure (Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Short Form; Kastner, Sellbom, & Lilienfeld, 2012; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996) in relation to adverse developmental factors, self and informant ratings of general personality and "near neighbor" personality styles from the Dark Triad (e.g., narcissism), as well as internalizing symptoms and externalizing behaviors. The 3 factors-Fearless Dominance, Self-centered Impulsivity, and Coldheartedness-manifested relatively limited relations with one another (median r = .22) and demonstrated varying empirical networks such that Self-centered Impulsivity was associated with substantial maladaptivity, Fearless Dominance was associated with a mixture of adaptive and maladaptive correlates, and Coldheartedness' relations to the external criteria fell in between and manifested a relatively small number of significant correlations. There was little evidence that the psychopathy factors in general, and Fearless Dominance more specifically, interacted with one another in the prediction of externalizing behaviors or interacted with adverse developmental/parental experiences to predict these behaviors. These results are relevant to ongoing discussions regarding the manner in which psychopathy is conceptualized and assessed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26348030

  14. Validity of the Externalizing Spectrum Inventory in a Criminal Offender Sample: Relations with Disinhibitory Psychopathology, Personality, and Psychopathic Features

    PubMed Central

    Venables, Noah C.; Patrick, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The Externalizing Spectrum Inventory (ESI; Krueger, Markon, Patrick, Benning, & Kramer, 2007) provides a self-report based method for indexing a range of correlated problem behaviors and traits in the domain of deficient impulse control. The ESI organizes lower-order behaviors and traits of this kind around higher-order factors encompassing general disinhibitory proneness, callous-aggression, and substance abuse. The current study used data from a male prisoner sample (N = 235) to evaluate the validity of ESI total and factor scores in relation to external criterion measures consisting of externalizing disorder symptoms (including child and adult antisocial deviance and substance-related problems) assessed via diagnostic interview, personality traits assessed by self-report, and psychopathic features as assessed by both interview and self-report. Results provide evidence for the validity of the ESI measurement model and point to its potential utility as a referent for research on the neurobiological correlates and etiological bases of externalizing proneness. PMID:21787091

  15. A psychometric evaluation of the Personality Assessment Inventory - short form clinical scales in an inpatient psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Samuel J; Siefert, Caleb J; Shorey, Hal S; Antonius, Daniel; Shiva, Andrew; Kehl-Fie, Kendra; Blais, Mark A

    2009-12-30

    Few studies have assessed the psychometric properties of the Personality Assessment Inventory short-form (PAI-SF) clinical scales, and none have conducted these evaluations using participants from psychiatric inpatient units. The present study evaluated item-level tests of scaling assumptions of the PAI-SF using a large (N=503) clinical sample of participants who completed the PAI during their admission to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Internal consistency reliability was high across scales, and tests of item-scale convergence and discrimination generally confirmed hypothesized item groupings. Scale-level correlations supported unique variance being measured by each scale. Finally, agreement between the PAI short- and full-form scales was found to be high. The results are discussed with regards to scale interpretation. PMID:19879654

  16. Inventory of Electronic Mobility Aids for Persons with Visual Impairments: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roentgen, Uta R.; Gelderblom, Gert Jan; Soede, Mathijs; de Witte, Luc P.

    2008-01-01

    This literature review of existing electronic mobility aids for persons who are visually impaired and recent developments in this field identified and classified 146 products, systems, and devices. The 21 that are currently available that can be used without environmental adaptation are described in functional terms. (Contains 2 tables.)

  17. Personality Type as a Determinant of Caregiver Distress: Preliminary Findings Using the Weinberger Assessment Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Jonathon M.; And Others

    This study explored personality characteristics of female help-seeking caregivers. Female caregivers (N=45) of elderly demented relatives were actively recruited through mass media and special interest groups to participate in a psychoeducational class to alleviate the frustrations of caregiving and increase life satisfaction. The Weinberger…

  18. Dreaming and personality: Wake-dream continuity, thought suppression, and the Big Five Inventory.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Josie E

    2015-12-15

    Studies have found relationships between dream content and personality traits, but there are still many traits that have been underexplored or have had questionable conclusions drawn about them. Experimental work has found a 'rebound' effect in dreams when thoughts are suppressed prior to sleep, but the effect of trait thought suppression on dream content has not yet been researched. In the present study participants (N=106) reported their Most Recent Dream, answered questions about the content of the dream, and completed questionnaires measuring trait thought suppression and the 'Big Five' personality traits. Of these, 83 were suitably recent for analyses. A significant positive correlation was found between trait thought suppression and participants' ratings of dreaming of waking-life emotions, and high suppressors reported dreaming more of their waking-life emotions than low suppressors did. The results may lend support to the compensation theory of dreams, and/or the ironic process theory of mental control. PMID:26496477

  19. A case law survey of the Personality Assessment Inventory: examining its role in civil and criminal trials.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Kacy L; Edens, John F

    2008-05-01

    Although professional surveys suggest that the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) is a popular instrument among forensic and correctional psychologists, relatively little is known about the specific types of legal cases in which it is applied, the particular types of questions it is used to address, or the extent to which its admissibility has been at issue in court cases. Using a comprehensive legal database, we surveyed all published U.S., Canadian, European, and Australian criminal and civil cases in which the PAI was administered. The PAI appears to be introduced by examiners in a wide variety of civil (e.g., child custody, personal injury) and criminal (e.g., insanity, competence) cases to aid in the assessment of a broad range of psychopathology. Additionally, the PAI seems to be used frequently to assess questions concerning potential dissimulation and response styles. Surprisingly, the admissibility of the PAI into evidence was never at issue in any of the cases reviewed. PMID:18444127

  20. Predicting Recidivism with the Personality Assessment Inventory in a Sample of Sex Offenders Screened for Civil Commitment as Sexually Violent Predators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boccaccini, Marcus T.; Murrie, Daniel C.; Hawes, Samuel W.; Simpler, Amber; Johnson, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    We examined the ability of scores from the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) to predict postrelease (M = 4.90 years follow-up) arrests in a sample of 1,412 sex offenders. We focused on scores from 4 PAI measures conceptually relevant to offending, including the Antisocial Features (ANT), Aggression (AGG), and Dominance (DOM)…

  1. The Neo Personality Inventory-Revised: Factor Structure and Gender Invariance from Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling Analyses in a High-Stakes Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furnham, Adrian; Guenole, Nigel; Levine, Stephen Z.; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    This study presents new analyses of NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R) responses collected from a large British sample in a high-stakes setting. The authors show the appropriateness of the five-factor model underpinning these responses in a variety of new ways. Using the recently developed exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM)…

  2. The Relationship between Personality Type and Software Usability Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, William H.

