Science.gov

Sample records for multiple independent lyme

  1. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Kalish, R

    1993-05-01

    The clinical features of Lyme disease have been well documented since its description as a distinct clinical entity in 1975. A better understanding of the diversity of Borrelia strains and species that cause the disease as well as new insights into the immunology and pathogenesis of Lyme disease help explain some of the observed variations in clinical manifestations. The diagnosis of Lyme disease may be straightforward when patients in endemic areas present with typical clinical features; however, the diagnosis should be in doubt when the clinical picture is nonspecific or atypical, or a feasible exposure history cannot be obtained. Laboratory diagnosis is primarily based on serologic techniques, but interpretation of test results can be fraught with uncertainty. Treatment with appropriate antibiotics is successful in the majority of cases of Lyme disease. However, some patients may not respond, and in these cases multiple repeated courses are usually ineffective and unwarranted. More data are needed to determine the appropriate treatment of Lyme disease during pregnancy, and the appropriate management of ixodes tick bites. A suitable arthropod vector and a competent animal reservoir host are essential for perpetuating Lyme disease in a geographic location. The intricate ecologic forces at work are well understood in certain endemic areas but are poorly defined elsewhere, particularly where the disease is sporadic or its existence is in question. Prevention of Lyme disease is best achieved through education regarding avoidance of the tick vector. A vaccine using a recombinant form of the OspA protein of B. burgdorferi has been successful in animal models. Whether an effective human vaccine can be developed remains unknown. PMID:8502779

  2. Lyme Disease Presenting with Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Baker, Keith; Jeanmonod, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted multisystem inflammatory disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. With more than 25,000 CDC reported cases annually, it has become the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. We report a case of 38-year-old man with Lyme disease presenting with simultaneous palsy of 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves.

  3. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Nat, Laura Bogdana; Simiti, Adriana Liana; Poanta, Laura Irina

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease (Borreliosis), also called the "disease of 1000 faces", is produced by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi, transmitted by the Ixodes tick. The clinical picture is non-specific and polymorph, with multisystemic involvement. Diagnosis is most often one of exclusion, and certain diagnosis is based on the presence of Borellia antibodies. The treatment is done differently depending on the stage of the disease and the severity of injuries, being used antibiotics like Doxycycline, Amoxicillin, Erythromycin or Penicillin. Under treatment the disease quickly heals without sequel, in the early stages, but advanced stages are usually resistant to treatment and chronic injuries can occur. Symptoms get worse without treatment and become chronic. We present the case of a woman of 66-year-old with a complex history of disease, which began one year prior to admission, through multiple and nonspecific symptoms; she presented herself in numerous medical services (gastroenterology, rheumatology--where an immunosuppressive treatment was initiated, hematology) without determining a final diagnosis. She was admitted in our service with altered general state and worsening symptoms, predominantly fever, muscle pain, joint pain, the patient being immobilized in bed. After multiple investigations and the problem of differential diagnosis with multiple pathologies, we finally established the diagnosis of Lyme disease. The peculiarities of the case are represented by the severity of the clinical manifestations and fulminant disease evolution under the unjustified administration of immunosuppressive treatment, and atypical joint involvement regarding localization and evolution that raised the issue of differential diagnosis with osteosarcoma or bone tuberculosis. PMID:25726630

  4. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom ... Muscle and joint aches A stiff neck Fatigue Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because you may ...

  5. Lyme disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that is spread through the bite of one of several types of ... Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi ( B burgdorferi ). Blacklegged ticks and other species of ticks ...

  6. The Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi Utilizes Multiple Ligands, Including RNA, for Interferon Regulatory Factor 3-Dependent Induction of Type I Interferon-Responsive Genes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer C.; Maylor-Hagen, Heather; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H.; Weis, Janis J.

    2010-01-01

    We recently discovered a critical role for type I interferon (IFN) in the development of murine Lyme arthritis. Borrelia burgdorferi-mediated induction of IFN-responsive genes by bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) was dependent upon a functional type I IFN receptor but independent of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, TLR9, and the adapter molecule MyD88. We now demonstrate that induction of the IFN transcriptional profile in B. burgdorferi-stimulated BMDMs occurs independently of the adapter TRIF and of the cytoplasmic sensor NOD2. In contrast, B. burgdorferi-induced transcription of these genes was dependent upon a rapid STAT1 feedback amplification pathway. IFN profile gene transcription was IRF3 dependent but did not utilize B. burgdorferi-derived DNA or DNase-sensitive ligands. Instead, IFN-responsive gene expression could be induced by B. burgdorferi-derived RNA. Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)-dependent IFN profile gene transcription was also induced by sonicated bacteria, by the lipoprotein OspA, and by factors released into the BSKII medium during culture of B. burgdorferi. The IFN-stimulatory activity of B. burgdorferi culture supernatants was not destroyed by nuclease treatment. Nuclease digestion also had no effect on IFN profile induction mediated by sonicated B. burgdorferi. Thus, B. burgdorferi-derived RNA, OspA, and non-nucleic acid ligands present in both sonicated bacteria and B. burgdorferi culture medium contribute to type I IFN-responsive gene induction. These findings suggest that B. burgdorferi invasion of joint tissue and the resultant type I IFN induction associated with Lyme arthritis development may involve multiple triggering ligands. PMID:20404081

  7. [Lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Herzer, P; Fingerle, V; Pfister, H-W; Krause, A

    2014-07-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a multisystem infectious disease affecting mainly the skin, nervous system, joints and heart. It is caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex which are transmitted by ticks. The diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis is based primarily on typical clinical symptoms and signs with serological confirmation. Antibiotic therapy is beneficial for all manifestations and treatment refractory cases are rare. The diagnosis "chronic Lyme borreliosis" is increasingly being misused for all conceivable medically unexplained symptoms. PMID:24969608

  8. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings. PMID:27348896

  9. Multiple independent transmission cycles of a tick-borne pathogen within a local host community.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Maude; Abrial, David; Gasqui, Patrick; Bord, Severine; Marsot, Maud; Masseglia, Sébastien; Pion, Angélique; Poux, Valérie; Zilliox, Laurence; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Bailly, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Many pathogens are maintained by multiple host species and involve multiple strains with potentially different phenotypic characteristics. Disentangling transmission patterns in such systems is often challenging, yet investigating how different host species contribute to transmission is crucial to properly assess and manage disease risk. We aim to reveal transmission cycles of bacteria within the Borrelia burgdorferi species complex, which include Lyme disease agents. We characterized Borrelia genotypes found in 488 infected Ixodes ricinus nymphs collected in the Sénart Forest located near Paris (France). These genotypes were compared to those observed in three sympatric species of small mammals and network analyses reveal four independent transmission cycles. Statistical modelling shows that two cycles involving chipmunks, an introduced species, and non-sampled host species such as birds, are responsible for the majority of tick infections. In contrast, the cycle involving native bank voles only accounts for a small proportion of infected ticks. Genotypes associated with the two primary transmission cycles were isolated from Lyme disease patients, confirming the epidemiological threat posed by these strains. Our work demonstrates that combining high-throughput sequence typing with networks tools and statistical modeling is a promising approach for characterizing transmission cycles of multi-host pathogens in complex ecological settings. PMID:27498685

  10. Multiple independent transmission cycles of a tick-borne pathogen within a local host community

    PubMed Central

    Jacquot, Maude; Abrial, David; Gasqui, Patrick; Bord, Severine; Marsot, Maud; Masseglia, Sébastien; Pion, Angélique; Poux, Valérie; Zilliox, Laurence; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Vourc’h, Gwenaël; Bailly, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Many pathogens are maintained by multiple host species and involve multiple strains with potentially different phenotypic characteristics. Disentangling transmission patterns in such systems is often challenging, yet investigating how different host species contribute to transmission is crucial to properly assess and manage disease risk. We aim to reveal transmission cycles of bacteria within the Borrelia burgdorferi species complex, which include Lyme disease agents. We characterized Borrelia genotypes found in 488 infected Ixodes ricinus nymphs collected in the Sénart Forest located near Paris (France). These genotypes were compared to those observed in three sympatric species of small mammals and network analyses reveal four independent transmission cycles. Statistical modelling shows that two cycles involving chipmunks, an introduced species, and non-sampled host species such as birds, are responsible for the majority of tick infections. In contrast, the cycle involving native bank voles only accounts for a small proportion of infected ticks. Genotypes associated with the two primary transmission cycles were isolated from Lyme disease patients, confirming the epidemiological threat posed by these strains. Our work demonstrates that combining high-throughput sequence typing with networks tools and statistical modeling is a promising approach for characterizing transmission cycles of multi-host pathogens in complex ecological settings. PMID:27498685

  11. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Evans, J

    1994-07-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is the most common arthropod-borne infection. The majority of cases occur in the Northeast, the Midwest, and California, which are areas with established foci of Borrelia burgdorferi. Phenotypic and genotypic diversity of B. burgdorferi has resulted in its classification into three separate genospecies and may account for differences in disease expression. Clinical features of Lyme disease have expanded to include a flulike illness without erythema migrans and the persistence of intrathecal antibody responses after successful antibiotic therapy in neuroborreliosis. Better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of Lyme arthritis will help guide future treatment decisions, and recent progress made in assessing the risk of infection from tick bites and vaccine development may help calm public anxiety about Lyme disease. PMID:8068513

  12. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... It has also been reported in China, Europe, Japan, Australia, and the parts of the former Soviet ... bacterium can affect the joints, heart, and nervous system. The late phase of Lyme disease can also ...

  13. Lyme endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Hidri, N; Barraud, O; de Martino, S; Garnier, F; Paraf, F; Martin, C; Sekkal, S; Laskar, M; Jaulhac, B; Ploy, M-C

    2012-12-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a common tick-borne disease with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Cardiac involvement has been reported during both the acute phase (atrioventricular block, pericarditis) and the chronic stage (dilated cardiomyopathy), but is rare (<5%). Here we describe the first case of Borrelia afzelii Lyme endocarditis, in a 61-year-old man living in an endemic area of France. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of B. afzelii DNA in the mitral valve by specific real-time PCR. He was treated empirically with amoxicillin for 6 weeks and remains well 12 months later. PMID:23043635

  14. Contrasting emergence of Lyme disease across ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Mysterud, Atle; Easterday, William Ryan; Stigum, Vetle Malmer; Aas, Anders Bjørnsgaard; Meisingset, Erling L.; Viljugrein, Hildegunn

    2016-01-01

    Global environmental changes are causing Lyme disease to emerge in Europe. The life cycle of Ixodes ricinus, the tick vector of Lyme disease, involves an ontogenetic niche shift, from the larval and nymphal stages utilizing a wide range of hosts, picking up the pathogens causing Lyme disease from small vertebrates, to the adult stage depending on larger (non-transmission) hosts, typically deer. Because of this complexity the role of different host species for emergence of Lyme disease remains controversial. Here, by analysing long-term data on incidence in humans over a broad geographical scale in Norway, we show that both high spatial and temporal deer population density increase Lyme disease incidence. However, the trajectories of deer population sizes play an overall limited role for the recent emergence of the disease. Our study suggests that managing deer populations will have some effect on disease incidence, but that Lyme disease may nevertheless increase as multiple drivers are involved. PMID:27306947

  15. Contrasting emergence of Lyme disease across ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mysterud, Atle; Easterday, William Ryan; Stigum, Vetle Malmer; Aas, Anders Bjørnsgaard; Meisingset, Erling L; Viljugrein, Hildegunn

    2016-01-01

    Global environmental changes are causing Lyme disease to emerge in Europe. The life cycle of Ixodes ricinus, the tick vector of Lyme disease, involves an ontogenetic niche shift, from the larval and nymphal stages utilizing a wide range of hosts, picking up the pathogens causing Lyme disease from small vertebrates, to the adult stage depending on larger (non-transmission) hosts, typically deer. Because of this complexity the role of different host species for emergence of Lyme disease remains controversial. Here, by analysing long-term data on incidence in humans over a broad geographical scale in Norway, we show that both high spatial and temporal deer population density increase Lyme disease incidence. However, the trajectories of deer population sizes play an overall limited role for the recent emergence of the disease. Our study suggests that managing deer populations will have some effect on disease incidence, but that Lyme disease may nevertheless increase as multiple drivers are involved. PMID:27306947

  16. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  17. Chronic Lyme Disease and Co-infections: Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In Lyme disease concurrent infections frequently occur. The clinical and pathological impact of co-infections was first recognized in the 1990th, i.e. approximately ten years after the discovery of Lyme disease. Their pathological synergism can exacerbate Lyme disease or induce similar disease manifestations. Co-infecting agents can be transmitted together with Borrelia burgdorferi by tick bite resulting in multiple infections but a fraction of co-infections occur independently of tick bite. Clinically relevant co-infections are caused by Bartonella species, Yersinia enterocolitica, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In contrast to the USA, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) and babesiosis are not of major importance in Europe. Infections caused by these pathogens in patients not infected by Borrelia burgdorferi can result in clinical symptoms similar to those occurring in Lyme disease. This applies particularly to infections caused by Bartonella henselae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Chlamydia trachomatis primarily causes polyarthritis. Chlamydophila pneumoniae not only causes arthritis but also affects the nervous system and the heart, which renders the differential diagnosis difficult. The diagnosis is even more complex when co-infections occur in association with Lyme disease. Treatment recommendations are based on individual expert opinions. In antibiotic therapy, the use of third generation cephalosporins should only be considered in cases of Lyme disease. The same applies to carbapenems, which however are used occasionally in infections caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. For the remaining infections predominantly tetracyclines and macrolides are used. Quinolones are for alternative treatment, particularly gemifloxacin. For Bartonella henselae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae the combination with rifampicin is recommended. Erythromycin is the drug of choice for

  18. Chronic Lyme Disease and Co-infections: Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In Lyme disease concurrent infections frequently occur. The clinical and pathological impact of co-infections was first recognized in the 1990th, i.e. approximately ten years after the discovery of Lyme disease. Their pathological synergism can exacerbate Lyme disease or induce similar disease manifestations. Co-infecting agents can be transmitted together with Borrelia burgdorferi by tick bite resulting in multiple infections but a fraction of co-infections occur independently of tick bite. Clinically relevant co-infections are caused by Bartonella species, Yersinia enterocolitica, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In contrast to the USA, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) and babesiosis are not of major importance in Europe. Infections caused by these pathogens in patients not infected by Borrelia burgdorferi can result in clinical symptoms similar to those occurring in Lyme disease. This applies particularly to infections caused by Bartonella henselae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Chlamydia trachomatis primarily causes polyarthritis. Chlamydophila pneumoniae not only causes arthritis but also affects the nervous system and the heart, which renders the differential diagnosis difficult. The diagnosis is even more complex when co-infections occur in association with Lyme disease. Treatment recommendations are based on individual expert opinions. In antibiotic therapy, the use of third generation cephalosporins should only be considered in cases of Lyme disease. The same applies to carbapenems, which however are used occasionally in infections caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. For the remaining infections predominantly tetracyclines and macrolides are used. Quinolones are for alternative treatment, particularly gemifloxacin. For Bartonella henselae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae the combination with rifampicin is recommended. Erythromycin is the drug of choice for

  19. Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Linden T

    2016-05-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Lyme disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:27136224

  20. Lyme Disease: Fact or Fiction?

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Lyme Disease Lyme Disease Preventing tick bites On people On pets In ... What you need to know about Lyme carditis Lyme Disease Rashes and Look-alikes Diagnosis and testing Two- ...

  1. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease is among the most frequently diagnosed zoonotic tick-borne diseases worldwide. The number of human cases has been on the increase since the first recognition of its aetiological agent. Lyme disease is caused by spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia, with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) found in the Americas, and B. afzelii and B. garinii, in addition to B. burgdorferi s.s., in Europe and Asia. Environmental factors, such as human encroachment onto habitats favourable to ticks and their hosts, reduced deforestation, increased human outdoor activities, and climatic factors favouring a wider distribution of tick vectors, have enhanced the impact of the disease on both humans and animals. Clinical manifestations in humans include, in the early phases, erythema migrans, followed several weeks later by neuro-borreliosis (meningo-radiculitis, meningitis or meningo-encephalitis), Lyme arthritis and/or Borrelia lymphocytoma. In dogs, acute signs include fever, general malaise, lameness, lymph node enlargement and polyarthritis, as well as neuro-borreliosis in the chronic form. Diagnosis is mainly serological in both humans and animals, based on either a two-tier approach (an immunoenzymatic test followed by a Western blot confirmatory test) in humans or C(6) peptide, only in dogs. Early treatment with antibiotics, such as doxycycline or amoxicillin, for three weeks usually reduces the risk of chronic disease. Tick control, including the use of tick repellents for both humans and animals, particularly dogs, is highly reliable in preventing transmission. Vaccines are not available to prevent human infection, whereas several vaccines are available to reduce transmission and the clinical manifestations of infection in dogs. PMID:26601457

  2. Multiple-Wavelength Pyrometry Independent Of Emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Multiple-wavelength pyrometric method provides for determination of two sequential temperatures of same surface or temperatures of two surfaces made of same material. Temperatures measured, without knowing emissivity, by uncalibrated spectral radiometer.

  3. Origin of the Lyme Dome and implications for the timing of multiple Alleghanian deformational and intrusive events in southern Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, G.J.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Wintsch, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Geologic mapping, structural analysis, and geochronology in the area of the Lyme dome, southern Connecticut provides constraints on the origin of the rocks in the core of the dome, the absolute timing of the principal deformational and thermal events attributed to Alleghanian orogenesis, and the processes that generated the dome. Detrital zircon geochronology in combination with ages on intrusive rocks brackets the deposition of quartzite in the core of the dome sometime between ca. 925 and 620 Ma. Granite and granodiorite intruded the Neoproteorozic metasedimentary rocks in the core of the dome at ca. 620 to 610 Ma. Four major early Permian events associated with the Alleghanian orogeny affected the rocks in the Lyme dome area. Syn-tectonic migmatization and widespread penetrative deformation (D1, ca. 300 - 290 Ma) included emplacement of alaskite at 290 ?? 4 Ma during regional foliation development and aluminosilicate-orthoclase metamorphic conditions. Rocks of the Avalon terrane may have wedged between Gander cover rocks and Gander basement in the core of the Lyme during D1. Limited structural evidence for diapiric uplift of the Lyme dome indicates that diapirism started late in D1 and was completed by D2 (ca. 290 - 280 Ma) when horizontal WNW contractional stresses dominated over vertical stresses. Second sillimanite metamorphism continued and syn-tectonic D2 granite pegmatite (288 ?? 4 Ma) and the Joshua Rock Granite Gniess (284 ?? 3 Ma) intruded at this time. North-northwest extension during D3 (ca. 280 - 275 Ma) led to granitic pegmatite intrusion along S3 cleavage planes and in extensional zones in boudin necks during hydraulic failure and decompression melting. Intrusion of a Westerly Granite dike at 275 ?? 4 Ma suggests that D3 extension was active, and perhaps concluding, by ca. 275 Ma. Late randomly oriented but gently dipping pegmatite dikes record a final stage of intrusion during D4 (ca. 275 - 260 Ma), and a switch from NNW extension to vertical

  4. [Lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Weber, K

    1986-11-01

    Lyme borreliosis has in common features with another spirochetosis, syphilis, e.g. the development in three stages and the occurrence of reinfection and congenital infection. The European variant (erythema migrans disease in the broader sense) initially more often seems to have a mild course than in the United States, but lymphocytoma, Bannwarth syndrome and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans seem to be more common in Europe. Administration of tetracycline for stage 1 and of parenteral penicillin G in high doses for stages 2 and 3 and during pregnancy is recommended. PMID:3542901

  5. Lyme disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a ...

  6. Lyme disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  7. Lyme disease antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  8. Lyme Disease (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Lyme Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Lyme Disease Print A A A Text Size What's in ... and summer, you might hear about something called Lyme disease. It has nothing to do with limes, but ...

  9. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Duffy, J

    1990-07-01

    Lyme disease is a complex multisystem disorder recognized on six continents that is epidemic in some parts of the world during spring, summer, and fall seasons. It is an infectious disease caused by a spirochete, B. burgdorferi, which is transmitted chiefly by I. dammini and pacificus ticks in the United States and I. ricinis in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. Diagnosis is based on patient contact with an endemic area, one or more characteristic clinical features, particularly erythema migrans rash, and a positive serologic test for B. burgdorferi infection in the majority of cases with illness greater than 4 to 6 weeks' duration. Although infection is the primary cause, immune mechanisms almost certainly play a synergistic role in some manifestations during late stages. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are important for full recovery. Therapy with doxycycline or amoxicillin is effective in the earliest stages but serious late complications require high doses of intravenous penicillin or ceftriaxone. Some sequelae respond well to antibiotic therapy while others such as chronic arthritis or advanced central nervous system disease may not. Anti-B. burgdorferi antibodies appear to be protective in certain experimental studies but data are limited and inconclusive in humans. PMID:2195920

  10. Endometriosis-associated Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Matalliotakis, I M; Cakmak, H; Ziogos, M D E; Kalogeraki, A; Kappou, D; Arici, A

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study is to report three cases of patients with endometriosis and infertility, and associated with Lyme disease. The medical files of 405 women with endometriosis and 200 without endometriosis were studied retrospectively. We report 3 cases with endometriosis and Lyme disease. Of 405 patients with endometriosis treated in our study over a 6-year period, 3(0.8%) had Lyme disease. All cases presented with typical erythema migraines, fever and fatigue. The serological findings were positive for Borrelia burgdorferi, for 3 cases. Two out of 3 women underwent IVF-ET procedures and one of them conceived in the first cycle without complication during pregnancy or after childbirth recorded. We concluded that women with endometriosis are more likely to have chronic fatigue syndrome, systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and other autoimmune inflammatory and endocrine diseases. A review of the literature confirms the uniqueness of the co-existence of Lyme disease in women with endometriosis in these cases. PMID:20143981

  11. Intraarticular corticosteroids in refractory childhood Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nimmrich, S; Becker, I; Horneff, G

    2014-07-01

    Lyme arthritis caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is a common late manifestation of Lyme borreliosis. Current treatment recommendations include at least one oral or intravenous antibiotic course, followed by antirheumatic therapy in case of refractory arthritis. We reviewed the course of 31 children with Lyme arthritis who had received antibiotic treatment and assessed outcome and requirement of antirheumatic therapy. Of a total of 31 patients, 23 (74%) showed complete resolution of arthritis after one or two courses of antibiotics, whereas in 8 patients (28%), steroid injections had been performed due to relapsing or remaining symptoms. All of these 8 patients showed immediate resolution of symptoms after intraarticular steroid injections. Four of them (50%) remained asymptomatic so far with a follow-up period between five up to 40 months. In two cases, multiple intraarticular corticosteroid injections were required; three patients received additional or consecutive treatment with systemic antirheumatic treatment. Patients with antibiotic refractory arthritis showed a higher rate of positivity of the IgG p58 and OspC immunoblot bands (p = 0.05) at presentation. Antibodies against OspA, an indicator of later stage infection, occurred more frequently in the refractory group without reaching significant level. No clinical marker as indicator for severe or prolonged course of Lyme arthritis was identifiable. A quarter of childhood Lyme arthritis patients were refractory to antibiotics and required antirheumatic treatment. Intraarticular steroid injections in childhood Lyme arthritis refractory to antibiotics can lead to marked clinical improvement. PMID:24390634

  12. [Lyme disease and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, R; Hajrić, A; Cirković, A; Miković, Z; Dmitrović, R

    1993-01-01

    The authors have investigated Borrelia infection in pregnant women with two or more spontaneous abortions, but with no clinical manifestations of Lyme disease. In 42 such cases the results were negative. On the other hand, in two cases with positive epidemiologic data, but without clinical manifestations of Lyme disease, serologic findings were positive. No complications during pregnancy or after childbirth were recorded. PMID:8262402

  13. Interleukin-10 Alters Effector Functions of Multiple Genes Induced by Borrelia burgdorferi in Macrophages To Regulate Lyme Disease Inflammation ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Aarti; Dixit, Saurabh; Philipp, Mario T.; Singh, Shree R.; Morici, Lisa A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Dennis, Vida A.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) modulates inflammatory responses elicited in vitro and in vivo by Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete. How IL-10 modulates these inflammatory responses still remains elusive. We hypothesize that IL-10 inhibits effector functions of multiple genes induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammation. Because macrophages are essential in the initiation of inflammation, we used mouse J774 macrophages and live B. burgdorferi spirochetes as the model target cell and stimulant, respectively. First, we employed transcriptome profiling to identify genes that were induced by stimulation of cells with live spirochetes and that were perturbed by addition of IL-10 to spirochete cultures. Spirochetes significantly induced upregulation of 347 genes at both the 4-h and 24-h time points. IL-10 inhibited the expression levels, respectively, of 53 and 65 of the 4-h and 24-h genes, and potentiated, respectively, at 4 h and 24 h, 65 and 50 genes. Prominent among the novel identified IL-10-inhibited genes also validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, IRAK3, TRAF1, IRG1, PTGS2, MMP9, IFI44, IFIT1, and CD40. Proteome analysis using a multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed the IL-10 modulation/and or potentiation of RANTES/CCL5, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2)/CXCL2, IP-10/CXCL10, MIP-1α/CCL3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)/CSF3, CXCL1, CXCL5, CCL2, CCL4, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1α, IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and IL-9. Similar results were obtained using sonicated spirochetes or lipoprotein as stimulants. Our data show that IL-10 alters effectors induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammatory responses. Moreover, for the first time, this study provides global insight into potential mechanisms used by IL-10 to control Lyme disease inflammation. PMID

  14. Ocular Lyme borreliosis as a rare presentation of unilateral vision loss.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Fortin, Jeffrey; Kohli, Anita; Suarez, Maria J; Miller, P Elliott

    2016-01-01

    Ocular Lyme borreliosis is a rare manifestation of Lyme disease. We describe a case of an 80-year-old woman who presented with a 1-month history of unilateral painless central vision loss. Based on a temporal artery biopsy, she was initially diagnosed with giant cell arteritis and treated with a 3-day course of high-dose intravenous steroids. A more detailed history uncovered multiple previous treatments for Lyme disease and residence in an endemic Lyme area. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with ocular Lyme borreliosis and treated with intravenous antibiotics. After 5 weeks of treatment, unilateral vision loss did not progress and optic disc oedema resolved. PMID:27113793

  15. Chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Lyme disease is a poorly defined diagnosis that is usually given to patients with prolonged, unexplained symptoms or with alternative medical diagnoses. Data do not support the proposition that chronic, treatment-refractory infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is responsible for the many conditions that get labeled as chronic Lyme disease. Prolonged symptoms after successful treatment of Lyme disease are uncommon, but in rare cases may be severe. Prolonged courses of antibiotics neither prevent nor ameliorate these symptoms and are associated with considerable harm. PMID:25999227

  16. Delay Independent Criterion for Multiple Time-delay Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. J.; Liu, K. F. R.; Yeh, K.; Chen, C. W.; Chung, P. Y.

    Based on the fuzzy Lyapunov method, this work addresses the stability conditions for nonlinear systems with multiple time delays to ensure the stability of building structure control systems. The delay independent conditions are derived via the traditional Lyapunov and fuzzy Lyapunov methods for multiple time-delay systems as approximated by the Tagagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model. The fuzzy Lyapunov function is defined as a fuzzy blending of quadratic Lyapunov functions. A parallel distributed compensation (PDC) scheme is utilized to construct a global fuzzy logic control (FLC) by blending all linear local state feedback controllers in the controller design procedure. Furthermore, the H infinity performance and robustness of the design for modeling errors also need to be considered in the stability conditions.

  17. Lyme disease in children.

    PubMed

    Sood, Sunil K

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis and management of Lyme disease in children is similar to that in adults with a few clinically relevant exceptions. The use of doxycycline as an initial empiric choice is to be avoided for children 8 years old and younger. Children may present with insidious onset of elevated intracranial pressure during acute disseminated Lyme disease; prompt diagnosis and treatment of this condition is important to prevent loss of vision. Children who acquire Lyme disease have an excellent prognosis even when they present with the late disseminated manifestation of Lyme arthritis. Guidance on the judicious use of serologic tests is provided. Pediatricians and family practitioners should be familiar with the prevention and management of tick bites, which are common in children. PMID:25999224

  18. Complications of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Cooke, W D; Dattwyler, R J

    1992-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is the multisystem infectious disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Complications of this infection can involve many organ systems, especially the skin, joints, nervous system, and heart. These manifestations may be acute, or evolve slowly over months or years. Diagnosis is not always straightforward, and is currently hampered by lack of a specific serologic assay. This review discusses the syndromes associated with Lyme borreliosis and addresses issues of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:1580609

  19. Lyme disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, L E; Steere, A C; Benach, J L; Slade, J D; Broome, C V

    1986-06-27

    Lyme disease is an increasingly recognized tick-borne illness caused by a spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Because the etiologic agent of Lyme disease is a spirochete, there has been concern about the effect of maternal Lyme disease on pregnancy outcome. We reviewed cases of Lyme disease in pregnant women who were identified before knowledge of the pregnancy outcomes. Nineteen cases were identified with onset between 1976 and 1984. Eight of the women were affected during the first trimester, seven during the second trimester, and two during the third trimester; in two, the trimester of onset was unknown. Thirteen received appropriate antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease. Of the 19 pregnancies, five had adverse outcomes, including syndactyly, cortical blindness, intrauterine fetal death, prematurity, and rash in the newborn. Adverse outcomes occurred in cases with infection during each of the trimesters. Although B burgdorferi could not be implicated directly in any of the adverse outcomes, the frequency of such outcomes warrants further surveillance and studies of pregnant women with Lyme disease. PMID:2423719

  20. Lyme disease and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  1. Lyme Disease 'Biofilm' Eludes Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_157467.html Lyme Disease 'Biofilm' Eludes Antibiotics: Report Germ forms slimy layer that makes it ... bacteria that causes Lyme disease protects itself from antibiotics by forming a slime-like layer called a ...

  2. Lyme Disease in Oregon ▿

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, J. Stone; Kohlhepp, Sue; Gresbrink, Robert; Metz, Paul; Gleaves, Curt; Gilbert, David

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of Lyme disease in Oregon is calculated from cases reported to the Oregon State Health Division. We reviewed the exposure history of reported cases of Lyme disease and performed field surveys for infected Ixodes pacificus ticks. The incidence of Lyme disease correlated with the distribution of infected I. pacificus ticks. PMID:18448697

  3. Lyme disease: review.

    PubMed

    Biesiada, Grażyna; Czepiel, Jacek; Leśniak, Maciej R; Garlicki, Aleksander; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-12-20

    Lyme disease is a multi-organ animal-borne disease, caused by spirochetes of Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), which typically affect the skin, nervous system, musculoskeletal system and heart. A history of confirmed exposure to tick bites, typical signs and symptoms of Lyme borreliosis and positive tests for anti-Bb antibodies, are the basis of a diagnosis. A two-step diagnosis is necessary: the first step is based on a high sensitivity ELISA test with positive results confirmed by a more specific Western blot assay. Antibiotic therapy is curative in most cases, but some patients develop chronic symptoms, which do not respond to antibiotics. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the symptoms, clinical diagnosis and treatment of Lyme borreliosis. PMID:23319969

  4. Lyme borreliosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Vanousová, Daniela; Hercogová, Jana

    2008-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is the most common human tick-borne illness in the Northern Hemisphere. The causative agent is the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi species complex, and the hard-shell ticks of the genus Ixodes is responsible for pathogen transmission from animals to humans. The incidence of the disease is increasing year by year and although lyme disease is not fatal, it can affect the skin, heart, nervous, and musculoskeletal system with an impairment of quality of life. The appropriate diagnosis of lyme disease should be promptly treated by antibiotics to prevent late stage of the disease. The choice of antibiotics depends on many factors such as the stage of the disease, the drug efficacy, adverse effects, type of delivery, duration of treatment, and cost. Treatment failure occurs as a result of many reasons, re-infection is possible. The recommended treatment schedule in the Czech Republic is presented. PMID:18394084

  5. Macrophage Polarization during Murine Lyme Borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, Carrie E.; Olson, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Infection of C3H mice with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, reliably produces an infectious arthritis and carditis that peak around 3 weeks postinfection and then spontaneously resolve. Macrophage polarization has been suggested to drive inflammation, the clearance of bacteria, and tissue repair and resolution in a variety of infectious disease models. During Lyme disease it is clear that macrophages are capable of clearing Borrelia spirochetes and exhausted neutrophils; however, the role of macrophage phenotype in disease development or resolution has not been studied. Using classical (NOS2) and alternative (CD206) macrophage subset-specific markers, we determined the phenotype of F4/80+ macrophages within the joints and heart throughout the infection time course. Within the joint, CD206+ macrophages dominated throughout the course of infection, and NOS2+ macrophage numbers became elevated only during the peak of inflammation. We also found dual NOS2+ CD206+ macrophages which increased during resolution. In contrast to findings for the ankle joints, numbers of NOS2+ and CD206+ macrophages in the heart were similar at the peak of inflammation. 5-Lipoxygenase-deficient (5-LOX−/−) mice, which display a failure of Lyme arthritis resolution, recruited fewer F4/80+ cells to the infected joints and heart, but macrophage subset populations were unchanged. These results highlight differences in the inflammatory infiltrates during Lyme arthritis and carditis and demonstrate the coexistence of multiple macrophage subsets within a single inflammatory site. PMID:25870230

  6. Lyme disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schutzer, S E; Janniger, C K; Schwartz, R A

    1991-04-01

    Lyme disease, caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, can affect those exposed to a vector tick. Pregnant women are no exception, and such infection places the fetus at risk. It is particularly important to recognize the disease early so that effective therapy may be instituted. Although the present patient had a favorable outcome, not all do. Clinical diagnosis is especially important since conventional laboratory tests may be inadequate or require lengthy periods of time before a positive result occurs. The dermatologic sign of Lyme disease, erythema migrans, although occurring in only 50 percent of cases, is likely to be the most important diagnostic sign. PMID:2070648

  7. Dermatologic manifestations of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Berger, B W

    1989-01-01

    Erythema migrams (EM), the distinctive cutaneous lesion of Lyme disease, has a variable clinical appearance, but at some point presents as a centrifugally expanding, usually erythematous, annular patch. Of 237 patients with this condition, 201 (85%) were examined initially from May through September. Thirty-four (14%) remembered having been bitten by a deer tick. The median interval from the bite to the appearance of EM was 9 days (range, 1-36 days). Forty-one (17%) of the patients had multiple EM lesions. Of the 237 patients, 128 (54%) manifested major extracutaneous signs and symptoms. Although EM also has a variable histologic picture, the presence of a deep and superficial perivascular and interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrate containing plasma cells is diagnostic. Spirochetes can be demonstrated with Warthin-Starry staining in approximately 40% of the biopsy specimens. Concomitant cutaneous lesions appeared on some patients before and during antibiotic therapy. Nine patients with serologic evidence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection had cutaneous lesions other than EM, including granuloma annulare (three), erythema nodosum (two), papular urticaria (two), Henoch-Schönlein-like purpura (one), and morphea (one). Whether these entities are cutaneous markers of Lyme disease or are coincidental findings is yet to be determined. PMID:2814169

  8. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events.

    PubMed

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F; Hillis, David M

    2013-04-01

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment. PMID:23530234

  9. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events

    PubMed Central

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Hillis, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment. PMID:23530234

  10. Widespread transmission of independent cancer lineages within multiple bivalve species.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Michael J; Villalba, Antonio; Carballal, María J; Iglesias, David; Sherry, James; Reinisch, Carol; Muttray, Annette F; Baldwin, Susan A; Goff, Stephen P

    2016-06-30

    Most cancers arise from oncogenic changes in the genomes of somatic cells, and while the cells may migrate by metastasis, they remain within that single individual. Natural transmission of cancer cells from one individual to another has been observed in two distinct cases in mammals (Tasmanian devils and dogs), but these are generally considered to be rare exceptions in nature. The discovery of transmissible cancer in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) suggested that this phenomenon might be more widespread. Here we analyse disseminated neoplasia in mussels (Mytilus trossulus), cockles (Cerastoderma edule), and golden carpet shell clams (Polititapes aureus) and find that neoplasias in all three species are attributable to independent transmissible cancer lineages. In mussels and cockles, the cancer lineages are derived from their respective host species; however, unexpectedly, cancer cells in P. aureus are all derived from Venerupis corrugata, a different species living in the same geographical area. No cases of disseminated neoplasia have thus far been found in V. corrugata from the same region. These findings show that transmission of cancer cells in the marine environment is common in multiple species, that it has originated many times, and that while most transmissible cancers are found spreading within the species of origin, cross-species transmission of cancer cells can occur. PMID:27338791

  11. Lyme Disease Data

    MedlinePlus

    ... the northeast and upper Midwest. Lyme Disease Data File To facilitate the public health and research community’s ... Right–click the link and select “save”. File Formats Help: How do I view different file ...

  12. Lyme Disease in Construction

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. You can get Lyme disease after a deer tick feeds on you. The deer tick is found in most of the United ... joints. Sometimes joint replacement is needed. Protect Yourself Deer ticks are tiny — the size of the head ...

  13. Seeks, finds, threats: Lyme disease!

    PubMed

    Muschart, Xavier; Blommaert, Dominique

    2015-02-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a disease commonly found in humans. Here we report the case of a young, healthy girl presenting with symptomatic first- and second-degree atrioventricular blocks secondary to cardiac myocarditis. The disappearance of the conduction anomaly after antibiotic treatment confirmed Lyme disease before the results from the serology. Therefore, when a healthy, young person suddenly presents with an atrioventricular conduction block, physicians should consider a diagnosis of Lyme disease. PMID:25167973

  14. [Biologic diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Remy, V

    2007-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a multisystemic infection transmitted by ticks. Its diagnosis is based on clinical and biological criteria. These criteria could be different in Europe than in the USA, because of the existence of multiples strains of borrelia in Europe. In primary stage of LB, the diagnosis is often clinical. In the secondary stage, LB diagnosis is established with an Elisa serology confirmed by a Western blot. The interpretation criteria of these laboratory tests should follow European recommendations (EUCALB). LB with neurological involvement should be confirmed by screening for intrathecal synthesis of borrelia antibodies in CSF. LB with rheumatologic expression could be confirmed by screening for borrelia in joint fluid by PCR. There is no strong marker of activity of the disease. Follow-up for LB is difficult, because antibodies may persist for years and LB does not confer immunization. PMID:17360138

  15. Lyme disease: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Nathwani, D; Hamlet, N; Walker, E

    1990-01-01

    In the last decade, Lyme borreliosis has emerged as a complex new infection whose distribution is worldwide. The multisystem disorder, which primarily affects the skin, joints, heart and nervous system at different stages, is caused by the tick-borne spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi. After the first weeks of infection almost all patients have a positive antibody response to the spirochaete and serological determinations are currently the most practical laboratory aid in diagnosis. Treatment with appropriate antibiotics is usually curative. PMID:2107856

  16. Lyme disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Silver, H M

    1997-03-01

    There has been great concern in the past regarding the possible fetal infection and teratogenicity from Lyme disease contracted during pregnancy because of the similarities of disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi to syphilis. Although the initial retrospective case reports were alarming, more recent prospective data have been reassuring. This article reviews the evidence that currently supports the assurance of the benign nature of this infection with respect to the fetus. PMID:9067786

  17. Epitope-Specific Evolution of Human B Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE Protein from Early to Late Stages of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Jacek, Elzbieta; Tang, Kevin S; Komorowski, Lars; Ajamian, Mary; Probst, Christian; Stevenson, Brian; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Most immunogenic proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, are known or expected to contain multiple B cell epitopes. However, the kinetics of the development of human B cell responses toward the various epitopes of individual proteins during the course of Lyme disease has not been examined. Using the highly immunogenic VlsE as a model Ag, we investigated the evolution of humoral immune responses toward its immunodominant sequences in 90 patients with a range of early to late manifestations of Lyme disease. The results demonstrate the existence of asynchronous, independently developing, Ab responses against the two major immunogenic regions of the VlsE molecule in the human host. Despite their strong immunogenicity, the target epitopes were inaccessible to Abs on intact spirochetes, suggesting a lack of direct immunoprotective effect. These observations document the association of immune reactivity toward specific VlsE sequences with different phases of Lyme disease, demonstrating the potential use of detailed epitope mapping of Ags for staging of the infection, and offer insights regarding the pathogen's possible immune evasion mechanisms. PMID:26718339

  18. Epitope-Specific Evolution of Human B Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE Protein from Early to Late Stages of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jacek, Elzbieta; Tang, Kevin S.; Komorowski, Lars; Ajamian, Mary; Probst, Christian; Stevenson, Brian; Wormser, Gary P.; Marques, Adriana R.

