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Sample records for multiple binding modes

  1. The DNA-Binding Domain of Yeast Rap1 Interacts with Double-Stranded DNA in Multiple Binding Modes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae repressor-activator protein 1 (Rap1) is an essential protein involved in multiple steps of DNA regulation, as an activator in transcription, as a repressor at silencer elements, and as a major component of the shelterin-like complex at telomeres. All the known functions of Rap1 require the known high-affinity and specific interaction of the DNA-binding domain with its recognition sequences. In this work, we focus on the interaction of the DNA-binding domain of Rap1 (Rap1DBD) with double-stranded DNA substrates. Unexpectedly, we found that while Rap1DBD forms a high-affinity 1:1 complex with its DNA recognition site, it can also form lower-affinity complexes with higher stoichiometries on DNA. These lower-affinity interactions are independent of the presence of the recognition sequence, and we propose they originate from the ability of Rap1DBD to bind to DNA in two different binding modes. In one high-affinity binding mode, Rap1DBD likely binds in the conformation observed in the available crystal structures. In the other alternative lower-affinity binding mode, we propose that a single Myb-like domain of the Rap1DBD makes interactions with DNA, allowing for more than one protein molecule to bind to the DNA substrates. Our findings suggest that the Rap1DBD does not simply target the protein to its recognition sequence but rather it might be a possible point of regulation. PMID:25382181

  2. Three-Dimensional Structures Reveal Multiple ADP/ATP Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    C Simmons; C Magee; D Smith; L Lauman; J Chaput; J Allen

    2011-12-31

    The creation of synthetic enzymes with predefined functions represents a major challenge in future synthetic biology applications. Here, we describe six structures of de novo proteins that have been determined using protein crystallography to address how simple enzymes perform catalysis. Three structures are of a protein, DX, selected for its stability and ability to tightly bind ATP. Despite the addition of ATP to the crystallization conditions, the presence of a bound but distorted ATP was found only under excess ATP conditions, with ADP being present under equimolar conditions or when crystallized for a prolonged period of time. A bound ADP cofactor was evident when Asp was substituted for Val at residue 65, but ATP in a linear configuration is present when Phe was substituted for Tyr at residue 43. These new structures complement previously determined structures of DX and the protein with the Phe 43 to Tyr substitution [Simmons, C. R., et al. (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 4, 649-658] and together demonstrate the multiple ADP/ATP binding modes from which a model emerges in which the DX protein binds ATP in a configuration that represents a transitional state for the catalysis of ATP to ADP through a slow, metal-free reaction capable of multiple turnovers. This unusual observation suggests that design-free methods can be used to generate novel protein scaffolds that are tailor-made for catalysis.

  3. Multiple CaMKII Binding Modes to the Actin Cytoskeleton Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid; Conte, Ianina; Carter, Tom; Bayer, K Ulrich; Molloy, Justin E

    2016-07-26

    Localization of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) to dendritic spine synapses is determined in part by the actin cytoskeleton. We determined binding of GFP-tagged CaMKII to tag-RFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton within live cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking. Stepwise photobleaching showed that CaMKII formed oligomeric complexes. Photoactivation experiments demonstrated that diffusion out of the evanescent field determined the track lifetimes. Latrunculin treatment triggered a coupled loss of actin stress fibers and the colocalized, long-lived CaMKII tracks. The CaMKIIα (α) isoform, which was previously thought to lack F-actin interactions, also showed binding, but this was threefold weaker than that observed for CaMKIIβ (β). The βE' splice variant bound more weakly than α, showing that binding by β depends critically on the interdomain linker. The mutations βT287D and αT286D, which mimic autophosphorylation states, also abolished F-actin binding. Autophosphorylation triggers autonomous CaMKII activity, but does not impair GluN2B binding, another important synaptic protein interaction of CaMKII. The CaMKII inhibitor tatCN21 or CaMKII mutations that inhibit GluN2B association by blocking binding of ATP (βK43R and αK42M) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin (βA303R) had no effect on the interaction with F-actin. These results provide the first rationale for the reduced synaptic spine localization of the αT286D mutant, indicating that transient F-actin binding contributes to the synaptic localization of the CaMKIIα isoform. The track lifetime distributions had a stretched exponential form consistent with a heterogeneously diffusing population. This heterogeneity suggests that CaMKII adopts different F-actin binding modes, which is most easily rationalized by multiple subunit contacts between the CaMKII dodecamer and the F-actin cytoskeleton that stabilize the initial weak (micromolar

  4. Unraveling multiple binding modes of acridine orange to DNA using a multispectroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Mhejabeen; Krishnamurthy, Bhavana; Pal, Haridas

    2016-09-21

    The interaction of acridine orange (AOH(+)) with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) under different dye-DNA conditions has been investigated in detail using multispectroscopic techniques, unraveling a number of hitherto unexplored intricacies of dye-DNA binding. The observed results intriguingly show contrasting binding features when low (2.4 μM) and significantly high (23 μM) dye concentrations are used. It is conclusively inferred from absorption, steady-state fluorescence, circular dichroism, fluorescence decay and anisotropy decay studies that at low [DNA] to [dye] ratio, especially with higher dye concentration, dimeric AOH(+) predominantly binds externally to DNA surfaces through electrostatic interactions. At sufficiently high [DNA] to [dye] ratios, however, the interaction intriguingly changes to monomeric AOH(+) bound to DNA, predominantly in the intercalative mode between DNA base pairs, with partly an electrostatic binding on DNA surfaces. With very low initial dye concentration, monomeric (AOH(+)) mostly binds to DNA through intercalative and electrostatic modes for most DNA to dye ratios. The present study demonstrates a systematic correlation of the striking changes in the photophysical properties of the dye upon multimode binding with DNA. The observed results are of great significance in understanding the fundamental insights of dye/drug binding to DNA hosts, of use in the design of effective therapeutic agents. PMID:27545984

  5. The Facilitation of Protein-DNA Search and Recognition by Multiple Modes of Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Jason Suh

    The studies discussed in this thesis unify experimental and theoretical techniques, both established and novel, in investigating the problem of how a protein that binds specific sites on DNA translocates to, recognizes, and stably binds to its target site or sites. The thesis is organized into two parts. Part I outlines the history of the problem and the theory and experiments that have addressed the problem and presents an apparent incompatibility between efficient search and stable, specific binding. To address this problem, we elaborate a model of protein-DNA interaction in which the protein may bind DNA in either a search (S) mode or a recognition (R) mode. The former is characterized by zero or weak sequence-dependence in the binding energy, while the latter is highly sequence-dependent. The protein undergoes a random walk along the DNA in the S mode, and if it encounters its target site, must undergo a conformational transition into the R mode. The model resolves the apparent paradox, and accounts for the observed speed, specificity, and stability in protein-DNA interactions. The model shows internal agreement as regards theoretical and simulated results, as well as external agreement with experimental measurements. Part II reports on research that has tested the applicability of the two-mode model to the tumor suppressor transcription factor p53. It describes in greater depth the experimental techinques and findings up to the present work, and introduces the techinques and biological system used in our research. We employ single-molecule optical microscopy in two projects to study the diffusional kinetics of p53 on DNA. The first project measures the diffusion coefficient of p53 and determines that the protein satisfies a number of requirements for the validity of the two-mode model and for efficient target localization. The second project examines the sequence-dependence in p53's sliding kinetics, and explicitly models the energy landscape it experiences on

  6. Characterization of Fluorescence of ANS–Tear Lipocalin Complex: Evidence for Multiple-Binding Modes

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2010-01-01

    ANS is widely used as a probe for locating binding sites of proteins and studying structural changes under various external conditions. However, the nature of ANS-binding sites in proteins and the accompanying changes in fluorescence properties are controversial. We examined the steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence of the ANS–protein complexes for tear lipocalin (TL) and its mutants in order to discern the origin of lifetime components via analysis that included the multiexponential decay and the model-free maximum entropy methods. Fluorescence lifetimes of ANS–TL complexes can be grouped into two species, 14.01–17.42 ns and 2.72–4.37 ns. The log-normal analyses of fluorescence spectral shapes reveal the heterogeneous nature of both long- and short-lifetime species. The constructed time-resolved emission, amplitude (TRES) and area normalized (TRANES), and decay-associated spectra are consistent with a model that includes heterogeneous modes of ANS binding with two separate lifetime components. The two lifetime components are not derived from solvent relaxation, but rather may represent different binding modes. PMID:18028215

  7. Characterization of fluorescence of ANS-tear lipocalin complex: evidence for multiple-binding modes.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2007-01-01

    ANS is widely used as a probe for locating binding sites of proteins and studying structural changes under various external conditions. However, the nature of ANS-binding sites in proteins and the accompanying changes in fluorescence properties are controversial. We examined the steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence of the ANS-protein complexes for tear lipocalin (TL) and its mutants in order to discern the origin of lifetime components via analysis that included the multiexponential decay and the model-free maximum entropy methods. Fluorescence lifetimes of ANS-TL complexes can be grouped into two species, 14.01-17.42 ns and 2.72-4.37 ns. The log-normal analyses of fluorescence spectral shapes reveal the heterogeneous nature of both long- and short-lifetime species. The constructed time-resolved emission, amplitude (TRES) and area normalized (TRANES), and decay-associated spectra are consistent with a model that includes heterogeneous modes of ANS binding with two separate lifetime components. The two lifetime components are not derived from solvent relaxation, but rather may represent different binding modes. PMID:18028215

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Insight into the Multiple Glycosaminoglycan Binding Modes of the Link Module from Human TSG-6.

    PubMed

    Park, Younghee; Jowitt, Thomas A; Day, Anthony J; Prestegard, James H

    2016-01-19

    Tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is a hyaluronan (HA)-binding protein that is essential for stabilizing and remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) during ovulation and inflammatory disease processes such as arthritis. The Link module, one of the domains of TSG-6, is responsible for binding hyaluronan and other glycosaminoglycans found in the ECM. In this study, we used a well-defined chondroitin sulfate (CS) hexasaccharide (ΔC444S) to determine the structure of the Link module, in solution, in its chondroitin sulfate-bound state. A variety of nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were employed, including chemical shift perturbation, residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), nuclear Overhauser effects, spin relaxation measurements, and paramagnetic relaxation enhancements from a spin-labeled analogue of ΔC444S. The binding site for ΔC444S on the Link module overlapped with that of HA. Surprisingly, ΔC444S binding induced dimerization of the Link module (as confirmed by analytical ultracentrifugation), and a second weak binding site that partially overlapped with a previously identified heparin site was detected. A dimer model was generated using chemical shift perturbations and RDCs as restraints in the docking program HADDOCK. We postulate that the molecular cross-linking enhanced by the multiple binding modes of the Link module might be critical for remodeling the ECM during inflammation/ovulation and might contribute to other functions of TSG-6. PMID:26685054

  9. Cross-class metallo-β-lactamase inhibition by bisthiazolidines reveals multiple binding modes.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Philip; González, Mariano M; Mojica, Maria F; González, Javier M; Castillo, Valerie; Saiz, Cecilia; Kosmopoulou, Magda; Tooke, Catherine L; Llarrull, Leticia I; Mahler, Graciela; Bonomo, Robert A; Vila, Alejandro J; Spencer, James

    2016-06-28

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) hydrolyze almost all β-lactam antibiotics and are unaffected by clinically available β-lactamase inhibitors (βLIs). Active-site architecture divides MBLs into three classes (B1, B2, and B3), complicating development of βLIs effective against all enzymes. Bisthiazolidines (BTZs) are carboxylate-containing, bicyclic compounds, considered as penicillin analogs with an additional free thiol. Here, we show both l- and d-BTZ enantiomers are micromolar competitive βLIs of all MBL classes in vitro, with Kis of 6-15 µM or 36-84 µM for subclass B1 MBLs (IMP-1 and BcII, respectively), and 10-12 µM for the B3 enzyme L1. Against the B2 MBL Sfh-I, the l-BTZ enantiomers exhibit 100-fold lower Kis (0.26-0.36 µM) than d-BTZs (26-29 µM). Importantly, cell-based time-kill assays show BTZs restore β-lactam susceptibility of Escherichia coli-producing MBLs (IMP-1, Sfh-1, BcII, and GOB-18) and, significantly, an extensively drug-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolate expressing L1. BTZs therefore inhibit the full range of MBLs and potentiate β-lactam activity against producer pathogens. X-ray crystal structures reveal insights into diverse BTZ binding modes, varying with orientation of the carboxylate and thiol moieties. BTZs bind the di-zinc centers of B1 (IMP-1; BcII) and B3 (L1) MBLs via the free thiol, but orient differently depending upon stereochemistry. In contrast, the l-BTZ carboxylate dominates interactions with the monozinc B2 MBL Sfh-I, with the thiol uninvolved. d-BTZ complexes most closely resemble β-lactam binding to B1 MBLs, but feature an unprecedented disruption of the D120-zinc interaction. Cross-class MBL inhibition therefore arises from the unexpected versatility of BTZ binding. PMID:27303030

  10. Multiple Binding Modes between HNF4[alpha] and the LXXLL Motifs of PGC-1[alpha] Lead to Full Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Geun Bae; Wu, Guangteng; Shoelson, Steven E.; Chi, Young-In

    2010-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a novel nuclear receptor that participates in a hierarchical network of transcription factors regulating the development and physiology of such vital organs as the liver, pancreas, and kidney. Among the various transcriptional coregulators with which HNF4{alpha} interacts, peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) represents a novel coactivator whose activation is unusually robust and whose binding mode appears to be distinct from that of canonical coactivators such as NCoA/SRC/p160 family members. To elucidate the potentially unique molecular mechanism of PGC-1{alpha} recruitment, we have determined the crystal structure of HNF4{alpha} in complex with a fragment of PGC-1{alpha} containing all three of its LXXLL motifs. Despite the presence of all three LXXLL motifs available for interactions, only one is bound at the canonical binding site, with no additional contacts observed between the two proteins. However, a close inspection of the electron density map indicates that the bound LXXLL motif is not a selected one but an averaged structure of more than one LXXLL motif. Further biochemical and functional studies show that the individual LXXLL motifs can bind but drive only minimal transactivation. Only when more than one LXXLL motif is involved can significant transcriptional activity be measured, and full activation requires all three LXXLL motifs. These findings led us to propose a model wherein each LXXLL motif has an additive effect, and the multiple binding modes by HNF4{alpha} toward the LXXLL motifs of PGC-1{alpha} could account for the apparent robust activation by providing a flexible mechanism for combinatorial recruitment of additional coactivators and mediators.

  11. Multiple binding modes for palmitate to barley lipid transfer protein facilitated by the presence of proline 12

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lorna J; Gunsteren, Wilfred F Van; Allison, Jane R

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to characterise the binding of the fatty acid ligand palmitate in the barley lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP) internal cavity. Two different palmitate binding modes (1 and 2), with similar protein–ligand interaction energies, have been identified using a variety of simulation strategies. These strategies include applying experimental protein–ligand atom–atom distance restraints during the simulation, or protonating the palmitate ligand, or using the vacuum GROMOS 54B7 force-field parameter set for the ligand during the initial stages of the simulations. In both the binding modes identified the palmitate carboxylate head group hydrogen bonds with main chain amide groups in helix A, residues 4 to 19, of the protein. In binding mode 1 the hydrogen bonds are to Lys 11, Cys 13, and Leu 14 and in binding mode 2 to Thr 15, Tyr 16, Val 17, Ser 24 and also to the OH of Thr 15. In both cases palmitate binding exploits irregularity of the intrahelical hydrogen-bonding pattern in helix A of barley LTP due to the presence of Pro 12. Simulations of two variants of barley LTP, namely the single mutant Pro12Val and the double mutant Pro12Val Pro70Val, show that Pro 12 is required for persistent palmitate binding in the LTP cavity. Overall, the work identifies key MD simulation approaches for characterizing the details of protein–ligand interactions in complexes where NMR data provide insufficient restraints. PMID:23139016

  12. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  13. Surface plasmon resonance imaging reveals multiple binding modes of Agrobacterium transformation mediator VirE2 to ssDNA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanghyun; Zbaida, David; Elbaum, Michael; Leh, Hervé; Nogues, Claude; Buckle, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    VirE2 is the major secreted protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in its genetic transformation of plant hosts. It is co-expressed with a small acidic chaperone VirE1, which prevents VirE2 oligomerization. After secretion into the host cell, VirE2 serves functions similar to a viral capsid in protecting the single-stranded transferred DNA en route to the nucleus. Binding of VirE2 to ssDNA is strongly cooperative and depends moreover on protein–protein interactions. In order to isolate the protein–DNA interactions, imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPRi) studies were conducted using surface-immobilized DNA substrates of length comparable to the protein-binding footprint. Binding curves revealed an important influence of substrate rigidity with a notable preference for poly-T sequences and absence of binding to both poly-A and double-stranded DNA fragments. Dissociation at high salt concentration confirmed the electrostatic nature of the interaction. VirE1–VirE2 heterodimers also bound to ssDNA, though by a different mechanism that was insensitive to high salt. Neither VirE2 nor VirE1–VirE2 followed the Langmuir isotherm expected for reversible monomeric binding. The differences reflect the cooperative self-interactions of VirE2 that are suppressed by VirE1. PMID:26044711

  14. Evolution of Protein Binding Modes in Homooligomers

    PubMed Central

    Dayhoff, Judith E.; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Bryant, Stephen H.; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of protein interactions cannot be deciphered without a detailed analysis of interaction interfaces and binding modes. We performed a large-scale study of protein homooligomers in terms of their symmetry, interface sizes, and conservation of binding modes. We also focused specifically on the evolution of protein binding modes from nine families of homooligomers and mapped 60 different binding modes and oligomerization states onto the phylogenetic trees of these families. We observed a significant tendency for the same binding modes to be clustered together and conserved within clades on phylogenetic trees; this trend is especially pronounced for close homologs with 70% sequence identity or higher. Some binding modes are conserved among very distant homologs, pointing to their ancient evolutionary origin, while others are very specific for a certain phylogenetic group. Moreover, we found that the most ancient binding modes have a tendency to involve symmetrical (isologous) homodimer binding arrangements with larger interfaces, while recently evolved binding modes more often exhibit asymmetrical arrangements and smaller interfaces. PMID:19879880

  15. The Transcription Factor AmrZ Utilizes Multiple DNA Binding Modes to Recognize Activator and Repressor Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Edward E.; Waligora, Elizabeth A.; Xu, Binjie; Dellos-Nolan, Sheri; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Hollis, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    AmrZ, a member of the Ribbon-Helix-Helix family of DNA binding proteins, functions as both a transcriptional activator and repressor of multiple genes encoding Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors. The expression of these virulence factors leads to chronic and sustained infections associated with worsening prognosis. In this study, we present the X-ray crystal structure of AmrZ in complex with DNA containing the repressor site, amrZ1. Binding of AmrZ to this site leads to auto-repression. AmrZ binds this DNA sequence as a dimer-of-dimers, and makes specific base contacts to two half sites, separated by a five base pair linker region. Analysis of the linker region shows a narrowing of the minor groove, causing significant distortions. AmrZ binding assays utilizing sequences containing variations in this linker region reveals that secondary structure of the DNA, conferred by the sequence of this region, is an important determinant in binding affinity. The results from these experiments allow for the creation of a model where both intrinsic structure of the DNA and specific nucleotide recognition are absolutely necessary for binding of the protein. We also examined AmrZ binding to the algD promoter, which results in activation of the alginate exopolysaccharide biosynthetic operon, and found the protein utilizes different interactions with this site. Finally, we tested the in vivo effects of this differential binding by switching the AmrZ binding site at algD, where it acts as an activator, for a repressor binding sequence and show that differences in binding alone do not affect transcriptional regulation. PMID:22511872

  16. Multiple binding modes of a small molecule to human Keap1 revealed by X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Mikiya; Saburi, Hajime; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Naitow, Hisashi; Shimozono, Rieko; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Inoue, Hideki; Nakamura, Noriko; Yoshizawa, Yoshitaka; Aoki, Takumi; Tanimura, Ryuji; Kunishima, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Keap1 protein acts as a cellular sensor for oxidative stresses and regulates the transcription level of antioxidant genes through the ubiquitination of a corresponding transcription factor, Nrf2. A small molecule capable of binding to the Nrf2 interaction site of Keap1 could be a useful medicine. Here, we report two crystal structures, referred to as the soaking and the cocrystallization forms, of the Kelch domain of Keap1 with a small molecule, Ligand1. In these two forms, the Ligand1 molecule occupied the binding site of Keap1 so as to mimic the ETGE motif of Nrf2, although the mode of binding differed in the two forms. Because the Ligand1 molecule mediated the crystal packing in both the forms, the influence of crystal packing on the ligand binding was examined using a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in aqueous conditions. In the MD structures from the soaking form, the ligand remained bound to Keap1 for over 20 ns, whereas the ligand tended to dissociate in the cocrystallization form. The MD structures could be classified into a few clusters that were related to but distinct from the crystal structures, indicating that the binding modes observed in crystals might be atypical of those in solution. However, the dominant ligand recognition residues in the crystal structures were commonly used in the MD structures to anchor the ligand. Therefore, the present structural information together with the MD simulation will be a useful basis for pharmaceutical drug development. PMID:26199865

  17. Cooperative binding: a multiple personality.

    PubMed

    Martini, Johannes W R; Diambra, Luis; Habeck, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Cooperative binding has been described in many publications and has been related to or defined by several different properties of the binding behavior of the ligand to the target molecule. In addition to the commonly used Hill coefficient, other characteristics such as a sigmoidal shape of the overall titration curve in a linear plot, a change of ligand affinity of the other binding sites when a site of the target molecule becomes occupied, or complex roots of the binding polynomial have been used to define or to quantify cooperative binding. In this work, we analyze how the different properties are related in the most general model for binding curves based on the grand canonical partition function and present several examples which highlight differences between the cooperativity characterizing properties which are discussed. Our results mainly show that among the presented definitions there are not two which fully coincide. Moreover, this work poses the question whether it can make sense to distinguish between positive and negative cooperativity based on the macroscopic binding isotherm only. This article shall emphasize that scientists who investigate cooperative effects in biological systems could help avoiding misunderstandings by stating clearly which kind of cooperativity they discuss. PMID:26319983

  18. A Combined Crystallographic and Theoretical Study Explains the Capability of Carboxylic Acids to Adopt Multiple Binding Modes in the Active Site of Carbonic Anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Langella, Emma; D'Ambrosio, Katia; D'Ascenzio, Melissa; Carradori, Simone; Monti, Simona M; Supuran, Claudiu T; De Simone, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Carboxylates are the least investigated class of inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Here we explain the versatility of binding of these molecules to CAs by examining a new adduct of hCA II with N-carboxymethyl-saccharin. PMID:26507456

  19. Multiple mode of binding of phencyclidines: high affinity association between phencyclidine receptors in rat brain and a monovalent ion-sensitive polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Haring, R.; Kloog, Y.; Harshak-Felixbrodt, N.A.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-01-30

    Two populations of phencyclidine (PCP) binding sites are shown to exist in the rat brain: a high-affinity monovalent ion-sensitive site (Kd of 10-14 nM for (/sup 3/H)TCP, (/sup 3/H)N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine), which exists in both the frontal cortex and the hippocampus, and a lower affinity site (Kd of 80-130 nM for (/sup 3/H)TCP) which is found in the hippocampus but not in the frontal cortex. The nature of the interactions between the ion-binding sites and the high affinity PCP receptors depend on both ligand structure (PCP or TCP) and the ion involved (K or Na). The high-affinity sites are associated with an Mr 90,000 polypeptide whose labeling by (/sup 3/H)azido phencyclidine is selectively inhibited by monovalent ions.

  20. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  1. ResDE-Dependent Regulation of Enterotoxin Gene Expression in Bacillus cereus: Evidence for Multiple Modes of Binding for ResD and Interaction with Fnr▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Esbelin, Julia; Armengaud, Jean; Zigha, Assia; Duport, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    In the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus F4430/73, the production of major virulence factors hemolysin BL (Hbl) and nonhemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) is regulated through complex mechanisms. The two-component regulatory system ResDE is involved in the activation of hbl and nhe transcription. Here, the response regulator ResD and the sensor kinase ResE were overexpressed and purified, and autophosphorylation of ResE and transphosphorylation of ResD by ResE were demonstrated in vitro. ResD is mainly monomeric in solution, regardless of its phosphorylation state. ResD was shown to interact directly with promoter regions (p) of the enterotoxin regulator genes resDE, fnr, and plcR and the enterotoxin structural genes nhe and hbl, but with different affinities. Binding of ResD to pplcR, pnhe, and phbl was not dependent on the ResD phosphorylation status. In contrast, ResD phosphorylation significantly increased interactions between ResD and presDE and pfnr. Taken together, these results showed that phosphorylation of ResD results in a different target expression pattern. Furthermore, ResD and the redox activator Fnr were found to physically interact and simultaneously bind their target DNAs. We propose that unphosphorylated ResD acts as an antiactivator of Fnr, while phosphorylated ResD acts as a coactivator of Fnr. Finally, our findings represent the first molecular evidence of the role of ResDE as a sentinel system capable of sensing redox changes and coordinating a response that modulates B. cereus virulence. PMID:19395489

  2. Analysis of Nidogen-1/Laminin γ1 Interaction by Cross-Linking, Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Modeling Reveals Multiple Binding Modes

    PubMed Central

    Lössl, Philip; Kölbel, Knut; Tänzler, Dirk; Nannemann, David; Ihling, Christian H.; Keller, Manuel V.; Schneider, Marian; Zaucke, Frank; Meiler, Jens; Sinz, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We describe the detailed structural investigation of nidogen-1/laminin γ1 complexes using full-length nidogen-1 and a number of laminin γ1 variants. The interactions of nidogen-1 with laminin variants γ1 LEb2–4, γ1 LEb2–4 N836D, γ1 short arm, and γ1 short arm N836D were investigated by applying a combination of (photo-)chemical cross-linking, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and computational modeling. In addition, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA studies were used to determine kinetic constants of the nidogen-1/laminin γ1 interaction. Two complementary cross-linking strategies were pursued to analyze solution structures of laminin γ1 variants and nidogen-1. The majority of distance information was obtained with the homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linker bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)glutarate. In a second approach, UV-induced cross-linking was performed after incorporation of the diazirine-containing unnatural amino acids photo-leucine and photo-methionine into laminin γ1 LEb2–4, laminin γ1 short arm, and nidogen-1. Our results indicate that Asn-836 within laminin γ1 LEb3 domain is not essential for complex formation. Cross-links between laminin γ1 short arm and nidogen-1 were found in all protein regions, evidencing several additional contact regions apart from the known interaction site. Computational modeling based on the cross-linking constraints indicates the existence of a conformational ensemble of both the individual proteins and the nidogen-1/laminin γ1 complex. This finding implies different modes of interaction resulting in several distinct protein-protein interfaces. PMID:25387007

  3. A thermodynamic signature for drug-DNA binding mode.

    PubMed

    Chaires, Jonathan B

    2006-09-01

    A number of small molecules bind directly and selectively to DNA, acting as chemotherapeutic agents by inhibiting replication, transcription or topoisomerase activity. Two common binding modes for these small molecules are intercalation or groove-binding. Intercalation results from insertion of a planar aromatic substituent between DNA base pairs, with concomitant unwinding and lengthening of the DNA helix. Groove binding, in contrast, does not perturb the duplex structure to any great extent. Groove-binders are typically crescent-shaped, and fit snugly into the minor groove with little distortion of the DNA structure. Recent calorimetric studies have determined the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the DNA binding of representative DNA binding compounds. Analysis of such thermodynamic data culled from the literature reveals distinctive thermodynamic signatures for groove-binding and intercalating compounds. Plots of the binding enthalpy (DeltaH) against binding entropy (-TDeltaS) for 26 drug-DNA interactions reveal that groove-binding interactions are clustered in a region of the graph with favorable entropy contributions to the free energy, while intercalators are clustered in a region with unfavorable entropy but favorable enthalpy contributions. Groove-binding is predominantly entropically driven, while intercalation in enthalpically driven. The molecular basis of the contrasting thermodynamic signatures for the two binding modes is by no means clear, but the pattern should be of use in categorizing new DNA binding agents. PMID:16730635

  4. Binding modes of thrombin binding aptamers investigated by simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapaidze, A.; Bancaud, A.; Brut, M.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin binding aptamers HD1 and HD22 are the most studied aptamers, both for therapeutic and sensing purposes. Yet, there is still no commercialized aptamer-based sensor device for thrombin detection, suggesting that the binding modes of these aptamers remain to be precisely described. Here, we investigate thrombin-aptamer interactions with molecular dynamics simulations, and show that the different solved structures of HD1-thrombin complex are energetically similar and consequently possibly co-existing. Conversely, HD22 folding is much more stable, and its binding energy with thrombin is significantly larger than that of HD1 complexes. These results are confronted to experiments, which consist in monitoring aggregation of aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticles triggered by thrombin. HD1 alone, but not HD22, can trigger aggregation, meaning that this aptamer has multiple sites of interactions with thrombin. Furthermore, pre-incubation of HD22 with thrombin impedes HD1 aggregation, suggesting that HD1 and HD22 have competing affinities for the same binding site. Altogether, this study shows that the characterization of aptamer-thrombin interactions by structural and kinetic experiments joined to simulations is necessary for the development of biosensors.

  5. Multiple Mode Actuation of a Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2001-01-01

    The effects of multiple mode periodic excitation on the evolution of a circular turbulent jet were studied experimentally. A short, wide-angle diffuser was attached to the jet exit. Streamwise and cross-stream excitations were introduced at the junction between the jet exit and the diffuser inlet on opposing sides of the jet. The introduction of high amplitude, periodic excitation in the streamwise direction enhances the mixing and promotes attachment of the jet shear-layer to the diffuser wall. Cross-stream excitation applied over a fraction of the jet circumference can deflect the jet away from the excitation slot. The two modes of excitation were combined using identical frequencies and varying the relative phase between the two actuators in search of an optimal response. It is shown that, for low and moderate periodic momentum input levels, the jet deflection angles depend strongly on the relative phase between the two actuators. Optimum performance is achieved when the phase difference is pi +/- pi/6. The lower effectiveness of the equal phase excitation is attributed to the generation of an azimuthally symmetric mode that does not produce the required non-axisymmetric vectoring. For high excitation levels, identical phase becomes more effective, while phase sensitivity decreases. An important finding was that with proper phase tuning, two unsteady actuators can be combined to obtain a non-linear response greater than the superposition of the individual effects.

  6. Fluoroquinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes: two modes of drug binding.

    PubMed

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-05-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys(466) gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly(81) and GyrB-Glu(466) residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases. PMID:24497635

  7. DYNAMIC STRUCTURAL REARRANGEMENTS BETWEEN DNA BINDING MODES of E. coli SSB PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rahul; Kozlov, Alexander G.; Lohman, Timothy M.; Ha, Taekjip

    2007-01-01

    Summary Escherichia coli (E. coli) single stranded (ss)DNA binding (SSB) protein binds ssDNA in multiple binding modes and regulates many DNA processes via protein-protein interactions. Here, we present direct evidence for fluctuations between the two major modes of SSB binding, (SSB)35 and (SSB)65 formed on (dT)70, with rates of interconversion on time scales that vary as much as 200-fold for a mere 4-fold change in NaCl concentration. Such remarkable electrostatic effects allow only one of the two modes to be significantly populated outside a narrow range of salt concentration, providing a context for precise control of SSB function in cellular processes via SSB expression levels and interactions with other proteins. Deletion of the acidic C-terminus of SSB, the site of binding of several proteins involved in DNA metabolism, does not affect the strong salt dependence, but shifts the equilibrium towards the highly cooperative (SSB)35 mode, suggesting that interactions of proteins with the C-terminus may regulate the binding mode transition and vice versa. Single molecule analysis further revealed a novel low abundance binding configuration and provides a direct demonstration that the SSB-ssDNA complex is a finely tuned assembly in dynamic equilibrium among several well-defined structural and functional states. PMID:17490681

  8. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  9. Computational study of the binding modes of caffeine to the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuli; Burger, Steven K; Ayers, Paul W; Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban

    2011-12-01

    Using the recently solved crystal structure of the human adenosine A(2A) receptor, we applied MM/PBSA to compare the binding modes of caffeine with those of the high-affinity selective antagonist ZM241385. MD simulations were performed in the environment of the lipid membrane bilayer. Four low-energy binding modes of caffeine-A(2A) were found, all of which had similar energies. Assuming an equal contribution of each binding mode of caffeine, the computed binding free energy difference between caffeine and ZM241385 is -2.4 kcal/mol, which compares favorably with the experimental value, -3.6 kcal/mol. The configurational entropy contribution of -0.9 kcal/mol from multiple binding modes of caffeine helps explain how a small molecule like caffeine can compete with a significantly larger molecule, ZM241385, which can form many more interactions with the receptor. We also performed residue-wise energy decomposition and found that Phe168, Leu249, and Ile274 contribute most significantly to the binding modes of caffeine and ZM241385. PMID:21970461

  10. Detection and characterization of nonspecific, sparsely-populated binding modes in the early stages of complexation

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, A.; Bornstein, A.; Pant, H. C.; Brady, M.; Sriram, R.; Hassan, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed to study protein-ligand binding in a system governed by specific and non-specific interactions. Strong associations lead to narrow distributions in the proteins configuration space; weak and ultra-weak associations lead instead to broader distributions, a manifestation of non-specific, sparsely-populated binding modes with multiple interfaces. The method is based on the notion that a discrete set of preferential first-encounter modes are metastable states from which stable (pre-relaxation) complexes at equilibrium evolve. The method can be used to explore alternative pathways of complexation with statistical significance and can be integrated into a general algorithm to study protein interaction networks. The method is applied to a peptide-protein complex. The peptide adopts several low-population conformers and binds in a variety of modes with a broad range of affinities. The system is thus well suited to analyze general features of binding, including conformational selection, multiplicity of binding modes, and nonspecific interactions, and to illustrate how the method can be applied to study these problems systematically. The equilibrium distributions can be used to generate biasing functions for simulations of multiprotein systems from which bulk thermodynamic quantities can be calculated. PMID:25782918

  11. Multiple mode model of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Ghanem, E.S.; Bateman, G.; Stotler, D.P.

    1989-07-01

    Theoretical models for radical transport of energy and particles in tokamaks due to drift waves, rippling modes, and resistive ballooning modes have been combined in a predictive transport code. The resulting unified model has been used to simulate low confinement mode (L-mode) energy confinement scalings. Dependence of global energy confinement on electron density for the resulting model is also described. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Optical Tweezers Experiments Resolve Distinct Modes of DNA-Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Micah J.; Williams, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Optical tweezers are ideally suited to perform force microscopy experiments that isolate a single biomolecule, which then provides multiple binding sites for ligands. The captured complex may be subjected to a spectrum of forces, inhibiting or facilitating ligand activity. In the following experiments, we utilize optical tweezers to characterize and quantify DNA binding of various ligands. High Mobility Group Type B (HMGB) proteins, which bind to double-stranded DNA, are shown to serve the dual purpose of stabilizing and enhancing the flexibility of double stranded DNA. Unusual intercalating ligands are observed to thread into and lengthen the double-stranded structure. Proteins binding to both double- and single-stranded DNA, such as the alpha polymerase subunit of E. coli Pol III, are characterized and the subdomains containing the distinct sites responsible for binding are isolated. Finally, DNA binding of bacteriophage T4 and T7 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins are measured for a range of salt concentrations, illustrating a binding model for proteins that slide along double-stranded DNA, ultimately binding tightly to ssDNA. These recently developed methods quantify both the binding activity of the ligand as well as the mode of binding. PMID:19173290

  13. Multiple instance learning of Calmodulin binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitously conserved protein that acts as a calcium sensor, and interacts with a large number of proteins. Detection of CaM binding proteins and their interaction sites experimentally requires a significant effort, so accurate methods for their prediction are important. Results: We present a novel algorithm (MI-1 SVM) for binding site prediction and evaluate its performance on a set of CaM-binding proteins extracted from the Calmodulin Target Database. Our approach directly models the problem of binding site prediction as a large-margin classification problem, and is able to take into account uncertainty in binding site location. We show that the proposed algorithm performs better than the standard SVM formulation, and illustrate its ability to recover known CaM binding motifs. A highly accurate cascaded classification approach using the proposed binding site prediction method to predict CaM binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana is also presented. Availability: Matlab code for training MI-1 SVM and the cascaded classification approach is available on request. Contact: fayyazafsar@gmail.com or asa@cs.colostate.edu PMID:22962461

  14. Multiple Modes of Inquiry in Earth Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastens, Kim A.; Rivet, Ann

    2008-01-01

    To help teachers enrich their students' understanding of inquiry in Earth science, this article describes six modes of inquiry used by practicing geoscientists (Earth scientists). Each mode of inquiry is illustrated by using examples of seminal or pioneering research and provides pointers to investigations that enable students to experience these…

  15. Observation of Protein Structural Vibrational Mode Sensitivity to Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Snell, Edward; Markelz, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    We report the first measurements of the dependence of large-scale protein intramolecular vibrational modes on ligand binding. These collective vibrational modes in the terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1) are of great interest due to their predicted relation to protein function. Our technique, Crystals Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM), allows for room temperature, table-top measurements of the optically active intramolecular modes. CATM measurements have revealed surprisingly narrowband features. CATM measurements are performed on single crystals of chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) as well as CEWL bound to tri-N-acetylglucosamine (CEWL-3NAG) inhibitor. We find narrow band resonances that dramatically shift with binding. Quasiharmonic calculations are performed on CEWL and CEWL-3NAG proteins with CHARMM using normal mode analysis. The expected CATM response of the crystals is then calculated by summing over all protein orientations within the unit cell. We will compare the CATM measurements with the calculated results and discuss the changes which arise with protein-ligand binding. This work is supported by NSF grant MRI 2 grant DBI2959989.

  16. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanli; Sun, Lidan; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Yanhui; Gong, Wuzhuang; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Liang, Huaping

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K+ channel as a template. We then performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of evodiamine within the TRPV1 binding pocket. There are no significant interspecies differences in evodiamine binding in rat, human and rabbit TRPV1 models. Pharmacophore modeling further provided confidence for the validity of the docking studies. This study is the first to shed light on the structural determinants required for the interaction between TRPV1 and evodiamine, and gives new suggestions for the rational design of novel TRPV1 ligands. PMID:22942745

  17. Structural system reliability under multiple failure modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahadevan, S.; Chamis, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a computational method for system reliability estimation of propulsion structures. The failure domain of the entire structural system is computed through the union of failure regions for various critical system failure modes. The effect of non-critical progressive damage is incorporated through structural reanalysis, resulting in the construction of several linear segments to approximately cover the system failure domain. An adaptive damage imposition scheme is outlined for the sake of computational efficiency. The proposed method is used to construct the system survival cdf (cumulative distribution function) of a two-rotor system.

  18. Influenza virus binds its host cell using multiple dynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sieben, Christian; Kappel, Christian; Zhu, Rong; Wozniak, Anna; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Grubmüller, Helmut; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus belongs to a wide range of enveloped viruses. The major spike protein hemagglutinin binds sialic acid residues of glycoproteins and glycolipids with dissociation constants in the millimolar range [Sauter NK, et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31:9609–9621], indicating a multivalent binding mode. Here, we characterized the attachment of influenza virus to host cell receptors using three independent approaches. Optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed very low interaction forces. Further, the observation of sequential unbinding events strongly suggests a multivalent binding mode between virus and cell membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a variety of unbinding pathways that indicate a highly dynamic interaction between HA and its receptor, allowing rationalization of influenza virus–cell binding quantitatively at the molecular level. PMID:22869709

  19. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Vuister, Geerten W

    2012-06-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal C-terminal fragment of the channels (de Groot et al. in Mol Cell Biol 31:2845-2853, 12). Here, we investigate this binding in detail and find significant differences between TRPV5 and TRPV6. We also identify and characterize in vitro four other CaM binding fragments of TRPV5/6, which likely are also involved in TRPV5/6 channel regulation. The five CaM binding sites display diversity in binding modes, binding stoichiometries and binding affinities, which may fine-tune the response of the channels to varying Ca(2+)-concentrations. PMID:22354706

  20. Simultaneous demultiplexing and steering of multiple orbital angular momentum modes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple scheme to perform simultaneous demultiplexing and steering of multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single complex phase mask. By designing the phase mask, the propagation directions of demultiplexed beams can be arbitrarily steered. System experiments using orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing 32-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM-32QAM) signals over two OAM modes are carried out by using a two-mode complex phase mask. Moreover, demultiplexing of sixteen OAM modes and arbitrary demultiplexed beam steering are also demonstrated in the experiment. PMID:26503167

  1. Simultaneous demultiplexing and steering of multiple orbital angular momentum modes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple scheme to perform simultaneous demultiplexing and steering of multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single complex phase mask. By designing the phase mask, the propagation directions of demultiplexed beams can be arbitrarily steered. System experiments using orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing 32-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM-32QAM) signals over two OAM modes are carried out by using a two-mode complex phase mask. Moreover, demultiplexing of sixteen OAM modes and arbitrary demultiplexed beam steering are also demonstrated in the experiment. PMID:26503167

  2. Polypharmacology within CXCR4: Multiple binding sites and allosteric behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planesas, Jesús M.; Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I.; Borrell, José I.; Teixidó, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    CXCR4 is a promiscuous receptor, which binds multiple diverse ligands. As usual in promiscuous proteins, CXCR4 has a large binding site, with multiple subsites, and high flexibility. Hence, it is not surprising that it is involved in the phenomenon of allosteric modulation. However, incomplete knowledge of allosteric ligand-binding sites has hampered an in-depth molecular understanding of how these inhibitors work. For example, it is known that lipidated fragments of intracellular GPCR loops, so called pepducins, such as pepducin ATI-2341, modulate CXCR4 activity using an agonist allosteric mechanism. Nevertheless, there are also examples of small organic molecules, such as AMD11070 and GSK812397, which may act as antagonist allosteric modulators. Here, we give new insights into this issue by proposing the binding interactions between the CXCR4 receptor and the above-mentioned allosteric modulators. We propose that CXCR4 has minimum two topographically different allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site would be in the intracellular loop 1 (ICL1) where pepducin ATI-2341 would bind to CXCR4, and the second one, in the extracellular side of CXCR4 in a subsite into the main orthosteric binding pocket, delimited by extracellular loops n° 1, 2, and the N-terminal end, where antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397 would bind. Prediction of allosteric interactions between CXCR4 and pepducin ATI-2341 were studied first by rotational blind docking to determine the main binding region and a subsequent refinement of the best pose was performed using flexible docking methods and molecular dynamics. For the antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397, the entire CXCR4 protein surface was explored by blind docking to define the binding region. A second docking analysis by subsites of the identified binding region was performed to refine the allosteric interactions. Finally, we identified the binding residues that appear to be essential for CXCR4 (agonists and antagonists) allosteric

  3. Multiple modes in the vibration of cantilevered shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindle, W. L.; Torvik, P. J.

    1987-06-01

    The term multiple modes describes pairs of modes which are similar in shape but occur at different frequencies. This phenomenon has been observed in holographic vibration test results for a turbine blade. Pairs of modes were found, such as two modes which both resembled first torsional modes. In this investigation holographic interferometry was used to verify the earlier results for the turbine blade and to investigate three shell segments simulating blades. The shells ranged in size from moderately to very thick with length to thickness ratios of 16, 8 and 5·6. The blade geometry is characterized by a circumferential angle of 142° and a ratio of length to inner radii arc length near 1·0. In addition, a NASTRAN finite element analysis was performed on these simulated blades. Both mode shapes and frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the results from the experiment. The multiple mode phenomenon was found to be an artifact of the holographic experiment. Pairs of modes were found in the NASTRAN results for the simulated blades in which the out-of-plane displacements (those seen in the hologram) were very similar, but for which the displacements in the plane of the hologram differed significantly. Thus, the two modes which appeared in the experimental results as first torsional modes were seen to include quite different in-plane displacements. The two modes are therefore quite different and do not contradict the normal result, which may be justified from such elementary considerations as a Rayleigh quotient, that similar modes must produce similar frequencies.

  4. Multiprocessor system with multiple concurrent modes of execution

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Daniel; Ceze, Luis H; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-12-31

    A multiprocessor system supports multiple concurrent modes of speculative execution. Speculation identification numbers (IDs) are allocated to speculative threads from a pool of available numbers. The pool is divided into domains, with each domain being assigned to a mode of speculation. Modes of speculation include TM, TLS, and rollback. Allocation of the IDs is carried out with respect to a central state table and using hardware pointers. The IDs are used for writing different versions of speculative results in different ways of a set in a cache memory.

  5. Coherent coupling of multiple transverse modes in quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nanfang; Diehl, Laurent; Cubukcu, Ertugrul; Bour, David; Corzine, Scott; Höfler, Gloria; Wojcik, Aleksander K; Crozier, Kenneth B; Belyanin, Alexey; Capasso, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Quantum cascade lasers are a unique laboratory for studying nonlinear laser dynamics because of their high intracavity intensity, strong intersubband optical nonlinearity, and an unusual combination of relaxation time scales. Here we investigate the nonlinear coupling between the transverse modes of quantum cascade lasers. We present evidence for stable phase coherence of multiple transverse modes over a large range of injection currents. We explain the phase coherence by a four-wave mixing interaction originating from the strong optical nonlinearity of the gain transition. The phase-locking conditions predicted by theory are supported by spectral data and both near- and far-field mode measurements. PMID:19257192

  6. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum. PMID:27492782

  7. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-08-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum.

  8. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum. PMID:27492782

  9. A k-mode synchronization methodology for multiple satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, M. Hossein; Arozullah, Mohammed

    The authors describe a k-mode burst synchronization methodology that can improve the synchronization performance of the digital communication networks with bursty dynamic users. The method is suitable for the applications such as centralized and distributed multiple satellite networking, where the system supports a large number of low-orbit user satellites. In the mobile networking environment usually there is no network synchronization and the users are highly dynamic. Therefore, more stringent analysis of the system synchronization performance is required. The methodology defined provides flexibility of selecting the k-synchronization stage, which provides a more stable synchronization. The major features of this synchronization method are: a) the synchronizer avoids returning to bit-by-bit comparison mode from higher modes for small errors; b) since there are many modes with different synchronization levels, the synchronizer provides a more stable synchronization; and c) the synchronizer is more stable in environments with burst noise or jamming.

  10. Charging system with galvanic isolation and multiple operating modes

    SciTech Connect

    Kajouke, Lateef A.; Perisic, Milun; Ransom, Ray M.

    2013-01-08

    Systems and methods are provided for operating a charging system with galvanic isolation adapted for multiple operating modes. A vehicle charging system comprises a DC interface, an AC interface, a first conversion module coupled to the DC interface, and a second conversion module coupled to the AC interface. An isolation module is coupled between the first conversion module and the second conversion module. The isolation module comprises a transformer and a switching element coupled between the transformer and the second conversion module. The transformer and the switching element are cooperatively configured for a plurality of operating modes, wherein each operating mode of the plurality of operating modes corresponds to a respective turns ratio of the transformer.

  11. Estrophilin immunoreactivity versus estrogen receptor binding activity in meningiomas: evidence for multiple estrogen binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, K.P.; Schott, W.; Gross, S.

    1987-09-01

    The existence of estrogen receptors in human meningiomas has long been a controversial issue. This may be explained, in part, by apparent heterogeneity of estrogen binding sites in meningioma tissue. In this study, estrogen receptors were determined in 58 meningiomas with an enzyme immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies against human estrogen receptor protein (estrophilin) and with a sensitive radioligand binding assay using /sup 125/I-labeled estradiol (/sup 125/I-estradiol) as radioligand. Low levels of estrophilin immunoreactivity were found in tumors from 62% of patients, whereas radioligand binding activity was demonstrated in about 46% of the meningiomas examined. In eight (14%) tissue samples multiple binding sites for estradiol were observed. The immunoreactive binding sites correspond to the classical, high affinity estrogen receptors: the Kd for /sup 125/I-estradiol binding to the receptor was approximately 0.2 nM and the binding was specific for estrogens. The second, low affinity class of binding sites considerably influenced measurement of the classical receptor even at low ligand concentrations. The epidemiological and clinical data from patients with meningiomas, and the existence of specific estrogen receptors confirmed by immunochemical detection, may be important factors in a theory of oncogenesis.

  12. A multiple work mode YAG laser in derma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yu; Zhang, Guizhong; Ye, Zhisheng; Yu, Lin

    2006-06-01

    It has been very common that a pulse laser is used in derma surgery based on the theory of "Selective Photothermolysis". This method has also been accepted as the best way to treat the pigments by the medical textbook. A kind of double-pulsed laser which gets the name by two pulse output at one pumping process is developed for derma surgery lately, and this kind of laser has been proved more effective and safe than single-pulse laser. We also develop a multiple work mode YAG laser including two double-pulsed modes at 1064nm and 532nm, two single-pulsed modes at 1064nm and 532nm, and one free-running mode at 1064nm. Considering availability, security and reliability of the laser as a surgery machine, some important subsystems of the laser are optimized carefully, such as Q-switch driver, wavelength-switching system, power supply, and control system etc. At last we get a prototype laser which can run for longer than 30 minutes continuously, and output Max10 pulse per second (pps) with Max800mJ energy at 1064nm double Q-Switch mode, or Max400mJ at 532nm. Using double pulse mode of the laser we do some removal experiments of tattoos and other pigments, and obtain good effect.

  13. Inhibiting multiple mode vibration in controlled flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James M.; Seering, Warren P.

    1991-01-01

    Prior research has led to the development of input command pre-shapers that can significantly reduce residual vibration. These shapers exhibit marked insensitivity to errors in natural frequency estimates and can be used to minimize vibration at more than one frequency. A method is outlined for the development of multiple mode input shapers. An examination is made of the results of shaper performance tests conducted on linear and non-linear computer models of MACE, an MIT/NASA experimental flexible structure.

  14. Identification of the binding modes of N-phenylphthalimides inhibiting bacterial thymidylate synthase through X-ray crystallography screening.

    PubMed

    Mangani, Stefano; Cancian, Laura; Leone, Rosalida; Pozzi, Cecilia; Lazzari, Sandra; Luciani, Rosaria; Ferrari, Stefania; Costi, M Paola

    2011-08-11

    To identify specific bacterial thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibitors, we exploited phenolphthalein (PTH), which inhibits both bacterial and human enzymes. The X-ray crystal structure of Lactobacillus casei TS (LcTS) that binds PTH showed multiple binding modes of the inhibitor, which prevented a classical structure-based drug design approach. To overcome this issue, we synthesized two phthalimidic libraries that were tested against TS enzymes and then we performed X-ray crystallographic screening of the active compounds. Compounds 6A, 8A, and 12A showed 40-fold higher affinity for bacterial TS than human TS. The X-ray crystallographic screening characterized the binding mode of six inhibitors in complexes with LcTS. Of these, 20A, 23A, and 24A showed a common unique binding mode, whereas 8A showed a different, unique binding mode. A comparative analysis of the LcTS X-ray complexes that were obtained with the pathogenic TS enabled the selection of compounds 8A and 23A as specific compounds and starting points to be exploited for the specific inhibition of pathogen enzymes. PMID:21696158

  15. Reusable Launch Vehicle Control In Multiple Time Scale Sliding Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A reusable launch vehicle control problem during ascent is addressed via multiple-time scaled continuous sliding mode control. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust, de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of bounded external disturbances and plant uncertainties. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues placement. Overall stability of a two-loop control system is addressed. An optimal control allocation algorithm is designed that allocates torque commands into end-effector deflection commands, which are executed by the actuators. The dual-time scale sliding mode controller was designed for the X-33 technology demonstration sub-orbital launch vehicle in the launch mode. Simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties. This is a significant advancement in performance over that achieved with linear, gain scheduled control systems currently being used for launch vehicles.

  16. Sensitive NMR Approach for Determining the Binding Mode of Tightly Binding Ligand Molecules to Protein Targets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Nitsche, Christoph; Pilla, Kala Bharath; Graham, Bim; Huber, Thomas; Klein, Christian D; Otting, Gottfried

    2016-04-01

    Structure-guided drug design relies on detailed structural knowledge of protein-ligand complexes, but crystallization of cocomplexes is not always possible. Here we present a sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to determine the binding mode of tightly binding lead compounds in complex with difficult target proteins. In contrast to established NMR methods, it does not depend on rapid exchange between bound and free ligand or on stable isotope labeling, relying instead on a tert-butyl group as a chemical label. tert-Butyl groups are found in numerous protein ligands and deliver an exceptionally narrow and tall (1)H NMR signal. We show that a tert-butyl group also produces outstandingly intense intra- and intermolecular NOESY cross-peaks. These enable measurements of pseudocontact shifts generated by lanthanide tags attached to the protein, which in turn allows positioning of the ligand on the protein. Once the ligand has been located, assignments of intermolecular NOEs become possible even without prior resonance assignments of protein side chains. The approach is demonstrated with the dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease in complex with a high-affinity ligand containing a tert-butyl group. PMID:26974502

  17. Exploration of the binding mode between (-)-zampanolide and tubulin using docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Si-Yan; Mo, Guang-Quan; Chen, Jin-Can; Zheng, Kang-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    The binding mode of (-)-zampanolide (ZMP) to tubulin was investigated using docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and binding free-energy calculations. The docking studies validated the experimental results indicating that the paclitaxel site is the binding site for (-)-ZMP. The 18 ns MD simulation shows the docking mode has changed a lot, whereas it offers more reliable binding data. MM-PBSA binding free-energy calculations further confirmed the results of the MD simulation. The study revealed that hydrophobic interactions play an important role in stabilizing the binding, and the strong hydrogen bond formed with Asp224 enhances the affinity for tubulin. Meanwhile, the results support the assumption that (-)-ZMP can be attacked by His227, leading to a nucleophilic reaction and covalent binding. These theoretical results lead to a greater understanding of the mechanism of action of binding to tubulin, and will therefore aid the design of new compounds with higher affinities for tubulin. PMID:24478043

  18. Binding mode and free energy prediction of fisetin/β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Nutho, Bodee; Khuntawee, Wasinee; Rungnim, Chompoonut; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Wolschann, Peter; Karpfen, Alfred; Kungwan, Nawee; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, our aim is to investigate the preferential binding mode and encapsulation of the flavonoid fisetin in the nano-pore of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) at the molecular level using various theoretical approaches: molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and binding free energy calculations. The molecular docking suggested four possible fisetin orientations in the cavity through its chromone or phenyl ring with two different geometries of fisetin due to the rotatable bond between the two rings. From the multiple MD results, the phenyl ring of fisetin favours its inclusion into the β-CD cavity, whilst less binding or even unbinding preference was observed in the complexes where the larger chromone ring is located in the cavity. All MM- and QM-PBSA/GBSA free energy predictions supported the more stable fisetin/β-CD complex of the bound phenyl ring. Van der Waals interaction is the key force in forming the complexes. In addition, the quantum mechanics calculations with M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) clearly showed that both solvation effect and BSSE correction cannot be neglected for the energy determination of the chosen system. PMID:25550745

  19. Homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulations elucidated α-fetoprotein binding modes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An important mechanism of endocrine activity is chemicals entering target cells via transport proteins and then interacting with hormone receptors such as the estrogen receptor (ER). α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is a major transport protein in rodent serum that can bind and sequester estrogens, thus preventing entry to the target cell and where they could otherwise induce ER-mediated endocrine activity. Recently, we reported rat AFP binding affinities for a large set of structurally diverse chemicals, including 53 binders and 72 non-binders. However, the lack of three-dimensional (3D) structures of rat AFP hinders further understanding of the structural dependence for binding. Therefore, a 3D structure of rat AFP was built using homology modeling in order to elucidate rat AFP-ligand binding modes through docking analyses and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Methods Homology modeling was first applied to build a 3D structure of rat AFP. Molecular docking and Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA) scoring were then used to examine potential rat AFP ligand binding modes. MD simulations and free energy calculations were performed to refine models of binding modes. Results A rat AFP tertiary structure was first obtained using homology modeling and MD simulations. The rat AFP-ligand binding modes of 13 structurally diverse, representative binders were calculated using molecular docking, (MM-GBSA) ranking and MD simulations. The key residues for rat AFP-ligand binding were postulated through analyzing the binding modes. Conclusion The optimized 3D rat AFP structure and associated ligand binding modes shed light on rat AFP-ligand binding interactions that, in turn, provide a means to estimate binding affinity of unknown chemicals. Our results will assist in the evaluation of the endocrine disruption potential of chemicals. PMID:24266910

  20. A novel assay for drug-DNA binding mode, affinity, and exclusion number: scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Coury, J E; McFail-Isom, L; Williams, L D; Bottomley, L A

    1996-01-01

    Determining the mode-of-binding of a DNA ligand is not always straightforward. Here, we establish a scanning force microscopic assay for mode-of-binding that is (i) direct: lengths of individual DNA-ligand complexes are directly measured; (ii) rapid: there are no requirements for staining or elaborate sample preparation; and (iii) unambiguous: an observed increase in DNA length upon addition of a ligand is definitive evidence for an intercalative mode-of-binding. Mode-of-binding, binding affinity, and site-exclusion number are readily determined from scanning force microscopy measurements of the changes in length of individual drug-DNA complexes as a function of drug concentration. With this assay, we resolve the ambiguity surrounding the mode of binding of 2,5-bis(4-amidinophenyl) furan (APF) to DNA and show that it binds to DNA by nonintercalative modes. APF is a member of an important class of aromatic dicationic drugs that show significant activity in the treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, an opportunistic infection that is the leading cause of death in AIDS patients. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8901572

  1. Digital Real-Time Multiple Channel Multiple Mode Neutron Flux Estimation on FPGA-based Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevenin, Mathieu; Barbot, Loïc; Corre, Gwénolé; Woo, Romuald; Destouches, Christophe; Normand, Stéphane

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a complete custom full-digital instrumentation device that was designed for real-time neutron flux estimation, especially for nuclear reactor in-core measurement using subminiature Fission Chambers (FCs). Entire fully functional small-footprint design (about 1714 LUTs) is implemented on FPGA. It enables real-time acquisition and analysis of multiple channels neutron's flux both in counting mode and Campbelling mode. Experimental results obtained from this brand new device are consistent with simulation results and show good agreement within good uncertainty. This device paves the way for new applications perspectives in real-time nuclear reactor monitoring.

  2. Accuracy of binding mode prediction with a cascadic stochastic tunneling method.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Bernhard; Basili, Serena; Merlitz, Holger; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the binding modes predicted for 83 complexes of the high-resolution subset of the ASTEX/CCDC receptor-ligand database using the atomistic FlexScreen approach with a simple forcefield-based scoring function. The median RMS deviation between experimental and predicted binding mode was just 0.83 A. Over 80% of the ligands dock within 2 A of the experimental binding mode, for 60 complexes the docking protocol locates the correct binding mode in all of ten independent simulations. Most docking failures arise because (a) the experimental structure clashed in our forcefield and is thus unattainable in the docking process or (b) because the ligand is stabilized by crystal water. PMID:17427957

  3. Functionalization of small platinum nanoparticles with amines and phosphines: Ligand binding modes and particle stability.

    PubMed

    Wand, Patricia; Bartl, Johannes D; Heiz, Ueli; Tschurl, Martin; Cokoja, Mirza

    2016-09-15

    We report the binding mode of amines and phosphines on platinum nanoparticles. Protective ligands comprising different functional groups are systematically studied for the elucidation of ligand binding at different functionalization conditions. From the functionalization conditions it is concluded that the binding of amines to the nanoparticles occurs via the formation of a PtHN moiety or electrostatic interaction, which is supported by spectroscopic evidences. In particular from complex chemistry such a binding mode is surprising, as amines are expected to bind via their electron pair to the metal. Similar results from functionalization are observed for phosphine-protected nanoparticles, which suggest similar binding modes in these systems. In contrast to the strong covalent bond of the protection with thiols, considerable weakly binding systems result. The characteristics of the binding mode are reflected by the stability of the colloids and their catalytic properties. In the selective hydrogenation of 3-hexyne to 3-hexene thiolate-stabilized Pt particles are highly stable, but exhibit the lowest activity. On the other hand, amine- and phosphine-capped platinum nanoparticles show a significantly higher activity, but rapidly agglomerate. PMID:27288572

  4. Vibrational study on the cobalt binding mode of Carnosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torreggiani, Armida; Taddei, Paola; Tinti, Anna; Fini, Giancarlo

    2002-10-01

    The Co(II)- L-Carnosine (Carnos) system was investigated at different pH and metal/ligand molar ratios by Raman and IR spectroscopy. Raman spectra present some marker bands yielding information on the ability of the Co(II)/Carnos system to bind molecular oxygen and to identify the metal co-ordination site of the imidazole ring (N π or N τ atom) of Carnos. The existence of different oxygenated species is greatly affected by pH and the structure of the predominant complexes depends on the available nitrogen atoms. Under basic conditions, binuclear complexes binding molecular oxygen are the predominant species and two forms (monobridged and dibridged) were identified by the Raman νO-O band (750-850 cm -1). Decreasing pH to 7, the species present in the system are less able to bind oxygen. Hydrogen peroxide and a Co(III) chelate not binding O 2, were formed with a significant conversion of peroxo into superoxo complexes. A slight excess of Carnos does not enhance metal chelation. In slightly acidic conditions, the formation of H 2O 2 and superoxo species is more enhanced than at pH 7 and another Co(III) chelate is probably formed.

  5. Mechanisms for multiple activity modes of VTA dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Andrew; Faure, Philippe; Gutkin, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Midbrain ventral segmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons send numerous projections to cortical and sub-cortical areas, and diffusely release dopamine (DA) to their targets. DA neurons display a range of activity modes that vary in frequency and degree of burst firing. Importantly, DA neuronal bursting is associated with a significantly greater degree of DA release than an equivalent tonic activity pattern. Here, we introduce a single compartmental, conductance-based computational model for DA cell activity that captures the behavior of DA neuronal dynamics and examine the multiple factors that underlie DA firing modes: the strength of the SK conductance, the amount of drive, and GABA inhibition. Our results suggest that neurons with low SK conductance fire in a fast firing mode, are correlated with burst firing, and require higher levels of applied current before undergoing depolarization block. We go on to consider the role of GABAergic inhibition on an ensemble of dynamical classes of DA neurons and find that strong GABA inhibition suppresses burst firing. Our studies suggest differences in the distribution of the SK conductance and GABA inhibition levels may indicate subclasses of DA neurons within the VTA. We further identify, that by considering alternate potassium dynamics, the dynamics display burst patterns that terminate via depolarization block, akin to those observed in vivo in VTA DA neurons and in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) DA cell preparations under apamin application. In addition, we consider the generation of transient burst firing events that are NMDA-initiated or elicited by a sudden decrease of GABA inhibition, that is, disinhibition. PMID:26283955

  6. Characterization of the Modes of Binding between Human Sweet Taste Receptor and Low-Molecular-Weight Sweet Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Tanaka, Takaharu; Abe, Keiko; Misaka, Takumi; Ishiguro, Masaji

    2012-01-01

    One of the most distinctive features of human sweet taste perception is its broad tuning to chemically diverse compounds ranging from low-molecular-weight sweeteners to sweet-tasting proteins. Many reports suggest that the human sweet taste receptor (hT1R2–hT1R3), a heteromeric complex composed of T1R2 and T1R3 subunits belonging to the class C G protein–coupled receptor family, has multiple binding sites for these sweeteners. However, it remains unclear how the same receptor recognizes such diverse structures. Here we aim to characterize the modes of binding between hT1R2–hT1R3 and low-molecular-weight sweet compounds by functional analysis of a series of site-directed mutants and by molecular modeling–based docking simulation at the binding pocket formed on the large extracellular amino-terminal domain (ATD) of hT1R2. We successfully determined the amino acid residues responsible for binding to sweeteners in the cleft of hT1R2 ATD. Our results suggest that individual ligands have sets of specific residues for binding in correspondence with the chemical structures and other residues responsible for interacting with multiple ligands. PMID:22536376

  7. Amine substitution of quinazolinones leads to selective nanomolar AChE inhibitors with 'inverted' binding mode.

    PubMed

    Darras, Fouad H; Wehle, Sarah; Huang, Guozheng; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Decker, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Selective and nanomolar acetylcholinesterase inhibitors were obtained by connecting tri- and tetracyclic quinazolinones-previously described as moderately active and unselective cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors-via a hydroxyl group in para position to an anilinic nitrogen with different amines linked via a three carbon atom spacer. These tri- and tetracyclic quinazolinones containing different alicyclic ring sizes and connected to tertiary amines were docked to a high-resolution hAChE crystal structure to investigate the preferred binding mode in relation to results obtained by experimental structure-activity relationships. While the 'classical orientation' locating the heterocycle in the active site was rarely found, an alternative binding mode with the basic aliphatic amine in the active center ('inverted' orientation) was obtained for most compounds. Analyses of extended SARs based on this inverted binding mode are able to explain the compounds' binding affinities at AChE. PMID:25047936

  8. Two Distinctive Binding Modes of Endonuclease Inhibitors to the N-Terminal Region of Influenza Virus Polymerase Acidic Subunit.