    2011-01-01

    The study attempted to determine if there is a relationship between user's psychological personality types, measured by the Myers Briggs Type Indicator[R] (MBTI[R]) and distinct measures of usability measured by the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI). The study was expected to provide an answer to the following basic research…

  3. Detecting Over- and Underreporting of Psychopathology with the Spanish-Language Personality Assessment Inventory: Findings from a Simulation Study with Bilingual Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Krissie; Boccaccini, Marcus T.; Noland, Ramona M.

    2008-01-01

    Existing research on the Spanish-language translation of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; L. C. Morey, 1991) suggests that the validity scales from the English- and Spanish-language versions may not be equivalent measures. In the current study, 72 bilingual participants completed both the English- and Spanish-language versions of the PAI…

  4. Examining the Construct Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised: Preferential Correlates of Fearless Dominance and Self-Centered Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edens, John F.; McDermott, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    Although the construct of psychopathy is frequently construed as a unitary syndrome, the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996) and its revision, the PPI-R (Lilienfeld & Widows, 2005), are composed of 2 scales, termed Fearless Dominance (FD) and Self-Centered Impulsivity (SCI), which appear to reflect orthogonal…

  5. Factor Structure of the Primary Scales of the Inventory of Personality Organization in a Nonclinical Sample Using Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, William D.; Levy, Kenneth N.

    2012-01-01

    Using exploratory structural equation modeling and multiple regression, we examined the factor structure and criterion relations of the primary scales of the Inventory of Personality Organization (IPO; Kernberg & Clarkin, 1995) in a nonclinical sample. Participants (N = 1,260) completed the IPO and measures of self-concept clarity, defenses,…

  6. Assessment of Mindfulness with the French Version of the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills in Community and Borderline Personality Disorder Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Rosetta; Jermann, Francoise; Bondolfi, Guido; McQuillan, Annabel

    2010-01-01

    This article explores mindfulness skills in community and borderline personality disorder (BPD) samples. Study 1 includes 173 community volunteers and explores the psychometric properties of the French version of the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills (KIMS). Study 2 explores the KIMS factor structure in 130 BPD patients and compares KIMS…

  7. Effect of Symptom Information and Intelligence in Dissimulation. An Examination of Faking Response Styles by Inmates on the Basic Personality Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffan, Jarrod S.; Kroner, Daryl G.; Morgan, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    This study employed the Basic Personality Inventory (BPI) to differentiate various types of dis-simulation, including malingered psychopathology and faking good, by inmates. In particular, the role of intelligence in utilizing symptom information to successfully malinger was examined. On admission to a correctional facility, 161 inmates completed…

  8. Clinical Utility of the McVaugh and Grow Rules for the Detection of Faking on the Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Gordon B.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the clinical utility of the McVaugh and Grow (1983) criteria for faking in the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) in children (N=100). Results showed that profiles exceeding the fake bad criterion were found in 35 percent of the cases, but only one profile met fake good criteria. (LLL)

  9. Racial Bias in Personality Assessment: Using the MMPI-2 to Predict Psychiatric Diagnoses of African American and Caucasian Chemical Dependency Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monnot, Matthew J.; Quirk, Stuart W.; Hoerger, Michael; Brewer, Linda

    2009-01-01

    An assessment of predictive bias was conducted on numerous scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; J. N. Butcher, W. G. Dahlstrom, J. R. Graham, A. Tellegen, & B. Kaemmer, 1989), including the Restructured Clinical (RC) scales, in the prediction of clinical diagnostic status for African American and Caucasian male…

  10. Comparison of personality characteristics on the bear-fedio inventory between patients with epilepsy and those with non-epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Tremont, Geoffrey; Smith, Megan M; Bauer, Lyndsey; Alosco, Michael L; Davis, Jennifer D; Blum, Andrew S; LaFrance, W Curt

    2012-01-01

    This study used the Bear-Fedio Personality Inventory (BFI) to compare 41 individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and 37 with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (NES). Both groups exhibited similar elevations on the BFI, although TLE individuals show greater endorsement of at least one hypergraphia symptom, as compared with those with NES. The correlates of the BFI with demographic and seizure characteristics differed between the groups. These results argue against a specific TLE personality syndrome and suggest that personality characteristics may be related to the experience of having repeated seizures, rather than the specific underlying pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22450613

  11. A Head-to-Head Comparison of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) With the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4 (PDQ-4) in Predicting the General Level of Personality Pathology Among Community Dwelling Subjects.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Andrea; Somma, Antonella; Borroni, Serena; Maffei, Cesare; Markon, Kristian E; Krueger, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    In order to evaluate if measures of DSM-5 Alternative PD Model domains predicted interview-based scores of general personality pathology when compared to self-report measures of DSM-IV Axis II/DSM-5 Section II PD criteria, 300 Italian community adults were administered the Iowa Personality Disorder Screen (IPDS) interview, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), and the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+ (PDQ-4+). Multiple regression analyses showed that the five PID-5 domain scales collectively explained an adequate rate of the variance of the IPDS interview total score. This result was slightly lower than the amount of variance in the IPDS total score explained by the 10 PDQ-4+ scales. The PID-5 traits scales performed better than the PDQ-4+, although the difference was marginal. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that the PID-5 domain and trait scales provided a moderate, but significant increase in the prediction of the general level of personality pathology above and beyond the PDQ-4+ scales. PMID:26828108

  12. Factor structure and construct validity of the psychopathic personality inventory in a forensic sample.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Valerie M; McLawsen, Julia E; Huss, Matthew T; Scalora, Mario J

    2013-01-01

    A wealth of research has underscored the strong relationship between PCL-R scores and recidivism. However, mounting criticism cites the PCL-R's cumbersome administration procedures and failure to adequately measure core features associated with the construct of psychopathy (Skeem, Polaschek, Patrick, & Lilienfeld, 2011). In light of these concerns, this study examined the PPI and the PPI-R, which were designed to measure core personality features associated with psychopathy (Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996; Lilienfeld & Widows, 2005). Study one examined the PPI relative to the PCL-R and examined its factor structure. The instruments shared few significant correlations and neither the PCL-R nor the PPI significantly predicted recidivism. Study two examined the PPI-R relative to the PCL-R, the PPI, both history of violence and future criminal activity and measure of related constructs. The PPI-R was significantly correlated with measures of empathy and criminal thinking and the factors were related to a history of violence and predicted future violent criminal behavior. PMID:23399313