    2016-01-01

    Most immunogenic proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, are known or expected to contain multiple B cell epitopes. However, the kinetics of the development of human B cell responses toward the various epitopes of individual proteins during the course of Lyme disease has not been examined. Using the highly immunogenic VlsE as a model Ag, we investigated the evolution of humoral immune responses toward its immunodominant sequences in 90 patients with a range of early to late manifestations of Lyme disease. The results demonstrate the existence of asynchronous, independently developing, Ab responses against the two major immunogenic regions of the VlsE molecule in the human host. Despite their strong immunogenicity, the target epitopes were inaccessible to Abs on intact spirochetes, suggesting a lack of direct immunoprotective effect. These observations document the association of immune reactivity toward specific VlsE sequences with different phases of Lyme disease, demonstrating the potential use of detailed epitope mapping of Ags for staging of the infection, and offer insights regarding the pathogen’s possible immune evasion mechanisms. PMID:26718339

  19. No Geographic Correlation between Lyme Disease and Death Due to 4 Neurodegenerative Disorders, United States, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Perea, Anna E.; Pastula, Daniel M.; Mead, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Associations between Lyme disease and certain neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed, but supportive evidence for an association is lacking. Similar geographic distributions would be expected if 2 conditions were etiologically linked. Thus, we compared the distribution of Lyme disease cases in the United States with the distributions of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson disease; no geographic correlations were identified. Lyme disease incidence per US state was not correlated with rates of death due to ALS, MS, or Parkinson disease; however, an inverse correlation was detected between Lyme disease and Alzheimer disease. The absence of a positive correlation between the geographic distribution of Lyme disease and the distribution of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, ALS, MS, and Parkinson disease provides further evidence that Lyme disease is not associated with the development of these neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:26488307

  20. Lyme disease: the next decade

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Although Lyme disease remains a controversial illness, recent events have created an unprecedented opportunity to make progress against this serious tick-borne infection. Evidence presented during the legally mandated review of the restrictive Lyme guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has confirmed the potential for persistent infection with the Lyme spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, as well as the complicating role of tick-borne coinfections such as Babesia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Bartonella species associated with failure of short-course antibiotic therapy. Furthermore, renewed interest in the role of cell wall-deficient (CWD) forms in chronic bacterial infection and progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of biofilms has focused attention on these processes in chronic Lyme disease. Recognition of the importance of CWD forms and biofilms in persistent B. burgdorferi infection should stimulate pharmaceutical research into new antimicrobial agents that target these mechanisms of chronic infection with the Lyme spirochete. Concurrent clinical implementation of proteomic screening offers a chance to correct significant deficiencies in Lyme testing. Advances in these areas have the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease in the coming decade. PMID:21694904

  1. New insights into Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Brandon N.; Gherezghiher, Teshome B.; Hilario, Jennifer D.; Kellermann, Gottfried H.

    2015-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is transmitted through the bite of a tick that is infected by the bacterial spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Clinical manifestation of the disease can lead to heart conditions, neurological disorders, and inflammatory disorders. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of oxidative stress and intracellular communication in Lyme borreliosis patients. Mitochondrial superoxide and cytosolic ionized calcium was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of Lyme borreliosis patients and healthy controls. Mitochondrial superoxide levels were significantly higher (p<0.0001) in Lyme borreliosis patients (n=32) as compared to healthy controls (n=30). Significantly low (p<0.0001) levels of cytosolic ionized calcium were also observed in Lyme borreliosis patients (n=11) when compared to healthy controls (n=11). These results indicate that there is an imbalance of reactive oxygen species and cytosolic calcium in Lyme borreliosis patients. The results further suggest that oxidative stress and interrupted intracellular communication may ultimately contribute to a condition of mitochondrial dysfunction in the immune cells of Lyme borreliosis patients. PMID:25838067

  2. Multiple independent introductions of Plasmodium falciparum in South America

    PubMed Central

    Yalcindag, Erhan; Elguero, Eric; Arnathau, Céline; Durand, Patrick; Akiana, Jean; Anderson, Timothy J.; Aubouy, Agnes; Balloux, François; Besnard, Patrick; Bogreau, Hervé; Carnevale, Pierre; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Fontenille, Didier; Gamboa, Dionicia; Jombart, Thibaut; Le Mire, Jacques; Leroy, Eric; Maestre, Amanda; Mayxay, Mayfong; Ménard, Didier; Musset, Lise; Newton, Paul N.; Nkoghé, Dieudonné; Noya, Oscar; Ollomo, Benjamin; Rogier, Christophe; Veron, Vincent; Wide, Albina; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Carme, Bernard; Legrand, Eric; Chevillon, Christine; Ayala, Francisco J.; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck

    2012-01-01

    The origin of Plasmodium falciparum in South America is controversial. Some studies suggest a recent introduction during the European colonizations and the transatlantic slave trade. Other evidence—archeological and genetic—suggests a much older origin. We collected and analyzed P. falciparum isolates from different regions of the world, encompassing the distribution range of the parasite, including populations from sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and South America. Analyses of microsatellite and SNP polymorphisms show that the populations of P. falciparum in South America are subdivided in two main genetic clusters (northern and southern). Phylogenetic analyses, as well as Approximate Bayesian Computation methods suggest independent introductions of the two clusters from African sources. Our estimates of divergence time between the South American populations and their likely sources favor a likely introduction from Africa during the transatlantic slave trade. PMID:22203975

  3. Multiple independent introductions of Plasmodium falciparum in South America.

    PubMed

    Yalcindag, Erhan; Elguero, Eric; Arnathau, Céline; Durand, Patrick; Akiana, Jean; Anderson, Timothy J; Aubouy, Agnes; Balloux, François; Besnard, Patrick; Bogreau, Hervé; Carnevale, Pierre; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Fontenille, Didier; Gamboa, Dionicia; Jombart, Thibaut; Le Mire, Jacques; Leroy, Eric; Maestre, Amanda; Mayxay, Mayfong; Ménard, Didier; Musset, Lise; Newton, Paul N; Nkoghé, Dieudonné; Noya, Oscar; Ollomo, Benjamin; Rogier, Christophe; Veron, Vincent; Wide, Albina; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Carme, Bernard; Legrand, Eric; Chevillon, Christine; Ayala, Francisco J; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck

    2012-01-10

    The origin of Plasmodium falciparum in South America is controversial. Some studies suggest a recent introduction during the European colonizations and the transatlantic slave trade. Other evidence--archeological and genetic--suggests a much older origin. We collected and analyzed P. falciparum isolates from different regions of the world, encompassing the distribution range of the parasite, including populations from sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and South America. Analyses of microsatellite and SNP polymorphisms show that the populations of P. falciparum in South America are subdivided in two main genetic clusters (northern and southern). Phylogenetic analyses, as well as Approximate Bayesian Computation methods suggest independent introductions of the two clusters from African sources. Our estimates of divergence time between the South American populations and their likely sources favor a likely introduction from Africa during the transatlantic slave trade. PMID:22203975

  4. Delivering multiple independent RIB simultaneously: Technical and operational challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, A. C.

    2016-06-01

    ISAC is an ISOL-type facility at which RIB are produced by direct reactions of 480 MeV protons from TRIUMFs main cyclotron on thick targets. Like other ISOL-type facilities, ISAC is limited to the production and delivery of a single RIB at any given time. ARIEL, the Advanced Rare-IsotopE Laboratory, will provide for the production and delivery of, ultimately, two additional RIB, the first produced by photofission on actinide targets using electrons from a new superconducting electron linac and the second by direct and indirect reactions with protons from TRIUMFs main cyclotron. This will allow for the simultaneous delivery of three independent RIB to experimental areas at ARIEL and ISAC. The shift from single-user to multi-user operation will introduce significant technical and operational challenges that RIB facilities have not yet had to address. Almost all aspects of facility operation will become more complex as the first RIB from ARIEL targets become available.

  5. Lyme Borreliosis and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Biju; Chatterjee, Manas

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem illness which is caused by the strains of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and transmitted by the tick, Ixodes. Though very commonly reported from the temperate regions of the world, the incidence has increased worldwide due to increasing travel and changing habitats of the vector. Few cases have been reported from the Indian subcontinent too. Skin manifestations are the earliest to occur, and diagnosing these lesions followed by appropriate treatment, can prevent complications of the disease, which are mainly neurological. The three main dermatological manifestations are erythema chronicum migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Many other dermatological conditions including morphea, lichen sclerosus and lately B cell lymphoma, have been attributed to the disease. Immunofluorescence and polymerase reaction tests have been developed to overcome the problems for diagnosis. Culture methods are also used for diagnosis. Treatment with Doxycycline is the mainstay of management, though prevention is of utmost importance. Vaccines against the condition are still not very successful. Hence, the importance of recognising the cutaneous manifestations early, to prevent systemic complications which can occur if left untreated, can be understood. This review highlights the cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis and its management. PMID:23723463

  6. Sulforaphane inhibits multiple inflammasomes through an Nrf2-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Allison J; Maier, Nolan K; Leppla, Stephen H; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasomes are intracellular complexes that have an important role in cytosolic innate immune sensing and pathogen defense. Inflammasome sensors detect a diversity of intracellular microbial ligands and endogenous danger signals and activate caspase-1, thus initiating maturation and release of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. These events, although crucial to the innate immune response, have also been linked to the pathology of several inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. The natural isothiocyanate sulforaphane, present in broccoli sprouts and available as a dietary supplement, has gained attention for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. We discovered that sulforaphane inhibits caspase-1 autoproteolytic activation and interleukin-1β maturation and secretion downstream of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor leucine-rich repeat proteins NLRP1 and NLRP3, NLR family apoptosis inhibitory protein 5/NLR family caspase-1 recruitment domain-containing protein 4 (NAIP5/NLRC4), and absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasome receptors. Sulforaphane does not inhibit the inflammasome by direct modification of active caspase-1 and its mechanism is not dependent on protein degradation by the proteasome or de novo protein synthesis. Furthermore, sulforaphane-mediated inhibition of the inflammasomes is independent of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like factor 2 (Nrf2) and the antioxidant response-element pathway, to which many of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of sulforaphane have been attributed. Sulforaphane was also found to inhibit cell recruitment to the peritoneum and interleukin-1β secretion in an in vivo peritonitis model of acute gout and to reverse NLRP1-mediated murine resistance to Bacillus anthracis spore infection. These findings demonstrate that sulforaphane inhibits the inflammasomes through a novel mechanism and contributes to

  7. Laboratory aspects of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, A G

    1988-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (Lyme disease), a common tick-borne disorder of people and domestic animals in North America and Europe, is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Following the discovery and initial propagation of this agent in 1981 came revelations that other tick-associated infectious disorders are but different forms of Lyme borreliosis. A challenge for the clinician and microbiology laboratory is confirmation that a skin rash, a chronic meningitis, an episode of myocarditis, or an arthritic joint is the consequence of B. burgdorferi infection. The diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis may be established by (i) directly observing the spirochete in host fluid or tissue, (ii) recovering the etiologic spirochete from the patient in culture medium or indirectly through inoculation of laboratory animals, or (iii) carrying out serologic tests with the patient's serum or cerebrospinal fluid. The last method, while lacking in discriminatory power, is the most efficacious diagnostic assay for most laboratories at present. Images PMID:3069200

  8. Multiple correlation computer program determines relationships between several independent and dependent variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspar, H.; Newsbaum, J. B.

    1967-01-01

    Relationships between independent and dependent variables are determined by multiple correlation computer program. This is applied to research and experimental design and development of complex hardware and components that require test programs.

  9. Lyme disease in central Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercogova, J; Brzonova, I

    2001-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a fascinating disease, the aetiopathology of which is not yet completely known. Different subspecies of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato are responsible for the variable clinical course of the disease. Some new cutaneous (alopecia) and ocular (photophobia and retinal vasculitis) manisfestations have been described and the largest prospective study on erythema migrans during pregnancy was published during the last year. Optimal therapy of Lyme borreliosis is still lacking, but doxycycline, amoxicillin, penicillin, and ceftriaxone are recommended most frequently. PMID:11979122

  10. Lyme disease. A Canadian perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Green, L.; Costero, A.

    1993-01-01

    Lyme disease is an expanding community health issue in the United States. This has led to greater public awareness in Canada, although the disease remains rare here. We review the biology of ticks and show how feeding patterns are relevant to disease transmission. Diagnosing Lyme disease is sometimes problematic, but treatment can be effective, particularly in the early stages. Preventive measures are aimed at avoiding tick contact and early tick removal. Images Figure 1 PMID:8489644

  11. Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQ Health care providers Educational materials Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir It ... ONE 7(1): e29914. HHS Special Webinar on Lyme Disease Persistence frame support disabled and/or not supported ...

  12. Lyme disease - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000252.htm Lyme disease - what to ask your doctor To use the ... this page, please enable JavaScript. You may get Lyme disease when you are bitten by a tick that ...

  13. Teratogen update: Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Elliott, D J; Eppes, S C; Klein, J D

    2001-11-01

    We reviewed the world literature concerning the reproductive effects of Lyme disease (LD). Borrelia burgdorferi, which is the etiology of LD, is a spirochete and, as such, may share the potential for causing fetal infection, which may occur in the setting of maternal spirochetemia. Information concerning the effects of gestational LD derives from case reports and series, epidemiologic studies, and experimental animal models. Although provocative, these studies fail to define a characteristic teratogenic effect. However, skin and cardiac involvement have predominated in some reports. Pregnancy wastage has been suggested primarily by animal studies. Gestational LD appears to be associated with a low risk of adverse pregnancy outcome, particularly with appropriated antibiotic therapy. Suggestions for management of clinical situations are presented. PMID:11745834

  14. Treatment of Lyme borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis in humans. This inflammatory disease can affect the skin, the peripheral and central nervous system, the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular system and rarely the eyes. Early stages are directly associated with viable bacteria at the site of inflammation. The pathogen-host interaction is complex and has been elucidated only in part. B. burgdorferi is highly susceptible to antibiotic treatment and the majority of patients profit from this treatment. Some patients develop chronic persistent disease despite repeated antibiotics. Whether this is a sequel of pathogen persistence or a status of chronic auto-inflammation, auto-immunity or a form of fibromyalgia is highly debated. Since vaccination is not available, prevention of a tick bite or chemoprophylaxis is important. If the infection is manifest, then treatment strategies should target not only the pathogen by using antibiotics but also the chronic inflammation by using anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:20067594

  15. Pharmacist initiation of postexposure doxycycline for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anita N; Orr, K Kelly; Bratberg, Jeffrey P; Silverblatt, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To enhance public access to prophylaxis for Lyme disease following an identified Ixodes scapularis tick bite through pharmacist-initiated antibiotic therapy and to assess patient satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service provided. SETTING Independent community pharmacy in Charlestown, RI, from May to October 2012. PRACTICE DESCRIPTION Under a collaborative practice agreement, trained pharmacists at an independent pharmacy identified patients eligible for postexposure antibiotic prophylaxis following attachment and removal of an I. scapularis tick (commonly known as a deer tick) and dispensed two 100 mg tablets of doxycycline. Patients were included if they were 18 years or older, provided informed consent, had an estimated time of tick attachment of 36 hours or more, had the tick removed within 72 hours of visit, denied contraindications to doxycycline therapy, and reported telephone access for follow-up. Patients enrolled in the study protocol were given counseling related to doxycycline, signs and symptoms of Lyme disease, and future tick prevention strategies. PRACTICE INNOVATION Pharmacist initiation of doxycycline prophylaxis has not been described in the literature previously. Successful pharmacist initiation of antibiotic prophylaxis may have broader implications for states with endemic Lyme disease or other infectious disease public health concerns. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient self-reported adverse outcomes and satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service. RESULTS Eight patients enrolled in the study and completed the follow-up survey. The results indicated a high level of satisfaction with the pharmacy services provided, with no reports of the subsequent development of Lyme disease symptoms or major adverse events. CONCLUSION The project has expanded to three community pharmacy sites in southern Rhode Island based on this experience. Similar pharmacy-based collaborative practice models should be considered in highly endemic Lyme disease

  16. Post-Lyme disease syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dąbek, Józefa; Cieślik, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    About 10% of patients with Lyme disease continue to experience musculoskeletal pain and cognitive dysfunction after recommended antibiotic treatment. This condition is called post-Lyme disease syndrome (PLDS) or post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. These two terms are used interchangeably. The pathogenesis of PLDS has been controversial. The hypothesis that patients with PLDS may harbor hidden reservoirs of Borrelia burgdorferi after their initial antibiotic treatment is difficult to accept. The prospective, double-blind studies contradict this point of view. Also, recently published research applying xenodiagnosis to PLDS supports the opinion that PLDS most likely has an autoimmune background. Lengthy courses of antibiotics are not justified in patients with PLDS because of the lack of benefit, and they are fraught with hazards. Most patients with PLDS recover from persistent symptoms with time. However, it can take months before they feel completely well.

  17. Gender Differences in Childhood Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Tveitnes, Dag; Øymar, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Background. Many neurological diseases show differences between genders. We studied gender differences in childhood Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) in an endemic area of Lyme borreliosis in Norway. Methods. In a population based study, all children (<14 years of age) with symptoms suspicious of LNB, including all children with acute facial nerve palsy, were evaluated for LNB by medical history, clinical examination, blood tests, and lumbar puncture. LNB was diagnosed according to international criteria. Results. 142 children were diagnosed with LNB during 2001–2009. Facial nerve palsy was more common in girls (86%) than in boys (62%) (p < 0.001), but headache and/or neck stiffness as the only symptom was more common in boys (30%) than in girls (10%) (p = 0.003). The girls were younger than boys and had a shorter duration of symptoms, but boys had a higher level of pleocytosis than girls. In a multivariate analysis, both gender and having headache and neck stiffness were associated with a higher level of pleocytosis. Conclusion. Girls and boys have different clinical presentations of LNB, and boys have a higher level of inflammation than girls independent of the clinical presentation. PMID:26576072

  18. Photonic generation and independent steering of multiple RF signals for software defined radars.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Pinna, Sergio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2013-09-23

    As the improvement of radar systems claims for digital approaches, photonics is becoming a solution for software defined high frequency and high stability signal generation. We report on our recent activities on the photonic generation of flexible wideband RF signals, extending the proposed architecture to the independent optical beamforming of multiple signals. The scheme has been tested generating two wideband signals at 10 GHz and 40 GHz, and controlling their independent delays at two antenna elements. Thanks to the multiple functionalities, the proposed scheme allows to improve the effectiveness of the photonic approach, reducing its cost and allowing flexibility, extremely wide bandwidth, and high stability. PMID:24104176

  19. Conspicuous impacts of inconspicuous hosts on the Lyme disease epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Brisson, Dustin; Dykhuizen, Daniel E; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2007-01-01

    Emerging zoonotic pathogens are a constant threat to human health throughout the world. Control strategies to protect public health regularly fail, due in part to the tendency to focus on a single host species assumed to be the primary reservoir for a pathogen. Here, we present evidence that a diverse set of species can play an important role in determining disease risk to humans using Lyme disease as a model. Host-targeted public health strategies to control the Lyme disease epidemic in North America have focused on interrupting Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (ss) transmission between blacklegged ticks and the putative dominant reservoir species, white-footed mice. However, B. burgdorferi ss infects more than a dozen vertebrate species, any of which could transmit the pathogen to feeding ticks and increase the density of infected ticks and Lyme disease risk. Using genetic and ecological data, we demonstrate that mice are neither the primary host for ticks nor the primary reservoir for B. burgdorferi ss, feeding 10% of all ticks and 25% of B. burgdorferi-infected ticks. Inconspicuous shrews feed 35% of all ticks and 55% of infected ticks. Because several important host species influence Lyme disease risk, interventions directed at a multiple host species will be required to control this epidemic. PMID:18029304

  20. "Capitalizing on Sport": Sport, Physical Education and Multiple Capitals in Scottish Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, John; Lingard, Bob; Weiner, Gaby; Forbes, Joan

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on a research study into the existence and use of different forms of capital--including social, cultural and physical capital--in three independent schools in Scotland. We were interested in understanding how these forms of capital work to produce and reproduce "advantage" and "privilege". Analysis is framed by a multiple capitals…

  1. Datafish Multiphase Data Mining Technique to Match Multiple Mutually Inclusive Independent Variables in Large PACS Databases.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Brendan P; Klochko, Chad; Halabi, Safwan; Siegal, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Retrospective data mining has tremendous potential in research but is time and labor intensive. Current data mining software contains many advanced search features but is limited in its ability to identify patients who meet multiple complex independent search criteria. Simple keyword and Boolean search techniques are ineffective when more complex searches are required, or when a search for multiple mutually inclusive variables becomes important. This is particularly true when trying to identify patients with a set of specific radiologic findings or proximity in time across multiple different imaging modalities. Another challenge that arises in retrospective data mining is that much variation still exists in how image findings are described in radiology reports. We present an algorithmic approach to solve this problem and describe a specific use case scenario in which we applied our technique to a real-world data set in order to identify patients who matched several independent variables in our institution's picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) database. PMID:26572132

  2. [Post-Lyme disease syndrome].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Jurkowski, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    Lyme disease is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacteria, spirochete of the Borrelia type. Skin, nervous system, musculoskeletal system and heart may be involved in the course of the disease. The prognosis for properly treated Lyme disease is usually good. However, in about 5% of patients so called Post-Lyme disease syndrome (PLSD) develops. It is defined as a syndrome of subjective symptoms persisting despite proper treatment of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. The most common symptoms include: fatigue, muscle and joint pain, and problems with memory and concentration. Pathogenesis of PLDS remains unknown. The differential diagnosis should include neurological, rheumatic and mental diseases. Till now there is no causative treatment of PLDS. In relieving symptom rehabilitation, painkillers, anti-inflammatory and antidepressants medicines are recommended. Emotional and psychological supports are also necessary. Non-specific symptoms reported by patients with post- Lyme disease syndrome raise the suspicion of other pathologies. This can lead to misdiagnosis and implementation of unnecessary, potentially harmful to the patient's therapy. An increase in tick-borne diseases needs to increase physicians awareness of these issues. PMID:27000820

  3. Lyme Disease Comes to Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Describes one summer camp's plan for dealing with Lyme disease. Describes the disease and the deer tick. Recommends avoiding tick exposure through clothing, frequent examination, showers, and avoiding high grass and brushy areas, and using chemical insect repellents and chemicals to kill ticks in deer mouse nests. (DHP)

  4. [Winged scapula in lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Rausch, V; Königshausen, M; Gessmann, J; Schildhauer, T A; Seybold, D

    2016-06-01

    Here we present the case of a young patient with one-sided winged scapula and lyme borreliosis. This disease can be very delimitating in daily life. If non-operative treatment fails, dynamic or static stabilization of the scapula can be a therapeutic option. PMID:26849378

  5. Forest fragmentation and Lyme disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vectorborne disease in the United States. It is associated with human exposure to infected Ixodes ticks which exist even in degraded forest and herbaceous habitat. We provide an overview of the epidemiology, ecology and landscape charact...

  6. Generalizability in two clinical trials of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the generalizability of two National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials in patients with chronic Lyme disease and to determine whether selection factors resulted in the unfavorable outcomes. Design Epidemiologic review of the generalizability of two trials conducted by Klempner et al. This paper considers whether the study group was representative of the general chronic Lyme disease population. Results In their article in The New England Journal of Medicine, Klempner et al. failed to discuss the limitations of their clinical trials. This epidemiologic review argues that their results are not generalizable to the overall Lyme disease population. The treatment failure reported by the authors may be the result of enrolling patients who remained ill after an average of 4.7 years and an average of 3 previous courses of treatment. The poor outcome cited in these trials may be explained by having selected patients who had undergone delayed treatment or multiple treatments unsuccessfully. These selection factors were not addressed by the studies' authors, nor have they been discussed by reviewers. The trials have been over-interpreted by the NIH and widely publicized in a press release. The results have been extrapolated to other groups of Lyme disease patients by commentators, by a case discussant in an influential medical journal, and by health insurance companies to deny antibiotic treatment. Conclusion The Klempner et al. trials are assumed to be internally valid based on a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) design. However, this review argues that the trials have limited generalizability beyond the select group of patients with characteristics like those in the trial. Applying the findings to target populations with characteristics that differ from those included in these trials is inappropriate and may limit options for chronic Lyme disease patients who might benefit from antibiotic treatment

  7. The Positive Predictive Value of Lyme Elisa for the Diagnosis of Lyme Disease in Children.

    PubMed

    Lipsett, Susan C; Pollock, Nira R; Branda, John A; Gordon, Caroline D; Gordon, Catherine R; Lantos, Paul M; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2015-11-01

    By using a Lyme enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we demonstrated that high ELISA index values are strongly predictive of Lyme disease. In children with clinical presentations consistent with Lyme disease, ELISA index values ≥3.0 had a positive predictive value of 99.4% (95% confidence interval: 98.1-99.8%) for Lyme disease, making a supplemental Western immunoblot potentially unnecessary. PMID:26222064

  8. Scintigraphic evaluation of Lyme disease: Gallium-67 imaging of Lyme myositis

    SciTech Connect

    Kengen, R.A.; v.d. Linde, M.; Sprenger, H.G.; Piers, D.A. )

    1989-10-01

    A patient suffering from Lyme disease had cardiac conduction abnormalities, symptoms of arthritis, and myalgia. A Ga-67 image showed evidence of endomyocarditis, but intense skeletal muscle uptake pointed to Lyme myositis. Reference is made to two other case reports of Lyme myositis.

  9. A Presentation of Lyme Disease: Pseudotumor Cerebri.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Burcu; İncecik, Faruk; Hergüner, Özlem M; Alabaz, Derya; Beşen, Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by a tick-transmitted spirochete, B. burgdorferi. It can present with both central and peripheral nervous system manifestations, including aseptic meningitis, meningoencephalitis, Bell's palsy and other cranial neuropathies, radiculoneuritis, and myelitis. However, pseudotumor cerebri associated with Lyme disease is rare. Here, we report a eight-year-old girl with the unusual manifestation of pseudotumor cerebri associated Lyme disease. PMID:27411423

  10. Flocking of multi-agent systems with multiplicative and independent measurement noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongzheng; Wang, Yajun; Zhao, Donghua

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the effect of noise and group density on the emergence of flocking in a stochastic Cucker-Smale type system. We consider the independent and multiplicative measurement noise and derive sufficient conditions for flocking and non-flocking in terms of the noise intensity and group density. We report that, in noise environments, it is rather easy for the group with high density to form and maintain ordered group motion. Moreover, we find that, under the perturbation of multiplicative noise, systems with weak coupling can tolerate relatively strong perturbation of noise.

  11. Lyme arthritis of the pediatric ankle.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Amiethab; Walrath, Jessica; Hennrikus, William

    2014-10-01

    Lyme arthritis results from acute inflammation caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The number of cases per year has been rising since 2006, with a majority of patients being affected in the northeastern United States. Development of Lyme arthritis is of particular importance to the orthopedic surgeon because Lyme arthritis often presents as an acute episode of joint swelling and tenderness and may be confused with bacterial septic arthritis. Considering the vast difference in treatment management between these 2 pathologies, differentiating between them is of critical importance. Septic arthritis often needs to be addressed surgically, whereas Lyme arthritis can be treated with oral antibiotics alone. Laboratory testing for Lyme disease often results in a delay in diagnosis because many laboratories batch-test Lyme specimens only a few times per week because of increased expense. The authors present a case of Lyme arthritis in the pediatric ankle in an endemic region. No clear algorithm exists to delineate between septic arthritis and Lyme arthritis of the joint. Improved clinical guidelines for the identification and diagnosis of Lyme arthritis of the ankle are important so that appropriate antibiotics can be used and surgery can be avoided. PMID:25275987

  12. Presence of Multiple Independent Effects in Risk Loci of Common Complex Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiayi

    2012-01-01

    Many genetic loci and SNPs associated with many common complex human diseases and traits are now identified. The total genetic variance explained by these loci for a trait or disease, however, has often been very small. Much of the “missing heritability” has been revealed to be hidden in the genome among the large number of variants with small effects. Several recent studies have reported the presence of multiple independent SNPs and genetic heterogeneity in trait-associated loci. It is therefore reasonable to speculate that such a phenomenon could be common among loci known to be associated with a complex trait or disease. For testing this hypothesis, a total of 117 loci known to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn disease (CD), type 1 diabetes (T1D), or type 2 diabetes (T2D) were selected. The presence of multiple independent effects was assessed in the case-control samples genotyped by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium study and imputed with SNP genotype information from the HapMap Project and the 1000 Genomes Project. Eleven loci with evidence of multiple independent effects were identified in the study, and the number was expected to increase at larger sample sizes and improved statistical power. The variance explained by the multiple effects in a locus was much higher than the variance explained by the single reported SNP effect. The results thus significantly improve our understanding of the allelic structure of these individual disease-associated loci, as well as our knowledge of the general genetic mechanisms of common complex traits and diseases. PMID:22770979

  13. Lyme neuroborreliosis-epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Koedel, Uwe; Fingerle, Volker; Pfister, Hans-Walter

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium, is the most common vector-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. The clinical presentation varies with disease stage, and neurological manifestations (often referred to as Lyme neuroborreliosis) are reported in up to 12% of patients with Lyme disease. Most aspects of the epidemiology, clinical manifestation and treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis are well known and accepted; only the management of so-called chronic Lyme disease is surrounded by considerable controversy. This term is used for disparate patient groups, including those who have untreated late-stage infection (for example, late neuroborreliosis), those with subjective symptoms that persist after treatment (termed 'post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome' [PTLDS]), and those with unexplained subjective complaints that may or may not be accompanied by positive test results for B. burgdorferi infection in serum (here called 'chronic Lyme disease'). The incidence of PTLDS is still a matter of debate, and its pathogenesis is unclear, but there is evidence that these patients do not have ongoing B. burgdorferi infection and, thus, do not benefit from additional antibiotic therapy. Chronic Lyme disease lacks an accepted clinical definition, and most patients who receive this diagnosis have other illnesses. Thus, a careful diagnostic work-up is needed to ensure proper treatment. PMID:26215621

  14. Chronic Lyme; diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ljøstad, U; Mygland, Å

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we aim to discuss the definition, clinical and laboratory features, diagnostics, and management of chronic Lyme. Chronic Lyme is a rare condition caused by long-lasting and ongoing infection with the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). The most common manifestations are progressive encephalitis, myelitis, acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans with or without neuropathy, and arthritis. Chronic Lyme is not considered to present with isolated subjective symptoms. Direct detection of Bb has low yield in most manifestations of chronic Lyme, while almost 100% of the cases are seropositive, that is, have detectable Bb IgG antibodies in serum. Detection of Bb antibodies only with Western blot technique and not with ELISA and detection of Bb IgM antibodies without simultaneous detection of Bb IgG antibodies should be considered as seronegativity in patients with long-lasting symptoms. Patients with chronic Lyme in the nervous system (neuroborreliosis) have, with few exceptions, pleocytosis and production of Bb antibodies in their cerebrospinal fluid. Strict guidelines should be applied in diagnostics of chronic Lyme, and several differential diagnoses, including neurological disease, rheumatologic disease, post-Lyme disease syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and psychiatric disease, should be considered in the diagnostic workup. Antibiotic treatment with administration route and dosages according to current guidelines are recommended. Combination antimicrobial therapy or antibiotic courses longer than 4 weeks are not recommended. Patients who attribute their symptoms to chronic Lyme on doubtful basis should be offered a thorough and systematic diagnostic approach, and an open and respectful dialogue. PMID:23190290

  15. Lyme disease in northwestern coastal California.

    PubMed Central

    Ley, C; Davila, I H; Mayer, N M; Murray, R A; Rutherford, G W; Reingold, A L

    1994-01-01

    To determine the incidence of physician-diagnosed Lyme disease in an endemic area of California, an active surveillance program was implemented in Lake, Mendocino, Sonoma, and southern Humboldt counties. More than 200 medical care providers were called monthly for their list of suspected cases of Lyme disease. Pertinent information was abstracted from the medical record of each patient. Of 153 cases of possible early Lyme disease ascertained from July 1991 to December 1992, 37% consisted of physician-diagnosed erythema migrans. Only 58% of erythema migrans rashes were at least 5 cm in diameter. An additional 43 patients had suspicious rashes not classified as erythema migrans. Of 166 patients with possible late-stage Lyme disease, 31% had specific clinical symptoms and 75% had a positive serologic test. With an incident case defined as physician-diagnosed erythema migrans of at least 5 cm in diameter, the annual incidence of Lyme disease in northwestern coastal California according to active surveillance only was 5.5 per 100,000. The rate of Lyme disease in California is substantially lower than that in the Atlantic northeastern United States. Many suspected cases of Lyme disease in this endemic area do not meet surveillance criteria, which are intentionally restrictive. Although some of the illnesses not meeting surveillance criteria may be due to infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, it appears that Lyme disease is being overdiagnosed in this area. Images PMID:8053175

  16. Sunburn and Lyme Disease: Two Preventable Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlicin, Karen M.

    1995-01-01

    Stresses the importance of educating campers and staff about the dangers of overexposure to the sun and the transmission of Lyme disease. Discusses the importance of using an appropriate sunscreen and avoiding outdoor activities during peak hours of sunlight. Discusses how Lyme disease is transmitted, the life cycle of a tick, and how to remove…

  17. Genetic variants in lipid metabolism are independently associated with multiple features of the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to find single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), within transcriptional pathways of glucose and lipid metabolism, which are related to multiple features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods 373 SNPs were measured in 3575 subjects of the Doetinchem cohort. Prevalence of MetS features, i.e. hyperglycemia, abdominal obesity, decreased HDL-cholesterol levels and hypertension, were measured twice in 6 years. Associations between the SNPs and the individual MetS features were analyzed by log-linear models. For SNPs related to multiple MetS features (P < 0.01), we investigated whether these associations were independent of each other. Results Two SNPs, CETP Ile405Val and APOE Cys112Arg, were associated with both the prevalence of low HDL-cholesterol level (Ile405Val P = < .0001; Cys112Arg P = 0.001) and with the prevalence of abdominal obesity (Ile405Val P = 0.007; Cys112Arg P = 0.007). For both SNPs, the association with HDL-cholesterol was partly independent of the association with abdominal obesity and vice versa. Conclusion Two SNPs, mainly known for their role in lipid metabolism, were associated with two MetS features i.e., low HDL-cholesterol concentration, as well as, independent of this association, abdominal obesity. These SNPs may help to explain why low HDL-cholesterol levels and abdominal obesity frequently co-occur. PMID:21767357

  18. Sinus Pause in Association with Lyme Carditis

    PubMed Central

    Dibs, Samer R.; Friedman, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in the United States. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cardiac involvement is seen in 4% to 10% of patients with Lyme disease. The principal manifestation of Lyme carditis is self-limited conduction system disease, with predominant involvement of the atrioventricular node. On rare occasions, Lyme carditis patients present with other conduction system disorders such as bundle branch block, intraventricular conduction delay, and supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia. We report the unusual case of a 59-year-old man who presented with new-onset symptomatic sinus pauses one month after hiking in upstate New York. To our knowledge, this is the first case report from North America that describes the relationship between symptomatic sinus pause and Lyme carditis. PMID:26175640

  19. A clinical review of Lyme disease in Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Patil, Naveen; Bariola, J Ryan; Saccente, Michael; Vyas, Keyur S; Bradsher, Robert W

    2010-02-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. Since it was first described more than 30 years ago, Lyme disease has generated a great deal of controversy. Lyme disease is not endemic in Arkansas, and testing for Borrelia burgdorferi can lead to clinical confusion, unnecessary treatment and excess cost. This article will present a brief review of Lyme disease, with an emphasis on what is known regarding Lyme disease in Arkansas. PMID:20218039

  20. Relaxing the independent censoring assumption in the Cox proportional hazards model using multiple imputation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dan; White, Ian R; Seaman, Shaun; Evans, Hannah; Baisley, Kathy; Carpenter, James

    2014-11-30

    The Cox proportional hazards model is frequently used in medical statistics. The standard methods for fitting this model rely on the assumption of independent censoring. Although this is sometimes plausible, we often wish to explore how robust our inferences are as this untestable assumption is relaxed. We describe how this can be carried out in a way that makes the assumptions accessible to all those involved in a research project. Estimation proceeds via multiple imputation, where censored failure times are imputed under user-specified departures from independent censoring. A novel aspect of our method is the use of bootstrapping to generate proper imputations from the Cox model. We illustrate our approach using data from an HIV-prevention trial and discuss how it can be readily adapted and applied in other settings. PMID:25060703

  1. Relaxing the independent censoring assumption in the Cox proportional hazards model using multiple imputation

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Dan; White, Ian R; Seaman, Shaun; Evans, Hannah; Baisley, Kathy; Carpenter, James

    2014-01-01

    The Cox proportional hazards model is frequently used in medical statistics. The standard methods for fitting this model rely on the assumption of independent censoring. Although this is sometimes plausible, we often wish to explore how robust our inferences are as this untestable assumption is relaxed. We describe how this can be carried out in a way that makes the assumptions accessible to all those involved in a research project. Estimation proceeds via multiple imputation, where censored failure times are imputed under user-specified departures from independent censoring. A novel aspect of our method is the use of bootstrapping to generate proper imputations from the Cox model. We illustrate our approach using data from an HIV-prevention trial and discuss how it can be readily adapted and applied in other settings. © 2014 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25060703

  2. Diagnostic impact of routine Lyme serology in recent-onset arthritis: results from the ESPOIR cohort

    PubMed Central

    Guellec, Dewi; Narbonne, Valérie; Cornec, Divi; Marhadour, Thierry; Varache, Sophie; Dougados, Maxime; Daurès, Jean Pierre; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Saraux, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lyme disease may be considered by rheumatologists in patients with recent-onset arthritis, even in the absence of suggestive symptoms. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic impact of routine Lyme serology in a French cohort of patients with recent-onset arthritis affecting at least 2 joints. Methods We performed an ancillary study of a French prospective multicentre cohort established to monitor clinical, biological and radiographic data in patients with inflammatory arthritis in at least 2 joints, lasting for 6 weeks to 6 months. Borrelia IgM and IgG antibodies were sought routinely at baseline, using ELISA tests, independently from the physician's strategy for detecting a spirochetal infection. We recorded the proportion of patients with a final diagnosis of Lyme arthritis and evaluated the diagnostic performance of Lyme serology in this particular context. The clinical and biological characteristics of patients according to the Lyme serology results were analysed. Results Of 810 patients, 657 (81.1%) were negative for IgM and IgG antibodies, 91 (11.2%) had only IgM antibodies, 49 (6%) had only IgG antibodies, and 13 (1.6%) had IgG and IgM antibodies. Thus, 7.6% had IgG positivity, consistent with exposure to Borrelia infection. IgG positivity was significantly more prevalent in the North and North-East regions of France (χ2=14.6, p<0.001). No patients received a definite diagnosis of Lyme arthritis. Conclusions This study does not support routine Lyme serological testing in patients with recent-onset inflammatory arthritis affecting more than 1 joint. PMID:26819751

  3. Separation of multiple scatterers in NEWS experiments using Independent Component Analysis (ICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaverbeke, S.; Van Den Abeele, K.; Nion, D.; De Lathauwer, L.

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy combined with imaging techniques such as acoustic time reversal (NEWS-TR) or sparse array tomography is a promising new methodology for detecting microdamage at an early stage. When dealing with structures which could potentially contain many point-like nonlinear scatterers, there is a need to develop techniques for separately imaging the defects using a distributed sensor network which can be used either in time-reversal imaging processes or for tomographic imaging.. In this contribution, we discuss the application of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) methods to solve the problem of separating multiple nonlinear scatterers distributed throughout a sample, either by combining ICA with time reversal or by using ICA in conjunction with a tomographic experiment. We illustrate the procedure for ICA based tomographic imaging of multiple scatterers in an infinite medium.