    PubMed

    Fudo, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Norio; Nukaga, Michiyoshi; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2016-05-10

    Influenza viruses are global threat to humans, and the development of new antiviral agents are still demanded to prepare for pandemics and to overcome the emerging resistance to the current drugs. Influenza polymerase acidic protein N-terminal domain (PAN) has endonuclease activity and is one of the appropriate targets for novel antiviral agents. First, we performed X-ray cocrystal analysis on the complex structures of PAN with two endonuclease inhibitors. The protein crystallization and the inhibitor soaking were done at pH 5.8. The binding modes of the two inhibitors were different from a common binding mode previously reported for the other influenza virus endonuclease inhibitors. We additionally clarified the complex structures of PAN with the same two endonuclease inhibitors at pH 7.0. In one of the crystal structures, an additional inhibitor molecule, which chelated to the two metal ions in the active site, was observed. On the basis of the crystal structures at pH 7.0, we carried out 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for both of the complexes. The analysis of simulation results suggested that the binding mode of each inhibitor to PAN was stable in spite of the partial deviation of the simulation structure from the crystal one. Furthermore, crystal structure analysis and MD simulation were performed for PAN in complex with an inhibitor, which was already reported to have a high compound potency for comparison. The findings on the presence of multiple binding sites at around the PAN substrate-binding pocket will provide a hint for enhancing the binding affinity of inhibitors. PMID:27088785

  9. Effects of driving mode on the performance of multiple-chamber piezoelectric pumps with multiple actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Kan, Junwu; Wang, Shuyun; Wang, Hongyun; Ma, Jijie; Jiang, Yonghua

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited output capability of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the driving voltage is frequently increased to obtain the desired output. However, the excessive voltage application may lead to a large deformation in the piezoelectric ceramics, which could cause it to breakdown or become damaged. Therefore, increasing the number of chambers to obtain the desired output is proposed. Using a check-valve quintuple-chamber pump with quintuple piezoelectric actuators, the characteristics of the pump under different driving modes are investigated through experiments. By changing the number and connection mode of working actuators, pump performances in terms of flow rate and backpressure are tested at a voltage of 150 V with a frequency range of 60 Hz -400 Hz. Experiment results indicate that the properties of the multiple-chamber pump change significantly with distinct working chambers even though the number of pumping chambers is the same. Pump performance declines as the distance between the working actuators increases. Moreover, pump performance declines dramatically when the working piezoelectric actuator closest to the outlet is involved. The maximum backpressures of the pump with triple, quadruple, and quintuple actuators are increased by 39%, 83%, and 128%, respectively, compared with the pump with double working actuators; the corresponding maximum flow rates of the pumps are simply increased by 25.9%, 49.2%, and 67.8%, respectively. The proposed research offers practical guidance for the effective utilization of the multiple-chamber pumps under different driving modes.

  10. High-Resolution Specificity from DNA Sequencing Highlights Alternative Modes of Lac Repressor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor–operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  11. High-resolution specificity from DNA sequencing highlights alternative modes of Lac repressor binding.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D

    2014-11-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor-operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  12. Detection of persistent organic pollutants binding modes with androgen receptor ligand binding domain by docking and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are persistent in the environment after release from industrial compounds, combustion productions or pesticides. The exposure of POPs has been related to various reproductive disturbances, such as reduced semen quality, testicular cancer, and imbalanced sex ratio. Among POPs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4’-DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the most widespread and well-studied compounds. Recent studies have revealed that 4,4’-DDE is an antagonist of androgen receptor (AR). However, the mechanism of the inhibition remains elusive. CB-153 is the most common congener of PCBs, while the action of CB-153 on AR is still under debate. Results Molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches have been employed to study binding modes and inhibition mechanism of 4,4’-DDE and CB-153 against AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Several potential binding sites have been detected and analyzed. One possible binding site is the same binding site of AR natural ligand androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Another one is on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function (AF2) region, which is crucial for the co-activators recruitment. Besides, a novel possible binding site was observed for POPs with low binding free energy with the receptor. Detailed interactions between ligands and the receptor have been represented. The disrupting mechanism of POPs against AR has also been discussed. Conclusions POPs disrupt the function of AR through binding to three possible biding sites on AR/LBD. One of them shares the same binding site of natural ligand of AR. Another one is on AF2 region. The third one is in a cleft near N-terminal of the receptor. Significantly, values of binding free energy of POPs with AR/LBD are comparable to that of natural ligand androgen DHT. PMID:24053684

  13. Design of eight-mode polarization-maintaining few-mode fiber for multiple-input multiple-output-free spatial division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixian; LaRochelle, Sophie

    2015-12-15

    We propose a polarization-maintaining few-mode fiber (FMF) that features an elliptical ring shaped core with a high refractive index contrast ∼0.03 between the core and the cladding. This fiber design alleviates the usual trade-off between the number of guided modes and the achievable birefringence that is usually observed in conventional elliptical-core FMFs. Through numerical simulations, we show that this fiber design can support up to 10 guided vector modes over the entire C band while providing large birefringence. Except for the two fundamental modes, the eight higher-order vector modes are all separated from their adjacent modes by effective index differences >10⁻⁴, which is the typical birefringence value of single-mode polarization maintaining fibers. The designed fiber targets applications in spatial division multiplexing of optical channels, without multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) digital signal processing, for short-reach optical interconnects. PMID:26670527

  14. Real-time multi-mode neutron multiplicity counter

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S; Alvarez, Raymond A

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments are directed to a digital data acquisition method that collects data regarding nuclear fission at high rates and performs real-time preprocessing of large volumes of data into directly useable forms for use in a system that performs non-destructive assaying of nuclear material and assemblies for mass and multiplication of special nuclear material (SNM). Pulses from a multi-detector array are fed in parallel to individual inputs that are tied to individual bits in a digital word. Data is collected by loading a word at the individual bit level in parallel, to reduce the latency associated with current shift-register systems. The word is read at regular intervals, all bits simultaneously, with no manipulation. The word is passed to a number of storage locations for subsequent processing, thereby removing the front-end problem of pulse pileup. The word is used simultaneously in several internal processing schemes that assemble the data in a number of more directly useable forms. The detector includes a multi-mode counter that executes a number of different count algorithms in parallel to determine different attributes of the count data.

  15. S. cerevisiae Replication Protein A (scRPA) Binds to Single–stranded DNA in Multiple Salt-dependent Modes†

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Sangaralingam; Kozlov, Alexander G.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the single stranded DNA binding properties of the S. cerevisiae Replication Protein A (scRPA) using fluorescence titrations, isothermal titration calorimetry and sedimentation equilibrium in order to determine whether scRPA can bind to ssDNA in multiple binding modes. We measured the occluded site size for scRPA binding poly(dT), as well as the stoichiometry, equilibrium binding constants and binding enthalpy of scRPA-((dT)L) complexes as a function of oligodeoxynucleotide length, L. Sedimentation equilibrium studies show that scRPA is stable hetero-trimer over the range of [NaCl] examined (0.02 M to 1.5 M). However, the occluded site size, n, undergoes a salt-dependent transition between values of n=18−20 nucleotides at low [NaCl] to n=26−28 nucleotides at high [NaCl], with a transition midpoint near 0.36 M NaCl (25.0°C, pH 8.1). Measurements of the stoichiometry of scRPA-(dT)L complexes also show a [NaCl]-dependent change in stoichiometry consistent with the observed change in occluded site size. Measurements of the ΔHobs for scRPA binding to (dT)L at 1.5 M NaCl, yield a contact site size of 28 nucleotides, similar to the occluded site size determined at this [NaCl]. Altogether, these data support a model in which scRPA can bind to ssDNA in at least two binding modes, a low site size mode (n = 18 ± 1 nucleotides), stabilized at low [NaCl], in which only three of its OB-folds are used, and a higher site size mode (n = 27 ± 1 nucleotides), stabilized at higher [NaCl], which uses four of its OB-folds. No evidence for highly cooperative binding of scRPA to ssDNA was found either under any conditions examined. Thus, scRPA shows some similar behavior to the E. coli SSB homo-tetramer, which also shows binding mode transitions, but some significant differences also exist. PMID:17002295

  16. Binding Mode Selection Determines the Action of Ecstasy Homologs at Monoamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Sandtner, Walter; Stockner, Thomas; Hasenhuetl, Peter S; Partilla, John S; Seddik, Amir; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Cao, Jianjing; Holy, Marion; Steinkellner, Thomas; Rudnick, Gary; Baumann, Michael H; Ecker, Gerhard F; Newman, Amy Hauck; Sitte, Harald H

    2016-01-01

    Determining the structural elements that define substrates and inhibitors at the monoamine transporters is critical to elucidating the mechanisms underlying these disparate functions. In this study, we addressed this question directly by generating a series of N-substituted 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs that differ only in the number of methyl substituents on the terminal amine group. Starting with 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N-dimethylamphetamine (MDDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N,N-trimethylamphetamine (MDTMA) were prepared. We evaluated the functional activities of the compounds at all three monoamine transporters in native brain tissue and cells expressing the transporters. In addition, we used ligand docking to generate models of the respective protein-ligand complexes, which allowed us to relate the experimental findings to available structural information. Our results suggest that the 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs bind at the monoamine transporter orthosteric binding site by adopting one of two mutually exclusive binding modes. 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine adopt a high-affinity binding mode consistent with a transportable substrate, whereas MDDMA and MDTMA adopt a low-affinity binding mode consistent with an inhibitor, in which the ligand orientation is inverted. Importantly, MDDMA can alternate between both binding modes, whereas MDTMA exclusively binds to the low-affinity mode. Our experimental results are consistent with the idea that the initial orientation of bound ligands is critical for subsequent interactions that lead to transporter conformational changes and substrate translocation. PMID:26519222

  17. Binding Mode Selection Determines the Action of Ecstasy Homologs at Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Sandtner, Walter; Stockner, Thomas; Hasenhuetl, Peter S.; Partilla, John S.; Seddik, Amir; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Cao, Jianjing; Holy, Marion; Steinkellner, Thomas; Rudnick, Gary; Baumann, Michael H.; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2016-01-01

    Determining the structural elements that define substrates and inhibitors at the monoamine transporters is critical to elucidating the mechanisms underlying these disparate functions. In this study, we addressed this question directly by generating a series of N-substituted 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs that differ only in the number of methyl substituents on the terminal amine group. Starting with 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N-dimethylamphetamine (MDDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N,N-trimethylamphetamine (MDTMA) were prepared. We evaluated the functional activities of the compounds at all three monoamine transporters in native brain tissue and cells expressing the transporters. In addition, we used ligand docking to generate models of the respective protein-ligand complexes, which allowed us to relate the experimental findings to available structural information. Our results suggest that the 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs bind at the monoamine transporter orthosteric binding site by adopting one of two mutually exclusive binding modes. 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine adopt a high-affinity binding mode consistent with a transportable substrate, whereas MDDMA and MDTMA adopt a low-affinity binding mode consistent with an inhibitor, in which the ligand orientation is inverted. Importantly, MDDMA can alternate between both binding modes, whereas MDTMA exclusively binds to the low-affinity mode. Our experimental results are consistent with the idea that the initial orientation of bound ligands is critical for subsequent interactions that lead to transporter conformational changes and substrate translocation. PMID:26519222

  18. Binding mode prediction of biologically active compounds from plant Salvia Miltiorrhiza as integrase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Lugsanangarm, Kiattisak; Kokpol, Sirirat; Abd-Elazem, Ibrahim S

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN), an essential enzyme for HIV-1 replication, has been targeted in antiretroviral drug therapy. The emergence of HIV-1 variants clinically resistant to antiretroviral agents has lead to the development of alternative IN inhibitors. In the present work, binding modes of a high potent IN inhibitor, M522 and M532, within the catalytic binding site of wild type (WT) IN were determined using molecular docking calculation. Both M522 and M532 displayed similar modes of binding within the IN putative binding pocket and exhibited favorable interactions with the catalytic Mg2+ ions, the nearby amino acids and viral DNA through metal-ligand chelation, hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions. Furthermore, the modes of action of these two compounds against the mutated Y212R, N224H and S217H PFV IN were also predicted. Although the replacement of amino acid could somehow disturb inhibitor binding mode, almost key interactions which detected in the WT complexes were fairly conserved. Detailed information could highlight the application of M522 and M532 as candidate IN inhibitors for drug development against drug resistant strains. PMID:23750093

  19. Insight into the Binding Mode of Agonists of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor from Calculated Electron Densities

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Michael E; Gutbrod, Oliver; Matthiesen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are among the most prominent and most economically important insecticide targets. Thus, an understanding of the modes of binding of respective agonists is important for the design of specific compounds with favorable vertebrate profiles. In the case of nAChRs, the lack of available high-resolution X-ray structures leaves theoretical considerations as the only viable option. Starting from classical homology and docking approaches, binding mode hypotheses are created for five agonists of the nAChR, covering insecticides in the main group 4 of the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) mode of action (MoA) classification, namely, neonicotinoids, nicotine, sulfoxaflor, and butenolides. To better understand these binding modes, the topologies of calculated electron densities of small-model systems are analyzed in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The theoretically obtained modes of binding are very much in line with the biology-driven IRAC MoA classification of the investigated ligands. PMID:26175091

  20. Structure-based drug design enables conversion of a DFG-in binding CSF-1R kinase inhibitor to a DFG-out binding mode

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Marvin J.; Pelc, Matthew; Kamtekar, Satwik; Day, Jacqueline; Poda, Gennadiy I.; Hall, Molly K.; Michener, Marshall L.; Reitz, Beverly A.; Mathis, Karl J.; Pierce, Betsy S.; Parikh, Mihir D.; Mischke, Deborah A.; Long, Scott A.; Parlow, John J.; Anderson, David R.; Thorarensen, Atli

    2010-08-11

    The work described herein demonstrates the utility of structure-based drug design (SBDD) in shifting the binding mode of an HTS hit from a DFG-in to a DFG-out binding mode resulting in a class of novel potent CSF-1R kinase inhibitors suitable for lead development.

  1. Non-peptide ligand binding to the formyl peptide receptor FPR2--A comparison to peptide ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Stepniewski, Tomasz M; Filipek, Slawomir

    2015-07-15

    Ligands of the FPR2 receptor initiate many signaling pathways including activation of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway. The possible actions include also calcium flux, superoxide generation, as well as migration and proliferation of monocytes. FPR2 activation may induce a pro- and anti-inflammatory effect depending on the ligand type. It is also found that this receptor is involved in tumor growth. Most of currently known FPR2 ligands are agonists since they were designed based on N-formyl peptides, which are natural agonists of formyl receptors. Since the non-peptide drugs are indispensable for effective treatment strategies, we performed a docking study of such ligands employing a generated dual template homology model of the FPR2 receptor. The study revealed different binding modes of particular classes of these drugs. Based on the obtained docking poses we proposed a detailed location of three hydrophobic pockets in orthosteric binding site of FPR2. Our model emphasizes the importance of aromatic stacking, especially with regard to residues His102(3.29) and Phe257(6.51), for binding of FPR2 ligands. We also identified other residues important for non-peptide ligand binding in the binding site of FPR2. PMID:25882522

  2. Mode of binding of the antithyroid drug propylthiouracil to mammalian haem peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Singh, A; Kushwaha, G S; Singh, A K; Kaur, P; Sharma, S; Singh, T P

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian haem peroxidase superfamily consists of myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoperoxidase (LPO), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO). These enzymes catalyze a number of oxidative reactions of inorganic substrates such as Cl(-), Br(-), I(-) and SCN(-) as well as of various organic aromatic compounds. To date, only structures of MPO and LPO are known. The substrate-binding sites in these enzymes are located on the distal haem side. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a potent antithyroid drug that acts by inhibiting the function of TPO. It has also been shown to inhibit the action of LPO. However, its mode of binding to mammalian haem peroxidases is not yet known. In order to determine the mode of its binding to peroxidases, the structure of the complex of LPO with PTU has been determined. It showed that PTU binds to LPO in the substrate-binding site on the distal haem side. The IC50 values for the inhibition of LPO and TPO by PTU are 47 and 30 µM, respectively. A comparision of the residues surrounding the substrate-binding site on the distal haem side in LPO with those in TPO showed that all of the residues were identical except for Ala114 (LPO numbering scheme), which is replaced by Thr205 (TPO numbering scheme) in TPO. A threonine residue in place of alanine in the substrate-binding site may affect the affinity of PTU for peroxidases. PMID:25760705

  3. Investigation of the binding modes between AIE-active molecules and dsDNA by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Ma, Ke; Hu, Ting; Jiang, Bo; Xu, Bin; Tian, Wenjing; Sun, Jing Zhi; Zhang, Wenke

    2015-05-01

    AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active molecules hold promise for the labeling of biomolecules as well as living cells. The study of the binding modes of such molecules to biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, will shed light on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of molecular interactions and eventually facilitate the design/preparation of new AIE-active bioprobes. Herein, we studied the binding modes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with two types of synthetic AIE-active molecules, namely, tetraphenylethene-derived dicationic compounds (cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy) and anthracene-derived dicationic compounds (DSAI and DSABr-C6) using single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The experimental data indicate that DSAI can strongly intercalate into DNA base pairs, while DSABr-C6 is unable to intercalate into DNA due to the steric hindrance of the alkyl side chains. Cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy can also intercalate into DNA base pairs, but the binding shows strong ionic strength dependence. Multiple binding modes of TPEDPy with dsDNA have been discussed. In addition, the electrostatic interaction enhanced intercalation of cis-TPEDPy with dsDNA has also been revealed.AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active molecules hold promise for the labeling of biomolecules as well as living cells. The study of the binding modes of such molecules to biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, will shed light on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of molecular interactions and eventually facilitate the design/preparation of new AIE-active bioprobes. Herein, we studied the binding modes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with two types of synthetic AIE-active molecules, namely, tetraphenylethene-derived dicationic compounds (cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy) and anthracene-derived dicationic compounds (DSAI and DSABr-C6) using single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The

  4. Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method: Hamiltonian Replica Exchange with Torsional Flattening for Binding Mode Prediction and Binding Free Energy Estimation.

    PubMed

    Mentes, Ahmet; Deng, Nan-Jie; Vijayan, R S K; Xia, Junchao; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-05-10

    Molecular dynamics modeling of complex biological systems is limited by finite simulation time. The simulations are often trapped close to local energy minima separated by high energy barriers. Here, we introduce Hamiltonian replica exchange (H-REMD) with torsional flattening in the Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM), to reduce energy barriers along torsional degrees of freedom and accelerate sampling of intramolecular degrees of freedom relevant to protein-ligand binding. The method is tested on a standard benchmark (T4 Lysozyme/L99A/p-xylene complex) and on a library of HIV-1 integrase complexes derived from the SAMPL4 blind challenge. We applied the torsional flattening strategy to 26 of the 53 known binders to the HIV Integrase LEDGF site found to have a binding energy landscape funneled toward the crystal structure. We show that our approach samples the conformational space more efficiently than the original method without flattening when starting from a poorly docked pose with incorrect ligand dihedral angle conformations. In these unfavorable cases convergence to a binding pose within 2-3 Å from the crystallographic pose is obtained within a few nanoseconds of the Hamiltonian replica exchange simulation. We found that torsional flattening is insufficient in cases where trapping is due to factors other than torsional energy, such as the formation of incorrect intramolecular hydrogen bonds and stacking. Work is in progress to generalize the approach to handle these cases and thereby make it more widely applicable. PMID:27070865

  5. Modulation of activation-loop phosphorylation by JAK inhibitors is binding mode dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Débora; Rubert, Joëlle; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Scheufler, Clemens; Marque, Fanny; Régnier, Catherine H.; De Pover, Alain; Ryckelynck, Hugues; Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Goel, Aviva; Wyder, Lorenza; Tavares, Gisele; Baffert, Fabienne; Pissot-Soldermann, Carole; Manley, Paul W.; Gaul, Christoph; Voshol, Hans; Levine, Ross L.; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Radimerski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    JAK inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemias. Most of these drugs target the ATP-binding pocket and stabilize the active conformation of the JAK kinases. This type-I binding mode leads to an increase in JAK activation-loop phosphorylation, despite blockade of kinase function. Here we report that stabilizing the inactive state via type-II inhibition acts in the opposite manner, leading to a loss of activation-loop phosphorylation. We used X-ray crystallography to corroborate the binding mode and report for the first time the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain in an inactive conformation. Importantly, JAK inhibitor-induced activation-loop phosphorylation requires receptor interaction, as well as intact kinase and pseudokinase domains. Hence, depending on the respective conformation stabilized by a JAK inhibitor, hyperphosphorylation of the activation-loop may or may not be elicited. PMID:22684457

  6. The remarkable multiple mode Delta Scuti star BDS 1269A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, B. J.; Horan, S. J.

    1984-07-01

    Over 1600 differential photoelectric Stroemgren b measurements on BDS 1269A obtained during a 6 month period in 1982-1983 have been analyzed using periodiograms and convergent least squares. Seven frequencies are identified in the data set. This frequency set, when combined with other frequencies found in data obtained by Rucinski in 1976, suggests that the main pulsation mode of BDS 1269A is nonradial. The complete frequency representation also includes lower amplitude radial modes. The current analysis suggests that this star may have transferred power into alternative modes since 1976 and in this regard might be similar to another nonradial pulsator, 21 Mon.

  7. Putative binding modes of Ku70-SAP domain with double strand DNA: a molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen; Pluth, Janice M; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-05-01

    The channel structure of the Ku protein elegantly reveals the mechanistic basis of sequence-independent DNA-end binding, which is essential to genome integrity after exposure to ionizing radiation or in V(D)J recombination. However, contradicting evidence indicates that this protein is also involved in the regulation of gene expression and in other regulatory processes with intact chromosomes. This computational study predicts that a putative DNA binding domain of this protein, the SAP domain, can form DNA-bound complexes with relatively high affinities (ΔG ≈ -20 kcal mol(-1)). The binding modes are searched by low frequency vibration modes driven by the fully flexible docking method while binding affinities are calculated by the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. We find this well defined 5 kDa domain with a helix-extended loop-helix structure is suitable to form favorable electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with either the major groove or the minor groove of DNA. The calculation also reveals the sequence specified binding preference which may relate to the observed pause sites when Ku translocates along DNA and the perplex binding of Ku with circular DNA. PMID:21947447

  8. The binding modes and binding affinities of epipodophyllotoxin derivatives with human topoisomerase IIα.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Dubey, Abhishek; Soni, Komal; Kumar, Rishay; Singh, Harvinder

    2010-12-01

    Epipodophyllotoxin derivatives have important therapeutic value in the treatment of human cancers. These drugs kill cells by inhibiting the ability of topoisomerase II (TP II) to ligate nucleic acids that it cleaves during the double-stranded DNA passage reaction. The 3D structure of human TP IIα was modeled by homology modeling. A virtual library consisting of 143 epipodophyllotoxin derivatives has been developed. Their molecular interactions and binding affinities with modeled human TP IIα have been studied using the docking and Bimolecular Association with Energetics (eMBrAcE) developed by Schrödinger. Structure activity relationship models were developed between the experimental activity expressed in terms of percentage of intracellular covalent TP II-DNA complexes (log PCPDCF) of these compounds and molecular descriptors like docking score and free energy of binding. For both the cases the r2 was in the range of 0.624-0.800 indicating good data fit and r2(cv) was in the range of 0.606-774 indicating that the predictive capabilities of the models were acceptable. Low levels of root mean square error for the majority of inhibitors establish the docking and eMBrAcE based prediction model as an efficient tool for generating more potent and specific inhibitors of human TP IIα by testing rationally designed lead compounds based on epipodophyllotoxin derivatization. PMID:21075653

  9. CREB Binds to Multiple Loci on Human Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Euskirchen, Ghia; Royce, Thomas E.; Bertone, Paul; Martone, Rebecca; Rinn, John L.; Nelson, F. Kenneth; Sayward, Fred; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is an important transcription factor that can be activated by hormonal stimulation and regulates neuronal function and development. An unbiased, global analysis of where CREB binds has not been performed. We have mapped for the first time the binding distribution of CREB along an entire human chromosome. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of CREB-associated DNA and subsequent hybridization of the associated DNA to a genomic DNA microarray containing all of the nonrepetitive DNA of human chromosome 22 revealed 215 binding sites corresponding to 192 different loci and 100 annotated potential gene targets. We found binding near or within many genes involved in signal transduction and neuronal function. We also found that only a small fraction of CREB binding sites lay near well-defined 5′ ends of genes; the majority of sites were found elsewhere, including introns and unannotated regions. Several of the latter lay near novel unannotated transcriptionally active regions. Few CREB targets were found near full-length cyclic AMP response element sites; the majority contained shorter versions or close matches to this sequence. Several of the CREB targets were altered in their expression by treatment with forskolin; interestingly, both induced and repressed genes were found. Our results provide novel molecular insights into how CREB mediates its functions in humans. PMID:15082775

  10. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J.; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  11. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  12. Azimuthal Directivity of Fan Tones Containing Multiple Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Nallasamy, M.

    1997-01-01

    The directivity of fan tone noise is generally measured and plotted in the sideline or flyover plane and it is assumed that this curve is the same for all azimuthal angles. When two or more circumferential (m-order) modes of the same tone are present in the fan duct, an interference pattern develops in the azimuthal direction both in the duct and in the farfield. In this investigation two m-order modes of similar power were generated in a large low speed fan. Farfield measurements and a finite element propagation code both show substantial variations in the azimuthal direction. Induct mode measurement were made and used as input to the code. Although these tests may represent a worst case scenario, the validity of the current practice of assuming axisymmetry should be questioned.

  13. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  14. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  15. Deciphering the groove binding modes of tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin with calf thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Mo; Zhang, Guowen; Pan, Junhui; Xiong, Chunhong

    2016-02-01

    Tau-fluvalinate (TFL) and flumethrin (FL), widely used in agriculture and a class of synthetic pyrethroid pesticides with a similar structure, may cause a potential security risk. Herein, the modes of binding in vitro of TFL and FL with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were characterized by fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy with the aid of viscosity measurements, melting analyses and molecular docking studies. The fluorescence titration indicated that both TFL and FL bound to ctDNA forming complexes through hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. The binding constants of TFL and FL with ctDNA were in the range of 104 L mol- 1, and FL exhibited a higher binding propensity than TFL. The iodide quenching effect, single/double-stranded DNA effects, and ctDNA melting and viscosity measurements demonstrated that the binding of both TFL and FL to ctDNA was groove mode. The FT-IR analyses suggested the A-T region of the minor groove of ctDNA as the preferential binding for TFL and FL, which was confirmed by the displacement assays with Hoechst 33258 probe, and the molecular docking visualized the specific binding. The changes in CD spectra indicated that both FL and TFL induced the perturbation on the base stacking and helicity of B-DNA, but the disturbance caused by FL was more obvious. Gel electrophoresis analyses indicated that both TFL and FL did not cause significant DNA cleavage. This study provides novel insights into the binding properties of TFL/FL with ctDNA and its toxic mechanisms.

  16. Influence of the protonation state on the binding mode of methyl orange with cucurbiturils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Suhang; Sun, Xuzhuo; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-03-01

    Binding modes of methyl orange (MO) with cucurbiturils (CBs) have been investigated by Single Crystal X-ray Diffraction and NMR Spectroscopy. Detailed study of intermolecular interactions was supported by the Hirshfeld surface analysis. Protonation state of the anionic part of methyl orange has greatly influenced the binding mode of the complex. Stabilized by hydrogen bonding at the portal, hydrophobic and dispersion interactions in the cavity, the protonated methyl orange was deeply inserted into the cavity. On the contrary, the anionic methyl orange has been pushed towards the outside of the cavity by the electrostatic repulsion between the azo group and the portal oxygen. A "water bridge" was found in MO@CB8 linking both host and guest via hydrogen bonds.

  17. Regulators of complement activity mediate inhibitory mechanisms through a common C3b-binding mode.

    PubMed

    Forneris, Federico; Wu, Jin; Xue, Xiaoguang; Ricklin, Daniel; Lin, Zhuoer; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Volokhina, Elena; Granneman, Joke Cm; Hauhart, Richard; Bertram, Paula; Liszewski, M Kathryn; Atkinson, John P; Lambris, John D; Gros, Piet

    2016-05-17

    Regulators of complement activation (RCA) inhibit complement-induced immune responses on healthy host tissues. We present crystal structures of human RCA (MCP, DAF, and CR1) and a smallpox virus homolog (SPICE) bound to complement component C3b. Our structural data reveal that up to four consecutive homologous CCP domains (i-iv), responsible for inhibition, bind in the same orientation and extended arrangement at a shared binding platform on C3b. Large sequence variations in CCP domains explain the diverse C3b-binding patterns, with limited or no contribution of some individual domains, while all regulators show extensive contacts with C3b for the domains at the third site. A variation of ~100° rotation around the longitudinal axis is observed for domains binding at the fourth site on C3b, without affecting the overall binding mode. The data suggest a common evolutionary origin for both inhibitory mechanisms, called decay acceleration and cofactor activity, with variable C3b binding through domains at sites ii, iii, and iv, and provide a framework for understanding RCA disease-related mutations and immune evasion. PMID:27013439

  18. Analysis of the binding mode of laulimalide to microtubules: Establishing a laulimalide-tubulin pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Cassandra D M; Klobukowski, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2016-07-01

    Laulimalide (LA) is a microtubule-stabilizing agent, currently in preclinical studies. However, studying the binding of this species and successfully synthesizing potent analogues have been challenging. The LA binding site is located between tubulin protofilaments, and therefore LA is in contact with two adjacent [Formula: see text]-tubulin units. Here, an improved model of the binding mode of LA in microtubules is presented, using the newly available crystal structure pose and an extended tubulin heterodimer complex, as well as molecular dynamics simulations. With this model, a series of LA analogues developed by Mooberry and coworkers are also analyzed in order to establish important pharmacophores in LA binding and cytotoxicity. In the side chain, [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] interactions are important contributors to LA binding, as are water-mediated hydrogen bonds. An intramolecular hydrogen bond is correlated with high cytotoxicity, and is dependent on macrocycle conformation. Therefore, while the epoxide and olefin groups in the macrocycle do not engage in specific interactions with the protein, they are essential contributions to an active macrocycle conformation, and therefore potency. Calculations reveal that a balance in binding affinity is important for LA activity, where the more potent compounds have larger interactions with the adjacent tubulin unit than the less-active analogs. Several modifications are suggested for the rational design of LA analogues that should not disrupt the active macrocycle conformation. PMID:26230757

  19. Proposed Mode of Binding and Action of Positive Allosteric Modulators at Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yi; Yeatman, Holly R; Provasi, Davide; Alt, Andrew; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell; Filizola, Marta

    2016-05-20

    Available crystal structures of opioid receptors provide a high-resolution picture of ligand binding at the primary ("orthosteric") site, that is, the site targeted by endogenous ligands. Recently, positive allosteric modulators of opioid receptors have also been discovered, but their modes of binding and action remain unknown. Here, we use a metadynamics-based strategy to efficiently sample the binding process of a recently discovered positive allosteric modulator of the δ-opioid receptor, BMS-986187, in the presence of the orthosteric agonist SNC-80, and with the receptor embedded in an explicit lipid-water environment. The dynamics of BMS-986187 were enhanced by biasing the potential acting on the ligand-receptor distance and ligand-receptor interaction contacts. Representative lowest-energy structures from the reconstructed free-energy landscape revealed two alternative ligand binding poses at an allosteric site delineated by transmembrane (TM) helices TM1, TM2, and TM7, with some participation of TM6. Mutations of amino acid residues at these proposed allosteric sites were found to either affect the binding of BMS-986187 or its ability to modulate the affinity and/or efficacy of SNC-80. Taken together, these combined experimental and computational studies provide the first atomic-level insight into the modulation of opioid receptor binding and signaling by allosteric modulators. PMID:26841170

  20. 2,4-Diaminopyrimidine MK2 inhibitors. Part I: Observation of an unexpected inhibitor binding mode

    SciTech Connect

    Argiriadi, Maria A.; Ericsson, Anna M.; Harris, Christopher M.; Banach, David L.; Borhani, David W.; Calderwood, David J.; Demers, Megan D.; DiMauro, Jennifer; Dixon, Richard W.; Hardman, Jennifer; Kwak, Silvia; Li, Biqin; Mankovich, John A.; Marcotte, Douglas; Mullen, Kelly D.; Ni, Baofu; Pietras, M.; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Sousa, Silvino; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Wang, L.; Xiang, T.; Talanian, R.V.

    2010-09-17

    MK2 is a Ser/Thr kinase of significant interest as an anti-inflammatory drug discovery target. Here we describe the development of in vitro tools for the identification and characterization of MK2 inhibitors, including validation of inhibitor interactions with the crystallography construct and determination of the unique binding mode of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine inhibitors in the MK2 active site.

  1. A generic mode selection strategy for high-order mode gyrotrons operating at multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Joachim; Avramidis, Konstantinos; Gantenbein, Gerd; Illy, Stefan; Jin, Jianbo; Thumm, Manfred; Jelonnek, John

    2015-01-01

    High-power, high-frequency gyrotrons for electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive, such as proposed for the demonstration thermonuclear fusion reactor DEMO, require operating modes of very high order. As it is shown, the selection of the operating modes for such gyrotrons can be based on multi-frequency operability. A general selection strategy is derived, suitable for multi-purpose multi-frequency gyrotrons with quasi-optical mode converter and single-disc output window. Two examples, one of them relevant for future DEMO gyrotron designs, are discussed.

  2. Pulsed squeezed light: Simultaneous squeezing of multiple modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wasilewski, Wojciech; Lvovsky, A. I.; Banaszek, Konrad; Radzewicz, Czeslaw

    2006-06-15

    We analyze the spectral properties of squeezed light produced by means of pulsed, single-pass degenerate parametric down-conversion. The multimode output of this process can be decomposed into characteristic modes undergoing independent squeezing evolution akin to the Schmidt decomposition of the biphoton spectrum. The main features of this decomposition can be understood using a simple analytical model developed in the perturbative regime. In the strong pumping regime, for which the perturbative approach is not valid, we present a numerical analysis, specializing to the case of one-dimensional propagation in a beta-barium borate waveguide. Characterization of the squeezing modes provides us with an insight necessary for optimizing homodyne detection of squeezing. For a weak parametric process, efficient squeezing is found in a broad range of local oscillator modes, whereas the intense generation regime places much more stringent conditions on the local oscillator. We point out that without meeting these conditions, the detected squeezing can actually diminish with the increasing pumping strength, and we expose physical reasons behind this inefficiency.

  3. Multiple approaches to assess pectin binding to galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Zhao, Dongyang; Yan, Jingmin; Sun, Chongliang; Zhou, Yifa; Tai, Guihua

    2016-10-01

    Although several approaches have been used to evaluate binding of carbohydrates to lectins, results are not always comparable, especially with larger polysaccharides. Here, we quantitatively assessed and compared binding of pectin-derived polysaccharides to galectin-3 (Gal-3) using five methods: surface plasmon resonance (SPR), bio-layer interferometry (BLI), fluorescence polarization (FP), competitive fluorescence-linked immunosorbance (cFLISA), and the well-known cell-based hemagglutination assay (G3H). Our studies revealed that whereas Gal-3-pectin binding parameters determined by SPR and BLI were comparable and correlated with inhibitory potencies from the G3H assay, results using FP and cFLISA assays were highly variable and depended greatly on the probe and mass of the polysaccharide. In the cFLISA assay, for example, pectins showed no inhibition when using the DTAF-labeled asialofetuin probe, but did when using a DTAF-labeled pectin probe. And the FP approach with the DTAF-lactose probe did not work on polysaccharides and large galactan chains, although it did work well with smaller galactans. Nevertheless, even though results derived from all of these methods are in general agreement, derived KD, IC50, and MIC values do differ. Our results reflect the variability using various techniques and therefore will be useful to investigators who are developing pectin-derived Gal-3 antagonists as anti-cancer agents. PMID:27328612

  4. Multiple Binding Poses in the Hydrophobic Cavity of Bee Odorant Binding Protein AmelOBP14.

    PubMed

    Pechlaner, Maria; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2015-12-28

    In the first step of olfaction, odorants are bound and solubilized by small globular odorant binding proteins (OBPs) which shuttle them to the membrane of a sensory neuron. Low ligand affinity and selectivity at this step enable the recognition of a wide range of chemicals. Honey bee Apis mellifera's OBP14 (AmelOBP14) binds different plant odorants in a largely hydrophobic cavity. In long molecular dynamics simulations in the presence and absence of ligand eugenol, we observe a highly dynamic C-terminal region which forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity, and the ligand drifts away from its crystallized orientation. Hamiltonian replica exchange simulations, allowing exchanges of conformations sampled by the real ligand with those sampled by a noninteracting dummy molecule and several intermediates, suggest an alternative, quite different ligand pose which is adopted immediately and which is stable in long simulations. Thermodynamic integration yields binding free energies which are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. PMID:26633245

  5. Strategies to control the binding mode of de novo designed protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Der, Bryan S.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2013-01-01

    There has been significant recent progress in the computational design of protein interactions including the creation of novel heterodimers, homodimers, nanohedra, fibril caps and a protein crystal. Essential to these successes has been the use of innovative strategies for finding binding modes that are achievable, i.e. identifying binding partners and docked conformations that can be successfully stabilized via sequence optimization and backbone refinement. In many cases this has involved the use of structural motifs commonly found at naturally occurring interfaces including alpha helices inserted into hydrophobic grooves, beta-strand pairing, metal binding, established helix packing motifs, and the use of symmetry to form cooperative interactions. Future challenges include the creation of hydrogen bond networks and antibody-like interactions based on the redesign of protein surface loops. PMID:23731800

  6. Elucidating Binding Modes of Zuonin A Enantiomers to JNK1 via in silico methods

    PubMed Central

    Dykstra, Daniel W.; Dalby, Kevin N.; Ren, Pengyu

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling is associated with a number of diseases, including neurological conditions and cancer. Enantiomers of the lignan zuonin A, (−)-zuonin A and (+)-zuonin A bind isoforms of JNK with similar affinity and disrupt protein-protein interactions at JNK’s D-recruitment site. Thus, they are of interest as lead non-ATP competitive inhibitors of the JNKs. While (−)-zuonin A inhibits the activity of JNK towards c-Jun by 80% when saturating, (+)-zuonin A only inhibits by 15%. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to gain a better understanding of how these inhibitors interact with JNK. The results of this study provide new insight into potential binding modes for (−)-zuonin A and suggest that (−)-zuonin A interacts with JNK via an induced fit mechanism near the highly conserved ϕA-X-ϕB recognition site. Binding of (+)-zuonin A to JNK displays no such dynamic feature. The different binding modes may help explain differences in the inhibitory properties of the enantiomers although further experimental work would be necessary to fully confirm this interpretation. PMID:24001752

  7. Different modes of lipid binding to membrane proteins probed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Robinson, Carol V

    2015-04-29

    The realization that the lipid environment is crucial for maintaining the structure and function of membrane proteins prompts new methods to understand lipid interactions. One such method, mass spectrometry, is emerging with the potential to monitor different modes of lipid binding to membrane protein complexes. Initial studies monitored the addition of lipids and deduced the kinetic and thermodynamic effects of lipid binding to proteins. Recent efforts however have focused on identifying lipids already present, explicitly in plugs, annular rings, or cavities. Lipids that bind within these orifices to membrane proteins will have higher residence times than those in the bulk lipid bilayer and consequently can be quantified and characterized by mass spectrometry. In special cases, lipids identified within cavities have been proposed as substrates following activity assays. Alternatively, a gas-phase unfolding protocol can be used to distinguish lipids that are important for stability. These lipids can subsequently be added during crystallization for the characterization of lipid-bound protein complexes. Overall therefore this Perspective provides an overview of recent advances in mass spectrometry, with a particular focus on the distinction of the various modes of lipid binding, and their implications for structure and function as well as new directions that lie ahead. PMID:25860341

  8. Investigation of microwave photonic filter based on multiple longitudinal modes fiber laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuan; Li, Feng; Feng, Xinhuan; Lu, Chao; Guan, Bai-ou; Wai, P. K. A.

    2015-06-01

    We theoretically study the transfer function of a finite impulse response microwave photonic filter (FIR-MPF) system using a multi-wavelength fiber laser source by considering multiple longitudinal modes in each wavelength. The full response function with the response from longitudinal mode taps is obtained. We also discussed the influence of the longitudinal mode envelope and mode spacing on the performance of FIR-MPF. The response function of the longitudinal mode taps is fully discussed and the contribution is compared with the response of the carrier suppression factor for double sideband (DSB) modulation. The multiple longitudinal modes structure in the wavelength taps can be utilized to engineer the response of the FIR-MPF such that desirable features such as high side lode suppression ratio can be realized. The analysis provides a guideline for designing incoherent FIR-MPF systems.

  9. Binding of Cryptococcus neoformans by human cultured macrophages. Requirements for multiple complement receptors and actin.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; Tabuni, A

    1991-01-01

    We studied the receptors on human cultured macrophages (MO-M phi) responsible for binding encapsulated and isogenic mutant acapsular strains of Cryptococcus neoformans, and whether such binding leads to a phagocytic event. Both strains required opsonization with complement components in normal human serum in order for binding to occur. Binding of the acapsular, but not the encapsulated, strain led to phagocytosis. MAb directed against any of the three defined complement receptors (CR) on MO-M phi (CR1, CR3, and CR4) profoundly inhibited binding of serum-opsonized encapsulated (and to a lesser extent acapsular) organisms to MO-M phi. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated migration of CR to the area of the cryptococcal binding site. Trypsin and elastase inhibited binding of encapsulated and, to a lesser extent, acapsular yeasts to MO-M phi. Binding of encapsulated C. neoformans was profoundly inhibited by incubation in the cold or by inhibitors of receptor capping and actin microfilaments. Thus, multiple CR appear to contribute to binding of serum-opsonized encapsulated C. neoformans by MO-M phi. Binding is an energy-dependent process that requires conformational changes in actin yet does not lead to phagocytosis of the organism. In contrast, energy is not required for binding of acapsular yeasts by MO-M phi and binding triggers phagocytosis. Images PMID:1991837

  10. Measuring atmospheric dispersion with WLRS in multiple wavelength mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Haufe, K. H.; Dassing, Reiner

    1993-01-01

    The WLRS (Wettzell Laser Ranging System) allows the simultaneous tracking of satellites on two different wavelengths. These are the fundamental frequency of Nd:YAG at 1.064 microns and the second harmonic at 532 nm. Range measurements to the satellite LAGEOS were carried out with different experimental set-ups, after developing a detector unit based on a silicon avalanche photodiode in Geiger mode, which is sufficiently sensitive in the infrared domain. An approach towards a quantitative interpretation of the data is suggested and discussed briefly.

  11. Expected Multiple-Choice Test Item Scores Under Ordinal Response Modes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frary, Robert B.

    Ordinal response modes for multiple choice tests are those under which the examinee marks one or more choices in an effort to identify the correct choice, or include it in a proper subset of the choices. Two ordinal response modes: answer-until-correct, and Coomb's elimination of choices which examinees identify as wrong, were analyzed for scoring…

  12. Concentric core optical fiber with multiple-mode signal transmission

    DOEpatents

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1997-01-01

    A concentric core optical fiber provides for the simultaneous but independent transmission of signals over a single optical fiber. The concentric optical fiber is constructed of a single-mode or multimode inner optical fiber defined by a core and a cladding of a lower index of refraction than the core and an outer optical fiber defined by additional cladding concentrically disposed around the cladding and of an index of refraction lower than the first mentioned cladding whereby the latter functions as the core of the outer optical fiber. By employing such an optical fiber construction with a single-mode inner core or optical fiber, highly sensitive interferometric and stable less sensitive amplitude based sensors can be placed along the same length of a concentric core optical fiber. Also, by employing the concentric core optical fiber secure telecommunications can be achieved via the inner optical fiber since an intrusion of the concentric optical fiber will first cause a variation in the light being transmitted through the outer optical fiber and this variation of light being used to trigger a suitable alarm indicative of the intrusion.

  13. Concentric core optical fiber with multiple-mode signal transmission

    DOEpatents

    Muhs, J.D.

    1997-05-06

    A concentric core optical fiber provides for the simultaneous but independent transmission of signals over a single optical fiber. The concentric optical fiber is constructed of a single-mode or multimode inner optical fiber defined by a core and a cladding of a lower index of refraction than the core and an outer optical fiber defined by additional cladding concentrically disposed around the cladding and of an index of refraction lower than the first mentioned cladding whereby the latter functions as the core of the outer optical fiber. By employing such an optical fiber construction with a single-mode inner core or optical fiber, highly sensitive interferometric and stable less sensitive amplitude based sensors can be placed along the same length of a concentric core optical fiber. Also, by employing the concentric core optical fiber secure telecommunications can be achieved via the inner optical fiber since an intrusion of the concentric optical fiber will first cause a variation in the light being transmitted through the outer optical fiber and this variation of light being used to trigger a suitable alarm indicative of the intrusion. 3 figs.

  14. Binding Modes of Zaragozic Acid A to Human Squalene Synthase and Staphylococcal Dehydrosqualene Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-I; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Chang, Wei-Jung; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Zaragozic acids (ZAs) belong to a family of fungal metabolites with nanomolar inhibitory activity toward squalene synthase (SQS). The enzyme catalyzes the committed step of sterol synthesis and has attracted attention as a potential target for antilipogenic and antiinfective therapies. Here, we have determined the structure of ZA-A complexed with human SQS. ZA-A binding induces a local conformational change in the substrate binding site, and its C-6 acyl group also extends over to the cofactor binding cavity. In addition, ZA-A effectively inhibits a homologous bacterial enzyme, dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM), which synthesizes the precursor of staphyloxanthin in Staphylococcus aureus to cope with oxidative stress. Size reduction at Tyr248 in CrtM further increases the ZA-A binding affinity, and it reveals a similar overall inhibitor binding mode to that of human SQS/ZA-A except for the C-6 acyl group. These structures pave the way for further improving selectivity and development of a new generation of anticholesterolemic and antimicrobial inhibitors. PMID:22474324

  15. Binding modes of zaragozic acid A to human squalene synthase and staphylococcal dehydrosqualene synthase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-I; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Chang, Wei-Jung; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2012-05-25

    Zaragozic acids (ZAs) belong to a family of fungal metabolites with nanomolar inhibitory activity toward squalene synthase (SQS). The enzyme catalyzes the committed step of sterol synthesis and has attracted attention as a potential target for antilipogenic and antiinfective therapies. Here, we have determined the structure of ZA-A complexed with human SQS. ZA-A binding induces a local conformational change in the substrate binding site, and its C-6 acyl group also extends over to the cofactor binding cavity. In addition, ZA-A effectively inhibits a homologous bacterial enzyme, dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM), which synthesizes the precursor of staphyloxanthin in Staphylococcus aureus to cope with oxidative stress. Size reduction at Tyr(248) in CrtM further increases the ZA-A binding affinity, and it reveals a similar overall inhibitor binding mode to that of human SQS/ZA-A except for the C-6 acyl group. These structures pave the way for further improving selectivity and development of a new generation of anticholesterolemic and antimicrobial inhibitors. PMID:22474324

  16. The Octarepeat Domain of the Prion Protein Binds Cu(II) with Three Distinct Coordination Modes at pH 7.4

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Madhuri; Walter, Eric D.; Newell, Dustin J.; Jackson, Pilgrim J.; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Peisach, Jack; Gerfen, Gary J.; Bennett, Brian; Antholine, William E.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2010-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) binds Cu2+ in its N-terminal octarepeat domain. This unusual domain is comprised of four or more tandem repeats of the fundamental sequence PHGGGWGQ. Previous work from our laboratories demonstrates that at full copper occupancy, each HGGGW segment binds a single Cu2+. However, several recent studies suggest that low copper occupancy favors different coordination modes, possibly involving imidazoles from histidines in adjacent octapeptide segments. This is investigated here using a combination of X-band EPR, S-band EPR, and ESEEM, along with a library of modified peptides designed to favor different coordination interactions. At pH 7.4, three distinct coordination modes are identified. Each mode is fully characterized to reveal a series of copper-dependent octarepeat domain structures. Multiple His coordination is clearly identified at low copper stoichiometry. In addition, EPR detected copper–copper interactions at full occupancy suggest that the octarepeat domain partially collapses, perhaps stabilizing this specific binding mode and facilitating cooperative copper uptake. This work provides the first complete characterization of all dominant copper coordination modes at pH 7.4. PMID:16144413

  17. Binding mode of dihydroquinazolinones with lysozyme and its antifungal activity against Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, K; Madhumitha, G; Ravi, Lokesh; Khanna, V Gopiesh; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan

    2016-08-01

    Aspergillosis is one of the infectious fungal diseases affecting mainly the immunocompromised patients. The scarcity of the antifungal targets has identified the importance of N-myristoyl transferase (NMT) in the regulation of fungal pathway. The dihydroquinazolinone molecules were designed on the basis of fragments responsible for binding with the target enzyme. The aryl halide, 1(a-g), aryl boronic acid and potassium carbonate were heated together in water and dioxane mixture to yield new CC bond formation in dihydroquinazolinone. The bis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(II) dichloride was used as catalyst for the CC bond formation. The synthesized series were screened for their in vitro antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus fumigatus. The binding interactions of the active compound with lysozyme were explored using multiple spectroscopic studies. Molecular docking study of dihydroquinazolinones with the enzyme revealed the information regarding various binding forces involved in the interaction. PMID:27214045

  18. Multiple Binding Poses in the Hydrophobic Cavity of Bee Odorant Binding Protein AmelOBP14

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the first step of olfaction, odorants are bound and solubilized by small globular odorant binding proteins (OBPs) which shuttle them to the membrane of a sensory neuron. Low ligand affinity and selectivity at this step enable the recognition of a wide range of chemicals. Honey bee Apis mellifera’s OBP14 (AmelOBP14) binds different plant odorants in a largely hydrophobic cavity. In long molecular dynamics simulations in the presence and absence of ligand eugenol, we observe a highly dynamic C-terminal region which forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity, and the ligand drifts away from its crystallized orientation. Hamiltonian replica exchange simulations, allowing exchanges of conformations sampled by the real ligand with those sampled by a noninteracting dummy molecule and several intermediates, suggest an alternative, quite different ligand pose which is adopted immediately and which is stable in long simulations. Thermodynamic integration yields binding free energies which are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. PMID:26633245

  19. Enhancing The Mode Conversion Efficiency In JET Plasmas With Multiple Mode Conversion Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Ongena, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Beaumont, P.; Blackman, T.; Brennan, D.; Brett, A.; Coffey, I.; Coyne, A.; Felton, R.; Giroud, C.; Jacquet, P.; Kiptily, V.; Knipe, S.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Pangioni, L.

    2011-12-23

    The constructive interference effect described by Fuchs et al. [1] shows that the mode conversion and thereby the overall heating efficiency can be enhanced significantly when an integer number of fast wave wavelengths can be folded in between the high field side fast wave cutoff and the ion-ion hybrid layer(s) at which the ion Bernstein or ion cyclotron waves are excited. This effect was already experimentally identified in ({sup 3}He)-D plasmas [2] and was recently tested in ({sup 3}He)-H JET plasmas. The latter is an 'inverted' scenario, which differs significantly from the ({sup 3}He)-D scenarios since the mode-conversion layer is positioned between the low field side edge of the plasma and the ion-cyclotron layer of the minority {sup 3}He ions (whereas the order in which a wave entering the plasma from the low field side encounters these layers is inverted in a 'regular' scenario), and because much lower {sup 3}He concentrations are needed to achieve the mode-conversion heating regime. The presence of small amounts of {sup 4}He and D in the discharges gave rise to an additional mode conversion layer on top of the expected one associated with {sup 3}He-H, which made the interpretation of the results more complex but also more interesting: Three different regimes could be distinguished as a function of X[{sup 3}He], and the differing dynamics at the various concentrations could be traced back to the presence of these two mode conversion layers and their associated fast wave cutoffs. Whereas (1-D and 2-D) numerical modeling yields quantitative information on the RF absorptivity, recent analytical work by Kazakov [3] permits to grasp the dominant underlying wave interaction physics.

  20. Family 42 carbohydrate-binding modules display multiple arabinoxylan-binding interfaces presenting different ligand affinities.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Teresa; Santos-Silva, Teresa; Alves, Victor D; Dias, Fernando M V; Luís, Ana S; Prates, José A M; Ferreira, Luís M A; Romão, Maria J; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2010-10-01

    Enzymes that degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides display a modular architecture comprising a catalytic domain bound to one or more non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). CBMs display considerable variation in primary structure and are grouped into 59 sequence-based families organized in the Carbohydrate-Active enZYme (CAZy) database. Here we report the crystal structure of CtCBM42A together with the biochemical characterization of two other members of family 42 CBMs from Clostridium thermocellum. CtCBM42A, CtCBM42B and CtCBM42C bind specifically to the arabinose side-chains of arabinoxylans and arabinan, suggesting that various cellulosomal components are targeted to these regions of the plant cell wall. The structure of CtCBM42A displays a beta-trefoil fold, which comprises 3 sub-domains designated as alpha, beta and gamma. Each one of the three sub-domains presents a putative carbohydrate-binding pocket where an aspartate residue located in a central position dominates ligand recognition. Intriguingly, the gamma sub-domain of CtCBM42A is pivotal for arabinoxylan binding, while the concerted action of beta and gamma sub-domains of CtCBM42B and CtCBM42C is apparently required for ligand sequestration. Thus, this work reveals that the binding mechanism of CBM42 members is in contrast with that of homologous CBM13s where recognition of complex polysaccharides results from the cooperative action of three protein sub-domains presenting similar affinities. PMID:20637315

  1. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L.; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1–ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity. PMID:26719417

  2. Different Binding Modes of Small and Large Binders of GAT1.

    PubMed

    Wein, Thomas; Petrera, Marilena; Allmendinger, Lars; Höfner, Georg; Pabel, Jörg; Wanner, Klaus T

    2016-03-01

    Well-known inhibitors of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter GAT1 share a common scaffold of a small cyclic amino acid linked by an alkyl chain to a moiety with two aromatic rings. Tiagabine, the only FDA-approved GAT1 inhibitor, is a typical example. Some small amino acids such as (R)-nipecotic acid are medium-to-strong binders of GAT1, but similar compounds, such as proline, are very weak binders. When substituted with 4,4-diphenylbut-3-en-1-yl (DPB) or 4,4-bis(3-methylthiophen-2-yl)but-3-en-1-yl (BTB) groups, the resulting compounds have similar pKi and pIC50 values, even though the pure amino acids have very different values. To investigate if small amino acids and their substituted counterparts share a similar binding mode, we synthesized butyl-, DPB-, and BTB-substituted derivatives of small amino acids. Supported by the results of docking studies, we propose different binding modes not only for unsubstituted und substituted, but also for strong- and weak-binding amino acids. These data lead to the conclusion that following a fragment-based approach, not pure but N-butyl-substituted amino acids should be used as starting points, giving a better estimate of the activity when a BTB or DPB substituent is added. PMID:26804464

  3. In-silico identification of the binding mode of synthesized adamantyl derivatives inside cholinesterase enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aboudi, Amal; Al-Qawasmeh, Raed A; Shahwan, Alaa; Mahmood, Uzma; Khalid, Asaad; Ul-Haq, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the binding mode of synthesized adamantly derivatives inside of cholinesterase enzymes using molecular docking simulations. Methods: A series of hybrid compounds containing adamantane and hydrazide moieties was designed and synthesized. Their inhibitory activities against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and (butyrylcholinesterase) BChE were assessed in vitro. The binding mode of the compounds inside cholinesterase enzymes was investigated using Surflex-Dock package of Sybyl7.3 software. Results: A total of 26 adamantyl derivatives were synthesized. Among them, adamantane-1-carboxylic acid hydrazide had an almost equal inhibitory activity towards both enzymes, whereas 10 other compounds exhibited moderate inhibitory activity against BChE. The molecular docking studies demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions between the compounds and their surrounding residues in the active site played predominant roles, while hydrophilic interactions were also found. When the compounds were docked inside each enzyme, they exhibited stronger interactions with BChE over AChE, possibly due to the larger active site of BChE. The binding affinities of the compounds for BChE and AChE estimated were in agreement with the experimental data. Conclusion: The new adamantly derivatives selectively inhibit BChE with respect to AChE, thus making them good candidates for testing the hypothesis that BChE inhibitors would be more efficient and better tolerated than AChE inhibitors in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25937631

  4. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin.

    PubMed

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-12

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1-ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity. PMID:26719417

  5. Measuring spatial accessibility to healthcare for populations with multiple transportation modes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liang; Nekorchuk, Dawn

    2013-11-01

    Few measures of healthcare accessibility have considered multiple transportation modes when people seek healthcare. Based on the framework of the 2 Step Floating Catchment Area Method (2SFCAM), we proposed an innovative method to incorporate transportation modes into the accessibility estimation. Taking Florida, USA, as a study area, we illustrated the implementation of the multi-mode 2SFCAM, and compared the accessibility estimates with those from the traditional single-mode 2SFCAM. The results suggest that the multi-modal method, by accounting for heterogeneity in populations, provides more realistic accessibility estimations, and thus offers a better guidance for policy makers to mitigate health inequity issues. PMID:24077335

  6. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Waldbusser, George G.; Hales, Burke; Langdon, Chris J.; Haley, Brian A.; Schrader, Paul; Brunner, Elizabeth L.; Gray, Matthew W.; Miller, Cale A.; Gimenez, Iria; Hutchinson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is altering the chemistry of the world’s oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4) with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material affected only by

  7. Molecular Modeling Approaches to Study the Binding Mode on Tubulin of Microtubule Destabilizing and Stabilizing Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Maurizio; Forli, Stefano; Magnani, Matteo; Manetti, Fabrizio

    Tubulin targeting agents constitute an important class of anticancer drugs. By acting either as microtubule stabilizers or destabilizers, they disrupt microtubule dynamics, thus inducing mitotic arrest and, ultimately, cell death by apoptosis. Three different binding sites, whose exact location on tubulin has been experimentally detected, have been identified so far for antimitotic compound targeting microtubules, namely the taxoid, the colchicine and the vinka alkaloid binding site. A number of ligand- and structure-based molecular modeling studies in this field has been reported over the years, aimed at elucidating the binding modes of both stabilizing and destabilizing agent, as well as the molecular features responsible for their efficacious interaction with tubulin. Such studies are described in this review, focusing on information provided by different modeling approaches on the structural determinants of antitubulin agents and the interactions with the binding pockets on tubulin emerged as fundamental for antitumor activity.To describe molecular modeling approaches applied to date to molecules known to bind microtubules, this paper has been divided into two main parts: microtubule destabilizing (Part 1) and stabilizing (Part 2) agents. The first part includes structure-based and ligand-based approaches to study molecules targeting colchicine (1.1) and vinca alkaloid (1.2) binding sites, respectively. In the second part, the studies performed on microtubule-stabilizing antimitotic agents (MSAA) are described. Starting from the first representative compound of this class, paclitaxel, molecular modeling studies (quantitative structure-activity relationships - QSAR - and structure-based approaches), performed on natural compounds acting with the same mechanism of action and temptative common pharmacophoric hypotheses for all of these compounds, are reported.

  8. Distinct Pose of Discodermolide in Taxol Binding Pocket Drives a Complementary Mode of Microtubule Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Khrapunovich-Baine, Marina; Menon, Vilas; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Smith, Amos B.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Fiser, Andras; Horwitz, Susan Band; Xiao, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton has proven to be an effective target for cancer therapeutics. One class of drugs, known as microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs), binds to microtubule polymers and stabilizes them against depolymerization. The prototype of this group of drugs, Taxol, is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used extensively in the treatment of human ovarian, breast, and lung carcinomas. Although electron crystallography and photoaffinity labeling experiments determined that the binding site for Taxol is in a hydrophobic pocket in β-tubulin, little was known about the effects of this drug on the conformation of the entire microtubule. A recent study from our laboratory utilizing hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) in concert with various mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has provided new information on the structure of microtubules upon Taxol binding. In the current study we apply this technique to determine the binding mode and the conformational effects on chicken erythrocyte tubulin (CET) of another MSA, discodermolide, whose synthetic analogues may have potential use in the clinic. We confirmed that like Taxol, discodermolide binds to the taxane binding pocket in β-tubulin. However, as opposed to Taxol, which has major interactions with the M-loop, discodermolide orients itself away from this loop and towards the N-terminal H1–S2 loop. Additionally, discodermolide stabilizes microtubules mainly via its effects on interdimer contacts, specifically on the α-tubulin side, and to a lesser extent on interprotofilament contacts between adjacent β-tubulin subunits. Also, our results indicate complementary stabilizing effects of Taxol and discodermolide on the microtubules, which may explain the synergy observed between the two drugs in vivo. PMID:19863156

  9. Mapping Inhibitor Binding Modes on an Active Cysteine Protease via NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gregory M.; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H.; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin-L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. We report an auto-induction methodology that provides soluble-cruzain at high yields (> 30 mg per liter in minimal media). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in NMR-based ligand mapping. Using CD and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective 15N-Cys, 15N-His, and 13C-Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verifies that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely covalent, non-covalent, and non-interacting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions in order to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies. PMID:23181936

  10. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants ( Kb) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH 2 (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  11. A novel hypothesis for the binding mode of HERG channel blockers

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Han . E-mail: hchoe@amc.seoul.kr; Nah, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Soo Nam; Lee, Han Sam; Lee, Hui Sun; Jo, Su Hyun; Leem, Chae Hun; Jang, Yeon Jin

    2006-05-26

    We present a new docking model for HERG channel blockade. Our new model suggests three key interactions such that (1) a protonated nitrogen of the channel blocker forms a hydrogen bond with the carbonyl oxygen of HERG residue T623; (2) an aromatic moiety of the channel blocker makes a {pi}-{pi} interaction with the aromatic ring of HERG residue Y652; and (3) a hydrophobic group of the channel blocker forms a hydrophobic interaction with the benzene ring of HERG residue F656. The previous model assumes two interactions such that (1) a protonated nitrogen of the channel blocker forms a cation-{pi} interaction with the aromatic ring of HERG residue Y652; and (2) a hydrophobic group of the channel blocker forms a hydrophobic interaction with the benzene ring of HERG residue F656. To test these models, we classified 69 known HERG channel blockers into eight binding types based on their plausible binding modes, and further categorized them into two groups based on the number of interactions our model would predict with the HERG channel (two or three). We then compared the pIC{sub 5} value distributions between these two groups. If the old hypothesis is correct, the distributions should not differ between the two groups (i.e., both groups show only two binding interactions). If our novel hypothesis is correct, the distributions should differ between Groups 1 and 2. Consistent with our hypothesis, the two groups differed with regard to pIC{sub 5}, and the group having more predicted interactions with the HERG channel had a higher mean pIC{sub 5} value. Although additional work will be required to further validate our hypothesis, this improved understanding of the HERG channel blocker binding mode may help promote the development of in silico predictions methods for identifying potential HERG channel blockers.