  13. Thinking styles in relation to personality traits: an investigation of the Thinking Styles Inventory and NEO-PI-R.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Anders M; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2004-09-01

    This study is an investigation of the Sternberg-Wagner Thinking Style Inventory (TSI), with regard to cross-cultural replication and relation to the five-factor personality model (FFM). TSI and NEO-PI-R were administered to 107 participants from USA and 114 participants from Norway. Inter-correlations between NEO-PI-R dimensions and TSI-scales and factors were not very strong, few exceeding 0.40, and the correlations were in predicted directions. Joint factor analyses of TSI and NEO-PI-R showed that TSI covers variance that NEO-PI-R does not explain. Thus, it is argued that the thinking styles give an independent contribution beyond FFM dimensions. However, TSI did not relate to FFM in the same manner in the two samples. Finally, the TSI-scales and factors were replicable across samples by Procrustes rotation. The question whether thinking style may be regarded as a valid and reliable construct is discussed. PMID:15281918

  14. Testing the predictive validity of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) in relation to inmate misconduct and violence.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Thomas J; Sorensen, Jon R; Davidson, Megan

    2016-08-01

    The Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) has been widely employed in correctional settings as a screening tool to assess inmates' risk for committing various types of institutional misconduct. Evaluations have generally found the PAI scales Antisocial Features (ANT), Aggression (AGG), and the Violence Potential Index (VPI) to be modestly related to institutional misbehavior, thus supporting its construct validity. The current study provides the most comprehensive examination of the predictive and incremental validity of the PAI and its subscales among a large sample of imprisoned offenders to date. In particular, the size of the sample (n = 15,546) and follow-up period (mean time at risk of 2.2 years) allowed for the disaggregation of institutional misconduct by levels of seriousness and separate examinations by conviction offense and criminal history variables. The 3 scales most strongly related to general rule infractions were ANT, AGG, and the VPI. After controlling for age at intake, violent conviction history, prior violent arrests, and time at risk, the PAI scales were shown to add incremental validity to the classification of 4 types of disciplinary infractions ranging from 2 to 4 percentage points. The study also explored the relationship of the PAI's response bias scales to institutional misconduct. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26460899

  15. Development and initial validation of a scale for detecting inconsistent responding on the personality assessment inventory-short form.

    PubMed

    Siefert, Caleb J; Stein, Michelle; Sinclair, Samuel Justin; Antonius, Daniel; Shiva, Andrew; Blais, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was the development of an inconsistency scale (ICN-SF) for the personality assessment inventory-short form (PAI-SF). In Study 1, 503 inpatient profiles were randomly assigned to a derivation or cross-validation sample. Ten correlated item pairs were identified using the derivation sample and placed on the ICN-SF. Psychometric properties of the ICN-SF total scores were comparable in the derivation and cross-validation samples. Total ICN-SF scores in both samples were significantly lower than scores obtained from computer-generated random samples. Diagnostic efficiency statistics are reported using multiple cut-off scores at various base rate estimates. ICN-SF scores greater than 8 reasonably balanced sensitivity and specificity rates. This cutoff correctly classified 92% of the random protocols and inaccurately classified 9% of the patient protocols in study 1. In study 2, PAI-SF scores from 627 forensic and civil inpatients produced similar results, effectively identifying cases with elevated scores on the full-form inconsistency scale. Overall the results of both studies suggest that the ICN-SF can aid examiners in assessing for inconsistent responding. PMID:22574923

  16. Harmonization of Neuroticism and Extraversion phenotypes across inventories and cohorts in the Genetics of Personality Consortium: an application of Item Response Theory.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Stéphanie M; de Moor, Marleen H M; McGue, Matt; Pettersson, Erik; Terracciano, Antonio; Verweij, Karin J H; Amin, Najaf; Derringer, Jaime; Esko, Tõnu; van Grootheest, Gerard; Hansell, Narelle K; Huffman, Jennifer; Konte, Bettina; Lahti, Jari; Luciano, Michelle; Matteson, Lindsay K; Viktorin, Alexander; Wouda, Jasper; Agrawal, Arpana; Allik, Jüri; Bierut, Laura; Broms, Ulla; Campbell, Harry; Smith, George Davey; Eriksson, Johan G; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franke, Barbera; Fox, Jean-Paul; de Geus, Eco J C; Giegling, Ina; Gow, Alan J; Grucza, Richard; Hartmann, Annette M; Heath, Andrew C; Heikkilä, Kauko; Iacono, William G; Janzing, Joost; Jokela, Markus; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Lehtimäki, Terho; Madden, Pamela A F; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Northstone, Kate; Nutile, Teresa; Ouwens, Klaasjan G; Palotie, Aarno; Pattie, Alison; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Polasek, Ozren; Pulkkinen, Lea; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Raitakari, Olli T; Realo, Anu; Rose, Richard J; Ruggiero, Daniela; Seppälä, Ilkka; Slutske, Wendy S; Smyth, David C; Sorice, Rossella; Starr, John M; Sutin, Angelina R; Tanaka, Toshiko; Verhagen, Josine; Vermeulen, Sita; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wright, Margaret J; Zgaga, Lina; Rujescu, Dan; Metspalu, Andres; Wilson, James F; Ciullo, Marina; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Deary, Ian J; Räikkönen, Katri; Arias Vasquez, Alejandro; Costa, Paul T; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Krueger, Robert F; Evans, David M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pedersen, Nancy L; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2014-07-01

    Mega- or meta-analytic studies (e.g. genome-wide association studies) are increasingly used in behavior genetics. An issue in such studies is that phenotypes are often measured by different instruments across study cohorts, requiring harmonization of measures so that more powerful fixed effect meta-analyses can be employed. Within the Genetics of Personality Consortium, we demonstrate for two clinically relevant personality traits, Neuroticism and Extraversion, how Item-Response Theory (IRT) can be applied to map item data from different inventories to the same underlying constructs. Personality item data were analyzed in >160,000 individuals from 23 cohorts across Europe, USA and Australia in which Neuroticism and Extraversion were assessed by nine different personality inventories. Results showed that harmonization was very successful for most personality inventories and moderately successful for some. Neuroticism and Extraversion inventories were largely measurement invariant across cohorts, in particular when comparing cohorts from countries where the same language is spoken. The IRT-based scores for Neuroticism and Extraversion were heritable (48 and 49 %, respectively, based on a meta-analysis of six twin cohorts, total N = 29,496 and 29,501 twin pairs, respectively) with a significant part of the heritability due to non-additive genetic factors. For Extraversion, these genetic factors qualitatively differ across sexes. We showed that our IRT method can lead to a large increase in sample size and therefore statistical power. The IRT approach may be applied to any mega- or meta-analytic study in which item-based behavioral measures need to be harmonized. PMID:24828478

  17. A comparison of the analgesic effects of methoxyflurane-nitrous oxide and nitrous oxide alone during labour related to the Eysenck personality inventory test.