  4. [Acute transverse myelitis and Lyme borreliosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Gaudichon, J; Sakr, W; Becher, S; Linard, M; Kozisek, S

    2013-06-01

    Lyme disease is an infectious disease caused by a spirochete of the Borrelia sensu lato group. Its incidence has greatly increased in recent years. The main vector is a tick of the Ixodes family. Clinical manifestations are multiple and show the multi-organ character of the disease. In terms of frequency, joint and neurological presentations, respectively more frequent in North America and Europe, are the main manifestations after cutaneous symptoms, of which erythema migrans is the most common, followed by cardiac and ocular signs. Other signs exist but are anecdotal. Neuroborreliosis manifests itself most often with peripheral facial palsy, but there are other clinical forms, which include acute myelitis (4-5% of neuroborreliosis). We present here the case of a 16-year-old teenager with acute myelitis and meningeal involvement due to Lyme disease, who presented with atypical symptoms (massive and rapid weight loss, vomiting). MRI showed localized marrow edema as well as leptomeningeal and root enhancement. Lumbar puncture showed lymphocytic pleocytosis. Lyme serology was positive both in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Even if acute myelitis remains exceptional among neuroborreliosis manifestations, this diagnosis has to be thought of when a child presents with unexplained neurological symptoms. PMID:23628118

  5. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses reveal multiple species of Boa and independent origins of insular dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Card, Daren C; Schield, Drew R; Adams, Richard H; Corbin, Andrew B; Perry, Blair W; Andrew, Audra L; Pasquesi, Giulia I M; Smith, Eric N; Jezkova, Tereza; Boback, Scott M; Booth, Warren; Castoe, Todd A

    2016-09-01

    Boa is a Neotropical genus of snakes historically recognized as monotypic despite its expansive distribution. The distinct morphological traits and color patterns exhibited by these snakes, together with the wide diversity of ecosystems they inhabit, collectively suggest that the genus may represent multiple species. Morphological variation within Boa also includes instances of dwarfism observed in multiple offshore island populations. Despite this substantial diversity, the systematics of the genus Boa has received little attention until very recently. In this study we examined the genetic structure and phylogenetic relationships of Boa populations using mitochondrial sequences and genome-wide SNP data obtained from RADseq. We analyzed these data at multiple geographic scales using a combination of phylogenetic inference (including coalescent-based species delimitation) and population genetic analyses. We identified extensive population structure across the range of the genus Boa and multiple lines of evidence for three widely-distributed clades roughly corresponding with the three primary land masses of the Western Hemisphere. We also find both mitochondrial and nuclear support for independent origins and parallel evolution of dwarfism on offshore island clusters in Belize and Cayos Cochinos Menor, Honduras. PMID:27241629

  6. Case studies of technology for adults with multiple disabilities to make telephone calls independently.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Boccasini, Adele; La Martire, Maria L; Lang, Russell

    2014-08-01

    Recent literature has shown the possibility of enabling individuals with multiple disabilities to make telephone calls independently via computer-aided telephone technology. These two case studies assessed a modified version of such technology and a commercial alternative to it for a woman and a man with multiple disabilities, respectively. The modified version used in Study 1 (a) presented the names of the persons available for a call and (b) reminded the participant of the response she needed to perform (i.e., pressing a microswitch) if she wanted to call any of those names/persons. The commercial device used in Study 2 was a Galaxy S3 (Samsung) equipped with the S-voice module, which allowed the participant to activate phone calls by uttering the word "Call" followed by the name of the persons he wanted to call. The results of the studies showed that the participants learned to make phone calls independently using the technology/device available. Implications of the results are discussed. PMID:25153758

  7. Microwave photonic filter with multiple independently tunable passbands based on a broadband optical source.

    PubMed

    Huang, Long; Chen, Dalei; Zhang, Fangzheng; Xiang, Peng; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Peng; Lu, Linlin; Pu, Tao; Chen, Xiangfei

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a novel microwave photonic filter (MPF) with multiple independently tunable passbands is proposed. A broadband optical source (BOS) is employed and split by a 1:N coupler into several branches. One branch is directed to a phase modulator which is modulated by a radio frequency signal and the other branches are delayed by optical delay lines (ODLs), respectively. All of these branches are combined by another 1:N coupler and sent to a dispersion compensation fiber which is used to introduce group delay dispersion to the optical signal. At a photodetector, each time-delayed broadband lightwave beating with the sidebands produced by the phase modulator forms a passband of the MPF. By tuning the delay of each broadband lightwave, the center frequency of the passband can be independently tuned. An MPF with two independently tunable passbands is experimentally demonstrated. The two passbands can be tuned from DC to 30 GHz with a 3-dB bandwidth of about 250 MHz. The stability and dynamic range of the MPF are also evaluated. By employing more branches delayed by ODLs, more passbands can be generated. PMID:26480071

  8. Multiple and independent origins of short seeded alleles of GS3 in rice

    PubMed Central

    Takano-Kai, Noriko; Jiang, Hui; Powell, Adrian; McCouch, Susan; Takamure, Itsuro; Furuya, Naruto; Doi, Kazuyuki; Yoshimura, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    GRAIN SIZE 3 (GS3) is a cloned gene that is related to seed length. Here we report the discovery of new deletion alleles at the GS3 locus, each of which confer short seed. We selected ten short seeded cultivars from a collection of 282 diverse cultivars. Sequence analysis across the GS3 gene in these ten cultivars identified three novel alleles and a known allele that contain several independent deletion(s) in the fifth exon of GS. These independent deletion variants each resulted in a frameshift mutation that caused a premature stop codon, and they were functionally similar to one another. Each coded for a truncated gene product that behaved as an incomplete dominant allele and conferred a short seeded phenotype. Haplotype analysis of these sequence variants indicated that two of the variants were of japonica origin, and two were from indica. Transformation experiments demonstrated that one of the deletion alleles of GS3 decrease the cell number in the upper epidermis of the glume, resulting in a significant reduction in seed length. The multiple and independent origins of these short seeded alleles indicate that farmers and early breeders imposed artificial selection favoring short seeds. PMID:23641184

  9. Evidence for Multiple Mediator Complexes in Yeast Independently Recruited by Activated Heat Shock Factor.

    PubMed

    Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Moustafa, Yara W; Chowdhary, Surabhi; Kainth, Amoldeep S; Gross, David S

    2016-07-15

    Mediator is an evolutionarily conserved coactivator complex essential for RNA polymerase II transcription. Although it has been generally assumed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator is a stable trimodular complex, its structural state in vivo remains unclear. Using the "anchor away" (AA) technique to conditionally deplete select subunits within Mediator and its reversibly associated Cdk8 kinase module (CKM), we provide evidence that Mediator's tail module is highly dynamic and that a subcomplex consisting of Med2, Med3, and Med15 can be independently recruited to the regulatory regions of heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1)-activated genes. Fluorescence microscopy of a scaffold subunit (Med14)-anchored strain confirmed parallel cytoplasmic sequestration of core subunits located outside the tail triad. In addition, and contrary to current models, we provide evidence that Hsf1 can recruit the CKM independently of core Mediator and that core Mediator has a role in regulating postinitiation events. Collectively, our results suggest that yeast Mediator is not monolithic but potentially has a dynamic complexity heretofore unappreciated. Multiple species, including CKM-Mediator, the 21-subunit core complex, the Med2-Med3-Med15 tail triad, and the four-subunit CKM, can be independently recruited by activated Hsf1 to its target genes in AA strains. PMID:27185874

  10. Treatment trials for post-Lyme disease symptoms revisited.

    PubMed

    Klempner, Mark S; Baker, Phillip J; Shapiro, Eugene D; Marques, Adriana; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Halperin, John J; Wormser, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    The authors of 4 National Institutes of Health-sponsored antibiotic treatment trials of patients with persistent unexplained symptoms despite previous antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease determined that retreatment provides little if any benefit and carries significant risk. Two groups recently provided an independent reassessment of these trials and concluded that prolonged courses of antibiotics are likely to be helpful. We have carefully considered the points raised by these groups, along with our own critical review of the treatment trials. On the basis of this analysis, the conclusion that there is a meaningful clinical benefit to be gained from retreatment of such patients with parenteral antibiotic therapy cannot be justified. PMID:23764268

  11. Lyme disease in Haryana, India.

    PubMed

    Jairath, Vijayeeta; Sehrawat, Manu; Jindal, Nidhi; Jain, V K; Aggarwal, Parul

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multiorgan animal-borne disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. This case series highlights its presence in Haryana, a nonendemic zone. The first case was a 27-year-old housewife who presented with an annular erythematous patch with a central papule following an insect bite on the left upper arm. The second case was a 32-year-old farmer who gave a history of insect bite on the right arm followed by the development of an erythematous patch with a central blister. The third case, a 17-year-old boy presented with a history of tick bite over right thigh and a typical bull's eye lesion with central ulceration. These cases were managed with oral doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for 14 days. The fourth case was a 7-year-old boy with typical erythema migrans on the right check and neck while the fifth case, a 30-year-old housewife, presented with an erythematous patch with a central papule on the right buttock. These patients were treated with oral amoxycillin 25 mg/kg, thrice daily for 14 days. All patients showed IgM antibodies to B. burgdorferi. Treatment led to clearance of lesions in all the patients. Lyme borreliosis was diagnosed in these patients based on the history of established exposure to tick bites, presence of classic signs and symptoms, serology and the response to treatment. PMID:25035356

  12. Mouse Transgenesis in a Single Locus with Independent Regulation for Multiple Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Joseph D.; Zhang, Juliet; Feng, Huifen; Gong, Shiaoching; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    A major barrier to complex experimental design in mouse genetics is the allele problem: combining three or more alleles is time-consuming and inefficient. Here, we solve this problem for transgenic animals with a simple modification of existing BAC transgenesis protocols, and generate triple-colored ‘prism’ mice in which the major cell types of the brain: neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, are each labeled with a distinct fluorophore. All three fluorophores are expressed from the same locus, yet each fluorophore is expressed in an independent temporal and spatial pattern. All three transgenes are generally co-inherited across multiple generations with stable genomic copy number and expression patterns. This generic solution should permit more sophisticated experimental manipulations to assess functional interactions amongst populations of cell types in vivo in a more rapid and efficient manner. PMID:22808177

  13. Multiple independent autonomous hydraulic oscillators driven by a common gravity head

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Lesher-Perez, Sasha Cai; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Self-switching microfluidic circuits that are able to perform biochemical experiments in a parallel and autonomous manner similar to instruction-embedded electronics, are rarely implemented. Here, we present design principles and demonstrations for gravity-driven, integrated, microfluidic pulsatile flow circuits. With a common gravity-head as the only driving force, these fluidic oscillator arrays realize a wide range of periods (0.4 s – 2 h) and flow rates (0.10 – 63 μL min−1) with completely independent timing between the multiple oscillator sub-circuits connected in parallel. As a model application, we perform systematic, parallel analysis of endothelial cell elongation response to different fluidic shearing patterns generated by the autonomous microfluidic pulsed flow generation system. PMID:26073884

  14. Multiple independent autonomous hydraulic oscillators driven by a common gravity head.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Lesher-Perez, Sasha Cai; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Self-switching microfluidic circuits that are able to perform biochemical experiments in a parallel and autonomous manner, similar to instruction-embedded electronics, are rarely implemented. Here, we present design principles and demonstrations for gravity-driven, integrated, microfluidic pulsatile flow circuits. With a common gravity head as the only driving force, these fluidic oscillator arrays realize a wide range of periods (0.4 s-2 h) and flow rates (0.10-63 μl min(-1)) with completely independent timing between the multiple oscillator sub-circuits connected in parallel. As a model application, we perform systematic, parallel analysis of endothelial cell elongation response to different fluidic shearing patterns generated by the autonomous microfluidic pulsed flow generation system. PMID:26073884

  15. Development of a Multiantigen Panel for Improved Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi Infection in Early Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Lahey, Lauren J; Panas, Michael W; Mao, Rong; Delanoy, Michelle; Flanagan, John J; Binder, Steven R; Rebman, Alison W; Montoya, Jose G; Soloski, Mark J; Steere, Allen C; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Arnaboldi, Paul M; Aucott, John N; Robinson, William H

    2015-12-01

    The current standard for laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease in the United States is serologic detection of antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a two-tiered testing algorithm; however, this scheme has limited sensitivity for detecting early Lyme disease. Thus, there is a need to improve diagnostics for Lyme disease at the early stage, when antibiotic treatment is highly efficacious. We examined novel and established antigen markers to develop a multiplex panel that identifies early infection using the combined sensitivity of multiple markers while simultaneously maintaining high specificity by requiring positive results for two markers to designate a positive test. Ten markers were selected from our initial analysis of 62 B. burgdorferi surface proteins and synthetic peptides by assessing binding of IgG and IgM to each in a training set of Lyme disease patient samples and controls. In a validation set, this 10-antigen panel identified a higher proportion of early-Lyme-disease patients as positive at the baseline or posttreatment visit than two-tiered testing (87.5% and 67.5%, respectively; P < 0.05). Equivalent specificities of 100% were observed in 26 healthy controls. Upon further analysis, positivity on the novel 10-antigen panel was associated with longer illness duration and multiple erythema migrans. The improved sensitivity and comparable specificity of our 10-antigen panel compared to two-tiered testing in detecting early B. burgdorferi infection indicates that multiplex analysis, featuring the next generation of markers, could advance diagnostic technology to better aid clinicians in diagnosing and treating early Lyme disease. PMID:26447113

  16. Development of a Multiantigen Panel for Improved Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi Infection in Early Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Panas, Michael W.; Mao, Rong; Delanoy, Michelle; Flanagan, John J.; Binder, Steven R.; Rebman, Alison W.; Montoya, Jose G.; Soloski, Mark J.; Steere, Allen C.; Dattwyler, Raymond J.; Arnaboldi, Paul M.; Aucott, John N.

    2015-01-01

    The current standard for laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease in the United States is serologic detection of antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a two-tiered testing algorithm; however, this scheme has limited sensitivity for detecting early Lyme disease. Thus, there is a need to improve diagnostics for Lyme disease at the early stage, when antibiotic treatment is highly efficacious. We examined novel and established antigen markers to develop a multiplex panel that identifies early infection using the combined sensitivity of multiple markers while simultaneously maintaining high specificity by requiring positive results for two markers to designate a positive test. Ten markers were selected from our initial analysis of 62 B. burgdorferi surface proteins and synthetic peptides by assessing binding of IgG and IgM to each in a training set of Lyme disease patient samples and controls. In a validation set, this 10-antigen panel identified a higher proportion of early-Lyme-disease patients as positive at the baseline or posttreatment visit than two-tiered testing (87.5% and 67.5%, respectively; P < 0.05). Equivalent specificities of 100% were observed in 26 healthy controls. Upon further analysis, positivity on the novel 10-antigen panel was associated with longer illness duration and multiple erythema migrans. The improved sensitivity and comparable specificity of our 10-antigen panel compared to two-tiered testing in detecting early B. burgdorferi infection indicates that multiplex analysis, featuring the next generation of markers, could advance diagnostic technology to better aid clinicians in diagnosing and treating early Lyme disease. PMID:26447113

  17. Lyme Disease Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi , in Syrian hamsters. J Parasitol 85: 426-30. Moody KD, ... that enables public health officials to look for trends and take actions to reduce disease and improve ...

  18. Beware of Ticks … & Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the killed bacteria and a geneti- cally engineered (recombinant) vac- cine. Talk to your veterinarian, since vaccinating against Lyme disease may not be appropriate for all dogs. There is no vaccine for cats, which do not seem to be ...

  19. Independent colonization of multiple urban centres by a formerly forest specialist bird species.

    PubMed

    Evans, Karl L; Gaston, Kevin J; Frantz, Alain C; Simeoni, Michelle; Sharp, Stuart P; McGowan, Andrew; Dawson, Deborah A; Walasz, Kazimierz; Partecke, Jesko; Burke, Terry; Hatchwell, Ben J

    2009-07-01

    Urban areas are expanding rapidly, but a few native species have successfully colonized them. The processes underlying such colonization events are poorly understood. Using the blackbird Turdus merula, a former forest specialist that is now one of the most common urban birds in its range, we provide the first assessment of two contrasting urban colonization models. First, that urbanization occurred independently. Second, that following initial urbanization, urban-adapted individuals colonized other urban areas in a leapfrog manner. Previous analyses of spatial patterns in the timing of blackbird urbanization, and experimental introductions of urban and rural blackbirds to uncolonized cities, suggest that the leapfrog model is likely to apply. We found that, across the western Palaearctic, urban blackbird populations contain less genetic diversity than rural ones, urban populations are more strongly differentiated from each other than from rural populations and assignment tests support a rural source population for most urban individuals. In combination, these results provide much stronger support for the independent urbanization model than the leapfrog one. If the former model predominates, colonization of multiple urban centres will be particularly difficult when urbanization requires genetic adaptations, having implications for urban species diversity. PMID:19364751

  20. How Does Independent Practice of Multiple-Criteria Text Influence the Reading Performance and Development of Second Graders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Jennifer P.; Allor, Jill H.; Roberts, J. Kyle

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the impact of independent practice of multiple-criteria text that targeted high-frequency words, decodability, and meaningfulness. Second-grade students, including at-risk students, were randomly assigned within classroom to a treatment group that read multiple-criteria text ("n" = 34), or contrast group that read…

  1. Visuospatial Attention to Single and Multiple Objects Is Independently Impaired in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Daniel J.; Nguyen, Victoria A.; Lewis, Michaela F.; Reynolds, Gretchen O.; Somers, David C.; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with deficits in visuospatial attention. It is as yet unknown whether these attentional deficits begin at a perceptual level or instead reflect disruptions in oculomotor or higher-order processes. In the present study, non-demented individuals with PD and matched normal control adults (NC) participated in two tasks requiring sustained visuospatial attention, both based on a multiple object tracking paradigm. Eye tracking was used to ensure central fixation. In Experiment 1 (26 PD, 21 NC), a pair of identical red dots (one target, one distractor) rotated randomly for three seconds at varied speeds. The task was to maintain the identity of the sole target, which was labeled prior to each trial. PD were less accurate than NC overall (p = .049). When considering only trials where fixation was maintained, however, there was no significant group difference, suggesting that the deficit’s origin is closely related to oculomotor processing. To determine whether PD had additional impairment in multifocal attention, in Experiment 2 (25 PD, 15 NC), two targets were presented along with distractors at a moderate speed, along with a control condition in which dots remained stationary. PD were less accurate than NC for moving (p = 0.02) but not stationary targets. This group difference remained significant when considering only trials where fixation was maintained, suggesting the source of the PD deficit was independent from oculomotor processing. Taken together, the results implicate separate mechanisms for single vs. multiple object tracking deficits in PD. PMID:26963388

  2. Visuospatial Attention to Single and Multiple Objects Is Independently Impaired in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Norton, Daniel J; Nguyen, Victoria A; Lewis, Michaela F; Reynolds, Gretchen O; Somers, David C; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with deficits in visuospatial attention. It is as yet unknown whether these attentional deficits begin at a perceptual level or instead reflect disruptions in oculomotor or higher-order processes. In the present study, non-demented individuals with PD and matched normal control adults (NC) participated in two tasks requiring sustained visuospatial attention, both based on a multiple object tracking paradigm. Eye tracking was used to ensure central fixation. In Experiment 1 (26 PD, 21 NC), a pair of identical red dots (one target, one distractor) rotated randomly for three seconds at varied speeds. The task was to maintain the identity of the sole target, which was labeled prior to each trial. PD were less accurate than NC overall (p = .049). When considering only trials where fixation was maintained, however, there was no significant group difference, suggesting that the deficit's origin is closely related to oculomotor processing. To determine whether PD had additional impairment in multifocal attention, in Experiment 2 (25 PD, 15 NC), two targets were presented along with distractors at a moderate speed, along with a control condition in which dots remained stationary. PD were less accurate than NC for moving (p = 0.02) but not stationary targets. This group difference remained significant when considering only trials where fixation was maintained, suggesting the source of the PD deficit was independent from oculomotor processing. Taken together, the results implicate separate mechanisms for single vs. multiple object tracking deficits in PD. PMID:26963388

  3. MULTI-RESERVOIR BIOADHESIVE MICRODEVICES FOR INDEPENDENT RATE-CONTROLLED DELIVERY OF MULTIPLE DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Chirra, Hariharasudhan D.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of oral administrative systems such as enterically coated tablets, capsules, particles, and liposomes have been developed to improve oral bioavailability of drugs. However, they suffer from poor intestinal localization and therapeutic efficacy due to the various physiological conditions and high shear fluid flow. Fabrication of novel microdevices combined with the introduction of controlled release, improved adhesion, selective targeting, and tissue permeation may overcome these issues and potentially diminish the toxicity and high frequency of conventional oral administration. Herein, thin, asymmetric, poly(methyl methacrylate); PMMA microdevices were fabricated with multiple reservoirs using photolithography and reactive ion etching. They were loaded with different individual model drug in each reservoir. Enhanced bioadhesion of the microdevices was observed in the presence of a conjugated of targeting protein; tomato lectin to the PMMA surface. As compared to drug encompassing hydrogels, an increase in drug permeation across the caco-2 monolayer was noticed in the presence of a microdevice loaded with the same drug-hydrogel system. Also, the release of multiple drugs from their respective reservoirs was found to be independent from each other. The use of different hydrogel systems in each reservoir showed differences in the controlled release of the respective drugs over the same period of release. These results suggest that in the future, the microfabricated unidirectional multi-drug releasing devices will have an impact over the oral administration of a broad range of therapeutics. PMID:22962019

  4. Isolation of live Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato spirochaetes from patients with undefined disorders and symptoms not typical for Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, N; Golovchenko, M; Vancova, M; Clark, K; Grubhoffer, L; Oliver, J H

    2016-03-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a multisystem disorder with a diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations, caused by spirochaetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. It is an infectious disease that can be successfully cured by antibiotic therapy in the early stages; however, the possibility of the appearance of persistent signs and symptoms of disease following antibiotic treatment is recognized. It is known that Lyme borreliosis mimics multiple diseases that were never proven to have a spirochaete aetiology. Using complete modified Kelly-Pettenkofer medium we succeeded in cultivating live B. burgdorferi sensu lato spirochaetes from samples taken from people who suffered from undefined disorders, had symptoms not typical for Lyme borreliosis, but who had undergone antibiotic treatment due to a suspicion of having Lyme disease even though they were seronegative. We report the first recovery of live B. burgdorferi sensu stricto from residents of southeastern USA and the first successful cultivation of live Borrelia bissettii-like strain from residents of North America. Our results support the fact that B. bissettii is responsible for human Lyme borreliosis worldwide along with B. burgdorferi s.s. The involvement of new spirochaete species in Lyme borreliosis changes the understanding and recognition of clinical manifestations of this disease. PMID:26673735

  5. Lyme arthritis and post-Lyme disease syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Arthur; Britchkov, Michael

    2002-07-01

    In the United States, intermittent or chronic mono- or oligoarthritis, particularly affecting the knee, is the most common manifestation of late Lyme disease (LD). Lyme arthritis (LA) can usually be prevented by early treatment of acute LD. However, the erythema migrans rash may go undetected in children and in the dark skin of African Americans, leading to delayed treatment and a relatively increased incidence in LA. Virtually all untreated patients with LA have high levels of serum immunoglobulin G antibodies, and sometimes low levels of immunoglobulin M antibodies, to Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) by ELISA and Western blot. These responses may persist for many years after antibiotic treatment, and therefore, serologic results do not accurately distinguish between active or past infection. Most patients with LA respond well to standard courses of antibiotic treatment, but a small percentage have persistent knee synovitis, in some cases possibly related to the triggering of intrasynovial autoimmunity. Other patients develop a syndrome of diffuse arthralgia, myalgia, fatigue, and subjective cognitive difficulty during or soon after LD, which persists despite antibiotic treatment. Patients with this post-treatment, post-LD syndrome were recently studied in a placebo-controlled double-blind antibiotic trial. There was no evidence of Borrelial infection in these patients by culture or detection of Bb DNA in blood or spinal fluid. Furthermore, there was no difference in responsiveness of these patients to a 3-month course of antibiotic compared with placebo treatment. Thus, LA caused by active Bb infection, post-treatment LA with persistent knee synovitis and post-LD syndrome are distinct and distinguishable clinical entities. PMID:12118171

  6. Lyme disease: a case report of a 17-year-old male with fatal Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Esther C; Vail, Eric; Kleinman, George; Lento, Patrick A; Li, Simon; Wang, Guiqing; Limberger, Ronald; Fallon, John T

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a systemic infection commonly found in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and north-central regions of the United States. Of the many systemic manifestations of Lyme disease, cardiac involvement is uncommon and rarely causes mortality. We describe a case of a 17-year-old adolescent who died unexpectedly after a 3-week viral-like syndrome. Postmortem examination was remarkable for diffuse pancarditis characterized by extensive infiltrates of lymphocytes and focal interstitial fibrosis. In the cardiac tissue, Borrelia burgdorferi was identified via special stains, immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction. The findings support B. burgdorferi as the causative agent for his fulminant carditis and that the patient suffered fatal Lyme carditis. Usually, Lyme carditis is associated with conduction disturbances and is a treatable condition. Nevertheless, few cases of mortality have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a rare example of fatal Lyme carditis in an unsuspected patient. PMID:25864163

  7. Tick Talk: Block Tick Bites and Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Tick Talk Block Tick Bites and Lyme Disease When warm weather arrives, you might get the ... mainly in the mid-Atlantic and southern states. Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness. It’s ...

  8. The increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Catherine; Leonard, Erin; Koffi, Jules Konan; Pelcat, Yann; Peregrine, Andrew; Chilton, Neil; Rochon, Kateryn; Lysyk, Tim; Lindsay, L. Robbin; Ogden, Nicholas Hume

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada due to range expansion of the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. The objectives of this article are to i) raise public awareness with the help of veterinarians on the emerging and expanding risk of Lyme disease across Canada, ii) review the key clinical features of Lyme disease in dogs, and iii) provide recommendations for veterinarians on the management of Lyme disease in dogs. PMID:26130829

  9. Domain loss has independently occurred multiple times in plant terpene synthase evolution.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Xu, Meimei; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tiernan, Mollie S; Wei, Gao; Cui, Guanghong; Huang, Luqi; Peters, Reuben J

    2011-12-01

    The extensive family of plant terpene synthases (TPSs) generally has a bi-domain structure, yet phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that these synthases have evolved from larger diterpene synthases. In particular, that duplication of the diterpene synthase genes required for gibberellin phytohormone biosynthesis provided an early predecessor, whose loss of a approximately 220 amino acid 'internal sequence element' (now recognized as the γ domain) gave rise to the precursor of the modern mono- and sesqui-TPSs found in all higher plants. Intriguingly, TPSs are conserved by taxonomic relationships rather than function. This relationship demonstrates that such functional radiation has occurred both repeatedly and relatively recently, yet phylogenetic analyses assume that the 'internal/γ' domain loss represents a single evolutionary event. Here we provide evidence that such a loss was not a singular event, but rather has occurred multiple times. Specifically, we provide an example of a bi-domain diterpene synthase from Salvia miltiorrhiza, along with a sesquiterpene synthase from Triticum aestivum (wheat) that is not only closely related to diterpene synthases, but retains the ent-kaurene synthase activity relevant to the ancestral gibberellin metabolic function. Indeed, while the wheat sesquiterpene synthase clearly no longer contains the 'internal/γ' domain, it is closely related to rice diterpene synthase genes that retain the ancestral tri-domain structure. Thus, these findings provide examples of key evolutionary intermediates that underlie the bi-domain structure observed in the expansive plant TPS gene family, as well as indicating that 'internal/γ' domain loss has occurred independently multiple times, highlighting the complex evolutionary history of this important enzymatic family. PMID:21999670

  10. Domain loss has independently occurred multiple times in plant terpene synthase evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hillwig, Matthew L.; Xu, Meimei; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tiernan, Mollie S.; Wei, Gao; Cui, Guanghong; Huang, Luqi; Peters, Reuben J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The extensive family of plant terpene synthases (TPSs) generally has a bi-domain structure, yet phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that these evolved from larger diterpene synthases. In particular, that duplication of the diterpene synthase genes required for gibberellin phytohormone biosynthesis provided an early predecessor, whose loss of a ~220 amino acid “internal sequence element” (now recognized as the γ domain) gave rise to the precursor of modern mono- and sesqui-TPSs found in all higher plants. Intriguingly, TPSs are conserved by taxonomic relationships rather than function, demonstrating that such functional radiation has occurred both repeatedly and relatively recently, yet phylogenetic analyses assume that “internal/γ” domain loss represents a single evolutionary event. Here we provide evidence that such loss was not a singular event, but rather has occurred multiple times. Specifically, we provide an example of a bi-domain diterpene synthase, from Salvia miltiorrhiza, along with a sesquiterpene synthase from Triticum aestivum (wheat) that is not only closely related to diterpene synthases, but retains the ent-kaurene synthase activity relevant to the ancestral gibberellin metabolic function. Indeed, while the wheat sesquiterpene synthase clearly no longer contains the “internal/γ” domain, it is closely related to rice diterpene synthase genes that retain the ancestral tri-domain structure. Thus, these findings provide examples of key evolutionary intermediates underlying the bi-domain structure observed in the expansive plant TPS gene family, as well as indicating that “internal/γ” domain loss has independently occurred multiple times, highlighting the complex evolutionary history of this important enzymatic family. PMID:21999670

  11. What Teachers Need to Know about Lyme Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Lysandra

    2009-01-01

    Although widely misunderstood, Lyme disease is the most prevalent vector borne disease in the United States. Children are the most at-risk group for Lyme disease, which can impact every system in the body. It can produce the musculo-skeletal, neurologic, psychiatric, opthalmologic, and cardiac symptoms. The symptoms of Lyme disease can have a…

  12. Epidemiology of Lyme disease in low-incidence states.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Brett, Meghan; Matthias, James; Stanek, Danielle; Springs, Chasisity Brown; Marsden-Haug, Nicola; Oltean, Hanna; Baker, JoDee Summers; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Mead, Paul S; Hinckley, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the U.S. Surveillance data from four states with a low-incidence of Lyme disease was evaluated. Most cases occurred after travel to high-incidence Lyme disease areas. Cases without travel-related exposure in low-incidence states differed epidemiologically; misdiagnosis may be common in these areas. PMID:26103924

  13. Geographic Distribution and Expansion of Human Lyme Disease, United States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease occurs in specific geographic regions of the United States. We present a method for defining high-risk counties based on observed versus expected number of reported human Lyme disease cases. Applying this method to successive periods shows substantial geographic expansion of counties at high risk for Lyme disease. PMID:26196670

  14. The behavior of multiple independent managers and ecological traits interact to determine prevalence of weeds.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Shaun R; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2013-04-01

    Management of damaging invasive plants is often undertaken by multiple decision makers, each managing only a small part of the invader's population. As weeds can move between properties and re-infest eradicated sites from unmanaged sources, the dynamics of multiple decision makers plays a significant role in weed prevalence and invasion risk at the landscape scale. We used a spatially explicit agent-based simulation to determine how individual agent behavior, in concert with weed population ecology, determined weed prevalence. We compared two invasive grass species that differ in ecology, control methods, and costs: Nassella trichotoma (serrated tussock) and Eragrostis curvula (African love grass). The way decision makers reacted to the benefit of management had a large effect on the extent of a weed. If benefits of weed control outweighed the costs, and either net benefit was very large or all agents were very sensitive to net benefits, then agents tended to act synchronously, reducing the pool of infested agents available to spread the weed. As N. trichotoma was more damaging than E. curvula and had more effective control methods, agents chose to manage it more often, which resulted in lower prevalence of N. trichotoma. A relatively low number of agents who were intrinsically less motivated to control weeds led to increased prevalence of both species. This was particularly apparent when long-distance dispersal meant each infested agent increased the invasion risk for a large portion of the landscape. In this case, a small proportion of land mangers reluctant to control, regardless of costs and benefits, could lead to the whole landscape being infested, even when local control stopped new infestations. Social pressure was important, but only if it was independent of weed prevalence, suggesting that early access to information, and incentives to act on that information, may be crucial in stopping a weed from infesting large areas. The response of our model to both

  15. Report for simultaneous, multiple independently steered beam study for Airborne Electronically Steerable Phased Array (AESPA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design concepts of an array for the formation of multiple, simultaneous, independently pointed beams for satellite communication links were investigated through tradeoffs of various approaches which were conceived as possible solutions to the problem. After the preferred approach was selected, a more detailed design was configured and is presented as a candidate system that should be given further consideration for development leading to a preliminary design. This array uses an attenuator and a phase shifter with every element. The aperture excitation necessary to form the four beams is calculated and then placed across the array using these devices. Pattern analysis was performed for two beam and four beam cases with numerous patterns being presented. Parameter evaluation shown includes pointing accuracy and beam shape, sidelobe characteristics, gain control, and beam normalization. It was demonstrated that a 4 bit phase shifter and a 6 bit, 30 dB attenuator were sufficient to achieve adequate pattern performances. The phase amplitude steered multibeam array offers the flexibility of 1 to 4 beams with an increase in gain of 6 dB if only one beam is selected.

  16. A two-layer multiple-time-scale turbulence model and grid independence study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1989-01-01

    A two-layer multiple-time-scale turbulence model is presented. The near-wall model is based on the classical Kolmogorov-Prandtl turbulence hypothesis and the semi-empirical logarithmic law of the wall. In the two-layer model presented, the computational domain of the conservation of mass equation and the mean momentum equation penetrated up to the wall, where no slip boundary condition has been prescribed; and the near wall boundary of the turbulence equations has been located at the fully turbulent region, yet very close to the wall, where the standard wall function method has been applied. Thus, the conservation of mass constraint can be satisfied more rigorously in the two-layer model than in the standard wall function method. In most of the two-layer turbulence models, the number of grid points to be used inside the near-wall layer posed the issue of computational efficiency. The present finite element computational results showed that the grid independent solutions were obtained with as small as two grid points, i.e., one quadratic element, inside the near wall layer. Comparison of the computational results obtained by using the two-layer model and those obtained by using the wall function method is also presented.

  17. A rigorous multiple independent binding site model for determining cell-based equilibrium dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Drake, Andrew W; Klakamp, Scott L

    2007-01-10

    A new 4-parameter nonlinear equation based on the standard multiple independent binding site model (MIBS) is presented for fitting cell-based ligand titration data in order to calculate the ligand/cell receptor equilibrium dissociation constant and the number of receptors/cell. The most commonly used linear (Scatchard Plot) or nonlinear 2-parameter model (a single binding site model found in commercial programs like Prism(R)) used for analysis of ligand/receptor binding data assumes only the K(D) influences the shape of the titration curve. We demonstrate using simulated data sets that, depending upon the cell surface receptor expression level, the number of cells titrated, and the magnitude of the K(D) being measured, this assumption of always being under K(D)-controlled conditions can be erroneous and can lead to unreliable estimates for the binding parameters. We also compare and contrast the fitting of simulated data sets to the commonly used cell-based binding equation versus our more rigorous 4-parameter nonlinear MIBS model. It is shown through these simulations that the new 4-parameter MIBS model, when used for cell-based titrations under optimal conditions, yields highly accurate estimates of all binding parameters and hence should be the preferred model to fit cell-based experimental nonlinear titration data. PMID:17141800

  18. Proton pump inhibitors induce a caspase-independent antitumor effect against human multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Canitano, Andrea; Iessi, Elisabetta; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Federici, Cristina; Fais, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy and is responsive to a limited number of drugs. Unfortunately, to date, despite the introduction of novel drugs, no relevant increase in survival rates has been obtained. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been shown to have significant antitumor action as single agents as well as in combination with chemotherapy. This study investigates the potential anti-tumor effectiveness of two PPIs, Lansoprazole and Omeprazole, against human MM cells. We found that Lansoprazole exerts straightforward efficacy against myeloma cells, even at suboptimal concentrations (50 µM), while Omeprazole has limited cytotoxic action. The Lansoprazole anti-MM effect was mostly mediated by a caspase-independent apoptotic-like cytotoxicity, with only a secondary anti-proliferative action. This study provides clear evidence supporting the use of Lansoprazole in the strive against MM with an efficacy proven much higher than current therapeutical approaches and without reported side effects. It is however conceivable that, consistent with the results obtained in other human tumors, Lansoprazole may well be combined with existing anti-myeloma therapies with the aim to improve the low level of efficacy of the current strategies. PMID:27084522

  19. An Unrecognized Rash Progressing to Lyme Carditis: Important Features and Recommendations Regarding Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shawn; Singla, Montish

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of 46-year-old man with no medical history, who complained of extreme fatigue, near-syncope, and palpitations. He initially presented in complete heart block. A transvenous pacemaker was placed in the emergency department, and he was started empirically on Ceftriaxone for Lyme disease. He was admitted and over the course of the next few days, his rhythm regressed to Mobitz type I first-degree atrioventricular block and then to normal sinus rhythm. This case report highlights some important features regarding Lyme carditis, a rare presentation of early disseminated Lyme disease (seen in a few weeks to months after the initial tick bite). In 25%-30% of patients, the characteristic targetoid rash may not be seen, a likely culprit of the disease not being detected early and progressing to disseminated disease. The most common cardiac complaint of Lyme disease is palpitations, occurring in 6.6% of patients, which may not accurately reflect progression into disseminated Lyme disease because it is a nonspecific finding. Conduction abnormality, occurring in 1.8% of patients, is a more specific finding of Borrelia invading cardiac tissue. Finally, this case report highlights a recommendation that patients with confirmed Lyme disease or those presenting with cardiac abnormalities or symptoms who have an atypical profile for a cardiac event should be screened with a 12-lead electrocardiogram, Lyme serology, and be considered for antibiotic therapy with the possibility of temporary pacing. PMID:25730155

  20. Diagnosis and management of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Wright, William F; Riedel, David J; Talwani, Rohit; Gilliam, Bruce L

    2012-06-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States. Transmission occurs primarily through the bite of an infected deer tick (Ixodes scapularis). Identification of an erythema migrans rash following a tick bite is the only clinical manifestation sufficient to make the diagnosis of Lyme disease in the absence of laboratory confirmation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a two-tier serologic testing protocol using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay initially, followed by the more specific Western blot to confirm the diagnosis when the assay samples are positive or equivocal. The treatment of Lyme disease is determined mainly by the clinical manifestations of the disease. Doxycycline is often the preferred agent for oral treatment because of its activity against other tick-borne illnesses. Preventive measures include avoiding areas with high tick burdens, wearing protective clothing, using tick repellants (e.g., diethyltoluamide [DEET]), performing frequent body checks and bathing following outdoor activities, and instituting environmental landscape modifications (e.g., grass mowing, deer exclusion fencing) to reduce the tick burden. Although there is controversy regarding treatment of post-Lyme disease syndrome and chronic Lyme disease, there is no biologic or clinical trial evidence indicating that prolonged antibiotic therapy is of benefit. PMID:22962880

  1. Lyme borreliosis in 2005, 30 years after initial observations in Lyme Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Steere, Allen C

    2006-11-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, Afzelius described a patient with an expanding skin lesion, called erythema migrans, which is now known to be the initial skin manifestation of Lyme borreliosis. Approximately 70 years later, in 1976, epidemiologic evaluation of a cluster of children with arthritis in Lyme, Connecticut led to a complete description of the infection. During the subsequent years, investigators in a number of countries have made remarkable strides in the elucidation of this tick-borne spirochetal infection. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current status of Lyme borreliosis, including areas in which knowledge of the infection is still incomplete. PMID:17160599

  2. Texas Occurrence of Lyme Disease and Its Neurological Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Dandashi, Jad A; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Dayawansa, Samantha; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Huang, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Today, Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. The culprits behind Lyme disease are the Borrelia species of bacteria. In the USA, Borrelia burgdorferi causes the majority of cases, while in Europe and Asia Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii carry the greatest burden of disease. The clinical manifestations of Lyme disease have been identified as early localized, early disseminated, and late chronic. The neurological effects of Lyme disease include both peripheral and central nervous systems involvement, including focal nerve abnormalities, cranial neuropathies, painful radiculoneuritis, meningitis, and/or toxic metabolic encephalopathy, known as Lyme encephalopathy. Given the geographic predominance of Lyme disease in the Northeast and Midwest of the USA, no major studies have been conducted regarding Southern states. Between 2005 and 2014, the Center for Disease Control has reported 582 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Texas. Because of the potential for increased incidence and prevalence in Texas, it has become essential for research and clinical efforts to be diverted to the region. The Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Lyme Lab has been investigating the ecology of Lyme disease in Texas and developing a pan-specific serological test for Lyme diagnosis. This report aimed to exposure materials and raise awareness of Lyme disease to healthcare providers. PMID:27478852

  3. [The Health Council of the Netherlands' advice on Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Verbon, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions about Lyme disease. At the initiative of the Dutch Association for Lyme Patients, the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament requested a report on Lyme disease. The Health Council of the Netherlands advised standardization of Lyme serology in all Dutch laboratories as soon as possible. Standardization of diagnostic serological tests was strongly recommended. Studies into new tests which discriminate between active disease and past infection were recommended. Patients with Lyme disease were divided in those with Lyme specific and non-specific symptoms and duration of symptoms. Treatment advice was given for each of these 6 patient categories with a prominent role for the decision of the attending physician. Additionally it was advised to set up specialized treatment centers with a multidisciplinary approach. The report clearly shows the problems in care for Lyme patients from the perspective of both patients and physicians, but is cautious in the solutions offered. PMID:23859114

  4. Gestational Lyme borreliosis. Implications for the fetus.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A B

    1989-11-01

    Great diversity of clinical expression of signs and symptoms of gestational Lyme borreliosis parallels the diversity of prenatal syphilis. It is documented that transplacental transmission of the spirochete from mother to fetus is possible. Further research is necessary to investigate possible teratogenic effects that might occur if the spirochete reaches the fetus during the period of organogenesis. Autopsy and clinical studies have associated gestational Lyme borreliosis with various medical problems including fetal death, hydrocephalus, cardiovascular anomalies, neonatal respiratory distress, hyperbilirubinemia, intrauterine growth retardation, cortical blindness, sudden infant death syndrome, and maternal toxemia of pregnancy. Whether any or all of these associations are coincidentally or causally related remains to be clarified by further investigation. It is my expectation that the spectrum of gestational Lyme borreliosis will expand into many of the clinical domains of prenatal syphilis. PMID:2685924

  5. Lyme carditis. Electrophysiologic and histopathologic study

    SciTech Connect

    Reznick, J.W.; Braunstein, D.B.; Walsh, R.L.; Smith, C.R.; Wolfson, P.M.; Gierke, L.W.; Gorelkin, L.; Chandler, F.W.

    1986-11-01

    To further define the nature of Lyme carditis, electrophysiologic study and endomyocardial biopsy were performed in a patient with Lyme disease, whose principal cardiac manifestation was high-degree atrioventricular block. Intracardiac recording demonstrated supra-Hisian block and complete absence of an escape mechanism. Gallium 67 scanning demonstrated myocardial uptake, and right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy revealed active lymphocytic myocarditis. A structure compatible with a spirochetal organism was demonstrated in one biopsy specimen. It is concluded that Lyme disease can produce active myocarditis, as suggested by gallium 67 imaging and confirmed by endomyocardial biopsy. Furthermore, the presence of high-grade atrioventricular block in this disease requires aggressive management with temporary pacemaker and corticosteroid therapy.