  12. Distinct ETA receptor binding mode of macitentan as determined by site directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Bur, Daniel; Bolli, Martin H; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The competitive endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) bosentan and ambrisentan, which have long been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, are characterized by very short (1 min) occupancy half-lives at the ET(A) receptor. The novel ERA macitentan, displays a 20-fold increased receptor occupancy half-life, causing insurmountable antagonism of ET-1-induced signaling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We show here that the slow ET(A) receptor dissociation rate of macitentan was shared with a set of structural analogs, whereas compounds structurally related to bosentan displayed fast dissociation kinetics. NMR analysis showed that macitentan adopts a compact structure in aqueous solution and molecular modeling suggests that this conformation tightly fits into a well-defined ET(A) receptor binding pocket. In contrast the structurally different and negatively charged bosentan-type molecules only partially filled this pocket and expanded into an extended endothelin binding site. To further investigate these different ET(A) receptor-antagonist interaction modes, we performed functional studies using ET(A) receptor variants harboring amino acid point mutations in the presumed ERA interaction site. Three ET(A) receptor residues significantly and differentially affected ERA activity: Mutation R326Q did not affect the antagonist activity of macitentan, however the potencies of bosentan and ambrisentan were significantly reduced; mutation L322A rendered macitentan less potent, whereas bosentan and ambrisentan were unaffected; mutation I355A significantly reduced bosentan potency, but not ambrisentan and macitentan potencies. This suggests that--in contrast to bosentan and ambrisentan--macitentan-ET(A) receptor binding is not dependent on strong charge-charge interactions, but depends predominantly on hydrophobic interactions. This different binding mode could be the reason for macitentan's sustained target occupancy and insurmountable

  13. Nanohole Arrays of Mixed Designs and Microwriting for Simultaneous and Multiple Protein Binding Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jin; Yang, Jiun-Chan; Larson, Dale N.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate using nanohole arrays of mixed designs and a microwriting process based on dip-pen nanolithography to monitor multiple, different protein binding events simultaneously in real time based on the intensity of Extraordinary Optical Transmission of nanohole arrays. The microwriting process and small footprint of the individual nanohole arrays enabled us to observe different binding events located only 16μm apart, achieving high spatial resolution. We also present a novel concept that incorporates nanohole arrays of different designs to improve confidence and accuracy of binding studies. For proof of concept, two types of nanohole arrays, designed to exhibit opposite responses to protein bindings, were fabricated on one transducer. Initial studies indicate that the mixed designs could help to screen out artifacts such as protein intrinsic signals, providing improved accuracy of binding interpretation. PMID:19297143

  14. Structural investigations into the binding mode of novel neolignans Cmp10 and Cmp19 microtubule stabilizers by in silico molecular docking, molecular dynamics, and binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Shubhandra; Kumar, Akhil; Kumar, B Sathish; Negi, Arvind S; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-06-01

    Microtubule stabilizers provide an important mode of treatment via mitotic cell arrest of cancer cells. Recently, we reported two novel neolignans derivatives Cmp10 and Cmp19 showing anticancer activity and working as microtubule stabilizers at micromolar concentrations. In this study, we have explored the binding site, mode of binding, and stabilization by two novel microtubule stabilizers Cmp10 and Cmp19 using in silico molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and binding free energy calculations. Molecular docking studies were performed to explore the β-tubulin binding site of Cmp10 and Cmp19. Further, MD simulations were used to probe the β-tubulin stabilization mechanism by Cmp10 and Cmp19. Binding affinity was also compared for Cmp10 and Cmp19 using binding free energy calculations. Our docking results revealed that both the compounds bind at Ptxl binding site in β-tubulin. MD simulation studies showed that Cmp10 and Cmp19 binding stabilizes M-loop (Phe272-Val288) residues of β-tubulin and prevent its dynamics, leading to a better packing between α and β subunits from adjacent tubulin dimers. In addition, His229, Ser280 and Gln281, and Arg278, Thr276, and Ser232 were found to be the key amino acid residues forming H-bonds with Cmp10 and Cmp19, respectively. Consequently, binding free energy calculations indicated that Cmp10 (-113.655 kJ/mol) had better binding compared to Cmp19 (-95.216 kJ/mol). This study provides useful insight for better understanding of the binding mechanism of Cmp10 and Cmp19 and will be helpful in designing novel microtubule stabilizers. PMID:26212016

  15. High-speed multiple-mode mass-sensing resolves dynamic nanoscale mass distributions

    PubMed Central

    Olcum, Selim; Cermak, Nathan; Wasserman, Steven C.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneously measuring multiple eigenmode frequencies of nanomechanical resonators can determine the position and mass of surface-adsorbed proteins, and could ultimately reveal the mass tomography of nanoscale analytes. However, existing measurement techniques are slow (<1 Hz bandwidth), limiting throughput and preventing use with resonators generating fast transient signals. Here we develop a general platform for independently and simultaneously oscillating multiple modes of mechanical resonators, enabling frequency measurements that can precisely track fast transient signals within a user-defined bandwidth that exceeds 500 Hz. We use this enhanced bandwidth to resolve signals from multiple nanoparticles flowing simultaneously through a suspended nanochannel resonator and show that four resonant modes are sufficient for determining their individual position and mass with an accuracy near 150 nm and 40 attograms throughout their 150-ms transit. We envision that our method can be readily extended to other systems to increase bandwidth, number of modes, or number of resonators. PMID:25963304

  16. Binding Mode and Induced Fit Predictions for Prospective Computational Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Grebner, Christoph; Iegre, Jessica; Ulander, Johan; Edman, Karl; Hogner, Anders; Tyrchan, Christian

    2016-04-25

    Computer-aided drug design plays an important role in medicinal chemistry to obtain insights into molecular mechanisms and to prioritize design strategies. Although significant improvement has been made in structure based design, it still remains a key challenge to accurately model and predict induced fit mechanisms. Most of the current available techniques either do not provide sufficient protein conformational sampling or are too computationally demanding to fit an industrial setting. The current study presents a systematic and exhaustive investigation of predicting binding modes for a range of systems using PELE (Protein Energy Landscape Exploration), an efficient and fast protein-ligand sampling algorithm. The systems analyzed (cytochrome P, kinase, protease, and nuclear hormone receptor) exhibit different complexities of ligand induced fit mechanisms and protein dynamics. The results are compared with results from classical molecular dynamics simulations and (induced fit) docking. This study shows that ligand induced side chain rearrangements and smaller to medium backbone movements are captured well in PELE. Large secondary structure rearrangements, however, remain challenging for all employed techniques. Relevant binding modes (ligand heavy atom RMSD < 1.0 Å) can be obtained by the PELE method within a few hours of simulation, positioning PELE as a tool applicable for rapid drug design cycles. PMID:26974351

  17. Molecular docking to explore the possible binding mode of potential inhibitors of thioredoxin glutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, JINGWEI; HUA, WEIJUAN; LI, JIAHUANG; HUA, ZICHUN

    2015-01-01

    Praziquantel (PZQ) is the treatment of choice for schistosomiasis, one of the most important but neglected tropical diseases. Recently, however, Schistosoma have exhibited reduced susceptibility to PZQ, and an urgent need to develop new drugs to treat schistosomiasis has emerged. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) plays a crucial role in the redox balance of the parasite, combining glutaredoxin (Grx), glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase (TR) activities. Several compounds, including oxadiazole 2-oxides, phosphinic acid amides, isoxazolones and phosphoramidites, have been identified as agents that inhibit TGR from Schistosoma mansoni (smTGR) and exhibit anti-schistosomal activity. 4-Phenyl-1,2,5-oxadiazole-3-carbonitrile-2-oxide has also been shown to be active against TGR from Schistosoma japonicum (sjTGR). The binding sites of these inhibitors, however, remain unclear. To explore the binding interactions of these compounds, we selected six compounds to dock into the NADPH binding site, the active site of the TR domain and the Grx active site of both smTGR and sjTGR using AutoDock 4.2.5.1. The results suggested that the most favoured binding site for all compounds in either sjTGR or smTGR was the oxidised glutathione-binding pocket of the TR domain. Although all of the compounds could fit into the sjTGR site, the inhibition efficiency of these compounds towards sjTGR was marginally lower than it was towards smTGR, suggesting that it would be necessary to design specific inhibitors of TGR for different Schistosoma species. The docking results showed that all compounds docking in smTGR and sjTGR adopted similar binding modes in the TR domain. Two peptide fragments from another subunit, Phe505′–Leu508′ and Pro572′–Thr577′, played a critical role in the interactions with the inhibitors. In conclusion, the present study has revealed binding mechanisms for potential inhibitors of Schistosoma TGRs and could lead to structure-based ligand design

  18. Topological effects and binding modes operating with multivalent iminosugar-based glycoclusters and mannosidases.

    PubMed

    Brissonnet, Yoan; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Morandat, Sandrine; Garcia Moreno, M Isabel; Deniaud, David; Matthews, Susan E; Vidal, Sébastien; Šesták, Sergej; El Kirat, Karim; Gouin, Sébastien G

    2013-12-11

    Multivalent iminosugars have been recently explored for glycosidase inhibition. Affinity enhancements due to multivalency have been reported for specific targets, which are particularly appealing when a gain in enzyme selectivity is achieved but raise the question of the binding mode operating with this new class of inhibitors. Here we describe the development of a set of tetra- and octavalent iminosugar probes with specific topologies and an assessment of their binding affinities toward a panel of glycosidases including the Jack Bean α-mannosidase (JBαMan) and the biologically relevant class II α-mannosidases from Drosophila melanogaster belonging to glycohydrolase family 38, namely Golgi α-mannosidase ManIIb (GM) and lysosomal α-mannosidase LManII (LM). Very different inhibitory profiles were observed for compounds with identical valencies, indicating that the spatial distribution of the iminosugars is critical to fine-tune the enzymatic inhibitory activity. Compared to the monovalent reference, the best multivalent compound showed a dramatic 800-fold improvement in the inhibitory potency for JBαMan, which is outstanding for just a tetravalent ligand. The compound was also shown to increase both the inhibitory activity and the selectivity for GM over LM. This suggests that multivalency could be an alternative strategy in developing therapeutic GM inhibitors not affecting the lysosomal mannosidases. Dynamic light scattering experiments and atomic force microscopy performed with coincubated solutions of the compounds with JBαMan shed light on the multivalent binding mode. The multivalent compounds were shown to promote the formation of JBαMan aggregates with different sizes and shapes. The dimeric nature of the JBαMan allows such intermolecular cross-linking mechanisms to occur. PMID:24224682

  19. Theory and Normal Mode Analysis of Change in Protein Vibrational Dynamics on Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Mortisugu, Kei; Njunda, Brigitte; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-12-01

    The change of protein vibrations on ligand binding is of functional and thermodynamic importance. Here, this process is characterized using a simple analytical 'ball-and-spring' model and all-atom normal-mode analysis (NMA) of the binding of the cancer drug, methotrexate (MTX) to its target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The analytical model predicts that the coupling between protein vibrations and ligand external motion generates entropy-rich, low-frequency vibrations in the complex. This is consistent with the atomistic NMA which reveals vibrational softening in forming the DHFR-MTX complex, a result also in qualitative agreement with neutron-scattering experiments. Energy minimization of the atomistic bound-state (B) structure while gradually decreasing the ligand interaction to zero allows the generation of a hypothetical 'intermediate' (I) state, without the ligand force field but with a structure similar to that of B. In going from I to B, it is found that the vibrational entropies of both the protein and MTX decrease while the complex structure becomes enthalpically stabilized. However, the relatively weak DHFR:MTX interaction energy results in the net entropy gain arising from coupling between the protein and MTX external motion being larger than the loss of vibrational entropy on complex formation. This, together with the I structure being more flexible than the unbound structure, results in the observed vibrational softening on ligand binding.

  20. Dynamic Binding Mode of a Synaptotagmin-1-SNARE Complex in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Kyle D.; Bacaj, Taulant; Cavalli, Andrea; Camilloni, Carlo; Swarbrick, James D.; Liu, Jin; Zhou, Amy; Zhou, Peng; Barlow, Nicholas; Xu, Junjie; Seven, Alpay B.; Prinslow, Eric A.; Voleti, Rashmi; Häussinger, Daniel; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Graham, Bim; Südhof, Thomas C.; Rizo, Josep

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Rapid neurotransmitter release depends on the Ca2+-sensor Synaptotagmin-1 and the SNARE complex formed by synaptobrevin, syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25. How Synaptotagmin-1 triggers release remains unclear, in part because elucidating high-resolution structures of Synaptotagmin-1-SNARE complexes has been challenging. An NMR approach based on lanthanide-induced pseudocontact shifts now reveals a dynamic binding mode where basic residues in the concave side of the Synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain β-sandwich interact with a polyacidic region of the SNARE complex formed by syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25. The physiological relevance of this dynamic structural model is supported by mutations in basic residues of Synaptotagmin-1 that markedly impair SNARE-complex binding in vitro and Synaptotagmin-1 function in neurons. Mutations with milder effects on binding have correspondingly milder effects on Synaptotagmin-1 function. Our results support a model whereby their dynamic interaction facilitates cooperation between synaptotagmin-1 and the SNAREs in inducing membrane fusion. PMID:26030874

  1. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; et al

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes withmore » different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.« less

  2. DNA binding mode of novel tetradentate amino acid based 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.; Selvaganapathy, M.; Mahalakshmi, R.

    2012-10-01

    Few transition metal complexes of tetradentate N2O2 donor Schiff base ligands containing 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine and amino acids (alanine/valine) abbreviated to KHL1/KHL2 have been synthesized. All the metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic data. The Schiff bases KHL1/KHL2 are found to act as tetradentate ligands using N2O2 donor set of atoms leading to a square-planar geometry for the complexes around the metal ions. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA have been investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The DNA binding constants reveal that all these complexes interact with DNA through minor groove binding mode. The studies on mechanism of photocleavage reveal that singlet oxygen (1O2) and superoxide anion radical (O2rad -) may play an important role in the photocleavage. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger, Fusarium solani, Culvularia lunata, Rhizoctonia bataicola and Candida albicans by MIC method.

  3. A Novel Cofactor-binding Mode in Bacterial IMP Dehydrogenases Explains Inhibitor Selectivity*

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. These findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization. PMID:25572472

  4. Studies of the binding mode of TXNHCH2COOH with calf thymus DNA by spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Ataci, Nese; Arsu, Nergis

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a thioxanthone derivative named 2-(9-oxo-9H-thioxanthen-2ylamino) acetic acid (TX-NHCH2COOH) was used to investigate small molecule and DNA binding interactions. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy were used and melting studies were used to explain the binding mode of TXNHCH2COOH-DNA. Intrinsic binding constant Kb TXNHCH2COOH was found 6×10(5)M(-1)from UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Fluorescence emmision intensity increased by adding ct-DNA to the TXNHCH2COOH and KI quenching experiments resulted with low Ksv value. Additionally, 3.7°C increase for Tm was observed. The observed quenching of EB and ct-DNA complex and increase viscosity values of ct-DNA by addition of TXNHCH2COOH was determined. All those results indicate that TXNHCH2COOH can intercalate into DNA base pairs. Fluorescence microscopy helped to display imaging of the TXNHCH2COOH-DNA solution. PMID:27367618

  5. Structural studies on the forward and reverse binding modes of peptides to the chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Michael; Berthold, Nicole; Kieslich, Björn; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Sträter, Norbert

    2013-07-24

    Hsp70 chaperones have been implicated in assisting protein folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains, refolding of misfolded proteins, and protein trafficking. For these functions, the chaperones need to exhibit a significant promiscuity in binding to different sequences of hydrophobic peptide stretches. To characterize the structural basis of sequence specificity and flexibility of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 chaperone DnaK, we have analyzed crystal structures of the substrate binding domain of the protein in complex with artificially designed peptides as well as small proline-rich antimicrobial peptides. The latter peptides from mammals and insects were identified to target DnaK after cell penetration. Interestingly, the complex crystal structures reveal two different peptide binding modes. The peptides can bind either in a forward or in a reverse direction to the conventional substrate binding cleft of DnaK in an extended conformation. Superposition of the two binding modes shows a remarkable similarity in the side chain orientations and hydrogen bonding pattern despite the reversed peptide orientation. The DnaK chaperone has evolved to bind peptides in both orientations in the substrate binding cleft with comparable energy without rearrangements of the protein. Optimal hydrophobic interactions with binding pockets -2 to 0 appear to be the main determinant for the orientation and sequence position of peptide binding. PMID:23562829

  6. Modification of a styryl dye binding mode with calf thymus DNA in vesicular medium: from minor groove to intercalative.

    PubMed

    Manna, Anamika; Chakravorti, Sankar

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports an interesting transformation of binding mode of 2-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-1-methylpyridinium iodide (DASPMI) with calf thymus DNA from minor groove binding in buffer solution to intercalative binding when the dye is encapsulated inside a vesicle formed by the interaction of 1,8-naphthalimide (a charge transfer dye) with the supramolecular association of sodium dodecyl sulfate and block-copolymer polyethylene-b-polyethylene glycol. The pre-encapsulated dye in the vesicular interior binds intercalatively to ct-DNA, as evinced by the high value of equilibrium binding constant of DASPMI-DNA complex, changes in CD-spectra of DNA and isosbestic point, along with downshift and hypochromicity of absorption band. Increase in anisotropy decay by 1.5 times with a single component strongly confirms restricted motion of the probe inside ct-DNA confirming intercalative binding. The compaction of ct-DNA caused by the interaction of the vesicle allows DASPMI to bind ct-DNA in the intercalative mode. However, the groove binding mode in ct-DNA-DASPMI remains unaffected by the retro-addition of the vesicles to the already bound dye to ct-DNA. PMID:22506549

  7. MBSTAR: multiple instance learning for predicting specific functional binding sites in microRNA targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Dip; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression by binding to specific sites in the 3'untranslated regions of its target genes. Machine learning based miRNA target prediction algorithms first extract a set of features from potential binding sites (PBSs) in the mRNA and then train a classifier to distinguish targets from non-targets. However, they do not consider whether the PBSs are functional or not, and consequently result in high false positive rates. This substantially affects the follow up functional validation by experiments. We present a novel machine learning based approach, MBSTAR (Multiple instance learning of Binding Sites of miRNA TARgets), for accurate prediction of true or functional miRNA binding sites. Multiple instance learning framework is adopted to handle the lack of information about the actual binding sites in the target mRNAs. Biologically validated 9531 interacting and 973 non-interacting miRNA-mRNA pairs are identified from Tarbase 6.0 and confirmed with PAR-CLIP dataset. It is found that MBSTAR achieves the highest number of binding sites overlapping with PAR-CLIP with maximum F-Score of 0.337. Compared to the other methods, MBSTAR also predicts target mRNAs with highest accuracy. The tool and genome wide predictions are available at http://www.isical.ac.in/~bioinfo_miu/MBStar30.htm.

  8. Constructing Standards: A Study of Nurses Negotiating with Multiple Modes of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nes, Sturle; Moen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to explore how multiple modes of knowledge play out in the consolidation of nursing procedures in construction of "local universality". The paper seeks to explore processes where nurses negotiate universal procedures that are to become local standards in a hospital. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based…

  9. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs. PMID:26487699

  10. Multiple opioid receptor binding in dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, S.W.; James, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells were prepared by the method of Rogers and El-Fakahany. Over 95% of these cells are viable as demonstrated by their exclusion of the dye trypan blue. Opioid receptor binding assays were performed in a modified Kreb-Ringers physiological buffer. The following radiolabeled ligands and conditions were used to selectively labeled multiple opioid receptors: mu binding, 1 nM (/sup 3/H)naloxone + 20 nM DADLE + 300 nM U50,488H; kappa binding, 4 nM (-)-(/sup 3/H)-EKC + 100 nM DAGO + 500 nM DADLE; delta binding, 2 nM (/sup 3/H)-DADLE + 100 nM DAGO + 300 nM U50,488H; sigma binding, 4 nM (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. The intact brain cells in physiological buffer demonstrated specific binding for mu, kappa, delta, and sigma receptors. The relative binding potency of naloxone for each of the receptor types is arbitrarily set at 1.

  11. A theory of mode of action of azolylalkylquinolines as DNA binding agents using automated flexible ligand docking.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Armin Madadkar; Amini, Sara Rasoul; Tyndall, Joel D A; Azizi, Ebrahim; Daneshtalab, Mohsen; Khalaj, Ali

    2006-12-01

    Azolylalkylquinolines (AAQs) are a family of quinolines with varying degrees of cytotoxic activity (comparable or moderately superior to adriamycin in some cases) developed in the past decade in our group where their exact mode of action is still unclear. In this study the most probable DNA binding mode of AAQs was investigated employing a novel flexible ligand docking approach by using AutoDock 3.0. Forty-nine AAQs with known experimental inhibitory activity were docked onto d(CGCAAATTTGCG)(2), d(CGATCG)(2) and d(CGCG)(2) oligonucleotides retrieved from the Protein Data Bank (PDB IDs: 102D, 1D12 and 1D32, respectively) as the representatives of the three plausible models of interactions between chemotherapeutic agents and DNA (groove binding, groove binding plus intercalation and bisintercalation, respectively). Good correlation (r(2)=0.64) between calculated binding energies and experimental inhibitory activities was obtained using groove binding plus intercalation model for phenyl-azolylalkylquinoline (PAAQ) series. Our findings show that the most probable mode of action of PAAQs as DNA binding agents is via intercalation of quinolinic moiety between CG base pairs with linker chain and azole moiety binding to the minor groove. PMID:16621634

  12. The Mode of Hedgehog Binding to Ihog Homologues is Not Conserved Across Different Phyla

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, J.; Zheng, X; Hauk, G; Ghirlando, R; Beachy, P; Leahy, D

    2008-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins specify tissue pattern in metazoan embryos by forming gradients that emanate from discrete sites of expression and elicit concentration-dependent cellular differentiation or proliferation responses1, 2. Cellular responses to Hh and the movement of Hh through tissues are both precisely regulated, and abnormal Hh signalling has been implicated in human birth defects and cancer3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Hh signalling is mediated by its amino-terminal domain (HhN), which is dually lipidated and secreted as part of a multivalent lipoprotein particle8, 9, 10. Reception of the HhN signal is modulated by several cell-surface proteins on responding cells, including Patched (Ptc), Smoothened (Smo), Ihog (known as CDO or CDON in mammals) and the vertebrate-specific proteins Hip (also known as Hhip) and Gas1 (ref. 11). Drosophila Ihog and its vertebrate homologues CDO and BOC contain multiple immunoglobulin and fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats, and the first FNIII repeat of Ihog binds Drosophila HhN in a heparin-dependent manner12, 13. Surprisingly, pull-down experiments suggest that a mammalian Sonic hedgehog N-terminal domain (ShhN) binds a non-orthologous FNIII repeat of CDO12, 14. Here we report biochemical, biophysical and X-ray structural studies of a complex between ShhN and the third FNIII repeat of CDO. We show that the ShhN-CDO interaction is completely unlike the HhN-Ihog interaction and requires calcium, which binds at a previously undetected site on ShhN. This site is conserved in nearly all Hh proteins and is a hotspot for mediating interactions between ShhN and CDO, Ptc, Hip and Gas1. Mutations in vertebrate Hh proteins causing holoprosencephaly and brachydactyly type A1 map to this calcium-binding site and disrupt interactions with these partners.

  13. A Novel Approach to Beam Steering Using Arrays Composed of Multiple Unique Radiating Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadie, Nathan Richard

    Phased array antennas have found wide application in both radar and wireless communications systems particularly as implementation costs continue to decrease. The primary advantages of electronically scanned arrays are speed of beam scan and versatility of beamforming compared to mechanically scanned fixed beam antennas. These benefits come at the cost of a few well known design issues including element pattern rolloff and mutual coupling between elements. Our primary contribution to the field of research is the demonstration of significant improvement in phased array scan performance using multiple unique radiating modes. In short, orthogonal radiating modes have minimal coupling by definition and can also be generated with reduced rolloff at wide scan angles. In this dissertation, we present a combination of analysis, full-wave electromagnetic simulation and measured data to support our claims. The novel folded ring resonator (FRR) antenna is introduced as a wideband and multi-band element embedded in a grounded dielectric substrate. Multiple radiating modes of a small ground plane excited by a four element FRR array were also investigated. A novel hemispherical null steering antenna composed of two collocated radiating elements, each supporting a unique radiating mode, is presented in the context of an anti-jam GPS receiver application. Both the antenna aperture and active feed network were fabricated and measured showing excellent agreement with analytical and simulated data. The concept of using an antenna supporting multiple radiating modes for beam steering is also explored. A 16 element hybrid linear phased array was fabricated and measured demonstrating significantly improved scan range and scanned gain compared to a conventional phased array. This idea is expanded to 2 dimensional scanning arrays by analysis and simulation of a hybrid phased array composed of novel multiple mode monopole on patch antenna sub-arrays. Finally, we fabricated and

  14. Recent progress with microtubule stabilizers: new compounds, binding modes and cellular activities

    PubMed Central

    Rohena, Cristina C.

    2014-01-01

    Nature has yielded numerous classes of chemically distinct microtubule stabilizers. Several of these, including paclitaxel (Taxol) and docetaxel (Taxotere), are important drugs used in the treatment of cancer. New microtubule stabilizers and novel formulations of these agents continue to provide advances in cancer therapy. In this review we cover recent progress from late 2008 to August 2013 in the chemistry and biology of these diverse microtubule stabilizers focusing on the wide range of organisms that produce these compounds, their mechanisms of inhibiting microtubule-dependent processes, mechanisms of drug resistance, and their interactions with tubulin including their distinct binding sites and modes. A new potential role for microtubule stabilizers in neurodegenerative diseases is reviewed. PMID:24481420

  15. Binding mode of the breakthrough inhibitor AZD9291 to epidermal growth factor receptor revealed.

    PubMed

    Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Silva, Shevan; Dickson, James M; Patterson, Adam V; Smaill, Jeff B; Flanagan, Jack U; McKeage, Mark J; Squire, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of genetic drivers of lung cancer in patient sub-groups has led to their use as predictive biomarkers and as targets for selective drug therapy. Some of the most important lung cancer drivers are mutations in the EGFR gene, for example, the exon 19 deletions and the L858R variant that confer sensitivity to the front line drugs erlotinib and gefitinib; the acquired T790M variants confer drug resistance and a poor prognosis. A challenge then in targeting EGFR is to produce drugs that inhibit both sensitising variants and resistance variants, leaving wild type protein in healthy cells unaffected. One such agent is AstraZeneca's "breakthrough" AZD9291 molecule that shows a 200-fold selectivity for T790M/L858R over wild type EGFR. Our X-ray crystal structure reveals the binding mode of AZD9291 to the kinase domain of wild type EGFR. PMID:26522274

  16. Structurally Diverse Mitochondrial Branched Chain Aminotransferase (BCATm) Leads with Varying Binding Modes Identified by Fragment Screening.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, Jennifer A; Ancellin, Nicolas; Bertrand, Sophie M; Bingham, Ryan P; Carter, Paul S; Chung, Chun-Wa; Churcher, Ian; Dodic, Nerina; Fournier, Charlène; Francis, Peter L; Hobbs, Andrew; Jamieson, Craig; Pickett, Stephen D; Smith, Sarah E; Somers, Donald O'N; Spitzfaden, Claus; Suckling, Colin J; Young, Robert J

    2016-03-24

    Inhibitors of mitochondrial branched chain aminotransferase (BCATm), identified using fragment screening, are described. This was carried out using a combination of STD-NMR, thermal melt (Tm), and biochemical assays to identify compounds that bound to BCATm, which were subsequently progressed to X-ray crystallography, where a number of exemplars showed significant diversity in their binding modes. The hits identified were supplemented by searching and screening of additional analogues, which enabled the gathering of further X-ray data where the original hits had not produced liganded structures. The fragment hits were optimized using structure-based design, with some transfer of information between series, which enabled the identification of ligand efficient lead molecules with micromolar levels of inhibition, cellular activity, and good solubility. PMID:26938474

  17. PSMA-targeted SPECT agents: Mode of Binding effect on in vitro Performance

    PubMed Central

    Nedrow-Byers, Jessie R.; Moore, Adam L.; Ganguly, Tanushree; Hopkins, Mark R.; Fulton, Melody D.; Benny, Paul; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The enzyme-biomarker prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an active target for imaging and therapeutic applications for prostate cancer. The internalization of PSMA has been shown to vary with inhibitors’ mode of binding: irreversible, slowly reversible and reversible. METHODS In the present study, PSMA-targeted clickable derivatives of an irreversible phosphoramidate inhibitor DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54 (IC50 = 1.0 nM) and a slowly reversible phosphate inhibitor, DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54.2 (IC50 = 6.6 nM) were clicked to 99mTc(CO)3-DPA-azide to assemble a PSMA-targeted SPECT agent. The selectivity, percent uptake, and internalization of these PSMA-targeted SPECT agents were evaluated in PSMA-positive and PSMA-negative cells. RESULTS In vitro studies demonstrated that PSMA-targeted SPECT agents exhibited selective cellular uptake in the PSMA-positive LNCaP cells compared to PSMA-negative PC3 cells. More importantly, it was found that 99mTc(CO)3-DPA-DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54 based on an irreversible PSMA inhibitor core, exhibited greater uptake and internalization than 99mTc(CO)3-DPA-DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54.2 constructed from a slowly-reversible PSMA inhibitor core. CONCLUSIONS We have demonstrated that a PSMA-targeted SPECT agent can be assembled efficiently using copper-less click chemistry. In addition, we demonstrated that mode of binding has an effect on internalization and percent uptake of PSMA-targeted SPECT agents; with the irreversible targeting agent demonstrating superior uptake and internalization in PSMA+ cells. The approach demonstrated in this work now supports a modular approach for the assembly of PSMA-targeted imaging and therapeutic agents. PMID:22911263

  18. Landau resonant modification of multiple kink mode contributions to 3D tokamak equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; Lanctot, M. J.; Liu, Y. Q.; Logan, N.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Shiraki, D.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-12-17

    Detailed measurements of the plasma's response to applied magnetic perturbations provide experimental evidence that the form of three-dimensional (3D) tokamak equilibria, with toroidal mode number n = 1, is determined by multiple stable kink modes at high-pressure. For pressures greater than the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability limit, as calculated without a stabilizing wall, the 3D structure transitions in a way that is qualitatively predicted by an extended MHD model that includes kinetic wave-particle interactions. These changes in poloidal mode structure are correlated with the proximity of rotation profiles to thermal ion bounce and the precession drift frequencies suggesting that these kinetic resonances are modifying the relative amplitudes of the stable modes. These results imply that each kink may eventually be independently controlled.

  19. Landau resonant modification of multiple kink mode contributions to 3D tokamak equilibria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; Lanctot, M. J.; Liu, Y. Q.; Logan, N.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Shiraki, D.; et al

    2015-12-17

    Detailed measurements of the plasma's response to applied magnetic perturbations provide experimental evidence that the form of three-dimensional (3D) tokamak equilibria, with toroidal mode number n = 1, is determined by multiple stable kink modes at high-pressure. For pressures greater than the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability limit, as calculated without a stabilizing wall, the 3D structure transitions in a way that is qualitatively predicted by an extended MHD model that includes kinetic wave-particle interactions. These changes in poloidal mode structure are correlated with the proximity of rotation profiles to thermal ion bounce and the precession drift frequencies suggesting that thesemore » kinetic resonances are modifying the relative amplitudes of the stable modes. These results imply that each kink may eventually be independently controlled.« less

  20. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.

  1. A computational analysis of the binding mode of closantel as inhibitor of the Onchocerca volvulus chitinase: insights on macrofilaricidal drug design.

    PubMed

    Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; Lizarazo-Ortega, Cristian; Guo, Xianwu; Correa-Basurto, José; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A

    2011-12-01

    Onchocerciasis is a leading cause of blindness with at least 37 million people infected and more than 120 million people at risk of contracting the disease; most (99%) of this population, threatened by infection, live in Africa. The drug of choice for mass treatment is the microfilaricidal Mectizan(®) (ivermectin); it does not kill the adult stages of the parasite at the standard dose which is a single annual dose aimed at disease control. However, multiple treatments a year with ivermectin have effects on adult worms. The discovery of new therapeutic targets and drugs directed towards the killing of the adult parasites are thus urgently needed. The chitinase of filarial nematodes is a new drug target due to its essential function in the metabolism and molting of the parasite. Closantel is a potent and specific inhibitor of chitinase of Onchocerca volvulus (OvCHT1) and other filarial chitinases. However, the binding mode and specificity of closantel towards OvCHT1 remain unknown. In the absence of a crystallographic structure of OvCHT1, we developed a homology model of OvCHT1 using the currently available X-ray structures of human chitinases as templates. Energy minimization and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the model led to a high quality of 3D structure of OvCHIT1. A flexible docking study using closantel as the ligand on the binding site of OvCHIT1 and human chitinases was performed and demonstrated the differences in the closantel binding mode between OvCHIT1 and human chitinase. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculation were employed to determine and compare the detailed binding mode of closantel with OvCHT1 and the structure of human chitinase. This comparative study allowed identification of structural features and properties responsible for differences in the computationally predicted closantel binding modes. The homology model and the closantel binding mode reported herein might help guide the rational development of

  2. Calcium Binding by Ro 60 Multiple Antigenic Peptides on PVDF Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Bachmann, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies directed against ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles are observed in systemic lupus erythematosus. Ro RNP particle is one such target. It is composed of a 60 kDa protein (Ro 60 or SS-A) that is non-covalently associated with at least one of the four short uridine-rich RNAs (the hY RNAs). Previously, we showed that multiple antigenic peptides (MAPs) made from the sequence of the Ro 60 autoantigen could be used, using double-immunodiffusion studies, enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, affinity chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance, to show intramolecular and intermolecular protein-protein interaction within the Ro 60 RNP particle. We also observed that calcium is important in mediating this interaction. We hypothesized, therefore, that 60 kDa Ro is a calcium-binding protein. To investigate this, we electrophoresed 60 kDa Ro MAPs, transferred them to PVDF membrane, and assayed calcium binding using the Quin-2 system. Several Ro 60 MAPs were found to bind calcium using this assay, as well as bovine serum albumin, another calcium-binding protein. However, a MAP constructed from the Sm autoantigen did not bind to calcium. These data, along with our observation regarding the involvement of calcium in protein-protein interaction occurring between Ro 60 antigen and Ro 60 MAPs, makes us propose that Ro 60 antigen is a calcium-binding protein. PMID:26139264

  3. A rigorous multiple independent binding site model for determining cell-based equilibrium dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Drake, Andrew W; Klakamp, Scott L

    2007-01-10

    A new 4-parameter nonlinear equation based on the standard multiple independent binding site model (MIBS) is presented for fitting cell-based ligand titration data in order to calculate the ligand/cell receptor equilibrium dissociation constant and the number of receptors/cell. The most commonly used linear (Scatchard Plot) or nonlinear 2-parameter model (a single binding site model found in commercial programs like Prism(R)) used for analysis of ligand/receptor binding data assumes only the K(D) influences the shape of the titration curve. We demonstrate using simulated data sets that, depending upon the cell surface receptor expression level, the number of cells titrated, and the magnitude of the K(D) being measured, this assumption of always being under K(D)-controlled conditions can be erroneous and can lead to unreliable estimates for the binding parameters. We also compare and contrast the fitting of simulated data sets to the commonly used cell-based binding equation versus our more rigorous 4-parameter nonlinear MIBS model. It is shown through these simulations that the new 4-parameter MIBS model, when used for cell-based titrations under optimal conditions, yields highly accurate estimates of all binding parameters and hence should be the preferred model to fit cell-based experimental nonlinear titration data. PMID:17141800

  4. Comparing Binding Modes of Analogous Fragments Using NMR in Fragment-Based Drug Design: Application to PRDX5

    PubMed Central

    Guichou, Jean-François; Cala, Olivier; Krimm, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design is one of the most promising approaches for discovering novel and potent inhibitors against therapeutic targets. The first step of the process consists of identifying fragments that bind the protein target. The determination of the fragment binding mode plays a major role in the selection of the fragment hits that will be processed into drug-like compounds. Comparing the binding modes of analogous fragments is a critical task, not only to identify specific interactions between the protein target and the fragment, but also to verify whether the binding mode is conserved or differs according to the fragment modification. While X-ray crystallography is the technique of choice, NMR methods are helpful when this fails. We show here how the ligand-observed saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment and the protein-observed 15N-HSQC experiment, two popular NMR screening experiments, can be used to compare the binding modes of analogous fragments. We discuss the application and limitations of these approaches based on STD-epitope mapping, chemical shift perturbation (CSP) calculation and comparative CSP sign analysis, using the human peroxiredoxin 5 as a protein model. PMID:25025339

  5. Tetramerization and interdomain flexibility of the replication initiation controller YabA enables simultaneous binding to multiple partners

    PubMed Central

    Felicori, Liza; Jameson, Katie H.; Roblin, Pierre; Fogg, Mark J.; Garcia-Garcia, Transito; Ventroux, Magali; Cherrier, Mickaël V.; Bazin, Alexandre; Noirot, Philippe; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Molina, Franck; Terradot, Laurent; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2016-01-01

    YabA negatively regulates initiation of DNA replication in low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. The protein exerts its control through interactions with the initiator protein DnaA and the sliding clamp DnaN. Here, we combined X-ray crystallography, X-ray scattering (SAXS), modeling and biophysical approaches, with in vivo experimental data to gain insight into YabA function. The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of YabA solved at 2.7 Å resolution reveals an extended α-helix that contributes to an intermolecular four-helix bundle. Homology modeling and biochemical analysis indicates that the C-terminal domain (CTD) of YabA is a small Zn-binding domain. Multi-angle light scattering and SAXS demonstrate that YabA is a tetramer in which the CTDs are independent and connected to the N-terminal four-helix bundle via flexible linkers. While YabA can simultaneously interact with both DnaA and DnaN, we found that an isolated CTD can bind to either DnaA or DnaN, individually. Site-directed mutagenesis and yeast-two hybrid assays identified DnaA and DnaN binding sites on the YabA CTD that partially overlap and point to a mutually exclusive mode of interaction. Our study defines YabA as a novel structural hub and explains how the protein tetramer uses independent CTDs to bind multiple partners to orchestrate replication initiation in the bacterial cell. PMID:26615189

  6. Efficient vibration mode analysis of aircraft with multiple external store configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, M.

    1988-01-01

    A coupling method for efficient vibration mode analysis of aircraft with multiple external store configurations is presented. A set of low-frequency vibration modes, including rigid-body modes, represent the aircraft. Each external store is represented by its vibration modes with clamped boundary conditions, and by its rigid-body inertial properties. The aircraft modes are obtained from a finite-element model loaded by dummy rigid external stores with fictitious masses. The coupling procedure unloads the dummy stores and loads the actual stores instead. The analytical development is presented, the effects of the fictitious mass magnitudes are discussed, and a numerical example is given for a combat aircraft with external wing stores. Comparison with vibration modes obtained by a direct (full-size) eigensolution shows very accurate coupling results. Once the aircraft and stores data bases are constructed, the computer time for analyzing any external store configuration is two to three orders of magnitude less than that of a direct solution.

  7. Positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 silences class II transactivator expression in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, N; Gyory, I; Wright, G; Wood, J; Wright, K L

    2001-05-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) acts as a master switch to activate expression of the genes required for MHC-II antigen presentation. During B-cell to plasma cell differentiation, MHC-II expression is actively silenced, but the mechanism has been unknown. In plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma the repression of MHC-II is associated with the loss of CIITA. We have identified that positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), a transcriptional repressor, inhibits CIITA expression in multiple myeloma cell lines. Repression of CIITA depends on the DNA binding activity of PRDI-BF1 and its specific binding site in the CIITA promoter. Deletion of a histone deacetylase recruitment domain in PRDI-BF1 does not inhibit repression of CIITA nor does blocking histone deacetylase activity. This is in contrast to PRDI-BF1 repression of the c-myc promoter. Repression of CIITA requires either the N-terminal acidic and conserved PR motif or the proline-rich domain. PRDI-BF1 has been shown to be a key regulator of B-cell and macrophage differentiation. These findings now indicate that PRDI-BF1 has at least two mechanisms of repression whose function is dependent on the nature of the target promoter. Importantly, PRDI-BF1 is defined as the key molecule in silencing CIITA and thus MHC-II in multiple myeloma cells. PMID:11279146

  8. New insight into the binding modes of TNP-AMP to human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Han, Xinya; Huang, Yunyuan; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, San; Zhu, Shuaihuan; Qin, Nian; Hong, Zongqin; Wei, Lin; Feng, Jiangtao; Ren, Yanliang; Feng, Lingling; Wan, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) contains two binding sites, a substrate fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) active site and an adenosine monophosphate (AMP) allosteric site. The FBP active site works by stabilizing the FBPase, and the allosteric site impairs the activity of FBPase through its binding of a nonsubstrate molecule. The fluorescent AMP analogue, 2',3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5'-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) has been used as a fluorescent probe as it is able to competitively inhibit AMP binding to the AMP allosteric site and, therefore, could be used for exploring the binding modes of inhibitors targeted on the allosteric site. In this study, we have re-examined the binding modes of TNP-AMP to FBPase. However, our present enzyme kinetic assays show that AMP and FBP both can reduce the fluorescence from the bound TNP-AMP through competition for FBPase, suggesting that TNP-AMP binds not only to the AMP allosteric site but also to the FBP active site. Mutagenesis assays of K274L (located in the FBP active site) show that the residue K274 is very important for TNP-AMP to bind to the active site of FBPase. The results further prove that TNP-AMP is able to bind individually to the both sites. Our present study provides a new insight into the binding mechanism of TNP-AMP to the FBPase. The TNP-AMP fluorescent probe can be used to exam the binding site of an inhibitor (the active site or the allosteric site) using FBPase saturated by AMP and FBP, respectively, or the K247L mutant FBPase. PMID:27137358

  9. New insight into the binding modes of TNP-AMP to human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xinya; Huang, Yunyuan; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, San; Zhu, Shuaihuan; Qin, Nian; Hong, Zongqin; Wei, Lin; Feng, Jiangtao; Ren, Yanliang; Feng, Lingling; Wan, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) contains two binding sites, a substrate fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) active site and an adenosine monophosphate (AMP) allosteric site. The FBP active site works by stabilizing the FBPase, and the allosteric site impairs the activity of FBPase through its binding of a nonsubstrate molecule. The fluorescent AMP analogue, 2‧,3‧-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5‧-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) has been used as a fluorescent probe as it is able to competitively inhibit AMP binding to the AMP allosteric site and, therefore, could be used for exploring the binding modes of inhibitors targeted on the allosteric site. In this study, we have re-examined the binding modes of TNP-AMP to FBPase. However, our present enzyme kinetic assays show that AMP and FBP both can reduce the fluorescence from the bound TNP-AMP through competition for FBPase, suggesting that TNP-AMP binds not only to the AMP allosteric site but also to the FBP active site. Mutagenesis assays of K274L (located in the FBP active site) show that the residue K274 is very important for TNP-AMP to bind to the active site of FBPase. The results further prove that TNP-AMP is able to bind individually to the both sites. Our present study provides a new insight into the binding mechanism of TNP-AMP to the FBPase. The TNP-AMP fluorescent probe can be used to exam the binding site of an inhibitor (the active site or the allosteric site) using FBPase saturated by AMP and FBP, respectively, or the K247L mutant FBPase.

  10. Non-Geiger mode single photon detector with multiple amplification and gain control mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nawar Rahman, Samia Hall, David; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2014-05-07

    A new type of single photon detector, Multiple Amplification Gain with Internal Control (MAGIC), is proposed and analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations based on a physical model of the device. The MAGIC detector has two coupled amplification mechanisms, avalanche multiplication and bipolar gain, and the net gain is regulated by a built-in feedback mechanism. Compared to conventional Geiger mode single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs), the MAGIC detector produces a much greater single photon detection efficiency of nearly 100%, low bit-error-ratio for single photon signals, and a large dynamic range. All these properties are highly desirable for applications that require single photon sensitivity and are absent for conventional Geiger-mode SPADs.

  11. Acoustic properties of multiple cavity resonance liner for absorbing higher-order duct modes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Di; Wang, Xiaoyu; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes analytical and experimental studies conducted to investigate the acoustic properties of axially non-uniform multiple cavity resonance liner for absorbing higher-order duct modes. A three-dimensional analytical model is proposed based upon transfer element method. The model is assessed by making a comparison with results of a liner performance experiment concerning higher-order modes propagation, and the agreement is good. According to the present results, it is found that the performance of multiple cavity resonance liner is related to the incident sound waves. Moreover, an analysis of the corresponding response of liner perforated panel-cavity system is performed, in which the features of resonance frequency and dissipation of the system under grazing or oblique incidence condition are revealed. The conclusions can be extended to typical non-locally reacting liners with single large back-cavity, and it would be beneficial for future non-locally reacting liner design to some extent. PMID:27586753

  12. Multiple-mode large deflection random response of beams with nonlinear damping subjected to acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. B.; Mei, Chuh

    1987-01-01

    Multiple-mode nonlinear analysis is carried out for beams subjected to acoustic excitation. Effects of both nonlinear damping and large-deflection are included in the analysis in an attempt to explain the experimental phenomena of aircraft panels excited at high sound pressure levels; that is the broadening of the strain response peaks and the increase of modal frequency. An amplitude dependent nonlinear damping model is used in the anlaysis to study the effects and interactions of multiple modes, nonlinear stiffness and nonlinear damping on the random response of beams. Mean square maximum deflection, mean square maximum strain, and spectral density function of maximum strain for simple supported and clamped beams are obtained. It is shown analytically that nonlinear damping contributes significantly to the broadening of the response peak and to the mean square deflection and strain.

  13. Passively mode-locked picosecond erbium-doped fiber lasers using multiple quantum well saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayduk, Michael J.; Krol, Mark F.; Pollock, Clifford R.; Teegarden, Kenneth J.; Wicks, Gary W.; Kaechele, Walter

    1998-07-01

    An experimental study of the mode-locking process in erbium- doped fiber lasers (EDFLs) operating at 1.55 micrometer using multiple quantum well saturable absorbers is described. The self-starting passively mode-locked laser was constructed in a Fabry-Perot configuration using the saturable absorber as the back reflector of the cavity. Picosecond pulses that ranged from 3.1 to 38.8 ps were generated using a series of saturable absorbers. The pulse widths were dependent upon the optical properties of the saturable absorber used as the mode- locking element as well as the dispersive elements contained within the cavity. The output power of the EDFL varied from 0.2 to 6.7 mW and was also dependent upon the saturable absorber used in the cavity.

  14. A non-sequence specific DNA binding mode of RAG1 is inhibited by RAG2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuying; Gwyn, Lori M.; De, Pallabi; Rodgers, Karla K.

    2009-01-01

    The RAG1 and RAG2 proteins catalyze the site-specific DNA cleavage reactions in V(D)J recombination, the process that assembles antigen receptor genes from component gene segments during lymphocyte development. The first step towards the DNA cleavage reaction is the sequence-specific association of the RAG proteins with the conserved recombination signal sequence (RSS), which flanks each gene segment in the antigen receptor loci. Questions remain as to the contribution of each RAG protein to recognition of the RSS. For example, while RAG1 alone is capable of recognizing the conserved elements of the RSS, it is not clear if or how RAG2 may enhance sequence-specific associations with the RSS. To shed light on this issue, we examined the association of RAG1, with and without RAG2, to consensus RSS versus non-RSS substrates using fluorescence anisotropy and gel mobility shift assays. The results indicate that while RAG1 can recognize the RSS, the sequence-specific interaction at physiological conditions is masked by a high affinity non-sequence specific DNA-binding mode. Significantly, addition of RAG2 effectively suppressed the association of RAG1 with non-sequence specific DNA, resulting in a large differential in binding affinity for the RSS versus non-RSS sites. We conclude that this represents a major means by which RAG2 contributes to the initial recognition of the RSS, and that therefore association of RAG1 with RAG2 is required for effective interactions with the RSS in developing lymphocytes. PMID:19232525

  15. Revealing the binding mode between respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein and benzimidazole-based inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dingjue; Ye, Wei; Chen, HaiFeng

    2015-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major respiratory pathogen in newborn infants and young children and can also be a threat to some elderly and high-risk adults with chronic pulmonary disease and the severely immunocompromised. The RSV fusion (RSVF) protein has been an attractive target for vaccine and drug development. Experimental results indicate a series of benzimidazole-based inhibitors which target RSVF protein to inhibit the viral entry of RSV. To reveal the binding mode between these inhibitors and RSVF protein, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the interactions between the inhibitors and the core domain of RSVF protein. MD results suggest that the active molecules have stronger π-π stacking, cation-π, and other interactions than less active inhibitors. The binding free energy between the active inhibitor and RSVF protein is also found to be significantly lower than that of the less active one using MM/GBSA. Then, Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods were used to construct three dimensional quantitative structure-activity (3D-QSAR) models. The cross-validated q(2) values are found to be 0.821 and 0.795 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. And the non-cross-validated r(2) values are 0.973 and 0.961. Ninety-two test set compounds validated these models. The results suggest that these models are robust with good prediction abilities. Furthermore, these models reveal possible methods to improve the bioactivity of inhibitors. PMID:25872614

  16. The impact of embedding multiple modes of representation on student construction of chemistry knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Mark Andrew

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of embedding multiple modes of representing science information on student conceptual understanding in science. Multiple representations refer to utilizing charts, graphs, diagrams, and other types of representations to communicate scientific information. This study investigated the impact of encouraging students to embed or integrate the multiple modes with text in end of unit writing-to-learn activities. A quasi-experimental design with four separate sites consisting of intact chemistry classes taught by different teachers at each site was utilized. At each site, approximately half of the classes were designated treatment classes and students in these classes participated in activities designed to encourage strategies to embed multiple modes within text in student writing. The control classes did not participate in these activities. All classes participated in identical end of unit writing tasks in which they were required to use at least one mode other than text, followed by identical end of unit assessments. This progression was then repeated for a second consecutive unit of study. Analysis of quantitative data indicated that in several cases, treatment classes significantly outperformed control classes both on measures of embeddedness in writing and on end of unit assessment measures. In addition, analysis at the level of individual students indicated significant positive correlations in many cases between measures of student embeddedness in writing and student performance on end of unit assessments. Three factors emerged as critical in increasing the likelihood of benefit for students from these types of activities. First, the level of teacher implementation and emphasis on the embeddedness lessons was linked to the possibility of conceptual benefit. Secondly, students participating in two consecutive lessons appeared to receive greater benefit during the second unit, inferring a cumulative benefit. Finally

  17. Multiple factors dictate target selection by Hfq-binding small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Beisel, Chase L; Updegrove, Taylor B; Janson, Ben J; Storz, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    Hfq-binding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria modulate the stability and translational efficiency of target mRNAs through limited base-pairing interactions. While these sRNAs are known to regulate numerous mRNAs as part of stress responses, what distinguishes targets and non-targets among the mRNAs predicted to base pair with Hfq-binding sRNAs is poorly understood. Using the Hfq-binding sRNA Spot 42 of Escherichia coli as a model, we found that predictions using only the three unstructured regions of Spot 42 substantially improved the identification of previously known and novel Spot 42 targets. Furthermore, increasing the extent of base-pairing in single or multiple base-pairing regions improved the strength of regulation, but only for the unstructured regions of Spot 42. We also found that non-targets predicted to base pair with Spot 42 lacked an Hfq-binding site, folded into a secondary structure that occluded the Spot 42 targeting site, or had overlapping Hfq-binding and targeting sites. By modifying these features, we could impart Spot 42 regulation on non-target mRNAs. Our results thus provide valuable insights into the requirements for target selection by sRNAs. PMID:22388518

  18. A strong 13C chemical shift signature provides the coordination mode of histidines in zinc-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-06-01

    Zinc is the second most abundant metal ion incorporated in proteins, and is in many cases a crucial component of protein three-dimensional structures. Zinc ions are frequently coordinated by cysteine and histidine residues. Whereas cysteines bind to zinc via their unique S(γ) atom, histidines can coordinate zinc with two different coordination modes, either N(δ1) or N(ε2) is coordinating the zinc ion. The determination of this coordination mode is crucial for the accurate structure determination of a histidine-containing zinc-binding site by NMR. NMR chemical shifts contain a vast amount of information on local electronic and structural environments and surprisingly their utilization for the determination of the coordination mode of zinc-ligated histidines has been limited so far to (15)N nuclei. In the present report, we observed that the (13)C chemical shifts of aromatic carbons in zinc-ligated histidines represent a reliable signature of their coordination mode. Using a statistical analysis of (13)C chemical shifts, we show that (13)C(δ2) chemical shift is sensitive to the histidine coordination mode and that the chemical shift difference δ{(13)C(ε1)} - δ{(13)C(δ2)} provides a reference-independent marker of this coordination mode. The present approach allows the direct determination of the coordination mode of zinc-ligated histidines even with non-isotopically enriched protein samples and without any prior structural information. PMID:22528293

  19. Excitation of surface plasmon polariton modes with multiple nitrogen vacancy centers in single nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shailesh; Lausen, Jens L.; Garcia-Ortiz, Cesar E.; Andersen, Sebastian K. H.; Roberts, Alexander S.; Radko, Ilya P.; Smith, Cameron L. C.; Kristensen, Anders; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamonds are interesting due to their remarkable characteristics that are well suited to applications in quantum-information processing and magnetic field sensing, as well as representing stable fluorescent sources. Multiple NV centers in nanodiamonds (NDs) are especially useful as biological fluorophores due to their chemical neutrality, brightness and room-temperature photostability. Furthermore, NDs containing multiple NV centers also have potential in high-precision magnetic field and temperature sensing. Coupling NV centers to propagating surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes gives a base for lab-on-a-chip sensing devices, allows enhanced fluorescence emission and collection which can further enhance the precision of NV-based sensors. Here, we investigate coupling of multiple NV centers in individual NDs to the SPP modes supported by silver surfaces protected by thin dielectric layers and by gold V-grooves (VGs) produced via the self-terminated silicon etching. In the first case, we concentrate on monitoring differences in fluorescence spectra obtained from a source ND, which is illuminated by a pump laser, and from a scattering ND illuminated only by the fluorescence-excited SPP radiation. In the second case, we observe changes in the average NV lifetime when the same ND is characterized outside and inside a VG. Fluorescence emission from the VG terminations is also observed, which confirms the NV coupling to the VG-supported SPP modes.

  20. Multiple dynamo modes as a mechanism for long-term solar activity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, M. J.; Käpylä, P. J.; Olspert, N.; Brandenburg, A.; Warnecke, J.; Karak, B. B.; Pelt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Solar magnetic activity shows both smooth secular changes, such as the modern Grand Maximum, and quite abrupt drops that are denoted as grand minima, such as the Maunder Minimum. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of convection-driven dynamos offer one way of examining the mechanisms behind these events. Aims: In this work, we analyze a solution of a solar-like DNS that was evolved for roughly 80 magnetic cycles of 4.9 years and where epochs of irregular behavior are detected. The emphasis of our analysis is to find physical causes for such behavior. Methods: The DNS employed is a semi-global (wedge-shaped) magnetoconvection model. For the data analysis tasks we use Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition and phase dispersion methods, as they are well suited for analyzing cyclic (non-periodic) signals. Results: A special property of the DNS is the existence of multiple dynamo modes at different depths and latitudes. The dominant mode is solar-like (equatorward migration at low latitudes and poleward at high latitudes). This mode is accompanied by a higher frequency mode near the surface and at low latitudes, showing poleward migration, and a low-frequency mode at the bottom of the convection zone. The low-frequency mode is almost purely antisymmetric with respect to the equator, while the dominant mode has strongly fluctuating mixed parity. The overall behavior of the dynamo solution is extremely complex, exhibiting variable cycle lengths, epochs of disturbed and even ceased surface activity, and strong short-term hemispherical asymmetries. Surprisingly, the most prominent suppressed surface activity epoch is actually a global magnetic energy maximum; during this epoch the bottom toroidal magnetic field obtains a maximum, demonstrating that the interpretation of grand minima-type events is non-trivial. The hemispherical asymmetries are seen only in the magnetic field, while the velocity field exhibits considerably weaker asymmetry. Conclusions: We interpret

  1. Orthogonal matrix factorization enables integrative analysis of multiple RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stražar, Martin; Žitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž; Ule, Jernej; Curk, Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression, including splicing, transport, polyadenylation and RNA stability. To model protein–RNA interactions by considering all available sources of information, it is necessary to integrate the rapidly growing RBP experimental data with the latest genome annotation, gene function, RNA sequence and structure. Such integration is possible by matrix factorization, where current approaches have an undesired tendency to identify only a small number of the strongest patterns with overlapping features. Because protein–RNA interactions are orchestrated by multiple factors, methods that identify discriminative patterns of varying strengths are needed. Results: We have developed an integrative orthogonality-regularized nonnegative matrix factorization (iONMF) to integrate multiple data sources and discover non-overlapping, class-specific RNA binding patterns of varying strengths. The orthogonality constraint halves the effective size of the factor model and outperforms other NMF models in predicting RBP interaction sites on RNA. We have integrated the largest data compendium to date, which includes 31 CLIP experiments on 19 RBPs involved in splicing (such as hnRNPs, U2AF2, ELAVL1, TDP-43 and FUS) and processing of 3’UTR (Ago, IGF2BP). We show that the integration of multiple data sources improves the predictive accuracy of retrieval of RNA binding sites. In our study the key predictive factors of protein–RNA interactions were the position of RNA structure and sequence motifs, RBP co-binding and gene region type. We report on a number of protein-specific patterns, many of which are consistent with experimentally determined properties of RBPs. Availability and implementation: The iONMF implementation and example datasets are available at https://github.com/mstrazar/ionmf. Contact: tomaz.curk@fri.uni-lj.si Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available

  2. Logic nanoparticle beacon triggered by the binding-induced effect of multiple inputs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Dong, Chen; Dong, Yafei; Liu, Shi; Pan, Linqiang; Zhang, Cheng

    2014-08-27

    Recently, the toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement reaction has been widely used in detecting molecular signals. However, traditional strand displacement, without cooperative signaling among DNA inputs, is insufficient for the design of more complicated nanodevices. In this work, a logic computing system is established using the cooperative "binding-induced" mechanism, based on the AuNP-based beacons, in which five kinds of multiple-input logic gates have been constructed. This system can recognize DNA and protein streptavidin simultaneously. Finally, the manipulations of the logic system are also demonstrated by controlling programmed conjugate DNA/AuNP clusters. This study provides the possibility of detecting multiple input signals and designing complex nanodevices that can be potentially applied to the detection of multiple molecular targets and the construction of large-scale DNA-based computation. PMID:25089841

  3. Binding Modes of Thioflavin T on the Surface of Amyloid Fibrils Studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Ivancic, Valerie A; Ekanayake, Oshini; Lazo, Noel D

    2016-08-18

    The mechanism for the interaction of thioflavin T (ThT) with amyloid fibrils at the molecular level is not known. Here, we used (1) H NMR spectroscopy to determine the binding mode of ThT on the surface of fibrils from lysozyme and insulin. Relayed rotating-frame Overhauser enhancements in ThT were observed, indicating that the orientation of ThT is orthogonal to the fibril surface. Importantly, the assembly state of ThT on both surfaces is different. On the surface of insulin fibrils, ThT is oligomeric, as indicated by rapid (1) H spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (R1ρ ), presumably due to intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions between ThT molecules. In contrast, ThT on the surface of lysozyme fibrils is a monomer, as indicated by slower (1) H R1ρ . These results shed new light into the mechanism for the enhancement of ThT fluorescence and may lead to more efficient detectors of amyloid assemblies, which have escaped detection by ThT in monomer form. PMID:27165642

  4. A highly tilted binding mode by a self-reactive T cell receptor results in altered engagement of peptide and MHC

    SciTech Connect

    Sethi, D.K.; Heroux, A.; Schubert, D. A.; Anders, A.-K.; Bonsor, D. A.; Thomas, C. P.; Sundberg, E. J.; Pyrdol, J.; Wucherpfennig, K. W.

    2011-01-17

    Self-reactive T cells that escape elimination in the thymus can cause autoimmune pathology, and it is therefore important to understand the structural mechanisms of self-antigen recognition. We report the crystal structure of a T cell receptor (TCR) from a patient with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that engages its self-peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand in an unusual manner. The TCR is bound in a highly tilted orientation that prevents interaction of the TCR-{alpha} chain with the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. In this structure, only a single germline-encoded TCR loop engages the MHC protein, whereas in most other TCR-pMHC structures all four germline-encoded TCR loops bind to the MHC helices. The tilted binding mode also prevents peptide contacts by the short complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3{beta} loop, and interactions that contribute to peptide side chain specificity are focused on the CDR3{alpha} loop. This structure is the first example in which only a single germline-encoded TCR loop contacts the MHC helices. Furthermore, the reduced interaction surface with the peptide may facilitate TCR cross-reactivity. The structural alterations in the trimolecular complex are distinct from previously characterized self-reactive TCRs, indicating that there are multiple unusual ways for self-reactive TCRs to bind their pMHC ligand.

  5. A Highly Tilted Binding Mode by a Self-Reactive T Cell Receptor Results in Altered Engagement of Peptide and MHC

    SciTech Connect

    D Sethi; D Schubert; A Anders; A Heroux; D Bonsor; C Thomas; E Sundberg; J Pyrdol; K Wucherpfennig

    2011-12-31

    Self-reactive T cells that escape elimination in the thymus can cause autoimmune pathology, and it is therefore important to understand the structural mechanisms of self-antigen recognition. We report the crystal structure of a T cell receptor (TCR) from a patient with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that engages its self-peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand in an unusual manner. The TCR is bound in a highly tilted orientation that prevents interaction of the TCR-{alpha} chain with the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. In this structure, only a single germline-encoded TCR loop engages the MHC protein, whereas in most other TCR-pMHC structures all four germline-encoded TCR loops bind to the MHC helices. The tilted binding mode also prevents peptide contacts by the short complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3{beta} loop, and interactions that contribute to peptide side chain specificity are focused on the CDR3{alpha} loop. This structure is the first example in which only a single germline-encoded TCR loop contacts the MHC helices. Furthermore, the reduced interaction surface with the peptide may facilitate TCR cross-reactivity. The structural alterations in the trimolecular complex are distinct from previously characterized self-reactive TCRs, indicating that there are multiple unusual ways for self-reactive TCRs to bind their pMHC ligand.