    PubMed

    Arozenius, S; Dahlgren, B E; Lindwall, L; Akerlind, I

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-three paturients who had received either methoxyflurane-nitrous oxide or nitrous oxide analgesia with or without pudendal block, underwent the Eysenck Personality Inventory Test on the second postpartum day and evaluated their memory of the pain (Subjectively Evaluated Pain Suffering Scores) during labor. Parturients who had received methoxyflurance-nitrous oxide analgesia reported significantly lower pain suffering than parturients who had had nitrous oxide analgesia. Subdivision according to Personality Inventory factors showed that at the introvert end of the Extroversion-Introversion scale, methoxyflurance-nitrous oxide analgesia with or without additional pudendal block resulted in significantly lower pain suffering than did not nitrous oxide analgesia. On the other hand, nitrous oxide analgesia without additional pudendal block gave significantly lower pain suffering at the extrovert end of the scale. Among the extroverts there was a tendency, though not statistically significant, towards non-approval of the pudendal block. PMID:7424496

  18. Juvenile sex offenders: Personality profile, coping styles and parental care.

    PubMed

    Margari, Francesco; Lecce, Paola Alessandra; Craig, Francesco; Lafortezza, Elena; Lisi, Andrea; Pinto, Floriana; Stallone, Valentina; Pierri, Grazia; Pisani, Rossella; Zagaria, Giuseppina; Margari, Lucia; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2015-09-30

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in juvenile sex offenders showing that this population is highly heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to identify possible different profiles that could help understand the motivation behind offending, comparing 31 Juvenile Sexual Offenders (JSOs), 31 Juvenile Sexual Non Offenders (JSNOs) and 31 Juvenile Non Offenders (Control Group). A data collection form, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) or Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) and the Parental Bonding Inventory (PBI) were administered to all participants. The results show that JSOs differs from JNSOs in some domains, such as living in single-parent homes, while maintain some common aspects such as academic failure and previous sexual intercourse. Moreover, JNSOs showed more abnormal personality traits, such as Authority Problems, MacAndrew Alcoholism, Acknowledgement and Alcohol-Drug Problem Proneness compared to JSOs and the Control Group, while JSOs and JNSOs use a coping strategy more oriented to Avoidance and Distraction compared to the Control group. Finally, JSOs described the relationships with fathers characterized by higher care and protection than JNSOs. These findings provide additional evidence with respect the prevention and treatment of criminal sexual behavior in adolescent. PMID:26233829

  19. Turbulent multiphase flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements and predictions of the structure of several multiphase flows are considered. The properties of dense sprays near the exits of pressure-atomizing injectors and of noncombusting and combusting dilute dispersed flows in round-jet configurations are addressed. It is found that the properties of dense sprays exhibit structure and mixing properties similar to variable-density single-phase flows at high Reynolds numbers within the atomization regime. The degree of development and turbulence levels at the injector exit have a surprisingly large effect on the structure and mixing properties of pressure-atomized sprays, particularly when the phase densities are large. Contemporary stochastic analysis of dilute multiphase flows provides encouraging predictions of turbulent dispersion for a wide variety of jetlike flows, particle-laden jets in gases and liquids, noncondensing and condensing bubbly jets, and nonevaporating, evaporating, and combusting sprays.

  20. Programmed Multiphasic Health Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershberg, P. I.

    1970-01-01

    Multiphase health screening procedures are advocated for detection and prevention of disease at an early stage through risk factor analysis. The use of an automated medical history questionnaire together with scheduled physical examination data provides a scanning input for computer printout. This system makes it possible to process laboratory results from 1,000 to 2,000 patients for biochemical determinations on an economically feasible base.

  1. Spinal patterns as predictors of personality profiles: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Koren, T; Rosenwinkel, E

    1992-01-01

    The present pilot study is part of an ongoing effort to further the investigation of the relationship between spinal patterns and personality. The present pilot study seeks to identify likely spinal patterns of certain personality profiles and asks whether changing posture can affect personality, and/or can emotional states alter posture? Forty patients of a private chiropractic practice participated in the study. Four radiographs (x-rays) of each subject were taken and each subject completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). Measurements obtained from the radiographs and the MMPI data were used to derive general linear models of the predictability of the MMPI in terms of the spinal/postural measures. Several models were highly significant and preliminary support for the authors' hypothesis that spinal patterns are likely to be predictive of personality profiles is suggested. Support for previous research is offered and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:1428613

  2. The Effect of Response Format on the Psychometric Properties of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory: Consequences for Item Meaning and Factor Structure.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Robert A; Donnellan, M Brent; Roberts, Brent W; Fraley, R Chris

    2016-04-01

    The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is currently the most widely used measure of narcissism in social/personality psychology. It is also relatively unique because it uses a forced-choice response format. We investigate the consequences of changing the NPI's response format for item meaning and factor structure. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 40 forced-choice items (n = 2,754), 80 single-stimulus dichotomous items (i.e., separate true/false responses for each item; n = 2,275), or 80 single-stimulus rating scale items (i.e., 5-point Likert-type response scales for each item; n = 2,156). Analyses suggested that the "narcissistic" and "nonnarcissistic" response options from the Entitlement and Superiority subscales refer to independent personality dimensions rather than high and low levels of the same attribute. In addition, factor analyses revealed that although the Leadership dimension was evident across formats, dimensions with entitlement and superiority were not as robust. Implications for continued use of the NPI are discussed. PMID:25616401

  3. Integrating psychopathology and personality disorders conceptualized by the MMPI-2-RF and the MCMI-III: a structural validity study.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Paul T; Egger, Jos I M; Rossi, Gina M P; Derksen, Jan J L