  6. Enzootic transmission of the agent of Lyme disease in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Telford, S R; Spielman, A

    1989-10-01

    To determine whether cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) maintain an enzootic cycle of transmission of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi), we examined the prevalence of infection in ticks and rabbits in a location in which rabbits were abundant. Of 72 unfed nymphal Ixodes dentatus swept from vegetation, 32% were infected by this spirochete, as determined by darkfield microscopy and indirect immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibody H5332. Infected ticks were reared from larvae feeding on each of 11 rabbits taken from the same site. Of 50 rabbits sampled there over a period of 2 years, sera of greater than 90% reacted with B. burgdorferi antigen by ELISA and by immunoblotting. Deer ticks (I. dammini) comprised less than 10% of ticks found on rabbits. We conclude that rabbits perpetuate the agent of Lyme disease in an enzootic cycle where rabbit-feeding Ixodes are abundant, that intensity of transmission is independent of the zoonotic cycle in mice, but that infection may occasionally be exchanged between these cycles. PMID:2802026

  7. AN INVESTIGATION OF NON-INDEPENDENCE OF COMPONENTS OF SCORES ON MULTIPLE-CHOICE TESTS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZIMMERMAN, DONALD W.; BURKHEIMER, GRAHAM J., JR.

    INVESTIGATION IS CONTINUED INTO VARIOUS EFFECTS OF NON-INDEPENDENT ERROR INTRODUCED INTO MULTIPLE-CHOICE TEST SCORES AS A RESULT OF CHANCE GUESSING SUCCESS. A MODEL IS DEVELOPED IN WHICH THE CONCEPT OF THEORETICAL COMPONENTS OF SCORES IS NOT INTRODUCED AND IN WHICH, THEREFORE, NO ASSUMPTIONS REGARDING ANY RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SUCH COMPONENTS NEED…

  8. Design of Experiments with Multiple Independent Variables: A Resource Management Perspective on Complete and Reduced Factorial Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Linda M.; Dziak, John J.; Li, Runze

    2009-01-01

    An investigator who plans to conduct an experiment with multiple independent variables must decide whether to use a complete or reduced factorial design. This article advocates a resource management perspective on making this decision, in which the investigator seeks a strategic balance between service to scientific objectives and economy.…

  9. [Lyme-Arthritis--a case report].

    PubMed

    von Ameln-Mayerhofer, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease is a serious infectious disease which, if untreated, does not recover and leads to further complications that might be severe. This exemplary case report describes a possible secondary Borrelia infection. It underlines that early antibiotic therapy in the correct dosage is essential. Furthermore, problems are discussed that might occur in context of the decision process concerning the best antibiotic substance and the optimal application route. Last but not least, possible problems associated with the discharge from hospital are discussed. In conclusion, early diagnosis together with an on-time optimal antibiotic therapy are fundamental in the clinical management of Lyme disease. PMID:27348897

  10. [The variable spectrum of cutaneous Lyme borreliosis. Diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, H

    2012-05-01

    Lyme borreliosis can affect almost all human organs. Erythema migrans is the first and most frequent manifestation in 80-90% of patients in the early stage of localized skin infection. Besides the typical clinical appearance, many atypical variants can be observed. The solitary borrelial lymphocytoma is much less common and occurs mostly in children. Due to improvement in the early recognition of Lyme borreliosis, the diagnosis is made in the disseminated and late stage in only 10-20% of patients. Multiple erythemata migrantia indicating the hematogenous dissemination of B. burgdorferi remain frequently unrecognized. Late stages of infection feature chronic plasma-cell rich cutaneous inflammation and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans in its edematous to atrophic forms. Cultivation or DNA detection of B. burgdorferi in skin biopsies are options to prove unusual skin manifestations. Serological detection of Borrelia-specific IgG- and IgM antibodies should be performed according to the two step protocol with ELISA and immunoassay according to the criteria of the MIQ 12. Serological tests have limited utility for follow-up. Antibiotic therapy is very effective if performed according to evidence-based protocols, such as the AWMF guidelines. PMID:22573314

  11. Contributions of societal and geographical environments to "chronic Lyme disease": the psychopathogenesis and aporology of a new "medically unexplained symptoms" syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Leonard H; Hassett, Afton L

    2002-01-01

    Lyme disease is a relatively well-described infectious disease with multisystem manifestations. Because of confusion over conflicting reports, anxiety related to vulnerability to disease, and sensationalized and inaccurate lay media coverage, a new syndrome, "chronic Lyme disease," has become established. Chronic Lyme disease is the most recent in a continuing series of "medically unexplained symptoms" syndromes. These syndromes, such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and multiple chemical sensitivity, meet the need for a societally and morally acceptable explanation for ill-defined symptoms in the absence of objective physical and laboratory findings. We describe factors involved in the psychopathogenesis of chronic Lyme disease and focus on the confusion and insecurity these patients feel, which gives rise to an inability to adequately formulate and articulate their health concerns and to deal adequately with their medical needs, a state of disorganization termed aporia. PMID:12194894

  12. Multiple independent constraints help resolve net ecosystem carbon exchange under nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, P. E.; Metcalfe, D.; Oren, R.; Ricciuto, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnitude, spatial distribution, and variability of land net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) are important determinants of the trajectory of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Independent observational constraints provide important clues regarding NEE and its component fluxes, with information available at multiple spatial scales: from cells, to leaves, to entire organisms and collections of organisms, to complex landscapes and up to continental and global scales. Experimental manipulations, ecosystem observations, and process modeling all suggest that the components of NEE (photosynthetic gains, and respiration and other losses) are controlled in part by the availability of mineral nutrients, and that nutrient limitation is a common condition in many biomes. Experimental and observational constraints at different spatial scales provide a complex and sometimes puzzling picture of the nature and degree of influence of nutrient availability on carbon cycle processes. Photosynthetic rates assessed at the cellular and leaf scales are often higher than the observed accumulation of carbon in plant and soil pools would suggest. We infer that a down-regulation process intervenes between carbon uptake and plant growth under conditions of nutrient limitation, and several down-regulation mechanisms have been hypothesized and tested. A recent evaluation of two alternative hypotheses for down-regulation in the light of whole-plant level flux estimates indicates that some plants take up and store extra carbon, releasing it to the environment again on short time scales. The mechanism of release, either as additional autotrophic respiration or as exudation belowground is unclear, but has important consequences for long-term ecosystem state and response to climate change signals. Global-scale constraints from atmospheric concentration and isotopic composition data help to resolve this question, ultimately focusing attention on land use fluxes as the most uncertain

  13. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K.; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  14. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael; Moriarty, Tara J

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  15. Lyme disease in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, Simon W; Bhatia, Ajay; Woodham, Sarah; Rakowicz, Wojtek

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, while still an uncommon disease in the UK, is on the increase. Case numbers have increased by 3.6-fold since 2001, with over 950 cases reported by the Health Protection Agency (HPA) in 2011, compared with less than 500 cases annually pre-2004. HPA indications of the true incidence are suggested to be closer to 3000 cases/year, of which around 82% of cases are indigenously acquired. Three genospecies, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelli and Borrelia garinii, represent the predominant pathogenic variants in the UK. Erythema migrans is the commonest manifestation, occurring in 60%-91% of cases. In the UK, neuroborelliosis is the most common complication, while myocarditis is unusual, and death from either conduction disease or carditis is extremely rare. The role of Borrelia infection in chronic dilated cardiomyopathy in the UK remains unproven. Controversy over the existence of either 'chronic Lyme disease' and/or 'post-Lyme disease syndrome' continues unabated. National medical societies, patient advocacy groups, insurance companies, lawyers, doctors, the private health medical sector and scientific journals have all become embroiled in this bitter controversy. New developments include diagnostic tests able to detect Lyme disease at an earlier stage, shorter durations of antibiotic therapy and potential advances in vaccines against Borrelia. PMID:24198341

  16. Lyme Disease: A Challenge for Outdoor Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitcombe, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Describes signs and symptoms of Lyme disease; life cycle and feeding habits of the deer tick (Ixodes dammini), which transmits the spirochete bacterium; tick control measures; outdoor precautions; and veterinary considerations. Discusses the disease's potential impact on outdoor education, and suggests a reasoned, nonhysterical approach. Contains…

  17. The dynamic proteome of Lyme disease Borrelia.

    PubMed

    Norris, Steven J

    2006-01-01

    The proteome of the spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the tick-borne agent of Lyme disease, has been characterized by two different approaches using mass spectrometry, providing a launching point for future studies on the dramatic changes in protein expression that occur during transmission of the bacterium between ticks and mammals. PMID:16563176

  18. Gallium-positive Lyme disease myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, L.I.; Welch, P.; Fisher, N.

    1985-09-01

    In the course of a work-up for fever of unknown origin associated with intermittent arrhythmias, a gallium scan was performed which revealed diffuse myocardial uptake. The diagnosis of Lyme disease myocarditis subsequently was confirmed by serologic titers. One month following recovery from the acute illness, the abnormal myocardial uptake completely resolved.

  19. Lyme Disease: Implications for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbit, Maryanne Drake; Willis, Dawn

    1990-01-01

    Lyme disease may be one of the most commonly misdiagnosed diseases of this decade. Health educators should be knowledgeable about this new disease and be able to share with the public information about prevention, early signs and symptoms, and treatment of the disease (Author/IAH)

  20. Predisposing factors for individuals' Lyme disease prevention practices: Connecticut, Maine, and Montana.

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, J E; Campbell, G L; Bailey, R E; Cartter, M L; Adams, M; Frazier, E L; Damrow, T A; Gensheimer, K F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined factors that predispose individuals to protect against Lyme disease. METHODS: Knowledge, attitude, and practice questions concerning Lyme disease prevention were included in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance surveys in Connecticut, Maine, and Montana. A total of 4246 persons were interviewed. RESULTS: Perceived risk of acquiring Lyme disease, knowing anyone with Lyme disease, knowledge about Lyme disease, and believing Lyme disease to be a common problem were significantly associated with prevention practices. CONCLUSIONS: Predisposing factors differ substantially between states and appear related to disease incidence. Personal risk, knowing someone with Lyme disease, and cognizance about Lyme disease and acting on this information are consistent with social learning theories. PMID:9431299

  1. Lyme disease in children: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Prose, N S; Abson, K G; Berg, D

    1992-03-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem disorder that is caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. In endemic areas, its occurrence is extremely common among children. The early diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease may prevent the development of serious cardiac, rheumatological, and neurological sequelae. For this reason, a full understanding of the clinical manifestations, laboratory evaluation, and antibiotic therapy of Lyme disease is of vital importance. PMID:1550714

  2. False Positive Lyme Disease IgM Immunoblots in Children.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Lipsett, Susan C; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2016-07-01

    In our cross-sectional sample of 7289 serologic tests for Lyme disease, we identified 167 instances of a positive IgM immunoblot but a negative IgG immunoblot test result. Considering that only 71% (95% CI 64%-78%) of patients had Lyme disease, a positive IgM immunoblot alone should be interpreted with caution to avoid over-diagnosis of Lyme disease. PMID:27157898

  3. Triple-phase bone image abnormalities in Lyme arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.J.; Dadparvar, S.; Slizofski, W.J.; Glab, L.B.; Burger, M. )

    1989-10-01

    Arthritis is a frequent manifestation of Lyme disease. Limited triple-phase Tc-99m MDP bone imaging of the wrists and hands with delayed whole-body images was performed in a patient with Lyme arthritis. This demonstrated abnormal joint uptake in the wrists and hands in all three phases, with increased activity seen in other affected joints on delayed whole-body images. These findings are nonspecific and have been previously described in a variety of rheumatologic conditions, but not in Lyme disease. Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of articular and periarticular bone scan abnormalities.

  4. Space-time delta-sigma modulation for reception of multiple simultaneous independent RF beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Guoguang; Black, Bruce A.; Siahmakoun, Azad Z.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we introduce and analyze a multiple-RF-beam beamformer in receive mode utilizing the principle of space-time delta-sigma modulation. This principle is based on sampling input signals in both time and space and converting the sampled signals into a digital format by delta-sigma conversion. Noise shaping is achieved in 2D frequency domain. We show that the modulator can receive signals of narrow and wide bandwidths with steering capability, can receive multiple beams, and establish tradeoffs between sampling in time and in space. The ability of the modulator to trade off between time and space provides an effective way to sample high frequency RF signals without down conversion. In addition, a space-time delta-sigma modulator has better performance than a solely temporal delta-sigma modulator (for the same filter order), as is typically used in communication systems to digitize the down-converted analog signals.

  5. Multiple single unit recording in the cortex of monkeys using independently moveable microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Baker, S N; Philbin, N; Spinks, R; Pinches, E M; Wolpert, D M; MacManus, D G; Pauluis, Q; Lemon, R N

    1999-12-15

    Simultaneous recording from multiple single neurones presents many technical difficulties. However, obtaining such data has many advantages, which make it highly worthwhile to overcome the technical problems. This report describes methods which we have developed to permit recordings in awake behaving monkeys using the 'Eckhorn' 16 electrode microdrive. Structural magnetic resonance images are collected to guide electrode placement. Head fixation is achieved using a specially designed headpiece, modified for the multiple electrode approach, and access to the cortex is provided via a novel recording chamber. Growth of scar tissue over the exposed dura mater is reduced using an anti-mitotic compound. Control of the microdrive is achieved by a computerised system which permits several experimenters to move different electrodes simultaneously, considerably reducing the load on an individual operator. Neurones are identified as pyramidal tract neurones by antidromic stimulation through chronically implanted electrodes; stimulus control is integrated into the computerised system. Finally, analysis of multiple single unit recordings requires accurate methods to correct for non-stationarity in unit firing. A novel technique for such correction is discussed. PMID:10638811

  6. γδ T Cells and dendritic cells in refractory Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Divan, Ali; Budd, Ralph C; Tobin, Richard P; Newell-Rogers, M Karen

    2015-04-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infection transmitted by tick vectors with an incidence of up to 300,000 individuals/yr in the United States. The primary treatments are oral or i.v. antibiotics. Despite treatment, some individuals do not recover and have prolonged symptoms affecting multiple organs, including the nervous system and connective tissues. Inflammatory arthritis is a common symptom associated with Lyme pathology. In the past decades, γδ T cells have emerged as candidates that contribute to the transition from innate to adaptive responses. These cells are also differentially regulated within the synovia of patients affected by RLA. Here, we review and discuss potential cellular mechanisms involving γδ T cells and DCs in RLA. TLR signaling and antigen processing and presentation will be the key concepts that we review in aid of understanding the impact of γδ T cells in RLA. PMID:25605869

  7. Misleading presentation of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Elizabeth Martha; Rothbarth, Philip H; Delfos, Nathalie M

    2012-01-01

    A young man presented with recent-onset non-specific symptoms like headache, sleepiness and weight loss, interfering with normal daily life. Physical and biochemical irregularities were absent. Because extensive examination by neurologist and psychiatrist including brain imaging did not reveal any clues, the complaints were initially considered psychosomatic. As the symptoms deteriorated with ongoing weight loss, the patient was re-admitted to the hospital. Again, extensive additional investigation did not reveal any abnormalities. Because of previous exposition to the woods Lyme serology was determined. Surprisingly, it appeared to be a remarkable presentation of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis which was successfully treated with ceftriaxon. Clinicians must be aware of the fact that this severe illness can present without any typical symptoms. PMID:23220829

  8. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  9. Performance and robustness of probabilistic river forecasts computed with quantile regression based on multiple independent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoss, F.; Fischbeck, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    This study applies quantile regression (QR) to predict exceedance probabilities of various water levels, including flood stages, with combinations of deterministic forecasts, past forecast errors and rates of water level rise as independent variables. A computationally cheap technique to estimate forecast uncertainty is valuable, because many national flood forecasting services, such as the National Weather Service (NWS), only publish deterministic single-valued forecasts. The study uses data from the 82 river gauges, for which the NWS' North Central River Forecast Center issues forecasts daily. Archived forecasts for lead times of up to 6 days from 2001 to 2013 were analyzed. Besides the forecast itself, this study uses the rate of rise of the river stage in the last 24 and 48 h and the forecast error 24 and 48 h ago as predictors in QR configurations. When compared to just using the forecast as an independent variable, adding the latter four predictors significantly improved the forecasts, as measured by the Brier skill score and the continuous ranked probability score. Mainly, the resolution increases, as the forecast-only QR configuration already delivered high reliability. Combining the forecast with the other four predictors results in a much less favorable performance. Lastly, the forecast performance does not strongly depend on the size of the training data set but on the year, the river gauge, lead time and event threshold that are being forecast. We find that each event threshold requires a separate configuration or at least calibration.

  10. Inflammation in the pathogenesis of lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Geeta; Didier, Peter J; England, John D; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Martin, Dale S; Jacobs, Mary B; Philipp, Mario T

    2015-05-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both peripheral and central nervous systems. We assessed a causal role for inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis pathogenesis by evaluating the induced inflammatory changes in the central nervous system, spinal nerves, and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rhesus macaques that were inoculated intrathecally with live B. burgdorferi and either treated with dexamethasone or meloxicam (anti-inflammatory drugs) or left untreated. ELISA of cerebrospinal fluid showed significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand 2, and CXCL13 and pleocytosis in all infected animals, except dexamethasone-treated animals. Cerebrospinal fluid and central nervous system tissues of infected animals were culture positive for B. burgdorferi regardless of treatment. B. burgdorferi antigen was detected in the DRG and dorsal roots by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Histopathology revealed leptomeningitis, vasculitis, and focal inflammation in the central nervous system; necrotizing focal myelitis in the cervical spinal cord; radiculitis; neuritis and demyelination in the spinal roots; and inflammation with neurodegeneration in the DRG that was concomitant with significant neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis. These changes were absent in the dexamethasone-treated animals. Electromyography revealed persistent abnormalities in F-wave chronodispersion in nerve roots of a few infected animals; which were absent in dexamethasone-treated animals. These results suggest that inflammation has a causal role in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:25892509

  11. 5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arvikar, Sheila L.; Steere, Allen C.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS In the United States, Lyme arthritis is the most common feature of late stage infection with the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, usually beginning months after the initial tick bite. However, in some patients, including most of those seen today, the earlier phases of the infection are asymptomatic and arthritis is the presenting manifestation of the disease. Patients with Lyme arthritis have intermittent or persistent attacks of joint swelling and pain in one or a few large joints, especially the knee, usually over a period of several years, without prominent systemic manifestations. Serologic testing is the mainstay of diagnosis. Synovial fluid PCR testing for B. burgdorferi DNA is often positive prior to treatment, but it is not a reliable marker of spirochetal eradication after antibiotic therapy. Responses to oral or intravenous antibiotic treatment are generally excellent, although a small percentage of patients have persistent synovitis after 2-3 months of oral and IV antibiotics, which usually then responds to anti-inflammatory therapies, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), or synovectomy. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme arthritis. PMID:25999223

  12. Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Geeta; Didier, Peter J.; England, John D.; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Martin, Dale S.; Jacobs, Mary B.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both peripheral and central nervous systems. We assessed a causal role for inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis pathogenesis by evaluating the induced inflammatory changes in the central nervous system, spinal nerves, and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rhesus macaques that were inoculated intrathecally with live B. burgdorferi and either treated with dexamethasone or meloxicam (anti-inflammatory drugs) or left untreated. ELISA of cerebrospinal fluid showed significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand 2, and CXCL13 and pleocytosis in all infected animals, except dexamethasone-treated animals. Cerebrospinal fluid and central nervous system tissues of infected animals were culture positive for B. burgdorferi regardless of treatment. B. burgdorferi antigen was detected in the DRG and dorsal roots by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Histopathology revealed leptomeningitis, vasculitis, and focal inflammation in the central nervous system; necrotizing focal myelitis in the cervical spinal cord; radiculitis; neuritis and demyelination in the spinal roots; and inflammation with neurodegeneration in the DRG that was concomitant with significant neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis. These changes were absent in the dexamethasone-treated animals. Electromyography revealed persistent abnormalities in F-wave chronodispersion in nerve roots of a few infected animals; which were absent in dexamethasone-treated animals. These results suggest that inflammation has a causal role in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:25892509

  13. Lyme borreliosis: A neglected zoonosis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elhelw, Rehab A; El-Enbaawy, Mona I; Samir, Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causal organism of Lyme borreliosis. In Egypt, available data about the occurrence of Lyme disease are scarce and no structured studies documented the presence of Lyme borreliosis in Egyptian animals and tick reservoirs verifying its zoonotic evidence. Besides, no successful trials to isolate B. burgdorferi from clinical samples have occurred. This study was conducted to investigate B. burgdorferi infection as an emerging zoonosis neglected in Egypt. A total number of 92 animals, tick and human companion specimens were collected and subjected for culture, PCR and/or serodetection. B. burgdorferi has been detected and isolated from Egyptian animal breeds. We also detected the presence of outer surface protein A gene of B. burgdorferi by PCR as well as anti-B. burgdorferi IgM by ELISA in human contacts who were suffering from fever of unknown origin. This report represents the first systematic study on animals associated with patients suffering from febrile illness to confirm the emerging of such neglected zoonosis in Egypt. PMID:25239124

  14. Lyme disease: case report of persistent Lyme disease from Pulaski County, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, James R; King, Scott; Case, Matthew; Santo, Arben

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman from Pulaski, Virginia, presented to a local clinic with headaches, fever, generalized joint pain, excessive thirst and fluid intake, and a progressing rash on her back. On physical examination, she had a large circular red rash on her back with a bull's-eye appearance, 16 × 18 cm in diameter. Serologic tests confirmed a diagnosis of Lyme disease. The patient could recall a walk through the woods 3 weeks prior, although she never noticed a tick on her body. Following a prolonged course of antibiotics, this case report presents a patient with ongoing symptoms consistent with post-treatment Lyme disease. PMID:24353444

  15. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Won Han, Sang; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-08-13

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol-3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells. PMID:25119109

  16. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells. PMID:25482812

  17. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells. PMID:25482812

  18. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Spectra Information from Multiple Independent Astrophysics Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W., Jr.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Maximum Likelihood (ML) statistical theory required to estimate spectra information from an arbitrary number of astrophysics data sets produced by vastly different science instruments is developed in this paper. This theory and its successful implementation will facilitate the interpretation of spectral information from multiple astrophysics missions and thereby permit the derivation of superior spectral information based on the combination of data sets. The procedure is of significant value to both existing data sets and those to be produced by future astrophysics missions consisting of two or more detectors by allowing instrument developers to optimize each detector's design parameters through simulation studies in order to design and build complementary detectors that will maximize the precision with which the science objectives may be obtained. The benefits of this ML theory and its application is measured in terms of the reduction of the statistical errors (standard deviations) of the spectra information using the multiple data sets in concert as compared to the statistical errors of the spectra information when the data sets are considered separately, as well as any biases resulting from poor statistics in one or more of the individual data sets that might be reduced when the data sets are combined.

  19. Scalable time-correlated photon counting system with multiple independent input channels.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael; Rahn, Hans-Jürgen; Röhlicke, Tino; Kell, Gerald; Nettels, Daniel; Hillger, Frank; Schuler, Ben; Erdmann, Rainer

    2008-12-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting continues to gain importance in a wide range of applications. Most prominently, it is used for time-resolved fluorescence measurements with sensitivity down to the single molecule level. While the primary goal of the method used to be the determination of fluorescence lifetimes upon optical excitation by short light pulses, recent modifications and refinements of instrumentation and methodology allow for the recovery of much more information from the detected photons, and enable entirely new applications. This is achieved most successfully by continuously recording individually detected photons with their arrival time and detection channel information (time tagging), thus avoiding premature data reduction and concomitant loss of information. An important property of the instrumentation used is the number of detection channels and the way they interrelate. Here we present a new instrument architecture that allows scalability in terms of the number of input channels while all channels are synchronized to picoseconds of relative timing and yet operate independent of each other. This is achieved by means of a modular design with independent crystal-locked time digitizers and a central processing unit for sorting and processing of the timing data. The modules communicate through high speed serial links supporting the full throughput rate of the time digitizers. Event processing is implemented in programmable logic, permitting classical histogramming, as well as time tagging of individual photons and their temporally ordered streaming to the host computer. Based on the time-ordered event data, any algorithms and methods for the analysis of fluorescence dynamics can be implemented not only in postprocessing but also in real time. Results from recently emerging single molecule applications are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument. PMID:19123551

  20. Lyme Myocarditis Presenting as Chest Pain in an Adolescent Girl.

    PubMed

    Fishe, Jennifer N; Marchese, Ronald F; Callahan, James M

    2016-07-01

    A previously healthy adolescent girl presented to the emergency department with new onset chest and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Laboratory studies and imaging were consistent with myocarditis. She developed heart block after admission and required stabilization in the cardiac intensive care unit. Lyme serology returned positive, and her condition was diagnosed as Lyme disease-associated myocarditis. PMID:26945194

  1. TOWARDS LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR REDUCING LYME DISEASE RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incidence of Lyme disease in the United States continues to grow. Low-density development is also increasing in endemic regions, raising questions about the relationship between development pattern and disease. This study sought to model Lyme disease incidence rate using quanti...

  2. A Lyme Disease Case Study and Individualized Healthcare Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavendish, Roberta

    2003-01-01

    The Atlantic and Pacific coasts are the boundaries of Lyme disease with the Northeastern and Midwestern regions of the United States continuing to report the majority of cases. New reported cases of Lyme disease doubled from 1991 to 2001 according to statistics published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2002). Within that…

  3. Water uptake is independent of the inferred composition of secondary aerosols derived from multiple biogenic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarra, M. R.; Good, N.; Wyche, K. P.; Hamilton, J. F.; Monks, P. S.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that the water uptake properties derived from sub- and super-saturated measurements of chamber-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are independent of their degree of oxidation determined using both online and offline methods. SOA particles are formed from the photooxidation of five structurally different biogenic VOCs representing a broad range of emitted species and their corresponding range of chemical reactivity: α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, limonene, myrcene and linalool. The fractional contribution of mass fragment 44 to the total organic signal (f44) is used to characterise the extent of oxidation of the formed SOA as measured online by an aerosol mass spectrometer. Results illustrate that the values of f44 are dependent on the precursor, the extent of photochemical ageing as well as on the initial experimental conditions. SOA generated from a single biogenic precursor should therefore not be used as a general proxy for biogenic SOA. Similarly, the generated SOA particles exhibit a range of hygroscopic properties depending on the precursor, its initial mixing ratio and photochemical ageing. The activation behaviour of the formed SOA particles show no temporal trends with photochemical ageing. The average κ values derived from the HTDMA and CCNc are generally found to cover the same range for each precursor under two different initial mixing ratio conditions. A positive correlation is observed between the hygroscopicity of particles of a single size and f44 for α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, linalool and myrcene, but not for limonene SOA. The investigation of the generality of this relationship reveal that α-pinene, limonene, linalool and myrcene are all able to generate particles with similar hygroscopicity (κHTDMA ~0.1) despite f44 exhibiting a relatively wide range of values (~4 to 11%). Similarly, κCCN is found to be independent of f44. The same findings are also true when sub- and super-saturated water uptake

  4. Water uptake is independent of the inferred composition of secondary aerosols derived from multiple biogenic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarra, M. R.; Good, N.; Wyche, K. P.; Hamilton, J. F.; Monks, P. S.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate that the water uptake properties derived from sub- and super-saturated measurements of chamber-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are independent of their degree of oxidation, determined using both online and offline methods. SOA particles are formed from the photooxidation of five structurally different biogenic VOCs, representing a broad range of emitted species and their corresponding range of chemical reactivity: α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, limonene, myrcene and linalool. The fractional contribution of mass fragment 44 to the total organic signal (f44) is used to characterise the extent of oxidation of the formed SOA as measured online by an aerosol mass spectrometer. Results illustrate that the values of f44 are dependent on the precursor, the extent of photochemical ageing as well as on the initial experimental conditions. SOA generated from a single biogenic precursor should therefore not be used as a general proxy for biogenic SOA. Similarly, the generated SOA particles exhibit a range of hygroscopic properties, depending on the precursor, its initial mixing ratio and photochemical ageing. The activation behaviour of the formed SOA particles show no temporal trends with photochemical ageing. The average κ values derived from the HTDMA and CCNc are generally found to cover the same range for each precursor under two different initial mixing ratio conditions. A positive correlation is observed between the hygroscopicity of particles of a single size and f44 for α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, linalool and myrcene, but not for limonene SOA. The investigation of the generality of this relationship reveals that α-pinene, limonene, linalool and myrcene are all able to generate particles with similar hygroscopicity (κHTDMA ~0.1) despite f44 exhibiting a relatively wide range of values (~4 to 11%). Similarly, κCCN is found to be independent of f44. The same findings are also true when sub- and super-saturated water uptake

  5. Multiple independent transpositions of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, M D; Fleischer, R C

    1996-12-24

    Transpositions of mtDNA sequences to the nuclear genome have been documented in a wide variety of individual taxa, but little is known about their taxonomic frequency or patterns of variation. We provide evidence of nuclear sequences homologous to the mtDNA control region in seven species of diving ducks (tribe Aythyini). Phylogenetic analysis places each nuclear sequence as a close relative of the mtDNA haplotypes of the specie(s) in which it occurs, indicating that they derive from six independent transposition events, all occurring within the last approximately 1.5 million years. Relative-rate tests and comparison of intraspecific variation in nuclear and mtDNA sequences confirm the expectation of a greatly reduced rate of evolution in the nuclear copies. By representing mtDNA haplotypes from ancestral populations, nuclear insertions may be valuable in some phylogenetic analyses, but they also confound the accurate determination of mtDNA sequences. In particular, our data suggest that the presumably nonfunctional but more slowly evolving nuclear sequences often will not be identifiable by changes incompatible with function and may be preferentially amplified by PCR primers based on mtDNA sequences from related taxa. PMID:8986794

  6. Individual differences in ensemble perception reveal multiple, independent levels of ensemble representation.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Jason; Brady, Timothy F; Alvarez, George A

    2015-04-01

    Ensemble perception, including the ability to "see the average" from a group of items, operates in numerous feature domains (size, orientation, speed, facial expression, etc.). Although the ubiquity of ensemble representations is well established, the large-scale cognitive architecture of this process remains poorly defined. We address this using an individual differences approach. In a series of experiments, observers saw groups of objects and reported either a single item from the group or the average of the entire group. High-level ensemble representations (e.g., average facial expression) showed complete independence from low-level ensemble representations (e.g., average orientation). In contrast, low-level ensemble representations (e.g., orientation and color) were correlated with each other, but not with high-level ensemble representations (e.g., facial expression and person identity). These results suggest that there is not a single domain-general ensemble mechanism, and that the relationship among various ensemble representations depends on how proximal they are in representational space. PMID:25844624

  7. A 2.9 ps equivalent resolution interpolating time counter based on multiple independent coding lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szplet, R.; Jachna, Z.; Kwiatkowski, P.; Rozyc, K.

    2013-03-01

    We present the design, operation and test results of a time counter that has an equivalent resolution of 2.9 ps, a measurement uncertainty at the level of 6 ps, and a measurement range of 10 s. The time counter has been implemented in a general-purpose reprogrammable device Spartan-6 (Xilinx). To obtain both high precision and wide measurement range the counting of periods of a reference clock is combined with a two-stage interpolation within a single period of the clock signal. The interpolation involves a four-phase clock in the first interpolation stage (FIS) and an equivalent coding line (ECL) in the second interpolation stage (SIS). The ECL is created as a compound of independent discrete time coding lines (TCL). The number of TCLs used to create the virtual ECL has an effect on its resolution. We tested ECLs made from up to 16 TCLs, but the idea may be extended to a larger number of lines. In the presented time counter the coarse resolution of the counting method equal to 2 ns (period of the 500 MHz reference clock) is firstly improved fourfold in the FIS and next even more than 400 times in the SIS. The proposed solution allows us to overcome the technological limitation in achievable resolution and improve the precision of conversion of integrated interpolators based on tapped delay lines.

  8. Multiple Independent Fusions of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase with Enzymes in the Pentose Phosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Nicholas A.; Dixon, Thomas A.; Cavalcanti, Andre R. O.

    2011-01-01

    Fusions of the first two enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconolactonase (6PGL), have been previously described in two distant clades, chordates and species of the malarial parasite Plasmodium. We have analyzed genome and expressed sequence data from a variety of organisms to identify the origins of these gene fusion events. Based on the orientation of the domains and range of species in which homologs can be found, the fusions appear to have occurred independently, near the base of the metazoan and apicomplexan lineages. Only one of the two metazoan paralogs of G6PD is fused, showing that the fusion occurred after a duplication event, which we have traced back to an ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. The Plasmodium genes are known to contain a functionally important insertion that is not seen in the other apicomplexan fusions, highlighting this as a unique characteristic of this group. Surprisingly, our search revealed two additional fusion events, one that combined 6PGL and G6PD in an ancestor of the protozoan parasites Trichomonas and Giardia, and another fusing G6PD with phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) in a species of diatoms. This study extends the range of species known to contain fusions in the pentose phosphate pathway to many new medically and economically important organisms. PMID:21829610

  9. Multiple independent regulatory pathways control UBI4 expression after heat shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Simon, J R; Treger, J M; McEntee, K

    1999-02-01

    Transcription of the polyubiquitin gene UBI4 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strongly induced by a variety of environmental stresses, such as heat shock, nutrient depletion and exposure to DNA-damaging agents. This transcriptional response of UBI4 is likely to be the primary mechanism for increasing the pool of ubiquitin for degradation of stress-damaged proteins. Deletion and promoter fusion studies of the 5' regulatory sequences indicated that two different elements, heat shock elements (HSEs) and stress response element (STREs), contributed independently to heat shock regulation of the UBI4 gene. In the absence of HSEs, STRE sequences localized to the intervals -264 to -238 and -215 to -183 were needed for stress control of transcription after heat shock. Site-directed mutagenesis of the STRE (AG4) at -252 to -248 abolished heat shock induction of UBI4 transcription. Northern analysis demonstrated that cells containing either a temperature-sensitive HSF or non-functional Msn2p/Msn4p transcription factors induced high levels of UBI4 transcripts after heat shock. In cells deficient in both heat stress pathways, heat-induced UBI4 transcript levels were considerably lower but not abolished, suggesting a role for another factor(s) in stress control of its expression. PMID:10048026

  10. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    PubMed Central

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  11. Unusual Presentation of Unilateral Isolated Probable Lyme Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Burakgazi, Ahmet Z.; Henderson, Carl S.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) is one of the most common manifestations of central nervous system involvement caused by various etiologies. Lyme ON is an exceedingly rare ocular manifestation of Lyme disease (LD) and only a few cases have been published in the literature. Lyme ON is very rare but should be included in the differential diagnosis in unexplained cases, particularly in Lyme endemic areas. Careful and detailed examination and investigation are warranted to make the diagnosis. We report this case to increase awareness of clinicians to include Lyme disease in differential diagnosis of ON for unexplained cases of ON. Herein we present a unique case with a unilateral ON caused by LD along with pre- and posttreatment findings and literature review. PMID:26953086

  12. Unusual Presentation of Unilateral Isolated Probable Lyme Optic Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Burakgazi, Ahmet Z; Henderson, Carl S

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) is one of the most common manifestations of central nervous system involvement caused by various etiologies. Lyme ON is an exceedingly rare ocular manifestation of Lyme disease (LD) and only a few cases have been published in the literature. Lyme ON is very rare but should be included in the differential diagnosis in unexplained cases, particularly in Lyme endemic areas. Careful and detailed examination and investigation are warranted to make the diagnosis. We report this case to increase awareness of clinicians to include Lyme disease in differential diagnosis of ON for unexplained cases of ON. Herein we present a unique case with a unilateral ON caused by LD along with pre- and posttreatment findings and literature review. PMID:26953086

  13. [Lyme borreliosis--experience of the last 25 years in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Lakos, András

    2009-04-19

    We recognized the first Hungarian Lyme patients just 25 years ago, in 1984. It was exactly 20 years ago, when we opened the Lyme Disease Outpatient Service at the Central (László) Hospital for Infectious Diseases. 15 years ago we established the financially independent Center for Tick-borne Diseases. The milestones of this work at the Center for Tick-borne Diseases are the description of a new tick-borne rickettsial illness (tick-borne lymphadenopathy), development of a Lyme immunoblot kit and an automated immunoblot reader. We described a simple and reliable method for detection of intrathecal borrelia antibody synthesis which is necessary for the diagnosis of neuroborreliosis. We also developed and routinely apply the comparative immunoblot assay for the evaluation of serological progression and/or regression, which can help the clinicians to decide whether a serological reaction is resulted from a previous healed or an active borrelia infection. We studied the pregnancy outcome of borrelia infected mothers and provided that untreated borrelia infection is associated with higher chance of adverse pregnancy outcome. PMID:19362925

  14. Cross-reactivity between Lyme and syphilis screening assays: Lyme disease does not cause false-positive syphilis screens.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, Glenn; LeBlanc, Jason; Heinstein, Charles; Roberts, Catherine; Lindsay, Robbin; Hatchette, Todd F

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of Lyme disease and syphilis in the same geographic area prompted an assessment of screening test cross-reactivity. This study supports the previously described cross-reactivity of Lyme screening among syphilis-positive sera and reports evidence against the possibility of false-positive syphilis screening tests resulting from previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection. PMID:26707064

  15. Recognition of multiple tachyarrhythmias by rate-independent means using a small microcomputer.

    PubMed

    Tooley, M A; Davies, D W; Nathan, A W; Camm, A J

    1991-02-01

    New implantable devices are now available that can offer different therapies for different arrhythmias but they need a method of discriminating between these rhythms. Heart rate analysis is predominantly used to discern between sinus rhythm (SR) and pathological tachycardias but this may be of limited value when the rates of the rhythms are similar. An enhanced form of Gradient Pattern Detection (GPD) has been developed using an 8-bit microcomputer that can distinguish between SR and up to three other arrhythmias in real time. This is a method based on electrogram morphology where each rhythm's specific electrogram is classified by a sequence of gradient 'zones'. The microprocessor of the computer is of similar processing power to ones used in current pacemakers. Five patients with multiple arrhythmias were studied. Four had ventricular tachycardia (VT) and one had three conduction patterns during supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). Bipolar endocardial right ventricular electrograms were recorded during SR and tachycardia in all patients. The computer would first 'learn' about each different rhythm by a semi-automatic means. Once all the rhythms were learned the program would enter the GPD analysis phase. The computer would output a series of real-time rhythm specific marker codes onto a chart recorder as it recognized each rhythm. Sixteen different arrhythmias (13 VT, 3 SVT) were examined for this study. All rhythms (including SR) were distinguished from each other except in the case of one patient with six VTs where two VTs had identical shapes and therefore could not be detected apart. The method would be a useful addition to heart rate analysis for future generations of microprocessor assisted pacemakers. PMID:1706848

  16. High consumption of coffee is associated with decreased multiple sclerosis risk; results from two independent studies

    PubMed Central

    Hedström, A K; Mowry, E M; Gianfrancesco, M A; Shao, X; Schaefer, C A; Shen, L; Olsson, T; Barcellos, L F; Alfredsson, L

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies on consumption of caffeine and risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) have yielded inconclusive results. We aimed to investigate whether consumption of coffee is associated with risk of MS. Methods Using two population-representative case–control studies (a Swedish study comprising 1620 cases and 2788 controls, and a US study comprising 1159 cases and 1172 controls), participants with different habits of coffee consumption based on retrospective data collection were compared regarding risk of MS, by calculating ORs with 95% CIs. Logistic regression models were adjusted for a broad range of potential confounding factors. Results Compared with those who reported no coffee consumption, the risk of MS was substantially reduced among those who reported a high consumption of coffee exceeding 900 mL daily (OR 0.70 (95% CI 0.49 to 0.99) in the Swedish study, and OR 0.69 (95% CI 0.50 to 0.96) in the US study). Lower odds of MS with increasing consumption of coffee were observed, regardless of whether coffee consumption at disease onset or 5 or 10 years prior to disease onset was considered. Conclusions In accordance with studies in animal models of MS, high consumption of coffee may decrease the risk of developing MS. Caffeine, one component of coffee, has neuroprotective properties, and has been shown to suppress the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which may be mechanisms underlying the observed association. However, further investigations are needed to determine whether exposure to caffeine underlies the observed association and, if so, to evaluate its mechanisms of action. PMID:26940586

  17. The distribution of canine exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi in a Lyme-Disease endemic area.

    PubMed Central

    Falco, R C; Smith, H A; Fish, D; Mojica, B A; Bellinger, M A; Harris, H L; Hechemy, K E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. A serosurvey of canine exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of human Lyme disease, was conducted in Westchester County, New York, to determine the distribution of exposure in an area endemic for Lyme disease. METHODS. A total of 1446 blood samples was collected from resident dogs and tested by modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Equivocal samples were further tested by immunoblot. A mean number of 57.8 samples was collected from each of 25 towns and cities. RESULTS. Seroprevalence rates for municipalities ranged from 6.5% to 85.2%. County seroprevalence was 49.2%. There was a significant difference among the rates for the northern (67.3%), central (45.2%), and southern (17.3%) regions. Multiple range analysis indicated homogeneity between the southern and central regions and the central and northern regions. CONCLUSIONS. Canine exposure to B burgdorferi increases in a south to north gradient within the county. Intensity of exposure, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers, indicates a similar pattern. The close association between dogs and humans suggests that human risk of acquiring Lyme disease within Westchester County is equally disparate and is inversely related to the degree of urbanization. PMID:8363007

  18. Unique expression of chronic Lyme disease and Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction to doxycycline therapy in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Haney, Chad; Nahata, Milap C