  6. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  7. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  8. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  9. Multiple binding sites in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: An opportunity for polypharmacolgy.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bermudez, Isabel; Varas, Rodrigo; Reyes-Parada, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    For decades, the development of selective compounds has been the main goal for chemists and biologists involved in drug discovery. However, diverse lines of evidence indicate that polypharmacological agents, i.e. those that act simultaneously at various protein targets, might show better profiles than selective ligands, regarding both efficacy and side effects. On the other hand, the availability of the crystal structure of different receptors allows a detailed analysis of the main interactions between drugs and receptors in a specific binding site. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) constitute a large and diverse family of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) that, as a product of its modulation, regulate neurotransmitter release, which in turns produce a global neuromodulation of the central nervous system. nAChRs are pentameric protein complexes in such a way that expression of compatible subunits can lead to various receptor assemblies or subtypes. The agonist binding site, located at the extracellular region, exhibits different properties depending on the subunits that conform the receptor. In the last years, it has been recognized that nAChRs could also contain one or more allosteric sites which could bind non-classical nicotinic ligands including several therapeutically useful drugs. The presence of multiple binding sites in nAChRs offers an interesting possibility for the development of novel polypharmacological agents with a wide spectrum of actions. PMID:26318763

  10. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through (15)N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  11. Multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering simulations using 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Cara A C; Rogge, Matthew D; Miller, Corey A; Hinders, Mark K

    2012-02-01

    We have implemented three-dimensional (3D) elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations to model Lamb wave scattering for two flaw-types in an aircraft-grade aluminum plate, a rounded rectangle flat-bottom hole and a disbond of the same shape. The plate thickness and flaws explored in this work include frequency-thickness regions where several Lamb wave modes exist and sometimes overlap in phase and/or group velocity. For the case of the flat-bottom hole the depth was incrementally increased to explore progressive changes in multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering due to the damage. The flat-bottom hole simulation results have been compared to experimental data and are shown to provide key insight for this well-defined experimental case by explaining unexpected results in experimental waveforms. For the rounded rectangle disbond flaw, which would be difficult to implement experimentally, we found that Lamb wave behavior differed significantly from the flat-bottom hole flaw. Most of the literature in this field is restricted to low frequency-thickness regions due to difficulties in interpreting data when multiple modes exist. We found that benchmarked 3D EFIT simulations can yield an understanding of scattering behavior for these higher frequency-thickness regions and in cases that would be difficult to set up experimentally. Additionally, our results show that 2D simulations would not have been sufficient for modeling the complicated scattering that occurred. PMID:21908011

  12. Selective Monocationic Inhibitors of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase. Binding Mode Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Ji, Haitao; Li, Huiying; Jing, Qing; Labby, Kristin Jansen; Martásek, Pavel; Roman, Linda J.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of pathophysiologic levels of nitric oxide through inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) has the potential to be therapeutically beneficial in various neurodegenerative diseases. We have developed a series of pyrrolidine-based nNOS inhibitors that exhibit excellent potencies and isoform selectivities (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 5437). However, there are still important challenges, such as how to decrease the multiple positive charges derived from basic amino groups, which contribute to poor bioavailability, without losing potency and/or selectivity. Here we present an interdisciplinary study combining molecular docking, crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, synthesis, and enzymology to explore potential pharmacophoric features of nNOS inhibitors and to design potent and selective monocationic nNOS inhibitors. The simulation results indicate that different hydrogen bond patterns, electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and a water molecule bridge are key factors for stabilizing ligands and controlling ligand orientation. We find that a heteroatom in the aromatic head or linker chain of the ligand provides additional stability and blocks the substrate binding pocket. Finally, the computational insights are experimentally validated with double-headed pyridine analogs. The compounds reported here are among the most potent and selective monocationic pyrrolidine-based nNOS inhibitors reported to date, and 10 shows improved membrane permeability. PMID:22731813

  13. Multiple Modes of Cell Death Discovered in a Prokaryotic (Cyanobacterial) Endosymbiont

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiwen; Rasmussen, Ulla; Zheng, Siping; Bao, Xiaodong; Chen, Bin; Gao, Yuan; Guan, Xiong; Larsson, John; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically-based cell death mechanism with vital roles in eukaryotes. Although there is limited consensus on similar death mode programs in prokaryotes, emerging evidence suggest that PCD events are operative. Here we present cell death events in a cyanobacterium living endophytically in the fern Azolla microphylla, suggestive of PCD. This symbiosis is characterized by some unique traits such as a synchronized development, a vertical transfer of the cyanobacterium between plant generations, and a highly eroding cyanobacterial genome. A combination of methods was used to identify cell death modes in the cyanobacterium. Light- and electron microscopy analyses showed that the proportion of cells undergoing cell death peaked at 53.6% (average 20%) of the total cell population, depending on the cell type and host developmental stage. Biochemical markers used for early and late programmed cell death events related to apoptosis (Annexin V-EGFP and TUNEL staining assays), together with visualization of cytoskeleton alterations (FITC-phalloidin staining), showed that all cyanobacterial cell categories were affected by cell death. Transmission electron microscopy revealed four modes of cell death: apoptotic-like, autophagic-like, necrotic-like and autolytic-like. Abiotic stresses further enhanced cell death in a dose and time dependent manner. The data also suggest that dynamic changes in the peptidoglycan cell wall layer and in the cytoskeleton distribution patterns may act as markers for the various cell death modes. The presence of a metacaspase homolog (domain p20) further suggests that the death modes are genetically programmed. It is therefore concluded that multiple, likely genetically programmed, cell death modes exist in cyanobacteria, a finding that may be connected with the evolution of cell death in the plant kingdom. PMID:23822984

  14. Multiple Modes of Cell Death Discovered in a Prokaryotic (Cyanobacterial) Endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiwen; Rasmussen, Ulla; Zheng, Siping; Bao, Xiaodong; Chen, Bin; Gao, Yuan; Guan, Xiong; Larsson, John; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically-based cell death mechanism with vital roles in eukaryotes. Although there is limited consensus on similar death mode programs in prokaryotes, emerging evidence suggest that PCD events are operative. Here we present cell death events in a cyanobacterium living endophytically in the fern Azolla microphylla, suggestive of PCD. This symbiosis is characterized by some unique traits such as a synchronized development, a vertical transfer of the cyanobacterium between plant generations, and a highly eroding cyanobacterial genome. A combination of methods was used to identify cell death modes in the cyanobacterium. Light- and electron microscopy analyses showed that the proportion of cells undergoing cell death peaked at 53.6% (average 20%) of the total cell population, depending on the cell type and host developmental stage. Biochemical markers used for early and late programmed cell death events related to apoptosis (Annexin V-EGFP and TUNEL staining assays), together with visualization of cytoskeleton alterations (FITC-phalloidin staining), showed that all cyanobacterial cell categories were affected by cell death. Transmission electron microscopy revealed four modes of cell death: apoptotic-like, autophagic-like, necrotic-like and autolytic-like. Abiotic stresses further enhanced cell death in a dose and time dependent manner. The data also suggest that dynamic changes in the peptidoglycan cell wall layer and in the cytoskeleton distribution patterns may act as markers for the various cell death modes. The presence of a metacaspase homolog (domain p20) further suggests that the death modes are genetically programmed. It is therefore concluded that multiple, likely genetically programmed, cell death modes exist in cyanobacteria, a finding that may be connected with the evolution of cell death in the plant kingdom. PMID:23822984

  15. Lynx1 and Aβ1-42 bind competitively to multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morten S; Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Pinborg, Lars H; Härtig, Wolfgang; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2016-10-01

    Lynx1 regulates synaptic plasticity in the brain by regulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). It is not known to which extent Lynx1 can bind to endogenous nAChR subunits in the brain or how this interaction is affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology. We apply affinity purification to demonstrate that a water-soluble variant of human Lynx1 (Ws-Lynx1) isolates α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits from human and rat cortical extracts, and rat midbrain and olfactory bulb extracts, suggesting that Lynx1 forms complexes with multiple nAChR subtypes in the human and rodent brain. Incubation with Ws-Lynx1 decreases nicotine-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells and striatal neurons, indicating that binding of Ws-Lynx1 is sufficient to inhibit signaling downstream of nAChRs. The effect of nicotine in PC12 cells is independent of α7 or α4β2 nAChRs, suggesting that Lynx1 can affect the function of native non-α7, non-α4β2 nAChR subtypes. We further show that Lynx1 and oligomeric β-amyloid1-42 compete for binding to several nAChR subunits, that Ws-Lynx1 prevents β-amyloid1-42-induced cytotoxicity in cortical neurons, and that cortical Lynx1 levels are decreased in a transgenic mouse model with concomitant β-amyloid and tau pathology. Our data suggest that Lynx1 binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the brain and that this interaction might have functional and pathophysiological implications in relation to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27460145

  16. Free-energy analysis of lysozyme-triNAG binding modes with all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with the solution theory in the energy representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Burri, Raghunadha Reddy; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Ishikura, Takakazu; Sakuraba, Shun; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kuwata, Kazuo; Kitao, Akio

    2013-02-01

    We propose a method for calculating the binding free energy of protein-ligand complexes using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with the solution theory in the energy representation. Four distinct modes for the binding of tri-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (triNAG) to hen egg-white lysozyme were investigated, one from the crystal structure and three generated by docking predictions. The proposed method was demonstrated to be used to distinguish the most plausible binding mode (crystal model) as the lowest binding energy mode.

  17. Multiple magnetic mode-based Fano resonance in split-ring resonator/disk nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wen, Xinglin; Li, Guangyuan; Ruan, Qifeng; Wang, Jianfang; Xiong, Qihua

    2013-12-23

    Plasmonic Fano resonance, enabled by the weak interaction between a bright super-radiant and a subradiant resonance mode, not only is fundamentally interesting, but also exhibits potential applications ranging from extraordinary optical transmission to biosensing. Here, we demonstrate strong Fano resonances in split-ring resonators/disk (SRR/D) nanocavities. The high-order magnetic modes are observed in SRRs by polarization-resolved transmission spectroscopy. When a disk is centered within the SRRs, multiple high-order magnetic modes are coupled to a broad electric dipole mode of SRR/D, leading to significant Fano resonance spectral features in near-IR regime. The strength and line shape of the Fano resonances are tuned through varying the SRR split-angle and interparticle distance between SRR and disk. Finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) simulations are conducted to understand the coupling mechanism, and the results show good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the coupled structure gives a sensitivity of ∼282 nm/RIU with a figure of merit ∼4. PMID:24215162

  18. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-Ming; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan ; Lee, Yuarn-Jang; Wang, Wei-Ting; Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Hsu, Chien-Ting; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Tsai, Jing-Shin; Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Wu, Chien-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  19. Probing carbohydrate product expulsion from a processive cellulase with multiple absolute binding free energy methods.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lintao; Beckham, Gregg T; Shirts, Michael R; Nimlos, Mark R; Adney, William S; Himmel, Michael E; Crowley, Michael F

    2011-05-20

    Understanding the enzymatic mechanism that cellulases employ to degrade cellulose is critical to efforts to efficiently utilize plant biomass as a sustainable energy resource. A key component of cellulase action on cellulose is product inhibition from monosaccharide and disaccharides in the product site of cellulase tunnel. The absolute binding free energy of cellobiose and glucose to the product site of the catalytic tunnel of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) of Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) was calculated using two different approaches: steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and alchemical free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations. For the SMD approach, three methods based on Jarzynski's equality were used to construct the potential of mean force from multiple pulling trajectories. The calculated binding free energies, -14.4 kcal/mol using SMD and -11.2 kcal/mol using FEP/MD, are in good qualitative agreement. Analysis of the SMD pulling trajectories suggests that several protein residues (Arg-251, Asp-259, Asp-262, Trp-376, and Tyr-381) play key roles in cellobiose and glucose binding to the catalytic tunnel. Five mutations (R251A, D259A, D262A, W376A, and Y381A) were made computationally to measure the changes in free energy during the product expulsion process. The absolute binding free energies of cellobiose to the catalytic tunnel of these five mutants are -13.1, -6.0, -11.5, -7.5, and -8.8 kcal/mol, respectively. The results demonstrated that all of the mutants tested can lower the binding free energy of cellobiose, which provides potential applications in engineering the enzyme to accelerate the product expulsion process and improve the efficiency of biomass conversion. PMID:21454590

  20. Quest for the binding mode of malachite green with humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Yin, Mingxing; Shi, Jinghua; Wang, Yanqing

    2015-02-01

    The association of malachite green (MG) with humic acid (HA) was investigated by using fluorescence, UV-vis spectroscopy and molecular Modelling method. The fluorescence spectral results indicated that the binding between MG and HA occurred by mainly hydrophobic and electrostatic forces with association constants of KA (298 K) = 6.24 × 105 L/mol and KA (310 K) = 10.20 × 105 L/mol. There were more than one binding sites on HA to bind with MG. The binding sites of MG with HA primarily located at the aromatic rings of HA. MG could enter into the hydrophobic cavities of HA to quench the fluorescence of HA. On the contrary, HA binding caused MG to a coplanar conformation with more extended π bond distribution by π-π stacking interactions. The experiment and calculation data both showed that the hydrophobic binding cavities in HA played a key role in its binding with MG.

  1. Origin of the damage ring pattern in fused silica induced by multiple longitudinal modes laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambonneau, M.; Diaz, R.; Grua, P.; Rullier, J.-L.; Duchateau, G.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Lamaignère, L.

    2014-01-01

    Ring patterns surrounding laser damage sites at the exit surface of fused silica are systematically observed when initiated by multiple longitudinal modes nanosecond laser pulses at 1064 nm. The appearance chronology of rings is found to be closely related to the temporal shape of the laser pulses. This supports that the damage morphology originates from the coupling of a laser-supported detonation wave propagating in air with an ablation mechanism in silica. In our experiments, the propagation speed of the detonation wave reaches about 20 km/s and scales as the cube root of the laser intensity, in good agreement with theory.

  2. Membrane binding mode of intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits depends on lipid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Sigalov, Alexander B.; Hendricks, Gregory M.

    2009-11-13

    Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling subunits including {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} all contain one or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), tyrosine residues of which are phosphorylated upon receptor triggering. Membrane binding-induced helical folding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} ITAMs is thought to control TCR activation. However, the question whether or not lipid binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} is necessarily accompanied by a folding transition of ITAMs remains open. In this study, we investigate whether the membrane binding mechanisms of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depend on the membrane model used. Circular dichroic and fluorescence data indicate that binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} to detergent micelles and unstable vesicles is accompanied by a disorder-to-order transition, whereas upon binding to stable vesicles these proteins remain unfolded. Using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we show that upon protein binding, unstable vesicles fuse and rupture. In contrast, stable vesicles remain intact under these conditions. This suggests different membrane binding modes for {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depending on the bilayer stability: (1) coupled binding and folding, and (2) binding without folding. These findings explain the long-standing puzzle in the literature and highlight the importance of the choice of an appropriate membrane model for protein-lipid interactions studies.

  3. Interacting multiple zero mode formulation and its application to a system consisting of a dark soliton in a condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, J.; Nakamura, Y.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2015-08-01

    To formulate the zero modes in a finite-size system with spontaneous breakdown of symmetries in quantum field theory is not trivial, for in the naive Bogoliubov theory, one encounters difficulties such as phase diffusion, the absence of a definite criterion for determining the ground state, and infrared divergences. An interacting zero mode formulation that has been proposed for systems with a single zero mode to avoid these difficulties is extended to general systems with multiple zero modes. It naturally and definitely gives the interactions among the quantized zero modes, the consequences of which can be observed experimentally. In this paper, as a typical example, we consider an atomic Bose-Einstein condensed system with a dark soliton that contains two zero modes corresponding to the spontaneous breakdown of the U(1) gauge and translational symmetries. Then we evaluate the standard deviations of the zero mode operators and see how the mutual interaction between the two zero modes affects them.

  4. On the verification of binding modes of p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone with mercury(II). The solid state studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata

    2014-08-01

    Two coordination compounds of p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone, fluorescent chemosensor, have been synthesised from the mercury(II) nitrate and mercury(II) chloride, and subsequently characterised by IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, as well as single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The inorganic anion has a distinct influence on binding mode of thiosemicarbazone ligand to Hg(II) ion. In both compounds the metal to ligand stoichiometry is 1:2 and the organic ligands coordinate to Hg ion in the neutral thione form, but they differ in a ligand binding mode and the conformation of the ligand. The crystal packing of mercury(II) nitrate complex with thiosemicarbazone is controlled by the mercury chelate ring-phenylene ring π···π stacking interactions.

  5. Structure, mechanics, and binding mode heterogeneity of LEDGF/p75-DNA nucleoprotein complexes revealed by scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; de Feyter, Steven

    2014-04-01

    LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease.LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SFM topographs of phage lambda DNA in situ, in the absence and presence of LEDGF/p75; model-independent tests for DNA chain equilibration in 2D; SFM topographs of

  6. Discovery of a Potent Class of PI3Kα Inhibitors with Unique Binding Mode via Encoded Library Technology (ELT)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the search of PI3K p110α wild type and H1047R mutant selective small molecule leads, an encoded library technology (ELT) campaign against the desired target proteins was performed which led to the discovery of a selective chemotype for PI3K isoforms from a three-cycle DNA encoded library. An X-ray crystal structure of a representative inhibitor from this chemotype demonstrated a unique binding mode in the p110α protein. PMID:26005528

  7. Multiple label-free biodetection and quantitative DNA-binding assays on a nanomechanical cantilever array

    PubMed Central

    McKendry, Rachel; Zhang, Jiayun; Arntz, Youri; Strunz, Torsten; Hegner, Martin; Lang, Hans Peter; Baller, Marko K.; Certa, Ulrich; Meyer, Ernst; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Gerber, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    We report a microarray of cantilevers to detect multiple unlabeled biomolecules simultaneously at nanomolar concentrations within minutes. Ligand-receptor binding interactions such as DNA hybridization or protein recognition occurring on microfabricated silicon cantilevers generate nanomechanical bending, which is detected optically in situ. Differential measurements including reference cantilevers on an array of eight sensors can sequence-specifically detect unlabeled DNA targets in 80-fold excess of nonmatching DNA as a background and discriminate 3′ and 5′ overhangs. Our experiments suggest that the nanomechanical motion originates from predominantly steric hindrance effects and depends on the concentration of DNA molecules in solution. We show that cantilever arrays can be used to investigate the thermodynamics of biomolecular interactions mechanically, and we have found that the specificity of the reaction on a cantilever is consistent with solution data. Hence cantilever arrays permit multiple binding assays in parallel and can detect femtomoles of DNA on the cantilever at a DNA concentration in solution of 75 nM. PMID:12119412

  8. Structure, multiple site binding, and segmental accommodation in thymidylate synthase on binding dUMP and an anti-folate.

    PubMed

    Montfort, W R; Perry, K M; Fauman, E B; Finer-Moore, J S; Maley, G F; Hardy, L; Maley, F; Stroud, R M

    1990-07-31

    The structure of Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase (TS) complexed with the substrate dUMP and an analogue of the cofactor methylenetetrahydrofolate was solved by multiple isomorphous replacement and refined at 1.97-A resolution to a residual of 18% for all data (16% for data greater than 2 sigma) for a highly constrained structure. All residues in the structure are clearly resolved and give a very high confidence in total correctness of the structure. The ternary complex directly suggests how methylation of dUMP takes place. C-6 of dUMP is covalently bound to gamma S of Cys-198(146) during catalysis, and the reactants are surrounded by specific hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions from conserved residues. Comparison with the independently solved structure of unliganded TS reveals a large conformation change in the enzyme, which closes down to sequester the reactants and several highly ordered water molecules within a cavernous active center, away from bulk solvent. A second binding site for the quinazoline ring of the cofactor analogue was discovered by withholding addition of reducing agent during crystal storage. The chemical change in the protein is slight, and from difference density maps modification of sulfhydryls is not directly responsible for blockade of the primary site. The site, only partially overlapping with the primary site, is also surrounded by conserved residues and thus may play a functional role. The ligand-induced conformational change is not a domain shift but involves the segmental accommodation of several helices, beta-strands, and loops that move as units against the beta-sheet interface between monomers. PMID:2223754

  9. A Study of the Predictive Relationships between Faculty Engagement, Learner Satisfaction and Outcomes in Multiple Learning Delivery Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Cherng-Jyh; Abdous, M'hammed

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the predictive relationships between faculty engagement, learner satisfaction, and outcomes across multiple learning delivery modes (LDMs). Participants were enrolled in courses with the options of three learning delivery modes: face-to-face, satellite broadcasting, and live video-streaming. The predictive relationship between…

  10. Modeling of Beams’ Multiple-Contact Mode with an Application in the Design of a High-g Threshold Microaccelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Chen, Wenyuan; Zhang, Weiping

    2011-01-01

    Beam’s multiple-contact mode, characterized by multiple and discrete contact regions, non-uniform stoppers’ heights, irregular contact sequence, seesaw-like effect, indirect interaction between different stoppers, and complex coupling relationship between loads and deformation is studied. A novel analysis method and a novel high speed calculation model are developed for multiple-contact mode under mechanical load and electrostatic load, without limitations on stopper height and distribution, providing the beam has stepped or curved shape. Accurate values of deflection, contact load, contact region and so on are obtained directly, with a subsequent validation by CoventorWare. A new concept design of high-g threshold microaccelerometer based on multiple-contact mode is presented, featuring multiple acceleration thresholds of one sensitive component and consequently small sensor size. PMID:22163897

  11. A Comparative Structure/Function Analysis of Two Type IV Pilin DNA Receptors Defines a Novel Mode of DNA Binding.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jamie-Lee; Xu, Yingqi; Ward, Philip N; Lea, Susan M; Matthews, Stephen J; Pelicic, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    DNA transformation is a widespread process allowing bacteria to capture free DNA by using filamentous nano-machines composed of type IV pilins. These proteins can act as DNA receptors as demonstrated by the finding that Neisseria meningitidis ComP minor pilin has intrinsic DNA-binding ability. ComP binds DNA better when it contains the DNA-uptake sequence (DUS) motif abundant in this species genome, playing a role in its trademark ability to selectively take up its own DNA. Here, we report high-resolution structures for meningococcal ComP and Neisseria subflava ComPsub, which recognize different DUS motifs. We show that they are structurally identical type IV pilins that pack readily into filament models and display a unique DD region delimited by two disulfide bonds. Functional analysis of ComPsub defines a new mode of DNA binding involving the DD region, adapted for exported DNA receptors. PMID:27161979

  12. Similarities and differences in affinity and binding modes of tricyclic pyrimido- and pyrazinoxanthines at human and rat adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Ewa; Drabczyńska, Anna; Karcz, Tadeusz; Müller, Christa E; Köse, Meryem; Karolak-Wojciechowska, Janina; Fruziński, Andrzej; Schabikowski, Jakub; Doroz-Płonka, Agata; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-09-15

    A new series of 32 pyrimido- and 5 tetrahydropyrazino[2,1-f]purinediones was obtained and evaluated for their adenosine receptors (ARs) affinities. The 1,3-dibutyl derivative of 9-(4-(2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy)phenyl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydropyrimido[1,2-f]purine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione was found to be the most potent A1 AR antagonist of the present series, showing selectivity over the other AR subtypes. The structure-activity for the obtained purinediones was established. Docking experiments of the investigated library to homology models of the human and rat A1 and A2A ARs allowed to compare the expected binding modes for selected compounds. The detailed analysis of binding cavities within individual AR subtypes indicated small but significant structural variations that may underlie the observed differences in binding affinities of purinediones at particular subtypes and species. PMID:27485602

  13. Determination of the cationic amphiphilic drug-DNA binding mode and DNA-assisted fluorescence resonance energy transfer amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Zahid; Banday, Abdul Rouf; Hussain, Mohammed Aamir; Tabish, Mohammad; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of drug-DNA binding is crucial for predicting the potential genotoxicity of drugs. Agarose gel electrophoresis, absorption, steady state fluorescence, and circular dichroism have been used in exploring the interaction of cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) such as amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMP), and promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) with calf thymus or pUC19 DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay, along with absorption and steady state fluorescence studies, reveal interaction between the CADs and DNA. A comparative study of the drugs with respect to the effect of urea, iodide induced quenching, and ethidium bromide (EB) exclusion assay reflects binding of CADs to the DNA primarily in an intercalative fashion. Circular dichroism data also support the intercalative mode of binding. Besides quenching, there is fluorescence exchange energy transfer (FRET) in between CADs and EB using DNA as a template.

  14. Dynamic control of polarization-inverted modes in three-dimensionally trapped multiple nanogaps

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Mamoru; Iida, Takuya

    2015-12-28

    We propose a guiding principle for the dynamic control of polarization-inverted modes in multiple nanogaps for unconventional optical transitions of molecules at arbitrary three-dimensional spatial positions. Based on our developed self-consistent theory for the optical assembly of nanoparticles (NPs), we clarified that spherical silver NPs can be optically trapped and aligned in the light-propagating direction via longitudinally polarized light; they form a rod-like nano-composite with multiple nanogaps. During trapping, there is a possibility that an additional irradiation of linearly polarized far-field light may excite the bonding and anti-bonding dark plasmon modes with low radiative decay rate of several meV via cancellation of inverted polarization. Our finding reveals that not only the steep change in the enhanced intensity of light field but also the phase inversion of light field between the dynamically formed nanogaps will pave the way to the highly sensitive sensors for molecules, the unconventional chemical reactions, and so on.

  15. The Sec1p/Munc18 protein Vps45p binds its cognate SNARE proteins via two distinct modes.

    PubMed

    Carpp, Lindsay N; Ciufo, Leonora F; Shanks, Scott G; Boyd, Alan; Bryant, Nia J

    2006-06-19

    Sec1p/Munc18 (SM) proteins are essential for SNARE-mediated membrane trafficking. The formulation of unifying hypotheses for the function of the SM protein family has been hampered by the observation that two of its members bind their cognate syntaxins (Sxs) in strikingly different ways. The SM protein Vps45p binds its Sx Tlg2p in a manner analogous to that captured by the Sly1p-Sed5p crystal structure, whereby the NH2-terminal peptide of the Sx inserts into a hydrophobic pocket on the outer face of domain I of the SM protein. In this study, we report that although this mode of interaction is critical for the binding of Vps45p to Tlg2p, the SM protein also binds Tlg2p-containing SNARE complexes via a second mode that involves neither the NH2 terminus of Tlg2p nor the region of Vps45p that facilitates this interaction. Our findings point to the possibility that SM proteins interact with their cognate SNARE proteins through distinct mechanisms at different stages in the SNARE assembly/disassembly cycle. PMID:16769821

  16. High-energy mode-locked fiber lasers using multiple transmission filters and a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xing; Kutz, J Nathan

    2013-03-11

    We theoretically demonstrate that in a laser cavity mode-locked by nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) using sets of waveplates and passive polarizer, the energy performance can be significantly increased by incorporating multiple NPR filters. The NPR filters are engineered so as to mitigate the multi-pulsing instability in the laser cavity which is responsible for limiting the single pulse per round trip energy in a myriad of mode-locked cavities. Engineering of the NPR filters for performance is accomplished by implementing a genetic algorithm that is capable of systematically identifying viable and optimal NPR settings in a vast parameter space. Our study shows that five NPR filters can increase the cavity energy by approximately a factor of five, with additional NPRs contributing little or no enhancements beyond this. With the advent and demonstration of electronic controls for waveplates and polarizers, the analysis suggests a general design and engineering principle that can potentially close the order of magnitude energy gap between fiber based mode-locked lasers and their solid state counterparts. PMID:23482223

  17. Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibrations of beams using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Decha-Umphai, Kamolphan

    1987-01-01

    Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibration of a beam is analyzed by the finite element method. The geometric nonlinearity is investigated. Inplane displacement and inertia (IDI) are also considered in the formulation. Harmonic force matrix is derived and explained. Nonlinear free vibration can be simply treated as a special case of the general forced vibration by setting the harmonic force matrix equal to zero. The effect of the higher modes is more pronouced for the clamped supported beam than the simply supported one. Beams without IDI yield more effect of the higher modes than the one with IDI. The effects of IDI are to reduce nonlinearity. For beams with end supports restrained from axial movement (immovable cases), only the hardening type nonlinearity is observed. However, beams of small slenderness ratio (L/R = 20) with movable end supports, the softening type nonlinearity is found. The concentrated force case yields a more severe response than the uniformly distributed force case. Finite element results are in good agreement with the solution of simple elliptic response, harmonic balance method, and Runge-Kutte method and experiment.

  18. Vitamin D receptor binding, chromatin states and association with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Disanto, Giulio; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Berlanga-Taylor, Antonio J; Ragnedda, Giammario; Morahan, Julia M; Watson, Corey T; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ebers, George C; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V

    2012-08-15

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the aetiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). More than 50 genomic regions have been associated with MS susceptibility and vitamin D status also influences the risk of this complex disease. However, how these factors interact in disease causation is unclear. We aimed to investigate the relationship between vitamin D receptor (VDR) binding in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), chromatin states in LCLs and MS-associated genomic regions. Using the Genomic Hyperbrowser, we found that VDR-binding regions overlapped with active regulatory regions [active promoter (AP) and strong enhancer (SE)] in LCLs more than expected by chance [45.3-fold enrichment for SE (P < 2.0e-05) and 63.41-fold enrichment for AP (P < 2.0e-05)]. Approximately 77% of VDR regions were covered by either AP or SE elements. The overlap between VDR binding and regulatory elements was significantly greater in LCLs than in non-immune cells (P < 2.0e-05). VDR binding also occurred within MS regions more than expected by chance (3.7-fold enrichment, P < 2.0e-05). Furthermore, regions of joint overlap SE-VDR and AP-VDR were even more enriched within MS regions and near to several disease-associated genes. These findings provide relevant insights into how vitamin D influences the immune system and the risk of MS through VDR interactions with the chromatin state inside MS regions. Furthermore, the data provide additional evidence for an important role played by B cells in MS. Further analyses in other immune cell types and functional studies are warranted to fully elucidate the role of vitamin D in the immune system. PMID:22595971

  19. Definition of the binding mode of phosphoinositide 3-kinase α-selective inhibitor A-66S through molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiaoli; Dong, Wangqing; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Rui; Kong, Wanjun; Li, Yiping

    2014-04-01

    Activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase α (PI3Kα) is commonly observed in human cancer and is critical for tumor progression, which has made PI3Kα an attractive target for anticancer drug discovery. To systematically investigate the binding mode of A-66S, a new selective PI3Kα inhibitor for PI3Kα, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and ensuing energetic analysis were performed. The binding free energy between PI3Kα and A-66S is -11.27 kcal•mol⁻¹ using MMPBSA method, while -14.67 kcal•mol⁻¹ using MMGBSA method, which is beneficial for the binding, and the van der Waals/hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are critical for the binding. The conserved hydrophobic adenine region of PI3Kα made up of Met772, Pro778, Ile800, Tyr836, Ile848, Val850, Val851, Met922, Phe930 and Ile932 accommodates the flat 2-tert-butyl-4'-methyl-4,5'-bithiazol moiety of A-66S, and the NH of Val851 forms a hydrogen with the nitrogen atom embedded in the aminothiazole ring of A-66S. The (S)-pyrrolidine carboxamide urea moiety especially extends toward the region of the binding site wall (Ser854-Gln859) defined by the C-terminal lobe, and has three hydrogen-bond arms with the backbone of Ser854 and the side chain of Gln859. Notably the interaction between the non-conserved residue Gln859 and A-66S is responsible for the selectivity profile of A-66S. The binding mode of A-66S for PI3Kα presented in this study should aid in the design of a new highly selective PI3Kα inhibitor. PMID:24633771

  20. Stilbene 5c, A Microtubule Poison with Vascular Disrupting Properties That Induces Multiple Modes of Growth Arrest and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, M.R.; Asnake, B.; Xu, Di; Beckman, M.J.; Durrant, D; Simoni, D; Baruchello, R; Lee, R. M.; Schwartz, E.L.; Gewirtz, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    The stilbene derivative, cis-3, 4’, 5-trimethoxy-3’-aminostilbene (stilbene 5c), is a potentially potent antitumor agent that acts via binding to the colchicine-binding site in tubulin. The current studies were designed to investigate the effectiveness of stilbene 5c against the HCT-116 human colon cancer cell line and B16/F10 melanoma cells as well as human endothelial cell formation and tumor perfusion. Stilbene 5c produced a time-dependent decrease in cell viability in both cell lines and the capacity of the cells to proliferate was not restored upon removal of the drug. Treatment with stilbene 5c also promoted both senescence and autophagy in both cell lines. TUNEL and annexin 5 staining indicated that apoptosis also occurs in stilbene 5c-treated HCT-116 cells, but not in B16/F10 melanoma cells. DAPI staining revealed morphological changes in the cell nuclei (binucleated and micronucleated cells) indicative of mitotic catastrophe in HCT-116 cells but not in the B16/F10 melanoma cells. p53-null HCT-116 cells demonstrated a similar growth arrest/cell death response to stilbene as p53-wild type HCT-116 cells. Stilbene 5c also completely inhibited human endothelial cell tube formation on Matrigel, consistent with potential anti-angiogenic actions. Using a new method developed for monitoring the pharmacodynamic effects of stilbene 5c in vivo, we found that a single injection of stilbene 5c reduced tumor perfusion by 65% at 4 hours, returning to baseline by 24 hours, while subsequent daily injections of stilbene 5c produced progressively larger reductions and smaller rebounds. This work indicates that stilbene 5c could potentially be effective against melanoma and colon cancer through the promotion of multiple modes of growth arrest and cell death coupled with anti-angiogenic and antivascular actions. PMID:24144631

  1. Stilbene 5c, a microtubule poison with vascular disrupting properties that induces multiple modes of growth arrest and cell death.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, M R; Asnake, B; Di, Xu; Beckman, M J; Durrant, D; Simoni, D; Baruchello, R; Lee, R M; Schwartz, E L; Gewirtz, D A

    2013-12-15

    The stilbene derivative, cis-3,4',5-trimethoxy-3'-aminostilbene (stilbene 5c), is a potentially potent antitumor agent that acts via binding to the colchicine-binding site in tubulin. The current studies were designed to investigate the effectiveness of stilbene 5c against the HCT-116 human colon cancer cell line and B16/F10 melanoma cells as well as human endothelial cell tube formation and tumor perfusion. Stilbene 5c produced a time-dependent decrease in cell viability in both cell lines and the capacity of the cells to proliferate was not restored upon removal of the drug. Treatment with stilbene 5c also promoted both senescence and autophagy in both cell lines. TUNEL and annexin 5 staining indicated that apoptosis also occurs in stilbene 5c-treated HCT-116 cells, but not in B16/F10 melanoma cells. DAPI staining revealed morphological changes in the cell nuclei (binucleated and micronucleated cells) indicative of mitotic catastrophe in HCT-116 cells but not in the B16/F10 melanoma cells. p53-null HCT-116 cells demonstrated a similar growth arrest/cell death response to stilbene as p53-wild type HCT-116 cells. Stilbene 5c also completely inhibited human endothelial cell tube formation on Matrigel, consistent with potential anti-angiogenic actions. Using a new method developed for monitoring the pharmacodynamic effects of stilbene 5c in vivo, we found that a single injection of stilbene 5c reduced tumor perfusion by 65% at 4h, returning to baseline by 24h, while subsequent daily injections of stilbene 5c produced progressively larger reductions and smaller rebounds. This work indicates that stilbene 5c could potentially be effective against melanoma and colon cancer through the promotion of multiple modes of growth arrest and cell death coupled with anti-angiogenic and antivascular actions. PMID:24144631

  2. Substrate Binding Mode and Molecular Basis of a Specificity Switch in Oxalate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC) catalyzes the conversion of oxalate into formate and carbon dioxide in a remarkable reaction that requires manganese and dioxygen. Previous studies have shown that replacing an active-site loop segment Ser161-Glu162-Asn163-Ser164 in the N-terminal domain of OxDC with the cognate residues Asp161-Ala162-Ser-163-Asn164 of an evolutionarily related, Mn-dependent oxalate oxidase gives a chimeric variant (DASN) that exhibits significantly increased oxidase activity. The mechanistic basis for this change in activity has now been investigated using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) and isotope effect (IE) measurements. Quantitative analysis of the reaction stoichiometry as a function of oxalate concentration, as determined by MIMS, suggests that the increased oxidase activity of the DASN OxDC variant is associated with only a small fraction of the enzyme molecules in solution. In addition, IE measurements show that C–C bond cleavage in the DASN OxDC variant proceeds via the same mechanism as in the wild-type enzyme, even though the Glu162 side chain is absent. Thus, replacement of the loop residues does not modulate the chemistry of the enzyme-bound Mn(II) ion. Taken together, these results raise the possibility that the observed oxidase activity of the DASN OxDC variant arises from an increased level of access of the solvent to the active site during catalysis, implying that the functional role of Glu162 is to control loop conformation. A 2.6 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a complex between oxalate and the Co(II)-substituted ΔE162 OxDC variant, in which Glu162 has been deleted from the active site loop, reveals the likely mode by which the substrate coordinates the catalytically active Mn ion prior to C–C bond cleavage. The “end-on” conformation of oxalate observed in the structure is consistent with the previously published V/K IE data and provides an empty coordination site for the dioxygen ligand that is thought to

  3. Dual modes of membrane binding direct pore formation by Streptolysin O.

    PubMed

    Mozola, Cara C; Caparon, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Effector translocation is central to the virulence of many bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pyogenes, which utilizes the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin Streptolysin O (SLO) to translocate the NAD(+) glycohydrolase SPN into host cells during infection. SLO's translocation activity does not require host cell membrane cholesterol or pore formation by SLO, yet SLO does form pores during infection via a cholesterol-dependent mechanism. Although cholesterol was considered the primary receptor for SLO, SLO's membrane-binding domain also encodes a putative carbohydrate-binding site, implicating a potential glycan receptor in binding and pore formation. Analysis of carbohydrate-binding site SLO mutants and carbohydrate-defective cell lines revealed that glycan recognition is involved in SLO's pore formation pathway and is an essential step when SLO is secreted by non-adherent bacteria, as occurs during lysis of erythrocytes. However, SLO also recognizes host cell membranes via a second mechanism when secreted from adherent bacteria, which requires co-secretion of SPN but not glycan binding by SLO. This SPN-mediated membrane binding of SLO correlates with SPN translocation, and requires SPN's non-enzymatic domain, which is predicted to adopt the structure of a carbohydrate-binding module. SPN-dependent membrane binding also promotes pore formation by SLO, demonstrating that pore formation can occur by distinct pathways during infection. PMID:26059530

  4. The Spring α-Helix Coordinates Multiple Modes of HCV (Hepatitis C Virus) NS3 Helicase Action.

    PubMed

    Gu, Meigang; Rice, Charles M

    2016-07-01

    Genomic DNA replication requires helicases to processively unwind duplexes. Although helicases encoded by positive-strand RNA viruses are necessary for RNA genome replication, their functions are not well understood. We determined structures of the hepatitis C virus helicase (NS3h) in complex with the transition state ATP mimic ADP·AlF4 (-) and compared them with the previous nucleic acid-associated ternary complexes. The results suggested that nucleic acid binding promotes a structural change of the spring helix at the transition state, optimizing the interaction network centered on the nucleophilic water. Analysis of ATP hydrolysis with and without conformational restraints on the spring helix further supported the importance of its action for both nucleic acid-stimulated and basal catalysis. We further found that an F238P substitution, predicted to destabilize the helix, diminished viral RNA replication without significantly affecting ATP-dependent duplex unwinding. The stability of the secondary structure, thus, seems critical for additional functions of NS3h. Taken together, the results suggest that the spring helix may be central to the coordination of multiple modes of NS3h action. Further characterization centered on this element may help understand the molecular details of how the viral helicase facilitates RNA replication. This new structural information may also aid efforts to develop specific inhibitors targeting this essential viral enzyme. PMID:27226535

  5. Modes of reproduction and the accumulation of deleterious mutations with multiplicative fitness effects.

    PubMed Central

    Haccou, Patsy; Schneider, Maria Victoria

    2004-01-01

    Mutational load depends not only on the number and nature of mutations but also on the reproductive mode. Traditionally, only a few specific reproductive modes are considered in the search of explanations for the maintenance of sex. There are, however, many alternatives. Including these may give radically different conclusions. The theory on deterministic deleterious mutations states that in large populations segregation and recombination may lead to a lower load of deleterious mutations, provided that there are synergistic interactions. Empirical research suggests that effects of deleterious mutations are often multiplicative. Such situations have largely been ignored in the literature, since recombination and segregation have no effect on mutation load in the absence of epistasis. However, this is true only when clonal reproduction and sexual reproduction with equal male and female ploidy are considered. We consider several alternative reproductive modes that are all known to occur in insects: arrhenotoky, paternal genome elimination, apomictic thelytoky, and automictic thelytoky with different cytological mechanisms to restore diploidy. We give a method that is based on probability-generating functions, which provides analytical and numerical results on the distributions of deleterious mutations. Using this, we show that segregation and recombination do make a difference. Furthermore, we prove that a modified form of Haldane's principle holds more generally for thelytokous reproduction. We discuss the implications of our results for evolutionary transitions between different reproductive modes in insects. Since the strength of Muller's ratchet is reduced considerably for several forms of automictic thelytoky, many of our results are expected to be also valid for initially small populations. PMID:15020489

  6. The different ligand-binding modes of relaxin family peptide receptors RXFP1 and RXFP2.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel J; Rosengren, K Johan; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2012-11-01

    Relaxin and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) are peptide hormones with a number of important physiological roles in reproduction, regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, and cardiovascular function. Relaxin and INSL3 mediate their actions through the closely related G-protein coupled receptors, relaxin family peptide receptors 1 and 2 (RXFP1 and RXFP2), respectively. These receptors have large extracellular domains (ECD) that contain high-affinity ligand-binding sites within their 10 leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing modules. Although relaxin can bind and activate both RXFP1 and RXFP2, INSL3 can only bind and activate RXFP2. To investigate whether this difference is related to the nature of the high-affinity ECD binding site or to differences in secondary binding sites involving the receptor transmembrane (TM) domain, we created a suite of constructs with RXFP1/2 chimeric ECD attached to single TM helices. We show that by changing as little as one LRR, representing four amino acid substitutions, we were able to engineer a high-affinity INSL3-binding site into the ECD of RXFP1. Molecular modeling of the INSL3-RXFP2 interaction based on extensive experimental data highlights the differences in the binding mechanisms of relaxin and INSL3 to the ECD of their cognate receptors. Interestingly, when the engineered RXFP1/2 ECD were introduced into full-length RXFP1 constructs, INSL3 exhibited only low affinity and efficacy on these receptors. These results highlight critical differences both in the ECD binding and in the coordination of the ECD-binding site with the TM domain, and provide new mechanistic insights into the binding and activation events of RXFP1 and RXFP2 by their native hormone ligands. PMID:22973049

  7. Noncanonical DNA-binding mode of repressor and its disassembly by antirepressor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsik; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyeon; Yoon, Hye Jin; Lim, Youngbin; Lee, Jong Woo; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Seong Keun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding repressors are involved in transcriptional repression in many organisms. Disabling a repressor is a crucial step in activating expression of desired genes. Thus, several mechanisms have been identified for the removal of a stably bound repressor (Rep) from the operator. Here, we describe an uncharacterized mechanism of noncanonical DNA binding and induction by a Rep from the temperate Salmonella phage SPC32H; this mechanism was revealed using the crystal structures of homotetrameric Rep (92–198) and a hetero-octameric complex between the Rep and its antirepressor (Ant). The canonical method of inactivating a repressor is through the competitive binding of the antirepressor to the operator-binding site of the repressor; however, these studies revealed several noncanonical features. First, Ant does not compete for the DNA-binding region of Rep. Instead, the tetrameric Ant binds to the C-terminal domains of two asymmetric Rep dimers. Simultaneously, Ant facilitates the binding of the Rep N-terminal domains to Ant, resulting in the release of two Rep dimers from the bound DNA. Second, the dimer pairs of the N-terminal DNA-binding domains originate from different dimers of a Rep tetramer (trans model). This situation is different from that of other canonical Reps, in which two N-terminal DNA-binding domains from the same dimeric unit form a dimer upon DNA binding (cis model). On the basis of these observations, we propose a noncanonical model for the reversible inactivation of a Rep by an Ant. PMID:27099293

  8. Noncanonical DNA-binding mode of repressor and its disassembly by antirepressor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsik; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyeon; Yoon, Hye Jin; Lim, Youngbin; Lee, Jong Woo; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Seong Keun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-05-01

    DNA-binding repressors are involved in transcriptional repression in many organisms. Disabling a repressor is a crucial step in activating expression of desired genes. Thus, several mechanisms have been identified for the removal of a stably bound repressor (Rep) from the operator. Here, we describe an uncharacterized mechanism of noncanonical DNA binding and induction by a Rep from the temperate Salmonella phage SPC32H; this mechanism was revealed using the crystal structures of homotetrameric Rep (92-198) and a hetero-octameric complex between the Rep and its antirepressor (Ant). The canonical method of inactivating a repressor is through the competitive binding of the antirepressor to the operator-binding site of the repressor; however, these studies revealed several noncanonical features. First, Ant does not compete for the DNA-binding region of Rep. Instead, the tetrameric Ant binds to the C-terminal domains of two asymmetric Rep dimers. Simultaneously, Ant facilitates the binding of the Rep N-terminal domains to Ant, resulting in the release of two Rep dimers from the bound DNA. Second, the dimer pairs of the N-terminal DNA-binding domains originate from different dimers of a Rep tetramer (trans model). This situation is different from that of other canonical Reps, in which two N-terminal DNA-binding domains from the same dimeric unit form a dimer upon DNA binding (cis model). On the basis of these observations, we propose a noncanonical model for the reversible inactivation of a Rep by an Ant. PMID:27099293

  9. Alpha-amylase starch binding domains: cooperative effects of binding to starch granules of multiple tandemly arranged domains.

    PubMed

    Guillén, D; Santiago, M; Linares, L; Pérez, R; Morlon, J; Ruiz, B; Sánchez, S; Rodríguez-Sanoja, R

    2007-06-01

    The Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase starch binding domain (SBD) is a functional domain responsible for binding to insoluble starch. Structurally, this domain is dissimilar from other reported SBDs because it is composed of five identical tandem modules of 91 amino acids each. To understand adsorption phenomena specific to this SBD, the importance of their modular arrangement in relationship to binding ability was investigated. Peptides corresponding to one, two, three, four, or five modules were expressed as His-tagged proteins. Protein binding assays showed an increased capacity of adsorption as a function of the number of modules, suggesting that each unit of the SBD may act in an additive or synergic way to optimize binding to raw starch. PMID:17468268

  10. Passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers using multiple quantum well saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayduk, Michael Joseph

    1997-09-01

    An experimental study of the mode-locking process in erbium-doped fiber lasers (EDFL's) operating at 1.55 μm using multiple quantum well saturable absorbers is presented. The self-starting passively mode-locked laser was constructed in a Fabry-Perot configuration using the saturable absorber as the back reflector of the cavity. Picosecond pulses that ranged from 14.2 to 38.8 ps were generated using a series of saturable absorbers. The pulse widths were dependent upon the optical properties of the saturable absorber used as the mode-locking element. The output power of the EDFL varied from 0.2 to 6.7 mW and was also dependent upon the saturable absorber used in the cavity. Soliton mode-locking using saturable absorbers was the mechanism responsible for the generation of the picosecond pulses by the EDFL. The long-lived carrier lifetime in the quantum wells was the primary optical property of the saturable absorber that determined the final pulse width. The carrier lifetimes of the eight individual saturable absorbers were investigated using time-resolved pump/probe experimental techniques. The lifetimes ranged from 40 to 1757 ps. The soliton mode- locking process allowed pulse widths of up to 45 times shorter than these carrier lifetimes to be produced. A self-starting passively mode-locked solid-state Cr4+:YAG laser was also developed using a novel saturable absorber mirror structure. The laser produced femtosecond pulses that were tunable from 1.488 to 1.535 μm. The average output power of the laser ranged from 40 to 80 mW at a repetition rate of 95 MHz. A minimum pulse width of 120 fs was generated at 1.488 μm. The high peak power of these pulses combined with its tunability in the 1.5 μm region made this laser an ideal spectroscopic source for use in the time-resolved pump/probe experiments.

  11. Distinct Z-DNA binding mode of a PKR-like protein kinase containing a Z-DNA binding domain (PKZ)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doyoun; Hur, Jeonghwan; Park, Kwangsoo; Bae, Sangsu; Shin, Donghyuk; Ha, Sung Chul; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Hohng, Sungchul; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded ribonucleic acid-activated protein kinase (PKR) downregulates translation as a defense mechanism against viral infection. In fish species, PKZ, a PKR-like protein kinase containing left-handed deoxyribonucleic acid (Z-DNA) binding domains, performs a similar role in the antiviral response. To understand the role of PKZ in Z-DNA recognition and innate immune response, we performed structural and functional studies of the Z-DNA binding domain (Zα) of PKZ from Carassius auratus (caZαPKZ). The 1.7-Å resolution crystal structure of caZαPKZ:Z-DNA revealed that caZαPKZ shares the overall fold with other Zα, but has discrete structural features that differentiate its DNA binding mode from others. Functional analyses of caZαPKZ and its mutants revealed that caZαPKZ mediates the fastest B-to-Z transition of DNA among Zα, and the minimal interaction for Z-DNA recognition is mediated by three backbone phosphates and six residues of caZαPKZ. Structure-based mutagenesis and B-to-Z transition assays confirmed that Lys56 located in the β-wing contributes to its fast B-to-Z transition kinetics. Investigation of the DNA binding kinetics of caZαPKZ further revealed that the B-to-Z transition rate is positively correlated with the association rate constant. Taking these results together, we conclude that the positive charge in the β-wing largely affects fast B-to-Z transition activity by enhancing the DNA binding rate. PMID:24682817

  12. Mean deviation coupling synchronous control for multiple motors via second-order adaptive sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Li, Lebao; Sun, Lingling; Zhang, Shengzhou

    2016-05-01

    A new mean deviation coupling synchronization control strategy is developed for multiple motor control systems, which can guarantee the synchronization performance of multiple motor control systems and reduce complexity of the control structure with the increasing number of motors. The mean deviation coupling synchronization control architecture combining second-order adaptive sliding mode control (SOASMC) approach is proposed, which can improve synchronization control precision of multiple motor control systems and make speed tracking errors, mean speed errors of each motor and speed synchronization errors converge to zero rapidly. The proposed control scheme is robustness to parameter variations and random external disturbances and can alleviate the chattering phenomena. Moreover, an adaptive law is employed to estimate the unknown bound of uncertainty, which is obtained in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem to minimize the control effort. Performance comparisons with master-slave control, relative coupling control, ring coupling control, conventional PI control and SMC are investigated on a four-motor synchronization control system. Extensive comparative results are given to shown the good performance of the proposed control scheme. PMID:26899554

  13. A Novel Binding Mode Reveals Two Distinct Classes of NMDA Receptor GluN2B-selective Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Stroebel, David; Buhl, Derek L; Knafels, John D; Chanda, Pranab K; Green, Michael; Sciabola, Simone; Mony, Laetitia; Paoletti, Pierre; Pandit, Jayvardhan

    2016-05-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are glutamate-gated ion channels that play key roles in brain physiology and pathology. Because numerous pathologic conditions involve NMDAR overactivation, subunit-selective antagonists hold strong therapeutic potential, although clinical successes remain limited. Among the most promising NMDAR-targeting drugs are allosteric inhibitors of GluN2B-containing receptors. Since the discovery of ifenprodil, a range of GluN2B-selective compounds with strikingly different structural motifs have been identified. This molecular diversity raises the possibility of distinct binding sites, although supporting data are lacking. Using X-ray crystallography, we show that EVT-101, a GluN2B antagonist structurally unrelated to the classic phenylethanolamine pharmacophore, binds at the same GluN1/GluN2B dimer interface as ifenprodil but adopts a remarkably different binding mode involving a distinct subcavity and receptor interactions. Mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that this novel binding site is physiologically relevant. Moreover, in silico docking unveils that GluN2B-selective antagonists broadly divide into two distinct classes according to binding pose. These data widen the allosteric and pharmacological landscape of NMDARs and offer a renewed structural framework for designing next-generation GluN2B antagonists with therapeutic value for brain disorders. PMID:26912815

  14. Actinomycin D binding mode reveals the basis for its potent HIV-1 and cancer activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Vladescu, Ioana D.; McCauley, Micah J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2011-03-01

    Actinomycin D (ActD) is one of the most studied antibiotics, which has been used as an anti-cancer agent and also shown to inhibit HIV reverse transcription. Initial studies with ActD established that it intercalates double stranded DNA (dsDNA). However, recent studies have shown that ActD binds with even higher affinity to single stranded DNA (ssDNA). In our studies we use optical tweezers to stretch and hold single dsDNA molecule at constant force in the presence of varying ActD concentrations until the binding reaches equilibrium. The change in dsDNA length upon ActD binding measured as a function of time yields the rate of binding in addition to the equilibrium lengthening of DNA. The results suggest extremely slow kinetics, on the order of several minutes and 0.52 +/- 0.06 μ M binding affinity. Holding DNA at constant force while stretching and relaxing suggests that ActD binds to two single strands that are close to each other rather than to pure dsDNA or ssDNA. This suggests that biological activity of ActD that contributes towards the inhibition of cellular replication is due to its ability to bind at DNA bubbles during RNA transcription, thereby stalling the transcription process.

  15. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine.

  16. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibration of complex structures. Volume 3: Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibrations of beams using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shen, Mo-How

    1987-01-01

    Multiple-mode nonlinear forced vibration of a beam was analyzed by the finite element method. Inplane (longitudinal) displacement and inertia (IDI) are considered in the formulation. By combining the finite element method and nonlinear theory, more realistic models of structural response are obtained more easily and faster.

  17. Fabric Controls on the Failure Mode of Strongly Deformed Metamorphic Rocks with Multiple Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, F.; Zanchetta, S.; Crosta, G. B.; Barberini, V.; Fusi, N.; De Ponti, E.

    2012-12-01

    resolutions (MicroCT: 40-60 μm; medical CT: 625 μm) and micro-structural analysis of thin sections. Investigation results suggest that the failure of strongly deformed metamorphic rocks is controlled by the occurrence of multiple anisotropies related to micro-fabric, not always characterised by clear meso-scale expression, including crenulation folding, shape preferred orientation, intracrystalline deformation microstructure. Different failure modes dominate depending on the geometrical arrangement of both foliation and fold axial surfaces, in turn affecting the values of rock strength and deformability. The results of this study point to the need of accounting for the effects of multiple, geometrically complex anisotropies in setting up realistic models of rock fracturing at different scale and for different geological and engineering applications.

  18. Multi-parameter sensing with a single magnetoelastic sensor by applying loads on the null locations of multiple resonant modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRouin, Andrew; Ghee Ong, Keat

    2016-03-01

    Magnetoelastic sensors are mass sensitive sensors commonly used for stress and pressure measurement, as well as chemical and biological monitoring when combined with a functionalized coating. Magnetoelastic sensors are typically made of free-standing, rectangular strips of magnetoelastic materials that exhibit longitudinal, extensional vibrations due to the excitation of magnetic fields. A single magnetoelastic sensor is generally used to monitor one parameter since only the fundamental resonant frequency is measured. Multiple-parameter sensing in close proximity has previously been achieved by using multiple magnetoelastic sensors of different dimensions and tracking their resonant frequencies independently. However, this requires a large surface area and inconvenient layout of dissimilarly shaped sensors. This paper presents a technique for monitoring multiple parameters with a single magnetoelastic sensor by applying separate mass loads at the null points (points of zero vibration) of multiple resonant modes. Applying a load at a null location does not affect the corresponding resonant mode but alters the resonant frequencies of other modes. Therefore, by isolating the variables of interest to multiple null points and simultaneously measuring the resonant frequency shifts of related resonant modes, the masses at each null location can be calculated. Results showed that changing the coverage at a null location along the width of the sensor can be used to minimize the loading effect on the corresponding resonant mode. In contrast, changing the lengthwise coverage can maximize the loading effect on other resonant modes, thus increasing the mass sensitivity of the sensor. Furthermore, simultaneously applying loads to null points of multiple resonant modes had a nearly additive effect, allowing detection of multiple parameters with a single magnetoelastic sensor.

  19. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    PubMed

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:27491650

  20. Crystal structures of Staphylococcal SaeR reveal possible DNA-binding modes.

    PubMed

    Ko, Tzu-Ping; Huang, Cheng-Yang; Hsieh, Tung-Ju; Chen, Sheng-Chia; Chen, Yu-Ren; Yang, Chia-Shin; Kuo, Hao-Cheng; Wang, Wen-Lung; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Lin, Ching-Heng; Chen, Yeh

    2016-06-10

    Two-component system SaeRS of Staphylococcus regulates virulence factor expression through phosphorylation of the DNA-binding regulator SaeR by the sensor histidine kinase SaeS. Here crystal structures of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of SaeR from two Staphylococcal species Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were determined and showed similar folds. Analyzing the DNA binding activity of three mutants of SeSaeR, we observed that Thr217 is important in binding to the phosphate group of DNA and Trp219 may interact with the base pairs. Additionally, the tandem arrangement of DBD may represent a possible way for SaeR oligomerization on DNA. PMID:27150628

  1. Microscopic Modes and Free Energies for Topoisomerase I-DNA Covalent Complex Binding with Non-campothecin Inhibitors by Molecular Docking and Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ning-Ning; Hamza, Adel; Hao, Ce; Xiu, Zhilong; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (Topo1) has been identified as an attractive target for anticancer drug development due to its central role in facilitating the nuclear process of the DNA. It is essential for rational design of novel Topo1 inhibitors to reliably predict the binding structures of the Topo1 inhibitors interacting with the Topo1-DNA complex. The detailed binding structures and binding free energies for the Topo1-DNA complex interacting with typical non-camptothecin (CPT) Topo1 inhibitors have been examined by performing molecular docking, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, and binding free energy calculations. The computational results provide valuable insights into the binding modes of the inhibitors binding with the Topo1-DNA complex and the key factors affecting the binding affinity. It has been demonstrated that the — stacking interaction with the DNA base pairs and the hydrogen bonding with Topo1 have the pivotal contributions to the binding structures and binding free energies, although the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions also significantly contribute to the stabilization of the binding structures. The calculated binding free energies are in good agreement with the available experiment activity data. The detailed binding modes and the crucial factors affecting the binding free energies obtained from the present computational studies may provide valuable insights for future rational design of novel, more potent Topo1 inhibitors. PMID:24363608

  2. hESC-secreted proteins can be enriched for multiple regenerative therapies by heparin-binding.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Hanadie; Conboy, Michael J; Li, Ju; Zeiderman, Matthew; Vazin, Tandis; Schlesinger, Christina; Schaffer, David V; Conboy, Irina M

    2013-05-01

    This work builds upon our findings that proteins secreted by hESCs exhibit pro-regenerative activity, and determines that hESC-conditioned medium robustly enhances the proliferation of both muscle and neural progenitor cells. Importantly, this work establishes that it is the proteins that bind heparin which are responsible for the pro-myogenic effects of hESC-conditioned medium, and indicates that this strategy is suitable for enriching the potentially therapeutic factors. Additionally, this work shows that hESC-secreted proteins act independently of the mitogen FGF-2, and suggests that FGF-2 is unlikely to be a pro-aging molecule in the physiological decline of old muscle repair. Moreover, hESC-secreted factors improve the viability of human cortical neurons in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) model, suggesting that these factors can enhance the maintenance and regeneration of multiple tissues in the aging body. PMID:23793469

  3. Structural Studies of an Engineered Zinc Biosensor Reveal an Unanticipated Mode of Zinc Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Telmer,P.; Shilton, B.

    2005-01-01

    Protein engineering was used previously to convert maltose-binding protein (MBP) into a zinc biosensor. Zn{sup 2+} binding by the engineered MBP was thought to require a large conformational change from 'open' to 'closed', similar to that observed when maltose is bound by the wild-type protein. We show that although this re-designed MBP molecule binds Zn{sup 2+} with high affinity as previously reported, it does not adopt a closed conformation in solution as assessed by small-angle X-ray scattering. High-resolution crystallographic studies of the engineered Zn{sup 2+}-binding MBP molecule demonstrate that Zn{sup 2+} is coordinated by residues on the N-terminal lobe only, and therefore Zn{sup 2+} binding does not require the protein to adopt a fully closed conformation. Additional crystallographic studies indicate that this unexpected Zn{sup 2+} binding site can also coordinate Cu{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} with only subtle changes in the overall conformation of the protein. This work illustrates that the energetic barrier to domain closure, which normally functions to maintain MBP in an open concentration in the absence of ligand, is not easily overcome by protein design. A comparison to the mechanism of maltose-induced domain rearrangement is discussed.

  4. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  5. Dual aptamer-immobilized surfaces for improved affinity through multiple target binding in potentiometric thrombin biosensing.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Higashi, Daiki; Matsumoto, Akira; Hoshi, Toru; Sawaguchi, Takashi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2015-11-15

    We developed a label-free and reagent-less potentiometric biosensor with improved affinity for thrombin. Two different oligomeric DNA aptamers that can recognize different epitopes in thrombin were introduced in parallel or serial manners on the sensing surface to capture the target via multiple contacts as found in many biological systems. The spacer and linker in the aptamer probes were optimized for exerting the best performance in molecular recognition. To gain the specificity of the sensor to the target, an antifouling molecule, sulfobeaine-3-undecanethiol (SB), was introduced on the sensor to form a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Surface characterization revealed that the aptamer probe density was comparable to the distance of the two epitopes in thrombin, while the backfilling SB SAM was tightly aligned on the surface to resist nonspecific adsorption. The apparent binding parameters were obtained by thrombin sensing in potentiometry using the 1:1 Langmuir adsorption model, showing the improved dissociation constants (Kd) with the limit of detection of 5.5 nM on the dual aptamer-immobilized surfaces compared with single aptamer-immobilized ones. A fine control of spacer and linker length in the aptamer ligand was essential to realize the multivalent binding of thrombin on the sensor surface. The findings reported herein are effective for improving the sensitivity of potentiometric biosensor in an affordable way towards detection of tiny amount of biomolecules. PMID:26067329

  6. A Compendium of Caenorhabditis elegans RNA Binding Proteins Predicts Extensive Regulation at Multiple Levels

    PubMed Central

    Tamburino, Alex M.; Ryder, Sean P.; Walhout, Albertha J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription and translation, as well as mRNA and protein stability. Although systems-level functions of transcription factors and microRNAs are rapidly being characterized, few studies have focused on the posttranscriptional gene regulation by RNA binding proteins (RBPs). RBPs are important to many aspects of gene regulation. Thus, it is essential to know which genes encode RBPs, which RBPs regulate which gene(s), and how RBP genes are themselves regulated. Here we provide a comprehensive compendium of RBPs from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (wRBP1.0). We predict that as many as 887 (4.4%) of C. elegans genes may encode RBPs ~250 of which likely function in a gene-specific manner. In addition, we find that RBPs, and most notably gene-specific RBPs, are themselves enriched for binding and modification by regulatory proteins, indicating the potential for extensive regulation of RBPs at many different levels. wRBP1.0 will provide a significant contribution toward the comprehensive delineation of posttranscriptional regulatory networks and will provide a resource for further studies regulation by RBPs. PMID:23390605

  7. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  8. Driving modes for designing the cornering response of fully electric vehicles with multiple motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Novellis, Leonardo; Sorniotti, Aldo; Gruber, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Fully electric vehicles with multiple drivetrains allow a significant variation of the steady-state and transient cornering responses through the individual control of the electric motor drives. As a consequence, alternative driving modes can be created that provide the driver the option to select the preferred dynamic vehicle behavior. This article presents a torque-vectoring control structure based on the combination of feedforward and feedback contributions for the continuous control of vehicle yaw rate. The controller is specifically developed to be easily implementable on real-world vehicles. A novel model-based procedure for the definition of the control objectives is described in detail, together with the automated tuning process of the algorithm. The implemented control functions are demonstrated with experimental vehicle tests. The results show the possibilities of torque-vectoring control in designing the vehicle understeer characteristic.

  9. Using input command pre-shaping to suppress multiple mode vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James M.; Seering, Warren P.

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft, space-borne robotic systems, and manufacturing equipment often utilize lightweight materials and configurations that give rise to vibration problems. Prior research has led to the development of input command pre-shapers that can significantly reduce residual vibration. These shapers exhibit marked insensitivity to errors in natural frequency estimates and can be combined to minimize vibration at more than one frequency. This paper presents a method for the development of multiple mode input shapers which are simpler to implement than previous designs and produce smaller system response delays. The new technique involves the solution of a group of simultaneous non-linear impulse constraint equations. The resulting shapers were tested on a model of MACE, an MIT/NASA experimental flexible structure.

  10. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Andrey I; Voll, Lars B; Psakhie, Sergey G; Popov, Valentin L

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting ("periodic rolling"). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  11. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-03-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear.

  12. Multiple Modes of Action of the Squamocin in the Midgut Cells of Aedes aegypti Larvae.

    PubMed

    da Silva Costa, Marilza; de Paula, Sérgio Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Zanuncio, José Cola; Santana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins are botanical compounds with good potential for use as insecticides. In the vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae), squamocin (acetogenin) has been reported to be a larvicide and cytotoxic, but the modes of action of this molecule are still poorly understood. This study evaluated the changes in the cell morphology, and in the expression of genes, for autophagy (Atg1 and Atg8), for membrane ion transporter V-ATPase, and for water channel aquaporin-4 (Aqp4) in the midgut of A. aegypti larvae exposed to squamocin from Annona mucosa Jacq. (Annonaceae). Squamocin showed cytotoxic action with changes in the midgut epithelium and digestive cells of A. aegypti larvae, increase in the expression for autophagy gene Atg1 and Atg8, decrease in the expression of V-ATPase, decrease in the expression of Aqp4 gene in LC20 and inhibition of Apq4 genes in the midgut of this vector in LC50. These multiple modes of action for squamocin are described for the first time in insects, and they are important because different sites of action of squamocin from A. mucosa may reduce the possibility of resistance of A. aegypti to this molecule. PMID:27532504

  13. Flow-Induced Multiple-Mode Vibrations of Gates with Submerged Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billeter, P.; Staubli, T.

    2000-04-01

    An experimental investigation of flow-induced vibrations of gates with multiple degrees of freedom is presented. An underflown vertical gate plate with submerged discharge was allowed to oscillate both in the cross-flow (z -) and in the streamwise (x -) direction. The two purposes of the investigation were to further the insight into the hydrodynamic coupling mechanisms of the two vibration modes and to determine the interaction of the unsteady lift and drag forces. Self-excited vibration tests were run with reduced velocities Vrzand Vrxfrom 0.8 to 14, covering a range in which the instability-induced excitation (IIE) due to impinging-leading-edge vortices (ILEV) as well as the transition to galloping (MIE) occurred. The ratio of the natural frequencies of the two vibration modes fx 0/fz 0, the gate opening ratio s/d, and the submergence of the gate plate were varied. Depending on the ranges of reduced velocities and frequency ratios, a complex interaction of two different kinds of instability-induced excitation was detected. Furthermore, it was found that streamwise IIE-excitation and cross-flow galloping coexist. To assess the relevant fluid dynamic amplification and attenuation mechanisms, simultaneous body response and flow velocity measurements were carried out.

  14. Multiple Modes of Action of the Squamocin in the Midgut Cells of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Sérgio Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2016-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins are botanical compounds with good potential for use as insecticides. In the vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae), squamocin (acetogenin) has been reported to be a larvicide and cytotoxic, but the modes of action of this molecule are still poorly understood. This study evaluated the changes in the cell morphology, and in the expression of genes, for autophagy (Atg1 and Atg8), for membrane ion transporter V-ATPase, and for water channel aquaporin-4 (Aqp4) in the midgut of A. aegypti larvae exposed to squamocin from Annona mucosa Jacq. (Annonaceae). Squamocin showed cytotoxic action with changes in the midgut epithelium and digestive cells of A. aegypti larvae, increase in the expression for autophagy gene Atg1 and Atg8, decrease in the expression of V-ATPase, decrease in the expression of Aqp4 gene in LC20 and inhibition of Apq4 genes in the midgut of this vector in LC50. These multiple modes of action for squamocin are described for the first time in insects, and they are important because different sites of action of squamocin from A. mucosa may reduce the possibility of resistance of A. aegypti to this molecule. PMID:27532504

  15. Study of rheological properties of polymeric liquids by using multiple-mode models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bangwu

    Knowledge of the rheological properties of non-Newtonian fluids is critical for modeling in polymer-processing equipment such as injection molders, extruders, and blow molders. Rheological measurements can be obtained through standard flows, such as shear flow and elongational flow. In our research, we modeled the rheological properties of polymeric fluids in several types of experiments: transient and steady shear flow, small amplitude oscillatory shear flow, transient elongational flow, and step-strain shear flow. The accuracy of modeling calculations depends critically on the performance of the rheological model used. Since most non-Newtonian media exhibit not just one, but a whole spectrum of relaxation times; therefore multiple relaxation modes models were used in our research. One of the coupled linear relaxation models, the Two Coupled Maxwell Modes (TCMM) Model, was used to describe quantitatively shear-thickening behavior. A full parameterization of the TCMM Model provided a thorough understanding of the significance of the model parameters and a clear insight into the peculiar behavior of shear thickening in dilute polymer solutions. The primary part of the research focused on models with linear springs. A typical, industrial-grade, low-density polyethylene polymer was studied using three types of multi-mode models. The data from small amplitude oscillatory shear flow and steady shear flow were fitted to obtain the parameters of the different models. Then the predictions for the other standard flows mentioned in the first paragraph were compared with experimental data. Overall evaluations of model performance were presented in detail. Finally, we tested the effects of spring type on the performance of the models described above. We replaced the linear elastic springs in all of the prior models with nonlinear springs to determine whether this would improve model performance in elongational flow. The Finitely-Extensible Nonlinear Elastic Spring Model was

  16. Modeling the Effect of Multiple Matrix Cracking Modes on Cyclic Hysteresis Loops of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of multiple matrix cracking modes on cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated. The interface slip between fibers and the matrix existed in matrix cracking mode 3 and mode 5, in which matrix cracking and interface debonding occurred in longitudinal yarns, are considered as the major reason for hysteresis loops of 2D woven CMCs. The effects of fiber volume content, peak stress, matrix crack spacing, interface properties, matrix cracking mode proportion and interface wear on interface slip and hysteresis loops have been analyzed. The cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven SiC/SiC composite corresponding to different peak stresses have been predicted using the present analysis. It was found that the damage parameter, i.e., the proportion of matrix cracking mode 3 in the entire cracking modes of the composite, increases with increasing peak stress.