    2012-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008 ) Restructured Clinical scales and Higher Order scales were linked to the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (Millon, Millon, Davis, & Grossman, 2009 ) personality disorder scales and clinical syndrome scales in a Flemish/Dutch sample of psychiatric inpatients and outpatients, substance abuse patients, correctional inmates, and forensic psychiatric patients (N = 968). Structural validity of psychopathology and personality disorders as conceptualized by both instruments was investigated by means of principal component analysis. Results reveal a higher order structure with 4 dimensions (internalizing disorders, externalizing disorders, paranoid ideation/thought disturbance, and pathological introversion) that parallels earlier research on pathological personality dimensions as well as research linking pathological personality traits with mental disorders. Theoretical and clinical implications are considered. PMID:22338624

  4. Testing whether the DSM-5 personality disorder trait model can be measured with a reduced set of items: An item response theory investigation of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Maples, Jessica L; Carter, Nathan T; Few, Lauren R; Crego, Cristina; Gore, Whitney L; Samuel, Douglas B; Williamson, Rachel L; Lynam, Donald R; Widiger, Thomas A; Markon, Kristian E; Krueger, Robert F; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-12-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes an alternative model of personality disorders (PDs) in Section III, consisting in part of a pathological personality trait model. To date, the 220-item Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger, Derringer, Markon, Watson, & Skodol, 2012) is the only extant self-report instrument explicitly developed to measure this pathological trait model. The present study used item response theory-based analyses in a large sample (n = 1,417) to investigate whether a reduced set of 100 items could be identified from the PID-5 that could measure the 25 traits and 5 domains. This reduced set of PID-5 items was then tested in a community sample of adults currently receiving psychological treatment (n = 109). Across a wide range of criterion variables including NEO PI-R domains and facets, DSM-5 Section II PD scores, and externalizing and internalizing outcomes, the correlational profiles of the original and reduced versions of the PID-5 were nearly identical (rICC = .995). These results provide strong support for the hypothesis that an abbreviated set of PID-5 items can be used to reliably, validly, and efficiently assess these personality disorder traits. The ability to assess the DSM-5 Section III traits using only 100 items has important implications in that it suggests these traits could still be measured in settings in which assessment-related resources (e.g., time, compensation) are limited. PMID:25844534

  5. Multiphase fluid characterization system

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2014-09-02

    A measurement system and method for permitting multiple independent measurements of several physical parameters of multiphase fluids flowing through pipes are described. Multiple acoustic transducers are placed in acoustic communication with or attached to the outside surface of a section of existing spool (metal pipe), typically less than 3 feet in length, for noninvasive measurements. Sound speed, sound attenuation, fluid density, fluid flow, container wall resonance characteristics, and Doppler measurements for gas volume fraction may be measured simultaneously by the system. Temperature measurements are made using a temperature sensor for oil-cut correction.

  6. Personality Profile of Male Adolescents With Tourette Syndrome: A Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Balottin, Laura; Selvini, Claudia; Luoni, Chiara; Mannarini, Stefania; Chiappedi, Matteo; Seri, Stefano; Termine, Cristiano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-03-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple tics and commonly associated with behavioral problems, especially obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The presence of specific personality traits has been documented in adult clinical populations with Tourette syndrome but has been underresearched in younger patients. We assessed the personality profiles of 17 male adolescents with Tourette syndrome and 51 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent version, along with a standardized psychometric battery. All participants scored within the normal range across all Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent version scales. Patients with Tourette syndrome scored significantly higher than healthy controls on the Obsessiveness Content Scale only (P = .046). Our findings indicate that younger male patients with Tourette syndrome do not report abnormal personality traits and have similar personality profiles to healthy peers, with the exception of obsessionality traits, which are likely to be related to the presence of comorbid obsessive compulsive symptoms rather than tics. PMID:26078419

  7. Psychometric Evaluation of Chinese-Language 44-Item and 10-Item Big Five Personality Inventories, Including Correlations with Chronotype, Mindfulness and Mind Wandering

    PubMed Central

    Carciofo, Richard; Yang, Jiaoyan; Song, Nan; Du, Feng; Zhang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    The 44-item and 10-item Big Five Inventory (BFI) personality scales are widely used, but there is a lack of psychometric data for Chinese versions. Eight surveys (total N = 2,496, aged 18–82), assessed a Chinese-language BFI-44 and/or an independently translated Chinese-language BFI-10. Most BFI-44 items loaded strongly or predominantly on the expected dimension, and values of Cronbach's alpha ranged .698-.807. Test-retest coefficients ranged .694-.770 (BFI-44), and .515-.873 (BFI-10). The BFI-44 and BFI-10 showed good convergent and discriminant correlations, and expected associations with gender (females higher for agreeableness and neuroticism), and age (older age associated with more conscientiousness and agreeableness, and also less neuroticism and openness). Additionally, predicted correlations were found with chronotype (morningness positive with conscientiousness), mindfulness (negative with neuroticism, positive with conscientiousness), and mind wandering/daydreaming frequency (negative with conscientiousness, positive with neuroticism). Exploratory analysis found that the Self-discipline facet of conscientiousness positively correlated with morningness and mindfulness, and negatively correlated with mind wandering/daydreaming frequency. Furthermore, Self-discipline was found to be a mediator in the relationships between chronotype and mindfulness, and chronotype and mind wandering/daydreaming frequency. Overall, the results support the utility of the BFI-44 and BFI-10 for Chinese-language big five personality research. PMID:26918618

  8. Psychometric Evaluation of Chinese-Language 44-Item and 10-Item Big Five Personality Inventories, Including Correlations with Chronotype, Mindfulness and Mind Wandering.

    PubMed

    Carciofo, Richard; Yang, Jiaoyan; Song, Nan; Du, Feng; Zhang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    The 44-item and 10-item Big Five Inventory (BFI) personality scales are widely used, but there is a lack of psychometric data for Chinese versions. Eight surveys (total N = 2,496, aged 18-82), assessed a Chinese-language BFI-44 and/or an independently translated Chinese-language BFI-10. Most BFI-44 items loaded strongly or predominantly on the expected dimension, and values of Cronbach's alpha ranged .698-.807. Test-retest coefficients ranged .694-.770 (BFI-44), and .515-.873 (BFI-10). The BFI-44 and BFI-10 showed good convergent and discriminant correlations, and expected associations with gender (females higher for agreeableness and neuroticism), and age (older age associated with more conscientiousness and agreeableness, and also less neuroticism and openness). Additionally, predicted correlations were found with chronotype (morningness positive with conscientiousness), mindfulness (negative with neuroticism, positive with conscientiousness), and mind wandering/daydreaming frequency (negative with conscientiousness, positive with neuroticism). Exploratory analysis found that the Self-discipline facet of conscientiousness positively correlated with morningness and mindfulness, and negatively correlated with mind wandering/daydreaming frequency. Furthermore, Self-discipline was found to be a mediator in the relationships between chronotype and mindfulness, and chronotype and mind wandering/daydreaming frequency. Overall, the results support the utility of the BFI-44 and BFI-10 for Chinese-language big five personality research. PMID:26918618