    2016-01-01

    I am a 24-year-old male who was diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease after 4 years of multiple, non-specific symptoms. I have written this case as first author with my faculty mentor listed as the coauthor. The objective of this report is to highlight the experience with doxycycline treatment. In 2007, at around age 19 years, I had an acute onset of sore throat, tonsillitis, low-grade fever, stiff upper back and neck muscles, migraines and severely stiff, cracking jaw joints. This led to >24 medical visits, multitudes of tests and examinations, and exploratory surgery over the next 3 years. In 2011, a Lyme-literate medical doctor (LLMD) diagnosed me with chronic Lyme disease. I started taking doxycycline 100 mg by mouth every 12 hours, leading to atypical sequences of events deemed a Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction by a LLMD. This case highlights the unique clinical expression of chronic Lyme disease and the Jarisch-Herxheimer response to doxycycline. PMID:27440843

  19. Consciousness and cognition may be mediated by multiple independent coherent ensembles.

    PubMed

    John, E R; Easton, P; Isenhart, R

    1997-03-01

    Short-term or working memory (WM) provides temporary storage of information in the brain after an experience and is associated with conscious awareness. Neurons sensitive to the multiple stimulus attributes comprising an experience are distributed within many brain regions. Such distributed cell assemblies, activated by an event, are the most plausible system to represent the WM of that event. Studies with a variety of imaging technologies have implicated widespread brain regions in the mediation of WM for different categories of information. Each kind of WM may thus be expected to involve many brain regions rather than a local, uniquely dedicated set of cells. Neurons in a distributed "cell assembly" may be self-selected by their temporally coherent activations. The process by which this fragmented representation of the recent past is reassembled to accomplish essentially automatic and reliable recognition of a recurrent event constitutes an important problem. One plausible mechanism to achieve the identification of past with previous events would require that the representational system mediating WM must coexist in spatial extent and somehow overlap in temporal activation with cell ensembles registering input from subsequent events. The detection of such a postulated mechanism required an experimental approach which would focus upon spatial patterns of coherent activation while information about different events was stored in WM and retrieved, rather than focusing upon the temporal sequences of activation in localized regions of interest. For this purpose, the familiar delayed matching from sample (DMS) task was modified. A series of information-free flashes, or "noncontingent probes," was presented before an initial series of visual information items, the Priming Sample, which were to be held in WM during a Delay Period. A second series of visual information items were then presented, the Matching Sample. The task required detection of any item in the second

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  1. Lyme Borreliosis in Human Patients in Florida and Georgia, USA

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kerry L.; Leydet, Brian; Hartman, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the cause of illness in several human patients residing in Florida and Georgia, USA, with suspected Lyme disease based upon EM-like skin lesions and/or symptoms consistent with early localized or late disseminated Lyme borreliosis. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays developed specifically for Lyme group Borrelia spp., followed by DNA sequencing for confirmation, we identified Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato DNA in samples of blood and skin and also in lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) removed from several patients who either live in or were exposed to ticks in Florida or Georgia. This is the first report to present combined PCR and DNA sequence evidence of infection with Lyme Borrelia spp. in human patients in the southern U.S., and to demonstrate that several B. burgdorferi sensu lato species may be associated with Lyme disease-like signs and symptoms in southern states. Based on the findings of this study, we suggest that human Lyme borreliosis occurs in Florida and Georgia, and that some cases of Lyme-like illness referred to as southern tick associated rash illness (STARI) in the southern U.S. may be attributable to previously undetected B. burgdorferi sensu lato infections. PMID:23781138

  2. Lyme disease. Recognising and treating erythema migrans.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne bacterial infection caused by Borrelia spirochetes. The first stage of infection involves a characteristic skin lesion, erythema migrans. Erythema migrans is a ring-shaped skin lesion, centred on the bite, which expands outwards. It usually appears within two weeks after a bite from an infected tick. If left untreated, the infection sometimes extends or progresses over a period of months or years, leading to potentially severe neurological, articular, cutaneous and cardiac complications. How is erythema migrans associated with Lyme disease recognised and managed? We conducted a systematic review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. This review does not address the complications of Lyme disease. Diagnosis of erythema migrans is based on clinical findings in a patient with a possible or confirmed recent tick bite. Serological tests are not useful at this stage of the infection. Antibiotics shown to be active in vitro also proved effective in non-comparative trials. In randomised trials, amoxicillin, doxycycline, cefuroxime and ceftriaxone had similar efficacy, clearing signs and symptoms in about 90% of patients, with a relapse rate of less than 5% at 6 months. Azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, three macrolide antibiotics, appear to have lower efficacy. Doxycycline should not be used to treat pregnant or breast-feeding women, or children under 8 years old, due to a risk of tooth and bone disorders in children. In practice, a diagnosis of erythema migrans should be borne in mind when a patient presents with recent history of a possible or confirmed tick bite and skin lesions suggestive of erythema migrans. Oral amoxicillin or doxycycline will prevent progression of the infection to the potentially severe, later stages of Lyme disease. Routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not justified after a tick bite, even in an endemic area, as the risk of infection is low. It is best to monitor the skin around the bite and

  3. Fine-scale mapping of 8q24 locus identifies multiple independent risk variants for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiajun; Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Wei; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Milne, Roger L; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Zhao, Zhiguo; Guo, Xingyi; Benitez, Javier; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Hui; Canisius, Sander; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Devilee, Peter; Droit, Arnaud; Dork, Thilo; Fasching, Peter A; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gaborieau, Valerie; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Grip, Mervi; Guenel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Johnson, Nichola; Torres, Diana; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Khan, Sofia; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Lambrechts, Diether; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Le Marchand, Loic; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; McLean, Catriona; Meindl, Alfons; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Olson, Janet E; Orr, Nick; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Peterlongo, Paolo; Choudary Putti, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Shrubsole, Matha J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Hwang Teo, Soo; Thienpont, Bernard; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Therese; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Wen, Wanqing; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Har Yip, Cheng; Zamora, Pilar M; Zheng, Ying; Floris, Giuseppe; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Kristensen, Vessela N; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Simard, Jacques; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong

    2016-09-15

    Previous genome-wide association studies among women of European ancestry identified two independent breast cancer susceptibility loci represented by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs13281615 and rs11780156 at 8q24. A fine-mapping study across 2.06 Mb (chr8:127,561,724-129,624,067, hg19) in 55,540 breast cancer cases and 51,168 controls within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium was conducted. Three additional independent association signals in women of European ancestry, represented by rs35961416 (OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.93-0.97, conditional p = 5.8 × 10(-6) ), rs7815245 (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.91-0.96, conditional p = 1.1 × 10(-6) ) and rs2033101 (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.02-1.07, conditional p = 1.1 × 10(-4) ) were found. Integrative analysis using functional genomic data from the Roadmap Epigenomics, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project, the Cancer Genome Atlas and other public resources implied that SNPs rs7815245 in Signal 3, and rs1121948 in Signal 5 (in linkage disequilibrium with rs11780156, r(2)  = 0.77), were putatively functional variants for two of the five independent association signals. The results highlighted multiple 8q24 variants associated with breast cancer susceptibility in women of European ancestry. PMID:27087578

  4. The many faces and phases of borreliosis. I. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Abele, D C; Anders, K H

    1990-08-01

    Lyme disease is increasingly being reported throughout the United States and many parts of the world. Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, is a spirochete that, not unlike the treponema of syphilis, can cause a spectrum of disease from the initial skin lesion, through widely varied symptoms and signs, to chronic neurologic and arthritic disability. The borrelial spirochete and Lyme disease are the subject of this review. A subsequent article will review other definite and possible cutaneous manifestations of borreliosis. PMID:2212114

  5. Isolation of the Lyme disease spirochete from mammals in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Loken, K I; Wu, C C; Johnson, R C; Bey, R F

    1985-07-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes were isolated from the kidneys of two Peromyscus spp. trapped in Minnesota in September and October 1983. No spirochetes were isolated from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), red backed voles (Clethrionomys gapperi), or shrews (Sorexy cinereus and Blarina brevicauda). This is the first report of the isolation of the Lyme disease spirochete from the midwestern United States and isolations from these animals, which were free of ticks, suggest that the Lyme disease spirochete may persist in animal organs for months. PMID:4001130

  6. Ocular Lyme disease: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffmann, D J; Wormser, G P

    1990-01-01

    Lyme disease is an emerging new spirochaetal disease in which ocular complications may arise. We have seen a 45-year-old woman who developed unilateral endophthalmitis leading to blindness during the course of this disease. Ocular tissue showed the characteristic spirochete. A literature review shows that the commonest ocular manifestation of Lyme disease is a mild conjunctivitis, but other symptoms may include periorbital oedema, oculomotor palsies, uveitis, papilloedema, papillitis, interstitial keratitis, and others. Ophthalmologists treating patients from Lyme disease endemic areas need to be aware of the protean clinical manifestation of this disease. PMID:2198927

  7. Borrelia burgdorferi infection and Lyme disease in children.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Sabatini, Caterina; Tagliaferri, Laura; Principi, Nicola

    2013-03-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem disease that frequently affects children. It is caused by a group of related spirochetes, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, that are transmitted by ticks belonging to species of the genus Ixodes. The clinical characteristics of Lyme disease in pediatrics resemble those observed in adults, although the symptoms may last for a shorter time and the outcome may be better. However, identifying Lyme disease in children can be significantly more difficult because some of its signs and symptoms can be similar to those of other common pediatric clinical manifestations. Finally, the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to childhood Lyme disease is frequently not codified, and guidelines specifically prepared for adults are used for children without having been validated. This review of the currently available data will evaluate what may be the best approach to the diagnosis and treatment of B. burgdorferi infection and disease in the pediatric population. PMID:23141587

  8. Acute exudative polymorphous vitelliform maculopathy in a patient with Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi S J; Tran, Lac H; Kim, Judy E

    2013-01-01

    Acute exudative polymorphous vitelli-form maculopathy (AEPVM) is a rare condition of unclear etiology that has been seen in association with respiratory and viral infections. It has also been reported as a paraneoplastic phenomenon in older individuals. The authors report the first case of AEPVM associated with Lyme disease with over 3.5 years of follow-up. Multimodality serial imaging suggested the lesions began as multiple serous detachments followed by accumulation of photoreceptor outer segments in the subretinal space that gradually resolved over time and gave rise to the characteristic fundus findings at various stages. PMID:24044715

  9. [Manifestation of Lyme arthritis in the puerperal period].

    PubMed

    Bussen, S; Steck, T

    1994-08-01

    Lyme disease, a tick-transmitted spirochetal illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, usually begins with a characteristic erythema chronicum migrans accompanied by flu-like symptoms. This phase may later be followed by meningitis, neuritis, carditis or arthritis. Congenital abnormalities due to maternal infection during pregnancy have been described. We report on a case of a 36-year old V gravida III para. After a normal pregnancy and a Cesarean section the patient developed postpartal an acute Lyme arthritis. PMID:7975802

  10. Chronic lyme disease: psychogenic fantasy or somatic infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mervine, Phyllis

    2003-01-01

    Sigal and Hassett published an article about Lyme disease in the EHP Supplements (Sigal and Hassett 2002), suggesting that chronic Lyme disease is "psychogenic." I do not think that Sigal and Hassett, non-psychiatrists, are qualified to speak about psychiatric matters. I, however, actually have had the disease, which they characterize as "medically unexplained," for over 25 years and have 15 years of experience as a patient advocate and educator. I beg to differ. PMID:12573917

  11. Molecular mechanisms of nutlin-induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma: evidence for p53-transcription-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Saha, Manujendra N; Jiang, Hua; Chang, Hong

    2010-09-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable plasma cell malignancy in which p53 is rarely mutated. Thus, activation of the p53 pathway by a small molecule inhibitor of the p53-MDM2 interaction, nutlin, in MM cells retaining wild type p53 is an attractive therapeutic strategy. Recently we reported that nutlin plus velcade (a proteasome inhibitor) displayed a synergistic response in MM. However, the mechanism of the p53-mediated apoptosis in MM has not been fully understood. Our data show that nutlin-induced apoptosis correlated with reduction in cell viability, upregulation of p53, p21 and MDM2 protein levels with a simultaneous increase in pro-apoptotic targets PUMA, Bax and Bak and downregulation of anti-apoptotic targets Bcl2 and survivin and activation of caspase in MM cells harboring wild type p53. Nutlin-induced apoptosis was inhibited when activation of caspase was blocked by the caspase inhibitor. Nutlin caused mitochondrial translocation of p53 where it binds with Bcl2, leading to cytochrome C release. Moreover, blocking the transcriptional arm of p53 by the p53-specific transcriptional inhibitor, pifithrin-α, not only inhibited nutlin-induced upregulation of p53-transcriptional targets but also augmented apoptosis in MM cells, suggesting an association of transcription-independent pathway of apoptosis. However, inhibitor of mitochondrial translocation of p53, PFT-μ, did not prevent nutlin-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the p53 transcription-dependent pathway was also operational in nutlin-induced apoptosis in MM. Our study provides the evidence that nutlin-induced apoptosis in MM cells is mediated by transcription-dependent and -independent pathways and supports further clinical evaluation of nutlin as a novel therapeutic agent in MM. PMID:20595817

  12. Multiple Sexual Partners as a Potential Independent Risk Factor for Cervical Cancer: a Meta-analysis of Epidemiological Studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Chang; Liu, Wei-Dong; Liu, Yan-Hui; Ye, Xiao-Hua; Chen, Si-Dong

    2015-01-01

    It's known that having multiple sexual partners is one of the risk factors of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection which is a major cause of cervical cancer. However, it is not clear whether the number of sexual partners is an independent risk factor for cervical cancer. We identified relevant studies by searching the databases of MEDLINE, PubMed and ScienceDirect published in English from January 1980 to January 2014. We analyzed those studies by combining the study-specific odds ratios (ORs) using random-effects models. Forty-one studies were included in this meta-analysis. We observed that the number of sexual partners was associated with the occurrence of non-malignant cervical disease (OR=1.82, 95%CI 1.63-2.00) and invasive cervical carcinoma (OR=1.77, 95%CI 1.50-2.05). Subgroup analyses revealed that the association remained significant after controlling for HPV infection (OR=1.52, 95%CI 1.21-1.83 for non-malignant disease; OR=1.53, 95%CI 1.30- 1.76 for invasive cervical carcinoma). We found that there was a non-linear relation of the number of sexual partners with both non-malignant cervical disease and invasive cervical carcinoma. The risk of both malignant and non-malignant disease is relatively stable in women with more than 4-7 sexual partners. Furthermore, the frequency-risk of disease remained significant after controlling for HPV infection.The study suggested that having multiple sexual partners, with or without HPV infection, is a potential risk factor of cervical cancer. PMID:25987056

  13. Vaccination against Lyme disease: Are we ready for it?

    PubMed

    Kaaijk, Patricia; Luytjes, Willem

    2016-03-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the Northern hemisphere and is caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. A first sign of Borrelia infection is a circular skin rash, erythema migrans, but it can develop to more serious manifestations affecting skin, nervous system, joints, and/or heart. The marked increase in Lyme disease incidence over the past decades, the severity of the disease, and the associated high medical costs of, in particular, the persistent forms of Lyme disease requires adequate measures for control. Vaccination would be the most effective intervention for prevention, but at present no vaccine is available. In the 1990s, 2 vaccines against Lyme disease based on the OspA protein from the predominant Borrelia species of the US showed to be safe and effective in clinical phase III studies. However, failed public acceptance led to the demise of these monovalent OspA-based vaccines. Nowadays, public seem to be more aware of the serious health problems that Lyme disease can cause and seem more ready for the use of a broadly protective vaccine. This article discusses several aspects that should be considered to enable the development and implementation of a vaccine to prevent Lyme disease successfully. PMID:26337648

  14. Vaccination against Lyme disease: Are we ready for it?

    PubMed Central

    Kaaijk, Patricia; Luytjes, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the Northern hemisphere and is caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. A first sign of Borrelia infection is a circular skin rash, erythema migrans, but it can develop to more serious manifestations affecting skin, nervous system, joints, and/or heart. The marked increase in Lyme disease incidence over the past decades, the severity of the disease, and the associated high medical costs of, in particular, the persistent forms of Lyme disease requires adequate measures for control. Vaccination would be the most effective intervention for prevention, but at present no vaccine is available. In the 1990s, 2 vaccines against Lyme disease based on the OspA protein from the predominant Borrelia species of the US showed to be safe and effective in clinical phase III studies. However, failed public acceptance led to the demise of these monovalent OspA-based vaccines. Nowadays, public seem to be more aware of the serious health problems that Lyme disease can cause and seem more ready for the use of a broadly protective vaccine. This article discusses several aspects that should be considered to enable the development and implementation of a vaccine to prevent Lyme disease successfully. PMID:26337648

  15. Assessing peridomestic entomological factors as predictors for Lyme disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connally, N.P.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Mather, T.N.

    2006-01-01

    The roles of entomologic risk factors, including density of nymphal blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis), prevalence of nymphal infection with the etiologic agent (Borrelia burgdorferi), and density of infected nymphs, in determining the risk of human Lyme disease were assessed at residences in the endemic community of South Kingstown, RI. Nymphs were sampled between May and July from the wooded edge around 51 and 47 residential properties in 2002 and 2003, respectively. Nymphs were collected from all residences sampled. Tick densities, infection rates, and densities of infected nymphs were all significantly higher around homes reporting Lyme disease histories in 2003, while only infection rates were significantly higher in 2002. However, densities of infected nymphs did not significantly predict the probability of Lyme disease at a residence (by logistic regression) in either year. There were no significant differences in entomologic risk factors between homes with state-confirmed Lyme disease histories and homes with self-reported cases (not reported to the state health department). Therefore, although entomologic risk factors tended to be higher at residences with cases of Lyme disease, entomological indices, in the absence of human behavior measures, were not useful predictors of Lyme disease at the scale of individual residences in a tick-endemic community.

  16. Novel Diagnosis of Lyme Disease: Potential for CAM Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hebroni, Frank; Raphael, Yaniv; Erde, Jonathan; Raxlen, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is the most common tick-borne disease in the northern hemisphere, producing a wide range of disabling effects on multiple human targets, including the skin, the nervous system, the joints and the heart. Insufficient clinical diagnostic methods, the necessity for prompt antibiotic treatment along with the pervasive nature of infection impel the development and establishment of new clinical diagnostic tools with increased accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The goal of this article is 4-fold: (i) to detail LD infection and pathology, (ii) to review prevalent diagnostic methods, emphasizing inherent problems, (iii) to introduce the usage of in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) in clinical diagnostics and (iv) to underscore the relevance of a novel comprehensive LD diagnostic approach to practitioners of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). Utilization of this analytical method will increase the accuracy of the diagnostic process and abridge the time to treatment, with antibiotics, herbal medicines and nutritional supplements, resulting in improved quality of care and disease prognosis. PMID:18955246

  17. Time-independent description of rapidly driven systems in the presence of friction: Multiple scale perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Ray Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim

    2012-03-01

    The dynamics of a classical system driven by a rapidly oscillating field (with frequency ω) in the presence of friction has been investigated using the multiple scale perturbation theory (MSPT). By exploiting the idea of separation of time scales, the slow motion has been computed in a systematic expansion in the inverse of ω to the order ω-3. This perturbation series can be viewed as a generalization of the calculation presented by Landau and Lifshitz for Kapitza's pendulum (where the point of suspension is moved periodically) in the presence of friction. The radiation induced dynamics of the system is found to be described by an effective time-independent potential with friction that controls the slow motion. The explicit appearance of friction in our computed effective potential is a manifestation of the dynamical effect due to the fast motion. The present study demonstrates that MSPT can be used to understand and predict the classical dynamics of a driven system in the presence of friction.

  18. IL2RA and IL7RA genes confer susceptibility for multiple sclerosis in two independent European populations.

    PubMed

    Weber, F; Fontaine, B; Cournu-Rebeix, I; Kroner, A; Knop, M; Lutz, S; Müller-Sarnowski, F; Uhr, M; Bettecken, T; Kohli, M; Ripke, S; Ising, M; Rieckmann, P; Brassat, D; Semana, G; Babron, M-C; Mrejen, S; Gout, C; Lyon-Caen, O; Yaouanq, J; Edan, G; Clanet, M; Holsboer, F; Clerget-Darpoux, F; Müller-Myhsok, B

    2008-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory neurologic disorder diagnosed in young adults and, due to its chronic course, is responsible for a substantial economic burden. MS is considered to be a multifactorial disease in which both genetic and environmental factors intervene. The well-established human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association does not completely explain the genetic impact on disease susceptibility. However, identification and validation of non-HLA-genes conferring susceptibility to MS has proven to be difficult probably because of the small individual contribution of each of these genes. Recently, associations with two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL2RA gene (rs12722489, rs2104286) and one SNP in the IL7RA gene (rs6897932) have been reported by several groups. These three SNPs were genotyped in a French and a German population of MS patients using the hME assay by the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight technology (Sequenom, San Diego, CA, USA). We show that these SNPs do contribute to the risk of MS in these two unrelated European MS patient populations with odds ratios varying from 1.1 to 1.5. The discovery and validation of new genetic risk factors in independent populations may help toward the understanding of MS pathogenesis by providing valuable information on biological pathways to be investigated. PMID:18354419

  19. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bojesen, Stig E; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Edwards, Stacey L; Pickett, Hilda A; Shen, Howard C; Smart, Chanel E; Hillman, Kristine M; Mai, Phuong L; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D; Lu, Yi; Karevan, Rod; Woods, Nicholas; Johnston, Rebecca L; French, Juliet D; Chen, Xiaoqing; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F; Maranian, Melanie J; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Lush, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Françis; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Risch, Harvey A; González-Neira, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Pita, Guillermo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Álvarez, Nuria; Larson, Melissa C; Fridley, Brooke L; Schoof, Nils; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cicek, Mine S; Peto, Julian; Kalli, Kimberly R; Broeks, Annegien; Armasu, Sebastian M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Braaf, Linde M; Winterhoff, Boris; Nevanlinna, Heli; Konecny, Gottfried E; Lambrechts, Diether; Rogmann, Lisa; Guénel, Pascal; Teoman, Attila; Milne, Roger L; Garcia, Joaquin J; Cox, Angela; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hein, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J; Haiman, Christopher A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Andrulis, Irene L; Moysich, Kirsten B; Hopper, John L; Odunsi, Kunle; Lindblom, Annika; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Simard, Jacques; Lurie, Galina; Fasching, Peter A; Carney, Michael E; Radice, Paolo; Wilkens, Lynne R; Swerdlow, Anthony; Goodman, Marc T; Brauch, Hiltrud; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hillemanns, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Devilee, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Pelttari, Liisa M; Zheng, Wei; Leminen, Arto; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bunker, Clareann H; Kristensen, Vessela; Ness, Roberta B; Muir, Kenneth; Edwards, Robert; Meindl, Alfons; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; du Bois, Andreas; Wu, Anna H; Harter, Philipp; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Hosono, Satoyo; Kang, Daehee; Nakanishi, Toru; Hartman, Mikael; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hamann, Ute; Karlan, Beth Y; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jensen, Allan; Eccles, Diana; Høgdall, Estrid; Shen, Chen-Yang; Brown, Judith; Woo, Yin Ling; Shah, Mitul; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Luben, Robert; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Czene, Kamila; Vierkant, Robert A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Levine, Douglas A; Rudolph, Anja; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Iversen, Edwin; Nickels, Stefan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Cramer, Daniel W; Gibson, Lorna; Terry, Kathryn L; Fletcher, Olivia; Vitonis, Allison F; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Poole, Elizabeth M; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Liu, Jianjun; Bandera, Elisa V; Li, Jingmei; Olson, Sara H; Humphreys, Keith; Orlow, Irene; Blomqvist, Carl; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Salvesen, Helga B; Muranen, Taru A; Wik, Elisabeth; Brouwers, Barbara; Krakstad, Camilla; Wauters, Els; Halle, Mari K; Wildiers, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Mulot, Claire; Aben, Katja K; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; van Altena, Anne M; Truong, Thérèse; Massuger, Leon F A G; Benitez, Javier; Pejovic, Tanja; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Hoatlin, Maureen; Zamora, M Pilar; Cook, Linda S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Kelemen, Linda E; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Le, Nhu D; Sohn, Christof; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Cybulski, Cezary; Henderson, Brian E; Menkiszak, Janusz; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Marchand, Loic Le; Yang, Hannah P; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Knight, Julia A; Høgdall, Claus K; Apicella, Carmel; Gore, Martin; Tsimiklis, Helen; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Brown, Robert; Martens, John W M; Flanagan, James M; Kriege, Mieke; Paul, James; Margolin, Sara; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Severi, Gianluca; Whittemore, Alice S; Baglietto, Laura; McGuire, Valerie; Stegmaier, Christa; Sieh, Weiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Labrèche, France; Gao, Yu-Tang; Goldberg, Mark S; Yang, Gong; Dumont, Martine; McLaughlin, John R; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Phelan, Catherine M; Lux, Michael P; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peissel, Bernard; Sellers, Thomas A; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica

    2013-01-01

    TERT-locus single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and leucocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the iCOGs chip, we analysed ~480 TERT-locus SNPs in breast (n=103,991), ovarian (n=39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (11,705) cancer cases and controls. 53,724 participants have leucocyte telomere measures. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. Peak 1 SNP rs2736108 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=5.8×10−7), reduced estrogen receptor negative (ER-negative) (P=1.0×10−8) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P=1.1×10−5) breast cancer risks, and altered promoter-assay signal. Peak 2 SNP rs7705526 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=2.3×10−14), increased low malignant potential ovarian cancer risk (P=1.3×10−15) and increased promoter activity. Peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 minor alleles increase ER-negative (P=1.2×10−12) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P=1.6×10−14) breast and invasive ovarian (P=1.3×10−11) cancer risks, but not via altered telomere length. The cancer-risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690 respectively increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice-variant. PMID:23535731

  20. Design of Experiments with Multiple Independent Variables: A Resource Management Perspective on Complete and Reduced Factorial Designs

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Linda M.; Dziak, John J.; Li, Runze

    2009-01-01

    An investigator who plans to conduct experiments with multiple independent variables must decide whether to use a complete or reduced factorial design. This article advocates a resource management perspective on making this decision, in which the investigator seeks a strategic balance between service to scientific objectives and economy. Considerations in making design decisions include whether research questions are framed as main effects or simple effects; whether and which effects are aliased (confounded) in a particular design; the number of experimental conditions that must be implemented in a particular design and the number of experimental subjects the design requires to maintain the desired level of statistical power; and the costs associated with implementing experimental conditions and obtaining experimental subjects. In this article four design options are compared: complete factorial, individual experiments, single factor, and fractional factorial designs. Complete and fractional factorial designs and single factor designs are generally more economical than conducting individual experiments on each factor. Although relatively unfamiliar to behavioral scientists, fractional factorial designs merit serious consideration because of their economy and versatility. PMID:19719358

  1. Polyadenylation occurs at multiple sites in maize mitochondrial cox2 mRNA and is independent of editing status.

    PubMed Central

    Lupold, D S; Caoile, A G; Stern, D B

    1999-01-01

    Polyadenylation of nucleus-encoded transcripts has a well-defined role in gene expression. The extent and function of polyadenylation in organelles and prokaryotic systems, however, are less well documented. Recent reports of polyadenylation-mediated RNA destabilization in Escherichia coli and in vascular plant chloroplasts prompted us to look for polyadenylation in plant mitochondria. Here, we report the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to map multiple polyadenylate addition sites in maize mitochondrial cox2 transcripts. The lack of sequence conservation surrounding these sites suggests that polyadenylation may occur at many 3' termini created by endoribonucleolytic and/or exoribonucleolytic activities, including those activities involved in 3' end maturation. Endogenous transcripts could be efficiently polyadenylated in vitro by using maize mitochondrial lysates with an activity that added AMP more efficiently than GMP. Polyadenylated substrates were tested for stability in maize mitochondrial S100 extracts, and we found that, compared with nonpolyadenylated RNAs, the polyadenylated substrates were less stable. Taken together with the low abundance of polyadenylated RNAs in maize mitochondria, our results are consistent with a degradation-related process. The fact that polyadenylation does not dramatically destabilize plant mitochondrial transcripts, at least in vitro, is in agreement with results obtained for animal mitochondria but differs from those obtained for chloroplasts and E. coli. Because fully edited, partially edited, and unedited transcripts were found among the cloned polyadenylated cox2 cDNAs, we conclude that RNA editing and polyadenylation are independent processes in maize mitochondria. PMID:10449588

  2. Time-independent description of rapidly driven systems in the presence of friction: multiple scale perturbation approach.

    PubMed

    Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2012-03-01

    The dynamics of a classical system driven by a rapidly oscillating field (with frequency ω) in the presence of friction has been investigated using the multiple scale perturbation theory (MSPT). By exploiting the idea of separation of time scales, the slow motion has been computed in a systematic expansion in the inverse of ω to the order ω(-3). This perturbation series can be viewed as a generalization of the calculation presented by Landau and Lifshitz for Kapitza's pendulum (where the point of suspension is moved periodically) in the presence of friction. The radiation induced dynamics of the system is found to be described by an effective time-independent potential with friction that controls the slow motion. The explicit appearance of friction in our computed effective potential is a manifestation of the dynamical effect due to the fast motion. The present study demonstrates that MSPT can be used to understand and predict the classical dynamics of a driven system in the presence of friction. PMID:22463007

  3. Clinical spectrum of skin manifestations of Lyme borreliosis in 204 children in Austria.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Martin; Resinger, Astrid; Semmelweis, Kristina; Ambros-Rudolph, Christina M; Müllegger, Robert R

    2015-05-01

    The spectrum of skin manifestations of Lyme borreliosis in children is not well characterized. We conducted a retrospective study to analyze the clinical characteristics, seroreactivity to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, and outcome after treatment in 204 children with skin manifestations of Lyme borreliosis seen in 1996-2011. Solitary erythema migrans was the most common manifestation (44.6%), followed by erythema migrans with multiple lesions (27%), borrelial lymphocytoma (21.6%), and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (0.9%). A collision lesion of a primary borrelial lymphocytoma and a surrounding secondary erythema migrans was diagnosed in 5.9% of children. Rate of seroreactivity to B. burgdorferi s.l. was lower in solitary erythema migrans compared to other diagnosis groups. Amoxicillin or phenoxymethylpenicillin led to complete resolution of erythema migrans within a median of 6 (solitary) and 14 days (multiple lesions), respectively, and of borrelia lymphocytoma within a median of 56 days. In conclusion, erythema migrans with multiple lesions and borrelial lymphocytoma appear to be more frequent in children than in adults, whereas acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is a rarity in childhood. The outcome after antibiotic therapy was excellent in children, and appears to be better than in adults. PMID:25366035

  4. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  5. Swimming dynamics of the Lyme disease spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Vig, Dhruv K.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, swims by undulating its cell body in the form of a traveling flat-wave, a process driven by rotating internal flagella. We study B. burgdorferi ’s swimming by treating the cell body and flagella as linearly elastic filaments. The dynamics of the cell are then determined from the balance between elastic and resistive forces and moments. We find that planar, traveling waves only exist when the flagella are effectively anchored at both ends of the bacterium and that these traveling flat-waves rotate as they undulate. The model predicts how the undulation frequency is related to the torque from the flagellar motors and how the stiffness of the cell body and flagella affect the undulations and morphology. PMID:23215618

  6. A nonlocal spatial model for Lyme disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of a nonlocal and time-delayed reaction-diffusion model for Lyme disease with a spatially heterogeneous structure. In the case of a bounded domain, we first prove the existence of the positive steady state and a threshold type result for the disease-free system, and then establish the global dynamics for the model system in terms of the basic reproduction number. In the case of an unbound domain, we obtain the existence of the disease spreading speed and its coincidence with the minimal wave speed. At last, we use numerical simulations to verify our analytic results and investigate the influence of model parameters and spatial heterogeneity on the disease infection risk.

  7. Swimming Dynamics of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vig, Dhruv K.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2012-11-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, swims by undulating its cell body in the form of a traveling flat wave, a process driven by rotating internal flagella. We study B. burgdorferi’s swimming by treating the cell body and flagella as linearly elastic filaments. The dynamics of the cell are then determined from the balance between elastic and resistive forces and moments. We find that planar, traveling waves only exist when the flagella are effectively anchored at both ends of the bacterium and that these traveling flat waves rotate as they undulate. The model predicts how the undulation frequency is related to the torque from the flagellar motors and how the stiffness of the cell body and flagella affect the undulations and morphology.

  8. Trehalose, an mTOR-Independent Inducer of Autophagy, Inhibits Human Cytomegalovirus Infection in Multiple Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Belzile, Jean-Philippe; Sabalza, Maite; Craig, Megan; Clark, Elizabeth; Morello, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the major viral cause of birth defects and a serious problem in immunocompromised individuals and has been associated with atherosclerosis. Previous studies have shown that the induction of autophagy can inhibit the replication of several different types of DNA and RNA viruses. The goal of the work presented here was to determine whether constitutive activation of autophagy would also block replication of HCMV. Most prior studies have used agents that induce autophagy via inhibition of the mTOR pathway. However, since HCMV infection alters the sensitivity of mTOR kinase-containing complexes to inhibitors, we sought an alternative method of inducing autophagy. We chose to use trehalose, a nontoxic naturally occurring disaccharide that is found in plants, insects, microorganisms, and invertebrates but not in mammals and that induces autophagy by an mTOR-independent mechanism. Given the many different cell targets of HCMV, we proceeded to determine whether trehalose would inhibit HCMV infection in human fibroblasts, aortic artery endothelial cells, and neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. We found that in all of these cell types, trehalose induces autophagy and inhibits HCMV gene expression and production of cell-free virus. Treatment of HCMV-infected neural cells with trehalose also inhibited production of cell-associated virus and partially blocked the reduction in neurite growth and cytomegaly. These results suggest that activation of autophagy by the natural sugar trehalose or other safe mTOR-independent agents might provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating HCMV disease. IMPORTANCE HCMV infects multiple cell types in vivo, establishes lifelong persistence in the host, and can cause serious health problems for fetuses and immunocompromised individuals. HCMV, like all other persistent pathogens, has to finely tune its interplay with the host cellular machinery to replicate efficiently and evade

  9. Unorthodox Alternative Therapies Marketed to Treat Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Paul M.; Shapiro, Eugene D.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Baker, Phillip J.; Halperin, John J.; McSweegan, Edward; Wormser, Gary P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Some patients with medically unexplained symptoms or alternative medical diagnoses suspect that they chronically suffer from the tick-borne infection Lyme disease. These patients are commonly targeted by providers of alternative therapies. This study was designed to identify and characterize the range of unorthodox alternative therapies advertised to patients with a diagnosis of Lyme disease. Methods. Internet searches using the Google search engine were performed to identify the websites of clinics and services that marketed nonantimicrobial therapies for Lyme disease. We subsequently used the PubMed search engine to identify any scientific studies evaluating such treatments for Lyme disease. Websites were included in our review so long as they advertised a commercial, nonantimicrobial product or service that specifically mentioned utility for Lyme disease. Websites with patient testimonials (such as discussion groups) were excluded unless the testimonial appeared as marketing on a commercial site. Results. More than 30 alternative treatments were identified, which fell into several broad categories: these included oxygen and reactive oxygen therapy; energy and radiation-based therapies; nutritional therapy; chelation and heavy metal therapy; and biological and pharmacological therapies ranging from certain medications without recognized therapeutic effects on Borrelia burgdorgeri to stem cell transplantation. Review of the medical literature did not substantiate efficacy or, in most cases, any rationale for the advertised treatments. Conclusions. Providers of alternative therapies commonly target patients who believe they have Lyme disease. The efficacy of these unconventional treatments for Lyme disease is not supported by scientific evidence, and in many cases they are potentially harmful. PMID:25852124

  10. Update on persistent symptoms associated with Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Carlos R.; Shapiro, Eugene D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Lyme disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. The pathogenesis, ecology, and epidemiology of Lyme disease have been well described, and antimicrobial treatment is very effective. There has been controversy about whether infection can persist and cause chronic symptoms despite treatment with antimicrobials. This review summarizes recent studies that have addressed this issue. Recent findings The pathogenesis of persistent nonspecific symptoms in patients who were treated for Lyme disease is poorly understood, and the validity of results of attempts to demonstrate persistent infection with B. burgdorferi has not been established. One study attempted to use xenodiagnosis to detect B. burgdorferi in patients who have been treated for Lyme disease. Another study assessed whether repeated episodes of erythema migrans were due to the same or different strains of B. burgdorferi. A possible cause of persistent arthritis in some treated patients is slow clearance of nonviable organisms that may lead to prolonged inflammation. The results of all of these studies continue to provide evidence that viable B. burgdorferi do not persist in patients who receive conventional antimicrobial treatment for Lyme disease. Summary Patients with persistent symptoms possibly associated with Lyme disease often provide a challenge for clinicians. Recent studies have provided additional evidence that viable B. burgdorferi do not persist after conventional treatment with antimicrobials, indicating that ongoing symptoms in patients who received conventional treatment for Lyme disease should not be attributed to persistent active infection. Video abstract http://links.lww.com/MOP/A23 PMID:25490690

  11. Diagnostic value of cytokines and chemokines in lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Cerar, T; Ogrinc, K; Lotric-Furlan, S; Kobal, J; Levicnik-Stezinar, S; Strle, F; Ruzić-Sabljic, E

    2013-10-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the concentrations of different cytokines and chemokines in blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis and to identify the possible marker(s) that would enable a distinction between clinically evident and suspected Lyme neuroborreliosis, as well as between Lyme neuroborreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE). Our additional interest was to evaluate the relationship between cytokine and chemokine concentrations and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato isolation from CSF, as well as intrathecal synthesis of specific borrelial antibodies. We found that higher concentrations of CXCL13 and lower concentrations of interleukin 10 (IL-10) in serum were associated with higher odds for clinically evident Lyme neuroborreliosis compared to suspected Lyme neuroborreliosis, as well as to TBE. The concentrations of IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and CXCL13 in the CSF were higher in patients with evident Lyme neuroborreliosis than in those who were only suspected to have the disease. A comparison of CSF cytokine and chemokine levels in patients with and without intrathecal synthesis of specific borrelial antibodies revealed that CXCL13 CSF concentration is significantly associated with intrathecal synthesis of borrelial antibodies. A comparison of the cytokine and chemokine CSF concentrations in patients with clinically evident Lyme neuroborreliosis according to CSF culture results revealed that higher concentrations of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) were associated with lower odds of Borrelia isolation. Although several differences in the blood serum and CSF concentrations of various cytokines and chemokines between the groups were found, the distinctive power of the majority of these findings is low. Further research on well-defined groups of patients is needed to appraise the potential diagnostic usefulness of these concentrations. PMID:23945160

  12. Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease - Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Adriana R.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States and Europe. Culture for B. burgdorferi is not routinely available. PCR can be helpful in synovial fluid of patients with Lyme arthritis. The majority of laboratory tests performed for the diagnosis of Lyme disease are based on detection of the antibody responses against B. burgdorferi in serum. The sensitivity of antibody-based tests increases with the duration of the infection, and patients who present very early in their illness are more likely to have a negative result. Patients with erythema migrans should receive treatment based on the clinical diagnosis. The current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for serodiagnosis of Lyme disease is a 2-tiered algorithm, an initial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) followed by separate IgM and IgG Western blots if the first EIA test result is positive or borderline. The IgM result is only relevant for patients with illness duration of less than a month. While the 2-tier algorithm works well for later stages of the infection, it has low sensitivity during early infection. A major advance has been the discovery of VlsE and its C6 peptide as markers of antibody response in Lyme disease. Specificity is extremely important in Lyme disease testing, as the majority of tests are being performed in situations with low likelihood of the disease, a situation where a positive result is more likely to be a false positive. Current assays do not distinguish between active and inactive infection, and patients may continue to be seropositive for years. There is a need to simplify the testing algorithm for Lyme disease, improving sensitivity in early disease while still maintaining high specificity and providing information about the stage of infection. The development of a point of care assay and biomarkers for active infection would be major advances for the field. PMID:25999225

  13. Multiple Independent Emergences of Type 2 Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses during a Large Outbreak in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jing; Jorba, Jaume; Bukbuk, David; Adu, Festus; Gumede, Nicksy; Pate, Muhammed Ali; Abanida, Emmanuel Ade; Gasasira, Alex; Iber, Jane; Chen, Qi; Vincent, Annelet; Chenoweth, Paul; Henderson, Elizabeth; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Naeem, Asif; Umami, Rifqiyah Nur; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Baba, Marycelin; Adeniji, Adekunle; Williams, A. J.; Kilpatrick, David R.; Oberste, M. Steven; Wassilak, Steven G.; Tomori, Oyewale; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen

    2013-01-01

    Since 2005, a large poliomyelitis outbreak associated with type 2 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV2) has occurred in northern Nigeria, where immunization coverage with trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV) has been low. Phylogenetic analysis of P1/capsid region sequences of isolates from each of the 403 cases reported in 2005 to 2011 resolved the outbreak into 23 independent type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV2) emergences, at least 7 of which established circulating lineage groups. Virus from one emergence (lineage group 2005-8; 361 isolates) was estimated to have circulated for over 6 years. The population of the major cVDPV2 lineage group expanded rapidly in early 2009, fell sharply after two tOPV rounds in mid-2009, and gradually expanded again through 2011. The two major determinants of attenuation of the Sabin 2 oral poliovirus vaccine strain (A481 in the 5′-untranslated region [5′-UTR] and VP1-Ile143) had been replaced in all VDPV2 isolates; most A481 5′-UTR replacements occurred by recombination with other enteroviruses. cVDPV2 isolates representing different lineage groups had biological properties indistinguishable from those of wild polioviruses, including efficient growth in neuron-derived HEK293 cells, the capacity to cause paralytic disease in both humans and PVR-Tg21 transgenic mice, loss of the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and the capacity for sustained person-to-person transmission. We estimate from the poliomyelitis case count and the paralytic case-to-infection ratio for type 2 wild poliovirus infections that ∼700,000 cVDPV2 infections have occurred during the outbreak. The detection of multiple concurrent cVDPV2 outbreaks in northern Nigeria highlights the risks of cVDPV emergence accompanying tOPV use at low rates of coverage in developing countries. PMID:23408630