  17. Modeling the Effect of Multiple Matrix Cracking Modes on Cyclic Hysteresis Loops of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the effect of multiple matrix cracking modes on cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated. The interface slip between fibers and the matrix existed in matrix cracking mode 3 and mode 5, in which matrix cracking and interface debonding occurred in longitudinal yarns, are considered as the major reason for hysteresis loops of 2D woven CMCs. The effects of fiber volume content, peak stress, matrix crack spacing, interface properties, matrix cracking mode proportion and interface wear on interface slip and hysteresis loops have been analyzed. The cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven SiC/SiC composite corresponding to different peak stresses have been predicted using the present analysis. It was found that the damage parameter, i.e., the proportion of matrix cracking mode 3 in the entire cracking modes of the composite, increases with increasing peak stress.

  18. The complex binding mode of the peptide hormone H2 relaxin to its receptor RXFP1.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Ashish; Bruell, Shoni; Patil, Nitin; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Scott, Daniel J; Petrie, Emma J; Bathgate, Ross A D; Gooley, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    H2 relaxin activates the relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1), a class A G-protein coupled receptor, by a poorly understood mechanism. The ectodomain of RXFP1 comprises an N-terminal LDLa module, essential for activation, tethered to a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain by a 32-residue linker. H2 relaxin is hypothesized to bind with high affinity to the LRR domain enabling the LDLa module to bind and activate the transmembrane domain of RXFP1. Here we define a relaxin-binding site on the LDLa-LRR linker, essential for the high affinity of H2 relaxin for the ectodomain of RXFP1, and show that residues within the LDLa-LRR linker are critical for receptor activation. We propose H2 relaxin binds and stabilizes a helical conformation of the LDLa-LRR linker that positions residues of both the linker and the LDLa module to bind the transmembrane domain and activate RXFP1. PMID:27088579

  19. The complex binding mode of the peptide hormone H2 relaxin to its receptor RXFP1

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Ashish; Bruell, Shoni; Patil, Nitin; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Scott, Daniel J.; Petrie, Emma J.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    H2 relaxin activates the relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1), a class A G-protein coupled receptor, by a poorly understood mechanism. The ectodomain of RXFP1 comprises an N-terminal LDLa module, essential for activation, tethered to a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain by a 32-residue linker. H2 relaxin is hypothesized to bind with high affinity to the LRR domain enabling the LDLa module to bind and activate the transmembrane domain of RXFP1. Here we define a relaxin-binding site on the LDLa-LRR linker, essential for the high affinity of H2 relaxin for the ectodomain of RXFP1, and show that residues within the LDLa-LRR linker are critical for receptor activation. We propose H2 relaxin binds and stabilizes a helical conformation of the LDLa-LRR linker that positions residues of both the linker and the LDLa module to bind the transmembrane domain and activate RXFP1. PMID:27088579

  20. Mixed-model QSAR at the glucocorticoid receptor: predicting the binding mode and affinity of psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Spreafico, Morena; Ernst, Beat; Lill, Markus A; Smiesko, Martin; Vedani, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that affects immune response, development, and metabolism in target tissues. Glucocorticoids are widely used to treat diverse pathophysiological conditions, but their clinical applicability is limited by side effects. A prediction of the binding affinity toward the GR would be beneficial for identifying glucocorticoid-mediated adverse effects triggered by drugs or chemicals. By identifying the binding mode to the GR using flexible docking (software Yeti) and quantifying the binding affinity through multidimensional QSAR (software Quasar), we validated a model family based on 110 compounds, representing four different chemical classes. The correlation with the experimental data (cross-validated r(2)=0.702; predictive r(2)=0.719) suggests that our approach is suited for predicting the binding affinity of related compounds toward the GR. After challenging the model by a series of scramble tests, a consensus approach (software Raptor), and a prediction set, it was incorporated into our VirtualToxLab and used to simulate and quantify the interaction of 24 psychotropic drugs with the GR. PMID:19009570

  1. Binding mode of inhibitors and Cryptosporidium parvum IMP dehydrogenase: A combined ligand- and receptor-based study.

    PubMed

    Li, R-J; Wang, Y-L; Wang, Q-H; Huang, W-X; Wang, J; Cheng, M-S

    2015-01-01

    A combined ligand- and target-based approach was used to analyse the interaction models of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (CpIMPDH) with selective inhibitors. First, a ligand-based pharmacophore model was generated from 20 NAD(+) competitive CpIMPDH inhibitors with the HipHop module. The characteristic of the NAD(+) binding site of CpIMPDH was then described, and the binding modes of the representative inhibitors were studied by molecular docking. The combination of the pharmacophore model and the docking results allowed us to evaluate the pharmacophore features and structural information of the NAD(+) binding site of CpIMPDH. This research supports the proposal of an interaction model inside the NAD(+) binding site of CpIMPDH, consisting of four key interaction points: two hydrophobic-aromatic groups, a hydrophobic-aliphatic group and a hydrogen bond donor. This study also provides guidance for the design of more potent CpIMPDH inhibitors for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. PMID:25978645

  2. Multiple tyrosine residues at the GABA binding pocket influence surface expression and mediate kinetics of the GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Laha, Kurt T; Tran, Phu N

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of aromatic residues in the ligand binding site of the GABA(A) receptor, as with other cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels, is undoubtedly important for the ability of neurotransmitters to bind and trigger channel opening. Here, we have examined three conserved tyrosine residues at the GABA binding pocket (β(2) Tyr97, β(2) Tyr157, and β(2) Tyr205), making mutations to alanine and phenylalanine. We fully characterized the effects each mutation had on receptor function using heterologous expression in HEK-293 cells, which included examining surface expression, kinetics of macroscopic currents, microscopic binding and unbinding rates for an antagonist, and microscopic binding rates for an agonist. The assembly or trafficking of GABA(A) receptors was disrupted when tyrosine mutants were expressed as αβ receptors, but interestingly not when expressed as αβγ receptors. Mutation of each tyrosine accelerated deactivation and slowed GABA binding. This provides strong evidence that these residues influence the binding of GABA. Qualitatively, mutation of each tyrosine has a very similar effect on receptor function; however, mutations at β(2) Tyr157 and β(2) Tyr205 are more detrimental than β(2) Tyr97 mutations, particularly to the GABA binding rate. Overall, the results suggest that interactions involving multiple tyrosine residues are likely during the binding process. PMID:23121119

  3. A binding mode hypothesis of tiagabine confirms liothyronine effect on γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 (GAT1).

    PubMed

    Jurik, Andreas; Zdrazil, Barbara; Holy, Marion; Stockner, Thomas; Sitte, Harald H; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2015-03-12

    Elevating GABA levels in the synaptic cleft by inhibiting its reuptake carrier GAT1 is an established approach for the treatment of CNS disorders like epilepsy. With the increasing availability of crystal structures of transmembrane transporters, structure-based approaches to elucidate the molecular basis of ligand-transporter interaction also become feasible. Experimental data guided docking of derivatives of the GAT1 inhibitor tiagabine into a protein homology model of GAT1 allowed derivation of a common binding mode for this class of inhibitors that is able to account for the distinct structure-activity relationship pattern of the data set. Translating essential binding features into a pharmacophore model followed by in silico screening of the DrugBank identified liothyronine as a drug potentially exerting a similar effect on GAT1. Experimental testing further confirmed the GAT1 inhibiting properties of this thyroid hormone. PMID:25679268

  4. A Binding Mode Hypothesis of Tiagabine Confirms Liothyronine Effect on γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter 1 (GAT1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Elevating GABA levels in the synaptic cleft by inhibiting its reuptake carrier GAT1 is an established approach for the treatment of CNS disorders like epilepsy. With the increasing availability of crystal structures of transmembrane transporters, structure-based approaches to elucidate the molecular basis of ligand–transporter interaction also become feasible. Experimental data guided docking of derivatives of the GAT1 inhibitor tiagabine into a protein homology model of GAT1 allowed derivation of a common binding mode for this class of inhibitors that is able to account for the distinct structure–activity relationship pattern of the data set. Translating essential binding features into a pharmacophore model followed by in silico screening of the DrugBank identified liothyronine as a drug potentially exerting a similar effect on GAT1. Experimental testing further confirmed the GAT1 inhibiting properties of this thyroid hormone. PMID:25679268

  5. Quest for the binding mode of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian

    2014-10-15

    The binding interaction of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA was studied by multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The UV-vis study revealed that an obvious interaction between tetrabromobisphenol A and Calf thymus DNA happened. The π-π(∗) transitions and the electron cloud of tetrabromobisphenol A might be changed by entering the groove of Calf thymus DNA. From the fluorescence spectral and thermodynamics studies, it was concluded that the hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic force played a major role in the binding of tetrabromobisphenol A to Calf thymus DNA. The molecular modeling study showed that the possible sites of tetrabromobisphenol A in the groove of DNA. Circular dichroism study also depicted that tetrabromobisphenol A bond to DNA. These above results would further advance our knowledge on the molecular mechanism of the binding interactions of brominated flame-retardants with nucleic acid. PMID:24830628

  6. Quest for the binding mode of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian

    2014-10-01

    The binding interaction of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA was studied by multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The UV-vis study revealed that an obvious interaction between tetrabromobisphenol A and Calf thymus DNA happened. The π-π∗ transitions and the electron cloud of tetrabromobisphenol A might be changed by entering the groove of Calf thymus DNA. From the fluorescence spectral and thermodynamics studies, it was concluded that the hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic force played a major role in the binding of tetrabromobisphenol A to Calf thymus DNA. The molecular modeling study showed that the possible sites of tetrabromobisphenol A in the groove of DNA. Circular dichroism study also depicted that tetrabromobisphenol A bond to DNA. These above results would further advance our knowledge on the molecular mechanism of the binding interactions of brominated flame-retardants with nucleic acid.

  7. Specificity Profiling of Dual Specificity Phosphatase Vaccinia VH1-related (VHR) Reveals Two Distinct Substrate Binding Modes*

    PubMed Central

    Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Chen, Xianwen; Taha, Hashem A.; Vyas, Shubham; Guan, Xiaoyan; Freitas, Michael A.; Hadad, Christopher M.; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    Vaccinia VH1-related (VHR) is a dual specificity phosphatase that consists of only a single catalytic domain. Although several protein substrates have been identified for VHR, the elements that control the in vivo substrate specificity of this enzyme remain unclear. In this work, the in vitro substrate specificity of VHR was systematically profiled by screening combinatorial peptide libraries. VHR exhibits more stringent substrate specificity than classical protein-tyrosine phosphatases and recognizes two distinct classes of Tyr(P) peptides. The class I substrates are similar to the Tyr(P) motifs derived from the VHR protein substrates, having sequences of (D/E/φ)(D/S/N/T/E)(P/I/M/S/A/V)pY(G/A/S/Q) or (D/E/φ)(T/S)(D/E)pY(G/A/S/Q) (where φ is a hydrophobic amino acid and pY is phosphotyrosine). The class II substrates have the consensus sequence of (V/A)P(I/L/M/V/F)X1–6pY (where X is any amino acid) with V/A preferably at the N terminus of the peptide. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies suggest that the class II peptides bind to VHR in an opposite orientation relative to the canonical binding mode of the class I substrates. In this alternative binding mode, the Tyr(P) side chain binds to the active site pocket, but the N terminus of the peptide interacts with the carboxylate side chain of Asp164, which normally interacts with the Tyr(P) + 3 residue of a class I substrate. Proteins containing the class II motifs are efficient VHR substrates in vitro, suggesting that VHR may act on a novel class of yet unidentified Tyr(P) proteins in vivo. PMID:23322772

  8. DNA Binding Mode Transitions of Escherichia coli HUαβ: Evidence for Formation of a Bent DNA – Protein Complex on Intact, Linear Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Junseock; Saecker, Ruth M.; Record, M. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli HUαβ, a major nucleoid associated protein (NAP), organizes the DNA chromosome and facilitates numerous DNA transactions. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and a series of DNA lengths (8, 15, 34, 38 and 160 base pairs) we establish that HUαβ interacts with duplex DNA using three different nonspecific binding modes. Both the HU to DNA mole ratio ([HU]/[DNA]) and DNA length dictate the dominant HU binding mode. On sufficiently long DNA (≥ 34 base pairs), at low [HU]/[DNA], HU populates a noncooperative 34 bp binding mode with a binding constant of 2.1 (± 0.4) × 106 M−1, and a binding enthalpy of +7.7 (± 0.6) kcal/mol at 15 °C and 0.15 M Na+. With increasing [HU]/[DNA], HU bound in the noncooperative 34 bp mode progressively converts to two cooperative (ω ~ 20) modes with site sizes of 10 bp and 6 bp. These latter modes exhibit smaller binding constants (1.1 (± 0.2) × 105 M−1 for the 10 bp mode, 3.5 (± 1.4) × 104 M−1 for the 6 bp mode) and binding enthalpies (4.2 (± 0.3) kcal/mol for the 10 bp mode, −1.6 (±0.3) kcal/mol for the 6 bp mode). As DNA length increases to 34 bp or more at low [HU]/[DNA], the small modes are replaced by the 34 bp binding mode. FRET data demonstrate that the 34 bp mode bends DNA by 143 ± 6° whereas the 6 and 10 bp modes do not. The model proposed in this study provides a novel quantitative and comprehensive framework for reconciling previous structural and solution studies of HU, including single molecule (force extension measurement, AFM), fluorescence, and electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays. In particular, it explains how HU condenses or extends DNA depending on the relative concentrations of HU and DNA. PMID:18657548

  9. DNA binding, DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity studies of a new water soluble copper(II) complex: The effect of ligand shape on the mode of binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Shahabadi, Nahid; Mansouri, Ghobad

    2012-02-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with [Cu(ph 2phen)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl was studied at physiological pH by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, circular dichroism, and viscometric techniques. Considerable hypochromicity and red shift are observed in the UV absorption band of the Cu complex. Binding constants ( Kb) of DNA with the complex were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy and entropy changes were calculated according to Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that reaction is predominantly enthalpically driven. All these results indicate that Cu(II) complex interacts with CT-DNA via intercalative mode. Also, this new complex induced cleavage in pUC18 plasmid DNA as indicated in gel electrophoresis and showed excellent antitumor activity against K562 (human chronic myeloid leukemia) and human T lymphocyte carcinoma-Jurkat cell lines.

  10. Combining quantum mechanical ligand conformation analysis and protein modeling to elucidate GPCR-ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Schultes, Sabine; Engelhardt, Harald; Roumen, Luc; Zuiderveld, Obbe P; Haaksma, Eric E J; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob; de Graaf, Chris

    2013-01-01

    SAR beyond protein-ligand interactions: By combining structure-affinity relationships, protein-ligand modeling studies, and quantum mechanical calculations, we show that ligand conformational energies and basicity play critical roles in ligand binding to the histamine H4 receptor, a GPCR that plays a key role in inflammation. PMID:23161844

  11. Characterization of the apoLp-III/LPS complex: insight in the mode of binding interaction

    PubMed Central

    Oztug, Merve; Martinon, Daisy; Weers, Paul M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoproteins are able to associate with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), potentially providing protection against septic shock. To gain insight in the molecular details of this binding interaction, apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) from Galleria mellonella was used as a model. The binding of apoLp-III to LPS was optimal around 37–40 °C, close to the LPS phase transition temperature. ApoLp-III formed complexes with LPS from E. coli (serotype O55:B5) with a diameter of 24 nm, a molecular weight of ~390 kDa, containing four molecules of apoLp-III and 24 molecules of LPS. The LPS-bound form of the protein was substantially more resistant to guanidine-induced denaturation compared to unbound protein. The denaturation profile displayed a multiphase character with a steep drop in secondary structure between 0–1 M guanidine, and a slower decrease above 1 M guanidine HCl. In contrast, apoLp-III bound to detoxified LPS was only slightly more resistant to guanidine HCl induced denaturation compared to unbound protein. Analysis of size-exclusion FPLC elution profiles of mixtures of apoLp-III with LPS or detoxified LPS indicated a much weaker binding interaction with detoxified LPS compared to intact LPS. These results indicate that apoLp-III initially interacts with exposed carbohydrate regions, but that the lipid A region is required for a more stable LPS binding interaction. PMID:22779761

  12. MtrA of the sodium ion pumping methyltransferase binds cobalamin in a unique mode.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Tristan; Ermler, Ulrich; Shima, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    In the three domains of life, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is primarily used in methyltransferase and isomerase reactions. The methyltransferase complex MtrA-H of methanogenic archaea has a key function in energy conservation by catalysing the methyl transfer from methyl-tetrahydromethanopterin to coenzyme M and its coupling with sodium-ion translocation. The cobalamin-binding subunit MtrA is not homologous to any known B12-binding proteins and is proposed as the motor of the sodium-ion pump. Here, we present crystal structures of the soluble domain of the membrane-associated MtrA from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and the cytoplasmic MtrA homologue/cobalamin complex from Methanothermus fervidus. The MtrA fold corresponds to the Rossmann-type α/β fold, which is also found in many cobalamin-containing proteins. Surprisingly, the cobalamin-binding site of MtrA differed greatly from all the other cobalamin-binding sites. Nevertheless, the hydrogen-bond linkage at the lower axial-ligand site of cobalt was equivalently constructed to that found in other methyltransferases and mutases. A distinct polypeptide segment fixed through the hydrogen-bond linkage in the relaxed Co(III) state might be involved in propagating the energy released upon corrinoid demethylation to the sodium-translocation site by a conformational change. PMID:27324530

  13. Mode of Ezrin-Membrane Interaction as a Function of PIP2 Binding and Pseudophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shabardina, Victoria; Kramer, Corinna; Gerdes, Benjamin; Braunger, Julia; Cordes, Andrea; Schäfer, Jonas; Mey, Ingo; Grill, David; Gerke, Volker; Steinem, Claudia

    2016-06-21

    Ezrin, a protein of the ezrin, radixin, moesin (ERM) family, provides a regulated linkage between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. The hallmark of this linkage is the activation of ezrin by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding and a threonine phosphorylation at position 567. To analyze the influence of these activating factors on the organization of ezrin on lipid membranes and the proposed concomitant oligomer-monomer transition, we made use of supported lipid bilayers in conjunction with atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Bilayers doped with either PIP2 as the natural receptor lipid of ezrin or a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid-equipped lipid to bind the proteins via their His6-tags to the lipid membrane were used to bind two different ezrin variants: ezrin wild-type and ezrin T567D mimicking the phosphorylated state. Using a combination of reflectometric interference spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Förster resonance energy transfer experiments, we show that only the ezrin T567D mutant, upon binding to PIP2-containing bilayers, undergoes a remarkable conformational change, which we attribute to an opening of the conformation resulting in monomeric protein on the lipid bilayer. PMID:27332129

  14. RANKL employs distinct binding modes to engage RANK and the OPG decoy receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christopher A.; Warren, Julia T.; Wang, Michael W.H.; Teitelbaum, Steven L.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) are members of the TNFR superfamily that regulate osteoclast formation and function by competing for RANK ligand (RANKL). RANKL promotes osteoclast development through RANK activation, while OPG inhibits this process by sequestering RANKL. For comparison, we solved crystal structures of RANKL with RANK, and RANKL with OPG. Complementary biochemical and functional studies reveal that the monomeric cytokine-binding region of OPG binds RANKL with ~500 fold higher affinity than RANK, and inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastogenesis ~150 times more effectively, in part because the binding cleft of RANKL makes unique contacts with OPG. Several side chains as well as the C-D and D-E loops of RANKL occupy different orientations when bound to OPG versus RANK. High affinity OPG binding requires a 90s-loop Phe residue that is mutated in juvenile Paget’s disease. These results suggest cytokine plasticity may help to fine tune specific TNF-family cytokine/receptor pair selectivity. PMID:23039992

  15. The solution structure of a specific GAGA factor-DNA complex reveals a modular binding mode.

    PubMed

    Omichinski, J G; Pedone, P V; Felsenfeld, G; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1997-02-01

    The structure of a complex between the DNA binding domain of the GAGA factor (GAGA-DBD) and an oligonucleotide containing its GAGAG consensus binding site has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The GAGA-DBD comprises a single classical Cys2-His2 zinc finger core, and an N-terminal extension containing two highly basic regions, BR1 and BR2. The zinc finger core binds in the major groove and recognizes the first three GAG bases of the consensus in a manner similar to that seen in other classical zinc finger-DNA complexes. Unlike the latter, which require tandem zinc finger repeats with a minimum of two units for high affinity binding, the GAGA-DBD makes use of only a single finger complemented by BR1 and BR2. BR2 forms a helix that interacts in the major groove recognizing the last G of the consensus, while BR1 wraps around the DNA in the minor groove and recognizes the A in the fourth position of the consensus. The implications of the structure of the GAGA-DBD-DNA complex for chromatin remodelling are discussed. PMID:9033593

  16. MtrA of the sodium ion pumping methyltransferase binds cobalamin in a unique mode

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Tristan; Ermler, Ulrich; Shima, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    In the three domains of life, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is primarily used in methyltransferase and isomerase reactions. The methyltransferase complex MtrA–H of methanogenic archaea has a key function in energy conservation by catalysing the methyl transfer from methyl-tetrahydromethanopterin to coenzyme M and its coupling with sodium-ion translocation. The cobalamin-binding subunit MtrA is not homologous to any known B12-binding proteins and is proposed as the motor of the sodium-ion pump. Here, we present crystal structures of the soluble domain of the membrane-associated MtrA from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and the cytoplasmic MtrA homologue/cobalamin complex from Methanothermus fervidus. The MtrA fold corresponds to the Rossmann-type α/β fold, which is also found in many cobalamin-containing proteins. Surprisingly, the cobalamin-binding site of MtrA differed greatly from all the other cobalamin-binding sites. Nevertheless, the hydrogen-bond linkage at the lower axial-ligand site of cobalt was equivalently constructed to that found in other methyltransferases and mutases. A distinct polypeptide segment fixed through the hydrogen-bond linkage in the relaxed Co(III) state might be involved in propagating the energy released upon corrinoid demethylation to the sodium-translocation site by a conformational change. PMID:27324530

  17. Possible differences in modes of agonist and antagonist binding at human 5-HT6 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pullagurla, Manik R; Westkaemper, Richard B; Glennon, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    A graphics model of the human 5-HT6 receptor was constructed and automated docking studies were performed. The model suggests that 5-HT6 antagonist arylsulfonyltryptamines might bind differently than that of the agonist serotonin. Furthermore, the model explains many of the empirical results from our previous structure-affinity studies. PMID:15357994

  18. PEPTIDE BINDING AS A MODE OF ACTION FOR THE CARCINOGENICITY AND TOXICITY OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure leads to tumors in human skin, lung, urinary bladder, kidney and liver. Three likely initial stages of arsenical-macromolecular interaction are (1) binding of trivalent arsenicals to the sulfhydryl groups of peptides and proteins, (2) arsenical-induced generation...

  19. Multiple omnidirectional defect modes and nonlinear magnetic-field effects in metamaterial photonic superlattices with a polaritonic defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Uriza, A. X.; Reyes Gómez, F.; Mejía-Salazar, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    We report the existence of multiple omnidirectional defect modes in the zero-nbar gap of photonic stacks, made of alternate layers of conventional dielectric and double-negative metamaterial, with a polaritonic defect layer. In the case of nonlinear magnetic metamaterials, the optical bistability phenomenon leads to switching from negligible to perfect transmission around these defect modes. We hope these findings have potential applications in the design and development of multichannel optical filters, power limiters, optical-diodes and optical-transistors.

  20. Substituent control of DNA binding modes in a series of chalcogenoxanthylium photosensitizers as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry and topoisomerase I DNA unwinding assay.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Ruel E; Onogul, Bilgehan; Polasani, Shivani R; Gannon, Michael K; Detty, Michael R

    2008-12-15

    The DNA binding efficacy and preferred mode of binding of a series of rhodamine-related chalcogenoxanthylium dyes was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) using ctDNA, [poly(dCdG)](2) and [poly(dAdT)](2), and by a topoisomerase I DNA unwinding (Topo I) assay. The dyes of this study showed tight binding to ctDNA with binding constants, K(b), on the order of 10(6)-10(7)M(-1). The ITC and Topo I assay studies suggested that the 9-substituent has a strong impact on binding modes ranging from an apparent preference for intercalation with a 9-2-thienyl substituent (similar binding to [poly(dCdG)](2) and [poly(dAdT)](2), re-supercoiling of DNA in the Topo I assay at <10(-5)M dye), to mixed binding modes with 9-phenyl derivatives (2- to 3-fold preference for binding to [poly(dAdT)](2), re-supercoiling of DNA in the Topo I assay at approximately 2 x 10(-5)M dye), to minor groove binding in a 9-(2-thienyl-5-diethylcarboxamide) derivative (strong preference for binding to [poly(dAdT)](2), did not show complete re-supercoiling in the Topo I assay). No binding to ctDNA was observed in one derivative with a 9-(3-thienyl-2-diethylcarboxamide) substituent, which cannot be co-planar with the xanthylium core. In series of dyes where the chalcogen atom was varied, the selenoxanthylium derivatives had 2- to 3-fold higher values of K(b) than the corresponding xanthylium, thioxanthylium, or telluroxanthylium derivatives, which all showed comparable values of K(b). The chalcogen atom appeared to have little influence on binding mode. PMID:18993079

  1. Interaction of the N-(3-Methylpyridin-2-yl)amide Derivatives of Flurbiprofen and Ibuprofen with FAAH: Enantiomeric Selectivity and Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    Deplano, Alessandro; Smaldone, Giovanni; Pedone, Emilia; Luque, F. Javier; Svensson, Mona; Novellino, Ettore; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Catalanotti, Bruno; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition is a promising approach for pain-relief. The Flu-AM1 and Ibu-AM5 derivatives of flurbiprofen and ibuprofen retain similar COX-inhibitory properties and are more potent inhibitors of FAAH than the parent compounds. However, little is known as to the nature of their interaction with FAAH, or to the importance of their chirality. This has been explored here. Methodology/Principal Findings FAAH inhibitory activity was measured in rat brain homogenates and in lysates expressing either wild-type or FAAHT488A-mutated enzyme. Molecular modelling was undertaken using both docking and molecular dynamics. The (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of Flu-AM1 inhibited rat FAAH with similar potencies (IC50 values of 0.74 and 0.99 μM, respectively), whereas the (S)-enantiomer of Ibu-AM5 (IC50 0.59 μM) was more potent than the (R)-enantiomer (IC50 5.7 μM). Multiple inhibition experiments indicated that both (R)-Flu-AM1 and (S)-Ibu-AM5 inhibited FAAH in a manner mutually exclusive to carprofen. Computational studies indicated that the binding site for the Flu-AM1 and Ibu-AM5 enantiomers was located between the acyl chain binding channel and the membrane access channel, in a site overlapping the carprofen binding site, and showed a binding mode in line with that proposed for carprofen and other non-covalent ligands. The potency of (R)-Flu-AM1 was lower towards lysates expressing FAAH mutated at the proposed carprofen binding area than in lysates expressing wild-type FAAH. Conclusions/Significance The study provides kinetic and structural evidence that the enantiomers of Flu-AM1 and Ibu-AM5 bind in the substrate channel of FAAH. This information will be useful in aiding the design of novel dual-action FAAH: COX inhibitors. PMID:26565710

  2. Replacement of glycine with dicarbonyl and related moieties in analogues of the C-terminal pentapeptide of cholecystokinin: CCK(2) agonists displaying a novel binding mode.

    PubMed

    Bellier, B; Million, M E; DaNascimento, S; Meudal, H; Kellou, S; Maigret, B; Garbay, C

    2000-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of cholecystokinin have indicated the possible occurrence of multiple affinity states of the CCK(2) receptor. Besides, numerous pharmacological experiments performed "in vitro" and "in vivo" support the eventuality of different pharmacological profiles associated to CCK(2) ligands. Indeed, some agonists are essentially anxiogenic and uneffective in memory tests, whereas others are not anxiogenic and appear as able to reinforce memory. The reference compound for the latter profile is the CCK-8 analogue BC 264 (Boc-Tyr(SO(3)H)-gNle-mGly-Trp-(NMe)Nle-Asp-Phe-NH(2)). However, although tetrapeptide ligands based on CCK-4 (Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH(2)) are known to possess sufficient structural features for CCK(2) recognition, none shares the properties of BC 264. Hence we have developed new short peptidic or pseudo-peptidic derivatives containing the C-terminal tetrapeptide of BC 264. Our results indicate that some compounds characterized by the presence of two carbonyl groups at the N-terminus, as in 2b (HO(2)C-CH(2)-CONH-Trp-(NMe)Nle-Asp-Phe-NH(2)), are likely to show a BC 264-like profile, bind to the CCK(2) receptor in a specific way, and display remarkable affinities (2b: 0.28 nM on guinea-pig cortex membrane preparations). This original binding mode is discussed and further enlightened by NMR and molecular modeling studies. PMID:11020275

  3. Dynamics of cellular retinoic acid binding protein I on multiple time scales with implications for ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V V; Sukumar, M; Gierasch, L M; Cosman, M

    2000-08-01

    Cellular retinoic acid binding protein I (CRABPI) belongs to the family of intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs), all of which bind a hydrophobic ligand within an internal cavity. The structures of several iLBPs reveal minimal structural differences between the apo (ligand-free) and holo (ligand-bound) forms, suggesting that dynamics must play an important role in the ligand recognition and binding processes. Here, a variety of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy methods were used to systematically study the dynamics of both apo and holo CRABPI at various time scales. Translational and rotational diffusion constant measurements were used to study the overall motions of the proteins. Both apo and holo forms of CRABPI tend to self-associate at high (1.2 mM) concentrations, while at low concentrations (0.2 mM), they are predominantly monomeric. Rapid amide exchange rate and laboratory frame relaxation rate measurements at two spectrometer field strengths (500 and 600 MHz) were used to probe the internal motions of the individual residues. Several residues in the apo form, notably within the ligand recognition region, exhibit millisecond time scale motions that are significantly arrested in the holo form. In contrast, no significant differences in the high-frequency motions were observed between the two forms. These results provide direct experimental evidence for dynamics-induced ligand recognition and binding at a specifically defined time scale. They also exemplify the importance of dynamics in providing a more comprehensive understanding of how a protein functions. PMID:10924105

  4. Multiple Beam Correlation Using Single-Mode Fiber Optics with Application to Interferometric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaklan, Stuart Bruce

    A study of the application of single-mode fiber optics to the multiple-beam interferometric recombination problem is presented. In the laboratory, the fibers have been used in wide bandwidth, two-arm, Mach-Zehnder test interferometers as well as a 5-telescope imaging interferometer connected to an all-fiber beam combiner. Based upon these experiments and some theoretical studies it is shown that fiber optics and fiber optic components such as directional couplers provide an excellent alternative to conventional optics such as mirrors, beamsplitters, and relay lenses. The equations describing the measurement of the complex degree of coherence in an interferometer with a single-mode fiber in each arm are derived. The equations reveal an important feature of the fibers: they filter phase fluctuations due to aberrations and turbulence at the input and convert them to intensity fluctuations at the output. This leads to a simplification of the calibration of measured visibilities. The coupling efficiency of light which has passed through a turbulent atmosphere is also studied as a function of fiber parameters and turbulence conditions for both image motion stabilized and non-stabilized cases. For the former case, coupling efficiency remains greater than 50% as long as telescope diameter is no larger than the turbulence coherence length. Beam combination architectures using arrays of directional couplers are fully discussed. Arrays accommodating up to 20 input beams are presented. The arrays require only N detector pixels for N input beams. A scheme of temporal multiplexing of the phase of each beam is used to identify individual fringe pairs. One possible scheme allows wide bandwidths even for large numbers of beams. A 5-telescope interferometer has been constructed and connected to an all-fiber beam combiner. Two extended objects were observed and reconstructed using standard radio astronomy VLBI software. The interferometer and beam combiner had good thermal and

  5. Asymmetric binding to NS5A by daclatasvir (BMS-790052) and analogs suggests two novel modes of HCV inhibition.

    PubMed

    Nettles, James H; Stanton, Richard A; Broyde, Joshua; Amblard, Franck; Zhang, Hongwang; Zhou, Longhu; Shi, Junxing; McBrayer, Tamara R; Whitaker, Tony; Coats, Steven J; Kohler, James J; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2014-12-11

    Symmetric, dimeric daclatasvir (BMS-790052) is the clinical lead for a class of picomolar inhibitors of HCV replication. While specific, resistance-bearing mutations at positions 31 and 93 of domain I strongly suggest the viral NS5A as target, structural mechanism(s) for the drugs' activities and resistance remains unclear. Several previous models suggested symmetric binding modes relative to the homodimeric target; however, none can fully explain SAR details for this class. We present semiautomated workflows to model potential receptor conformations for docking. Surprisingly, ranking docked hits with our library-derived 3D-pharmacophore revealed two distinct asymmetric binding modes, at a conserved poly-proline region between 31 and 93, consistent with SAR. Interfering with protein-protein interactions at this membrane interface can explain potent inhibition of replication-complex formation, resistance, effects on lipid droplet distribution, and virion release. These detailed interaction models and proposed mechanisms of action will allow structure-based design of new NS5A directed compounds with higher barriers to HCV resistance. PMID:25365735

  6. Investigation on the Binding Mode of 3, 4-Dihydropyrano[c]Chromene Derivative with Double Strand DNA

    PubMed Central

    Farajzadeh Dehkordi, Mahvash; Dehghan, Gholamreza; Mahdavi, Majid; Hosseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study on the interaction between small molecules and DNA has been very useful for investigating the structure and physical properties of DNA, elucidating the damage mechanism of DNA and significant in the design of new drugs targeted to DNA. This article describes an interaction of native calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) with a new 3, 4-dihydropyrano[c]chromene derivative, 2-amino-4-(4- chlorophenyl)-5-oxo-4H, 5H-pyrano-[3, 2-c] chromene-3-carbonitrile (4-CC) by using spectroscopic and viscometric techniques. Methods: The interaction between 4-CC and ctDNA is realized from the UV absorption spectrophotometry, viscosimetry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques which shows that the successive interaction of 4-CC with ctDNA occurs. Results: The experimental results revealed that 4-CC can interact with DNA through non- intercalative mode and the intrinsic binding constant (Kb) for 4-CC with DNA was estimated to 2.37 (±0.001) ×103 M-1. Methylene blue (MB) displacement studies revealed that 4-CC did not have any effect on MB bound DNA which is indicative of groove binding mode. Furthermore, 4-CC induces detectable changes in the CD spectrum of ctDNA as well as changes in its viscosity study corroborate the above experimental results. Conclusion: These results further advance our knowledge on the molecular aspects on the interaction of 4-CC to nucleic acids. PMID:26819919

  7. Binding Mode and Potency of N-Indolyloxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-Based Inhibitors Targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection in humans caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and manifested in progressive cardiomyopathy and/or gastrointestinal dysfunction. Limited therapeutic options to prevent and treat Chagas disease put 8 million people infected with T. cruzi worldwide at risk. CYP51, involved in the biosynthesis of the membrane sterol component in eukaryotes, is a promising drug target in T. cruzi. We report the structure–activity relationships (SAR) of an N-arylpiperazine series of N-indolyloxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based inhibitors designed to probe the impact of substituents in the terminal N-phenyl ring on binding mode, selectivity and potency. Depending on the substituents at C-4, two distinct ring binding modes, buried and solvent-exposed, have been observed by X-ray structure analysis (resolution of 1.95–2.48 Å). The 5-chloro-substituted analogs 9 and 10 with no substituent at C-4 demonstrated improved selectivity and potency, suppressing ≥99.8% parasitemia in mice when administered orally at 25 mg/kg, b.i.d., for 4 days. PMID:25393646

  8. Binding Mode of CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides to Nanoparticles Regulates Bifurcated Cytokine induction via Toll-like Receptor 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Chen, Song; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2012-07-01

    The interaction of cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) with Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) activates the immune system. Multimeric class A CpG ODNs induce interferon-α (IFN-α) and, to a lesser extent, interleukin-6. By contrast, monomeric class B CpG ODNs induce interleukin-6 but not IFN-α. This difference suggests that the multimerization of CpG ODN molecules is a key factor in IFN-α induction. We multimerized class B CpG ODN2006x3-PD molecules that consist entirely of a phosphodiester backbone onto quantum dot silicon nanoparticles with various binding modes. Herein, we present the binding mode-dependent bifurcation of cytokine induction and discuss its possible mechanism of CpG ODN and TLR9 interaction. Our discoveries also suggest that nanoparticles play roles in not only delivery of CpG ODNs but also control of CpG ODN activity.

  9. Binding mode and potency of N-indolyloxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based inhibitors targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Debora F; Choi, Jun Yong; Calvet, Claudia M; Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Johnston, Jonathan B; Kellar, Danielle; Gut, Jiri; Cameron, Michael D; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R; Podust, Larissa M

    2014-12-11

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection in humans caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and manifested in progressive cardiomyopathy and/or gastrointestinal dysfunction. Limited therapeutic options to prevent and treat Chagas disease put 8 million people infected with T. cruzi worldwide at risk. CYP51, involved in the biosynthesis of the membrane sterol component in eukaryotes, is a promising drug target in T. cruzi. We report the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of an N-arylpiperazine series of N-indolyloxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based inhibitors designed to probe the impact of substituents in the terminal N-phenyl ring on binding mode, selectivity and potency. Depending on the substituents at C-4, two distinct ring binding modes, buried and solvent-exposed, have been observed by X-ray structure analysis (resolution of 1.95-2.48 Å). The 5-chloro-substituted analogs 9 and 10 with no substituent at C-4 demonstrated improved selectivity and potency, suppressing ≥ 99.8% parasitemia in mice when administered orally at 25 mg/kg, b.i.d., for 4 days. PMID:25393646

  10. The Tubulin Binding Mode of Microtubule Stabilizing Agents Studied by Electron Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, James H.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    Since tubulin was discovered in 1967, drug probes have been used to manipulate mechanisms of microtubule polymerization and disassembly. In parallel, advances in optical imagery, electron microscopy, along with both electron and X-ray diffraction have provided ability to "see" the molecular underpinning of these machines. Nanoscale mapping of different tubulin polymers formed in the presence of different drugs and cofactors provide a context for examining the dynamic features relevant to their biological activity. Models built from EM maps have been used to understand the binding of stabilizing drugs such as taxanes and epothilones, to predict more effective molecules, and to explain mutation based resistance. Here, we discuss drug binding in the context of different polymeric forms and propose a trigger mechanism associated with microtubules' dynamic instability.

  11. Potent Glycosidase Inhibition with Heterovalent Fullerenes: Unveiling the Binding Modes Triggering Multivalent Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Abellán Flos, Marta; García Moreno, M Isabel; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, Jose Manuel; Nierengarten, Jean-Francois; Vincent, Stéphane P

    2016-08-01

    Glycosidases are key enzymes in metabolism, pathogenic/antipathogenic mechanisms and normal cellular functions. Recently, a novel approach for glycosidase inhibition that conveys multivalent glycomimetic conjugates has emerged. Many questions regarding the mechanism(s) of multivalent enzyme inhibition remain unanswered. Herein we report the synthesis of a collection of novel homo- and heterovalent glyco(mimetic)-fullerenes purposely conceived for probing the contribution of non-catalytic pockets in glysosidases to the multivalent inhibitory effect. Their affinities towards selected glycosidases were compared with data from homovalent fullerene conjugates. An original competitive glycosidase-lectin binding assay demonstrated that the multivalent derivatives and the substrate compete for low affinity non-glycone binding sites of the enzyme, leading to inhibition by a "recognition and blockage" mechanism. Most notably, this work provides evidence for enzyme inhibition by multivalent glycosystems, which will likely have a strong impact in the glycosciences given the utmost relevance of multivalency in Nature. PMID:27374430

  12. A Novel, ;Double-Clamp; Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-08-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be {approx}15 times more potent (IC{sub 50} = 0.27{+-}0.07 {mu}M) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC{sub 50} = 4.0{+-}1.8 {mu}M). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This 'double-clamp' binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  13. A Novel, “Double-Clamp” Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC50 = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC50 = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This “double-clamp” binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors. PMID:22276118

  14. A novel, "double-clamp" binding mode for human heme oxygenase-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC(50) = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC(50) = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This "double-clamp" binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors. PMID:22276118

  15. Detailed Analysis of the Binding Mode of Vanilloids to Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type I (TRPV1) by a Mutational and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Mori, Yoshikazu; Ogawa, Kazuo; Warabi, Eiji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hirokawa, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel and a multimodal sensor protein. Since the precise structure of TRPV1 was obtained by electron cryo-microscopy, the binding mode of representative agonists such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) has been extensively characterized; however, detailed information on the binding mode of other vanilloids remains lacking. In this study, mutational analysis of human TRPV1 was performed, and four agonists (capsaicin, RTX, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol) were used to identify amino acid residues involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. The detailed binding mode of each ligand was then simulated by computational analysis. As a result, three amino acids (L518, F591 and L670) were newly identified as being involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. In addition, in silico docking simulation and a subsequent mutational study suggested that [6]-gingerol might bind to and activate TRPV1 in a unique manner. These results provide novel insights into the binding mode of various vanilloids to the channel and will be helpful in developing a TRPV1 modulator. PMID:27606946

  16. Structural Insights into the Distinct Binding Mode of Cyclic Di-AMP with SaCpaA_RCK.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ko-Hsin; Liang, Juin-Ming; Yang, Jauo-Guey; Shih, Min-Shao; Tu, Zhi-Le; Wang, Yu-Chuang; Sun, Xing-Han; Hu, Nien-Jen; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Dow, J Maxwell; Ryan, Robert P; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2015-08-11

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a relatively new member of the family of bacterial cyclic dinucleotide second messengers. It has attracted significant attention in recent years because of the abundant roles it plays in a variety of Gram-positive bacteria. The structural features that allow diverse bacterial proteins to bind c-di-AMP are not fully understood. Here we report the biophysical and structural studies of c-di-AMP in complex with a bacterial cation-proton antiporter (CpaA) RCK (regulator of the conductance of K(+)) protein from Staphylococcus aureus (Sa). The crystal structure of the SaCpaA_RCK C-terminal domain (CTD) in complex with c-di-AMP was determined to a resolution of 1.81 Å. This structure revealed two well-liganded water molecules, each interacting with one of the adenine bases by a unique H2Olp-π interaction to stabilize the complex. Sequence blasting using the SaCpaA_RCK primary sequence against the bacterial genome database returned many CpaA analogues, and alignment of these sequences revealed that the active site residues are all well-conserved, indicating a universal c-di-AMP binding mode for CpaA_RCK. A proteoliposome activity assay using the full-length SaCpaA membrane protein indicated that c-di-AMP binding alters its antiporter activity by approximately 40%. A comparison of this structure to all other reported c-di-AMP-receptor complex structures revealed that c-di-AMP binds to receptors in either a "U-shape" or "V-shape" mode. The two adenine rings are stabilized in the inner interaction zone by a variety of CH-π, cation-π, backbone-π, or H2Olp-π interaction, but more commonly in the outer interaction zone by hydrophobic CH-π or π-π interaction. The structures determined to date provide an understanding of the mechanisms by which a single c-di-AMP can interact with a variety of receptor proteins, and how c-di-AMP binds receptor proteins in a special way different from that of c-di-GMP. PMID:26171638

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Investigate the Binding Mode of the Natural Product Liphagal with Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase α.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanjuan; Ma, Ying; Yang, Guangde; Li, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase α (PI3Kα) is an attractive target for anticancer drug design. Liphagal, isolated from the marine sponge Aka coralliphaga, possesses the special "liphagane" meroterpenoid carbon skeleton and has been demonstrated as a PI3Kα inhibitor. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the dynamic behaviors of PI3Kα binding with liphagal, and free energy calculations and energy decomposition analysis were carried out by use of molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann (generalized Born) surface area (MM/PB(GB)SA) methods. The results reveal that the heteroatom rich aromatic D-ring of liphagal extends towards the polar region of the binding site, and the D-ring 15-hydroxyl and 16-hydroxyl form three hydrogen bonds with Asp810 and Tyr836. The cyclohexyl A-ring projects up into the upper pocket of the lipophilic region, and the hydrophobic/van der Waals interactions with the residues Met772, Trp780, Ile800, Ile848, Val850, Met922, Phe930, Ile932 could be the key interactions for the affinity of liphagal to PI3Kα. Thus, a new strategy for the rational design of more potent analogs of liphagal against PI3Kα is provided. Our proposed PI3Kα/liphagal binding mode would be beneficial for the discovery of new active analogs of liphagal against PI3Kα. PMID:27367663

  18. Mixed-model QSAR at the human mineralocorticoid receptor: predicting binding mode and affinity of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Peristera, Ourania; Spreafico, Morena; Smiesko, Martin; Ernst, Beat; Vedani, Angelo

    2009-09-28

    We present a computational study on the human mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR) that is based on multi-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (mQSAR). Therein, we identified the binding mode of 48 steroid and non-steroid homologues by flexible docking to the crystal structure (software Yeti) and quantified it using 6D-QSAR (software Quasar). The receptor surrogate, evolved using a genetic algorithm, converged at a cross-validated r2 of 0.810, and yielded a predictive r2 of 0.661. The model was challenged by a series of scramble tests and by consensus scoring (software Raptor: r2=0.844, predictive r(2)=0.620). The model was then employed to predict the binding affinity of 26 anabolic steroids, demonstrating to which extent they might disrupt the endocrine system via binding to the hMR. The model for the hMR was added to the VirtualToxLab, a technology developed by the Biographics Laboratory 3R, allows the identification of the endocrine-disrupting potential of drugs, chemicals and natural products in silico. PMID:19523507

  19. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bieghs, Liesbeth; Brohus, Malene; Kristensen, Ida B.; Abildgaard, Niels; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans E.; Conover, Cheryl A.; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling plays a key role in homing, progression, and treatment resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). In the extracellular environment, the majority of IGF molecules are bound to one of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6), leaving a minor fraction of total IGF free and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM (n = 17), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n = 37), and control individuals (n = 15), using ELISA (IGFs) and 125I-IGF1 Western Ligand Blotting (IGFBPs). MGUS and MM patients displayed a significant increase in intact IGFBP-2 (2.5–3.8 fold) and decrease in intact IGFBP-3 (0.6–0.5 fold) in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration. PMID:27111220

  20. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients.

    PubMed

    Bieghs, Liesbeth; Brohus, Malene; Kristensen, Ida B; Abildgaard, Niels; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans E; Conover, Cheryl A; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin; Overgaard, Michael T; Nyegaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling plays a key role in homing, progression, and treatment resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). In the extracellular environment, the majority of IGF molecules are bound to one of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6), leaving a minor fraction of total IGF free and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM (n = 17), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n = 37), and control individuals (n = 15), using ELISA (IGFs) and 125I-IGF1 Western Ligand Blotting (IGFBPs). MGUS and MM patients displayed a significant increase in intact IGFBP-2 (2.5-3.8 fold) and decrease in intact IGFBP-3 (0.6-0.5 fold) in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration. PMID:27111220

  1. The Musashi family of RNA binding proteins: master regulators of multiple stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Jessie M; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Hime, Gary R; Siddall, Nicole A

    2013-01-01

    In order to maintain their unlimited capacity to divide, stem cells require controlled temporal and spatial protein expression. The Musashi family of RNA-binding proteins have been shown to exhibit this necessary translational control through both repression and activation in order to regulate multiple stem cell populations. This chapter looks in depth at the initial discovery and characterisation of Musashi in the model organism Drosophila, and its subsequent emergence as a master regulator in a number of stem cell populations. Furthermore the unique roles for mammalian Musashi-1 and Musashi-2 in different stem cell types are correlated with the perceived diagnostic power of Musashi expression in specific stem cell derived oncologies. In particular the potential role for Musashi in the identification and treatment of human cancer is considered, with a focus on the role of Musashi-2 in leukaemia. Finally, the manipulation of Musashi expression is proposed as a potential avenue towards the targeted treatment of specific aggressive stem cell cancers. PMID:23696360

  2. Structures of 5-Methylthioribose Kinase Reveal Substrate Specificity and Unusual Mode of Nucleotide Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Cornell, K.; Riscoe, M.; Behr, J.; Guillerm, G.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    The methionine salvage pathway is ubiquitous in all organisms, but metabolic variations exist between bacteria and mammals. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme in methionine salvage in bacteria and the absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that it is a good target for the design of novel antibiotics. The structures of the apo-form of Bacillus subtilis MTR kinase, as well as its ADP, ADP-PO4, AMPPCP, and AMPPCP-MTR complexes have been determined. MTR kinase has a bilobal eukaryotic protein kinase fold but exhibits a number of unique features. The protein lacks the DFG motif typically found at the beginning of the activation loop and instead coordinates magnesium via a DXE motif (Asp{sup 250}-Glu{sup 252}). In addition, the glycine-rich loop of the protein, analogous to the 'Gly triad' in protein kinases, does not interact extensively with the nucleotide. The MTR substrate-binding site consists of Asp{sup 233} of the catalytic HGD motif, a novel twin arginine motif (Arg{sup 340}/Arg{sup 341}), and a semi-conserved W-loop, which appears to regulate MTR binding specificity. No lobe closure is observed for MTR kinase upon substrate binding. This is probably because the enzyme lacks the lobe closure/inducing interactions between the C-lobe of the protein and the ribosyl moiety of the nucleotide that are typically responsible for lobe closure in protein kinases. The current structures suggest that MTR kinase has a dissociative mechanism.

  3. The "Gatekeeper" Residue Influences the Mode of Binding of Acetyl Indoles to Bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Unzue, Andrea; Zhao, Hongtao; Lolli, Graziano; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Jian; Zechner, Melanie; Dolbois, Aymeric; Caflisch, Amedeo; Nevado, Cristina

    2016-04-14

    Small-molecule hits for the bromodomains of CREBBP and BAZ2B have been identified by scaffold hopping followed by docking of a set of ∼200 compounds containing the acetyl indole scaffold. Chemical synthesis of nearly 30 derivatives has resulted in ligands of representatives of three subfamilies of human bromodomains with favorable ligand efficiency. The X-ray crystal structures of three different bromodomains (CREBBP, BAZ2B, and BRPF1b) in complex with acetyl indole derivatives reveal the influence of the gatekeeper residue on the orientation of small-molecule ligands in the acetyl lysine binding site. PMID:26982797

  4. The Impact of Embedding Multiple Modes of Representation within Writing Tasks on High School Students' Chemistry Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Mark A.; Hand, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact on chemistry learning of the degree to which students embedded or integrated multiple modes of representation in end of unit writing-to-learn activities. A multi-case study approach utilizing quasi-experimental methodology involving intact high school chemistry classes taught by two different teachers was…

  5. Teaching Multiple Modes of Representation in Middle-School Science Classrooms: Impact on Student Learning and Multimodal Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Smith, Leigh K.; Wimmer, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated how explicit instruction about multiple modes of representation (MMR) impacted grades 7 (n = 61) and 8 (n = 141) students' learning and multimodal use on end-of-unit assessments. Half of each teacher's (n = 3) students received an intervention consisting of explicit instruction on MMR in science…

  6. Novel peptide with a specific calcium-binding capacity from whey protein hydrolysate and the possible chelating mode.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Huang, Qimin; Huang, Shunli; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Shaoyun; Huang, Yifan; Hong, Jing; Rao, Pingfan

    2014-10-22

    A novel peptide with a specific calcium-binding capacity was isolated from whey protein hydrolysates. The isolation procedures included diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) anion-exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration, and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A peptide with a molecular mass of 237.99 Da was identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS), and its amino acid sequence was confirmed to be Gly-Tyr. The calcium-binding capacity of Gly-Tyr reached 75.38 μg/mg, increasing by 122% when compared to the hydrolysate complex. The chelating interaction mode between the Gly-Tyr and calcium ion was investigated, indicating that the major binding sites included the oxygen atom of the carbonyl group and nitrogen of the amino or imino group. The folding and structural modification of the peptide arose along with the addition of the calcium ion. The profile of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy demonstrated that the electron cloud density around the hydrogen nucleus in the peptide changed was caused by the calcium ion. The results of ζ potential showed that the Gly-Tyr-Ca chelate was a neutral molecule in which the calcium ion was surrounded by the specific binding sites of the peptide. Moreover, thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and calcium-releasing assay revealed that the Gly-Tyr-Ca chelate exerted excellent thermal stability and solubility in both acidic and basic conditions, which were beneficial to calcium absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of the human body and, therefore, improved its bioavailability. These findings further the progress in the research of whey protein, suggesting the potential in making peptide-calcium chelate as a dietary supplement. PMID:25265391

  7. Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium BipA Exhibits Two Distinct Ribosome Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    deLivron, M.; Robinson, V

    2008-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions to influence numerous cellular processes in bacteria. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, BipA has been implicated in controlling bacterial motility, modulating attachment and effacement processes, and upregulating the expression of virulence genes and is also responsible for avoidance of host defense mechanisms. In addition, BipA is thought to be involved in bacterial stress responses, such as those associated with virulence, temperature, and symbiosis. Thus, BipA is necessary for securing bacterial survival and successful invasion of the host. Steady-state kinetic analysis and pelleting assays were used to assess the GTPase and ribosome-binding properties of S. enterica BipA. Under normal bacterial growth, BipA associates with the ribosome in the GTP-bound state. However, using sucrose density gradients, we demonstrate that the association of BipA and the ribosome is altered under stress conditions in bacteria similar to those experienced during virulence. The data show that this differential binding is brought about by the presence of ppGpp, an alarmone that signals the onset of stress-related events in bacteria.

  8. Escherichia coli Topoisomerase IV E Subunit and an Inhibitor Binding Mode Revealed by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wong, Ying Lei; Ng, Fui Mee; Liu, Boping; Wong, Yun Xuan; Poh, Zhi Ying; Liu, Shuang; Then, Siew Wen; Lee, Michelle Yueqi; Ng, Hui Qi; Huang, Qiwei; Hung, Alvin W; Cherian, Joseph; Hill, Jeffrey; Keller, Thomas H; Kang, CongBao

    2016-08-19

    Bacterial topoisomerases are attractive antibacterial drug targets because of their importance in bacterial growth and low homology with other human topoisomerases. Structure-based drug design has been a proven approach of efficiently developing new antibiotics against these targets. Past studies have focused on developing lead compounds against the ATP binding pockets of both DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. A detailed understanding of the interactions between ligand and target in a solution state will provide valuable information for further developing drugs against topoisomerase IV targets. Here we describe a detailed characterization of a known potent inhibitor containing a 9H-pyrimido[4,5-b]indole scaffold against the N-terminal domain of the topoisomerase IV E subunit from Escherichia coli (eParE). Using a series of biophysical and biochemical experiments, it has been demonstrated that this inhibitor forms a tight complex with eParE. NMR studies revealed the exact protein residues responsible for inhibitor binding. Through comparative studies of two inhibitors of markedly varied potencies, it is hypothesized that gaining molecular interactions with residues in the α4 and residues close to the loop of β1-α2 and residues in the loop of β3-β4 might improve the inhibitor potency. PMID:27365392

  9. Multiple sup 3 H-oxytocin binding sites in rat myometrial plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Crankshaw, D.; Gaspar, V.; Pliska, V. )

    1990-01-01

    The affinity spectrum method has been used to analyse binding isotherms for {sup 3}H-oxytocin to rat myometrial plasma membranes. Three populations of binding sites with dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.6-1.5 x 10(-9), 0.4-1.0 x 10(-7) and 7 x 10(-6) mol/l were identified and their existence verified by cluster analysis based on similarities between Kd, binding capacity and Hill coefficient. When experimental values were compared to theoretical curves constructed using the estimated binding parameters, good fits were obtained. Binding parameters obtained by this method were not influenced by the presence of GTP gamma S (guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate) in the incubation medium. The binding parameters agree reasonably well with those found in uterine cells, they support the existence of a medium affinity site and may allow for an explanation of some of the discrepancies between binding and response in this system.

  10. Structure of the RNA binding domain of a DEAD-box helicase bound to its ribosomal RNA target reveals a novel mode of recognition by an RNA recognition motif

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, John W.; Hu, YaoXiong; McKay, David B.

    2010-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases of the bacterial DbpA subfamily are localized to their biological substrate when a carboxy-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain binds tightly and specifically to a segment of 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) that includes hairpin 92 of the peptidyl transferase center. A complex between a fragment of 23S rRNA and the RNA binding domain (RBD) of the Bacillus subtilis DbpA protein YxiN was crystallized and its structure determined to 2.9 Å resolution, revealing an RNA recognition mode that differs from those observed with other RRMs. The RBD is bound between two RNA strands at a three-way junction. Multiple phosphates of the RNA backbone interact with an electropositive band generated by lysines of the RBD. Nucleotides of the single-stranded loop of hairpin 92 interact with the RBD, including the guanosine base of G2553, which forms three hydrogen bonds with the peptide backbone. A G2553U mutation reduces the RNA binding affinity by two orders of magnitude, confirming that G2553 is a sequence specificity determinant in RNA binding. Binding of the RBD to 23S rRNA in the late stages of ribosome subunit maturation would position the ATP-binding duplex destabilization fragment of the protein for interaction with rRNA in the peptidyl transferase cleft of the subunit, allowing it to “melt out” unstable secondary structures and allow proper folding. PMID:20673833

  11. Multiple continuous-wave and pulsed modes of a figure-of-eight fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottiez, O.; Martinez-Rios, A.; Monzon-Hernandez, D.; Salceda-Delgado, G.; Hernandez-Garcia, J. C.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; Kuzin, E. A.

    2013-03-01

    We study experimentally a figure-of-eight fibre laser including a polarization-imbalanced nonlinear optical loop mirror and a Mach-Zehnder optical filter formed by two fibre tapers placed in series. Depending on the adjustments of two wave retarders included in the setup, different modes of operation of the laser are found. In continuous-wave mode, tunable single-wavelength operation as well as multiwavelength lasing are observed. For some adjustments, self-pulsing also takes place, although the pulses are very unstable. Finally, for some adjustments a mechanical stimulation (a kick) leads to the onset of passive mode locking. Measurements reveal that the mode-locked pulses actually are noise-like pulses. Both stable fundamental mode locking and second-harmonic mode locking with particular dynamics were obtained. In this work, we analyse how simple wave plate adjustments can lead to such a variety of operational modes of the fibre laser.

  12. Binding modes of DL-2-haloacid dehalogenase revealed by crystallography, modeling and isotope effects studies.

    PubMed

    Siwek, Agata; Omi, Rie; Hirotsu, Ken; Jitsumori, Keiji; Esaki, Nobuyoshi; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Paneth, Piotr

    2013-12-01

    Several pathways of biotic dechlorination can be found in enzymes, each characterized by different chlorine isotopic fractionation, which can thus serve as a signature of a particular mechanism. Unlike other dehalogenases, DL-2-haloacid dehalogenase, DL-DEX, converts both enantiomers of the substrate. Chlorine isotope effects for this enzyme are larger than in the case of other dehalogenases. Recently, the 3D structure of this enzyme became available and enabled us to model these isotope effects and seek their origin. We show that the elevated values of the chlorine kinetic isotope effects originate in part in the processes of binding and migration within the enzyme active site that precede the dehalogenation step. PMID:24071515

  13. On the binding mode of urease active site inhibitors: A density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopoldini, M.; Marino, T.; Russo, N.; Toscano, M.

    The way with which boric acid, a rapid reversible competitive inhibitor, binds the urease active site was explored at density functional B3LYP level of theory. The catalytic core of the enzyme was simulated by two models of different size. In both cases, amino acid residues belonging to the inner and to the outer coordination spheres of nickel ions were replaced by smaller molecular species. Contrary to the experimental indication that attributes the inhibitory ability of this acid to the lack of a nucleophilic attack by the enzyme to the boron atom, we instead found that another possibility exists based on the presence of a strong covalent sigma bond between boron and urease that we think can be hardly broken to allow any course of the reaction.

  14. Sorting photon wave packets using temporal-mode interferometry based on multiple-stage quantum frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. V.; Raymer, M. G.; McKinstrie, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    All classical and quantum technologies that encode in and retrieve information from optical fields rely on the ability to selectively manipulate orthogonal field modes of light. Such manipulation can be achieved with high selectivity for polarization modes and transverse-spatial modes. For the time-frequency degree of freedom, this could efficiently be achieved for a limited choice of approximately orthogonal modes, i.e., nonoverlapping bins in time or frequency. We recently proposed a method that surmounts the selectivity barrier for sorting arbitrary orthogonal temporal modes [Opt. Lett. 39, 2924 (2014)., 10.1364/OL.39.002924] using cascaded interferometric quantum frequency conversion in nonlinear optical media. We call this method temporal-mode interferometry, as it has a close resemblance to the well-known separated-fields atomic interferometry method introduced by Ramsey. The method has important implications for quantum memories, quantum dense coding, quantum teleportation, and quantum key distribution. Here we explore the inner workings of the method in detail, and extend it to multiple stages with a concurrent asymptotic convergence of temporal-mode selectivity to unity. We also complete our analysis of pump-chirp compensation to counter pump-induced nonlinear phase modulation in four-wave mixing implementations.

  15. Multiple determinants of splicing repression activity in the polypyrimidine tract binding proteins, PTBP1 and PTBP2.

    PubMed

    Keppetipola, Niroshika M; Yeom, Kyu-Hyeon; Hernandez, Adrian L; Bui, Tessa; Sharma, Shalini; Black, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    Most human genes generate multiple protein isoforms through alternative pre-mRNA splicing, but the mechanisms controlling alternative splicing choices by RNA binding proteins are not well understood. These proteins can have multiple paralogs expressed in different cell types and exhibiting different splicing activities on target exons. We examined the paralogous polypyrimidine tract binding proteins PTBP1 and PTBP2 to understand how PTBP1 can exhibit greater splicing repression activity on certain exons. Using both an in vivo coexpression assay and an in vitro splicing assay, we show that PTBP1 is more repressive than PTBP2 per unit protein on a target exon. Constructing chimeras of PTBP1 and 2 to determine amino acid features that contribute to their differential activity, we find that multiple segments of PTBP1 increase the repressive activity of PTBP2. Notably, when either RRM1 of PTBP2 or the linker peptide separating RRM2 and RRM3 are replaced with the equivalent PTBP1 sequences, the resulting chimeras are highly active for splicing repression. These segments are distinct from the known region of interaction for the PTBP1 cofactors Raver1 and Matrin3 in RRM2. We find that RRM2 of PTBP1 also increases the repression activity of an otherwise PTBP2 sequence, and that this is potentially explained by stronger binding by Raver1. These results indicate that multiple features over the length of the two proteins affect their ability to repress an exon. PMID:27288314

  16. Catalytic and Biocatalytic Iron Porphyrin Carbene Formation: Effects of Binding Mode, Carbene Substituent, Porphyrin Substituent, and Protein Axial Ligand.

    PubMed

    Khade, Rahul L; Zhang, Yong

    2015-06-24

    Iron porphyrin carbenes (IPCs) are important intermediates in various chemical reactions catalyzed by iron porphyrins and engineered heme proteins, as well as in the metabolism of various xenobiotics by cytochrome P450. However, there are no prior theoretical reports to help understand their formation mechanisms and identify key information governing the binding mode, formation feasibility, and stability/reactivity. A systematic quantum chemical study was performed to investigate the effects of carbene substituent, porphyrin substituent, and axial ligand on IPC formation pathways. Results not only are consistent with available experimental data but also provide a number of unprecedented insights into electronic, steric, and H-bonding effects of various structural factors on IPC formation mechanisms. These results shall facilitate research on IPC and related systems for sustainable chemical catalysis and biocatalysis. PMID:26067900

  17. Use of multiple modes of flight subsidy by a soaring terrestrial bird, the golden eagle Aquila chrysaetos, when on migration.