  9. Differential response patterns on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) in compensation-seeking and non-compensation-seeking mild traumatic brain injury patients.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Galbreath, Jennifer; Brown, Michelle; Turnbull, Jane

    2012-01-01

    There is relatively little research on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) populations. There is also little research on how compensation-seeking status affects personality assessment results in MTBI patients. The current study examined the PAI scales and subscales in two MTBI groups, one composed of compensation-seeking MTBI patients and the other consisting of non-compensation-seeking MTBI patients. Results indicated significant differences on several scales and subscales between the two MTBI groups, with the compensation-seeking MTBI patients having significantly higher elevations on scales related to somatic preoccupation (Somatic Complaint Scale, SOM), emotional distress (Anxiety Scale, ANX; Anxiety Related Disorders Scale, ARD; Depression Scale, DEP), and the Negative Impression Management, NIM, validity scale. All the SOM subscales and the Anxiety Cognitive (ANX-C) and ANX Affective, ANX-A, subscales were also elevated in the compensation-seeking group. Results indicated that several scales on the PAI were sensitive to group differences in compensation-seeking status in MTBI patients. PMID:22136511

  10. The Brief Reasons for Living Inventory for Adolescents (BRFL-A).

    PubMed

    Osman, A; Kopper, B A; Barrios, F X; Osman, J R; Besett, T; Linehan, M M

    1996-08-01

    This study modified and evaluated the psychometric properties of the Reasons for Living Inventory (RFL) in samples of adolescents. Internal consistency reliability, corrected item-total scale correlation, and exploratory factor analysis procedures were used with a mixed sample of 260 adolescents to identify 14 items for the brief version of the RFL (BRFL-A). Confirmatory factor analyses provided support for the five-factor oblique structure of the BRFL-A in a psychiatric inpatient sample with a range of suicidal behaviors. Reliabilities of the BRFL-A subscales were satisfactory. Four of the five subscales differentiated between suicidal and nonsuicidal adolescents. Significant correlations were found between three BRFL-A subscales and several suicide indices. Convergent-discriminant validity was examined by correlating the BRFL-A subscales with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescents (MMPI-A) Content Scales. Limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:8886940

  11. Interactive inventory monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Udoh, Usen E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for monitoring present location and/or present status of a target inventory item, where the inventory items are located on one or more inventory shelves or other inventory receptacles that communicate with an inventory base station through use of responders such as RFIDs. A user operates a hand held interrogation and display (IAD) module that communicates with, or is part of, the base station, to provide an initial inquiry. Information on location(s) of the target inventory item is also indicated visibly and/or audibly on the receptacle(s) for the user. Status information includes an assessment of operation readiness and a time, if known, that the specified inventory item or class was last removed or examined or modified. Presentation of a user access level may be required for access to the target inventory item. Another embodiment provides inventory information for a stack as a sight-impaired or hearing-impaired person passes adjacent to that stack.

  12. Personality features in ultra-high risk for psychosis: a comparative study with schizophrenia and control subjects using the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised (TCI-R).

    PubMed

    Fresán, Ana; León-Ortiz, Pablo; Robles-García, Rebeca; Azcárraga, Mariana; Guizar, Diana; Reyes-Madrigal, Francisco; Tovilla-Zárate, Carlos Alfonso; de la Fuente-Sandoval, Camilo

    2015-02-01

    Several variables have been identified as risk factors for conversion to overt psychosis in ultra-high risk for psychosis (UHR) individuals. Although almost two-thirds of them do not experience a transition to psychosis, they still exhibit functional disabilities. Other subjective developmental features may be useful for a more precise identification of individuals at UHR. Avoidant behaviors are consistently reported in schizophrenia and in UHR individuals and may be the reflection of a pattern of personality. Thus, personality features in UHR individuals deserves further research. The objective of the present study was to compare temperament and character dimensions between UHR individuals, patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. One hundred participants (25 UHR individuals, 25 schizophrenia patients and 50 control subjects) where evaluated with the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised (TCI-R). Univariate ANOVAs followed by Bonferroni tests were used. UHR individuals and schizophrenia patients exhibited higher levels of Harm Avoidance (HA) when compared to control subjects. For HA1 Anticipatory worry vs Uninhibited optimism and HA4 Fatigability & asthenia, UHR and schizophrenia groups showed similar scores and both groups were higher compared to control subjects. With respect to Cooperativeness (CO), UHR and schizophrenia reported lower scores than control subjects, in particular CO2 Empathy vs Social disinterest and CO3 Helpfulness vs unhelpfulness. This study replicates and extends the consideration of HA as a psychopathological related endophenotype and gives us further information of the possible role of personality features in the expression of some of the social dysfunctions observed both in prodromal subjects and schizophrenia patients. PMID:25554622

  13. Combining high-resolution gross domestic product data with home and personal care product market research data to generate a subnational emission inventory for Asia.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Juliet Elizabeth Natasha; Vamshi, Raghu; Holmes, Christopher; Rowson, Matthew; Miah, Taqmina; Price, Oliver Richard

    2014-04-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is reliant on good estimates of product usage information and robust exposure models. Over the past 20 to 30 years, much progress has been made with the development of exposure models that simulate the transport and distribution of chemicals in the environment. However, little progress has been made in our ability to estimate chemical emissions of home and personal care (HPC) products. In this project, we have developed an approach to estimate subnational emission inventory of chemical ingredients used in HPC products for 12 Asian countries including Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam (Asia-12). To develop this inventory, we have coupled a 1 km grid of per capita gross domestic product (GDP) estimates with market research data of HPC product sales. We explore the necessity of accounting for a population's ability to purchase HPC products in determining their subnational distribution in regions where wealth is not uniform. The implications of using high resolution data on inter- and intracountry subnational emission estimates for a range of hypothetical and actual HPC product types were explored. It was demonstrated that for low value products (<500 US$ per capita/annum required to purchase product) the maximum deviation from baseline (emission distributed via population) is less than a factor of 3 and it would not result in significant differences in chemical risk assessments. However, for other product types (>500 US$ per capita/annum required to purchase product) the implications on emissions being assigned to subnational regions can vary by several orders of magnitude. The implications of this on conducting national or regional level risk assessments may be significant. Further work is needed to explore the implications of this variability in HPC emissions to enable the HPC industry and/or governments to advance risk-based chemical

  14. Identifying personality subtypes based on the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners: implications for psychopathy and criminal offending.