  14. Country, Sex, EDSS Change and Therapy Choice Independently Predict Treatment Discontinuation in Multiple Sclerosis and Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G.; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand’Maison, François; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Girard, Marc; Grammond, Pierre; Iuliano, Gerardo; Fiol, Marcela; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Fernandez-Bolanos, Ricardo; Giuliani, Giorgio; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Cristiano, Edgardo; Herbert, Joseph; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Bergamaschi, Roberto; van Pesch, Vincent; Moore, Fraser; Vella, Norbert; Slee, Mark; Santiago, Vetere; Barnett, Michael; Havrdova, Eva; Young, Carolyn; Sirbu, Carmen-Adella; Tanner, Mary; Rutherford, Michelle; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a prospective study, MSBASIS, to assess factors leading to first treatment discontinuation in patients with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods The MSBASIS Study, conducted by MSBase Study Group members, enrols patients seen from CIS onset, reporting baseline demographics, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores. Follow-up visits report relapses, EDSS scores, and the start and end dates of MS-specific therapies. We performed a multivariable survival analysis to determine factors within this dataset that predict first treatment discontinuation. Results A total of 2314 CIS patients from 44 centres were followed for a median of 2.7 years, during which time 1247 commenced immunomodulatory drug (IMD) treatment. Ninety percent initiated IMD after a diagnosis of MS was confirmed, and 10% while still in CIS status. Over 40% of these patients stopped their first IMD during the observation period. Females were more likely to cease medication than males (HR 1.36, p = 0.003). Patients treated in Australia were twice as likely to cease their first IMD than patients treated in Spain (HR 1.98, p = 0.001). Increasing EDSS was associated with higher rate of IMD cessation (HR 1.21 per EDSS unit, p<0.001), and intramuscular interferon-β-1a (HR 1.38, p = 0.028) and subcutaneous interferon-β-1a (HR 1.45, p = 0.012) had higher rates of discontinuation than glatiramer acetate, although this varied widely in different countries. Onset cerebral MRI features, age, time to treatment initiation or relapse on treatment were not associated with IMD cessation. Conclusion In this multivariable survival analysis, female sex, country of residence, EDSS change and IMD choice independently predicted time to first IMD cessation. PMID:22768046

  15. Synergistic and independent actions of multiple terminal nucleotidyl transferases in the 3' tailing of small RNAs in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Shuxin; Dou, Yongchao; Zhang, Chi; Chen, Xuemei; Yu, Bin; Ren, Guodong

    2015-04-01

    All types of small RNAs in plants, piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in animals and a subset of siRNAs in Drosophila and C. elegans are subject to HEN1 mediated 3' terminal 2'-O-methylation. This modification plays a pivotal role in protecting small RNAs from 3' uridylation, trimming and degradation. In Arabidopsis, HESO1 is a major enzyme that uridylates small RNAs to trigger their degradation. However, U-tail is still present in null hen1 heso1 mutants, suggesting the existence of (an) enzymatic activities redundant with HESO1. Here, we report that UTP: RNA uridylyltransferase (URT1) is a functional paralog of HESO1. URT1 interacts with AGO1 and plays a predominant role in miRNA uridylation when HESO1 is absent. Uridylation of miRNA is globally abolished in a hen1 heso1 urt1 triple mutant, accompanied by an extensive increase of 3'-to-5' trimming. In contrast, disruption of URT1 appears not to affect the heterochromatic siRNA uridylation. This indicates the involvement of additional nucleotidyl transferases in the siRNA pathway. Analysis of miRNA tailings in the hen1 heso1 urt1 triple mutant also reveals the existence of previously unknown enzymatic activities that can add non-uridine nucleotides. Importantly, we show HESO1 may also act redundantly with URT1 in miRNA uridylation when HEN1 is fully competent. Taken together, our data not only reveal a synergistic action of HESO1 and URT1 in the 3' uridylation of miRNAs, but also independent activities of multiple terminal nucleotidyl transferases in the 3' tailing of small RNAs and an antagonistic relationship between uridylation and trimming. Our results may provide further insight into the mechanisms of small RNA 3' end modification and stability control. PMID:25928341

  16. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bojesen, Stig E; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Edwards, Stacey L; Pickett, Hilda A; Shen, Howard C; Smart, Chanel E; Hillman, Kristine M; Mai, Phuong L; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D; Lu, Yi; Karevan, Rod; Woods, Nicholas; Johnston, Rebecca L; French, Juliet D; Chen, Xiaoqing; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F; Maranian, Melanie J; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Lush, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Françis; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Risch, Harvey A; González-Neira, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Pita, Guillermo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Alvarez, Nuria; Larson, Melissa C; Fridley, Brooke L; Schoof, Nils; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cicek, Mine S; Peto, Julian; Kalli, Kimberly R; Broeks, Annegien; Armasu, Sebastian M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Braaf, Linde M; Winterhoff, Boris; Nevanlinna, Heli; Konecny, Gottfried E; Lambrechts, Diether; Rogmann, Lisa; Guénel, Pascal; Teoman, Attila; Milne, Roger L; Garcia, Joaquin J; Cox, Angela; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hein, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J; Haiman, Christopher A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Andrulis, Irene L; Moysich, Kirsten B; Hopper, John L; Odunsi, Kunle; Lindblom, Annika; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Simard, Jacques; Lurie, Galina; Fasching, Peter A; Carney, Michael E; Radice, Paolo; Wilkens, Lynne R; Swerdlow, Anthony; Goodman, Marc T; Brauch, Hiltrud; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hillemanns, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Devilee, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Pelttari, Liisa M; Zheng, Wei; Leminen, Arto; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bunker, Clareann H; Kristensen, Vessela; Ness, Roberta B; Muir, Kenneth; Edwards, Robert; Meindl, Alfons; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; du Bois, Andreas; Wu, Anna H; Harter, Philipp; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Hosono, Satoyo; Kang, Daehee; Nakanishi, Toru; Hartman, Mikael; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hamann, Ute; Karlan, Beth Y; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jensen, Allan; Eccles, Diana; Høgdall, Estrid; Shen, Chen-Yang; Brown, Judith; Woo, Yin Ling; Shah, Mitul; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Luben, Robert; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Czene, Kamila; Vierkant, Robert A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Levine, Douglas A; Rudolph, Anja; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Iversen, Edwin; Nickels, Stefan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Cramer, Daniel W; Gibson, Lorna; Terry, Kathryn L; Fletcher, Olivia; Vitonis, Allison F; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Poole, Elizabeth M; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Liu, Jianjun; Bandera, Elisa V; Li, Jingmei; Olson, Sara H; Humphreys, Keith; Orlow, Irene; Blomqvist, Carl; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Salvesen, Helga B; Muranen, Taru A; Wik, Elisabeth; Brouwers, Barbara; Krakstad, Camilla; Wauters, Els; Halle, Mari K; Wildiers, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Mulot, Claire; Aben, Katja K; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Altena, Anne Mvan; Truong, Thérèse; Massuger, Leon F A G; Benitez, Javier; Pejovic, Tanja; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Hoatlin, Maureen; Zamora, M Pilar; Cook, Linda S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Kelemen, Linda E; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Le, Nhu D; Sohn, Christof; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Cybulski, Cezary; Henderson, Brian E; Menkiszak, Janusz; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Le Marchand, Loic; Yang, Hannah P; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Knight, Julia A; Høgdall, Claus K; Apicella, Carmel; Gore, Martin; Tsimiklis, Helen; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Jager, Agnes; den Ouweland, Ans M Wvan; Brown, Robert; Martens, John W M; Flanagan, James M; Kriege, Mieke; Paul, James; Margolin, Sara; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Severi, Gianluca; Whittemore, Alice S; Baglietto, Laura; McGuire, Valerie; Stegmaier, Christa; Sieh, Weiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Labrèche, France; Gao, Yu-Tang; Goldberg, Mark S; Yang, Gong; Dumont, Martine; McLaughlin, John R; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Phelan, Catherine M; Lux, Michael P; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peissel, Bernard; Sellers, Thomas A; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jones, Michael; Ramus, Susan J; Orr, Nick; Menon, Usha; Pearce, Celeste L; Brüning, Thomas; Pike, Malcolm C; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Pylkäs, Katri; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Kauppila, Saila; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Ditsch, Nina; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Stram, Daniel O; van den Berg, David; Yip, Cheng Har; Ikram, M Kamran; Teh, Yew-Ching; Cai, Hui; Lu, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Miao, Hui; Iau, Philip Tsau-Choong; Teo, Yik Ying; McKay, James; Shapiro, Charles; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Fountzilas, George; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Healey, Catherine S; Luccarini, Craig; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Garber, Judy; Narod, Steven A; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tihomirova, Laima; Arun, Banu K; Campbell, Ian; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Collée, J Margriet; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Hooning, Maartje J; Rookus, Matti A; van der Luijt, Rob B; Os, Theo A Mvan; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Fineberg, Elena; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M John; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ellis, Steve D; Cole, Trevor; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Damiola, Francesca; Faivre, Laurence; Frenay, Marc; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Gronwald, Jacek; Byrski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Rhiem, Kerstin; Niederacher, Dieter; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Borg, Ake; Melin, Beatrice; Rantala, Johanna; Soller, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Salani, Ritu; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Foretova, Lenka; Savage, Sharon A; Lester, Jenny; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Olswold, Curtis; Cunningham, Julie M; Slager, Susan; Pankratz, Vernon S; Dicks, Ed; Lakhani, Sunil R; Couch, Fergus J; Hall, Per; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Reddel, Roger R; Goode, Ellen L; Greene, Mark H; Easton, Douglas F; Berchuck, Andrew; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M

    2013-04-01

    TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOGs, we analyzed ∼480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and controls. Leukocyte telomere measurements were also available for 53,724 participants. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. The minor allele at the peak 1 SNP rs2736108 associates with longer telomeres (P = 5.8 × 10(-7)), lower risks for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (P = 1.0 × 10(-8)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.1 × 10(-5)) breast cancers and altered promoter assay signal. The minor allele at the peak 2 SNP rs7705526 associates with longer telomeres (P = 2.3 × 10(-14)), higher risk of low-malignant-potential ovarian cancer (P = 1.3 × 10(-15)) and greater promoter activity. The minor alleles at the peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 increase ER-negative (P = 1.2 × 10(-12)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.6 × 10(-14)) breast and invasive ovarian (P = 1.3 × 10(-11)) cancer risks but not via altered telomere length. The cancer risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690, respectively, increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice variant. PMID:23535731

  17. Clinical determinants of Lyme borreliosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, anaplasmosis, and ehrlichiosis in an Australian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Background Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis. This spirochete, along with Babesia, Bartonella, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and the Rickettsia spp. are recognized tick-borne pathogens. In this study, the clinical manifestation of these zoonoses in Australia is described. Methods The clinical presentation of 500 patients over the course of 5 years was examined. Evidence of multisystem disease and cranial nerve neuropathy was sought. Supportive laboratory evidence of infection was examined. Results Patients from every state of Australia presented with a wide range of symptoms of disease covering multiple systems and a large range of time intervals from onset. Among these patients, 296 (59%) were considered to have a clinical diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis and 273 (54% of the 500) tested positive for the disease, the latter not being a subset of the former. In total, 450 (90%) had either clinical evidence for or laboratory proof of borrelial infection, and the great majority of cases featured neurological symptoms involving the cranial nerves, thus mimicking features of the disease found in Europe and Asia, as distinct from North America (where extracutaneous disease is principally an oligoarticular arthritis). Only 83 patients (17%; number [n]=492) reported never leaving Australia. Of the 500 patients, 317 (63%) had clinical or laboratory-supported evidence of coinfection with Babesia or Bartonella spp. Infection with A. phagocytophilum was detected in three individuals, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis was detected in one individual who had never traveled outside Australia. In the cohort, 30 (11%; n=279) had positive rickettsial serology. Conclusion The study suggests that there is a considerable presence of borreliosis in Australia, and a highly significant burden of coinfections accompanying borreliosis transmission. The concept sometimes advanced of a “Lyme-like illness” on the continent needs to be re-examined as the clinical interplay between

  18. The Psychoimmunology of Lyme/Tick-Borne Diseases and its Association with Neuropsychiatric Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Bransfield, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Disease progression of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Lyme/tick-borne diseases can be better understood by greater attention to psychoimmunology. Although there are multiple contributors that provoke and weaken the immune system, infections and persistent infections are significant causes of pathological immune reactions. Immune mediated ef-fects are a significant contributor to the pathophysiological processes and disease progression. These immune effects in-clude persistent inflammation with cytokine effects and molecular mimicry and both of these mechanisms may be present at the same time in persistent infections. Sickness syndrome associated with interferon treatment and autoimmune limbic encephalopathies are models to understand inflammatory and molecular mimicry effects upon neuropsychiatric symp-toms. Progressive inflammatory reactions have been proposed as a model to explain disease progression in depression, psychosis, dementia, epilepsy, autism and other mental illnesses and pathophysiological changes have been associated with oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, changes in homocysteine metabolism and altered tryptophan catabolism. Lyme dis-ease has been associated with the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-18 and interferon-gamma, the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL13 and increased levels proinflammatory lipoproteins. Borrelia burgdorferi surface gly-colipids and flagella antibodies appear to elicit anti-neuronal antibodies and anti-neuronal antibodies and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins can disseminate from the periphery to inflame the brain. Autism spectrum disorders associated with Lyme/tick-borne diseases may be mediated by a combination of inflammatory and molecular mimicry mechanisms. Greater interaction is needed between infectious disease specialists, immunologists and psychiatrists to benefit from this awareness and to further understand these mechanisms. PMID:23091569

  19. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%-15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. PMID:26028977

  20. Childhood neurologic disorders and Lyme disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gerber, M A; Zalneraitis, E L

    1994-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of clinically significant nervous system disease attributable to transplacental transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, we surveyed neurologists in areas of the United States in which Lyme disease is endemic (i.e., Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Wisconsin, and Minnesota). Overall, 162 of the 176 (92%) pediatric neurologists contacted responded to the survey with a range of 90-100% in the different geographic areas. One pediatric neurologist was following 3 children who were labeled as having "congenital Lyme disease," but none of the 3 met our case definition. None of the other pediatric neurologists surveyed had ever seen a child whose mother had been diagnosed as having Lyme disease during pregnancy. Similarly, none of the 37 adult neurologists in Connecticut surveyed had ever seen a child whose mother had been diagnosed as having had Lyme disease during pregnancy. We conclude that congenital neuroborreliosis is either not occurring or is occurring at an extremely low rate in areas endemic for Lyme disease. PMID:7986291

  1. Successful vaccination for Lyme disease: a novel mechanism?

    PubMed

    Exner, M

    2001-09-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the aetiologic agent of Lyme disease, which is a multi-system disorder resulting from the transmission of organisms from an infected tick. According to the US Centers for Disease Control, the incidence of Lyme disease in the US has increased 25-fold since national surveillance began and the geographical spread of Lyme disease causing spirochetes would indicate that the annual number of cases will continue to rise. Humoral immunity has been shown to play a role in protection and this has spurred efforts towards developing a Lyme disease vaccine. A number of protective immunogens have been characterised to date, but due to the heterogeneity of Lyme disease Borreliae, no single molecule has proven to be completely effective as a vaccinogen. This review will describe the immunogens that have been used to protect against B. burgdorferi infection, with a focus on the inherent challenges involved with providing successful immunity to B. burgdorferi. In addition, the promising aspects and the limitations of each protective immunogen will be discussed. PMID:11728214

  2. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%–15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. PMID:26028977

  3. Will Culling White-Tailed Deer Prevent Lyme Disease?

    PubMed

    Kugeler, K J; Jordan, R A; Schulze, T L; Griffith, K S; Mead, P S

    2016-08-01

    White-tailed deer play an important role in the ecology of Lyme disease. In the United States, where the incidence and geographic range of Lyme disease continue to increase, reduction of white-tailed deer populations has been proposed as a means of preventing human illness. The effectiveness of this politically sensitive prevention method is poorly understood. We summarize and evaluate available evidence regarding the effect of deer reduction on vector tick abundance and human disease incidence. Elimination of deer from islands and other isolated settings can have a substantial impact on the reproduction of blacklegged ticks, while reduction short of complete elimination has yielded mixed results. To date, most studies have been conducted in ecologic situations that are not representative to the vast majority of areas with high human Lyme disease risk. Robust evidence linking deer control to reduced human Lyme disease risk is lacking. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to recommend deer population reduction as a Lyme disease prevention measure, except in specific ecologic circumstances. PMID:26684932

  4. Precipitation and the occurrence of lyme disease in the Northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Bunnell, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of Lyme disease is a growing concern in the United States, and various studies have been performed to understand the factors related to Lyme disease occurrence. In the United States, Lyme disease has occurred most frequently in the northeastern United States. Positive correlations between the number of cases of Lyme disease reported in the northeastern United States during the 1992-2002 period indicate that late spring/early summer precipitation was a significant climate factor affecting the occurrence of Lyme disease. When late spring/early summer precipitation was greater than average, the occurrence of Lyme disease was above average, possibly due to increased tick activity and survival rate during wet conditions. Temperature did not seem to explain the variability in Lyme disease reports for the northeastern United States. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  5. Methods for control of tick vectors of Lyme Borreliosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaenson, T.G.T.; Fish, D.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Gray, J.S.; Mather, T.N.; Piesman, J.

    1991-01-01

    During the IVth International Conference on Lyme Borreliosis in Stockholm, 1990, a workshop on control of Lyme disease vectors briefly reviewed: basic ecological principles for tick control; biocontrol of ticks; chemical control, including the use of repellents and use of permethrin-treated rodent nest material; tick control by habitat modification; and reduction of tick host availability. It was concluded that, although much research work remains, Lyme borreliosis is to a large extent a preventable infection. Avoidance of heavily tick-infested areas, personal protection using proper clothing, and prompt removal of attached ticks remain the most effective protective measures. Many other prophylactic measures are available and could be efficiently integrated into schemes to reduce the abundance of vectors. However, since the ecology of the infection varies greatly between different localities it may be necessary to apply different combinations of control methods in different endemic regions.

  6. [Lyme disease acrodermitis chronica atrophicans: misleading vascular signs].

    PubMed

    Blaise, S; Fiandrino, G; Satger, B; Carpentier, P-H

    2014-05-01

    Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is a tertiary form of Lyme borrelliosis. It occurs at least six months, but also up to several years, after a tick bite. This rare condition is probably underestimated because of the difficult diagnosis. Clinical presentations of acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans are quite variable depending upon the duration of the disease. Complimentary explorations are difficult to interpret and rarely specific. Only rare configurations allow formal diagnosis of Borrelia burgdoferi infection. We present a patient who exhibited an atypical clinical presentation of Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans. The clinical outcome was quite favorable with treatment, confirming the diagnosis. Such treatments, which are well tolerated and highly effective, are essential since an untreated disease can lead to potentially severe neurological involvement. PMID:24698204

  7. Antiscience and ethical concerns associated with advocacy of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Bakken, Johan S; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Dumler, J Stephen; Halperin, John J; McSweegan, Edward; Nadelman, Robert B; O’Connell, Susan; Shapiro, Eugene D; Sood, Sunil K; Steere, Allen C; Weinstein, Arthur; Wormser, Gary P

    2015-01-01

    Advocacy for Lyme disease has become an increasingly important part of an antiscience movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines and that supports unproven (sometimes dangerous) alternative medical treatments. Some activists portray Lyme disease, a geographically limited tick-borne infection, as a disease that is insidious, ubiquitous, difficult to diagnose, and almost incurable; they also propose that the disease causes mainly non-specific symptoms that can be treated only with long-term antibiotics and other unorthodox and unvalidated treatments. Similar to other antiscience groups, these advocates have created a pseudoscientific and alternative selection of practitioners, research, and publications and have coordinated public protests, accused opponents of both corruption and conspiracy, and spurred legislative efforts to subvert evidence-based medicine and peer-reviewed science. The relations and actions of some activists, medical practitioners, and commercial bodies involved in Lyme disease advocacy pose a threat to public health. PMID:21867956

  8. Novel Microbial Virulence Factor Triggers Murine Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiuli; Qin, Jinhong; Promnares, Kamoltip; Kariu, Toru; Anderson, John F.; Pal, Utpal

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi bba57 is a conserved gene encoding a potential lipoprotein of unknown function. Here we show that bba57 is up-regulated in vivo and is required for early murine infection and potential spirochete transmission process. Although BBA57 is dispensable for late murine infection, the mutants were unable to induce disease. We show that BBA57, an outer membrane and surface-exposed antigen, is a major trigger of murine Lyme arthritis; even in cases of larger challenge inocula, which allow their persistence in joints at a level similar to wild-type spirochetes, bba57 mutants are unable to induce joint inflammation. We further showed that BBA57 deficiency reduces the expression of selected “neutrophil-recruiting” chemokines and associated receptors, causing significant impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis. New approaches to combat Lyme disease may include strategies to interfere with BBA57, a novel virulence factor and a trigger of murine Lyme arthritis. PMID:23303811

  9. Spatial and Temporal Emergence Pattern of Lyme Disease in Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Kolivras, Korine N.; Hong, Yili; Duan, Yuanyuan; Seukep, Sara E.; Prisley, Stephen P.; Campbell, James B.; Gaines, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of infectious diseases over the past several decades has highlighted the need to better understand epidemics and prepare for the spread of diseases into new areas. As these diseases expand their geographic range, cases are recorded at different geographic locations over time, making the analysis and prediction of this expansion complicated. In this study, we analyze spatial patterns of the disease using a statistical smoothing analysis based on areal (census tract level) count data of Lyme disease cases in Virginia from 1998 to 2011. We also use space and space–time scan statistics to reveal the presence of clusters in the spatial and spatiotemporal distribution of Lyme disease. Our results confirm and quantify the continued emergence of Lyme disease to the south and west in states along the eastern coast of the United States. The results also highlight areas where education and surveillance needs are highest. PMID:25331806

  10. Detecting Lyme disease using antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Jennifer; Lerner, Mitchell; Goldsmith, Brett; Brisson, Dustin; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-03-01

    We combine antibodies for Lyme flagellar protein with carbon nanotube transistors to create an electronic sensor capable of definitive detection of Lyme disease. Over 35,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported in the United States each year, of which more than 23 percent are originally misdiagnosed. Rational design of the coupling of the biological system to the electronic system gives us a flexible sensor platform which we can apply to several biological systems. By coupling these antibodies to carbon nanotubes in particular, we allow for fast, sensitive, highly selective, electronic detection. Unlike antibody or biomarker detection, bacterial protein detection leads to positive identification of both early and late stage bacterial infections, and is easily expandable to environmental monitoring.

  11. 'Lyme disease': ancient engine of an unrecognized borreliosis pandemic?

    PubMed

    Harvey, W T; Salvato, P

    2003-05-01

    Unexpectedly we have found large numbers of chronically ill Borrelia burgdorferi PCR- and seropositive patients in Houston, Texas, a zoonotically 'non-endemic' area. In order to understand this finding prior to sufficient data availability, we chose to examine critically currently accepted but troublesome 'Lyme disease' concepts. Our method was to analyze each foundation 'Lyme disease' premise within the context of available medical and veterinary literature, then to reconstruct the disease model consistent with the preponderance of that data. We find the present conceptualization of the illness seriously truncated, with a high likelihood of two distinct but connected forms of human B. burgdorferi infection. The yet-unrecognized form appears to have a broader clinical presentation, wider geographic distribution, and vastly greater prevalence. We conclude that 'Lyme disease' currently acknowledges only its zoonosis arm and is a limited conceptualization of a far more pervasive and unrecognized infection state that must be considered a global epidemic. PMID:12710914

  12. Vaccination against Lyme disease: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Embers, Monica E.; Narasimhan, Sukanya

    2013-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato bacteria transmitted to humans and domestic animals by the bite of an Ixodes spp. tick (deer tick). Despite improvements in diagnostic tests and public awareness of Lyme disease, the reported cases have increased over the past decade to approximately 30,000 per year. Limitations and failed public acceptance of a human vaccine, comprised of the outer surface A (OspA) lipoprotein of B. burgdorferi, led to its demise, yet current research has opened doors to new strategies for protection against Lyme disease. In this review we discuss the enzootic cycle of B. burgdorferi, and the unique opportunities it poses to block infection or transmission at different levels. We present the correlates of protection for this infectious disease, the pros and cons of past vaccination strategies, and new paradigms for future vaccine design that would include elements of both the vector and the pathogen. PMID:23407755

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  14. Nervous system Lyme disease, chronic Lyme disease, and none of the above.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2016-03-01

    Lyme borreliosis, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, causes nervous system involvement in 10-15 % of identified infected individuals. Not unlike the other well-known spirochetosis, syphilis, infection can be protracted, but is microbiologically curable in virtually all patients, regardless of disease duration. Diagnosis relies on 2-tier serologic testing, which after the first 4-6 weeks of infection is both highly sensitive and specific. After this early, acute phase, serologic testing should rely only on IgG reactivity. Nervous system involvement most commonly presents with meningitis, cranial neuritis and radiculoneuritis, but can also present with a broader array of peripheral nervous system manifestations. Central nervous system infection typically elicits a cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and, often, intrathecal production of specific antibody, findings that should not be expected in disease not affecting the CNS. Treatment with recommended courses of oral or, when necessary, parenteral antibiotics is highly effective. The attribution of chronic, non-specific symptoms to "chronic Lyme disease", in the absence of specific evidence of ongoing B. burgdorferi infection, is inappropriate and unfortunate, leading not only to unneeded treatment and its associated complications, but also to missed opportunities for more appropriate management of patients' often disabling symptoms. PMID:26377699

  15. A Chromosomally Encoded Virulence Factor Protects the Lyme Disease Pathogen against Host-Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiuli; Coleman, Adam S.; Anguita, Juan; Pal, Utpal

    2009-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterial pathogen of Lyme borreliosis, differentially expresses select genes in vivo, likely contributing to microbial persistence and disease. Expression analysis of spirochete genes encoding potential membrane proteins showed that surface-located membrane protein 1 (lmp1) transcripts were expressed at high levels in the infected murine heart, especially during early stages of infection. Mice and humans with diagnosed Lyme borreliosis also developed antibodies against Lmp1. Deletion of lmp1 severely impaired the pathogen's ability to persist in diverse murine tissues including the heart, and to induce disease, which was restored upon chromosomal complementation of the mutant with the lmp1 gene. Lmp1 performs an immune-related rather than a metabolic function, as its deletion did not affect microbial persistence in immunodeficient mice, but significantly decreased spirochete resistance to the borreliacidal effects of anti-B. burgdorferi sera in a complement-independent manner. These data demonstrate the existence of a virulence factor that helps the pathogen evade host-acquired immune defense and establish persistent infection in mammals. PMID:19266024

  16. Lyme carditis in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Matthew F; Thorn, Coben

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 68-year-old man with a history of liver transplant and of chronic immunosuppression therapy who presented to the emergency department (ED) for fevers and worsening fatigue for two days. On further investigation, the patient was found to have a new first-degree heart block on his electrocardiograph. Coupled with the history of a recent tick bite, the patient was diagnosed with vector-borne carditis. Although the patient's titers for various vectors remained negative, due to a long history of immunosuppression, he was treated for Lyme disease and his heart block completely resolved with antibiotic treatment. We describe details of the case as well as discuss the impacts of immunosuppression on vector-borne disease. Immunosuppressed patients represent a special population and can present with chief complaints made even more complicated by their medical history, and this case illustrates the importance of being mindful of how immunosuppression can affect a patient's presentation. As the efficacy of antirejection medications improved, the ED may see an increasing number of patients with solid organ transplants. A greater understanding of this special patient population is key to formulating optimal treatment plans. PMID:24083037

  17. [Lyme disease: prophylaxis after tick bite].

    PubMed

    Patey, O

    2007-01-01

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted by infected ticks. The transmission depends on several factors, especially on the duration of the tick's presence in the host body (the nymph which is smaller than the adults and thus less visible, is in this case the most frequently involved) and on whether the tick is infected or not. The interpretation of results in the few available studies is made difficult by the lack of information obtained (due to difficulty to collect information and examination costs). The comparison is made even more difficult by the difference between Borrelia ticks species in various regions. Today, the best methods are preventive: protective clothing, tick repellents, checking and removal of ticks after a journey in an endemic zone, and in case of tick bite, regular examination of the bite site during the following weeks in order to initiate an early curative treatment if ECM is diagnosed. The currently available data seems to be insufficient to suggest systematic antimicrobial prophylaxis in case of tick bite. PMID:17399928

  18. Lyme disease associated neuroretinitis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Vanya, Melinda; Fejes, Imre; Jako, Maria; Tula, Areta; Terhes, Gabriella; Janaky, Marta; Bartfai, Gyorgy

    2015-12-01

    We describe a rare case of Lyme disease complicated by unilateral neuroretinitis in the right eye. We report a case of a 27-year-old woman with blurred vision on her right eye. Because of the suspicion of optic neuritis (multiplex sclerosis) neurological examination was ordered. Surprisingly, computer tomography of the brain revealed incomplete empty sella, which generally results not monocular, but bilateral optic nerve swelling. Opthalmological examination (ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography) indicated not only monocular optic nerve, but retinal oedema next to the temporal part of the right optic disk. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) demonstrated no P100 latency delay and mild differences between the amplitudes of the responses of the left and right eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated the swelling of the optic nerve head and oedematous retina at the temporal part of the disk. Suspicion of an inflammatory cause of visual disturbance blood tests was ordered. Doxycycline treatment was ordered till the result of the blood test arrived. The Western blot and ELISA test were positive for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Following one week corticosteroide and ceftriaxone treatments, the patient displayed a clinical improvement. Unilateral neuroretinitis with optic disk swelling due to neuroborreliosis is a rare complication and in many cases it is difficult to distinguish between inflammatory and ischemic lesions. Further difficulty in the diagnosis can occur when intracranial alterations such as empty sella is demonstrated by CT examination. PMID:26689876

  19. Issues in the diagnosis and treatment of lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Donta, Sam T

    2012-01-01

    Since the identification of the causative organism more than 30 years ago, there remain questions about the di-agnosis and treatment of Lyme Disease. In this article, what is known about the disease will be reviewed, and approaches to the successful diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease described. In considering the diagnosis of Lyme disease, a major problem is the inability of documenting the existence and location of the bacteria. After the initial transfer of the bacteria from the Ixodes tick into the person, the spirochetes spread locally, but after an initial bacteremic phase, the organisms can no longer be reliably found in body fluids. The bacteria are proba-bly present in subcutaneous sites and intracellular loci. Currently, the use of circulating antibodies directed against spe-cific antigens of the Lyme borrelia are the standard means to diagnose the disease, but specific antibodies are not an ade-quate means to assess the presence or absence of the organism. What is needed is a more Lyme-specific antigen as a more definitive adjunct to the clinical diagnosis. As for the treatment of Lyme disease, the earliest phase is generally easily treated. But it is the more chronic form of the disease that is plagued with lack of information, frequently leading to erroneous recommendations about the type and du-ration of treatments. Hence, often cited recommendations about the duration of treatment, eg four weeks is adequate treatment, have no factual basis to support that recommendation, often leading to the conclusion that there is another, per-haps psychosomatic reason, for the continuing symptoms. B. burgdorferi is sensitive to various antibiotics, including pe-nicillins, tetracyclines, and macrolides, but there are a number of mitigating factors that affect the clinical efficacy of these antibiotics, and these factors are addressed. The successful treatment of Lyme disease appears to be dependent on the use of specific antibiotics over a sufficient period of

  20. [Bilateral peripheral facial paralysis secondary to Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Zapater Latorre, E; Castillo Ruiz, A; Alba García, J R; Armengot Carceller, M; Sancho Rieger, J; Basterra Alegría, J

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral facial paralisis (SBFP) occurs in 0.3-2% of all facial paralisis. We report a case of SBFP in association with Lyme disease. A review of literature about SBFP is made, studing specially the one caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. We present a diagnostic guideline of SBFP. Suspect diagnosis of Lyme disease is based on clinical and epidemiological criteria. Culture isolation of this bacteria is difficult, therefore serologic testing is required. Neuroborreliosis treatment is intravenous Ceftriaxone or Cefotaxime. Oral Doxycycline is useful in the treatment of neuritis without central nervous system involvement. PMID:15566265

  1. Issues in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Donta, Sam T

    2012-01-01

    Since the identification of the causative organism more than 30 years ago, there remain questions about the di-agnosis and treatment of Lyme Disease. In this article, what is known about the disease will be reviewed, and approaches to the successful diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease described. In considering the diagnosis of Lyme disease, a major problem is the inability of documenting the existence and location of the bacteria. After the initial transfer of the bacteria from the Ixodes tick into the person, the spirochetes spread locally, but after an initial bacteremic phase, the organisms can no longer be reliably found in body fluids. The bacteria are proba-bly present in subcutaneous sites and intracellular loci. Currently, the use of circulating antibodies directed against spe-cific antigens of the Lyme borrelia are the standard means to diagnose the disease, but specific antibodies are not an ade-quate means to assess the presence or absence of the organism. What is needed is a more Lyme-specific antigen as a more definitive adjunct to the clinical diagnosis. As for the treatment of Lyme disease, the earliest phase is generally easily treated. But it is the more chronic form of the disease that is plagued with lack of information, frequently leading to erroneous recommendations about the type and du-ration of treatments. Hence, often cited recommendations about the duration of treatment, eg four weeks is adequate treatment, have no factual basis to support that recommendation, often leading to the conclusion that there is another, per-haps psychosomatic reason, for the continuing symptoms. B. burgdorferi is sensitive to various antibiotics, including pe-nicillins, tetracyclines, and macrolides, but there are a number of mitigating factors that affect the clinical efficacy of these antibiotics, and these factors are addressed. The successful treatment of Lyme disease appears to be dependent on the use of specific antibiotics over a sufficient period of

  2. Differentiation of orofacial pain related to Lyme disease from other dental and facial pain disorders.

    PubMed

    Heir, G M

    1997-04-01

    The diagnostic process for the orofacial pain patient is often perplexing. Compounding the process of solving a diagnostic mystery is the multiplicity of etiologic factors. The propensity for Lyme disease to present with symptoms mimicking dental and temporomandibular disorders makes the task even more complex. It is hoped that the reader is cognizant of the fact that a pathologic process of dental structures--the teeth and their attachments to the mandible and maxilla, the temporomandibular joints, masticatory musculature, and vascular supply and sensory innervation of the oromandibular anatomy--may also be the source of facial pain. Although unique, similar complaints may also be manifestations of other causes, including pain associated with Lyme disease. The informed and fastidious clinician does not overlook these possibilities when evaluating the headache and facial pain patient. The clinician should be equipped with the knowledge and minimal armamentarium to evaluate the patient appropriately. To paraphrase from Sherlock Holmes, we must first eliminate the impossible, whatever is left is the truth, no matter how unlikely. A differential diagnosis must be achieved based on clinical experience, unbiased observations, and probability. PMID:9142482

  3. Genetic structure reveals a history of multiple independent origins followed by admixture in the allopolyploid weed Salsola ryanii.

    PubMed

    Welles, Shana R; Ellstrand, Norman C

    2016-08-01

    It has recently become clear that many invasive species have evolved in situ via hybridization or polyploidy from progenitors which themselves are introduced species. For species formed by hybridization or polyploidy, genetic diversity within the newly formed species is influenced by the number of independent evolutionary origins of the species. For recently formed species, an analysis of genetic structure can provide insight into the number of independent origin events involved in the formation of the species. For a putative invasive allopolyploid species, the number of origins involved in the species formation, the genetic diversity present within these origins, and the level of gene flow between independent origins determines the genetic composition of the neospecies. Here we analyze the genetic structure of the newly formed allopolyploid species, Salsola ryanii, a tumbleweed which evolved within the last 20-100 years in California. We utilize the genetic structure analysis to determine that this new species is the result of at least three independent allopolyplodization events followed by gene flow between the descendants of independent origins. PMID:27468305

  4. Fetal outcome in murine Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Silver, R M; Yang, L; Daynes, R A; Branch, D W; Salafia, C M; Weis, J J

    1995-01-01

    Lyme disease is an inflammatory syndrome caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Although this syndrome has important implications for human pregnancy, little is known about gestational infection with B. burgdorferi. Fetal death occurred in 33 of 280 gestational sacs (12%) in 39 C3H/HeN female mice infected by intradermal injection of B. burgdorferi 4 days after mating (acute infection), compared with 0 of 191 sacs in 25 control mice (P = 0.0001). Forty-six percent of acutely infected mice suffered at least one fetal death, compared with none of the control animals (P = 0.0002). There were no fetal deaths in 18 C3H/HeN mice infected 3 weeks prior to mating (chronic infection). A sensitive PCR technique detected B. burgdorferi DNA in the uteri of acutely infected mice but did not detect DNA in the uteri of controls or chronically infected mice. Spirochete DNA was only rarely detected in fetal tissues, and its presence was not required for fetal death. The inclusion of an internal competitive PCR target indicated that the lack of B. burgdorferi sequences in fetal DNA was not due to the presence of a PCR inhibitor. Histologic analysis of gestational tissues from infected animals demonstrated nonspecific pathology consistent with fetal death. These findings indicate an association between murine fetal death and acute infection with B. burgdorferi early in gestation but not with chronic infection. Our data suggest that fetal death is due to a maternal response to infection rather than fetal infection. These findings could provide an explanation for observations in humans in which sporadic cases of fetal death in women infected with B. burgdorferi during pregnancy have been reported, while previous infection has not been associated with fetal death. PMID:7806385

  5. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction Caused by Chronic Lyme Neuroborreliosis. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schefte, David F; Nordentoft, Tyge

    2015-07-30

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction is often classified as idiopathic. The condition is associated with poor quality of life and high morbidity, and treatment options are often unsatisfactory. A case of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction in a 66-year-old woman, presenting with back and abdominal pain, urinary retention and severe constipation is described. The patient lived in an area in which Lyme disease is endemic and had been bitten by ixodes ticks. Intrathecal synthesis of anti-borrelia IgM and IgG and lymphocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid was found, consistent with chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis since symptoms had lasted for more than six months. The patient's gastrointestinal function recovered and the pain subsided significantly following treatment with antibiotics. Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) often results in palsy, but rarely affects the autonomic nervous system. Three patients have been described with intestinal pseudoobstruction due to acute LNB. However, this is the first described case of intestinal pseudoobstruction due to chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. LNB must be suspected in patients with intestinal pseudoobstruction, in particular in patients who have been bitten by an ixodes tick and in patients living in an endemic area. PMID:26130639

  6. Perspective on the development of vaccines against Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Edelman, R

    1991-08-01

    Lyme disease, the multisystem illness caused by the tick-borne spirochaete, Borrelia burgdorferi, has emerged as a threat to public health worldwide. It is a particularly vexing problem in the United States where it is growing in range and intensity. In fact, in some hyperendemic regions of New York and New England, Lyme disease is now such a threat that it interferes with all sorts of outdoor activities, and has even led to depreciation of real estate values. Family dogs in these areas seem to have been particularly hard hit by a near epidemic of lameness caused by Lyme arthritis. Persons at high risk for infection, such as outdoor workers, campers and hikers, suburbanites with lawns to cut, and pregnant women exposed to potentially infected Ixodes ticks, are clamouring for some means of protection beyond simple behaviour modification and tick avoidance which are known not always to work. Hence, the interest in human and veterinary vaccines against Lyme disease is growing. PMID:1771965

  7. Management of tick bites and lyme disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graeme N; Gemmill, Ian; Moore, Kieran M

    2012-11-01

    Lyme disease results from the bite of a black-legged tick, populations of which have now become established in parts of Nova Scotia, southeastern Quebec, southern Ontario from the Thousand Islands through the geographic regions on the north shore of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie, southeastern Manitoba, and British Columbia's Lower Mainland, Fraser Valley, and Vancouver Island. It takes more than 24 hours of attachment to transfer the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi to the bitten animal or human. The diagnosis of Lyme disease is primarily clinical, with early Lyme disease characterized by a skin lesion (erythema migrans, a bull's-eye rash), which expands out from the site of the tick bite, and is often accompanied by influenza-like symptoms, arthralgia, myalgia, and fever. These signs and symptoms can present anywhere from three to 30 days after the tick bite. The management of pregnant women with a tick bite or suspected Lyme disease should be similar to that of non-pregnant adults, except that doxycyline, the first line antibiotic of choice, should not be used in pregnant women because of risk of permanent tooth discolouration and possible impact on bone formation in the fetus. An algorithm for the management of tick bites in pregnancy is presented. Clinical, serological, and epidemiological studies have all failed to demonstrate a causal association between infection with B. burgdorferi and any adverse pregnancy outcomes regardless of whether maternal exposure occurs before conception or during pregnancy itself. PMID:23231847

  8. Lyme borreliosis as a cause of facial palsy during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Grandsaerd, M J; Meulenbroeks, A A

    2000-07-01

    The medical history of a pregnant woman in whom the initial pattern of complaints suggested hyperemesis gravidarum is described. After about 18 days the patient developed left facial palsy. Repeated tests eventually confirmed the diagnosis of neuroborreliosis. The problems concerning diagnostics, therapy and the possible complications of Lyme borreliosis during gestation are described. PMID:10817889

  9. Clinical pathologic correlations of Lyme disease by stage.

    PubMed

    Duray, P H; Steere, A C

    1988-01-01

    Lyme disease is capable of producing a wide variety of clinical pathologic conditions and lesions having in common histologic features of collagen-vascular disease. The plasma cell is an omnipotent inflammatory responder in most tissues involved by Lyme disease, ranging from relatively acute to lesions that have gone on for years. Vascular thickening also seems to be prominent, and in the dermis is accompanied by scleroderma-like collagen expansion. The disease in some ways resembles the responses seen in lupus erythematosus such as mild cerebritis with lymphocytes and plasma cells in the leptomeninges. Lymphoplasmacytic panniculitis of Lyme disease resembles lupus profundus, both in the infiltrate and the plasma cell-blood vessel relationship. The onion skin thickened vessels of the synovia resemble the vessels of lupus spleens, while the scleradermoid thickening of the dermis and various skin lesions of stage III Lyme disease suggest a collagen-vascular disorder. Finally, the perivascular lymphoid infiltrate in clinical myositis does not differ from that seen in polymyositis or dermatomyositis. All of these histologic derangements suggest immunologic damage in response to persistence of the spirochete, however few in number. PMID:2847622

  10. Spirochete antigens persist near cartilage after murine Lyme borreliosis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bockenstedt, Linda K.; Gonzalez, David G.; Haberman, Ann M.; Belperron, Alexia A.