    PubMed

    Katzner, Todd E; Turk, Philip J; Duerr, Adam E; Miller, Tricia A; Lanzone, Michael J; Cooper, Jeff L; Brandes, David; Tremblay, Junior A; Lemaître, Jérôme

    2015-11-01

    Large birds regularly use updrafts to subsidize flight. Although most research on soaring bird flight has focused on use of thermal updrafts, there is evidence suggesting that many species are likely to use multiple modes of subsidy. We tested the degree to which a large soaring species uses multiple modes of subsidy to provide insights into the decision-making that underlies flight behaviour. We statistically classified more than 22 000 global positioning satellite-global system for mobile communications telemetry points collected at 30-s intervals to identify the type of subsidized flight used by 32 migrating golden eagles during spring in eastern North America. Eagles used subsidized flight on 87% of their journey. They spent 41.9% ± 1.5 ([Formula: see text], range: 18-56%) of their subsidized northbound migration using thermal soaring, 45.2% ± 2.1 (12-65%) of time gliding between thermals, and 12.9% ± 2.2 (1-55%) of time using orographic updrafts. Golden eagles responded to the variable local-scale meteorological events they encountered by switching flight behaviour to take advantage of multiple modes of subsidy. Orographic soaring occurred more frequently in morning and evening, earlier in the migration season, and when crosswinds and tail winds were greatest. Switching between flight modes allowed migration for relatively longer periods each day and frequent switching behaviour has implications for a better understanding of avian flight behaviour and of the evolution of use of subsidy in flight. PMID:26538556

  18. Potent inhibition of mandelate racemase by a fluorinated substrate-product analogue with a novel binding mode.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Mitesh; Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin; Bearne, Stephen L

    2014-02-25

    Mandelate racemase (MR) from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes the Mg(2+)-dependent 1,1-proton transfer that interconverts the enantiomers of mandelate. Because trifluorolactate is also a substrate of MR, we anticipated that replacing the phenyl rings of the competitive, substrate-product analogue inhibitor benzilate (Ki = 0.7 mM) with trifluoromethyl groups might furnish an inhibitor. Surprisingly, the substrate-product analogue 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxy-2-(trifluoromethyl)propanoate (TFHTP) was a potent competitive inhibitor [Ki = 27 ± 4 μM; cf. Km = 1.2 mM for both (R)-mandelate and (R)-trifluorolactate]. To understand the origins of this high binding affinity, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the MR-TFHTP complex to 1.68 Å resolution. Rather than chelating the active site Mg(2+) with its glycolate moiety, like other ground state analogues, TFHTP exhibited a novel binding mode with the two trifluoromethyl groups closely packed against the 20s loop and the carboxylate bridging the two active site Brønsted acid-base catalysts Lys 166 and His 297. Recognizing that positioning a carboxylate between the Brønsted acid-base catalysts could yield an inhibitor, we showed that tartronate was a competitive inhibitor of MR (Ki = 1.8 ± 0.1 mM). The X-ray crystal structure of the MR-tartronate complex (1.80 Å resolution) revealed that the glycolate moiety of tartronate chelated the Mg(2+) and that the carboxylate bridged Lys 166 and His 297. Models of tartronate in monomers A and B of the crystal structure mimicked the binding orientations of (S)-mandelate and that anticipated for (R)-mandelate, respectively. For the latter monomer, the 20s loop appeared to be disordered, as it also did in the X-ray structure of the MR triple mutant (C92S/C264S/K166C) complexed with benzilate, which was determined to 1.89 Å resolution. These observations indicate that the 20s loop likely undergoes a significant conformational change upon binding (R)-mandelate. In general, our

  19. Contribution of Multiple Vibration Modes to Chaotic Vibrations of a Post-buckled Beam with an Axial Elastic Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Shinichi; Nagai, Ken-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Takao; Hoshi, Kazuaki

    Analytical results are presented on contribution of multiple modes of vibration to chaotic responses of a post-buckled clamped beam constrained by an axial spring. Introducing the mode shape function proposed by the senior author and applying the Galerkin procedure to the governing equation of the beam, a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations in amultiple-degree-of-freedom system is obtained. Chaotic time responses are integrated numerically. Responses of the beam subjected to periodic lateral acceleration are investigated by comparing with the relevant experimental results. Dominant chaotic responses are generated within the frequency ranges of the subharmonic resonance of 1/2 and 1/3 orders. The maximum Lyapunov exponent of the chaotic response corresponding to the sub-harmonic resonance of 1/2 order is greater than that of the chaos with the sub-harmonic resonance of 1/3 order. The analytical results of the chaotic responses have remarkable agreement with that of the experimental results. The Lyapunov dimension and the Poincaré projection of the chaotic responses predict that more than three modes of vibration contribute to the chaos based on the calculation from the equation of multiple-degree-of-freedom system. The principal component analysis shows that the lowest vibration mode contributes dominantly. Higher modes of vibration contribute to the chaos with small amount of amplitude.

  20. Evolutionary Limitation and Opportunities for Developing tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors with 5-Binding-Mode Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs as building blocks for translation. Each of the aaRS families plays a pivotal role in protein biosynthesis and is indispensable for cell growth and survival. In addition, aaRSs in higher species have evolved important non-translational functions. These translational and non-translational functions of aaRS are attractive for developing antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic agents and for treating other human diseases. The interplay between amino acids, tRNA, ATP, EF-Tu and non-canonical binding partners, had shaped each family with distinct pattern of key sites for regulation, with characters varying among species across the path of evolution. These sporadic variations in the aaRSs offer great opportunity to target these essential enzymes for therapy. Up to this day, growing numbers of aaRS inhibitors have been discovered and developed. Here, we summarize the latest developments and structural studies of aaRS inhibitors, and classify them with distinct binding modes into five categories. PMID:26670257

  1. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3-H4 at replication forks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia; Hödl, Martina; Strandsby, Anne; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Chen, Shoudeng; Groth, Anja; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-08-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase, chaperones histones H3-H4. Our first structure shows an H3-H4 tetramer bound by two MCM2 histone-binding domains (HBDs), which hijack interaction sites used by nucleosomal DNA. Our second structure reveals MCM2 and ASF1 cochaperoning an H3-H4 dimer. Mutational analyses show that the MCM2 HBD is required for MCM2-7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3-H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling histones genome wide during DNA replication. PMID:26167883

  2. Development of Small-Molecule Trypanosoma brucei N-Myristoyltransferase Inhibitors: Discovery and Optimisation of a Novel Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, Daniel; Smith, Victoria; Thompson, Stephen; Robinson, David A; Luksch, Torsten; Smith, Alasdair; Torrie, Leah S; McElroy, Stuart; Stojanovski, Laste; Norval, Suzanne; Collie, Iain T; Hallyburton, Irene; Rao, Bhavya; Brand, Stephen; Brenk, Ruth; Frearson, Julie A; Read, Kevin D; Wyatt, Paul G; Gilbert, Ian H

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) from Trypanosoma brucei has been validated both chemically and biologically as a potential drug target for human African trypanosomiasis. We previously reported the development of some very potent compounds based around a pyrazole sulfonamide series, derived from a high-throughput screen. Herein we describe work around thiazolidinone and benzomorpholine scaffolds that were also identified in the screen. An X-ray crystal structure of the thiazolidinone hit in Leishmania major NMT showed the compound bound in the previously reported active site, utilising a novel binding mode. This provides potential for further optimisation. The benzomorpholinone was also found to bind in a similar region. Using an X-ray crystallography/structure-based design approach, the benzomorpholinone series was further optimised, increasing activity against T. brucei NMT by >1000-fold. A series of trypanocidal compounds were identified with suitable in vitro DMPK properties, including CNS exposure for further development. Further work is required to increase selectivity over the human NMT isoform and activity against T. brucei. PMID:26395087

  3. Co-solvation effect on the binding mode of the α-mangostin/β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex

    PubMed Central

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Phunpee, Sarunya; Kunaseth, Manaschai; Namuangruk, Supawadee; Rungsardthong, Kanin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cyclodextrins (CDs) have been extensively utilized as host molecules to enhance the solubility, stability and bioavailability of hydrophobic drug molecules through the formation of inclusion complexes. It was previously reported that the use of co-solvents in such studies may result in ternary (host:guest:co-solvent) complex formation. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of ethanol as a co-solvent on the inclusion complex formation between α-mangostin (α-MGS) and β-CD, using both experimental and theoretical studies. Experimental phase-solubility studies were carried out in order to assess complex formation, with the mechanism of association being probed using a mathematical model. It was found that α-MGS was poorly soluble at low ethanol concentrations (0–10% v/v), but higher concentrations (10–40% v/v) resulted in better α-MGS solubility at all β-CD concentrations studied (0–10 mM). From the equilibrium constant calculation, the inclusion complex is still a binary complex (1:1), even in the presence of ethanol. The results from our theoretical study confirm that the binding mode is binary complex and the presence of ethanol as co-solvent enhances the solubility of α-MGS with some effects on the binding affinity with β-CD, depending on the concentration employed. PMID:26734079

  4. Multiple DNA Binding Proteins Contribute to Timing of Chromosome Replication in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. DnaA associated with either ATP or ADP binds to a set of strong DnaA binding sites in oriC, whereas only DnaA(ATP) is capable of binding additional and weaker sites to promote initiation. Additional DNA binding proteins act to ensure that initiation occurs timely by affecting either the cellular mass at which DNA replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on oriC for modulation of its activity but also at additional regulatory sites to control the nucleotide bound status of DnaA. Here we review the contribution of key DNA binding proteins to the tight regulation of chromosome replication in E. coli cells. PMID:27446932

  5. Multiple DNA Binding Proteins Contribute to Timing of Chromosome Replication in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. DnaA associated with either ATP or ADP binds to a set of strong DnaA binding sites in oriC, whereas only DnaAATP is capable of binding additional and weaker sites to promote initiation. Additional DNA binding proteins act to ensure that initiation occurs timely by affecting either the cellular mass at which DNA replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on oriC for modulation of its activity but also at additional regulatory sites to control the nucleotide bound status of DnaA. Here we review the contribution of key DNA binding proteins to the tight regulation of chromosome replication in E. coli cells. PMID:27446932

  6. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  7. Two distinct DNA binding modes guide dual roles Of a CRISPR-Cas protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Westra, Edze R.; Vlot, Marnix; Künne, Tim; Sobota, Małgorzata; Dekker, Cees; Brouns, Stan J.J.; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Small RNA-guided protein complexes play an essential role in CRISPR-mediated immunity in prokaryotes. While these complexes initiate interference by flagging cognate invader DNA for destruction, recent evidence has implicated their involvement in new CRISPR memory formation, called priming, against mutated invader sequences. The mechanism by which the target recognition complex mediates these disparate responses—interference and priming—remains poorly understood. Using single-molecule FRET, we visualize how bona fide and mutated targets are differentially probed by E. coli Cascade. We observe that the recognition of bona fide targets is an ordered process that is tightly controlled for high fidelity. Mutated targets are recognized with low fidelity, which is featured by short-lived and PAM- and seed-independent binding by any segment of the crRNA. These dual roles of Cascade in immunity with distinct fidelities underpin CRISPR-Cas robustness, allowing for efficient degradation of bona fide targets and priming of mutated DNA targets. PMID:25752578

  8. Manganese-deoxyribonucleic acid binding modes. Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion results.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, S D; Bryant, R G

    1986-01-01

    Ion-DNA interactions are discussed and the applied magnetic field strength dependence of water proton spin-lattice relaxation rates is used to study the Mn(II)-DNA interaction both qualitatively and quantitatively. Associations in which the manganese II (Mn(II)) ion is completely immobilized on the DNA are identified as well as a range of associations in which the ion is only partially reorientationally restricted. Quantitative analysis of the strength of the association in which manganese is immobilized is carried out both with and without a counter-ion condensation correction for electrostatic attraction of the mobile ions. From competition experiments with manganese the relative strengths of the interactions of magnesium and calcium with DNA are found to be identical but less than that of manganese with DNA and the affinity of lithium for DNA is found to be slightly higher than that of sodium. The data demonstrate that the reduced mobility of nonsite-bound ions may have a significant effect on DNA-ion binding analyses performed using magnetic resonance and relaxation methods. PMID:3779006

  9. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  10. Aspects of specific protein-DNA interaction; multi-mode binding of the oligopeptide antibiotic netropsin to (A.T)-rich DNA segments.

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, K E; Stutter, E; Schweiss, H

    1979-01-01

    By means of titration viscometry a number of distinct modes could be resolved for the interaction between the antibiotic netropsin and DNA species of 50, 58, and 69 mole + (A+T) below r = 0.04 netropsin molecules bound per DNA phosphate group. The number of corresponding binding sites increases with a high power of the (A+T) content. The apparent association constants are very high (greater than 10(6) M-1, some perhaps greater than 10(6) M-1) and also rather different for most of the binding sites. It is suggested that some of these interaction modes differ in the number of hydrogen bonds formed between donors of the ligand and acceptors of the binding sites. The interaction modes were characterized quantitatively by their (species-independent) changes of DNA contour length and by the percentage of local DNA stiffening. PMID:390500

  11. Binding mode analyses and pharmacophore model development for sulfonamide chalcone derivatives, a new class of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Keun Woo

    2008-06-01

    Sulfonamide chalcone derivatives are a new class of non-saccharide compounds that effectively inhibit glucosidases which are the major targets in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes and HIV infection. Our aim is to explore their binding mode of interaction at the active site by comparing with the sugar derivatives and to develop a pharmacophore model which would represent the critical features responsible for alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity. The homology modeled structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-glucosidase was built and used for molecular docking of non-sugar/sugar derivatives. The validated docking results projected the crucial role of NH group in the binding of sugar/non-sugar derivatives to the active site. Ligplot analyses revealed that Tyr71, and Phe177 form hydrophobic interactions with sugar/non-sugar derivatives by holding the terminal glycosidic ring mimics. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies were performed for protein alone and with chalcone derivative to prove its binding mechanism as shown by docking/Ligplot results. It would also help to substantiate the homology modeled structure stability. With the knowledge of the crucial interactions between ligand and protein from docking and MD simulation studies, features for pharmacophore model development were chosen. The CATALYST/HipHop was used to generate a five featured pharmacophore model with a training set of five non-sugar derivatives. As validation, all the crucial features of the model were perfectly mapped onto the 3D structures of the sugar derivatives as well as the newly tested non-sugar derivatives. Thus, it can be useful in virtual screening for finding new non-sugar derivatives as alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. PMID:18096420

  12. In vivo occupancy of mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein supports the strand displacement mode of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Miralles Fusté, Javier; Shi, Yonghong; Wanrooij, Sjoerd; Zhu, Xuefeng; Jemt, Elisabeth; Persson, Örjan; Sabouri, Nasim; Gustafsson, Claes M; Falkenberg, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation, and mutations affecting the genome have been linked to a number of diseases as well as the natural ageing process in mammals. Human mtDNA is replicated by a molecular machinery that is distinct from the nuclear replisome, but there is still no consensus on the exact mode of mtDNA replication. We here demonstrate that the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein (mtSSB) directs origin specific initiation of mtDNA replication. MtSSB covers the parental heavy strand, which is displaced during mtDNA replication. MtSSB blocks primer synthesis on the displaced strand and restricts initiation of light-strand mtDNA synthesis to the specific origin of light-strand DNA synthesis (OriL). The in vivo occupancy profile of mtSSB displays a distinct pattern, with the highest levels of mtSSB close to the mitochondrial control region and with a gradual decline towards OriL. The pattern correlates with the replication products expected for the strand displacement mode of mtDNA synthesis, lending strong in vivo support for this debated model for mitochondrial DNA replication. PMID:25474639

  13. Breast anticancer drug tamoxifen and its metabolites bind tRNA at multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, P; Thomas, T J; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-01-01

    The binding sites of breast anticancer drug tamoxifen and its metabolites with tRNA were located by FTIR, CD, UV-visible, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling. Structural analysis showed that tamoxifen and its metabolites bind tRNA at several binding sites with overall binding constants of K(tam-tRNA) = 5.2 (± 0.6) × 10(4) M(-1), K(4-hydroxytam-tRNA) = 6.5 ( ± 0.5) × 10(4) M(-1) and K(endox-tRNA) = 1.3 (± 0.2) × 10(4) M(-1). The number of binding sites occupied by drug molecules on tRNA were 1 (tamoxifen), 0.8 (4-hydroxitamoxifen) and 1.2 (endoxifen). Docking showed the participation of several nucleobases in drug-tRNA complexes with the free binding energy of -4.31 (tamoxifen), -4.45 (4-hydroxtamoxifen) and -4.38 kcal/mol (endoxifen). The order of binding is 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen > tamoxifen > endoxifen. Drug binding did not alter tRNA conformation from A-family structure, while biopolymer aggregation occurred at high drug concentration. PMID:25263468

  14. Mode of molecular recognition of L-fucose by fucose-binding legume lectins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C J; Surolia, A

    2000-02-16

    Recognition of cell surface carbohydrate moieties by lectins plays a vital role in many a biological process. Fucosyated residues are often implicated as key recognition markers in many cellular processes. In particular, the aspects of molecular recognition of fucose by fucose-bindinglectins UEA 1 and LTA pose a special case because no crystal structure of these lectins is available. The study was conducted to elucidate the process of recognition of l-fucose by UEA1 and LTA by correlating structure-based sequence alignment and other available biochemical/biophysical data. The study points out that the mode of recognition of l-fucose is coordinated by the invariant triad of residues the asparagine 137, glycine 105, and aspartate 87. The major hydrophobic stacking residue in this case is the tyrosine 220. The study also reiterates the key role of the conserved triad of residues in the combining site which is a common feature for all legume lectins whose crystal structures are known. PMID:10679191

  15. Binding mode analyses and pharmacophore model development for stilbene derivatives as a novel and competitive class of α-glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuno; Kim, Songmi; Kim, Jun Young; Arooj, Mahreen; Kim, Siu; Hwang, Swan; Kim, Byeong-Woo; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Keun Woo

    2014-01-01

    Stilbene urea derivatives as a novel and competitive class of non-glycosidic α-glucosidase inhibitors are effective for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. The main purposes of our molecular modeling study are to explore the most suitable binding poses of stilbene derivatives with analyzing the binding affinity differences and finally to develop a pharmacophore model which would represents critical features responsible for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Three-dimensional structure of S. cerevisiae α-glucosidase was built by homology modeling method and the structure was used for the molecular docking study to find out the initial binding mode of compound 12, which is the most highly active one. The initial structure was subjected to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for protein structure adjustment at compound 12-bound state. Based on the adjusted conformation, the more reasonable binding modes of the stilbene urea derivatives were obtained from molecular docking and MD simulations. The binding mode of the derivatives was validated by correlation analysis between experimental Ki value and interaction energy. Our results revealed that the binding modes of the potent inhibitors were engaged with important hydrogen bond, hydrophobic, and π-interactions. With the validated compound 12-bound structure obtained from combining approach of docking and MD simulation, a proper four featured pharmacophore model was generated. It was also validated by comparison of fit values with the Ki values. Thus, these results will be helpful for understanding the relationship between binding mode and bioactivity and for designing better inhibitors from stilbene derivatives. PMID:24465730

  16. Multiple octamer binding sites in the promoter region of the bovine alpha s2-casein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Groenen, M A; Dijkhof, R J; van der Poel, J J; van Diggelen, R; Verstege, E

    1992-01-01

    Using a set of overlapping oligonucleotides from the promoter region of the bovine alpha s2-casein gene we have identified two nuclear factors which probably are involved in expression of this gene and the related calcium sensitive alpha s1- and beta-casein genes. One of these factors which was present in extracts of all tissues that have been tested including Hela cells turned out to be the octamer binding protein OCT-1. Oct-1 binds with different affinity to 4 sites at positions centred around -480, -260, -210 and -50. The strongest of these 4 binding sites, the one around position -50, is highly conserved in all calcium sensitive caseins of mouse, rat, rabbit and cattle. The other nuclear factor (MGF, mammary gland factor) which is specifically expressed in the mammary gland, binds to a site around position -90. This binding site is also highly conserved in all calcium sensitive caseins of mouse, rat, rabbit and cattle. Images PMID:1508722

  17. The prediction of novel multiple lipid-binding regions in protein translocation motor proteins: a possible general feature.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2011-03-01

    Protein translocation is an important cellular process. SecA is an essential protein component in the Sec system, as it contains the molecular motor that facilitates protein translocation. In this study, a bioinformatics approach was applied in the search for possible lipid-binding helix regions in protein translocation motor proteins. Novel lipid-binding regions in Escherichia coli SecA were identified. Remarkably, multiple lipid-binding sites were also identified in other motor proteins such as BiP, which is involved in ER protein translocation. The prokaryotic signal recognition particle receptor FtsY, though not a motor protein, is in many ways related to SecA, and was therefore included in this study. The results demonstrate a possible general feature for motor proteins involved in protein translocation. PMID:20957445

  18. Substrate Binding Mode and its Implication on Drug Design for Botulinum Neurotoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran, D.; Rawat, R; Ahmed, A; Swaminathan, S

    2008-01-01

    The seven antigenically distinct serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins, the causative agents of botulism, block the neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has declared them as Category A biowarfare agents. The most potent among them, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A), cleaves its substrate synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). An efficient drug for botulism can be developed only with the knowledge of interactions between the substrate and enzyme at the active site. Here, we report the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of BoNT/A with its uncleavable SNAP-25 peptide 197QRATKM202 and its variant 197RRATKM202 to 1.5 A and 1.6 A, respectively. This is the first time the structure of an uncleavable substrate bound to an active botulinum neurotoxin is reported and it has helped in unequivocally defining S1 to S5? sites. These substrate peptides make interactions with the enzyme predominantly by the residues from 160, 200, 250 and 370 loops. Most notably, the amino nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen of P1 residue (Gln197) chelate the zinc ion and replace the nucleophilic water. The P1?-Arg198, occupies the S1? site formed by Arg363, Thr220, Asp370, Thr215, Ile161, Phe163 and Phe194. The S2? subsite is formed by Arg363, Asn368 and Asp370, while S3? subsite is formed by Tyr251, Leu256, Val258, Tyr366, Phe369 and Asn388. P4?-Lys201 makes hydrogen bond with Gln162. P5?-Met202 binds in the hydrophobic pocket formed by the residues from the 250 and 200 loop. Knowledge of interactions between the enzyme and substrate peptide from these complex structures should form the basis for design of potent inhibitors for this neurotoxin.

  19. Identical phosphatase mechanisms achieved through distinct modes of binding phosphoprotein substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pazy, Y.; Motaleb, M.A.; Guarnieri, M.T.; Charon, N.W.; Zhao, R.; Silversmith, R.E.

    2010-04-05

    Two-component signal transduction systems are widespread in prokaryotes and control numerous cellular processes. Extensive investigation of sensor kinase and response regulator proteins from many two-component systems has established conserved sequence, structural, and mechanistic features within each family. In contrast, the phosphatases which catalyze hydrolysis of the response regulator phosphoryl group to terminate signal transduction are poorly understood. Here we present structural and functional characterization of a representative of the CheC/CheX/FliY phosphatase family. The X-ray crystal structure of Borrelia burgdorferi CheX complexed with its CheY3 substrate and the phosphoryl analogue BeF{sub 3}{sup -} reveals a binding orientation between a response regulator and an auxiliary protein different from that shared by every previously characterized example. The surface of CheY3 containing the phosphoryl group interacts directly with a long helix of CheX which bears the conserved (E - X{sub 2} - N) motif. Conserved CheX residues Glu96 and Asn99, separated by a single helical turn, insert into the CheY3 active site. Structural and functional data indicate that CheX Asn99 and CheY3 Thr81 orient a water molecule for hydrolytic attack. The catalytic residues of the CheX-CheY3 complex are virtually superimposable on those of the Escherichia coli CheZ phosphatase complexed with CheY, even though the active site helices of CheX and CheZ are oriented nearly perpendicular to one other. Thus, evolution has found two structural solutions to achieve the same catalytic mechanism through different helical spacing and side chain lengths of the conserved acid/amide residues in CheX and CheZ.

  20. Identification of an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that binds to tomato mosaic virus genomic RNA and inhibits its multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisaki, Koki; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2008-10-25

    The genomic RNAs of positive-strand RNA viruses carry RNA elements that play positive, or in some cases, negative roles in virus multiplication by interacting with viral and cellular proteins. In this study, we purified Arabidopsis thaliana proteins that specifically bind to 5' or 3' terminal regions of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) genomic RNA, which contain important regulatory elements for translation and RNA replication, and identified these proteins by mass spectrometry analyses. One of these host proteins, named BTR1, harbored three heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K-homology RNA-binding domains and preferentially bound to RNA fragments that contained a sequence around the initiation codon of the 130K and 180K replication protein genes. The knockout and overexpression of BTR1 specifically enhanced and inhibited, respectively, ToMV multiplication in inoculated A. thaliana leaves, while such effect was hardly detectable in protoplasts. These results suggest that BTR1 negatively regulates the local spread of ToMV.

  1. A critical examination of the numerology of antigen-binding cells: evidence for multiple receptor specificities on single cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, A

    1977-01-01

    The data available from other laboratories as well as our own on the frequency of cells recognizing major histocompatibility antigens or conventional protein and hapten antigens is critically evaluated. The frequency of specific binding for a large number of antigens is sufficiently high to support the idea that at least part of the antigen-binding cell population must have multiple specificities. Our results suggest that these multiple specific cells result from single cells synthesizing and displaying as many as 50-100 species of receptor, each at a frequency of 10(4) per cell. A model involving gene expansion of constant-region genes is suggested and some auxilliary evidence consistent with such C-gene expansion is presented. PMID:68706

  2. The versatile binding mode of transition-state analogue inhibitors of tyrosinase towards dicopper(II) model complexes: experimental and theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Orio, Maylis; Bochot, Constance; Dubois, Carole; Gellon, Gisèle; Hardré, Renaud; Jamet, Hélène; Luneau, Dominique; Philouze, Christian; Réglier, Marius; Serratrice, Guy; Belle, Catherine

    2011-11-25

    We describe 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (HSPNO) as a new and efficient competitive inhibitor of mushroom tyrosinase (K(IC) =3.7 μM). Binding studies of HSPNO and 2-hydroxypyridine-N-oxide (HOPNO) on dinuclear copper(II) complexes [Cu(2)(BPMP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2) (1; HBPMP=2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenol) and [Cu(2)(BPEP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2)) (2; HBPEP=2,6-bis{bis[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]aminomethyl}-4-methylphenol), known to be functional models for the tyrosinase diphenolase activity, have been performed. A combination of structural data, spectroscopic studies, and DFT calculations evidenced the adaptable binding mode (bridging versus chelating) of HOPNO in relation to the geometry and chelate size of the dicopper center. For comparison, binding studies of HSPNO and kojic acid (5-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) on dinuclear complexes were performed. A theoretical approach has been developed and validated on HOPNO adducts to compare the binding mode on the model complexes. It has been applied for HSPNO and kojic acid. Although results for HSPNO were in line with those obtained with HOPNO, thus reflecting their chemical similarity, we showed that the bridging mode was the most preferential binding mode for kojic acid on both complexes. PMID:22025275

  3. Influence of driving frequency on discharge modes in a dielectric-barrier discharge with multiple current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-07-15

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the effect of the driving frequency on the discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure argon discharge with multiple current pulses. The discharge mode was discussed in detail not only at current peaks but also between two adjacent peaks. The simulation results show that different transitions between the Townsend and glow modes during the discharge take place with the driving frequency increased. A complicated transition from the Townsend mode, through glow, Townsend, and glow, and finally back to the Townsend one is found in the discharge with the driving frequency of 8 kHz. There is a tendency of transition from the Townsend to glow mode for the discharge both at the current peaks and troughs with the increasing frequency. The discharge in the half period can all along operate in the glow mode with the driving frequency high enough. This is resulted from the preservation of more electrons in the gas gap and acquisition of more electron energy from the swiftly varying electric field with the increase in driving frequency. Comparison of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the electron density at different driving frequencies indicates that the increment of the driving frequency allows the plasma chemistry to be enhanced. This electrical characteristic is important for the applications, such as surface treatment and biomedical sterilization.

  4. Complexation of Lanthanides with Glutaroimide-dioxime: Binding Strength and Coordination Modes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Seraj A; Yang, Yanqiu; Zhang, Zhicheng; Gagnon, Kevin J; Teat, Simon J; Luo, Shunzhong; Rao, Linfeng

    2016-02-01

    The complexation of lanthanides (Nd(3+) and Eu(3+)) with glutaroimide-dioxime (H2L), a cyclic imide dioxime ligand that has been found to form stable complexes with actinides (UO2(2+) and NpO2(+)) and transition metal ions (Fe(3+), Cu(2+), etc.), was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, luminescence spectroscopy, and microcalorimetry. Lanthanides form three successive complexes, M(HL)(2+), M(HL)L, and M(HL)2(+) (where M stands for Nd(3+)/Eu(3+) and HL(-) stands for the singly deprotonated ligand). The enthalpies of complexation, determined by microcalorimetry, show that the formation of these complexes is exothermic. The stability constants of Ln(3+)/H2L complexes are several orders of magnitude lower than that of the corresponding Fe(3+)/H2L complexes but are comparable with that of UO2(2+)/H2L complexes. A structure of Eu(3+)/H2L complex, identified by single-crystal X-ray diffractometry, shows that the ligand coordinates to Eu(3+) in a tridentate mode, via the two oxygen atoms of the oxime group and the nitrogen atom of the imide group. The relocation of protons of the oxime groups (-CH═N-OH) from the oxygen to the nitrogen atom, and the deprotonation of the imide group (-CH-NH-CH-) result in a conjugated system with delocalized electron density on the ligand (-O-N-C-N-C-N-O-) that forms strong complexes with the lanthanide ions. PMID:26765525

  5. Use of Multiple Peptide-Based SERS Probes Binding to Different Epitopes on a Protein Biomarker To Improve Detection Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kayeong; Cho, Jun-Haeng; Yoon, Moon-Young; Chung, Hoeil

    2016-04-01

    We propose an analytical strategy to improve the sensitivity for detecting a protein biomarker through signal multiplication by manipulating multiple peptide-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes to bind the biomarker. Protective antigen (PA) was used as an Anthrax biomarker in this study. For this purpose, five small peptides selective to various PA epitopes with different binding affinities were chosen and peptide-conjugated Au nanoparticle (AuNP) SERS probes were individually prepared using each peptide. Initially, five different SERS probes were separately used to detect PA and the sensitivities were compared. Next, the possibility of enhancing sensitivity by employing multiple SERS probes was examined. Rather than applying the probes simultaneously, which would induce competitive binding, each probe was added sequentially and an optimal probe-addition sequence was determined to provide maximal sensitivity. Finally, PA samples at seven different concentrations were measured with the optimal sequence. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.1 aM, and the enhancement was more effective at lower PA concentrations. The proposed scheme can be further applicable to detect other protein biomarkers to diagnose various diseases. PMID:26948277

  6. Molecular modeling and docking of novel laccase from multiple serotype of Yersinia enterocolitica suggests differential and multiple substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepti; Sharma, Krishna Kant; Dhar, Mahesh Shanker; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2014-06-20

    Multi-copper oxidases (MCOs) are widely distributed in bacteria, where they are responsible for metal homeostasis, acquisition and oxidation. Using specific primers, yacK coding for MCO was amplified from different serotypes of Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1A. Homology modeling of the protein followed by docking with five well-known substrates for different MCO's (viz., 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid [ABTS], syringaldazine, L-tyrosine, ammonium ferrous sulfate and guaiacol), lignin monomers (Coniferyl alcohol, p-coumaryl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol) and two inhibitors i.e., kojic acid and N-hydroxyglycine was done. The docking gave maximum GoldScore i.e., 91.93 and 72.64 with ammonium ferrous sulfate and ABTS, respectively. Similarly, docking with ICM gave -82.10 and -83.61 docking score, confirming the protein to be true laccase with ferroxidase activity. Further, validation with ammonium ferrous sulfate as substrate gave laccase activity of 0.36Units/L/min. Guaiacol, L-tyrosine, and lignin monomers showed good binding affinity with protein models with GoldScores of 35.89, 41.82, 40.41, 41.12 and 43.10, respectively. The sequence study of all the cloned Yack genes showed serotype specific clade in dendrogram. There was distinct discrimination in the ligand binding affinity of Y. enterocolitica laccase, among strains of same clonal groups, suggesting it as a tool for phylogenetic studies. PMID:24832734

  7. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    also contains 3-sialyllactose (another predicted site 1 binder) and bisbenzimide 33342 (non-binder). A series of five predicted Site-2 binders were then screened sequentially in the presence of the Site-1 binder doxorubicin. These experiments showed that the compounds lavendustin A and naphthofluorescein-di-({beta}-D-galactopyranoside) binds along with doxorubicin to TetC. Further experiments indicate that doxorubicin and lavendustin are potential candidates to use in preparing a bidendate inhibitor specific for TetC. The simultaneous binding of two different predicted Site-2 ligands to TetC suggests that they may bind multiple sites. Another possibility is that the conformations of the binding sites are dynamic and can bind multiple diverse ligands at a single site depending on the pre-existing conformation of the protein, especially when doxorubicin is already bound.

  8. Multiple individual and cross-specific indiotypes on 13 levan-binding myeloma proteins of BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    13 leven-binding myeloma proteins (LBMP) of BALB/c origin were classified into two groups with different binding specificities; one group of 11 proteins bound beta2 leads to 1 fructosans, a second group of two proteins bound fructosans probably of beta2 leads to 6 linkage. Anti-idiotypic sera prepared to 10 of the proteins in the appropriate strains of mice identified numerous idiotypic determinants. Each protein used for immunization had its own unique individual idiotypic specificities (IdI) and in addition most of the proteins carried two- nine cross-specific or shared idiotypes (IdX) that were found only among LBMP, and not found in 106 non-LBMP. Most of the IdX determinants and only four of the IdI determinants of the beta2 leads to 1 fructosan binding group were located in the antigen-binding site. The multiplicity of antigenic differences in this functionally related group of immunoglobulins reveals an unexpected degree of heterogeneity in V-regions that appears to be unrelated to binding. PMID:1151286

  9. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-05-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, (/sup 3/H) dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for (/sup 3/H) (D-Ala2, D-Leu5)enkephalin and (3H)ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites.

  10. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-15

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  11. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  12. Control of focusing fields for positron acceleration in nonlinear plasma wakes using multiple laser modes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.-L. Li, F.-Y.; Chen, M.; Weng, S.-M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Sheng, Z.-M.

    2014-12-15

    Control of transverse wakefields in the nonlinear laser-driven bubble regime using a combination of Hermite-Gaussian laser modes is proposed. By controlling the relative intensity ratio of the two laser modes, the focusing force can be controlled, enabling matched beam propagation for emittance preservation. A ring bubble can be generated with a large longitudinal accelerating field and a transverse focusing field suitable for positron beam focusing and acceleration.

  13. Multiple activities of RNA-binding proteins S1 and Hfq.

    PubMed

    Hajnsdorf, Eliane; Boni, Irina V

    2012-07-01

    In all organisms, RNA-binding proteins participate in modulating all the steps in the life cycle of RNA, including transcription, folding, translation and turnover. In bacteria, RNA-binding proteins may be specific for a few RNA targets (e.g., several ribosomal proteins that recognize both rRNA during ribosome assembly and their own mRNAs when acting as highly specific autogenous repressors) or function as global regulators implicated in numerous regulatory networks. Some RNA-binding proteins combine all these features, and this particularly concerns the ribosomal protein S1 and the Sm-like protein Hfq. S1 is a key mRNA-binding protein in gram-negative bacteria; it recognizes mRNA leaders and provides binding of diverse mRNAs to the ribosome at the initiation step of translation. Moreover, S1 is a highly specific autogenous repressor that is able to distinguish its own mRNA from all the others. Hfq is recognized as a global regulator that facilitates small RNA-mRNA interactions in bacteria; it thereby controls the expression of many mRNAs either positively or negatively. In addition, these two proteins were reported to affect transcription, RNA degradation and other processes. Although they have no sequence specificity, Hfq and S1 preferentially bind A/U-rich single-stranded RNA regions; despite this, they nevertheless carry out very different tasks in the cell. This review is focused on the diversity of functions that can be performed by these abundant RNA-binding bacterial proteins. PMID:22370051

  14. Flashlamp pumped oscillator-amplifier Nd:YAG system mode-locked using multiple quantum well saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubecek, Vaclav; Jelinkova, Helena; Dombrovsky, Andrej; Diels, Jean-Claude; Stintz, Andreas

    2004-09-01

    We report on flashlamp pumped oscillator - three amplifiers Nd:YAG picosecond laser system in which the liquid saturable dye used for passive mode locking is replaced by semiconductor saturable absorber with multiple quantum well (MQW) structure. This element placed at Brewster angle inside a laser resonator had 100 layers of absorber and therefore it has high nonlinearity and is suitable for high power Q-switched and mode locked operation. The short pulse train from oscillator contained only 5-6 pulses with total energy of 3 mJ in single transversal mode, the pulse duration was 80 ps. After amplification, the maximum energy of the pulse train was 180 mJ. In the regime of the amplification of a single selected pulse the energy on the output of the third amplifier was 50 mJ. Operation of the oscillator in active-passive regime of mode locking using an additional acousto-optic mode-locker leads to improvement of reproducibility and stability of output parameters.

  15. Identification of a novel series of BET family bromodomain inhibitors: binding mode and profile of I-BET151 (GSK1210151A).

    PubMed

    Seal, Jonathan; Lamotte, Yann; Donche, Frédéric; Bouillot, Anne; Mirguet, Olivier; Gellibert, Françoise; Nicodeme, Edwige; Krysa, Gael; Kirilovsky, Jorge; Beinke, Soren; McCleary, Scott; Rioja, Inma; Bamborough, Paul; Chung, Chun-Wa; Gordon, Laurie; Lewis, Toni; Walker, Ann L; Cutler, Leanne; Lugo, David; Wilson, David M; Witherington, Jason; Lee, Kevin; Prinjha, Rab K

    2012-04-15

    A novel series of quinoline isoxazole BET family bromodomain inhibitors are discussed. Crystallography is used to illustrate binding modes and rationalize their SAR. One member, I-BET151 (GSK1210151A), shows good oral bioavailability in both the rat and minipig as well as demonstrating efficient suppression of bacterial induced inflammation and sepsis in a murine in vivo endotoxaemia model. PMID:22437115

  16. Solution structure of the Zβ domain of human DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors and its binding modes to B- and Z-DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyungmin; Khayrutdinov, Bulat I.; Lee, Chung-Kyung; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Kang, Sung Wook; Park, Hyejin; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Jee, JunGoo; Rich, Alexander; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Jeon, Young Ho

    2011-01-01

    The DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI), also known as DLM-1/ZBP1, initiates an innate immune response by binding to foreign DNAs in the cytosol. For full activation of the immune response, three DNA binding domains at the N terminus are required: two Z-DNA binding domains (ZBDs), Zα and Zβ, and an adjacent putative B-DNA binding domain. The crystal structure of the Zβ domain of human DAI (hZβDAI) in complex with Z-DNA revealed structural features distinct from other known Z-DNA binding proteins, and it was classified as a group II ZBD. To gain structural insights into the DNA binding mechanism of hZβDAI, the solution structure of the free hZβDAI was solved, and its bindings to B- and Z-DNAs were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. Compared to the Z-DNA–bound structure, the conformation of free hZβDAI has notable alterations in the α3 recognition helix, the “wing,” and Y145, which are critical in Z-DNA recognition. Unlike some other Zα domains, hZβDAI appears to have conformational flexibility, and structural adaptation is required for Z-DNA binding. Chemical-shift perturbation experiments revealed that hZβDAI also binds weakly to B-DNA via a different binding mode. The C-terminal domain of DAI is reported to undergo a conformational change on B-DNA binding; thus, it is possible that these changes are correlated. During the innate immune response, hZβDAI is likely to play an active role in binding to DNAs in both B and Z conformations in the recognition of foreign DNAs. PMID:21471454

  17. Identification of Novel Membrane-binding Domains in Multiple Yeast Cdc42 Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe

    2007-01-01

    The Rho-type GTPase Cdc42 is a central regulator of eukaryotic cell polarity and signal transduction. In budding yeast, Cdc42 regulates polarity and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in part through the PAK-family kinase Ste20. Activation of Ste20 requires a Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain, which mediates its recruitment to membrane-associated Cdc42. Here, we identify a separate domain in Ste20 that interacts directly with membrane phospholipids and is critical for its function. This short region, termed the basic-rich (BR) domain, can target green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane in vivo and binds PIP2-containing liposomes in vitro. Mutation of basic or hydrophobic residues in the BR domain abolishes polarized localization of Ste20 and its function in both MAP kinase–dependent and independent pathways. Thus, Cdc42 binding is required but is insufficient; instead, direct membrane binding by Ste20 is also required. Nevertheless, phospholipid specificity is not essential in vivo, because the BR domain can be replaced with several heterologous lipid-binding domains of varying lipid preferences. We also identify functionally important BR domains in two other yeast Cdc42 effectors, Gic1 and Gic2, suggesting that cooperation between protein–protein and protein–membrane interactions is a prevalent mechanism during Cdc42-regulated signaling and perhaps for other dynamic localization events at the cell cortex. PMID:17914055

  18. Two distinct modes of metal ion binding in the nuclease active site of a viral DNA-packaging terminase: insight into the two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiyan; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Anna Y.; Varnado, Brittany; Beutler, John A.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Many dsDNA viruses encode DNA-packaging terminases, each containing a nuclease domain that resolves concatemeric DNA into genome-length units. Terminase nucleases resemble the RNase H-superfamily nucleotidyltransferases in folds, and share a two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism. Here we show that residue K428 of a bacteriophage terminase gp2 nuclease domain mediates binding of the metal cofactor Mg2+. A K428A mutation allows visualization, at high resolution, of a metal ion binding mode with a coupled-octahedral configuration at the active site, exhibiting an unusually short metal-metal distance of 2.42 Å. Such proximity of the two metal ions may play an essential role in catalysis by generating a highly positive electrostatic niche to enable formation of the negatively charged pentacovalent phosphate transition state, and provides the structural basis for distinguishing Mg2+ from Ca2+. Using a metal ion chelator β-thujaplicinol as a molecular probe, we observed a second mode of metal ion binding at the active site, mimicking the DNA binding state. Arrangement of the active site residues differs drastically from those in RNase H-like nucleases, suggesting a drifting of the active site configuration during evolution. The two distinct metal ion binding modes unveiled mechanistic details of the two-metal-ion catalysis at atomic resolution. PMID:26450964

  19. Limiting the Number of Potential Binding Modes by Introducing Symmetry into Ligands: Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors for Trypsin-Like Serine Proteases.

    PubMed

    Furtmann, Norbert; Häußler, Daniela; Scheidt, Tamara; Stirnberg, Marit; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Bajorath, Jürgen; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-01-11

    In the absence of X-ray data, the exploration of compound binding modes continues to be a challenging task. For structure-based design, specific features of active sites in different targets play a major role in rationalizing ligand binding characteristics. For example, dibasic compounds have been reported as potent inhibitors of various trypsin-like serine proteases, the active sites of which contain several binding pockets that can be targeted by cationic moieties. This results in several possible orientations within the active site, complicating the binding mode prediction of such compounds by docking tools. Therefore, we introduced symmetry in bi- and tribasic compounds to reduce conformational space in docking calculations and to simplify binding mode selection by limiting the number of possible pocket occupations. Asymmetric bisbenzamidines were used as starting points for a multistage and structure-guided optimization. A series of 24 final compounds with either two or three benzamidine substructures was ultimately synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of five serine proteases, leading to potent symmetric inhibitors for the pharmaceutical drug targets matriptase, matriptase-2, thrombin and factor Xa. This study underlines the relevance of ligand symmetry for chemical biology. PMID:26625703

  20. Multiple Scattering X-Ray Absorption Studies of Zn2+ Binding Sites in Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    PubMed Central

    Giachini, Lisa; Francia, Francesco; Mallardi, Antonia; Palazzo, Gerardo; Carpenè, Emilio; Boscherini, Federico; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Binding of transition metal ions to the reaction center (RC) protein of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been previously shown to slow light-induced electron and proton transfer to the secondary quinone acceptor molecule, QB. On the basis of x-ray diffraction at 2.5 Å resolution a site, formed by AspH124, HisH126, and HisH128, has been identified at the protein surface which binds Cd2+ or Zn2+. Using Zn K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy we report here on the local structure of Zn2+ ions bound to purified RC complexes embedded into polyvinyl alcohol films. X-ray absorption fine structure data were analyzed by combining ab initio simulations and multiparameter fitting; structural contributions up to the fourth coordination shell and multiple scattering paths (involving three atoms) have been included. Results for complexes characterized by a Zn to RC stoichiometry close to one indicate that Zn2+ binds two O and two N atoms in the first coordination shell. Higher shell contributions are consistent with a binding cluster formed by two His, one Asp residue, and a water molecule. Analysis of complexes characterized by ∼2 Zn ions per RC reveals a second structurally distinct binding site, involving one O and three N atoms, not belonging to a His residue. The local structure obtained for the higher affinity site nicely fits the coordination geometry proposed on the basis of x-ray diffraction data, but detects a significant contraction of the first shell. Two possible locations of the second new binding site at the cytoplasmic surface of the RC are proposed. PMID:15613631

  1. Inactivation of Multiple Bacterial Histidine Kinases by Targeting the ATP-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial agents that exploit new targets will be required to combat the perpetual rise of bacterial resistance to current antibiotics. We are exploring the inhibition of histidine kinases, constituents of two-component systems. Two-component systems are the primary signaling pathways that bacteria utilize to respond to their environment. They are ubiquitous in bacteria and trigger various pathogenic mechanisms. To attenuate these signaling pathways, we sought to broadly target the histidine kinase family by focusing on their highly conserved ATP-binding domain. Development of a fluorescence polarization displacement assay facilitated high-throughput screening of ∼53 000 diverse small molecules for binding to the ATP-binding pocket. Of these compounds, nine inhibited the catalytic activity of two or more histidine kinases. These scaffolds could provide valuable starting points for the design of broadly effective HK inhibitors, global reduction of bacterial signaling, and ultimately, a class of antibiotics that function by a new mechanism of action. PMID:25531939

  2. Self-assembled nanospheres with multiple endohedral binding sites pre-organize catalysts and substrates for highly efficient reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qiang; Gonell, Sergio; Leenders, Stefan H A M; Dürr, Maximilian; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Reek, Joost N H

    2016-03-01

    Tuning reagent and catalyst concentrations is crucial in the development of efficient catalytic transformations. In enzyme-catalysed reactions the substrate is bound-often by multiple non-covalent interactions-in a well-defined pocket close to the active site of the enzyme; this pre-organization facilitates highly efficient transformations. Here we report an artificial system that co-encapsulates multiple catalysts and substrates within the confined space defined by an M12L24 nanosphere that contains 24 endohedral guanidinium-binding sites. Cooperative binding means that sulfonate guests are bound much more strongly than carboxylates. This difference has been used to fix gold-based catalysts firmly, with the remaining binding sites left to pre-organize substrates. This strategy was applied to a Au(I)-catalysed cyclization of acetylenic acid to enol lactone in which the pre-organization resulted in much higher reaction rates. We also found that the encapsulated sulfonate-containing Au(I) catalysts did not convert neutral (acid) substrates, and so could have potential in the development of substrate-selective catalysis and base-triggered on/off switching of catalysis. PMID:26892553

  3. Self-assembled nanospheres with multiple endohedral binding sites pre-organize catalysts and substrates for highly efficient reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-Qiang; Gonell, Sergio; Leenders, Stefan H. A. M.; Dürr, Maximilian; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Reek, Joost N. H.

    2016-03-01

    Tuning reagent and catalyst concentrations is crucial in the development of efficient catalytic transformations. In enzyme-catalysed reactions the substrate is bound—often by multiple non-covalent interactions—in a well-defined pocket close to the active site of the enzyme; this pre-organization facilitates highly efficient transformations. Here we report an artificial system that co-encapsulates multiple catalysts and substrates within the confined space defined by an M12L24 nanosphere that contains 24 endohedral guanidinium-binding sites. Cooperative binding means that sulfonate guests are bound much more strongly than carboxylates. This difference has been used to fix gold-based catalysts firmly, with the remaining binding sites left to pre-organize substrates. This strategy was applied to a Au(I)-catalysed cyclization of acetylenic acid to enol lactone in which the pre-organization resulted in much higher reaction rates. We also found that the encapsulated sulfonate-containing Au(I) catalysts did not convert neutral (acid) substrates, and so could have potential in the development of substrate-selective catalysis and base-triggered on/off switching of catalysis.

  4. Identification and Pharmacological Characterization of Multiple Allosteric Binding Sites on the Free Fatty Acid 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Daniel C.-H.; Guo, Qi; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jane; Nguyen, Kathy; Chen, Michael; Tran, Thanh; Dransfield, Paul J.; Brown, Sean P.; Houze, Jonathan; Vimolratana, Marc; Jiao, Xian Yun; Wang, Yingcai; Birdsall, Nigel J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of FFA1 (GPR40), a member of G protein-coupling receptor family A, is mediated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids and leads to amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting a potential role for free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) as a target for type 2 diabetes. It was assumed previously that there is a single binding site for fatty acids and synthetic FFA1 agonists. However, using members of two chemical series of partial and full agonists that have been identified, radioligand binding interaction studies revealed that the full agonists do not bind to the same site as the partial agonists but exhibit positive heterotropic cooperativity. Analysis of functional data reveals positive functional cooperativity between the full agonists and partial agonists in various functional assays (in vitro and ex vivo) and also in vivo. Furthermore, the endogenous fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) shows negative or neutral cooperativity with members of both series of agonists in binding assays but displays positive cooperativity in functional assays. Another synthetic agonist is allosteric with members of both agonist series, but apparently competitive with DHA. Therefore, there appear to be three allosterically linked binding sites on FFA1 with agonists specific for each of these sites. Activation of free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFAR1) by each of these agonists is differentially affected by mutations of two arginine residues, previously found to be important for FFAR1 binding and activation. These ligands with their high potencies and strong positive functional cooperativity with endogenous fatty acids, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, have the potential to deliver therapeutic benefits. PMID:22859723

  5. Identification and pharmacological characterization of multiple allosteric binding sites on the free fatty acid 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daniel C-H; Guo, Qi; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jane; Nguyen, Kathy; Chen, Michael; Tran, Thanh; Dransfield, Paul J; Brown, Sean P; Houze, Jonathan; Vimolratana, Marc; Jiao, Xian Yun; Wang, Yingcai; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Swaminath, Gayathri

    2012-11-01

    Activation of FFA1 (GPR40), a member of G protein-coupling receptor family A, is mediated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids and leads to amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting a potential role for free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) as a target for type 2 diabetes. It was assumed previously that there is a single binding site for fatty acids and synthetic FFA1 agonists. However, using members of two chemical series of partial and full agonists that have been identified, radioligand binding interaction studies revealed that the full agonists do not bind to the same site as the partial agonists but exhibit positive heterotropic cooperativity. Analysis of functional data reveals positive functional cooperativity between the full agonists and partial agonists in various functional assays (in vitro and ex vivo) and also in vivo. Furthermore, the endogenous fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) shows negative or neutral cooperativity with members of both series of agonists in binding assays but displays positive cooperativity in functional assays. Another synthetic agonist is allosteric with members of both agonist series, but apparently competitive with DHA. Therefore, there appear to be three allosterically linked binding sites on FFA1 with agonists specific for each of these sites. Activation of free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFAR1) by each of these agonists is differentially affected by mutations of two arginine residues, previously found to be important for FFAR1 binding and activation. These ligands with their high potencies and strong positive functional cooperativity with endogenous fatty acids, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, have the potential to deliver therapeutic benefits. PMID:22859723

  6. Multiple Src Homology 3 Binding to the Ubiquitin Ligase Itch Conserved Proline-Rich Region.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Guillaume; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Angers, Annie

    2015-12-22

    Itch is a member of the C2-WW-HECT (CWH) family of ubiquitin ligases involved in the control of inflammatory signaling pathways, several transcription factors, and sorting of surface receptors to the degradative pathway. In addition to these common domains, Itch also contains a conserved proline-rich region (PRR) allowing its interaction with Src homology 3 (SH3) domain-containing proteins. This region is composed of 20 amino acids and contains one consensus class I and three class II SH3-binding motifs. Several SH3 domain-containing partners have been shown to recognize the Itch PRR, but their binding properties have been poorly defined. Here we compare a subset of endocytic SH3 domain-containing proteins using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, isothermal titration calorimetry, and pull-down assays. Results indicate that Endophilin is a high-affinity binding partner of Itch both in vivo and in vitro, with a calculated KD placing this complex among the highest-affinity SH3 domain-mediated interactions reported to date. All of the SH3 domains tested here bind to Itch with a 1:1 stoichiometry, except for β-PIX that binds with a 2:1 stoichiometry. Together, these results indicate that Itch PRR is a versatile binding module that can accommodate several different SH3 domain-containing proteins but has a preference for Endophilin. Interestingly, the catalytic activity of Itch toward different SH3 domain-containing proteins was similar, except for β-PIX that was not readily ubiquitylated even though it could interact with an affinity comparable to those of other substrates tested. PMID:26613292

  7. Multiple modes of surface plasmonic polaritons in transversely-truncated metal/dielectric superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Liang; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Xuan-Zhang

    2015-10-01

    The surface plasmonic polariton (SPP) of a transversely-truncated metal/dielectric superlattice (SL) structure has been solved with an approximate method. The effect of inter-layer interfaces in the SL is taken into consideration efficiently in comparison with the effective-medium method. The silver/air and silver/SiO2 SLs with a shorter period are regarded as two specific examples in numerical calculation. A series of separated SPP modes are found and highly localized at the surface, and the highest-frequency mode is the only one also predicated by the effective-medium method. These results obviously show the effect of inter-layer interfaces in the case of short period, whilst the reliability and limitation of the effective-medium method is presented as well. Because the skin depths of the modes are extremely small, the SLs can be used as ideal surface-wave waveguides.

  8. A mechanistic insight into metal-cluster π-envelopment: a dual binding mode involving bent and planar ligand-conformers.

    PubMed

    Masai, Kohei; Shirato, Katsunori; Yamamoto, Koji; Kurashige, Yuki; Murahashi, Tetsuro

    2016-05-11

    Metal clusters are effectively stabilized by bridging π-coordination of planar π-conjugated unsaturated hydrocarbons. However, the mechanism of π-envelopment of a metal cluster has been elusive. By employing 1,2-bis(4-aryl-1,3-butadienyl)benzene as the π-conjugated ligand, we found that the π-envelopment of a Pd4 cluster proceeded in a stepwise manner, where the sp(2)-carbon ligands initially envelop the Pd4 cluster through a bent binding mode, and then isomerized to a thermodynamically more stable planar mode under mild heating or visible light irradiation. The involvement of a bent binding mode indicates the kinetically preferred coordination at the axial coordination site trans to a metal-metal bond. PMID:27093889

  9. Improved Intraoperative Visualization of Nerves through a Myelin-Binding Fluorophore and Dual-Mode Laparoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cotero, Victoria E.; Kimm, Simon Y.; Siclovan, Tiberiu M.; Zhang, Rong; Kim, Evgenia M.; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Gondo, Tatsuo; Scardino, Peter T.; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Laudone, Vincent P.; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to visualize and spare nerves during surgery is critical for avoiding chronic morbidity, pain, and loss of function. Visualization of such critical anatomic structures is even more challenging during minimal access procedures because the small incisions limit visibility. In this study, we focus on improving imaging of nerves through the use of a new small molecule fluorophore, GE3126, used in conjunction with our dual-mode (color and fluorescence) laparoscopic imaging instrument. GE3126 has higher aqueous solubility, improved pharmacokinetics, and reduced non-specific adipose tissue fluorescence compared to previous myelin-binding fluorophores. Dosing and kinetics were initially optimized in mice. A non-clinical modified Irwin study in rats, performed to assess the potential of GE3126 to induce nervous system injuries, showed the absence of major adverse reactions. Real-time intraoperative imaging was performed in a porcine model. Compared to white light imaging, nerve visibility was enhanced under fluorescence guidance, especially for small diameter nerves obscured by fascia, blood vessels, or adipose tissue. In the porcine model, nerve visualization was observed rapidly, within 5 to 10 minutes post-intravenous injection and the nerve fluorescence signal was maintained for up to 80 minutes. The use of GE3126, coupled with practical implementation of an imaging instrument may be an important step forward in preventing nerve damage in the operating room. PMID:26076448

  10. A novel RNA-binding mode of the YTH domain reveals the mechanism for recognition of determinant of selective removal by Mmi1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chongyuan; Zhu, Yuwei; Bao, Hongyu; Jiang, Yiyang; Xu, Chao; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2016-01-01

    The YTH domain-containing protein Mmi1, together with other factors, constitutes the machinery used to selectively remove meiosis-specific mRNA during the vegetative growth of fission yeast. Mmi1 directs meiotic mRNAs to the nuclear exosome for degradation by recognizing their DSR (determinant of selective removal) motif. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain in the apo state and in complex with a DSR motif, demonstrating that the Mmi1 YTH domain selectively recognizes the DSR motif. Intriguingly, Mmi1 also contains a potential m6A (N6-methyladenine)-binding pocket, but its binding of the DSR motif is dependent on a long groove opposite the m6A pocket. The DSR-binding mode is distinct from the m6A RNA-binding mode utilized by other YTH domains. Furthermore, the m6A pocket cannot bind m6A RNA. Our structural and biochemical experiments uncover the mechanism of the YTH domain in binding the DSR motif and help to elucidate the function of Mmi1. PMID:26673708

  11. Structure of Bacillus subtilis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase in complex with acivicin: diversity of the binding mode of a classical and electrophilic active-site-directed glutamate analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Hiratake, Jun; Wada, Kei

    2014-02-01

    The binding modes of acivicin, a classical and an electrophilic active-site-directed glutamate analogue, to bacterial γ-glutamyltranspeptidases were found to be diverse. γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) is an enzyme that plays a central role in glutathione metabolism, and acivicin is a classical inhibitor of GGT. Here, the structure of acivicin bound to Bacillus subtilis GGT determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.8 Å resolution is presented, in which it binds to the active site in a similar manner to that in Helicobacter pylori GGT, but in a different binding mode to that in Escherichia coli GGT. In B. subtilis GGT, acivicin is bound covalently through its C3 atom with sp{sup 2} hybridization to Thr403 O{sup γ}, the catalytic nucleophile of the enzyme. The results show that acivicin-binding sites are common, but the binding manners and orientations of its five-membered dihydroisoxazole ring are diverse in the binding pockets of GGTs.

  12. Multiple binding of repressed mRNAs by the P-body protein Rck/p54

    PubMed Central

    Ernoult-Lange, Michèle; Baconnais, Sonia; Harper, Maryannick; Minshall, Nicola; Souquere, Sylvie; Boudier, Thomas; Bénard, Marianne; Andrey, Philippe; Pierron, Gérard; Kress, Michel; Standart, Nancy; le Cam, Eric; Weil, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Translational repression is achieved by protein complexes that typically bind 3′ UTR mRNA motifs and interfere with the formation of the cap-dependent initiation complex, resulting in mRNPs with a closed-loop conformation. We demonstrate here that the human DEAD-box protein Rck/p54, which is a component of such complexes and central to P-body assembly, is in considerable molecular excess with respect to cellular mRNAs and enriched to a concentration of 0.5 mM in P-bodies, where it is organized in clusters. Accordingly, multiple binding of p54 proteins along mRNA molecules was detected in vivo. Consistently, the purified protein bound RNA with no sequence specificity and high nanomolar affinity. Moreover, bound RNA molecules had a relaxed conformation. While RNA binding was ATP independent, relaxing of bound RNA was dependent on ATP, though not on its hydrolysis. We propose that Rck/p54 recruitment by sequence-specific translational repressors leads to further binding of Rck/p54 along mRNA molecules, resulting in their masking, unwinding, and ultimately recruitment to P-bodies. Rck/p54 proteins located at the 5′ extremity of mRNA can then recruit the decapping complex, thus coupling translational repression and mRNA degradation. PMID:22836354

  13. Dual-mode on-demand droplet routing in multiple microchannels using a magnetic fluid as carrier phase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jitae; Won, June; Song, Simon

    2014-09-01

    We present dual-mode, on-demand droplet routing in a multiple-outlet microfluidic device using an oil-based magnetic fluid. Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticle-contained oleic acid (MNOA) was used as a carrier phase for droplet generation and manipulation. The water-in-MNOA droplets were selectively distributed in a curved microchannel with three branches by utilizing both a hydrodynamic laminar flow pattern and an external magnetic field. Without the applied magnetic field, the droplets travelled along a hydrodynamic centerline that was displaced at each bifurcating junction. However, in the presence of a permanent magnet, they were repelled from the centerline and diverted into the desired channel when the repelled distance exceeded the minimum offset allocated to the channel. The repelled distance, which is proportional to the magnetic field gradient, was manipulated by controlling the magnet's distance from the device. To evaluate routing performance, three different sizes of droplets with diameters of 63, 88, and 102 μm were directed into designated outlets with the magnet positioned at varying distances. The result demonstrated that the 102-μm droplets were sorted with an accuracy of ∼93%. Our technique enables on-demand droplet routing in multiple outlet channels by simply manipulating magnet positions (active mode) as well as size-based droplet separation with a fixed magnet position (passive mode). PMID:25332742

  14. Dual-mode on-demand droplet routing in multiple microchannels using a magnetic fluid as carrier phase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jitae; Won, June; Song, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We present dual-mode, on-demand droplet routing in a multiple-outlet microfluidic device using an oil-based magnetic fluid. Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticle-contained oleic acid (MNOA) was used as a carrier phase for droplet generation and manipulation. The water-in-MNOA droplets were selectively distributed in a curved microchannel with three branches by utilizing both a hydrodynamic laminar flow pattern and an external magnetic field. Without the applied magnetic field, the droplets travelled along a hydrodynamic centerline that was displaced at each bifurcating junction. However, in the presence of a permanent magnet, they were repelled from the centerline and diverted into the desired channel when the repelled distance exceeded the minimum offset allocated to the channel. The repelled distance, which is proportional to the magnetic field gradient, was manipulated by controlling the magnet's distance from the device. To evaluate routing performance, three different sizes of droplets with diameters of 63, 88, and 102 μm were directed into designated outlets with the magnet positioned at varying distances. The result demonstrated that the 102-μm droplets were sorted with an accuracy of ∼93%. Our technique enables on-demand droplet routing in multiple outlet channels by simply manipulating magnet positions (active mode) as well as size-based droplet separation with a fixed magnet position (passive mode). PMID:25332742

  15. Development of a Competitive Binding Assay System with Recombinant Estrogen Receptors from Multiple Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT In the current study, we developed a new system using full-length recombinant baculovirus-expressed estrogen receptors which allows for direct comparison of binding across species. Estrogen receptors representing five vertebrate classes were compared: human (hERα), quai...

  16. Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis toxin CrylAc to multiple sites of cadherin in pink bollworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used for pest control. In particular, Bt toxin Cry lAc produced by transgenic cotton kills some key lepidopteran pests. We found that CrylAc binds to recombinant peptides corresponding to extracellular regions of a cadherin protein (BtR) in a major ...

  17. Binding of Multiple Features in Memory by High-Functioning Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Dermot M.; Gaigg, Sebastian B.; Gardiner, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Diminished episodic memory and diminished use of semantic information to aid recall by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are both thought to result from diminished relational binding of elements of complex stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we asked high-functioning adults with ASD and typical comparison participants to study grids in…

  18. Acoustic fatigue life prediction for nonlinear structures with multiple resonant modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. N.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents an effort to develop practical and accurate methods for estimating the fatigue lives of complex aerospace structures subjected to intense random excitations. The emphasis of the current program is to construct analytical schemes for performing fatigue life estimates for structures that exhibit nonlinear vibration behavior and that have numerous resonant modes contributing to the response.