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Tavernier, Geert; Roose, Annelore; Bijttebier, Patricia; Smith, Sarah Francis; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to identify personality subtypes on the basis of the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners. Participants included 110 Flemish male prisoners assessed by means of the Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness Five Factor Inventory and different symptom, personality, and coping measures. We found two clusters: an emotionally stable/resilient cluster and an aggressive/undercontrolled cluster. Prisoners within the aggressive/undercontrolled cluster scored significantly higher on almost all Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 basic scales, (in)direct aggression measures, and depressive coping scales compared with resilients. They also scored higher on drug abuse and committed more sexual offenses than resilient prisoners. These two personality subtypes bear theoretically and practically important implications for psychopathy subtypes and different pathways to criminal offenses. PMID:23123385

  15. Personalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca Martin

    1996-01-01

    Describes how a typical high school in Huntington Beach, California, curbed disruptive student behavior by personalizing the school experience for "problem" students. Through mostly volunteer efforts, an adopt-a-kid program was initiated that matched kids' learning styles to adults' personality styles and resulted in fewer suspensions and numerous…

  16. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Sætre, C; Johansen, G A; Tjugum, S A

    2012-07-01

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (Corneliussen et al., 2005). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100 ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. PMID:22341954

  17. Multi-method Assessment of Psychopathy in Relation to Factors of Internalizing and Externalizing from the Personality Assessment Inventory: The Impact of Method Variance and Suppressor Effects

    PubMed Central

    Blonigen, Daniel M.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Douglas, Kevin S.; Poythress, Norman G.; Skeem, Jennifer L.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Edens, John F.; Krueger, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Research to date has revealed divergent relations across factors of psychopathy measures with criteria of internalizing (INT; anxiety, depression) and externalizing (EXT; antisocial behavior, substance use). However, failure to account for method variance and suppressor effects has obscured the consistency of these findings across distinct measures of psychopathy. Using a large correctional sample, the current study employed a multi-method approach to psychopathy assessment (self-report, interview/file review) to explore convergent and discriminant relations between factors of psychopathy measures and latent criteria of INT and EXT derived from the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; L. Morey, 2007). Consistent with prediction, scores on the affective-interpersonal factor of psychopathy were negatively associated with INT and negligibly related to EXT, whereas scores on the social deviance factor exhibited positive associations (moderate and large, respectively) with both INT and EXT. Notably, associations were highly comparable across the psychopathy measures when accounting for method variance (in the case of EXT) and when assessing for suppressor effects (in the case of INT). Findings are discussed in terms of implications for clinical assessment and evaluation of the validity of interpretations drawn from scores on psychopathy measures. PMID:20230156

  18. Reliability and Construct Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised in a Swedish Non-Criminal Sample - A Multimethod Approach including Psychophysiological Correlates of Empathy for Pain.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Karolina; Nilsonne, Gustav; Howner, Katarina; Tamm, Sandra; Caman, Shilan; Wang, Hui-Xin; Ingvar, Martin; Edens, John F; Gustavsson, Petter; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Petrovic, Predrag; Fischer, Håkan; Kristiansson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Cross-cultural investigation of psychopathy measures is important for clarifying the nomological network surrounding the psychopathy construct. The Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R) is one of the most extensively researched self-report measures of psychopathic traits in adults. To date however, it has been examined primarily in North American criminal or student samples. To address this gap in the literature, we examined PPI-R's reliability, construct validity and factor structure in non-criminal individuals (N = 227) in Sweden, using a multimethod approach including psychophysiological correlates of empathy for pain. PPI-R construct validity was investigated in subgroups of participants by exploring its degree of overlap with (i) the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), (ii) self-rated empathy and behavioral and physiological responses in an experiment on empathy for pain, and (iii) additional self-report measures of alexithymia and trait anxiety. The PPI-R total score was significantly associated with PCL:SV total and factor scores. The PPI-R Coldheartedness scale demonstrated significant negative associations with all empathy subscales and with rated unpleasantness and skin conductance responses in the empathy experiment. The PPI-R higher order Self-Centered Impulsivity and Fearless Dominance dimensions were associated with trait anxiety in opposite directions (positively and negatively, respectively). Overall, the results demonstrated solid reliability (test-retest and internal consistency) and promising but somewhat mixed construct validity for the Swedish translation of the PPI-R. PMID:27300292

  19. A test of the International Personality Item Pool representation of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory and development of a 120-item IPIP-based measure of the five-factor model.

    PubMed

    Maples, Jessica L; Guan, Li; Carter, Nathan T; Miller, Joshua D

    2014-12-01

    There has been a substantial increase in the use of personality assessment measures constructed using items from the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) such as the 300-item IPIP-NEO (Goldberg, 1999), a representation of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992). The IPIP-NEO is free to use and can be modified to accommodate its users' needs. Despite the substantial interest in this measure, there is still a dearth of data demonstrating its convergence with the NEO PI-R. The present study represents an investigation of the reliability and validity of scores on the IPIP-NEO. Additionally, we used item response theory (IRT) methodology to create a 120-item version of the IPIP-NEO. Using an undergraduate sample (n = 359), we examined the reliability, as well as the convergent and criterion validity, of scores from the 300-item IPIP-NEO, a previously constructed 120-item version of the IPIP-NEO (Johnson, 2011), and the newly created IRT-based IPIP-120 in comparison to the NEO PI-R across a range of outcomes. Scores from all 3 IPIP measures demonstrated strong reliability and convergence with the NEO PI-R and a high degree of similarity with regard to their correlational profiles across the criterion variables (rICC = .983, .972, and .976, respectively). The replicability of these findings was then tested in a community sample (n = 757), and the results closely mirrored the findings from Sample 1. These results provide support for the use of the IPIP-NEO and both 120-item IPIP-NEO measures as assessment tools for measurement of the five-factor model. PMID:24932643

  20. Personality and psychopathological profiles in individuals exposed to mobbing.

    PubMed

    Girardi, Paolo; Monaco, Edoardo; Prestigiacomo, Claudio; Talamo, Alessandra; Ruberto, Amedeo; Tatarelli, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, mental health and medical professionals have been asked to assess claims of psychological harm arising from harassment at the workplace, or "mobbing." This study assessed the personality and psychopathological profiles of 146 individuals exposed to mobbing using validity, clinical, and content scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2. Profiles and factor analyses were obtained. Two major dimensions emerged among those exposed to mobbing: (a) depressed mood, difficulty in making decisions, change-related anguish, and passive-aggressive traits (b) somatic symptoms, and need for attention and affection. This cross-sectional pilot study provides evidence that personality profiles of mobbing victims and psychological damage resulting from mobbing may be evaluated using standardized assessments, though a longitudinal study is needed to delineate cause-and-effect relationships. PMID:17479554

  1. Inventory Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Known as MRO for Maintenance, Repair and Operating supplies, Tropicana Products, Inc.'s automated inventory management system is an adaptation of the Shuttle Inventory Management System (SIMS) developed by NASA to assure adequate supply of every item used in support of the Space Shuttle. The Tropicana version monitors inventory control, purchasing receiving and departmental costs for eight major areas of the company's operation.