    2012-01-01

    An enigmatic feature of Lyme disease is the slow resolution of musculoskeletal symptoms that can continue after treatment, with some patients developing an inflammatory arthritis that becomes refractory to antibiotic therapy. Using intravital microscopy and the mouse model of Lyme borreliosis, we observed that Borrelia burgdorferi antigens, but not infectious spirochetes, can remain adjacent to cartilage for extended periods after antibiotic treatment. B. burgdorferi was not recovered by culture or xenodiagnosis with ticks after antibiotic treatment of WT mice and all but one of the immunodeficient mice with heightened pathogen burden due to impaired TLR responsiveness. Amorphous GFP+ deposits were visualized by intravital microscopy in the entheses of antibiotic-treated mice infected with GFP-expressing spirochetes and on the ear cartilage surface in sites where immunofluorescence staining detected spirochete antigens. Naive mice were not infected by tissue transplants from antibiotic-treated mice even though transplants contained spirochete DNA. Tissue homogenates from antibiotic-treated mice induced IgG reactive with B. burgdorferi antigens after immunization of naive mice and stimulated TNF-α production from macrophages in vitro. This is the first direct demonstration that inflammatory B. burgdorferi components can persist near cartilaginous tissue after treatment for Lyme disease. We propose that these deposits could contribute to the development of antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. PMID:22728937

  11. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christina A; Starr, J Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Mead, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000-2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months. PMID:26889721

  12. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction Caused by Chronic Lyme Neuroborreliosis. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Schefte, David F; Nordentoft, Tyge

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction is often classified as idiopathic. The condition is associated with poor quality of life and high morbidity, and treatment options are often unsatisfactory. A case of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction in a 66-year-old woman, presenting with back and abdominal pain, urinary retention and severe constipation is described. The patient lived in an area in which Lyme disease is endemic and had been bitten by ixodes ticks. Intrathecal synthesis of anti-borrelia IgM and IgG and lymphocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid was found, consistent with chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis since symptoms had lasted for more than six months. The patient’s gastrointestinal function recovered and the pain subsided significantly following treatment with antibiotics. Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) often results in palsy, but rarely affects the autonomic nervous system. Three patients have been described with intestinal pseudoobstruction due to acute LNB. However, this is the first described case of intestinal pseudoobstruction due to chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. LNB must be suspected in patients with intestinal pseudoobstruction, in particular in patients who have been bitten by an ixodes tick and in patients living in an endemic area. PMID:26130639

  13. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Mead, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000–2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months. PMID:26889721

  14. Effects of Forest Fragmentation on Human Risk of Lyme Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Percent forest-herbaceous edge repeatedly explained most of the variability in reported Lyme disease rates within a rural-to-urban study gradient across central Maryland and southeastern Pennsylvania. A one-percent increase in forest-herbaceous edge was associated with an increas...

  15. First Case of Lyme Arthritis Involving a Prosthetic Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Wright, William F.; Oliverio, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States. Arthritis is usually a mani­festation of late dis­ease but has not been associated with cases of periprosthetic joint infections. We report on a patient who was first diagnosed with periprosthetic joint infection and subsequently Lyme arthritis. PMID:27419168

  16. Lyme disease risk in dogs in New Brunswick.

    PubMed

    Bjurman, Natalie K; Bradet, Gina; Lloyd, Vett K

    2016-09-01

    This study assessed the seroprevalence of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in New Brunswick dogs. Testing of 699 serum samples from dogs across the province revealed a 6% province-wide seropositivity, more than 6 times higher than that found in 2008. The rapid increase in seropositivity indicates increased Lyme disease risk to both canine and human health. PMID:27587892

  17. A case of chronic progressive lyme encephalitis as a manifestation of late lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Roman, Matthew; Shah, Disha; Zaretskaya, Marina; Yassin, Mohamed H

    2014-11-19

    A 54-year-old female living in Europe presented with gait ataxia, dizziness, and bilateral hearing loss. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed non-specific white matter changes. The patient's condition gradually deteriorated over two years without diagnosis. The patient continued to decline cognitively and neurologically with worsening ataxia and upper motor neuron signs. Repeat MRI showed worsening white matter changes. Lumbar puncture, not previously done, showed positive Lyme testing. Treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone resulted in marked neurological improvement. Four years after symptom, the patient has short-term memory deficits and chronic fatigue, but is otherwise neurologically, cognitively, and functionally intact. Follow up MRI findings remain largely unchanged. Because cases of intraparenchymal or encephalopathic neuroborreliosis in America are lacking, so are treatment options. We present a rare case and discuss our experience with antibiotic treatment. This case lends evidence to define optimal treatment of this disease, imperative for hastening neurological recovery. PMID:25568755

  18. Concordant species delimitation from multiple independent evidence: A case study with the Pachytriton brevipes complex (Caudata: Salamandridae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunke; Murphy, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data are widely used to delimit species. However, owing to its strict maternal inheritance in most species, mtDNA tracks female dispersion and dispersal only. The accuracy of mtDNA-derived species delimitation is often not explicitly tested using other independent evidence, such as nuclear DNA (nDNA) data, morphological data, or ecological data. Because species are independent evolutionary lineages that can form testable hypotheses, we present a multi-evidence case study on species delimitation that combines statistical approaches with spatially explicit ecological analysis. Montane salamanders of the Pachytriton brevipes complex (Salamandridae) from southeastern China exhibit conservative morphology and variable color patterning that impede species diagnosis. Recent studies proposed splitting P. brevipes into four species based on deep mtDNA divergence but also found discordance between mtDNA and nDNA trees. In this study, we test evolutionary independence of these hypothesized species lineages using two coalescent-based Bayesian methods (Bayes factor and BP&P). Despite significant conflict between mtDNA gene tree and the species phylogeny, the results reinforce the inference of at least four species in the complex as opposed to the one species recognized for over 130 years. Correlative ecological niche modeling and statistical analysis of environmental data indicate that suitable habitats for each species are isolated by incompatible intervening lowland regions, so the likelihood of gene flow among species is very low, which means species lineages should maintain their evolutionary independence. We demonstrate that concordance among independent evidence confirms species status, which forms the basis for accurate assessment of regional biodiversity. PMID:26119130

  19. A Verbal-Instruction System to Help Persons with Multiple Disabilities Perform Complex Food- and Drink-Preparation Tasks Independently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Smaldone, Angela; La Martire, Maria L.; Alberti, Gloria; Scigliuzzo, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    In a recent single-case study, we showed that a new verbal-instruction system, ensuring the automatic presentation of step instructions, was beneficial for promoting the task performance of a woman with multiple disabilities (including blindness). The present study was aimed at replicating and extending the aforementioned investigation with three…

  20. The Impact of Multiple Concussions on Emotional Distress, Post-Concussive Symptoms, and Neurocognitive Functioning in Active Duty United States Marines Independent of Combat Exposure or Emotional Distress

    PubMed Central

    Lathan, Corinna E.; Bleiberg, Joseph; Tsao, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists as to whether the lingering effects of concussion on emotional, physical, and cognitive symptoms is because of the effects of brain trauma or purely to emotional factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder or depression. This study examines the independent effects of concussion on persistent symptoms. The Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment, a clinical decision support tool, was used to assess neurobehavioral functioning in 646 United States Marines, all of whom were fit for duty. Marines were assessed for concussion history, post-concussive symptoms, emotional distress, neurocognitive functioning, and deployment history. Results showed that a recent concussion or ever having experienced a concussion was associated with an increase in emotional distress, but not with persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) or neurocognitive functioning. Having had multiple lifetime concussions, however, was associated with greater emotional distress, PPCS, and reduced neurocognitive functioning that needs attention and rapid discrimination, but not for memory-based tasks. These results are independent of deployment history, combat exposure, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Results supported earlier findings that a previous concussion is not generally associated with post-concussive symptoms independent of covariates. In contrast with other studies that failed to find a unique contribution for concussion to PPCS, however, evidence of recent and multiple concussion was seen across a range of emotional distress, post-concussive symptoms, and neurocognitive functioning in this study population. Results are discussed in terms of implications for assessing concussion on return from combat. PMID:25003552

  1. A tale of two syndromes: Lyme disease preceding postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Adam M; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is poorly understood. However, it has been suggested that altered immune activity or denervation of the autonomic system following illness may be an important trigger. Patients infected with Lyme disease have a small incidence of post-Lyme disease syndrome that share similar characteristics to POTS. We report a short series of two women who present with persistent symptoms of orthostatic intolerance consistent with POTS after treated Lyme disease. PMID:24830783

  2. Multiple productive immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements in chronic lymphocytic leukemia are mostly derived from independent clones

    PubMed Central

    Plevova, Karla; Francova, Hana Skuhrova; Burckova, Katerina; Brychtova, Yvona; Doubek, Michael; Pavlova, Sarka; Malcikova, Jitka; Mayer, Jiri; Tichy, Boris; Pospisilova, Sarka

    2014-01-01

    In chronic lymphocytic leukemia, usually a monoclonal disease, multiple productive immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements are identified sporadically. Prognostication of such cases based on immunoglobulin heavy variable gene mutational status can be problematic, especially if the different rearrangements have discordant mutational status. To gain insight into the possible biological mechanisms underlying the origin of the multiple rearrangements, we performed a comprehensive immunogenetic and immunophenotypic characterization of 31 cases with the multiple rearrangements identified in a cohort of 1147 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. For the majority of cases (25/31), we provide evidence of the co-existence of at least two B lymphocyte clones with a chronic lymphocytic leukemia phenotype. We also identified clonal drifts in serial samples, likely driven by selection forces. More specifically, higher immunoglobulin variable gene identity to germline and longer complementarity determining region 3 were preferred in persistent or newly appearing clones, a phenomenon more pronounced in patients with stereotyped B-cell receptors. Finally, we report that other factors, such as TP53 gene defects and therapy administration, influence clonal selection. Our findings are relevant to clonal evolution in the context of antigen stimulation and transition of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24038023

  3. Testing for shared biogeographic history in the lower Central American freshwater fish assemblage using comparative phylogeography: concerted, independent, or multiple evolutionary responses?

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Justin C; Johnson, Jerald B

    2014-01-01

    A central goal of comparative phylogeography is determining whether codistributed species experienced (1) concerted evolutionary responses to past geological and climatic events, indicated by congruent spatial and temporal patterns (“concerted-response hypothesis”); (2) independent responses, indicated by spatial incongruence (“independent-response hypothesis”); or (3) multiple responses (“multiple-response hypothesis”), indicated by spatial congruence but temporal incongruence (“pseudocongruence”) or spatial and temporal incongruence (“pseudoincongruence”). We tested these competing hypotheses using DNA sequence data from three livebearing fish species codistributed in the Nicaraguan depression of Central America (Alfaro cultratus, Poecilia gillii, and Xenophallus umbratilis) that we predicted might display congruent responses due to co-occurrence in identical freshwater drainages. Spatial analyses recovered different subdivisions of genetic structure for each species, despite shared finer-scale breaks in northwestern Costa Rica (also supported by phylogenetic results). Isolation-with-migration models estimated incongruent timelines of among-region divergences, with A. cultratus and Xenophallus populations diverging over Miocene–mid-Pleistocene while P. gillii populations diverged over mid-late Pleistocene. Approximate Bayesian computation also lent substantial support to multiple discrete divergences over a model of simultaneous divergence across shared spatial breaks (e.g., Bayes factor [B10] = 4.303 for Ψ [no. of divergences] > 1 vs. Ψ = 1). Thus, the data support phylogeographic pseudoincongruence consistent with the multiple-response hypothesis. Model comparisons also indicated incongruence in historical demography, for example, support for intraspecific late Pleistocene population growth was unique to P. gillii, despite evidence for finer-scale population expansions in the other taxa. Empirical tests for phylogeographic congruence

  4. Genome and phylogenetic analyses of Trypanosoma evansi reveal extensive similarity to T. brucei and multiple independent origins for dyskinetoplasty.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Jason; Anupama, Atashi; Balmer, Oliver; Jackson, Andrew; Lewis, Michael; Brown, Rob; Cestari, Igor; Desquesnes, Marc; Gendrin, Claire; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Imamura, Hideo; Ivens, Alasdair; Kořený, Luděk; Lai, De-Hua; MacLeod, Annette; McDermott, Suzanne M; Merritt, Chris; Monnerat, Severine; Moon, Wonjong; Myler, Peter; Phan, Isabelle; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Sivam, Dhileep; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lukeš, Julius; Stuart, Ken; Schnaufer, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Two key biological features distinguish Trypanosoma evansi from the T. brucei group: independence from the tsetse fly as obligatory vector, and independence from the need for functional mitochondrial DNA (kinetoplast or kDNA). In an effort to better understand the molecular causes and consequences of these differences, we sequenced the genome of an akinetoplastic T. evansi strain from China and compared it to the T. b. brucei reference strain. The annotated T. evansi genome shows extensive similarity to the reference, with 94.9% of the predicted T. b. brucei coding sequences (CDS) having an ortholog in T. evansi, and 94.6% of the non-repetitive orthologs having a nucleotide identity of 95% or greater. Interestingly, several procyclin-associated genes (PAGs) were disrupted or not found in this T. evansi strain, suggesting a selective loss of function in the absence of the insect life-cycle stage. Surprisingly, orthologous sequences were found in T. evansi for all 978 nuclear CDS predicted to represent the mitochondrial proteome in T. brucei, although a small number of these may have lost functionality. Consistent with previous results, the F1FO-ATP synthase γ subunit was found to have an A281 deletion, which is involved in generation of a mitochondrial membrane potential in the absence of kDNA. Candidates for CDS that are absent from the reference genome were identified in supplementary de novo assemblies of T. evansi reads. Phylogenetic analyses show that the sequenced strain belongs to a dominant group of clonal T. evansi strains with worldwide distribution that also includes isolates classified as T. equiperdum. At least three other types of T. evansi or T. equiperdum have emerged independently. Overall, the elucidation of the T. evansi genome sequence reveals extensive similarity of T. brucei and supports the contention that T. evansi should be classified as a subspecies of T. brucei. PMID:25568942

  5. Genome and Phylogenetic Analyses of Trypanosoma evansi Reveal Extensive Similarity to T. brucei and Multiple Independent Origins for Dyskinetoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Carnes, Jason; Anupama, Atashi; Balmer, Oliver; Jackson, Andrew; Lewis, Michael; Brown, Rob; Cestari, Igor; Desquesnes, Marc; Gendrin, Claire; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Imamura, Hideo; Ivens, Alasdair; Kořený, Luděk; Lai, De-Hua; MacLeod, Annette; McDermott, Suzanne M.; Merritt, Chris; Monnerat, Severine; Moon, Wonjong; Myler, Peter; Phan, Isabelle; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Sivam, Dhileep; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lukeš, Julius; Stuart, Ken; Schnaufer, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Two key biological features distinguish Trypanosoma evansi from the T. brucei group: independence from the tsetse fly as obligatory vector, and independence from the need for functional mitochondrial DNA (kinetoplast or kDNA). In an effort to better understand the molecular causes and consequences of these differences, we sequenced the genome of an akinetoplastic T. evansi strain from China and compared it to the T. b. brucei reference strain. The annotated T. evansi genome shows extensive similarity to the reference, with 94.9% of the predicted T. b. brucei coding sequences (CDS) having an ortholog in T. evansi, and 94.6% of the non-repetitive orthologs having a nucleotide identity of 95% or greater. Interestingly, several procyclin-associated genes (PAGs) were disrupted or not found in this T. evansi strain, suggesting a selective loss of function in the absence of the insect life-cycle stage. Surprisingly, orthologous sequences were found in T. evansi for all 978 nuclear CDS predicted to represent the mitochondrial proteome in T. brucei, although a small number of these may have lost functionality. Consistent with previous results, the F1FO-ATP synthase γ subunit was found to have an A281 deletion, which is involved in generation of a mitochondrial membrane potential in the absence of kDNA. Candidates for CDS that are absent from the reference genome were identified in supplementary de novo assemblies of T. evansi reads. Phylogenetic analyses show that the sequenced strain belongs to a dominant group of clonal T. evansi strains with worldwide distribution that also includes isolates classified as T. equiperdum. At least three other types of T. evansi or T. equiperdum have emerged independently. Overall, the elucidation of the T. evansi genome sequence reveals extensive similarity of T. brucei and supports the contention that T. evansi should be classified as a subspecies of T. brucei. PMID:25568942

  6. Clustering of Two Genes Putatively Involved in Cyanate Detoxification Evolved Recently and Independently in Multiple Fungal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, M. Holly; McGary, Kriston L.; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Slot, Jason C.; Geiser, David M.; Sink, Stacy; O’Donnell, Kerry; Rokas, Antonis

    2015-01-01

    Fungi that have the enzymes cyanase and carbonic anhydrase show a limited capacity to detoxify cyanate, a fungicide employed by both plants and humans. Here, we describe a novel two-gene cluster that comprises duplicated cyanase and carbonic anhydrase copies, which we name the CCA gene cluster, trace its evolution across Ascomycetes, and examine the evolutionary dynamics of its spread among lineages of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (hereafter referred to as the FOSC), a cosmopolitan clade of purportedly clonal vascular wilt plant pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal cyanase and carbonic anhydrase genes reveals that the CCA gene cluster arose independently at least twice and is now present in three lineages, namely Cochliobolus lunatus, Oidiodendron maius, and the FOSC. Genome-wide surveys within the FOSC indicate that the CCA gene cluster varies in copy number across isolates, is always located on accessory chromosomes, and is absent in FOSC’s closest relatives. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the CCA gene cluster in 163 FOSC strains from a wide variety of hosts suggests a recent history of rampant transfers between isolates. We hypothesize that the independent formation of the CCA gene cluster in different fungal lineages and its spread across FOSC strains may be associated with resistance to plant-produced cyanates or to use of cyanate fungicides in agriculture. PMID:25663439

  7. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in the Southeastern United States, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Nigrovic, Lise E; Auwaerter, Paul G; Fowler, Vance G; Ruffin, Felicia; Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Reber, Jodi; Williams, Carl; Broyhill, James; Pan, William K; Gaines, David N

    2015-12-01

    Background.  The majority of Lyme disease cases in the United States are acquired on the east coast between northern Virginia and New England. In recent years the geographic extent of Lyme disease has been expanding, raising the prospect of Lyme disease becoming endemic in the southeast. Methods.  We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Virginia Department of Health and North Carolina Department of Public Health and entered them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial and spatiotemporal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. Results.  There was a marked increase in Lyme disease cases in Virginia, particularly from 2007 onwards. Northern Virginia experienced intensification and geographic expansion of Lyme disease cases. The most notable area of expansion was to the southwest along the Appalachian Mountains with development of a new disease cluster in the southern Virginia mountain region. Conclusions.  The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Virginia between 2000 and 2014, particularly southward in the Virginia mountain ranges. If these trends continue, North Carolina can expect autochthonous Lyme disease transmission in its mountain region in the coming years. PMID:26550580

  8. Tocilizumab Efficacy in a Patient with Positive Anti-CCP Chronic Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Julianna; Rosner, Itzhak; Rimar, Doron; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Boulman, Nina; Slobodin, Gleb

    2016-01-01

    Context: Lyme arthritis, a manifestation of tick-borne Lyme disease, can prove to be refractory to classic treatment. Case Report: We present a case of a 48-year-old male, diagnosed with chronic Lyme arthritis, refractory to recurrent and prolonged courses of doxycycline, ceftriaxone, as well as hydroxychloroquine and methotrexate. The patient responded partially to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha blockade by etanercept and, finally, entered long-term remission after his treatment was switched to tocilizumab. Conclusion: Off label treatment by biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs can be considered in selected patients with severe antibiotic-resistant Lyme arthritis.C. PMID:27213145

  9. Public awareness of Lyme disease in obstetric, pediatric, and student settings in northwestern Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Curi, M B

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study has been to survey the attitudes and understandings of Lyme disease by pregnant women, mothers, and ninth-grade students in Northwestern Connecticut. A sample of 100 obstetrical patients from two private obstetric offices, 100 mothers from four private pediatric offices, and 200 students from four secondary schools was asked to complete a 15 question survey about Lyme disease. In all groups, the responses indicated some misconceptions or a lack of knowledge about the manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of Lyme disease, as well as about the transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi. This information indicates that better public education about Lyme disease is important. PMID:8275686

  10. Third-degree heart block associated with lyme carditis: review of published cases.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Mead, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Lyme carditis is an uncommon manifestation of Lyme disease that most commonly involves some degree of atrioventricular conduction blockade. Third-degree conduction block is the most severe form and can be fatal if untreated. Systematic review of the medical literature identified 45 published cases of third-degree conduction block associated with Lyme carditis in the United States. Median patient age was 32 years, 84% of patients were male, and 39% required temporary pacing. Recognizing patient groups more likely to develop third-degree heart block associated with Lyme carditis is essential to providing prompt and appropriate therapy. PMID:24879781

  11. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in the Southeastern United States, 2000–2014

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Paul M.; Nigrovic, Lise E.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Fowler, Vance G.; Ruffin, Felicia; Brinkerhoff, R. Jory; Reber, Jodi; Williams, Carl; Broyhill, James; Pan, William K.; Gaines, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The majority of Lyme disease cases in the United States are acquired on the east coast between northern Virginia and New England. In recent years the geographic extent of Lyme disease has been expanding, raising the prospect of Lyme disease becoming endemic in the southeast. Methods. We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Virginia Department of Health and North Carolina Department of Public Health and entered them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial and spatiotemporal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. Results. There was a marked increase in Lyme disease cases in Virginia, particularly from 2007 onwards. Northern Virginia experienced intensification and geographic expansion of Lyme disease cases. The most notable area of expansion was to the southwest along the Appalachian Mountains with development of a new disease cluster in the southern Virginia mountain region. Conclusions. The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Virginia between 2000 and 2014, particularly southward in the Virginia mountain ranges. If these trends continue, North Carolina can expect autochthonous Lyme disease transmission in its mountain region in the coming years. PMID:26550580

  12. Intentions to receive a potentially available Lyme disease vaccine in an urban sample

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Joshua; Kusz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The only human Lyme disease vaccine of LYMErix was voluntarily removed from the market in the United States in 2002 for a number of reasons. A new human Lyme disease vaccine is currently being developed. We would like any future approved human Lyme disease vaccine to be of interest and marketable to consumers. Methods: We surveyed 714 participants to determine variables associated with intentions to receive a Lyme disease vaccine. Predictor variables included demographics, protection motivational theory, Lyme disease knowledge, Lyme disease preventive behaviors, beliefs and perceived health. Results: We found in multivariate linear regression analyses that Asian/Asian American race/ethnicity (p < 0.001), South Asian race/ethnicity (p = 0.01) and coping appraisal variables of response efficacy (p < 0.001) and self-efficacy (p < 0.001) were each significantly associated with increased intentions. The belief that vaccines are typically not safe was significantly associated with decreased intentions (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Asian/Asian American and South Asian race/ethnicities have a strong interest in receiving a Lyme disease vaccine. Although pharmaceutical companies may benefit by advertising a Lyme disease vaccine to Asian/Asian Americans and South Asians, marketers need to address and use approaches to interest those from other race/ethnicities. Also, marketers need to address the erroneous belief that vaccines are typically not safe in order to interest those with such beliefs to use a Lyme disease vaccine. PMID:27551427

  13. Adaptation and Evaluation of a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Model for Lyme Disease Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Aenishaenslin, Cécile; Gern, Lise; Michel, Pascal; Ravel, André; Hongoh, Valérie; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Milord, François; Bélanger, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Designing preventive programs relevant to vector-borne diseases such as Lyme disease (LD) can be complex given the need to include multiple issues and perspectives into prioritizing public health actions. A multi-criteria decision aid (MCDA) model was previously used to rank interventions for LD prevention in Quebec, Canada, where the disease is emerging. The aim of the current study was to adapt and evaluate the decision model constructed in Quebec under a different epidemiological context, in Switzerland, where LD has been endemic for the last thirty years. The model adaptation was undertaken with a group of Swiss stakeholders using a participatory approach. The PROMETHEE method was used for multi-criteria analysis. Key elements and results of the MCDA model are described and contrasted with the Quebec model. All criteria and most interventions of the MCDA model developed for LD prevention in Quebec were directly transferable to the Swiss context. Four new decision criteria were added, and the list of proposed interventions was modified. Based on the overall group ranking, interventions targeting human populations were prioritized in the Swiss model, with the top ranked action being the implementation of a large communication campaign. The addition of criteria did not significantly alter the intervention rankings, but increased the capacity of the model to discriminate between highest and lowest ranked interventions. The current study suggests that beyond the specificity of the MCDA models developed for Quebec and Switzerland, their general structure captures the fundamental and common issues that characterize the complexity of vector-borne disease prevention. These results should encourage public health organizations to adapt, use and share MCDA models as an effective and functional approach to enable the integration of multiple perspectives and considerations in the prevention and control of complex public health issues such as Lyme disease or other vector

  14. A verbal-instruction system to help persons with multiple disabilities perform complex food- and drink-preparation tasks independently.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Smaldone, Angela; La Martire, Maria L; Alberti, Gloria; Scigliuzzo, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    In a recent single-case study, we showed that a new verbal-instruction system, ensuring the automatic presentation of step instructions, was beneficial for promoting the task performance of a woman with multiple disabilities (including blindness). The present study was aimed at replicating and extending the aforementioned investigation with three adults with multiple disabilities. During Part I of the study, the new instruction system was compared with a system requiring the participants to seek instructions on their own. Two tasks were used, one per system. During Part II of the study, the new system was applied with two additional tasks. The results of Part I showed that (a) the participants had a better performance (i.e., in terms of correct steps or task execution time) on the task carried out with the new system than on the task carried out with the comparison/control system, and (b) the performance of this latter task improved rapidly when the new system was used with it. The results of Part II showed satisfactory performance with each of the two tasks carried out directly with the new system. The implications of these data were discussed. PMID:21703819

  15. Multiple Independent Retroelement Insertions in the Promoter of a Stress Response Gene Have Variable Molecular and Functional Effects in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Merenciano, Miriam; Ullastres, Anna; de Cara, M A R; Barrón, Maite G; González, Josefa

    2016-08-01

    Promoters are structurally and functionally diverse gene regulatory regions. The presence or absence of sequence motifs and the spacing between the motifs defines the properties of promoters. Recent alternative promoter usage analyses in Drosophila melanogaster revealed that transposable elements significantly contribute to promote diversity. In this work, we analyzed in detail one of the transposable element insertions, named FBti0019985, that has been co-opted to drive expression of CG18446, a candidate stress response gene. We analyzed strains from different natural populations and we found that besides FBti0019985, there are another eight independent transposable elements inserted in the proximal promoter region of CG18446. All nine insertions are solo-LTRs that belong to the roo family. We analyzed the sequence of the nine roo insertions and we investigated whether the different insertions were functionally equivalent by performing 5'-RACE, gene expression, and cold-stress survival experiments. We found that different insertions have different molecular and functional consequences. The exact position where the transposable elements are inserted matters, as they all showed highly conserved sequences but only two of the analyzed insertions provided alternative transcription start sites, and only the FBti0019985 insertion consistently affects CG18446 expression. The phenotypic consequences of the different insertions also vary: only FBti0019985 was associated with cold-stress tolerance. Interestingly, the only previous report of transposable elements inserting repeatedly and independently in a promoter region in D. melanogaster, were also located upstream of a stress response gene. Our results suggest that functional validation of individual structural variants is needed to resolve the complexity of insertion clusters. PMID:27517860

  16. Multiple Independent Retroelement Insertions in the Promoter of a Stress Response Gene Have Variable Molecular and Functional Effects in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Merenciano, Miriam; Ullastres, Anna; González, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    Promoters are structurally and functionally diverse gene regulatory regions. The presence or absence of sequence motifs and the spacing between the motifs defines the properties of promoters. Recent alternative promoter usage analyses in Drosophila melanogaster revealed that transposable elements significantly contribute to promote diversity. In this work, we analyzed in detail one of the transposable element insertions, named FBti0019985, that has been co-opted to drive expression of CG18446, a candidate stress response gene. We analyzed strains from different natural populations and we found that besides FBti0019985, there are another eight independent transposable elements inserted in the proximal promoter region of CG18446. All nine insertions are solo-LTRs that belong to the roo family. We analyzed the sequence of the nine roo insertions and we investigated whether the different insertions were functionally equivalent by performing 5’-RACE, gene expression, and cold-stress survival experiments. We found that different insertions have different molecular and functional consequences. The exact position where the transposable elements are inserted matters, as they all showed highly conserved sequences but only two of the analyzed insertions provided alternative transcription start sites, and only the FBti0019985 insertion consistently affects CG18446 expression. The phenotypic consequences of the different insertions also vary: only FBti0019985 was associated with cold-stress tolerance. Interestingly, the only previous report of transposable elements inserting repeatedly and independently in a promoter region in D. melanogaster, were also located upstream of a stress response gene. Our results suggest that functional validation of individual structural variants is needed to resolve the complexity of insertion clusters. PMID:27517860

  17. 2  ×  2 multiple-input multiple-output optical-wireless integration system based on optical independent-sideband modulation enabled by an in-phase/quadrature modulator.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel and simple 2×2 multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) optical-wireless integration system, in which optical independent-sideband modulation enabled by an in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator, instead of optical polarization multiplexing, is used to assist the simultaneous generation of two wireless millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signals. Software-based digital signal processing is used to generate the driving signal for the I/Q modulator, the output of which is two independent single-sideband optical vector signals located at two sides of a large central optical carrier. Based on our proposed 2×2 MIMO optical-wireless integration system, we experimentally demonstrate the simultaneous generation and 2×2 MIMO wireless delivery of two independent 40-GHz quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) wireless mm-wave signals. Each 40-GHz QPSK wireless mm-wave signal can carry up to 4-Gbaud transmitter data with a bit-error ratio less than the hard-decision forward-error-correction threshold of 3.8×10-3. PMID:27367121

  18. Chronic unremitting headache associated with Lyme disease-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kowacs, Pedro André; Martins, Rodrigo Tomazini; Piovesan, Elcio Juliato; Pinto, Maria Cristina Araujo; Yoshinari, Natalino Hagime

    2013-07-01

    The Brazilian Lyme-disease-like illness (BLDLI) or Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome is a unique zoonosis found in Brazil. It reproduces all the clinical symptoms of Lyme disease except for the high frequencies of relapse and the presence of autoimmune manifestations. Two cases of borreliosis manifesting with unremitting headache, which is a symptom associated with late-stage BLDLI, were presented. Clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic aspects of the BLDLI and its associated headaches were showed and discussed in this article. BLDLI diagnosis requires additional attention by physicians, since the disease has a tendency to progress to the late, recurrent stage or the chronic form, and the associated headache can be confused with chronic primary headache or with analgesic-overuse one. Special attention should be paid to patients with headaches who have traveled to endemic areas. PMID:23857618

  19. [Lyme borreliosis--an infectious disease with interdisciplinary demands].

    PubMed

    Maiwald, M

    1994-08-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an infectious disease with various clinical manifestations, caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. Although symptoms of the disease have been described since more than 100 years ago, it was not until 1982 that the causative organism was discovered. In Europe, Lyme borreliosis is the most common tick-borne disease, and in endemic regions, a considerable number of clinical cases can be found. The course of the disease is in stages and involves various organ systems, such as skin, nervous system, heart, and joints. Laboratory diagnosis is considered to be difficult and relies mainly on the determination of antibodies. A vaccine for use in humans is not yet available, but experimental data support the feasibility of a vaccine development. PMID:7940504

  20. Lyme borreliosis: reviewing potential vaccines, clinical aspects and health economics.

    PubMed

    Šmit, Renata; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a multisystem infectious disease with a growing burden in many parts of North America, Asia and Europe. Persistent infection of LB can usually be treated effectively with antibiotic therapy, but it may be followed by post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. Therefore, it is important to begin with treatment in the early phase of the disease. Vaccination shows potential as the most effective way of preventing LB and reducing its burden in these continents. It is concluded that there is a need for continuous effort in research from all perspectives on LB, especially regarding prevention with novel vaccines, their development, clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. This review may help to further develop (cost-) effective strategies for prevention and control of the disease to reduce its burden and achieve population-wide health benefits. PMID:26414102

  1. A pooled job physical exposure dataset from multiple independent studies in a consortium study of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Stephen S.; Kapellusch, Jay M.; Garg, Arun; Silverstein, Barbara A.; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Burt, Susan E.; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley A.; Gerr, Frederic E.; Hegmann, Kurt T.; Merlino, Linda A.; Thiese, Matthew S.; Rempel, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Six research groups independently conducted prospective studies of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) incidence in 54 US workplaces in 10 US States. Physical exposure variables were collected by all research groups at the individual worker level. Data from these research groups were pooled to increase the exposure spectrum and statistical power. Objective This paper provides a detailed description of the characteristics of the pooled physical exposure variables and the source data information from the individual research studies. Methods Physical exposure data were inspected and prepared by each of the individual research studies according to detailed instructions provided by an exposure sub-committee of the research consortium. Descriptive analyses were performed on the pooled physical exposure dataset. Correlation analyses were performed among exposure variables estimating similar exposure aspects. Results At baseline, there were a total of 3010 subjects in the pooled physical exposure dataset. Overall, the pooled data meaningfully increased the spectra of most exposure variables. The increased spectra were due to the wider range in exposure data of different jobs provided by the research studies. The correlations between variables estimating similar exposure aspects showed different patterns among data provided by the research studies. Conclusions The increased spectra of the physical exposure variables among the data pooled likely improved the possibility of detecting potential associations between these physical exposure variables and CTS incidence. It is also recognized that methods need to be developed for general use by all researchers for standardization of physical exposure variable definition, data collection, processing and reduction. PMID:25504866

  2. Ancient and Novel Small RNA Pathways Compensate for the Loss of piRNAs in Multiple Independent Nematode Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Sarkies, Peter; Selkirk, Murray E.; Jones, John T.; Blok, Vivian; Boothby, Thomas; Goldstein, Bob; Hanelt, Ben; Ardila-Garcia, Alex; Fast, Naomi M.; Schiffer, Phillip M.; Kraus, Christopher; Taylor, Mark J.; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Blaxter, Mark L.; Miska, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA pathways act at the front line of defence against transposable elements across the Eukaryota. In animals, Piwi interacting small RNAs (piRNAs) are a crucial arm of this defence. However, the evolutionary relationships among piRNAs and other small RNA pathways targeting transposable elements are poorly resolved. To address this question we sequenced small RNAs from multiple, diverse nematode species, producing the first phylum-wide analysis of how small RNA pathways evolve. Surprisingly, despite their prominence in Caenorhabditis elegans and closely related nematodes, piRNAs are absent in all other nematode lineages. We found that there are at least two evolutionarily distinct mechanisms that compensate for the absence of piRNAs, both involving RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs). Whilst one pathway is unique to nematodes, the second involves Dicer-dependent RNA-directed DNA methylation, hitherto unknown in animals, and bears striking similarity to transposon-control mechanisms in fungi and plants. Our results highlight the rapid, context-dependent evolution of small RNA pathways and suggest piRNAs in animals may have replaced an ancient eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerase pathway to control transposable elements. PMID:25668728

  3. Recent independent emergence of multiple multidrug-resistant Serratia marcescens clones within the United Kingdom and Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Boinett, Christine J.; Martin, Veronique; Peacock, Sharon J.; Parkhill, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Serratia marcescens, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for a wide range of nosocomial infections. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains is an increasing danger to public health. To design effective means to control the dissemination of S. marcescens, an in-depth analysis of the population structure and variation is required. Utilizing whole-genome sequencing, we characterized the population structure and variation, as well as the antimicrobial resistance determinants, of a systematic collection of antimicrobial-resistant S. marcescens associated with bloodstream infections in hospitals across the United Kingdom and Ireland between 2001 and 2011. Our results show that S. marcescens is a diverse species with a high level of genomic variation. However, the collection was largely composed of a limited number of clones that emerged from this diverse background within the past few decades. We identified potential recent transmissions of these clones, within and between hospitals, and showed that they have acquired antimicrobial resistance determinants for different beta-lactams, ciprofloxacin, and tetracyclines on multiple occasions. The expansion of these multidrug-resistant clones suggests that the treatment of S. marcescens infections will become increasingly difficult in the future. PMID:27432456

  4. Leptin Acts via Lateral Hypothalamic Area Neurotensin Neurons to Inhibit Orexin Neurons by Multiple GABA-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Goforth, Paulette B.; Leinninger, Gina M.; Patterson, Christa M.

    2014-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin modulates neural systems appropriately for the status of body energy stores. Leptin inhibits lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) orexin (OX; also known as hypocretin)-producing neurons, which control feeding, activity, and energy expenditure, among other parameters. Our previous results suggest that GABAergic LHA leptin receptor (LepRb)-containing and neurotensin (Nts)-containing (LepRbNts) neurons lie in close apposition with OX neurons and control Ox mRNA expression. Here, we show that, similar to leptin, activation of LHA Nts neurons by the excitatory hM3Dq DREADD (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drugs) hyperpolarizes membrane potential and suppresses action potential firing in OX neurons in mouse hypothalamic slices. Furthermore, ablation of LepRb from Nts neurons abrogated the leptin-mediated inhibition, demonstrating that LepRbNts neurons mediate the inhibition of OX neurons by leptin. Leptin did not significantly enhance GABAA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission, and GABA receptor antagonists did not block leptin-mediated inhibition of OX neuron activity. Rather, leptin diminished the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs onto OX neurons. Furthermore, leptin indirectly activated an ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel in OX neurons, which was required for the hyperpolarization of OX neurons by leptin. Although Nts did not alter OX activity, galanin, which is coexpressed in LepRbNts neurons, inhibited OX neurons, whereas the galanin receptor antagonist M40 (galanin-(1–12)-Pro3-(Ala-Leu)2-Ala amide) prevented the leptin-induced hyperpolarization of OX cells. These findings demonstrate that leptin indirectly inhibits OX neurons by acting on LHA LepRbNts neurons to mediate two distinct GABA-independent mechanisms of inhibition: the presynaptic inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission and the opening of KATP channels. PMID:25143620

  5. Interpretation of Ocular Melanin Drug Binding Assays. Alternatives to the Model of Multiple Classes of Independent Sites.