  19. Multiple proteins bind to VA RNA genes of adenovirus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, M W; Roeder, R G

    1987-01-01

    Using fractionated HeLa cell nuclear extracts and both nuclease (DNase I) cleavage and chemical cleavage (methidiumpropyl-EDTA X Fe(II) protection methodologies, we demonstrated the presence of three proteins which interacted specifically, yet differentially, with the two VA genes of adenovirus type 2. One, previously identified as transcription initiation factor TFIIIC, bound to a site centered on the transcriptionally essential B-block concensus element of the VAI gene and, with a lower affinity, to the analogous site in the VAII gene. Another, identified as the cellular protein involved in adenovirus replication, nuclear factor I, bound to sites immediately downstream from the two VAI terminators (at approximately +160 and +200). The third, a previously unrecognized VA gene binding protein termed VBP, bound immediately upstream of the B-block element in the VAI gene but showed no binding to VAII. Possible roles for these proteins in VA gene transcription were investigated in in vitro assay systems reconstituted with partially purified transcription factors (RNA polymerase III, TFIIIB, and TFIIIC). Although TFIIIC activity was present predominantly in fractions containing B-block binding activity, there was not complete correspondence between functional and DNA binding activities. The nuclear factor I-like protein had no effect when added to a complete transcription reaction. The presence of VBP appeared to depress the intrinsic ratio of VAI-VAII synthesis, thereby simulating the relative transcription levels observed early in adenovirus infection of HeLa cells. These observations suggest a model, involving both intragenic binding factors (VBP and TFIIIC) and variable template concentrations, for the differential regulation of VA transcription during the course of adenovirus infection. Images PMID:3561405

  20. Multiple modes of water quality impairment by fecal contamination in a rapidly developing coastal area: southwest Brunswick County, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Lawrence B; Hales, Jason C; Carey, Erin S; Loucaides, Socratis; Rowland, Kevin R; Toothman, Byron R

    2016-02-01

    Fecal contamination of surface waters is a significant problem, particularly in rapidly developing coastal watersheds. Data from a water quality monitoring program in southwest Brunswick County, North Carolina, gathered in support of a regional wastewater and stormwater management program were used to examine likely modes and sources of fecal contamination. Sampling was conducted at 42 locations at 3-4-week intervals between 1996 and 2003, including streams, ponds, and estuarine waters in a variety of land use settings. Expected fecal sources included human wastewater systems (on-site and central), stormwater runoff, and direct deposition by animals. Fecal coliform levels were positively associated with rainfall measures, but frequent high fecal coliform concentrations at times of no rain indicated other modes of contamination as well. Fecal coliform levels were also positively associated with silicate levels, a groundwater source signal, indicating that flux of fecal-contaminated groundwater was a mode of contamination, potentially elevating FC levels in impacted waters independent of stormwater runoff. Fecal contamination by failing septic or sewer systems at many locations was significant and in addition to effects of stormwater runoff. Rainfall was also linked to fecal contamination by central sewage treatment system failures. These results highlight the importance of considering multiple modes of water pollution and different ways in which human activities cause water quality degradation. Management of water quality in coastal regions must therefore recognize diverse drivers of fecal contamination to surface waters. PMID:26769702

  1. Structure of the Staphylococcus aureus AgrA LytTR Domain Bound to DNA Reveals a Beta Fold with an Unusual Mode of Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sidote,D.; Barbieri, C.; Wu, T.; Stock, A.

    2008-01-01

    The LytTR domain is a DNA-binding motif found within the AlgR/AgrA/LytR family of transcription factors that regulate virulence factor and toxin gene expression in pathogenic bacteria. This previously uncharacterized domain lacks sequence similarity with proteins of known structure. The crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus AgrA complexed with a DNA pentadecamer duplex has been determined at 1.6 Angstroms resolution. The structure establishes a 10-stranded {beta} fold for the LytTR domain and reveals its mode of interaction with DNA. Residues within loop regions of AgrA contact two successive major grooves and the intervening minor groove on one face of the oligonucleotide duplex, inducing a substantial bend in the DNA. Loss of DNA binding upon substitution of key interacting residues in AgrA supports the observed binding mode. This mode of protein-DNA interaction provides a potential target for future antimicrobial drug design.

  2. Identification of multiple salicylic acid-binding proteins using two high throughput screens

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Tian, Miaoying; Moreau, Magali; Park, Sang-Wook; Choi, Hyong Woo; Fei, Zhangjun; Friso, Giulia; Asif, Muhammed; Manosalva, Patricia; von Dahl, Caroline C.; Shi, Kai; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P.; O'Doherty, Inish; Schroeder, Frank C.; van Wijk, Klass J.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important hormone involved in many diverse plant processes, including floral induction, stomatal closure, seed germination, adventitious root initiation, and thermogenesis. It also plays critical functions during responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. The role(s) of SA in signaling disease resistance is by far the best studied process, although it is still only partially understood. To obtain insights into how SA carries out its varied functions, particularly in activating disease resistance, two new high throughput screens were developed to identify novel SA-binding proteins (SABPs). The first utilized crosslinking of the photo-reactive SA analog 4-AzidoSA (4AzSA) to proteins in an Arabidopsis leaf extract, followed by immuno-selection with anti-SA antibodies and then mass spectroscopy-based identification. The second utilized photo-affinity crosslinking of 4AzSA to proteins on a protein microarray (PMA) followed by detection with anti-SA antibodies. To determine whether the candidate SABPs (cSABPs) obtained from these screens were true SABPs, recombinantly-produced proteins were generated and tested for SA-inhibitable crosslinking to 4AzSA, which was monitored by immuno-blot analysis, SA-inhibitable binding of the SA derivative 3-aminoethylSA (3AESA), which was detected by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay, or SA-inhibitable binding of [3H]SA, which was detected by size exclusion chromatography. Based on our criteria that true SABPs must exhibit SA-binding activity in at least two of these assays, nine new SABPs are identified here; nine others were previously reported. Approximately 80 cSABPs await further assessment. In addition, the conflicting reports on whether NPR1 is an SABP were addressed by showing that it bound SA in all three of the above assays. PMID:25628632

  3. Coherent modes for multiple non-rigid bunches in a storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    A method is presented for determining the stability of a system consisting of several highly relativistic bunches of charged particles circulating in a storage ring. The particles interact with magnets designed to guide the beam as well as with electromagnetic fields induced by the particles themselves. Previous work has considered modes where all bunches in the ring are executing the same type of internal oscillation. This dissertation considers the results of allowing those modes to couple to one another. The formalism begins with a self-consistent distribution, and analyzes small perturbations to that distribution to determine if they grow exponentially. The formalism allows one to do this computation for an arbitrary magnetic lattice, as well as an arbitrary distribution of wakefield sources around the ring. The method also allows for the inclusion of a feedback system which is designed to damp multibunch oscillations. The PEP-II B-factory with a linear lattice is used as an example to demonstrate and explain the phenomenology that results from this coupling of multibunch modes. The effect of adding feedback is also explored.

  4. Discovery of multiple, ionization-created CS{sub 2} anions and a new mode of operation for drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Snowden-Ifft, Daniel P.

    2014-01-15

    This paper focuses on the surprising discovery of multiple species of ionization-created CS{sub 2} anions in gas mixtures containing electronegative CS{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, identified by their slightly different drift velocities. Data are presented to understand the formation mechanism and identity of these new anions. Regardless of the micro-physics, however, this discovery offers a new, trigger-less mode of operation for the drift chambers. A demonstration of trigger-less operation is presented.

  5. Binding Modes of Three Inhibitors 8CA, F8A and I4A to A-FABP Studied Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Wang, Jinan; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-01-01

    Adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (A-FABP) is an important target of drug designs treating some diseases related to lipid-mediated biology. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with solvated interaction energy method (SIE) were carried out to study the binding modes of three inhibitors 8CA, F8A and I4A to A-FABP. The rank of our predicted binding affinities is in accordance with experimental data. The results show that the substitution in the position 5 of N-benzyl and the seven-membered ring of N-benzyl-indole carboxylic acids strengthen the I4A binding, while the substitution in the position 2 of N-benzyl weakens the F8A binding. Computational alanine scanning and dynamics analyses were performed and the results suggest that the polar interactions of the positively charged residue R126 with the three inhibitors provide a significant contribution to inhibitor bindings. This polar interaction induces the disappearance of the correlated motion of the C terminus of A-FABP relative to the N terminus and favors the stability of the binding complex. This study is helpful for the rational design of potent inhibitors within the fields of metabolic disease, inflammation and atherosclerosis. PMID:24918907

  6. Hepatic Radiofrequency Ablation Using Multiple Probes: Ex Vivo and In Vivo Comparative Studies of Monopolar versus Multipolar Modes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Se Hyung; Choi, Jin Young; Lee, Min Woo; Choi, Seung Hong; Eo, Hong; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2006-01-01

    Objective We wanted to compare the efficiency of multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using three perfused-cooled electrodes with multiple overlapping and simultaneous monopolar techniques for creating an ablation zone in ex vivo bovine livers and in in vivo porcine livers. Materials and Methods In the ex vivo experiments, we used a 200 W generator (Valleylab, CC-3 model) and three perfused-cooled electrodes or internally cooled electrodes to create 30 coagulation zones by performing consecutive monopolar RFA (group A, n = 10), simultaneous monopolar RFA (group B, n = 10) or multipolar RFA (group C, n = 10) in explanted bovine livers. In the consecutive mode, three ablation spheres were created by sequentially applying 150 watts radiofrequency (RF) energy to the internally cooled electrodes for 12 minutes each for a total of 36 minutes. In the simultaneous monopolar and multipolar modes, RF energy was concurrently applied to the three perfused-cooled electrodes for 20 minutes at 150 watt with instillation of 6% hypertonic saline at 2 mL/min. During RFA, we measured the temperatures of the treated area at its center. The changes in impedance, the current and liver temperature during RFA, as well as the dimensions of the thermal ablation zones, were compared among the three groups. In the in vivo experiments, three coagulations were created by performing multipolar RFA in a pig via laparotomy with using same parameter as the ex vivo study. Results In the ex vivo experiments, the impedance was gradually decreased during the RFA in groups B and C, but in group A, the impedance was increased during RFA and this induced activation by the pulsed RF technique. In groups A, B and C, the mean final-temperature values were 80±10℃, 69±18℃and 79±12℃, respectively (p < 0.05). The multipolar mode created a larger volume of ablation than did the other modes: 37.6±4.0 cm3 (group A); 44.9±12.7 cm3 (group B); and 78.9±6.9 cm3 (group C) (p < 0.05). In the in vivo

  7. A solution NMR study of the interactions of oligomannosides and the anti-HIV-1 2G12 antibody reveals distinct binding modes for branched ligands.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Marradi, Marco; Padro, Daniel; Angulo, Jesús; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-02-01

    The structural and affinity details of the interactions of synthetic oligomannosides, linear (di-, tri-, and tetra-) and branched (penta- and hepta-), with the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody 2G12 (HIV=human immunodeficiency virus) have been investigated in solution by using ligand-based NMR techniques, specifically saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy and transferred NOE experiments. Linear oligomannosides show similar binding modes to the antibody, with the nonreducing terminal disaccharide Manα(1→2)Man (Man=mannose) making the closest protein/ligand contacts in the bound state. In contrast, the branched pentamannoside shows two alternate binding modes, involving both ligand arms (D2- and D3-like), a dual binding description of the molecular recognition of this ligand by 2G12 in solution that differs from the single binding mode deduced from X-ray studies. On the contrary, the antibody shows an unexpected selectivity for one arm (D1-like) of the other branched ligand (heptamannoside). This result explains the previously reported lack of affinity enhancement relative to that of the D1-like tetramannoside. Single-ligand STD NMR titration experiments revealed noticeable differences in binding affinities among the linear and branched ligands in solution, with the latter showing decreased affinity. Among the analyzed series of ligands, the strongest 2G12 binders were the linear tri- and tetramannosides because both show similar affinity for the antibody. These results demonstrate that NMR spectroscopic techniques can deliver abundant structural, dynamics, and affinity information for the characterization of oligomannose-2G12 binding in solution, thus complementing, and, as in the case of the pentamannoside, extending, the structural view from X-ray crystallography. This information is of key importance for the development of multivalent synthetic gp120 high-mannose glycoconjugate mimics in the context of vaccine development. PMID:21268157

  8. Determinants of affinity and mode of DNA binding at the carboxy terminus of the bacteriophage SPO1-encoded type II DNA-binding protein, TF1.

    PubMed Central

    Andera, L; Geiduschek, E P

    1994-01-01

    The role of the carboxy-terminal amino acids of the bacteriophage SPO1-encoded type II DNA-binding protein, TF1, in DNA binding was analyzed. Chain-terminating mutations truncating the normally 99-amino-acid TF1 at amino acids 96, 97, and 98 were constructed, as were missense mutations substituting cysteine, arginine, and serine for phenylalanine at amino acid 97 and tryptophan for lysine at amino acid 99. The binding of the resulting proteins to a synthetic 44-bp binding site in 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil DNA, to binding sites in larger SPO1 [5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil-containing] DNA fragments, and to thymine-containing homologous DNA was analyzed by gel retardation and also by DNase I and hydroxy radical footprinting. We conclude that the C tail up to and including phenylalanine at amino acid 97 is essential for DNA binding and that the two C-terminal amino acids, 98 and 99, are involved in protein-protein interactions between TF1 dimers bound to DNA. Images PMID:8113176

  9. Structural and Functional Characterization of CRM1-Nup214 Interactions Reveals Multiple FG-Binding Sites Involved in Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Port, Sarah A; Monecke, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Spillner, Christiane; Hofele, Romina; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2015-10-27

    CRM1 is the major nuclear export receptor. During translocation through the nuclear pore, transport complexes transiently interact with phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats of multiple nucleoporins. On the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore, CRM1 tightly interacts with the nucleoporin Nup214. Here, we present the crystal structure of a 117-amino-acid FG-repeat-containing fragment of Nup214, in complex with CRM1, Snurportin 1, and RanGTP at 2.85 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight binding sites for Nup214 FG motifs on CRM1, with intervening stretches that are loosely attached to the transport receptor. Nup214 binds to N- and C-terminal regions of CRM1, thereby clamping CRM1 in a closed conformation and stabilizing the export complex. The role of conserved hydrophobic pockets for the recognition of FG motifs was analyzed in biochemical and cell-based assays. Comparative studies with RanBP3 and Nup62 shed light on specificities of CRM1-nucleoporin binding, which serves as a paradigm for transport receptor-nucleoporin interactions. PMID:26489467

  10. Multiple alignment modes for nematic liquid crystals doped with alkylthiol-capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hao; Hegmann, Torsten

    2009-08-01

    The ability of alkylthiol capped gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to tune, alter, and reverse the alignment of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) has been investigated in detail. Adjusting the concentration of the suspended Au NPs in the nematic LC host, optimizing the sample preparation protocol, or providing different sample substrates (untreated glass slides, rubbed polyimide-coated LC test cell, or ITO-coated glass slides) results in several LC alignment scenarios (modes) including vertical alignment, planar alignment, and a thermally controlled alignment switch between these two alignment modes. The latter thermal switch between planar and homeotropic alignment was observed particularly for lower concentrations (i.e., around 1 to 2 wt %) of suspended NPs in the size regime of 1.5-2 nm and was found to be concentration-dependent and thermally reversible. Different scenarios are discussed that could explain these induced alignment modes. In one scenario, the NP-induced alignment is related to the temperature-dependent change of the order parameter, S, of the nematic phase (ordering in the bulk). In the second scenario, a change of the ordering of the nematic molecules around the NPs that reside at the interfaces is described. We also started to test spin coating as an alternative way of preparing nematic thin films with well-separated Au NPs on the substrate and found this to be a possible method for manufacturing of future NP-doped LC devices, as this method produced evenly distributed NPs on glass substrates. Together the presented findings continue to pave the way for LC display-related applications of Au NP-doped nematic LCs and provide insights for N-LC sensor applications. PMID:20355789

  11. Involvement of individual subsites and secondary substrate binding sites in multiple attack on amylose by barley alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Kramhøft, Birte; Bak-Jensen, Kristian Sass; Mori, Haruhide; Juge, Nathalie; Nøhr, Jane; Svensson, Birte

    2005-02-15

    Barley alpha-amylase 1 (AMY1) hydrolyzed amylose with a degree of multiple attack (DMA) of 1.9; that is, on average, 2.9 glycoside bonds are cleaved per productive enzyme-substrate encounter. Six AMY1 mutants, spanning the substrate binding cleft from subsites -6 to +4, and a fusion protein, AMY1-SBD, of AMY1 and the starch binding domain (SBD) of Aspergillus niger glucoamylase were also analyzed. DMA of the subsite -6 mutant Y105A and AMY1-SBD increased to 3.3 and 3.0, respectively. M53E, M298S, and T212W at subsites -2, +1/+2, and +4, respectively, and the double mutant Y105A/T212W had decreased DMA of 1.0-1.4. C95A (subsite -5) had a DMA similar to that of wild type. Maltoheptaose (G7) was always the major initial oligosaccharide product. Wild-type and the subsite mutants released G6 at 27-40%, G8 at 60-70%, G9 at 39-48%, and G10 at 33-44% of the G7 rate, whereas AMY1-SBD more efficiently produced G8, G9, and G10 at rates similar to, 66%, and 60% of G7, respectively. In contrast, the shorter products appeared with large individual differences: G1, 0-15%; G2, 8-43%; G3, 0-22%; and G4, 0-11% of the G7 rate. G5 was always a minor product. Multiple attack thus involves both longer translocation of substrate in the binding cleft upon the initial cleavage to produce G6-G10, essentially independent of subsite mutations, and short-distance moves resulting in individually very different rates of release of G1-G4. Accordingly, the degree of multiple attack as well as the profile of products can be manipulated by structural changes in the active site or by introduction of extra substrate binding sites. PMID:15697208

  12. Evidence for multiple mechanisms for membrane binding and integration via carboxyl-terminal insertion sequences.

    PubMed

    Kim, P K; Janiak-Spens, F; Trimble, W S; Leber, B; Andrews, D W

    1997-07-22

    Subcellular localization of proteins with carboxyl-terminal insertion sequences requires the molecule be both targeted to and integrated into the correct membrane. The mechanism of membrane integration of cytochrome b5 has been shown to be promiscuous, spontaneous, nonsaturable, and independent of membrane proteins. Thus endoplasmic reticulum localization for cytochrome b5 depends primarily on accurate targeting to the appropriate membrane. Here direct comparison of this mechanism with that of three other proteins integrated into membranes via carboxyl-terminal insertion sequences [vesicle-associated membrane protein 1(Vamp1), polyomavirus middle-T antigen, and Bcl-2] revealed that, unlike cytochrome b5, membrane selectivity for these molecules is conferred at least in part by the mechanisms of membrane integration. Bcl-2 membrane integration was similar to that of cytochrome b5 except that insertion into lipid vesicles was inefficient. Unlike cytochrome b5 and Bcl-2, Vamp1 binding to canine pancreatic microsomes was saturable, ATP-dependent, and abolished by mild trypsin treatment of microsomes. Surprisingly, although the insertion sequence of polyomavirus middle-T antigen was sufficient to mediate electrostatic binding to membranes, binding did not lead to integration into the bilayer. Together these results demonstrate that there are at least two different mechanisms for correct membrane integration of proteins with insertion sequences, one mediated primarily by targeting and one relying on factors in the target membrane to mediate selective integration. Our results also demonstrate that, contrary to expectation, hydrophobicity is not sufficient for insertion sequence-mediated membrane integration. We suggest that the structure of the insertion sequence determines whether or not specific membrane-bound receptor proteins are required for membrane integration. PMID:9220974

  13. Multiple mode x-ray ptychography using a lens and a fixed diffuser optic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Batey, Darren J.; Edo, Tega B.; Parsons, Aaron D.; Rau, Christoph; Rodenburg, John M.

    2016-05-01

    We employ a novel combination of a Fresnel lens and a diffuser for x-ray ptychography. The setup uses increased flux by enlarging the width of the coherence-defining slits upstream of the experimental station. In the reconstruction algorithm, modal decomposition is used to account for the resulting partial coherence in the beam. We show that if the object has sparse feactures and large areas of flat contrast, the diffuser facilitates a better reconstruction and the extra diversity in the data also allows cleaner separation of the constituent modes in the illumination. The setup also allows a quick, real-time measure of the beam coherence.

  14. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, Sven O.; Mayer, Magnus C.; Roeser, Dirk; Multhaup, Gerd; Than, Manuel E.

    2015-03-01

    Two X-ray structures of APLP1 E2 with and without a heparin dodecasaccharide are presented, revealing two distinct binding modes of the protein to heparan sulfate. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of how APP-like proteins bind to heparan sulfates and how they specifically recognize nonreducing structures of heparan sulfates. Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2){sub 2}–(heparin){sub 2} complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins.

  15. Multiple cyclic tornado production modes in the 5 May 2007 Greensburg, Kansas supercell storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanamachi, Robin Lynn

    Long-track, violent tornadoes are rare events, but are responsible for a disproportionate majority of tornado fatalities, injuries, and property damage. It has been observed that such tornadoes are often generated as part of a series produced by one supercell, and preceded by one or more smaller tornadoes. At some point, a transition in the tornado production mode occurs, from short-track, cyclic tornado production (mode I), to long-track, single (plus satellite) tornado production (mode II). This transition has been documented only a few times at close range by Doppler weather radars. A cyclic, tornadic supercell ("the Greensburg storm") generated at least 22 tornadoes in southwest Kansas on 5 May 2007. One of these was the first documented EF-5 tornado ("the Greensburg tornado"), which destroyed 95% of the buildings in Greensburg, Kansas and caused 11 fatalities. The University of Massachusetts X-band, polarimetric, mobile Doppler radar (UMass X-Pol), which was operating in the area as part of a severe storms research project, collected data in the Greensburg storm for over an hour, including its transition from tornado production mode I to mode II. The first 10 tornadoes produced by the Greensburg storm can be seen in this UMass X-Pol data set. In this study, the UMass X-Pol data (as well as contemporaneous data from the WSR-88D at Dodge City, Kansas, or KDDC) are analyzed with the aim of diagnosing whether this transition occurred as a result of changes in the environmental wind profile, interaction of tornadoes with the storm's cold pool, or a combination of the two. These efforts met with limited success, largely because of the relative scarcity of observations of low-level flow in the inflow sector of the Greensburg storm. However, in the process, features of the Greensburg storm related to tornado production (such as vortices, updrafts, and polarimetric signatures) are documented, and relationships among them before, during, and after this transition are

  16. Investigation of multiple roots of the resistive wall mode dispersion relation, including kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.

    2011-07-15

    The resistive wall mode instability in tokamak plasmas has a complex frequency which can be determined by a dispersion relation that is cubic, in general, leading to three distinct roots. A simplified model of the dispersion relation, including kinetic effects, is presented and used to explore the behavior of these roots. By changing the plasma rotation frequency, it is shown that one root has a slow mode rotation frequency (less than the inverse wall time) while the other two rotate more quickly, one leading and one lagging the plasma rotation frequency. When realistic experimental parameters from the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are used, however, only one slow rotating, near-marginal stability root is found, consistent with present experiments and more detailed calculations with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)]. Electron collisionality acts to stabilize one of the rotating roots, while ion collisionality can stabilize the other. In devices with low rotation and low collisionality, these two rotating roots may manifest themselves, but they are likely to remain stable.

  17. Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 Binds the D2 Dopamine Receptor and G-protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 1 (GRK1) Peptides Using Different Modes of Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Pandalaneni, Sravan; Karuppiah, Vijaykumar; Saleem, Muhammad; Haynes, Lee P.; Burgoyne, Robert D.; Mayans, Olga; Derrick, Jeremy P.; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) is the primordial member of the neuronal calcium sensor family of EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins. It interacts with both the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), regulating its internalization and surface expression, and the cognate kinases GRK1 and GRK2. Determination of the crystal structures of Ca2+/NCS-1 alone and in complex with peptides derived from D2R and GRK1 reveals that the differential recognition is facilitated by the conformational flexibility of the C-lobe-binding site. We find that two copies of the D2R peptide bind within the hydrophobic crevice on Ca2+/NCS-1, but only one copy of the GRK1 peptide binds. The different binding modes are made possible by the C-lobe-binding site of NCS-1, which adopts alternative conformations in each complex. C-terminal residues Ser-178–Val-190 act in concert with the flexible EF3/EF4 loop region to effectively form different peptide-binding sites. In the Ca2+/NCS-1·D2R peptide complex, the C-terminal region adopts a 310 helix-turn-310 helix, whereas in the GRK1 peptide complex it forms an α-helix. Removal of Ser-178–Val-190 generated a C-terminal truncation mutant that formed a dimer, indicating that the NCS-1 C-terminal region prevents NCS-1 oligomerization. We propose that the flexible nature of the C-terminal region is essential to allow it to modulate its protein-binding sites and adapt its conformation to accommodate both ligands. This appears to be driven by the variability of the conformation of the C-lobe-binding site, which has ramifications for the target specificity and diversity of NCS-1. PMID:25979333

  18. Multiple transcription factor binding sites predict AID targeting in non-immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Jamie L.; Liu, Man; Yaari, Gur; Khalil, Ashraf M.; Tomayko, Mary M.; Shlomchik, Mark J.; Schatz, David G.; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant targeting of the enzyme Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) results in the accumulation of somatic mutations in approximately 25% of expressed genes in germinal center B cells. Observations in Ung−/− Msh2−/− mice suggest that many other genes efficiently repair AID-induced lesions, so that up to 45% of genes may actually be targeted by AID. It is important to understand the mechanisms that recruit AID to certain genes, as this mis-targeting represents an important risk for genome instability. We hypothesize that several mechanisms will combine to target AID to each locus. In order to resolve which mechanisms affect AID targeting, we analyze 7.3Mb of sequence data, along with the regulatory context, from 83 genes in Ung−/− Msh2−/− mice to identify common properties of AID targets. This analysis identifies the involvement of three transcription factor binding sites (E-box motifs, along with YY1 and C/EBP-beta binding sites) that may work together to recruit AID. Based on previous knowledge and these newly discovered features, a classification tree model was built to predict genome-wide AID targeting. Using this predictive model we were able to identify a set of 101 high-interest genes that are likely targets of AID. PMID:23514741

  19. Long-term music training tunes how the brain temporally binds signals from multiple senses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hweeling; Noppeney, Uta

    2011-12-20

    Practicing a musical instrument is a rich multisensory experience involving the integration of visual, auditory, and tactile inputs with motor responses. This combined psychophysics-fMRI study used the musician's brain to investigate how sensory-motor experience molds temporal binding of auditory and visual signals. Behaviorally, musicians exhibited a narrower temporal integration window than nonmusicians for music but not for speech. At the neural level, musicians showed increased audiovisual asynchrony responses and effective connectivity selectively for music in a superior temporal sulcus-premotor-cerebellar circuitry. Critically, the premotor asynchrony effects predicted musicians' perceptual sensitivity to audiovisual asynchrony. Our results suggest that piano practicing fine tunes an internal forward model mapping from action plans of piano playing onto visible finger movements and sounds. This internal forward model furnishes more precise estimates of the relative audiovisual timings and hence, stronger prediction error signals specifically for asynchronous music in a premotor-cerebellar circuitry. Our findings show intimate links between action production and audiovisual temporal binding in perception. PMID:22114191

  20. A multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun and its electron beam analysis in self and trigger breakdown modes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Jadon, Arvind Singh; Pal, Udit Narayan; Rahaman, Hasibur; Prakash, Ram

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, a pseudospark discharge based multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun is reported which has been operated separately in self and trigger breakdown modes using two different gases, namely, argon and hydrogen. The beam current and beam energy have been analyzed using a concentric ring diagnostic arrangement. Two distinct electron beams are clearly seen with hollow cathode and conductive phases. The hollow cathode phase has been observed for ∼50 ns where the obtained electron beam is having low beam current density and high energy. While in conductive phase it is high current density and low energy electron beam. It is inferred that in the hollow cathode phase the beam energy is more for the self breakdown case whereas the current density is more for the trigger breakdown case. The tailor made operation of the hollow cathode phase electron beam can play an important role in microwave generation. Up to 30% variation in the electron beam energy has been achieved keeping the same gas and by varying the breakdown mode operations. Also, up to 32% variation in the beam current density has been achieved for the trigger breakdown mode at optimized trigger position by varying the gas type. PMID:27036773

  1. A Dual-Mode Bandpass Filter with Multiple Controllable Transmission-Zeros Using T-Shaped Stub-Loaded Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zh.; Wang, C.; Kim, N. Y.

    2014-01-01

    A dual-mode broadband bandpass filter (BPF) with multiple controllable transmission-zeros using T-shaped stub-loaded resonators (TSSLRs) is presented. Due to the symmetrical plane, the odd-even-mode theory can be adopted to characterize the BPF. The proposed filter consists of a dual-mode TSSLR and two modified feed-lines, which introduce two capacitive and inductive source-load (S-L) couplings. Five controllable transmission zeros (TZs) can be achieved for the high selectivity and the wide stopband because of the tunable amount of coupling capacitance and inductance. The center frequency of the proposed BPF is 5.8 GHz, with a 3 dB fraction bandwidth of 8.9%. The measured insertion and return losses are 1.75 and 28.18 dB, respectively. A compact size and second harmonic frequency suppression can be obtained by the proposed BPF with S-L couplings. PMID:24688406

  2. A multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun and its electron beam analysis in self and trigger breakdown modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Jadon, Arvind Singh; Pal, Udit Narayan; Rahaman, Hasibur; Prakash, Ram

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, a pseudospark discharge based multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun is reported which has been operated separately in self and trigger breakdown modes using two different gases, namely, argon and hydrogen. The beam current and beam energy have been analyzed using a concentric ring diagnostic arrangement. Two distinct electron beams are clearly seen with hollow cathode and conductive phases. The hollow cathode phase has been observed for ˜50 ns where the obtained electron beam is having low beam current density and high energy. While in conductive phase it is high current density and low energy electron beam. It is inferred that in the hollow cathode phase the beam energy is more for the self breakdown case whereas the current density is more for the trigger breakdown case. The tailor made operation of the hollow cathode phase electron beam can play an important role in microwave generation. Up to 30% variation in the electron beam energy has been achieved keeping the same gas and by varying the breakdown mode operations. Also, up to 32% variation in the beam current density has been achieved for the trigger breakdown mode at optimized trigger position by varying the gas type.

  3. Computational modeling of the Fc αRI receptor binding in the Fc α domain of the human antibody IgA: Normal Modes Analysis (NMA) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, Manori; Posgai, Monica; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Ibrahim, George; Stan, George; Herr, Andrew; George Stan Group Collaboration; Herr's Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Fc αRI receptor binding in the Fc α domain of the antibody IgA triggers immune effector responses such as phagocytosis and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in eukaryotic cells. Fc α is a dimer of heavy chains of the IgA antibody and each Fc α heavy chain which consisted of two immunoglobulin constant domains, CH2 and CH3, can bind one Fc αRI molecule at the CH2-CH3 interface forming a 2:1 stoichiometry. Experimental evidences confirmed that Fc αRI binding to the Fc α CH2-CH3 junction altered the kinetics of HAA lectin binding at the distant IgA1 hinge. Our focus in this research was to understand the conformational changes and the network of residues which co-ordinate the receptor binding dynamics of the Fc α dimer complex. Structure-based elastic network modeling was used to compute normal modes of distinct Fc α configurations. Asymmetric and un-liganded Fc α configurations were obtained from the high resolution crystal structure of Fc α-Fc αRI 2:1 symmetric complex of PDB ID 1OW0. Our findings confirmed that Fc αRI binding, either in asymmetric or symmetric complex with Fc α, propagated long-range conformational changes across the Fc domains, potentially also impacting the distant IgA1 hinge.

  4. Two Modes of Binding of DinI to RecA Filament Provide a New Insight Into Regulation of SOS Response by DinI Protein

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, Vitold E.; Britt, Rachel L.; Bane, Lukas B.; Yu, Xiong; Cox, Michael M.; Egelman, Edward H.

    2011-01-01

    The RecA protein plays a principal role in the bacterial SOS response to DNA damage. The induction of the SOS response is well understood and involves the cleavage of the LexA repressor catalyzed by the RecA nucleoprotein filament. In contrast, our understanding of the regulation and termination of the SOS response is much more limited. RecX and DinI are two major regulators of RecA’s ability to promote LexA cleavage and a strand exchange reaction and are believed to modulate its activity in ongoing SOS events. DinI’s function in the SOS response remains controversial since its interaction with the RecA filament is concentration-dependent and may result in either stabilization or depolymerization of the filament. The 17 C-terminal residues of RecA modulate the interaction between DinI and RecA. We demonstrate that DinI binds to the active RecA filament in two distinct structural modes. In the first mode DinI binds to the C-terminus of a RecA protomer. In the second mode DinI resides deeply in the groove of the RecA filament with its negatively charged C-terminal helix proximal to the L2 loop of RecA. The deletion of the 17 C-terminal residues of RecA favors the second mode of binding. We suggest that the negatively charged C-terminus of RecA prevents DinI from entering the groove and protects the RecA filament from depolymerization. Polymorphic binding of DinI to RecA filaments implies an even more complex role of DinI in the bacterial SOS response. PMID:21458462

  5. Highly potent, non-basic 5-HT6 ligands. Site mutagenesis evidence for a second binding mode at 5-HT6 for antagonism.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ralph N; Stabler, Russel S; Repke, David B; Kress, James M; Walker, Keith A; Martin, Renee S; Brothers, Julie M; Ilnicka, Mariola; Lee, Simon W; Mirzadegan, Tara

    2010-06-01

    A series of 5-HT(6) ligands derived from (R)-1-(amino)methyl-6-(phenyl)sulfonyltetralin was prepared that yielded several non-basic analogs having sub-nanomolar affinity. Ligand structure-activity relationships, receptor point mutation studies, and molecular modeling of these novel ligands all combined to reveal a new alternative binding mode to 5-HT(6) for antagonism. PMID:20434910

  6. Can beating between different dynamo modes explain multiple magnetic cycles in solar - type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, R.; Karoff, C.; Metcalfe, T. S.

    2015-09-01

    Stellar magnetic activity can be characterized by a chaotic, multiple or single cycle behavior. Sometimes cyclic activity can be interrupted by a flat behavior. The mechanism that produce such a diverse behavior in stellar atmosphere is a matter of debate. We decided to address this issue by investigating the properties of a sample of 40 stars with high quality cycles, selected from the original data provided by the Mount Wilson Observatory. This sample contains stars with single and secondary cycles, whose secondary periods are longer or shorter than the primary cycle.

  7. Multiple regression and Artificial Neural Network for long-term rainfall forecasting using large scale climate modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekanik, F.; Imteaz, M. A.; Gato-Trinidad, S.; Elmahdi, A.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the application of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Multiple regression analysis (MR) to forecast long-term seasonal spring rainfall in Victoria, Australia was investigated using lagged El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) as potential predictors. The use of dual (combined lagged ENSO-IOD) input sets for calibrating and validating ANN and MR Models is proposed to investigate the simultaneous effect of past values of these two major climate modes on long-term spring rainfall prediction. The MR models that did not violate the limits of statistical significance and multicollinearity were selected for future spring rainfall forecast. The ANN was developed in the form of multilayer perceptron using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Both MR and ANN modelling were assessed statistically using mean square error (MSE), mean absolute error (MAE), Pearson correlation (r) and Willmott index of agreement (d). The developed MR and ANN models were tested on out-of-sample test sets; the MR models showed very poor generalisation ability for east Victoria with correlation coefficients of -0.99 to -0.90 compared to ANN with correlation coefficients of 0.42-0.93; ANN models also showed better generalisation ability for central and west Victoria with correlation coefficients of 0.68-0.85 and 0.58-0.97 respectively. The ability of multiple regression models to forecast out-of-sample sets is compatible with ANN for Daylesford in central Victoria and Kaniva in west Victoria (r = 0.92 and 0.67 respectively). The errors of the testing sets for ANN models are generally lower compared to multiple regression models. The statistical analysis suggest the potential of ANN over MR models for rainfall forecasting using large scale climate modes.

  8. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes. PMID:17168764

  9. Delivery mode shapes the acquisition and structure of the initial microbiota across multiple body habitats in newborns.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Bello, Maria G; Costello, Elizabeth K; Contreras, Monica; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Fierer, Noah; Knight, Rob

    2010-06-29

    Upon delivery, the neonate is exposed for the first time to a wide array of microbes from a variety of sources, including maternal bacteria. Although prior studies have suggested that delivery mode shapes the microbiota's establishment and, subsequently, its role in child health, most researchers have focused on specific bacterial taxa or on a single body habitat, the gut. Thus, the initiation stage of human microbiome development remains obscure. The goal of the present study was to obtain a community-wide perspective on the influence of delivery mode and body habitat on the neonate's first microbiota. We used multiplexed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities from mothers and their newborn babies, four born vaginally and six born via Cesarean section. Mothers' skin, oral mucosa, and vagina were sampled 1 h before delivery, and neonates' skin, oral mucosa, and nasopharyngeal aspirate were sampled <5 min, and meconium <24 h, after delivery. We found that in direct contrast to the highly differentiated communities of their mothers, neonates harbored bacterial communities that were undifferentiated across multiple body habitats, regardless of delivery mode. Our results also show that vaginally delivered infants acquired bacterial communities resembling their own mother's vaginal microbiota, dominated by Lactobacillus, Prevotella, or Sneathia spp., and C-section infants harbored bacterial communities similar to those found on the skin surface, dominated by Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, and Propionibacterium spp. These findings establish an important baseline for studies tracking the human microbiome's successional development in different body habitats following different delivery modes, and their associated effects on infant health. PMID:20566857

  10. Delivery mode shapes the acquisition and structure of the initial microbiota across multiple body habitats in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Bello, Maria G.; Costello, Elizabeth K.; Contreras, Monica; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Fierer, Noah; Knight, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Upon delivery, the neonate is exposed for the first time to a wide array of microbes from a variety of sources, including maternal bacteria. Although prior studies have suggested that delivery mode shapes the microbiota's establishment and, subsequently, its role in child health, most researchers have focused on specific bacterial taxa or on a single body habitat, the gut. Thus, the initiation stage of human microbiome development remains obscure. The goal of the present study was to obtain a community-wide perspective on the influence of delivery mode and body habitat on the neonate's first microbiota. We used multiplexed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities from mothers and their newborn babies, four born vaginally and six born via Cesarean section. Mothers’ skin, oral mucosa, and vagina were sampled 1 h before delivery, and neonates’ skin, oral mucosa, and nasopharyngeal aspirate were sampled <5 min, and meconium <24 h, after delivery. We found that in direct contrast to the highly differentiated communities of their mothers, neonates harbored bacterial communities that were undifferentiated across multiple body habitats, regardless of delivery mode. Our results also show that vaginally delivered infants acquired bacterial communities resembling their own mother's vaginal microbiota, dominated by Lactobacillus, Prevotella, or Sneathia spp., and C-section infants harbored bacterial communities similar to those found on the skin surface, dominated by Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, and Propionibacterium spp. These findings establish an important baseline for studies tracking the human microbiome's successional development in different body habitats following different delivery modes, and their associated effects on infant health. PMID:20566857

  11. Combining Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics to Predict the Binding Modes of Flavonoid Derivatives with the Neuraminidase of the 2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shih-Jen; Chong, Fok-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Control of flavonoid derivatives inhibitors release through the inhibition of neuraminidase has been identified as a potential target for the treatment of H1N1 influenza disease. We have employed molecular dynamics simulation techniques to optimize the 2009 H1N1 influenza neuraminidase X-ray crystal structure. Molecular docking of the compounds revealed the possible binding mode. Our molecular dynamics simulations combined with the solvated interaction energies technique was applied to predict the docking models of the inhibitors in the binding pocket of the H1N1 influenza neuraminidase. In the simulations, the correlation of the predicted and experimental binding free energies of all 20 flavonoid derivatives inhibitors is satisfactory, as indicated by R2 = 0.75. PMID:22605992

  12. The intrinsically disordered amino-terminal region of human RecQL4: multiple DNA-binding domains confer annealing, strand exchange and G4 DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Heidi; Kiosze, Kristin; Sachsenweger, Juliane; Haumann, Sebastian; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Nuutinen, Tarmo; Syväoja, Juhani E.; Görlach, Matthias; Grosse, Frank; Pospiech, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Human RecQL4 belongs to the ubiquitous RecQ helicase family. Its N-terminal region represents the only homologue of the essential DNA replication initiation factor Sld2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and also participates in the vertebrate initiation of DNA replication. Here, we utilized a random screen to identify N-terminal fragments of human RecQL4 that could be stably expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli. Biophysical characterization of these fragments revealed that the Sld2 homologous RecQL4 N-terminal domain carries large intrinsically disordered regions. The N-terminal fragments were sufficient for the strong annealing activity of RecQL4. Moreover, this activity appeared to be the basis for an ATP-independent strand exchange activity. Both activities relied on multiple DNA-binding sites with affinities to single-stranded, double-stranded and Y-structured DNA. Finally, we found a remarkable affinity of the N-terminus for guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA, exceeding the affinities for other DNA structures by at least 60-fold. Together, these findings suggest that the DNA interactions mediated by the N-terminal region of human RecQL4 represent a central function at the replication fork. The presented data may also provide a mechanistic explanation for the role of elements with a G4-forming propensity identified in the vicinity of vertebrate origins of DNA replication. PMID:25336622

  13. Structural basis of FYCO1 and MAP1LC3A interaction reveals a novel binding mode for Atg8-family proteins.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaofang; Wang, Yingli; Gong, Yukang; Li, Faxiang; Guo, Yujiao; Hu, Shichen; Liu, Jianping; Pan, Lifeng

    2016-08-01

    FYCO1 (FYVE and coiled-coil domain containing 1) functions as an autophagy adaptor in directly linking autophagosomes with the microtubule-based kinesin motor, and plays an essential role in the microtubule plus end-directed transport of autophagic vesicles. The specific association of FYCO1 with autophagosomes is mediated by its interaction with Atg8-family proteins decorated on the outer surface of autophagosome. However, the mechanistic basis governing the interaction between FYCO1 and Atg8-family proteins is largely unknown. Here, using biochemical and structural analyses, we demonstrated that FYCO1 contains a unique LC3-interacting region (LIR), which discriminately binds to mammalian Atg8 orthologs and preferentially binds to the MAP1LC3A and MAP1LC3B. In addition to uncovering the detailed molecular mechanism underlying the FYCO1 LIR and MAP1LC3A interaction, the determined FYCO1-LIR-MAP1LC3A complex structure also reveals a unique LIR binding mode for Atg8-family proteins, and demonstrates, first, the functional relevance of adjacent sequences C-terminal to the LIR core motif for binding to Atg8-family proteins. Taken together, our findings not only provide new mechanistic insight into FYCO1-mediated transport of autophagosomes, but also expand our understanding of the interaction modes between LIR motifs and Atg8-family proteins in general. PMID:27246247

  14. Inhibition of Nuclear Receptor Binding SET Domain 2/Multiple Myeloma SET Domain by LEM-06 Implication for Epigenetic Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    di Luccio, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma SET domain (MMSET)/nuclear receptor binding SET domain 2 (NSD2) is a lysine histone methyltransferase (HMTase) and bona fide oncoprotein found aberrantly expressed in several cancers, suggesting potential role for novel therapeutic strategies. In particular, MMSET/NSD2 is emerging as a target for therapeutic interventions against multiple myeloma, especially t(4;14) myeloma that is associated with a significantly worse prognosis than other biological subgroups. Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematological malignancy in the United States, after non-Hodgkin lymphoma and remains an incurable malignancy. Thus, effective therapeutic strategies are greatly needed. HMTases inhibitors are scarce and no NSDs inhibitors have been isolated. Methods: We used homology modeling, molecular modeling simulations, virtual ligand screening, computational chemistry software for structure-activity relationship and performed in vitro H3K36 histone lysine methylation inhibitory assay using recombinant human NSD2-SET and human H3.1 histone. Results: Here, we report the discovery of LEM-06, a hit small molecule inhibitor of NSD2, with an IC50 of 0.8 mM against H3K36 methylation in vitro. Conclusions: We propose LEM-06 as a hit inhibitor that is useful to further optimize for exploring the biology of NSD2. LEM-06 derivatives may pave the way to specific NSD2 inhibitors suitable for therapeutic efforts against malignancies. PMID:26151044

  15. Symmetric caging formation for convex polygonal object transportation by multiple mobile robots based on fuzzy sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yanyan; Kim, YoonGu; Wee, SungGil; Lee, DongHa; Lee, SukGyu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of object caging and transporting is considered for multiple mobile robots. With the consideration of minimizing the number of robots and decreasing the rotation of the object, the proper points are calculated and assigned to the multiple mobile robots to allow them to form a symmetric caging formation. The caging formation guarantees that all of the Euclidean distances between any two adjacent robots are smaller than the minimal width of the polygonal object so that the object cannot escape. In order to avoid collision among robots, the parameter of the robots radius is utilized to design the caging formation, and the A⁎ algorithm is used so that mobile robots can move to the proper points. In order to avoid obstacles, the robots and the object are regarded as a rigid body to apply artificial potential field method. The fuzzy sliding mode control method is applied for tracking control of the nonholonomic mobile robots. Finally, the simulation and experimental results show that multiple mobile robots are able to cage and transport the polygonal object to the goal position, avoiding obstacles. PMID:26704719

  16. Application of Multiple Imputation for Missing Values in Three-Way Three-Mode Multi-Environment Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ting; McLachlan, Geoffrey J.; Dieters, Mark J.; Basford, Kaye E.

    2015-01-01

    It is a common occurrence in plant breeding programs to observe missing values in three-way three-mode multi-environment trial (MET) data. We proposed modifications of models for estimating missing observations for these data arrays, and developed a novel approach in terms of hierarchical clustering. Multiple imputation (MI) was used in four ways, multiple agglomerative hierarchical clustering, normal distribution model, normal regression model, and predictive mean match. The later three models used both Bayesian analysis and non-Bayesian analysis, while the first approach used a clustering procedure with randomly selected attributes and assigned real values from the nearest neighbour to the one with missing observations. Different proportions of data entries in six complete datasets were randomly selected to be missing and the MI methods were compared based on the efficiency and accuracy of estimating those values. The results indicated that the models using Bayesian analysis had slightly higher accuracy of estimation performance than those using non-Bayesian analysis but they were more time-consuming. However, the novel approach of multiple agglomerative hierarchical clustering demonstrated the overall best performances. PMID:26689369

  17. The Crystal Structure of PPIL1 Bound to Cyclosporine A Suggests a Binding Mode for a Linear Epitope of the SKIP Protein

    PubMed Central

    Stegmann, Christian M.; Lührmann, Reinhard; Wahl, Markus C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The removal of introns from pre-mRNA is carried out by a large macromolecular machine called the spliceosome. The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase PPIL1 is a component of the human spliceosome and binds to the spliceosomal SKIP protein via a binding site distinct from its active site. Principal Findings Here, we have studied the PPIL1 protein and its interaction with SKIP biochemically and by X-ray crystallography. A minimal linear binding epitope derived from the SKIP protein could be determined using a peptide array. A 36-residue region of SKIP centred on an eight-residue epitope suffices to bind PPIL1 in pull-down experiments. The crystal structure of PPIL1 in complex with the inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) was obtained at a resolution of 1.15 Å and exhibited two bound Cd2+ ions that enabled SAD phasing. PPIL1 residues that have previously been implicated in binding of SKIP are involved in the coordination of Cd2+ ions in the present crystal structure. Employing the present crystal structure, the determined minimal binding epitope and previously published NMR data [1], a molecular docking study was performed. In the docked model of the PPIL1·SKIP interaction, a proline residue of SKIP is buried in a hydrophobic pocket of PPIL1. This hydrophobic contact is encircled by several hydrogen bonds between the SKIP peptide and PPIL1. Conclusion We characterized a short, linear epitope of SKIP that is sufficient to bind the PPIL1 protein. Our data indicate that this SKIP peptide could function in recruiting PPIL1 into the core of the spliceosome. We present a molecular model for the binding mode of SKIP to PPIL1 which emphasizes the versatility of cyclophilin-type PPIases to engage in additional interactions with other proteins apart from active site contacts despite their limited surface area. PMID:20368803

  18. Qualitative multiple-fault diagnosis of continuous dynamic systems using behavioral modes

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, S.; Mooney, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Most model-based diagnosis systems, such as GDE and Sherlock, have concerned discrete, static systems such as logic circuits and use simple constraint propagation to detect inconsistencies. However, sophisticated systems such as QSIM and QPE have been developed for qualitative modeling and simulation of continuous dynamic systems. We present an integration of these two lines of research as implemented in a system called QDOCS for multiple-fault diagnosis of continuous dynamic systems using QSIM models. The main contributions of the algorithm include a method for propagating dependencies while solving a general constraint satisfaction problem and a method for verifying the consistency of a behavior with a model across time. Through systematic experiments on two realistic engineering systems, we demonstrate that QDOCS demonstrates a better balance of generality, accuracy, and efficiency than competing methods.

  19. Multiple-Component Crystal Fabric Measurements from Acoustically-Generated Normal Modes in Borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluskiewicz, D. J.; Waddington, E. D.; McCarthy, M.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Voigt, D.; Matsuoka, K.

    2014-12-01

    Sound wave velocities in ice are a proxy of crystal orientation fabric. Because p- and s-waves respectively travel faster and slower in the direction of an ice crystal c-axis, the velocities of these waves in a fabric are related to the clustering of ice crystal c-axes in the direction of wave propagation. Previous sonic logs at Dome C, NGRIP, WAIS, and NEEM have inferred a single component fabric description from the velocities of vertically-propagating p-waves around each ice core borehole. These records supplement thin-section measurements of crystal fabric by sampling larger numbers of crystals in a depth-continuous log. Observations of azimuthally anisotropic vertical-girdle fabrics at ice-core sites such as WAIS, NGRIP, and EDML underly a benefit for logging methods that are sensitive to such fabrics. We present a theoretical framework for using borehole flexural modes to measure azimuthal crystal-fabric anisotropy, and describe ongoing efforts to develop a sonic logging tool for this purpose. We also present data from p-wave logs and thin section measurements at the WAIS Divide, and describe how a flexural wave log could supplement the existing measurements.

  20. Ultra-broadband and high-efficiency polarization conversion metasurface with multiple plasmon resonance modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guo-Xiang; Shi, Hong-Yu; Xia, Song; Li, Wei; Zhang, An-Xue; Xu, Zhuo; Wei, Xiao-Yong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel metasurface design that achieves a high-efficiency ultra-broadband cross polarization conversion. The metasurface is composed of an array of unit resonators, each of which combines an H-shaped structure and two rectangular metallic patches. Different plasmon resonance modes are excited in unit resonators and allow the polarization states to be manipulated. The bandwidth of the cross polarization converter is 82% of the central frequency, covering the range from 15.7 GHz to 37.5 GHz. The conversion efficiency of the innovative new design is higher than 90%. At 14.43 GHz and 40.95 GHz, the linearly polarized incident wave is converted into a circularly polarized wave. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61471292, 61331005, 61471388, 51277012, 41404095, and 61501365), the 111 Project, China (Grant No. B14040), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB654602), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation ( Grant No. 2015M580849).

  1. Wavelength-selective emitters with pyramid nanogratings enhanced by multiple resonance modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Huu, Nghia; Pištora, Jaromír; Cada, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Binary gratings with high or low metal filling ratios in a grating region have been demonstrated as successful candidates in enhancing the emittance of emitters for thermophotovoltaics since they could support surface plasmons (SPs), the Rayleigh-Wood anomaly (RWA), or cavity resonance (CR) within their geometries. This work shows that combining a tungsten binary grating with a low and high filling ratio to form a pyramid grating can significantly increase the emittance, which is nearly perfect in the wavelength region from 0.6 to 1.72 μm, while being 0.1 at wavelengths longer than 2.5 μm. Moreover, the emittance spectrum of the hybrid tungsten grating is insensitive to the angle of incidence. The enhancement demonstrated by magnetic field and Poynting vector patterns is due to the interplay between SPs and RWA modes at short wavelengths, and CR at long wavelengths. Furthermore, a combined grating made of nickel is also proposed providing enhanced emittance in a wide angle of incidence.

  2. Wavelength-selective emitters with pyramid nanogratings enhanced by multiple resonance modes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huu, Nghia; Pištora, Jaromír; Cada, Michael

    2016-04-15

    Binary gratings with high or low metal filling ratios in a grating region have been demonstrated as successful candidates in enhancing the emittance of emitters for thermophotovoltaics since they could support surface plasmons (SPs), the Rayleigh-Wood anomaly (RWA), or cavity resonance (CR) within their geometries. This work shows that combining a tungsten binary grating with a low and high filling ratio to form a pyramid grating can significantly increase the emittance, which is nearly perfect in the wavelength region from 0.6 to 1.72 μm, while being 0.1 at wavelengths longer than 2.5 μm. Moreover, the emittance spectrum of the hybrid tungsten grating is insensitive to the angle of incidence. The enhancement demonstrated by magnetic field and Poynting vector patterns is due to the interplay between SPs and RWA modes at short wavelengths, and CR at long wavelengths. Furthermore, a combined grating made of nickel is also proposed providing enhanced emittance in a wide angle of incidence. PMID:26938942

  3. Multiple nucleic acid cleavage modes in divergent type III CRISPR systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Graham, Shirley; Tello, Agnes; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea from invading nucleic acids. Type III systems (Cmr, Csm) have been shown to cleave RNA targets in vitro and some are capable of transcription-dependent DNA targeting. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has two divergent subtypes of the type III system (Sso-IIID and a Cmr7-containing variant of Sso-IIIB). Here, we report that both the Sso-IIID and Sso-IIIB complexes cleave cognate RNA targets with a ruler mechanism and 6 or 12 nt spacing that relates to the organization of the Cas7 backbone. This backbone-mediated cleavage activity thus appears universal for the type III systems. The Sso-IIIB complex is also known to possess a distinct ‘UA’ cleavage mode. The predominant activity observed in vitro depends on the relative molar concentration of protein and target RNA. The Sso-IIID complex can cleave plasmid DNA targets in vitro, generating linear DNA products with an activity that is dependent on both the cyclase and HD nuclease domains of the Cas10 subunit, suggesting a role for both nuclease active sites in the degradation of double-stranded DNA targets. PMID:26801642

  4. Munc13-Like skMLCK Variants Cannot Mimic the Unique Calmodulin Binding Mode of Munc13 as Evidenced by Chemical Cross-Linking and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Sabine; Maucher, Daniel; Schneider, Marian; Ihling, Christian H.; Jahn, Olaf; Sinz, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Among the neuronal binding partners of calmodulin (CaM) are Munc13 proteins as essential presynaptic regulators that play a key role in synaptic vesicle priming and are crucial for presynaptic short-term plasticity. Recent NMR structural investigations of a CaM/Munc13-1 peptide complex have revealed an extended structure, which contrasts the compact structures of most classical CaM/target complexes. This unusual binding mode is thought to be related to the presence of an additional hydrophobic anchor residue at position 26 of the CaM binding motif of Munc13-1, resulting in a novel 1-5-8-26 motif. Here, we addressed the question whether the 1-5-8-26 CaM binding motif is a Munc13-related feature or whether it can be induced in other CaM targets by altering the motif's core residues. For this purpose, we chose skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase (skMLCK) with a classical 1-5-8-14 CaM binding motif and constructed three skMLCK peptide variants mimicking Munc13-1, in which the hydrophobic anchor amino acid at position 14 was moved to position 26. Chemical cross-linking between CaM and skMLCK peptide variants combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry yielded insights into the peptides' binding modes. This structural comparison together with complementary binding data from surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that skMLCK variants with an artificial 1-5-8-26 motif cannot mimic CaM binding of Munc13-1. Apparently, additional features apart from the spacing of the hydrophobic anchor residues are required to define the functional 1-5-8-26 motif of Munc13-1. We conclude that Munc13 proteins display a unique CaM binding behavior to fulfill their role as efficient presynaptic calcium sensors over broad range of Ca2+ concentrations. PMID:24130683

  5. Binding of multiple features in memory by high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Dermot M; Gaigg, Sebastian B; Gardiner, John M

    2014-09-01

    Diminished episodic memory and diminished use of semantic information to aid recall by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are both thought to result from diminished relational binding of elements of complex stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we asked high-functioning adults with ASD and typical comparison participants to study grids in which some cells contained drawings of objects in non-canonical colours. Participants were told at study which features (colour, item, location) would be tested in a later memory test. In a second experiment, participants studied similar grids and were told that they would be tested on object-location or object-colour combinations. Recognition of combinations was significantly diminished in ASD, which survived covarying performance on the Color Trails Test (D'Elia et al. Color trails test. Professional manual. Psychological Assessment Resources, Lutz, 1996), a test of executive difficulties. The findings raise the possibility that medial temporal as well as frontal lobe processes are dysfunctional in ASD. PMID:24696375

  6. Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Study of Dimerization in Prion Protein: Multiple Modes of Interaction and Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chamachi, Neharika G; Chakrabarty, Suman

    2016-08-01

    The pathological forms of prions are known to be a result of misfolding, oligomerization, and aggregation of the cellular prion. While the mechanism of misfolding and aggregation in prions has been widely studied using both experimental and computational tools, the structural and energetic characterization of the dimer form have not garnered as much attention. On one hand dimerization can be the first step toward a nucleation-like pathway to aggregation, whereas on the other hand it may also increase the conformational stability preventing self-aggregation. In this work, we have used extensive all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of both monomer and dimer forms of a mouse prion protein to understand the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic stability of dimeric prion as compared to the monomeric form. We show that prion proteins can dimerize spontaneously being stabilized by hydrophobic interactions as well as intermolecular hydrogen bonding and salt bridge formation. We have computed the conformational free energy landscapes for both monomer and dimer forms to compare the thermodynamic stability and misfolding pathways. We observe large conformational heterogeneity among the various modes of interactions between the monomers and the strong intermolecular interactions may lead to as high as 20% β-content. The hydrophobic regions in helix-2, surrounding coil regions, terminal regions along with the natively present β-sheet region appear to actively participate in prion-prion intermolecular interactions. Dimerization seems to considerably suppress the inherent dynamic instability observed in monomeric prions, particularly because the regions of structural frustration constitute the dimer interface. Further, we demonstrate an interesting reversible coupling between the Q160-G131 interaction (which leads to inhibition of β-sheet extension) and the G131-V161 H-bond formation. PMID:27390876

  7. The MAR-binding protein SATB1 orchestrates temporal and spatial expression of multiple genes during T-cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, John D.; Yasui, Dag H.; Niida, Hiroyuki; Joh, Tadashi; Loh, Dennis Y.; Kowhi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2000-02-24

    SATB1 is expressed primarily in thymocytes and can act as a transcriptional repressor. SATB1 binds in vivo to the matrix attachment regions (MARs) of DNA, which are implicated in the loop domain organization of chromatin. The role of MAR-binding proteins in specific cell lineages is unknown. We generated SATB1-null mice to determine how SATB1 functions in the T-cell lineage. SATB1-null mice are small in size, have disproportionately small thymi and spleens, and die at 3 weeks of age. At the cellular level, multiple defects in T-cell development were observed. Immature CD3-CD4-CD8 triple negative (TN) thymocytes were greatly reduced in number, and thymocyte development was blocked mainly at the DP stage. The few peripheral CD4{sup +} single positive (SP) cells underwent apoptosis and failed to proliferate in response to activating stimuli. At the molecular level, among 589 genes examined, at least 2% of genes including a proto-oncogene, cytokine receptor genes, and apoptosis-related genes were derepressed at inappropriate stages of T-cell development in SATB1-null mice. For example, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-7R{alpha} genes were ectopically transcribed in CD4{sup 4+}-CD{sup 8+} double positive (DP) thymocytes. SATB1 appears to orchestrate the temporal and spatial expression of genes during T-cell development, thereby ensuring the proper development of this lineage. Our data provide the first evidence that MAR-binding proteins can act as global regulators of cell function in specific cell lineages.

  8. The MAR-binding protein SATB1 orchestrates temporal and spatial expression of multiple genes during T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, John D.; Yasui, Dag H.; Niida, Hiroyuki; Joh, Tadashi; Loh, Dennis Y.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2000-01-01

    SATB1 is expressed primarily in thymocytes and can act as a transcriptional repressor. SATB1 binds in vivo to the matrix attachment regions (MARs) of DNA, which are implicated in the loop domain organization of chromatin. The role of MAR-binding proteins in specific cell lineages is unknown. We generated SATB1-null mice to determine how SATB1 functions in the T-cell lineage. SATB1-null mice are small in size, have disproportionately small thymi and spleens, and die at 3 weeks of age. At the cellular level, multiple defects in T-cell development were observed. Immature CD3−CD4−CD8− triple negative (TN) thymocytes were greatly reduced in number, and thymocyte development was blocked mainly at the DP stage. The few peripheral CD4+ single positive (SP) cells underwent apoptosis and failed to proliferate in response to activating stimuli. At the molecular level, among 589 genes examined, at least 2% of genes including a proto-oncogene, cytokine receptor genes, and apoptosis-related genes were derepressed at inappropriate stages of T-cell development in SATB1-null mice. For example, IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα genes were ectopically transcribed in CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. SATB1 appears to orchestrate the temporal and spatial expression of genes during T-cell development, thereby ensuring the proper development of this lineage. Our data provide the first evidence that MAR-binding proteins can act as global regulators of cell function in specific cell lineages. PMID:10716941

  9. Dual thio-digalactoside-binding modes of human galectins as the structural basis for the design of potent and selective inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tung-Ju; Lin, Hsien-Ya; Tu, Zhijay; Lin, Ting-Chien; Wu, Shang-Chuen; Tseng, Yu-Yao; Liu, Fu-Tong; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Human galectins are promising targets for cancer immunotherapeutic and fibrotic disease-related drugs. We report herein the binding interactions of three thio-digalactosides (TDGs) including TDG itself, TD139 (3,3'-deoxy-3,3'-bis-(4-[m-fluorophenyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-thio-digalactoside, recently approved for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), and TAZTDG (3-deoxy-3-(4-[m-fluorophenyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-thio-digalactoside) with human galectins-1, -3 and -7 as assessed by X-ray crystallography, isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy. Five binding subsites (A-E) make up the carbohydrate-recognition domains of these galectins. We identified novel interactions between an arginine within subsite E of the galectins and an arene group in the ligands. In addition to the interactions contributed by the galactosyl sugar residues bound at subsites C and D, the fluorophenyl group of TAZTDG preferentially bound to subsite B in galectin-3, whereas the same group favored binding at subsite E in galectins-1 and -7. The characterised dual binding modes demonstrate how binding potency, reported as decreased Kd values of the TDG inhibitors from μM to nM, is improved and also offer insights to development of selective inhibitors for individual galectins. PMID:27416897

  10. Docking, molecular dynamics and QM/MM studies to delineate the mode of binding of CucurbitacinE to F-actin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Pravin; Roopa, L; Nongthomba, Upendra; Sudheer Mohammed, M M; Kulkarni, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    CucurbitacinE (CurE) has been known to bind covalently to F-actin and inhibit depolymerization. However, the mode of binding of CurE to F-actin and the consequent changes in the F-actin dynamics have not been studied. Through quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) and density function theory (DFT) simulations after the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the docked complex of F-actin and CurE, a detailed transition state (TS) model for the Michael reaction is proposed. The TS model shows nucleophilic attack of the sulphur of Cys257 at the β-carbon of Michael Acceptor of CurE producing an enol intermediate that forms a covalent bond with CurE. The MD results show a clear difference between the structure of the F-actin in free form and F-actin complexed with CurE. CurE affects the conformation of the nucleotide binding pocket increasing the binding affinity between F-actin and ADP, which in turn could affect the nucleotide exchange. CurE binding also limits the correlated displacement of the relatively flexible domain 1 of F-actin causing the protein to retain a flat structure and to transform into a stable "tense" state. This structural transition could inhibit depolymerization of F-actin. In conclusion, CurE allosterically modulates ADP and stabilizes F-actin structure, thereby affecting nucleotide exchange and depolymerization of F-actin. PMID:26615469

  11. Dual thio-digalactoside-binding modes of human galectins as the structural basis for the design of potent and selective inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tung-Ju; Lin, Hsien-Ya; Tu, Zhijay; Lin, Ting-Chien; Wu, Shang-Chuen; Tseng, Yu-Yao; Liu, Fu-Tong; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Human galectins are promising targets for cancer immunotherapeutic and fibrotic disease-related drugs. We report herein the binding interactions of three thio-digalactosides (TDGs) including TDG itself, TD139 (3,3’-deoxy-3,3’-bis-(4-[m-fluorophenyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-thio-digalactoside, recently approved for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), and TAZTDG (3-deoxy-3-(4-[m-fluorophenyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-thio-digalactoside) with human galectins-1, -3 and -7 as assessed by X-ray crystallography, isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy. Five binding subsites (A–E) make up the carbohydrate-recognition domains of these galectins. We identified novel interactions between an arginine within subsite E of the galectins and an arene group in the ligands. In addition to the interactions contributed by the galactosyl sugar residues bound at subsites C and D, the fluorophenyl group of TAZTDG preferentially bound to subsite B in galectin-3, whereas the same group favored binding at subsite E in galectins-1 and -7. The characterised dual binding modes demonstrate how binding potency, reported as decreased Kd values of the TDG inhibitors from μM to nM, is improved and also offer insights to development of selective inhibitors for individual galectins. PMID:27416897

  12. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    PubMed Central

    Dahms, Sven O.; Mayer, Magnus C.; Roeser, Dirk; Multhaup, Gerd; Than, Manuel E.