  2. Personality and executive functioning as risk factors in recidivists.

    PubMed

    Valliant, Paul M; Freeston, Andrew; Pottier, Derek; Kosmyna, Robert

    2003-02-01

    The classification of an inmate population at a maximum security jail in Canada was undertaken to study factors correlated with recidivism. A total of 12 recidivists and 12 nonrecidivists were classified according to their index offenses, and a Criminal Record search was completed to verify their statements. A total of 15 non-offenders who had also undergone a criminal record check were included as controls. All participants were administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-168, Violence Risk Scale-Experimental Version, Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the groups on scores for the Hypochondriasis, Psychopathic Deviate, and Hypomania scales of the MMPI-168. Significant differences were noted for the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task and the Violence Risk Scale. Discriminant analysis of the recidivists and nonrecidivists correctly classified at a 91.3% level. PMID:12674297

  3. Interactive Inventory Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garud, Sumedha

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for monitoring present location and/or present status of a target inventory item, where the inventory items are located on one or more inventory shelves or other inventory receptacles that communicate with an inventory base station through use of responders such as RFIDs. A user operates a hand held interrogation and display (lAD) module that communicates with, or is part of the base station to provide an initial inquiry. lnformation on location(s) of the larget invenlory item is also indicated visibly and/or audibly on the receptacle(s) for the user. Status information includes an assessment of operation readiness and a time, if known, that the specified inventory item or class was last removed or examined or modified. Presentation of a user access level may be required for access to the target inventgory item. Another embodiment provides inventory informatin for a stack as a sight-impaired or hearing-impaired person adjacent to that stack.

  4. An Inventory of Job Options for Persons with Upper Extremity Impairments and Less than a College Education. First Edition. Research Report RT-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred, Wayne Gray

    This job inventory documents thirty-seven successfully employed, upper-extremity-impaired individuals in Houston, Texas. The inventory format for each contains three sections. The client profile contains basic identifying information, medical and functional data, and vocational information. The job profile presents basic identifying job…

  5. Relationships of the Big Five Personality Domains and Facets to Dimensions of the Healthy Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Nancy E.; Borgen, Fred H.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to compare a new inventory measuring concepts of the "healthy personality" with the most widely used inventory of the Big Five personality traits, the NEO personality inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R). Using adjectives as the stimulus materials, Borgen and Betz (2008) developed a 17-scale inventory called the Healthy personality…

  6. Methods of inventory control.

    PubMed

    Lindley, C; Mackowiak, J

    1985-01-01

    Various methods for controlling inventory are described, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. The open-to-buy (OTB) budget method limits purchases to a specific amount of funds available for purchasing pharmaceuticals during a specified period. The emphasis of the OTB method is financial control of the pharmacy inventory. Although it is useful in monitoring and adjusting the dollar value of the inventory, it should be combined with other methods for a total inventory control system. The primary emphasis of the short-list method is to provide accurate and timely inventory information to the person responsible for order placement. The short list identifies the items that are in short supply. It is the most common feedback and control mechanism in use, but it is best suited for settings where duplicate or reserve stock is maintained and monitored by more rigorous methods. The main objective of the minimum and maximum method is to determine when and how much to order of each item. It also provides limited dollar control. The major disadvantage of this method is the time it requires to establish the minimum and maximum levels and to update them regularly to reflect changes in demand. The stock record card method is used to record information on the movement of goods in and out of the storage area. Stock cards can also be used to monitor inventory levels and facilitate order initiation. It is probably the optimum method to be used alone. The most effective system of inventory control is one employing a combination of these methods tailored to meet the institution's needs and available resources. PMID:3970028

  7. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-3 - Stores inventories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stores inventories. 109....51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-3 Stores inventories. Perpetual inventory records are to be maintained for stores inventory items....

  8. 41 CFR 128-50.101 - Inventory records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inventory records. 128... Seized Personal Property § 128-50.101 Inventory records. Each bureau shall be responsible for establishing and maintaining inventory records of its seized personal property to ensure that: (a) The date...

  9. Correlations of MMPI factor scales with measures of the five factor model of personality.

    PubMed

    Costa, P T; Busch, C M; Zonderman, A B; McCrae, R R

    1986-01-01

    Two recent item factor analyses of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) classified the resulting factors according to a conceptual scheme offered by Norman's (1963) five factor model. The present article empirically evaluates those classifications by correlating MMPI factor scales with self-report and peer rating measures of the five factor model in a sample of 153 adult men and women. Both sets of predictions were generally supported, although MMPI factors derived in a normal sample showed closer correspondences with the five normal personality dimensions. MMPI factor scales were also correlated with 18 scales measuring specific traits within the broader domains of Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Openness. The nine Costa, Zonderman, McCrae, and Williams (1985) MMPI factor scales appear to give useful global assessments of four of the five factors; other instruments are needed to provide detailed information on more specific aspects of normal personality. The use of the five factor model in routine clinical assessment is discussed. PMID:3820053

  10. The prejudiced personality, racism, and anti-Semitism: the PR scale forty years later.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, E

    1995-10-01

    The relationship of prejudiced personality traits with racism and anti-Semitism was examined with 150 Asian American and White university students. The Prejudice (PR) scale, composed of 32 items from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, was administered along with the McConahay racism scale and the Selznick and Steinberg Anti-Semitism scale. Results indicated that for Whites, the PR scale was significantly correlated with old-fashioned and modern racism and anti-Semitism, replicating Gough's 1951 study (Gough, 1951b) with the PR scale. However, no such relationship was observed for the Asian American group. This suggests that personality traits of prejudicial attitudes may be relatively stable for Whites but may not be related to outgroup bias for other racial or ethnic groups. PMID:8656327