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2)2–(heparin)2 complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins. PMID:25760599

  13. Tempo and mode of the multiple origins of salinity tolerance in a water beetle lineage.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Paula; Andújar, Carmelo; Abellán, Pedro; Velasco, Josefa; Millán, Andrés; Ribera, Ignacio

    2014-02-01

    Salinity is one of the most important drivers of the distribution, abundance and diversity of organisms. Previous studies on the evolution of saline tolerance have been mainly centred on marine and terrestrial organisms, while lineages inhabiting inland waters remain largely unexplored. This is despite the fact that these systems include a much broader range of salinities, going from freshwater to more than six times the salinity of the sea (i.e. >200 g/L). Here, we study the pattern and timing of the evolution of the tolerance to salinity in an inland aquatic lineage of water beetles (Enochrus species of the subgenus Lumetus, family Hydrophilidae), with the general aim of understanding the mechanisms by which it was achieved. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny built from five mitochondrial and two nuclear genes and information about the salinity tolerance and geographical distribution of the species, we found that salinity tolerance appeared multiple times associated with periods of global aridification. We found evidence of some accelerated transitions from freshwater directly to high salinities, as reconstructed with extant lineages. This, together with the strong positive correlation found between salinity tolerance and aridity of the habitats in which species are found, suggests that tolerance to salinity may be based on a co-opted mechanism developed originally for drought resistance. PMID:24372998

  14. Phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein 4 (PEBP4) is a secreted protein and has multiple functions.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Liu, Dan; Lin, Hui; Jiang, Shanshan; Ying, Ying; Chun, Shao; Deng, Haiteng; Zaia, Joseph; Wen, Rong; Luo, Zhijun

    2016-07-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine binding proteins (PEBP) represent a superfamily of proteins that are conserved from bacteria to humans. In mammals, four members have been identified, PEBP1-4. To determine the functional differences among PEBP1-4 and the underlying mechanism for their actions, we performed a sequence alignment and found that PEBP4 contains a signal peptide and potential glycosylation sites, whereas PEBP1-3 are intracellular proteins. To test if PEBP4 is secreted, we made constructs with Myc epitope at the amino (N) terminus or carboxyl (C) terminus to mask the signal sequence or keep it free, respectively. Our data revealed that both mouse and human PEBP4 were secreted when the epitope was tagged at their C-terminus. To our surprise, secretion was dependent upon the C-terminal conserved domain in addition to the N-terminal signal sequence. When the epitope was placed to the N-terminus, the recombinant protein failed to secrete and instead, was retained in the cytoplasm. Mass spectrometry detected asparagine (N)-glycosylation on the secreted PEBP4. Although overexpression of N-terminal tagged PEBP4 resulted in an inhibition of ERK activation by EGF, that with a C-terminal epitope tag did not have such an effect. Likewise, transfection of PEBP4 shRNA did not appear to affect ERK activation, suggesting that PEBP4 does not participate in the regulation of this pathway. In contrast, PEBP4 siRNA suppressed phosphorylation of Act at S473. Therefore, our results suggest that PEBP4 is a multifunctional protein and can be secreted. It will be important to investigate the mechanism by which PEBP4 is secreted and regulates cellular events. PMID:27033522

  15. Detection of geodesic acoustic mode oscillations, using multiple signal classification analysis of Doppler backscattering signal on Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; the Tore Supra Team

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the first observation of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) on Tore Supra plasmas. Using the Doppler backscattering system, the oscillations of the plasma flow velocity, localized between r/a = 0.85 and r/a = 0.95, and with a frequency, typically around 10 kHz, have been observed at the plasma edge in numerous discharges. When the additional heating power is varied, the frequency is found to scale with Cs/R. The MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm is employed to access the temporal evolution of the perpendicular velocity of density fluctuations. The method is presented in some detail, and is validated and compared against standard methods, such as the conventional fast Fourier transform method, using a synthetic signal. It stands out as a powerful data analysis method to follow the Doppler frequency with a high temporal resolution, which is important in order to extract the dynamics of GAMs.

  16. Silica uptake by Spartina—evidence of multiple modes of accumulation from salt marshes around the world

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Joanna C.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) plays a critical role in plant functional ecology, protecting plants from multiple environmental stressors. While all terrestrial plants contain some Si, wetland grasses are frequently found to have the highest concentrations, although the mechanisms driving Si accumulation in wetland grasses remain in large part uncertain. For example, active Si accumulation is often assumed to be responsible for elevated Si concentrations found in wetland grasses. However, life stage and differences in Si availability in the surrounding environment also appear to be important variables controlling the Si concentrations of wetland grasses. Here we used original data from five North American salt marshes, as well as all known published literature values, to examine the primary drivers of Si accumulation in Spartina, a genus of prolific salt marsh grasses found worldwide. We found evidence of multiple modes of Si accumulation in Spartina, with passive accumulation observed in non-degraded marshes where Spartina was native, while rejective accumulation was found in regions where Spartina was invasive. Evidence of active accumulation was found in only one marsh where Spartina was native, but was also subjected to nutrient over-enrichment. We developed a conceptual model which hypothesizes that the mode of Si uptake by Spartina is dependent on local environmental factors and genetic origin, supporting the idea that plant species should be placed along a spectrum of Si accumulation. We hypothesize that Spartina exhibits previously unrecognized phenotypic plasticity with regard to Si accumulation, allowing these plants to respond to changes in marsh condition. These results provide new insight regarding how salt marsh ecosystems regulate Si exchange at the land-sea interface. PMID:24904599

  17. Analysis of salt-induced physiological and proline changes in 46 switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) lines indicates multiple response modes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongwoon; Liu, Yiming; Zhang, Xunzhong; Zhao, Bingyu; Childs, Kevin L

    2016-08-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is targeted as a biofuel feedstock species that may be grown on marginal lands including those with saline soils. Our study investigated salt stress responses in 46 switchgrass lines from the lowland and upland ecotypes by assessing physiological phenotypes and proline concentrations. Lowland switchgrass lines demonstrated less severe responses to salt stress than most upland switchgrass lines, but a number of upland lines performed as well as lowland individuals. Photosynthetic rate (Pn), the most important physiological trait measured, was reduced by salt treatment in all lines. Tolerant lines showed ∼50% reduction in Pn under salt stress, and sensitive lines exhibited ∼90% reduction in Pn after salt stress. Proline analysis showed the largest amount of variation under salt stress with some lines exhibiting minor increases in proline, but some salt-sensitive lines demonstrated more than 5000-fold increase in proline concentration in response to salt treatment. Clustering of salt-stress phenotypic responses revealed five groups of switchgrass. Lowland lines were present in two of the phenotypic clusters, but upland lines were found in all five of the phenotypic clusters. These results suggest that there are multiple modes of salt response in switchgrass including two distinct modes of salt tolerance. PMID:27111258

  18. Theory of Raman Scattering from Leggett's Collective Mode in a Multiple Band Superconductor: Application to MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Miles

    2008-03-01

    Using an extension of BCS theory to a two-band superconductor, Leggett showed that if the relevant parameters obeyed certain conditions a collective mode would exist corresponding to the counter flow of the two condensates.^1 I have extended earlier work on electronic Raman in superconductors^2 to the multiple band case in order to incorporate Leggett's theory. The following effects have been included: (a) Vertex correction in the particle/hole channel where the Raman vertex acts. (b) Realistic parameters that apply to MgB2 yielding a counter flow mode that decays into the pair-breaking continuum associated with the lower gap π band. (c) Large finite wave-vector effects due to the relatively large Fermi velocity of the π band. (d) Integration over the wave-vector in part (c) necessitated by the exponential decay of the photon fields traveling into and out of the metallic sample. A comparison to the results of Blumberg^3 will be given. ^1A.J. Leggett, Progr. Theor. Phys. 36, 901 (1966). ^2M.V. Klein and S.B. Dierker, Phys. Rev. B29, 4976 (1984). ^3G. Blumberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, (2007); arXiv:0710.2803.

  19. 4-Chloro-6-pyrimidinylferrocene modified silica gel: A novel multiple-function stationary phase for mixed-mode chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lijun; Zhou, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yanhao; Yu, Ajuan; Hu, Kai; Zhang, Shusheng; Wu, Yangjie

    2016-06-01

    A novel multi-function and mixed-mode stationary phase based on 4-chloro-6-pyrimidinylferrocene modified silica (NFcS) was synthesized and characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Linear solvation energy relationship method was successfully employed to evaluate the new phase with a set of 27 solutes including aromatic and aliphatic compounds. Multiple mechanisms including hydrophobic, π-π, hydrogen-bonding, charge-transfer, acid-base equilibrium and anion-exchange interactions are involved. Based on these interactions, successful separation could be achieved among polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, mono-substituted benzenes, aromatic amines, phenols, quinolines, pyridines and nucleosides in reversed-phase (RP) or normal-phase (NP) chromatography. Inorganic anions were also shown to be individually separated in anion-exchange chromatography by using the same column. Moreover, the results here also demonstrated that NFcS based stationary phase could effectively reduce the adverse effect of residual silanol in the separation process. Such stationary phase with characteristics of multi-interaction mechanism and mixed-mode separation is potential for the analysis of complex samples. The NFcS column was successfully employed for the analysis of plant growth regulators in Fruit. PMID:27130083

  20. Search for supersolidity in solid 4He using multiple-mode torsional oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Eyal, Anna; Mi, Xiao; Talanov, Artem V.; Reppy, John D.

    2016-01-01

    In 2004, Kim and Chan (KC) reported a decrease in the period of torsional oscillators (TO) containing samples of solid 4He, as the temperature was lowered below 0.2 K [Kim E, Chan MHW (2004) Science 305(5692):1941–1944]. These unexpected results constituted the first experimental evidence that the long-predicted supersolid state of solid 4He may exist in nature. The KC results were quickly confirmed in a number of other laboratories and created great excitement in the low-temperature condensed-matter community. Since that time, however, it has become clear that the period shifts seen in the early experiments can in large part be explained by an increase in the shear modulus of the 4He solid identified by Day and Beamish [Day J, Beamish J (2007) Nature 450(7171):853–856]. Using multiple-frequency torsional oscillators, we can separate frequency-dependent period shifts arising from changes in the elastic properties of the solid 4He from possible supersolid signals, which are expected to be independent of frequency. We find in our measurements that as the temperature is lowered below 0.2 K, a clear frequency-dependent contribution to the period shift arising from changes in the 4He elastic properties is always present. For all of the cells reported in this paper, however, there is always an additional small frequency-independent contribution to the total period shift, such as would be expected in the case of a transition to a supersolid state. PMID:27222579

  1. Search for supersolidity in solid 4He using multiple-mode torsional oscillators.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Anna; Mi, Xiao; Talanov, Artem V; Reppy, John D

    2016-06-01

    In 2004, Kim and Chan (KC) reported a decrease in the period of torsional oscillators (TO) containing samples of solid (4)He, as the temperature was lowered below 0.2 K [Kim E, Chan MHW (2004) Science 305(5692):1941-1944]. These unexpected results constituted the first experimental evidence that the long-predicted supersolid state of solid (4)He may exist in nature. The KC results were quickly confirmed in a number of other laboratories and created great excitement in the low-temperature condensed-matter community. Since that time, however, it has become clear that the period shifts seen in the early experiments can in large part be explained by an increase in the shear modulus of the (4)He solid identified by Day and Beamish [Day J, Beamish J (2007) Nature 450(7171):853-856]. Using multiple-frequency torsional oscillators, we can separate frequency-dependent period shifts arising from changes in the elastic properties of the solid (4)He from possible supersolid signals, which are expected to be independent of frequency. We find in our measurements that as the temperature is lowered below 0.2 K, a clear frequency-dependent contribution to the period shift arising from changes in the (4)He elastic properties is always present. For all of the cells reported in this paper, however, there is always an additional small frequency-independent contribution to the total period shift, such as would be expected in the case of a transition to a supersolid state. PMID:27222579

  2. Search for supersolidity in solid 4He using multiple-mode torsional oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyal, Anna; Mi, Xiao; Talanov, Artem V.; Reppy, John D.

    2016-06-01

    In 2004, Kim and Chan (KC) reported a decrease in the period of torsional oscillators (TO) containing samples of solid 4He, as the temperature was lowered below 0.2 K [Kim E, Chan MHW (2004) Science 305(5692):1941–1944]. These unexpected results constituted the first experimental evidence that the long-predicted supersolid state of solid 4He may exist in nature. The KC results were quickly confirmed in a number of other laboratories and created great excitement in the low-temperature condensed-matter community. Since that time, however, it has become clear that the period shifts seen in the early experiments can in large part be explained by an increase in the shear modulus of the 4He solid identified by Day and Beamish [Day J, Beamish J (2007) Nature 450(7171):853–856]. Using multiple-frequency torsional oscillators, we can separate frequency-dependent period shifts arising from changes in the elastic properties of the solid 4He from possible supersolid signals, which are expected to be independent of frequency. We find in our measurements that as the temperature is lowered below 0.2 K, a clear frequency-dependent contribution to the period shift arising from changes in the 4He elastic properties is always present. For all of the cells reported in this paper, however, there is always an additional small frequency-independent contribution to the total period shift, such as would be expected in the case of a transition to a supersolid state.

  3. Anti-adaptors provide multiple modes for regulation of the RssB adaptor protein

    PubMed Central

    Battesti, Aurelia; Hoskins, Joel R.; Tong, Song; Milanesio, Paola; Mann, Jessica M.; Kravats, Andrea; Tsegaye, Yodit M.; Bougdour, Alexandre; Wickner, Sue; Gottesman, Susan

    2013-01-01

    RpoS, an RNA polymerase σ factor, controls the response of Escherichia coli and related bacteria to multiple stress responses. During nonstress conditions, RpoS is rapidly degraded by ClpXP, mediated by the adaptor protein RssB, a member of the response regulator family. In response to stress, RpoS degradation ceases. Small anti-adaptor proteins—IraP, IraM, and IraD, each made under a different stress condition—block RpoS degradation. RssB mutants resistant to either IraP or IraM were isolated and analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Each of the anti-adaptors is unique in its interaction with RssB and sensitivity to RssB mutants. One class of mutants defined an RssB N-terminal region close to the phosphorylation site and critical for interaction with IraP but unnecessary for IraM and IraD function. A second class, in the RssB C-terminal PP2C-like domain, led to activation of RssB function. These mutants allowed the response regulator to act in the absence of phosphorylation but did not abolish interaction with anti-adaptors. This class of mutants is broadly resistant to the anti-adaptors and bears similarity to constitutively activated mutants found in a very different PP2C protein. The mutants provide insight into how the anti-adaptors perturb RssB response regulator function and activation. PMID:24352426

  4. Search for β2 Adrenergic Receptor Ligands by Virtual Screening via Grid Computing and Investigation of Binding Modes by Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Qifeng; Shao, Yonghua; Pan, Dabo; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    We designed a program called MolGridCal that can be used to screen small molecule database in grid computing on basis of JPPF grid environment. Based on MolGridCal program, we proposed an integrated strategy for virtual screening and binding mode investigation by combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and free energy calculations. To test the effectiveness of MolGridCal, we screened potential ligands for β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) from a database containing 50,000 small molecules. MolGridCal can not only send tasks to the grid server automatically, but also can distribute tasks using the screensaver function. As for the results of virtual screening, the known agonist BI-167107 of β2AR is ranked among the top 2% of the screened candidates, indicating MolGridCal program can give reasonable results. To further study the binding mode and refine the results of MolGridCal, more accurate docking and scoring methods are used to estimate the binding affinity for the top three molecules (agonist BI-167107, neutral antagonist alprenolol and inverse agonist ICI 118,551). The results indicate agonist BI-167107 has the best binding affinity. MD simulation and free energy calculation are employed to investigate the dynamic interaction mechanism between the ligands and β2AR. The results show that the agonist BI-167107 also has the lowest binding free energy. This study can provide a new way to perform virtual screening effectively through integrating molecular docking based on grid computing, MD simulations and free energy calculations. The source codes of MolGridCal are freely available at http://molgridcal.codeplex.com. PMID:25229694

  5. Receptor binding mode and pharmacological characterization of a potent and selective dual CXCR1/CXCR2 non-competitive allosteric inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, R; Barcelos, LS; Beccari, AR; Cavalieri, B; Moriconi, A; Bizzarri, C; Di Benedetto, P; Di Giacinto, C; Gloaguen, I; Galliera, E; Corsi, MM; Russo, RC; Andrade, SP; Cesta, MC; Nano, G; Aramini, A; Cutrin, JC; Locati, M; Allegretti, M; Teixeira, MM

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE DF 2156A is a new dual inhibitor of IL-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 with an optimal pharmacokinetic profile. We characterized its binding mode, molecular mechanism of action and selectivity, and evaluated its therapeutic potential. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The binding mode, molecular mechanism of action and selectivity were investigated using chemotaxis of L1.2 transfectants and human leucocytes, in addition to radioligand and [35S]-GTPγS binding approaches. The therapeutic potential of DF 2156A was evaluated in acute (liver ischaemia and reperfusion) and chronic (sponge-induced angiogenesis) experimental models of inflammation. KEY RESULTS A network of polar interactions stabilized by a direct ionic bond between DF 2156A and Lys99 on CXCR1 and the non-conserved residue Asp293 on CXCR2 are the key determinants of DF 2156A binding. DF 2156A acted as a non-competitive allosteric inhibitor blocking the signal transduction leading to chemotaxis without altering the binding affinity of natural ligands. DF 2156A effectively and selectively inhibited CXCR1/CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis of L1.2 transfectants and leucocytes. In a murine model of sponge-induced angiogenesis, DF 2156A reduced leucocyte influx, TNF-α production and neovessel formation. In vitro, DF 2156A prevented proliferation, migration and capillary-like organization of HUVECs in response to human IL-8. In a rat model of liver ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury, DF 2156A decreased PMN and monocyte-macrophage infiltration and associated hepatocellular injury. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS DF 2156A is a non-competitive allosteric inhibitor of both IL-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. It prevented experimental angiogenesis and hepatic I/R injury in vivo and, therefore, has therapeutic potential for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:21718305

  6. Revealing the binding modes and the unbinding of 14-3-3σ proteins and inhibitors by computational methods

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guodong; Cao, Zanxia; Xu, Shicai; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    The 14-3-3σ proteins are a family of ubiquitous conserved eukaryotic regulatory molecules involved in the regulation of mitogenic signal transduction, apoptotic cell death, and cell cycle control. A lot of small-molecule inhibitors have been identified for 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In this work, we carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method to study the binding mechanism between a 14-3-3σ protein and its eight inhibitors. The ranking order of our calculated binding free energies is in agreement with the experimental results. We found that the binding free energies are mainly from interactions between the phosphate group of the inhibitors and the hydrophilic residues. To improve the binding free energy of Rx group, we designed the inhibitor R9 with group R9 = 4-hydroxypheny. However, we also found that the binding free energy of inhibitor R9 is smaller than that of inhibitor R1. By further using the steer molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations, we identified a new hydrogen bond between the inhibitor R8 and residue Arg64 in the pulling paths. The information obtained from this study may be valuable for future rational design of novel inhibitors, and provide better structural understanding of inhibitor binding to 14-3-3σ proteins. PMID:26568041

  7. Probing Difference in Binding Modes of Inhibitors to MDMX by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Different Free Energy Methods.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuhua; Zhang, Shaolong; Zhang, Qinggang

    2015-01-01

    The p53-MDMX interaction has attracted extensive attention of anti-cancer drug development in recent years. This current work adopted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and cross-correlation analysis to investigate conformation changes of MDMX caused by inhibitor bindings. The obtained information indicates that the binding cleft of MDMX undergoes a large conformational change and the dynamic behavior of residues obviously change by the presence of different structural inhibitors. Two different methods of binding free energy predictions were employed to carry out a comparable insight into binding mechanisms of four inhibitors PMI, pDI, WK23 and WW8 to MDMX. The data show that the main factor controlling the inhibitor bindings to MDMX arises from van der Waals interactions. The binding free energies were further divided into contribution of each residue and the derived information gives a conclusion that the hydrophobic interactions, such as CH-CH, CH-π and π-π interactions, are responsible for the inhibitor associations with MDMX. PMID:26513747

  8. Probing Difference in Binding Modes of Inhibitors to MDMX by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Different Free Energy Methods

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuhua; Zhang, Shaolong; Zhang, Qinggang

    2015-01-01

    The p53-MDMX interaction has attracted extensive attention of anti-cancer drug development in recent years. This current work adopted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and cross-correlation analysis to investigate conformation changes of MDMX caused by inhibitor bindings. The obtained information indicates that the binding cleft of MDMX undergoes a large conformational change and the dynamic behavior of residues obviously change by the presence of different structural inhibitors. Two different methods of binding free energy predictions were employed to carry out a comparable insight into binding mechanisms of four inhibitors PMI, pDI, WK23 and WW8 to MDMX. The data show that the main factor controlling the inhibitor bindings to MDMX arises from van der Waals interactions. The binding free energies were further divided into contribution of each residue and the derived information gives a conclusion that the hydrophobic interactions, such as CH-CH, CH-π and π-π interactions, are responsible for the inhibitor associations with MDMX. PMID:26513747

  9. Unbound position II in MXCXXC metallochaperone model peptides impacts metal binding mode and reactivity: Distinct similarities to whole proteins.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Michal S; Dekel, Noa; Goch, Wojciech; Shalev, Deborah E; Danieli, Tsafi; Lebendiker, Mario; Bal, Wojciech; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2016-06-01

    The effect of position II in the binding sequence of copper metallochaperones, which varies between Thr and His, was investigated through structural analysis and affinity and oxidation kinetic studies of model peptides. A first Cys-Cu(I)-Cys model obtained for the His peptide at acidic and neutral pH, correlated with higher affinity and more rapid oxidation of its complex; in contrast, the Thr peptide with the Cys-Cu(I)-Met coordination under neutral conditions demonstrated weaker and pH dependent binding. Studies with human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) and three of its mutants where S residues were replaced with Ala suggested that (a) the binding affinity is influenced more by the binding sequence than by the protein fold (b) pH may play a role in binding reactivity, and (c) mutating the Met impacted the affinity and oxidation rate more drastically than did mutating one of the Cys, supporting its important role in protein function. Position II thus plays a dominant role in metal binding and transport. PMID:26901629

  10. Escherichia coli integration host factor bends the DNA at the ends of IS1 and in an insertion hotspot with multiple IHF binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Prentki, P; Chandler, M; Galas, D J

    1987-01-01

    The integration host factor of Escherichia coli (IHF) is a small, histone-like protein which participates in the integration of bacteriophage lambda into the E. coli chromosome and in a number of regulatory processes. Our recent footprinting analysis has shown that IHF binds specifically to the ends of the transposable element IS1, as well as to several sites within a short segment of the plasmid pBR322. We have extended our studies of the binding of the IHF molecule to these sites in vitro using a gel retardation assay. We report here that IHF bends the DNA upon binding, as judged from the strong cyclic dependence of the protein-induced mobility shift on the position of the binding site. Using cloned, synthetic ends of IS1 as substrates, we have found that some mutations within the conserved bases of the IHF consensus binding sequence abolish binding, and that alterations of the flanking sequences can greatly reduce IHF binding. The presence of multiple IHF sites on a single DNA fragment increases binding very little, indicating that IHF does not bind cooperatively in this complex. We discuss the possibility that DNA bending is related to the role IHF plays in forming and stabilizing nucleoprotein complexes, and suggest that bending at the IHF sites may be important to its diverse effects in the cell. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2822395

  11. Mode of interaction of TRIP13 AAA-ATPase with the Mad2-binding protein p31comet and with mitotic checkpoint complexes

    PubMed Central

    Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Kaisari, Sharon; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Hershko, Avram

    2015-01-01

    The AAA-ATPase thyroid hormone receptor interacting protein 13 (TRIP13), jointly with the Mad2-binding protein p31comet, promotes the inactivation of the mitotic (spindle assembly) checkpoint by disassembling the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). This checkpoint system ensures the accuracy of chromosome segregation by delaying anaphase until correct bipolar attachment of chromatids to the mitotic spindle is achieved. MCC inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets for degradation securin, an inhibitor of anaphase initiation. MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, and Bub3, in association with the APC/C activator Cdc20. The assembly of MCC in active checkpoint is initiated by the conversion of Mad2 from an open (O-Mad2) to a closed (C-Mad2) conformation, which then binds tightly to Cdc20. Conversely, the disassembly of MCC that takes place when the checkpoint is turned off involves the conversion of C-Mad2 back to O-Mad2. Previously, we found that the latter process is mediated by TRIP13 together with p31comet, but the mode of their interaction remained unknown. Here, we report that the oligomeric form of TRIP13 binds both p31comet and MCC. Furthermore, p31comet and checkpoint complexes mutually promote the binding of each other to oligomeric TRIP13. We propose that p31comet bound to C-Mad2–containing checkpoint complex is the substrate for the ATPase and that the substrate-binding site of TRIP13 is composed of subsites specific for p31comet and C-Mad2–containing complex. The simultaneous occupancy of both subsites is required for high-affinity binding to TRIP13. PMID:26324890

  12. Use of spatial time-division repetition rate multiplication of mode-locked laser pulses to generate microwave radiation from optoelectronic switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooradian, A.

    1984-09-01

    An all-optical technique is described which can substantially increase the pulse repetition rate of the output from any mode-locked laser. Multiplication of the repetition rate by a factor of 16 has been demonstrated. A mode-locked laser pulse train multiplied up to a 2-GHz repetition rate has been used to generate microwave radiation by means of a GaAs avalanche photodiode as well as an Fe:InP optoelectronic switch.

  13. Crystal structure of DnaT84–153-dT10 ssDNA complex reveals a novel single-stranded DNA binding mode

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Chen, Peng; Wang, Xuejuan; Cai, Gang; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    DnaT is a primosomal protein that is required for the stalled replication fork restart in Escherichia coli. As an adapter, DnaT mediates the PriA-PriB-ssDNA ternary complex and the DnaB/C complex. However, the fundamental function of DnaT during PriA-dependent primosome assembly is still a black box. Here, we report the 2.83 Å DnaT84–153-dT10 ssDNA complex structure, which reveals a novel three-helix bundle single-stranded DNA binding mode. Based on binding assays and negative-staining electron microscopy results, we found that DnaT can bind to phiX 174 ssDNA to form nucleoprotein filaments for the first time, which indicates that DnaT might function as a scaffold protein during the PriA-dependent primosome assembly. In combination with biochemical analysis, we propose a cooperative mechanism for the binding of DnaT to ssDNA and a possible model for the assembly of PriA-PriB-ssDNA-DnaT complex that sheds light on the function of DnaT during the primosome assembly and stalled replication fork restart. This report presents the first structure of the DnaT C-terminal complex with ssDNA and a novel model that explains the interactions between the three-helix bundle and ssDNA. PMID:25053836

  14. Modes of heme binding and substrate access for cytochrome P450 CYP74A revealed by crystal structures of allene oxide synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lenong; Chang, Zhenzhan; Pan, Zhiqiang; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2009-01-12

    Cytochrome P450s exist ubiquitously in all organisms and are involved in many biological processes. Allene oxide synthase (AOS) is a P450 enzyme that plays a key role in the biosynthesis of oxylipin jasmonates, which are involved in signal and defense reactions in higher plants. The crystal structures of guayule (Parthenium argentatum) AOS (CYP74A2) and its complex with the substrate analog 13(S)-hydroxyoctadeca-9Z,11E-dienoic acid have been determined. The structures exhibit a classic P450 fold but possess a heme-binding mode with an unusually long heme binding loop and a unique I-helix. The structures also reveal two channels through which substrate and product may access and leave the active site. The entrances are defined by a loop between {beta}3-2 and {beta}3-3. Asn-276 in the substrate binding site may interact with the substrate's hydroperoxy group and play an important role in catalysis, and Lys-282 at the entrance may control substrate access and binding. These studies provide both structural insights into AOS and related P450s and a structural basis to understand the distinct reaction mechanism.

  15. Structures of the APC–ARM domain in complexes with discrete Amer1/WTX fragments reveal that it uses a consensus mode to recognize its binding partners

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyi; Akyildiz, Senem; Xiao, Yafei; Gai, Zhongchao; An, Ying; Behrens, Jürgen; Wu, Geng

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor APC employs its conserved armadillo repeat (ARM) domain to recognize many of its binding partners, including Amer1/WTX, which is mutated in Wilms' tumor and bone overgrowth syndrome. The APC–Amer1 complex has important roles in regulating Wnt signaling and cell adhesion. Three sites A1, A2, and A3 of Amer1 have been reported to mediate its interaction with APC-ARM. In this study, crystal structures of APC–ARM in complexes with Amer1-A1, -A2, and -A4, which is newly identified in this work, were determined. Combined with our GST pull-down, yeast two-hybrid, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assay results using mutants of APC and Amer1 interface residues, our structures demonstrate that Amer1-A1, -A2, and -A4, as well as other APC-binding proteins such as Asef and Sam68, all employ a common recognition pattern to associate with APC–ARM. In contrast, Amer1-A3 binds to the C-terminal side of APC–ARM through a bipartite interaction mode. Composite mutations on either APC or Amer1 disrupting all four interfaces abrogated their association in cultured cells and impaired the membrane recruitment of APC by Amer1. Our study thus comprehensively elucidated the recognition mechanism between APC and Amer1, and revealed a consensus recognition sequence employed by various APC–ARM binding partners.

  16. The mode of action and the structure of a herbicide in complex with its target: binding of activated hydantocidin to the feedback regulation site of adenylosuccinate synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Fonné-Pfister, R; Chemla, P; Ward, E; Girardet, M; Kreuz, K E; Honzatko, R B; Fromm, H J; Schär, H P; Grütter, M G; Cowan-Jacob, S W

    1996-01-01

    (+)-Hydantocidin, a recently discovered natural spironucleoside with potent herbicidal activity, is shown to be a proherbicide that, after phosphorylation at the 5' position, inhibits adenylosuccinate synthetase, an enzyme involved in de novo purine synthesis. The mode of binding of hydantocidin 5'-monophosphate to the target enzyme was analyzed by determining the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex at 2.6-A resolution. It was found that adenylosuccinate synthetase binds the phosphorylated compound in the same fashion as it does adenosine 5'-monophosphate, the natural feedback regulator of this enzyme. This work provides the first crystal structure of a herbicide-target complex reported to date. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8790347

  17. Molecular Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Integration Host Factor Reveals Novel Insights into the Mode of DNA Binding and Nucleoid Compaction*

    PubMed Central

    Sharadamma, Narayanaswamy; Harshavardhana, Yadumurthy; Ravishankar, Apoorva; Anand, Praveen; Chandra, Nagasuma; Muniyappa, K.

    2014-01-01

    The annotated whole-genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed that Rv1388 (Mtihf) is likely to encode for a putative 20-kDa integration host factor (mIHF). However, very little is known about the functional properties of mIHF or the organization of the mycobacterial nucleoid. Molecular modeling of the mIHF three-dimensional structure, based on the cocrystal structure of Streptomyces coelicolor IHF duplex DNA, a bona fide relative of mIHF, revealed the presence of Arg-170, Arg-171, and Arg-173, which might be involved in DNA binding, and a conserved proline (Pro-150) in the tight turn. The phenotypic sensitivity of Escherichia coli ΔihfA and ΔihfB strains to UV and methyl methanesulfonate could be complemented with the wild-type Mtihf but not its alleles bearing mutations in the DNA-binding residues. Protein-DNA interaction assays revealed that wild-type mIHF, but not its DNA-binding variants, binds with high affinity to fragments containing attB and attP sites and curved DNA. Strikingly, the functionally important amino acid residues of mIHF and the mechanism(s) underlying its binding to DNA, DNA bending, and site-specific recombination are fundamentally different from that of E. coli IHFαβ. Furthermore, we reveal novel insights into IHF-mediated DNA compaction depending on the placement of its preferred binding sites; mIHF promotes DNA compaction into nucleoid-like or higher order filamentous structures. We therefore propose that mIHF is a distinct member of a subfamily of proteins that serve as essential cofactors in site-specific recombination and nucleoid organization and that these findings represent a significant advance in our understanding of the role(s) of nucleoid-associated proteins. PMID:25324543

  18. Keys to Lipid Selection in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Catalysis: Structural Flexibility, Gating Residues and Multiple Binding Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Bauer, Inga; Campomanes, Pablo; Cavalli, Andrea; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) regulates the endocannabinoid system cleaving primarily the lipid messenger anandamide. FAAH has been well characterized over the years and, importantly, it represents a promising drug target to treat several diseases, including inflammatory-related diseases and cancer. But its enzymatic mechanism for lipid selection to specifically hydrolyze anandamide, rather than similar bioactive lipids, remains elusive. Here, we clarify this mechanism in FAAH, examining the role of the dynamic paddle, which is formed by the gating residues Phe432 and Trp531 at the boundary between two cavities that form the FAAH catalytic site (the “membrane-access” and the “acyl chain-binding” pockets). We integrate microsecond-long MD simulations of wild type and double mutant model systems (Phe432Ala and Trp531Ala) of FAAH, embedded in a realistic membrane/water environment, with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments. We comparatively analyze three fatty acid substrates with different hydrolysis rates (anandamide > oleamide > palmitoylethanolamide). Our findings identify FAAH’s mechanism to selectively accommodate anandamide into a multi-pocket binding site, and to properly orient the substrate in pre-reactive conformations for efficient hydrolysis that is interceded by the dynamic paddle. Our findings therefore endorse a structural framework for a lipid selection mechanism mediated by structural flexibility and gating residues between multiple binding cavities, as found in FAAH. Based on the available structural data, this exquisite catalytic strategy for substrate specificity seems to be shared by other lipid-degrading enzymes with similar enzymatic architecture. The mechanistic insights for lipid selection might assist de-novo enzyme design or drug discovery efforts. PMID:26111155

  19. Targeting glutamine metabolism in multiple myeloma enhances BIM binding to BCL-2 eliciting synthetic lethality to venetoclax.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, R; Matulis, S M; Wei, C; Nooka, A K; Von Hollen, H E; Lonial, S; Boise, L H; Shanmugam, M

    2016-07-28

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy that is largely incurable due to development of resistance to therapy-elicited cell death. Nutrients are intricately connected to maintenance of cellular viability in part by inhibition of apoptosis. We were interested to determine if examination of metabolic regulation of BCL-2 proteins may provide insight on alternative routes to engage apoptosis. MM cells are reliant on glucose and glutamine and withdrawal of either nutrient is associated with varying levels of apoptosis. We and others have demonstrated that glucose maintains levels of key resistance-promoting BCL-2 family member, myeloid cell leukemic factor 1 (MCL-1). Cells continuing to survive in the absence of glucose or glutamine were found to maintain expression of MCL-1 but importantly induce pro-apoptotic BIM expression. One potential mechanism for continued survival despite induction of BIM could be due to binding and sequestration of BIM to alternate pro-survival BCL-2 members. Our investigation revealed that cells surviving glutamine withdrawal in particular, enhance expression and binding of BIM to BCL-2, consequently sensitizing these cells to the BH3 mimetic venetoclax. Glutamine deprivation-driven sensitization to venetoclax can be reversed by metabolic supplementation with TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate. Inhibition of glucose metabolism with the GLUT4 inhibitor ritonavir elicits variable cytotoxicity in MM that is marginally enhanced with venetoclax treatment, however, targeting glutamine metabolism with 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine uniformly sensitized MM cell lines and relapse/refractory patient samples to venetoclax. Our studies reveal a potent therapeutic strategy of metabolically driven synthetic lethality involving targeting glutamine metabolism for sensitization to venetoclax in MM. PMID:26640142

  20. Characterization of the differences in the cyclopiazonic acid binding mode to mammalian and P. Falciparum Ca2+ pumps: A computational study

    PubMed Central

    Di Marino, Daniele; D'Annessa, Ilda; Coletta, Andrea; Via, Allegra; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Despite the investments in malaria research, an effective vaccine has not yet been developed and the causative parasites are becoming increasingly resistant to most of the available drugs. PfATP6, the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump (SERCA) of P. falciparum, has been recently genetically validated as a potential antimalarial target and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) has been found to be a potent inhibitor of SERCAs in several organisms, including P. falciparum. In position 263, PfATP6 displays a leucine residue, whilst the corresponding position in the mammalian SERCA is occupied by a glutamic acid. The PfATP6 L263E mutation has been studied in relation to the artemisinin inhibitory effect on P. falciparum and recent studies have provided evidence that the parasite with this mutation is more susceptible to CPA. Here, we characterized, for the first time, the interaction of CPA with PfATP6 and its mammalian counterpart to understand similarities and differences in the mode of binding of the inhibitor to the two Ca2+ pumps. We found that, even though CPA does not directly interact with the residue in position 263, the presence of a hydrophobic residue in this position in PfATP6 rather than a negatively charged one, as in the mammalian SERCA, entails a conformational arrangement of the binding pocket which, in turn, determines a relaxation of CPA leading to a different binding mode of the compound. Our findings highlight differences between the plasmodial and human SERCA CPA-binding pockets that may be exploited to design CPA derivatives more selective toward PfATP6. Proteins 2015; 83:564–574. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25581715

  1. A Conserved Mode of Protein Recognition and Binding in a ParD−ParE Toxin−Antitoxin Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean

    2010-05-06

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This TA system forms an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding subdomain that is conserved between distantly related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite a low level of overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system.

  2. A conserved mode of protein recognition and binding in a ParD-ParE toxin-antitoxin complex†

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE-family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes, and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally-encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 Å resolution. This TA system forms an α2β2 heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding sub-domain that is conserved between distantly-related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite low overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system. PMID:20143871

  3. Exploration of DNA binding mode, chemical nuclease, cytotoxic and apoptotic potentials of diketone based oxovanadium(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Poonam Rajiv; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-05-01

    Two diketone based oxovanadium complexes, viz., bis(4,4,4-trifluoro-1-phenylbutane-1,3-dionato)oxovanadium(IV) (1) and bis(1,1,1-trifluoropentane-2,4-dionato)oxovanadium(IV) (2), have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The DNA binding and the cleaving ability of the complexes is assessed by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscometry and gel electrophoretic studies. The DNA binding constant values (Kb) are found to be 1.95 ± 0.16 × 10(3)M(-1) for complex 1 and 1.064 ± 0.17 × 10(3)M(-1) for complex 2, respectively. Based on the results of the spectral and viscosity studies, it is observed that the complexes, interestingly, have preferred minor groove binding with DNA. Further, the concentration-dependent oxidative cleavage pattern of pBR322 in the presence of the activating reagent, hydrogen peroxide, has also been discussed. In addition, the complexes have shown moderate cytotoxic activity by inducing apoptosis against the cervical cancer cell line, HeLa. The results of in silico analysis and logP predictions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations. Thus, synthesized oxovanadium complexes have displayed promising DNA binding behavior and DNA cleavage activity with moderately cytotoxic nature. PMID:25720830

  4. Alternative binding modes identified for growth and differentiation factor-associated serum protein (GASP) family antagonism of myostatin.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ryan G; Angerman, Elizabeth B; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin; Thompson, Thomas B

    2015-03-20

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β family of ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, it is a prime therapeutic target for muscle wasting disorders. Similar to other TGF-β family ligands, myostatin is neutralized by binding one of a number of structurally diverse antagonists. Included are the antagonists GASP-1 and GASP-2, which are unique in that they specifically antagonize myostatin. However, little is known from a structural standpoint describing the interactions of GASP antagonists with myostatin. Here, we present the First low resolution solution structure of myostatin-free and myostatin-bound states of GASP-1 and GASP-2. Our studies have revealed GASP-1, which is 100 times more potent than GASP-2, preferentially binds myostatin in an asymmetrical 1:1 complex, whereas GASP-2 binds in a symmetrical 2:1 complex. Additionally, C-terminal truncations of GASP-1 result in less potent myostatin inhibitors that form a 2:1 complex, suggesting that the C-terminal domains of GASP-1 are the primary mediators for asymmetric complex formation. Overall, this study provides a new perspective on TGF-β antagonism, where closely related antagonists can utilize different ligand-binding strategies. PMID:25657005

  5. Alternative Binding Modes Identified for Growth and Differentiation Factor-associated Serum Protein (GASP) Family Antagonism of Myostatin*

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ryan G.; Angerman, Elizabeth B.; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin; Thompson, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β family of ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, it is a prime therapeutic target for muscle wasting disorders. Similar to other TGF-β family ligands, myostatin is neutralized by binding one of a number of structurally diverse antagonists. Included are the antagonists GASP-1 and GASP-2, which are unique in that they specifically antagonize myostatin. However, little is known from a structural standpoint describing the interactions of GASP antagonists with myostatin. Here, we present the First low resolution solution structure of myostatin-free and myostatin-bound states of GASP-1 and GASP-2. Our studies have revealed GASP-1, which is 100 times more potent than GASP-2, preferentially binds myostatin in an asymmetrical 1:1 complex, whereas GASP-2 binds in a symmetrical 2:1 complex. Additionally, C-terminal truncations of GASP-1 result in less potent myostatin inhibitors that form a 2:1 complex, suggesting that the C-terminal domains of GASP-1 are the primary mediators for asymmetric complex formation. Overall, this study provides a new perspective on TGF-β antagonism, where closely related antagonists can utilize different ligand-binding strategies. PMID:25657005

  6. Inhibition and Larvicidal Activity of Phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum on Acetylcholinesterase against Mosquito Vectors and Their Binding Mode of Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hematpoor, Arshia; Liew, Sook Yee; Chong, Wei Lim; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus are vectors of dengue fever and West Nile virus diseases. This study was conducted to determine the toxicity, mechanism of action and the binding interaction of three active phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae) toward late 3rd or early 4th larvae of above vectors. A bioassay guided-fractionation on the hexane extract from the roots of Piper sarmentosum led to the isolation and identification of three active phenylpropanoids; asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3. The current study involved evaluation of the toxicity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition of these compounds against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were highly potent against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae causing up to 100% mortality at ≤ 15 μg/mL concentration. The ovicidal activity of asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3 were evaluated through egg hatching. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed potent ovicidal activity. Ovicidal activity for both compounds was up to 95% at 25μg/mL. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed strong inhibition on acetylcholinesterase with relative IC50 values of 0.73 to 1.87 μg/mL respectively. These findings coupled with the high AChE inhibition may suggest that asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 are neuron toxic compounds toward Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus. Further computational docking with Autodock Vina elaborates the possible interaction of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 with three possible binding sites of AChE which includes catalytic triads (CAS: S238, E367, H480), the peripheral sites (PAS: E72, W271) and anionic binding site (W83). The binding affinity of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were relatively strong with asaricin 1 showed a higher binding affinity in the anionic pocket. PMID:27152416

  7. Inhibition and Larvicidal Activity of Phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum on Acetylcholinesterase against Mosquito Vectors and Their Binding Mode of Interaction.

    PubMed

    Hematpoor, Arshia; Liew, Sook Yee; Chong, Wei Lim; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus are vectors of dengue fever and West Nile virus diseases. This study was conducted to determine the toxicity, mechanism of action and the binding interaction of three active phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae) toward late 3rd or early 4th larvae of above vectors. A bioassay guided-fractionation on the hexane extract from the roots of Piper sarmentosum led to the isolation and identification of three active phenylpropanoids; asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3. The current study involved evaluation of the toxicity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition of these compounds against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were highly potent against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae causing up to 100% mortality at ≤ 15 μg/mL concentration. The ovicidal activity of asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3 were evaluated through egg hatching. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed potent ovicidal activity. Ovicidal activity for both compounds was up to 95% at 25μg/mL. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed strong inhibition on acetylcholinesterase with relative IC50 values of 0.73 to 1.87 μg/mL respectively. These findings coupled with the high AChE inhibition may suggest that asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 are neuron toxic compounds toward Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus. Further computational docking with Autodock Vina elaborates the possible interaction of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 with three possible binding sites of AChE which includes catalytic triads (CAS: S238, E367, H480), the peripheral sites (PAS: E72, W271) and anionic binding site (W83). The binding affinity of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were relatively strong with asaricin 1 showed a higher binding affinity in the anionic pocket. PMID:27152416

  8. Human SLX4 is a Holliday junction resolvase subunit that binds multiple DNA repair/recombination endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Fekairi, Samira; Scaglione, Sarah; Chahwan, Charly; Taylor, Ewan R; Tissier, Agnès; Coulon, Stéphane; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Ruse, Cristian; Yates, John R; Russell, Paul; Fuchs, Robert P; McGowan, Clare H; Gaillard, Pierre-Henri L

    2009-07-10

    Structure-specific endonucleases resolve DNA secondary structures generated during DNA repair and recombination. The yeast 5' flap endonuclease Slx1-Slx4 has received particular attention with the finding that Slx4 has Slx1-independent key functions in genome maintenance. Although Slx1 is a highly conserved protein in eukaryotes, no orthologs of Slx4 were reported other than in fungi. Here we report the identification of Slx4 orthologs in metazoa, including fly MUS312, essential for meiotic recombination, and human BTBD12, an ATM/ATR checkpoint kinase substrate. Human SLX1-SLX4 displays robust Holliday junction resolvase activity in addition to 5' flap endonuclease activity. Depletion of SLX1 and SLX4 results in 53BP1 foci accumulation and H2AX phosphorylation as well as cellular hypersensitivity to MMS. Furthermore, we show that SLX4 binds the XPF(ERCC4) and MUS81 subunits of the XPF-ERCC1 and MUS81-EME1 endonucleases and is required for DNA interstrand crosslink repair. We propose that SLX4 acts as a docking platform for multiple structure-specific endonucleases. PMID:19596236

  9. Vitamin D Binding Protein Isoforms and Apolipoprotein E in Cerebrospinal Fluid as Prognostic Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Katarzyna; Minari, Nicoletta; Falvo, Sara; Marnetto, Fabiana; Caldano, Marzia; Reviglione, Raffaella; Berchialla, Paola; Capobianco, Marco A.; Malentacchi, Maria; Corpillo, Davide; Bertolotto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with a heterogeneous and unpredictable course. To date there are no prognostic biomarkers even if they would be extremely useful for early patient intervention with personalized therapies. In this context, the analysis of inter-individual differences in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome may lead to the discovery of biological markers that are able to distinguish the various clinical forms at diagnosis. Methods To this aim, a two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) study was carried out on individual CSF samples from 24 untreated women who underwent lumbar puncture (LP) for suspected MS. The patients were clinically monitored for 5 years and then classified according to the degree of disease aggressiveness and the disease-modifying therapies prescribed during follow up. Results The hierarchical cluster analysis of 2-DE dataset revealed three protein spots which were identified by means of mass spectrometry as Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and two isoforms of vitamin D binding protein (DBP). These three protein spots enabled us to subdivide the patients into subgroups correlated with clinical classification (MS aggressive forms identification: 80%). In particular, we observed an opposite trend of values for the two protein spots corresponding to different DBP isoforms suggesting a role of a post-translational modification rather than the total protein content in patient categorization. Conclusions These findings proved to be very interesting and innovative and may be developed as new candidate prognostic biomarkers of MS aggressiveness, if confirmed. PMID:26046356

  10. Nucleosome eviction and multiple co-factor binding predict estrogen-receptor-alpha-associated long-range interactions

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao; Wang, Xiaowo; Zhang, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    Many enhancers regulate their target genes via long-distance interactions. High-throughput experiments like ChIA-PET have been developed to map such largely cell-type-specific interactions between cis-regulatory elements genome-widely. In this study, we integrated multiple types of data in order to reveal the general hidden patterns embedded in the ChIA-PET data. We found characteristic distance features related to promoter–promoter, enhancer–enhancer and insulator–insulator interactions. Although a protein may have many binding sites along the genome, our hypothesis is that those sites that share certain open chromatin structure can accommodate relatively larger protein complex consisting of specific regulatory and ‘bridging’ factors, and may be more likely to form robust long-range deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) loops. This hypothesis was validated in the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) ChIA-PET data. An efficient classifier was built to predict ERα-associated long-range interactions solely from the related ChIP-seq data, hence linking distal ERα-dependent enhancers to their target genes. We further applied the classifier to generate additional novel interactions, which were undetected in the original ChIA-PET paper but were validated by other independent experiments. Our work provides a new insight into the long-range chromatin interactions through deeper and integrative ChIA-PET data analysis and demonstrates DNA looping predictability from ordinary ChIP-seq data. PMID:24782518

  11. Parametric study of the damage ring pattern in fused silica induced by multiple longitudinal modes laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chambonneau, M. Grua, P.; Rullier, J.-L.; Lamaignère, L.; Natoli, J.-Y.

    2015-03-14

    With the use of multiple longitudinal modes nanosecond laser pulses at 1064 nm, laser damage sites at the exit surface of fused silica clearly and systematically exhibit ring patterns. It has been shown in our previous works that the apparent chronology of rings was closely related to the temporal shape of the laser pulses. This particular correspondence had suggested an explanation of the ring morphology formation based on the displacement of an ionization front in the surrounding air. To provide a former basis for this hypothesis and deeper understanding of ring pattern formation, additional experiments have been performed. First, the impact of fluence has been investigated, revealing that a wide variety of damage sites are produced within a very narrow fluence range; this fact involves the chronology of appearance of a surface plasma during the laser pulse. The sizes of the damage sites are proportional to the fluence of their expansion occurring between the beginning of the plasma and the end of the laser pulse. Second, specific experiments have been carried out at different angles of incidence, resulting in egg-shaped patterns rather than circular ones. This behavior can be explained by our previous hypothesis of creation of a plasma in air, its expansion being tightly conditioned by the illumination angle. This series of experiments, in which the angle of incidence is varied up to 80°, permits us to link quantitatively the working hypothesis of ionization front propagation with theoretical hydrodynamics modeling.

  12. The Fort Collins Commuter Study: Impact of route type and transport mode on personal exposure to multiple air pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Good, Nicholas; Mölter, Anna; Ackerson, Charis; Bachand, Annette; Carpenter, Taylor; Clark, Maggie L; Fedak, Kristen M; Kayne, Ashleigh; Koehler, Kirsten; Moore, Brianna; L'Orange, Christian; Quinn, Casey; Ugave, Viney; Stuart, Amy L; Peel, Jennifer L; Volckens, John

    2016-01-01

    Traffic-related air pollution is associated with increased mortality and morbidity, yet few studies have examined strategies to reduce individual exposure while commuting. The present study aimed to quantify how choice of mode and route type affects personal exposure to air pollutants during commuting. We analyzed within-person difference in exposures to multiple air pollutants (black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), ultrafine particle number concentration (PNC), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5)) during commutes between the home and workplace for 45 participants. Participants completed 8 days of commuting by car and bicycle on direct and alternative (reduced traffic) routes. Mean within-person exposures to BC, PM2.5, and PNC were higher when commuting by cycling than when driving, but mean CO exposure was lower when cycling. Exposures to CO and BC were reduced when commuting along alternative routes. When cumulative exposure was considered, the benefits from cycling were attenuated, in the case of CO, or exacerbated, in the case of particulate exposures, owing to the increased duration of the commute. Although choice of route can reduce mean exposure, the effect of route length and duration often offsets these reductions when cumulative exposure is considered. Furthermore, increased ventilation rate when cycling may result in a more harmful dose than inhalation at a lower ventilation rate. PMID:26507004

  13. Steady state preparative multiple dual mode counter-current chromatography: Productivity and selectivity. Theory and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Kostanyan, Artak E; Erastov, Andrey A

    2015-08-01

    In the steady state (SS) multiple dual mode (MDM) counter-current chromatography (CCC), at the beginning of the first step of every cycle the sample dissolved in one of the phases is continuously fed into a CCC device over a constant time, not exceeding the run time of the first step. After a certain number of cycles, the steady state regime is achieved, where concentrations vary over time during each cycle, however, the concentration profiles of solutes eluted with both phases remain constant in all subsequent cycles. The objective of this work was to develop analytical expressions to describe the SS MDM CCC separation processes, which can be helpful to simulate and design these processes and select a suitable compromise between the productivity and the selectivity in the preparative and production CCC separations. Experiments carried out using model mixtures of compounds from the GUESSmix with solvent system hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water demonstrated a reasonable agreement between the predictions of the theory and the experimental results. PMID:26087966

  14. The Fort Collins Commuter Study: Impact of route type and transport mode on personal exposure to multiple air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Good, Nicholas; Mölter, Anna; Ackerson, Charis; Bachand, Annette; Carpenter, Taylor; Clark, Maggie L; Fedak, Kristen M; Kayne, Ashleigh; Koehler, Kirsten; Moore, Brianna; L'Orange, Christian; Quinn, Casey; Ugave, Viney; Stuart, Amy L; Peel, Jennifer L; Volckens, John

    2016-06-01

    Traffic-related air pollution is associated with increased mortality and morbidity, yet few studies have examined strategies to reduce individual exposure while commuting. The present study aimed to quantify how choice of mode and route type affects personal exposure to air pollutants during commuting. We analyzed within-person difference in exposures to multiple air pollutants (black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), ultrafine particle number concentration (PNC), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5)) during commutes between the home and workplace for 45 participants. Participants completed 8 days of commuting by car and bicycle on direct and alternative (reduced traffic) routes. Mean within-person exposures to BC, PM2.5, and PNC were higher when commuting by cycling than when driving, but mean CO exposure was lower when cycling. Exposures to CO and BC were reduced when commuting along alternative routes. When cumulative exposure was considered, the benefits from cycling were attenuated, in the case of CO, or exacerbated, in the case of particulate exposures, owing to the increased duration of the commute. Although choice of route can reduce mean exposure, the effect of route length and duration often offsets these reductions when cumulative exposure is considered. Furthermore, increased ventilation rate when cycling may result in a more harmful dose than inhalation at a lower ventilation rate. PMID:26507004

  15. Crystal Structure of Pim1 Kinase in Complex with a Pyrido[4,3-D]Pyrimidine Derivative Suggests a Unique Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jea-Won; Choi, Jang-Sik; Lee, Jaekyoo; Song, Ho-Juhn; Koh, Jong Sung; Lee, Byung Il

    2013-01-01

    Human Pim1 kinase is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays important biological roles in cell survival, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. Moreover, Pim1 is up-regulated in various hematopoietic malignancies and solid tumors. Thus, Pim1 is an attractive target for cancer therapeutics, and there has been growing interest in developing small molecule inhibitors for Pim1. Here, we describe the crystal structure of Pim1 in complex with a newly developed pyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidine-derivative inhibitor (SKI-O-068). Our inhibitor exhibits a half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 123 (±14) nM and has an unusual binding mode in complex with Pim1 kinase. The interactions between SKI-O-068 and the Pim1 active site pocket residue are different from those of other scaffold inhibitor-bound structures. The binding mode analysis suggests that the SKI-O-068 inhibitor can be improved by introducing functional groups that facilitate direct interaction with Lys67, which aid in the design of an optimized inhibitor. PMID:23936194

  16. Binding to Syntenin-1 Protein Defines a New Mode of Ubiquitin-based Interactions Regulated by Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Bago, Ružica; Odintsova, Elena; Muratov, Gayrat; Baldwin, Gouri; Sridhar, Pooja; Rajesh, Sandya; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor

    2011-01-01

    Syntenin-1 is a PDZ domain-containing adaptor that controls trafficking of transmembrane proteins including those associated with tetraspanin-enriched microdomains. We describe the interaction of syntenin-1 with ubiquitin through a novel binding site spanning the C terminus of ubiquitin, centered on Arg72, Leu73, and Arg74. A conserved LYPSL sequence in the N terminus, as well as the C-terminal region of syntenin-1, are essential for binding to ubiquitin. We present evidence for the regulation of this interaction through syntenin-1 dimerization. We have also established that syntenin-1 is phosphorylated downstream of Ulk1, a serine/threonine kinase that plays a critical role in autophagy and regulates endocytic trafficking. Importantly, Ulk1-dependent phosphorylation of Ser6 in the LYPSL prevents the interaction of syntenin-1 with ubiquitin. These results define an unprecedented ubiquitin-dependent pathway involving syntenin-1 that is regulated by Ulk1. PMID:21949238

  17. Nuclear factor 90 uses an ADAR2-like binding mode to recognize specific bases in dsRNA

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Uma; Grey, Heather; Cook, Atlanta G.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factors 90 and 45 (NF90 and NF45) form a protein complex involved in the post-transcriptional control of many genes in vertebrates. NF90 is a member of the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) family of proteins. RNA binding partners identified so far include elements in 3′ untranslated regions of specific mRNAs and several non-coding RNAs. In NF90, a tandem pair of dsRBDs separated by a natively unstructured segment confers dsRNA binding activity. We determined a crystal structure of the tandem dsRBDs of NF90 in complex with a synthetic dsRNA. This complex shows surprising similarity to the tandem dsRBDs from an adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme, ADAR2 in complex with a substrate RNA. Residues involved in unusual base-specific recognition in the minor groove of dsRNA are conserved between NF90 and ADAR2. These data suggest that, like ADAR2, underlying sequences in dsRNA may influence how NF90 recognizes its target RNAs. PMID:26712564

  18. Identification of the Zn2+ Binding Site and Mode of Operation of a Mammalian Zn2+ Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Ohana, Ehud; Hoch, Eitan; Keasar, Chen; Kambe, Taiho; Yifrach, Ofer; Hershfinkel, Michal; Sekler, Israel

    2009-01-01

    Vesicular zinc transporters (ZnTs) play a critical role in regulating Zn2+ homeostasis in various cellular compartments and are linked to major diseases ranging from Alzheimer disease to diabetes. Despite their importance, the intracellular localization of ZnTs poses a major challenge for establishing the mechanisms by which they function and the identity of their ion binding sites. Here, we combine fluorescence-based functional analysis and structural modeling aimed at elucidating these functional aspects. Expression of ZnT5 was followed by both accelerated removal of Zn2+ from the cytoplasm and its increased vesicular sequestration. Further, activity of this zinc transport was coupled to alkalinization of the trans-Golgi network. Finally, structural modeling of ZnT5, based on the x-ray structure of the bacterial metal transporter YiiP, identified four residues that can potentially form the zinc binding site on ZnT5. Consistent with this model, replacement of these residues, Asp599 and His451, with alanine was sufficient to block Zn2+ transport. These findings indicate, for the first time, that Zn2+ transport mediated by a mammalian ZnT is catalyzed by H+/Zn2+ exchange and identify the zinc binding site of ZnT proteins essential for zinc transport. PMID:19366695

  19. The Structure of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase from Halothermothrix orenii Reveals Its Mechanism of Action and Binding Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chua,T.; Bujnicki, J.; Tan, T.; Huynh, F.; Patel, B.; Sivaraman, J.; Ogimoto, Y.; Miyano, K.; Sawa, H.

    2008-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyzes the transfer of a glycosyl group from an activated donor sugar, such as uridine diphosphate glucose (UDP-Glc), to a saccharide acceptor D-fructose 6-phosphate (F6P), resulting in the formation of UDP and D-sucrose-6'-phosphate (S6P). This is a central regulatory process in the production of sucrose in plants, cyanobacteria, and proteobacteria. Here, we report the crystal structure of SPS from the nonphotosynthetic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii and its complexes with the substrate F6P and the product S6P. SPS has two distinct Rossmann-fold domains with a large substrate binding cleft at the interdomain interface. Structures of two complexes show that both the substrate F6P and the product S6P bind to the A-domain of SPS. Based on comparative analysis of the SPS structure with other related enzymes, the donor substrate, nucleotide diphosphate glucose, binds to the B-domain of SPS. Furthermore, we propose a mechanism of catalysis by H. orenii SPS. Our findings indicate that SPS from H. orenii may represent a valid model for the catalytic domain of plant SPSs and thus may provide useful insight into the reaction mechanism of the plant enzyme.

  20. Nuclear factor 90 uses an ADAR2-like binding mode to recognize specific bases in dsRNA.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Uma; Grey, Heather; Cook, Atlanta G

    2016-02-29

    Nuclear factors 90 and 45 (NF90 and NF45) form a protein complex involved in the post-transcriptional control of many genes in vertebrates. NF90 is a member of the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) family of proteins. RNA binding partners identified so far include elements in 3' untranslated regions of specific mRNAs and several non-coding RNAs. In NF90, a tandem pair of dsRBDs separated by a natively unstructured segment confers dsRNA binding activity. We determined a crystal structure of the tandem dsRBDs of NF90 in complex with a synthetic dsRNA. This complex shows surprising similarity to the tandem dsRBDs from an adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme, ADAR2 in complex with a substrate RNA. Residues involved in unusual base-specific recognition in the minor groove of dsRNA are conserved between NF90 and ADAR2. These data suggest that, like ADAR2, underlying sequences in dsRNA may influence how NF90 recognizes its target RNAs. PMID:26712564

  1. Ropizine concurrently enhances and inhibits ( sup 3 H) dextromethorpan binding to different structures of the guinea pig brain: Autoradiographic evidence for multiple binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Canoll, P.D.; Smith, P.R.; and Musacchio, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Ropizine produces a simultaneous enhancement and inhibition of ({sup 3}H) dextromethorphan (DM) high-affinity binding to different areas of the guinea pig brain. These results imply that there are two distinct types of high-affinity ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites, which are present in variable proportions in different brain structures. The ropizine-enhances ({sup 3}H)DM binding type was preferentially inhibited by (+)-pentazocine. This is consistent with the presumption that the (+)-pentazocine-sensitive site is identical with the common site for DM and 3-(-3-Hydroxphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ((+)-3-PPP). The second binding type, which is inhibited by ropizine and is not so sensitive to (+){minus} pentazocine, has not been fully characterized. This study demonstrates that the biphasic effects to ropizine are due, at least in part, to the effects of ropizine on two different types of ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites. However, this study does not rule out that the common DM/(+)-3-PPP site also might be inhibited by higher concentrations of ropizine.

  2. Agrobacterium Uses a Unique Ligand-Binding Mode for Trapping Opines and Acquiring A Competitive Advantage in the Niche Construction on Plant Host

    PubMed Central

    Planamente, Sara; El Sahili, Abbas; Blin, Pauline; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Dessaux, Yves; Moréra, Solange; Faure, Denis

    2014-01-01

    By modifying the nuclear genome of its host, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens induces the development of plant tumours in which it proliferates. The transformed plant tissues accumulate uncommon low molecular weight compounds called opines that are growth substrates for A. tumefaciens. In the pathogen-induced niche (the plant tumour), a selective advantage conferred by opine assimilation has been hypothesized, but not experimentally demonstrated. Here, using genetics and structural biology, we deciphered how the pathogen is able to bind opines and use them to efficiently compete in the plant tumour. We report high resolution X-ray structures of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) NocT unliganded and liganded with the opine nopaline (a condensation product of arginine and α-ketoglurate) and its lactam derivative pyronopaline. NocT exhibited an affinity for pyronopaline (KD of 0.6 µM) greater than that for nopaline (KD of 3.7 µM). Although the binding-mode of the arginine part of nopaline/pyronopaline in NocT resembled that of arginine in other PBPs, affinity measurement by two different techniques showed that NocT did not bind arginine. In contrast, NocT presented specific residues such as M117 to stabilize the bound opines. NocT relatives that exhibit the nopaline/pyronopaline-binding mode were only found in genomes of the genus Agrobacterium. Transcriptomics and reverse genetics revealed that A. tumefaciens uses the same pathway for assimilating nopaline and pyronopaline. Fitness measurements showed that NocT is required for a competitive colonization of the plant tumour by A. tumefaciens. Moreover, even though the Ti-plasmid conjugal transfer was not regulated by nopaline, the competitive advantage gained by the nopaline-assimilating Ti-plasmid donors led to a preferential horizontal propagation of this Ti-plasmid amongst the agrobacteria colonizing the plant-tumour niche. This work provided structural and genetic evidences to support the niche

  3. Bispyrimidines as potent histamine H(4) receptor ligands: delineation of structure-activity relationships and detailed H(4) receptor binding mode.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Harald; Schultes, Sabine; de Graaf, Chris; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Vischer, Henry F; Zuiderveld, Obbe P; Dobler, Julia; Stachurski, Katharina; Mayer, Moriz; Arnhof, Heribert; Scharn, Dirk; Haaksma, Eric E J; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob

    2013-06-13

    The basic methylpiperazine moiety is considered a necessary substructure for high histamine H4 receptor (H4R) affinity. This moiety is however also the metabolic hot spot for various classes of H4R ligands (e.g., indolcarboxamides and pyrimidines). We set out to investigate whether mildly basic 2-aminopyrimidines in combination with the appropriate linker can serve as a replacement for the methylpiperazine moiety. In the series of 2-aminopyrimidines, the introduction of an additional 2-aminopyrimidine moiety in combination with the appropriate linker lead to bispyrimidines displaying pKi values for