    PubMed

    Manzanares, José A; Rimpelä, Anna-Kaisa; Urtti, Arto

    2016-04-01

    Melanin has a high binding affinity for a wide range of drugs. The determination of the melanin binding capacity and its binding affinity are important, e.g., in the determination of the ocular drug distribution, the prediction of drug effects in the eye, and the trans-scleral drug delivery. The binding parameters estimated from a given data set vary significantly when using different isotherms or different nonlinear fitting methods. In this work, the commonly used bi-Langmuir isotherm, which assumes two classes of independent sites, is confronted with the Sips isotherm. Direct, log-log, and Scatchard plots are used, and the interpretation of the binding curves in the latter is critically analyzed. In addition to the goodness of fit, the emphasis is placed on the physical meaning of the binding parameters. The bi-Langmuir model imposes a bimodal distribution of binding energies for the sites on the melanin granules, but the actual distribution is most likely continuous and unimodal, as assumed by the Sips isotherm. Hence, the latter describes more accurately the distribution of binding energies and also the experimental results of melanin binding to drugs and metal ions. Simulations are used to show that the existence of two classes of sites cannot be confirmed on the sole basis of the shape of the binding curve in the Scatchard plot, and that serious doubts may appear on the meaning of the binding parameters of the bi-Langmuir model. Experimental results of melanin binding to chloroquine and metoprolol are used to illustrate the importance of the choice of the binding isotherm and of the method used to evaluate the binding parameters. PMID:26820602

  6. Stroke as an Unusual First Presentation of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Almoussa, Mohamad; Goertzen, Angelika; Fauser, Barbara; Zimmermann, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Lyme neuroborreliosis is a nervous system infection caused by spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi with diverse neurological complications. Stroke due to cerebral vasculitis is a rare consequence of neuroborreliosis and has been described in just a few case reports. Case Presentation. Here, we report the case of a 43-year-old patient who presented with discrete left-sided hemiparesis and amnestic cognitive impairment. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a thalamic infarct, and serological and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests confirmed the diagnosis of active neuroborreliosis. The antibiotic treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone for three weeks led to an improvement of the symptoms and remarkable regression of radiological findings, but not to full recovery of the amnestic cognitive disorder. Conclusion. Lyme neuroborreliosis should be suspected in patients with cerebrovascular events without obvious risk factors, especially those living in endemic areas such as northern Europe or those who have been exposed to ticks and those with clinical or radiological findings suggesting Lyme neuroborreliosis, in order to establish the diagnosis and start a proper antibiotic therapy. PMID:26788385

  7. Stroke as an Unusual First Presentation of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Almoussa, Mohamad; Goertzen, Angelika; Fauser, Barbara; Zimmermann, Christoph W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Lyme neuroborreliosis is a nervous system infection caused by spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi with diverse neurological complications. Stroke due to cerebral vasculitis is a rare consequence of neuroborreliosis and has been described in just a few case reports. Case Presentation. Here, we report the case of a 43-year-old patient who presented with discrete left-sided hemiparesis and amnestic cognitive impairment. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a thalamic infarct, and serological and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests confirmed the diagnosis of active neuroborreliosis. The antibiotic treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone for three weeks led to an improvement of the symptoms and remarkable regression of radiological findings, but not to full recovery of the amnestic cognitive disorder. Conclusion. Lyme neuroborreliosis should be suspected in patients with cerebrovascular events without obvious risk factors, especially those living in endemic areas such as northern Europe or those who have been exposed to ticks and those with clinical or radiological findings suggesting Lyme neuroborreliosis, in order to establish the diagnosis and start a proper antibiotic therapy. PMID:26788385

  8. Acute Lyme Neuroborreliosis With Transient Hemiparesis and Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Arseny A; Lienhard, Reto; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Erard, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    Nervous system involvement in Lyme disease often mimics other conditions and thus represents a diagnostic challenge, especially in an emergency department setting. We report a case of a female teenager presenting with sudden-onset aphasia and transient right-sided faciobrachial hemiplegia, along with headache and agitation. Ischemia, vasculitis, or another structural lesion was excluded by brain imaging. Toxicologic evaluation results were negative. Cerebral perfusion computed tomography and electroencephalography showed left parietotemporal brain dysfunction. Lumbar puncture result, although atypical, suggested bacterial infection and intravenous ceftriaxone was initiated. Finally, microbiological cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed Lyme neuroborreliosis, showing specific intrathecal antibody production and high level of C-X-C motif chemokine 13. The patient rapidly recovered. To our knowledge, this report for the first time illustrates that acute-onset language and motor symptoms may be directly related to Lyme neuroborreliosis. Neuroborreliosis may mimic other acute neurologic events such as stroke and should be taken into diagnostic consideration even in the absence of classic symptoms and evolution. PMID:25728308

  9. CCL19 as a Chemokine Risk Factor for Posttreatment Lyme Disease Syndrome: a Prospective Clinical Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Aucott, John N; Soloski, Mark J; Rebman, Alison W; Crowder, Lauren A; Lahey, Lauren J; Wagner, Catriona A; Robinson, William H; Bechtold, Kathleen T

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 10% to 20% of patients optimally treated for early Lyme disease develop persistent symptoms of unknown pathophysiology termed posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). The objective of this study was to investigate associations between PTLDS and immune mediator levels during acute illness and at several time points following treatment. Seventy-six participants with physician-documented erythema migrans and 26 healthy controls with no history of Lyme disease were enrolled. Sixty-four cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory markers were measured at each visit for a total of 6 visits over 1 year. An operationalized definition of PTLDS incorporating symptoms and functional impact was applied at 6 months and 1 year following treatment completion, and clinical outcome groups were defined as the return-to-health, symptoms-only, and PTLDS groups. Significance analysis of microarrays identified 7 of the 64 immune mediators to be differentially regulated by group. Generalized logit regressions controlling for potential confounders identified posttreatment levels of the T-cell chemokine CCL19 to be independently associated with clinical outcome group. Receiver operating characteristic analysis identified a CCL19 cutoff of >111.67 pg/ml at 1 month following treatment completion to be 82% sensitive and 83% specific for later PTLDS. We speculate that persistently elevated CCL19 levels among participants with PTLDS may reflect ongoing, immune-driven reactions at sites distal to secondary lymphoid tissue. Our findings suggest the relevance of CCL19 both during acute infection and as an immunologic risk factor for PTLDS during the posttreatment phase. Identification of a potential biomarker predictor for PTLDS provides the opportunity to better understand its pathophysiology and to develop early interventions in the context of appropriate and specific clinical information. PMID:27358211

  10. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations.

    PubMed

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta L E; van't Slot, Ruben; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Mäki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2011-06-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility to other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease and type 1 diabetes. We performed fine mapping on 446 independent individuals with celiac disease and 641 controls of Dutch origin, testing 872 tagging SNPs in a 22 Mb region of chromosome 6. The 12 most promising SNPs were followed up in 2071 individuals from 284 Finnish and 357 Hungarian celiac disease families to identify risk variants in this region. Multiple markers in the region were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Dutch material. Two SNPs, rs9391227 and rs4946111, were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Finnish population. The association to rs9391227 represents the strongest association signal found in the Finnish (P = 0.003, OR 0.66) as well as the combined Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations (P = 3.6 × 10(-5), OR 0.76). The rs9391227 is situated downstream of the HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HACE1) gene and is contained within a region of strong linkage disequilibrium enclosing HACE1. Two additional, independent, susceptibility variants in the 6q21-22 region were also found in a meta-analysis of the three populations. The 6q21-22 region was confirmed as a celiac disease susceptibility locus and harbors multiple independent associations, some of which may implicate ubiquitin-pathways in celiac disease susceptibility. PMID:21326284

  11. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta LE; Slot, Ruben van't; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Mäki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility to other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease and type 1 diabetes. We performed fine mapping on 446 independent individuals with celiac disease and 641 controls of Dutch origin, testing 872 tagging SNPs in a 22 Mb region of chromosome 6. The 12 most promising SNPs were followed up in 2071 individuals from 284 Finnish and 357 Hungarian celiac disease families to identify risk variants in this region. Multiple markers in the region were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Dutch material. Two SNPs, rs9391227 and rs4946111, were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Finnish population. The association to rs9391227 represents the strongest association signal found in the Finnish (P=0.003, OR 0.66) as well as the combined Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations (P=3.6 × 10−5, OR 0.76). The rs9391227 is situated downstream of the HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HACE1) gene and is contained within a region of strong linkage disequilibrium enclosing HACE1. Two additional, independent, susceptibility variants in the 6q21-22 region were also found in a meta-analysis of the three populations. The 6q21-22 region was confirmed as a celiac disease susceptibility locus and harbors multiple independent associations, some of which may implicate ubiquitin-pathways in celiac disease susceptibility. PMID:21326284

  12. Genotypic Variation and Mixtures of Lyme Borrelia in Ixodes Ticks from North America and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Chris D.; Matthews, Heather E.; Schutzer, Steven; Rounds, Megan A.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Nolte, Oliver; Campbell, Scott R.; Phillipson, Curtis A.; Li, Feng; Sampath, Ranga; Ecker, David J.; Eshoo, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lyme disease, caused by various species of Borrelia, is transmitted by Ixodes ticks in North America and Europe. Studies have shown the genotype of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) or the species of B. burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) affects the ability of the bacteria to cause local or disseminated infection in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a multilocus PCR electrospray mass spectrometry assay to determine the species and genotype Borrelia from ticks collected in New York, Connecticut, Indiana, Southern Germany, and California and characterized isolates from parts of the United States and Europe. These analyses identified 53 distinct genotypes of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto with higher resolution than ospC typing. Genotypes of other members of the B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex were also identified and genotyped including B. afzelii, B. garinii, B. lusitaniae, B. spielmanii, and B. valaisiana. While each site in North America had genotypes unique to that location, we found genotypes shared between individual regions and two genotypes found across the United States. Significant B. burgdorferi s.s. genotypic diversity was observed between North America and Europe: only 6.6% of US genotypes (3 of 45) were found in Europe and 27% of the European genotypes (3 of 11) were observed in the US. Interestingly, 39% of adult Ixodes scapularis ticks from North America were infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi s.s. and 22.2% of Ixodes ricinus ticks from Germany were infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi s.l. Conclusions/Significance The presence of multiple Borrelia genotypes in ticks increases the probability that a person will be infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi, potentially increasing the risks of disseminated Lyme disease. Our study indicates that the genotypic diversity of Borrelia in ticks in both North America and Europe is higher then previously reported and can have

  13. Spinal anaesthesia for caesarean delivery in a parturient with babesiosis and Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Sultan, P; Green, C; Riley, E; Carvalho, B

    2012-02-01

    We present a case of a parturient with babesiosis and Lyme disease who was scheduled for elective caesarean section. The caesarean section was performed under spinal anaesthesia, and the patient had a coronary artery dissection 4 days postoperatively. Neuraxial anaesthesia and possible mechanisms for the coronary artery dissection in a patient with babesiosis and Lyme disease are discussed. PMID:22251109

  14. A case of reversible third-degree AV block due to Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Stefan A J; Boswijk, Dirk J; Kimman, Geert P; Germans, Tjeerd

    2016-01-01

    The most common manifestation of Lyme carditis is a varying degree of atrioventricular (AV) conduction block. This case describes a 45-year-old male with third-degree AV block due to Lyme carditis. Treatment with intravenous antibiotics resulted in complete normalization of AV conduction, thereby averting permanent pacemaker implantation. PMID:27215649

  15. Proceedings of the 2nd workshop on lyme disease in the Southeast

    SciTech Connect

    Apperson, C.S.; Levine, J.F.; Snoddy, E.L.

    1993-12-31

    This volume provides author prepared abstracts of oral presentation at the Second Workshop on Lyme Disease in the Southeast head in Raleigh, North Carolina September 7-9, 1993. The 33 presentations covered various aspects of the epidemic including geographical distribution of various species of ticks, transmission risks, Lyme Disease epidemiology, and taxonomic aspects.

  16. Enhancing Lyme Disease Surveillance by Using Administrative Claims Data, Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen G.; Dunn, John R.; Schaffner, William; Jones, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is underreported in the United States. We used insurance administrative claims data to determine the value of such data in enhancing case ascertainment in Tennessee during January 2011–June 2013. Although we identified ≈20% more cases of Lyme disease (5/year), the method was resource intensive and not sustainable in this low-incidence state. PMID:26291336

  17. Lyme Disease in West Virginia: An Assessment of Distribution and Clinicians' Knowledge of Disease and Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarah; Parker, David; Mark-Carew, Miguella; White, Robert; Fisher, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease case misclassification, a top public health concern, may be attributed to the current disconnect between clinical diagnosis and surveillance. This study examines Lyme disease distribution in West Virginia (WV) and determines clinicians' knowledge of both disease and surveillance. Lyme disease surveillance data for 2013 were obtained from the WV Bureau for Public Health. A validated survey, distributed to clinicians at an academic medical center, assessed clinicians' knowledge of disease diagnosis and surveillance. There were 297 adult Lyme disease cases of which 83 were confirmed. Clinician survey responses resulted in a correct response rate of 70% for Lyme disease knowledge questions. Fewer than half of all clinicians were aware of the surveillance criteria for confirming Lyme disease cases. Neither medical specialty nor previous treatment of patients with Lyme disease were significantly associated with clinicians' knowledge of the disease. Clinicians in WV are familiar with symptoms and clinical management of Lyme disease. However, they are less knowledgeable about diagnosis and public health surveillance comprising reporting and confirming cases of the disease. Clinicians and public health authorities should collaborate more closely to promote education and awareness as a key step to successfully reducing the burden of Lymne disease. PMID:27491103

  18. The Prevalence and Incidence of Clinical and Asymptomatic Lyme Borreliose in a Population at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrer, Heinz; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Blood samples and questionnaires from 950 Swiss orienteers revealed positive antibodies for Lyme borreliosis in 248 (26.1%) of subjects, compared to 3.9-6.0% in 2 control groups. Six months later a second blood sample from 755 participants showed that 45 had seroconverted from negative to positive. Although positive Lyme seriology was common,…

  19. Diagnostic use of the lymphocyte transformation test-memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay in confirming active Lyme borreliosis in clinically and serologically ambiguous cases.

    PubMed

    Puri, Basant K; Segal, Daniel Rm; Monro, Jean A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out an independent evaluation of the proposition that the lymphocyte transformation test-memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (LTT-MELISA) may be diagnostically useful in the confirmation of active Lyme borreliosis in clinically and serologically ambiguous cases. Blood samples from 54 patients consecutively presenting to a British center with clinical suspicion of Lyme borreliosis were tested for this disease by immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) Western blots and by LTT-MELISA. Forty-five of these patients had Western blot results which were negative for both IgM and IgG by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); of these patients, 19 (42%) were LTT-MELISA-positive. Two of the patients who had IgM positive results by the CDC criteria were LTT-MELISA-negative. It is concluded that, for putative European-acquired Lyme borreliosis infections, it would be sensible to carry out both the LTT-MELISA and Western blot assay. PMID:25664127

  20. Diagnostic use of the lymphocyte transformation test-memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay in confirming active Lyme borreliosis in clinically and serologically ambiguous cases

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Basant K; Segal, Daniel RM; Monro, Jean A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out an independent evaluation of the proposition that the lymphocyte transformation test-memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (LTT-MELISA) may be diagnostically useful in the confirmation of active Lyme borreliosis in clinically and serologically ambiguous cases. Blood samples from 54 patients consecutively presenting to a British center with clinical suspicion of Lyme borreliosis were tested for this disease by immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) Western blots and by LTT-MELISA. Forty-five of these patients had Western blot results which were negative for both IgM and IgG by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); of these patients, 19 (42%) were LTT-MELISA-positive. Two of the patients who had IgM positive results by the CDC criteria were LTT-MELISA-negative. It is concluded that, for putative European-acquired Lyme borreliosis infections, it would be sensible to carry out both the LTT-MELISA and Western blot assay. PMID:25664127

  1. Clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of children with Lyme arthritis in Nova Scotia

    PubMed Central

    Glaude, Pier Diane; Huber, Adam M; Mailman, Timothy; Ramsey, Suzanne; Lang, Bianca; Stringer, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lyme disease is an emerging problem in Nova Scotia. Lyme arthritis is a late manifestation of Lyme disease. OBJECTIVE: To describe the demographic characteristics, referral patterns and clinical course of children diagnosed with Lyme arthritis in a tertiary care pediatric rheumatology clinic in Nova Scotia. METHODS: In the present retrospective chart review, subjects diagnosed with Lyme arthritis between 2006 and 2013 were identified through the clinic database. Demographic variables, referral patterns, clinical presentation and information regarding treatment course and outcome were collected. RESULTS: Seventeen patients were identified; 76% presented in 2012 and 2013. In 37.5% of cases, the referring physician suspected Lyme disease. Most patients presented with one or more painful and/or swollen joints; 94% had knee involvement. Only three of 17 patients had a history of erythema migrans and four of 17 recalled a tick bite. Five patients had a history of neurological manifestations consistent with Lyme disease, although, none had a diagnosis made at the time. Arthritis usually resolved after treatment with standard antibiotics; however, at last follow-up, two patients had antibiotic refractory Lyme arthritis, with one having joint damage despite aggressive arthritis treatment. CONCLUSION: A significant increase in cases of Lyme arthritis has recently been recognized in a pediatric rheumatology clinic in Nova Scotia. A history of a tick bite or erythema migrans were not sensitive markers of Lyme arthritis, and this diagnosis was often not considered by the referring physician. Educational initiatives should be undertaken to increase local awareness of this treatable cause of arthritis in children. PMID:26526378

  2. Phylogeographic Structure of the White-Footed Mouse and the Deer Mouse, Two Lyme Disease Reservoir Hosts in Québec

    PubMed Central

    Fiset, Jessica; Tessier, Nathalie; Millien, Virginie; Lapointe, Francois-Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Modification of a species range is one of many consequences of climate change and is driving the emergence of Lyme disease in eastern Canada. The primary reservoir host of the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, is the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), whose range is rapidly shifting north into southern Québec. The deer mouse, P. maniculatus, is occurring over most Québec province and is a less competent host for B. burgdorferi. Here, we compared the phylogeographic structure of both Peromyscus species in Québec. Using a combination of multiple mitochondrial DNA markers and phylogeographic methods, we detected an ongoing and rapid expansion of P. leucopus, while P. maniculatus appears more stable. Haplotype and populations networks indicated that populations of P. maniculatus exhibit more genetic structure than P. leucopus across the study area. Furthermore, significant and consistent genetic divergences between populations of the two species on both sides of the St. Lawrence River suggest that distinct lineages of P. leucopus and P. maniculatus with different ancestral origins colonized Southern Québec following the Last Glacial Maximum. The phylogeographic structure of pathogens is expected to mirror the structure observed in their reservoir hosts. As different strains of Borrelia burgdorferi may be associated with different levels of pathogenicity and immune responses of their hosts, our results are helpful at better understanding the pattern of spread of Lyme disease in a zone of emergence, and associated risk for human populations. PMID:26633555

  3. Phylogeographic Structure of the White-Footed Mouse and the Deer Mouse, Two Lyme Disease Reservoir Hosts in Québec.

    PubMed

    Fiset, Jessica; Tessier, Nathalie; Millien, Virginie; Lapointe, Francois-Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Modification of a species range is one of many consequences of climate change and is driving the emergence of Lyme disease in eastern Canada. The primary reservoir host of the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, is the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), whose range is rapidly shifting north into southern Québec. The deer mouse, P. maniculatus, is occurring over most Québec province and is a less competent host for B. burgdorferi. Here, we compared the phylogeographic structure of both Peromyscus species in Québec. Using a combination of multiple mitochondrial DNA markers and phylogeographic methods, we detected an ongoing and rapid expansion of P. leucopus, while P. maniculatus appears more stable. Haplotype and populations networks indicated that populations of P. maniculatus exhibit more genetic structure than P. leucopus across the study area. Furthermore, significant and consistent genetic divergences between populations of the two species on both sides of the St. Lawrence River suggest that distinct lineages of P. leucopus and P. maniculatus with different ancestral origins colonized Southern Québec following the Last Glacial Maximum. The phylogeographic structure of pathogens is expected to mirror the structure observed in their reservoir hosts. As different strains of Borrelia burgdorferi may be associated with different levels of pathogenicity and immune responses of their hosts, our results are helpful at better understanding the pattern of spread of Lyme disease in a zone of emergence, and associated risk for human populations. PMID:26633555

  4. Time-Independent and Time-Dependent Rheological Characterization of Dispersions with Varying Contents of Chickpea Flour and Gum Arabic Employing the Multiple Loop Experiments.

    PubMed

    J, Shanthilal; Bhattacharya, Suvendu

    2016-08-01

    The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) flour dispersions as the model system with different contents of flour (37% to 43%) and gum arabic (0% to 5%) were subjected to multiple loop experiments for simultaneous determination of the time-independent and time-dependent rheological characteristics. The Herschel-Bulkley model was suitable (0.993 ≤ r ≤ 0.999) to relate the time-independent characteristics linking shear stress and shear rate data for the individual upward and downward curves. The yield stress, consistency index, and apparent viscosity increased with the increasing flour and/or gum contents while flow behavior index (n) decreased. The yield stress generally decreased with the number of loops but n increased. In the individual loop tests, the n values for the decreasing shear stress/shear rate curves were always higher than corresponding increasing curves meaning a shift toward Newtonian characteristics. The time-independent properties (yield stress, apparent viscosity, consistency index, and n), the time-dependent characteristics like the area of the loop, and liquid characteristics like pourability and the nonoral sensory attributes (viscosity, spreadability, and tackiness) were individually predicted by artificial neural networks wherein the root mean square errors were between 3.6% and 17.2%. The sensory assessment indicated that the desirable parameters for a free-flowing and easily pourable spherical chickpea batter droplets occurred when the average pourability and spreadability values were 6.9 and 5.9, respectively. The normalized indices for these 2 parameters indicated that the batter having 40% flour and 2% gum contents was most suitable exhibiting a deviation of only 10% from the ideal sensory scores; these values were 40% and 0% to 3%, and 43% and 0%, respectively exhibiting up to 20% deviation. PMID:27331658

  5. Heterogeneous chromosome 12p deletion is an independent adverse prognostic factor and resistant to bortezomib-based therapy in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Xu, Yan; Deng, Ping; Yang, Ye; Sui, Weiwei; Jin, Fengyan; Hao, Mu; Li, Zengjun; Zang, Meirong; Zhou, Dehui; Gu, Zhimin; Ru, Kun; Wang, Jianxiang; Cheng, Tao; Qiu, Lugui

    2015-01-01

    The deletion of 12p (del(12p)) has been described as a novel negative prognostic marker in multiple myeloma (MM) and has gained increasing attention in recent years. However, its impact on MM is still controversial. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the clinical impact of 12p13 deletion using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on 275 newly diagnosed MM cases treated in a prospective, non-randomized clinical trial (BDH 2008/02). The results showed that deletion of 12p13 was detected in 10.5% of newly diagnosed cases and associated with multiple indicators for high tumor burden including ISS III, BM plasmacytosis larger than 50%, and renal lesion. Moreover, the cases with 12p13 deletion typically had higher incidence of del(17p), IGH translocation and t(4;14). Patients with del(12p) conferred significantly adverse prognosis for PFS and OS, even in patients subjected to bortezomib-based therapy. When adjusted to the established prognostic variables including del(13q), del(17p), t(4;14), amp(1q21), ISS stage and LDH, del(12p13) remained the powerful independent adverse factor for PFS (P = 0.007) and OS (P = 0.032). In addition, del(12p13) combined with high β2-MG, high LDH and bone lesion can further identify subpopulations with high-risk features. Our results strongly supported that del(12p13) can be used as a valuable prognostic marker in MM. PMID:25831238

  6. Post-treatment lyme syndrome and central sensitization.

    PubMed

    Batheja, Shweta; Nields, Jenifer A; Landa, Alla; Fallon, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Central sensitization is a process that links a variety of chronic pain disorders that are characterized by hypersensitivity to noxious stimuli and pain in response to non-noxious stimuli. Among these disorders, treatments that act centrally may have greater efficacy than treatments acting peripherally. Because many individuals with post-treatment Lyme syndrome (PTLS) have a similar symptom cluster, central sensitization may be a process mediating or exacerbating their sensory processing. This article reviews central sensitization, reports new data on sensory hyperarousal in PTLS, explores the potential role of central sensitization in symptom chronicity, and suggests new directions for neurophysiologic and treatment research. PMID:24026711

  7. Hint of Lyme, an uncommon cause of syncope.

    PubMed

    Manek, Megha; Kulkarni, Abhishek; Viera, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A 20-year-old Caucasian male patient presented after a single episode of syncope. His heart rate was 40 beats per minute. ECG showed new onset complete heart block. A temporary pacer was placed. He had a macular rash on the body from past 2 weeks and was diagnosed with contact dermatitis. Erythema migrans was considered as differential for rash. Lyme titre was ordered and found to be positive. After antibiotic therapy and observation on telemetry, his heart block resolved. He was subsequently discharged and a follow-up ECG revealed persistent normal sinus rhythm. PMID:24604793

  8. Diagnostic challenges of early Lyme disease: Lessons from a community case series

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne infection in North America, is increasingly reported. When the characteristic rash, erythema migrans, is not recognized and treated, delayed manifestations of disseminated infection may occur. The accuracy of diagnosis and treatment of early Lyme disease in the community is unknown. Methods A retrospective, consecutive case series of 165 patients presenting for possible early Lyme disease between August 1, 2002 and August 1, 2007 to a community-based Lyme referral practice in Maryland. All patients had acute symptoms of less than or equal to 12 weeks duration. Patients were categorized according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria and data were collected on presenting history, physical findings, laboratory serology, prior diagnoses and prior treatments. Results The majority (61%) of patients in this case series were diagnosed with early Lyme disease. Of those diagnosed with early Lyme disease, 13% did not present with erythema migrans; of those not presenting with a rash, 54% had been previously misdiagnosed. Among those with a rash, the diagnosis of erythema migrans was initially missed in 23% of patients whose rash was subsequently confirmed. Of all patients previously misdiagnosed, 41% had received initial antibiotics likely to be ineffective against Lyme disease. Conclusion For community physicians practicing in high-risk geographic areas, the diagnosis of Lyme disease remains a challenge. Failure to recognize erythema migrans or alternatively, viral-like presentations without a rash, can lead to missed or delayed diagnosis of Lyme disease, ineffective antibiotic treatment, and the potential for late manifestations. PMID:19486523

  9. Gender disparity between cutaneous and non-cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Strle, Franc; Wormser, Gary P; Mead, Paul; Dhaduvai, Kanthi; Longo, Michael V; Adenikinju, Omosalewa; Soman, Sandeep; Tefera, Yodit; Maraspin, Vera; Lotrič-Furlan, Stanka; Ogrinc, Katarina; Cimperman, Jože; Ružić-Sabljić, Eva; Stupica, Daša

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis in Europe include erythema migrans (EM) and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA); the most common non-cutaneous manifestations are Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) and Lyme arthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gender distribution of patients with these clinical manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Data on gender were obtained from the clinical records of patients with Lyme borreliosis aged ≥15 years who had been evaluated at the University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. Among 10,539 patients diagnosed with EM, 6,245 (59.3%) were female and among 506 ACA patients 347 (68.6%) were female. In contrast, among the 60 patients with Lyme arthritis only 15 (25%) were female (p<0.0001 for the comparison of gender with EM or ACA) and among the 130 patients with LNB only 51 (39.2%) were females (p<0.0001for the comparison of gender with EM or ACA). Although the proportion that was female in the LNB group was greater than that of patients with Lyme arthritis, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.10). Although older individuals are more likely to be female in the general Slovenian population, the age of patients with cutaneous versus non-cutaneous manifestations was not the explanation for the observed differences in gender. In conclusion, patients with cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis were predominantly female, whereas those with non-cutaneous manifestations were predominantly male. This provocative finding is unexplained but may have direct relevance to the pathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis. PMID:23737968

  10. Development of a Metabolic Biosignature for Detection of Early Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molins, Claudia R.; Ashton, Laura V.; Wormser, Gary P.; Hess, Ann M.; Delorey, Mark J.; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Schriefer, Martin E.; Belisle, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Early Lyme disease patients often present to the clinic prior to developing a detectable antibody response to Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent. Thus, existing 2-tier serology-based assays yield low sensitivities (29%–40%) for early infection. The lack of an accurate laboratory test for early Lyme disease contributes to misconceptions about diagnosis and treatment, and underscores the need for new diagnostic approaches. Methods. Retrospective serum samples from patients with early Lyme disease, other diseases, and healthy controls were analyzed for small molecule metabolites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). A metabolomics data workflow was applied to select a biosignature for classifying early Lyme disease and non-Lyme disease patients. A statistical model of the biosignature was trained using the patients' LC-MS data, and subsequently applied as an experimental diagnostic tool with LC-MS data from additional patient sera. The accuracy of this method was compared with standard 2-tier serology. Results. Metabolic biosignature development selected 95 molecular features that distinguished early Lyme disease patients from healthy controls. Statistical modeling reduced the biosignature to 44 molecular features, and correctly classified early Lyme disease patients and healthy controls with a sensitivity of 88% (84%–95%), and a specificity of 95% (90%–100%). Importantly, the metabolic biosignature correctly classified 77%–95% of the of serology negative Lyme disease patients. Conclusions. The data provide proof-of-concept that metabolic profiling for early Lyme disease can achieve significantly greater (P < .0001) diagnostic sensitivity than current 2-tier serology, while retaining high specificity. PMID:25761869

  11. Chronic or Late Lyme Neuroborreliosis: Analysis of Evidence Compared to Chronic or Late Neurosyphilis

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Whether spirochetes persist in affected host tissues and cause the late/chronic manifestations of neurosyphilis was the subject of long-lasting debate. Detection of Treponema pallidum in the brains of patients with general paresis established a direct link between persisting infection and tertiary manifestations of neurosyphilis. Today, the same question is in the center of debate with respect to Lyme disease. The goal of this review was to compare the established pathological features of neurosyphilis with those available for Lyme neuroborreliosis. If the main tertiary forms of neurosyphilis also occur in Lyme neuroborreliosis and Borrelia burgdorferi can be detected in brain lesions would indicate that the spirochete is responsible for the neuropsychiatric manifestations of late/chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. The substantial amounts of data available in the literature show that the major forms of late/chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis (meningovascular and meningoencephalitis) are clinically and pathologically confirmed. Borrelia burgdorferi was detected in association with tertiary brain lesions and cultivated from the affected brain or cerebrospinal fluid. The accumulated data also indicate that Borrelia burgdorferi is able to evade from destruction by the host immune reactions, persist in host tissues and sustain chronic infection and inflammation. These observations represent evidences that Borrelia burgdorferi in an analogous way to Treponema pallidum is responsible for the chronic/late manifestations of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Late Lyme neuroborreliosis is accepted by all existing guidelines in Europe, US and Canada. The terms chronic and late are synonymous and both define tertiary neurosyphilis or tertiary Lyme neuroborreliosis. The use of chronic and late Lyme neuroborreliosis as different entities is inaccurate and can be confusing. Further pathological investigations and the detection of spirochetes in infected tissues and body fluids are strongly needed

  12. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Borrelia afzelii and Two Borrelia garinii Lyme Disease Agent Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Dunn, John J.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Schutzer, Steve E.

    2011-01-01

    Human Lyme disease is commonly caused by several species of spirochetes in the Borrelia genus. In Eurasia these species are largely Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi, and B. bavariensis sp. nov. Whole-genome sequencing is an excellent tool for investigating and understanding the influence of bacterial diversity on the pathogenesis and etiology of Lyme disease. We report here the whole-genome sequences of four isolates from two of the Borrelia species that cause human Lyme disease, B. afzelii isolates ACA-1 and PKo and B. garinii isolates PBr and Far04. PMID:22123755

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an effective adjunctive treatment for chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Yu; Chen, Yen-Wen; Kao, Tseng-Hui; Kao, Hsin-Kuo; Lee, Yu-Chin; Cheng, Jui-Chun; Wang, Jia-Horng

    2014-05-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States, but it is relatively rare in Taiwan. Lyme disease can be treated with antibiotic agents, but approximately 20% of these patients experience persistent or intermittent subjective symptoms, so-called chronic Lyme disease (CLD). The mechanisms of CLD remain unclear and the symptoms related to CLD are difficult to manage. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) was applied in CLD therapy in the 1990s. However, reported information regarding the effectiveness of HBOT for CLD is still limited. Here, we present a patient with CLD who was successfully treated with HBOT. PMID:24726678

  14. Health Care Costs, Utilization and Patterns of Care following Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adrion, Emily R.; Aucott, John; Lemke, Klaus W.; Weiner, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lyme disease is the most frequently reported vector borne infection in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control have estimated that approximately 10% to 20% of individuals may experience Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome – a set of symptoms including fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and neurocognitive complaints that persist after initial antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease. Little is known about the impact of Lyme disease or post-treatment Lyme disease symptoms (PTLDS) on health care costs and utilization in the United States. Objectives 1) to examine the impact of Lyme disease on health care costs and utilization, 2) to understand the relationship between Lyme disease and the probability of developing PTLDS, 3) to understand how PTLDS may impact health care costs and utilization. Methods This study utilizes retrospective data on medical claims and member enrollment for persons aged 0-64 years who were enrolled in commercial health insurance plans in the United States between 2006-2010. 52,795 individuals treated for Lyme disease were compared to 263,975 matched controls with no evidence of Lyme disease exposure. Results Lyme disease is associated with $2,968 higher total health care costs (95% CI: 2,807-3,128, p<.001) and 87% more outpatient visits (95% CI: 86%-89%, p<.001) over a 12-month period, and is associated with 4.77 times greater odds of having any PTLDS-related diagnosis, as compared to controls (95% CI: 4.67-4.87, p<.001). Among those with Lyme disease, having one or more PTLDS-related diagnosis is associated with $3,798 higher total health care costs (95% CI: 3,542-4,055, p<.001) and 66% more outpatient visits (95% CI: 64%-69%, p<.001) over a 12-month period, relative to those with no PTLDS-related diagnoses. Conclusions Lyme disease is associated with increased costs above what would be expected for an easy to treat infection. The presence of PTLDS-related diagnoses after treatment is associated with significant health care

  15. Review of evidence for immune evasion and persistent infection in Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Berndtson, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Is chronic illness in patients with Lyme disease caused by persistent infection? Three decades of basic and clinical research have yet to produce a definitive answer to this question. This review describes known and suspected mechanisms by which spirochetes of the Borrelia genus evade host immune defenses and survive antibiotic challenge. Accumulating evidence indicates that Lyme disease spirochetes are adapted to persist in immune competent hosts, and that they are able to remain infective despite aggressive antibiotic challenge. Advancing understanding of the survival mechanisms of the Lyme disease spirochete carry noteworthy implications for ongoing research and clinical practice. PMID:23637552

  16. Frightening dreams and spells: a case of ventricular asystole from Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Weissman, K; Jagminas, L; Shapiro, M J

    1999-12-01

    We present a case of a 20-year-old woman who presented with a febrile illness, frightening dreams and repeated short episodes of apparent seizure activity. Third degree heart block and ventricular asystole were noted on the monitor when the patient experienced a spell during conscious sedation for a lumbar puncture. The combination of heart block and a predominantly lymphocytic cerebrospinal fluid led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. Lyme titres were strongly positive and subsequently confirmed by Western Blot analysis. Cardiac aetiologies and specifically heart block associated with Lyme disease should be considered in patients from endemic areas presenting with fever and unexplained spells or seizure-like activity. PMID:10646930

  17. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Borrelia afzelii and Two Borrelia garinii Lyme Disease Agent Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Casjens, S.R.; Dunn, J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Schutzer, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Human Lyme disease is commonly caused by several species of spirochetes in the Borrelia genus. In Eurasia these species are largely Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi, and B. bavariensis sp. nov. Whole-genome sequencing is an excellent tool for investigating and understanding the influence of bacterial diversity on the pathogenesis and etiology of Lyme disease. We report here the whole-genome sequences of four isolates from two of the Borrelia species that cause human Lyme disease, B. afzelii isolates ACA-1 and PKo and B. garinii isolates PBr and Far04.

  18. The Past, Present, and (Possible) Future of Serologic Testing for Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Theel, Elitza S

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease prevails as the most commonly transmitted tick-borne infection in the United States, and serologic evaluation for antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi remains the recommended modality for diagnosis. This review presents a brief historical perspective on the evolution of serologic assays for Lyme disease and provides a summary of the performance characteristics for the currently recommended two-tiered testing algorithm (TTTA). Additionally, a recently proposed alternative to the traditional TTTA is discussed, and novel methodologies, including immuno-PCR and metabolic profiling for Lyme disease, are outlined. PMID:26865690

  19. MO-C-17A-06: Online Adaptive Re-Planning to Account for Independent Motions Between Multiple Targets During Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F; Tai, A; Ahunbay, E; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional independent motions between multiple targets in radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer, and to study the dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning method to account for these variations. Methods: Ninety five diagnostic-quality daily CTs acquired for 9 lung cancer patients treated with IGRT using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were analyzed. On each daily CT set, contours of the targets (GTV, CTV, or involved nodes) and organs at risk were generated by populating the planning contours using an auto-segmentation tool (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing. For each patient, an IMRT plan was generated based on the planning CT with a prescription dose of 60 Gy in 2Gy fractions. Three plans were generated and compared for each daily CT set: an IGRT (repositioning) plan by copying the original plan with the required shifts, an online adaptive plan by rapidly modifying the aperture shapes and segment weights of the original plan to conform to the daily anatomy, and a new fully re-optimized plan based on the daily CT using a planning system (Panther, Prowess). Results: The daily deviations of the distance between centers of masses of the targets from the plans varied daily from -10 to 8 mm with an average −0.9±4.1 mm (one standard deviation). The average CTV V100 are 99.0±0.7%, 97.9±2.8%, 99.0±0.6%, and 99.1±0.6%, and the lung V20 Gy 928±332 cc, 944±315 cc, 917±300 cc, and 891±295 cc for the original, repositioning, adaptive, and re-optimized plans, respectively. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests show that the adaptive plans are statistically significantly better than the repositioning plans and comparable with the reoptimized plans. Conclusion: There exist unpredictable, interfractional, relative volume changes and independent motions between multiple targets during lung cancer RT which cannot be accounted for by the current IGRT repositioning but can be corrected by the online adaptive replanning method.

  20. Ancestral state reconstruction reveals multiple independent evolution of diagnostic morphological characters in the "Higher Oribatida" (Acari), conflicting with current classification schemes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    complex pattern of multiple independent gains (and losses). Thus, the observed pattern largely conflicts with current morphological classifications of the Circumdehiscentiae, suggesting that the current taxonomic classification schemes are not appropriate, apart from a recently proposed subdivision into 24 superfamilies. PMID:20701742

  1. Robustness evaluation of a computer-aided detection system for pulmonary embolism (PE) in CTPA using independent test set from multiple institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Kuriakose, Jean W.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Wei, Jun; Patel, Smita

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for assisting radiologists in detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) in computed tomographic pulmonary angiographic (CTPA) images. The CAD system includes stages of pulmonary vessel segmentation, prescreening of PE candidates and false positive (FP) reduction to identify suspicious PEs. The system was trained with 59 CTPA PE cases collected retrospectively from our patient files (UM set) with IRB approval. Five feature groups containing 139 features that characterized the intensity texture, gradient, intensity homogeneity, shape, and topology of PE candidates were initially extracted. Stepwise feature selection guided by simplex optimization was used to select effective features for FP reduction. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier was formulated to differentiate true PEs from FPs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of our CAD system using an independent test set of CTPA cases. The test set consists of 50 PE cases from the PIOPED II data set collected by multiple institutions with access permission. A total of 537 PEs were manually marked by experienced thoracic radiologists as reference standard for the test set. The detection performance was evaluated by freeresponse receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. The FP classifier obtained a test Az value of 0.847 and the FROC analysis indicated that the CAD system achieved an overall sensitivity of 80% at 8.6 FPs/case for the PIOPED test set.

  2. SMAC mimetic (JP1201) sensitizes non-small cell lung cancers to multiple chemotherapy agents in an IAP dependent but TNFα independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Rachel M.; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill E.; Girard, Luc; Xie, Yang; Gazdar, Adi; Harran, Patrick; Wang, Lai; Brekken, Rolf A.; Wang, Xiaodong; Minna, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are key regulators of apoptosis and are inhibited by the second mitocondrial activator of caspases (SMAC). Previously, a small subset of TNFα-expressing non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) was found to be sensitive to SMAC mimetics alone. In this study we determined if a SMAC mimetic (JP1201) could sensitize non-responsive NSCLC cell lines to standard chemotherapy. We found that JP1201 sensitized NSCLCs to doxorubicin, erlotinib, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, vinorelbine, and the combination of carboplatin with paclitaxel in a synergistic manner at clinically achievable drug concentrations. Sensitization did not occur with platinum alone. Furthermore, sensitization was specific for tumor compared to normal lung epithelial cells, increased in NSCLCs harvested after chemotherapy treatment, and did not induce TNFα secretion. Sensitization also was enhanced in vivo with increased tumor inhibition and increased survival of mice carrying xenografts. These effects were accompanied by caspase 3, 4, and 9 activation, indicating that both mitochondrial and ER stress-induced apoptotic pathways are activated by the combination of vinorelbine and JP1201. Chemotherapies that induce cell death through the mitochondrial pathway required only inhibition of XIAP for sensitization, while chemotherapies that induce cell death through multiple apoptotic pathways required inhibition of cIAP1, cIAP2, and XIAP. Therefore, the data suggest that IAP-targeted therapy using a SMAC mimetic provides a new therapeutic strategy for synergistic sensitization of NSCLCs to standard chemotherapy agents, which appears to occur independently of TNFα secretion. PMID:22049529

  3. Making sense of unfamiliar risks in the countryside: the case of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Afrodita; Uzzell, David; Barnett, Julie

    2011-05-01

    The focus of this paper is on how popular representations of the countryside provide countryside users with a discursive framework to make sense of unfamiliar countryside-based risks, taking Lyme disease as an example. Sixty-six semi-structured interviews were conducted with 82 visitors in Richmond Park, New Forest, and Exmoor National Park in the UK. The data were analysed using thematic analysis and was informed by social representations theory. The analysis indicated that a lay understanding of the risk of Lyme disease was filtered by place-attachment and the social representations of the countryside. Lyme disease was not understood primarily as a risk to health, but was instead constructed as a risk to the social and restorative practices in the context of the countryside. The findings suggest that advice about zoonoses such as Lyme disease is unlikely to cause panic, and that it should focus on the least intrusive preventative measures. PMID:21514209

  4. Study: Longer-Term Antibiotics Won't Ease 'Chronic Lyme Disease'

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158042.html Study: Longer-Term Antibiotics Won't Ease 'Chronic Lyme Disease' Dutch trial ... are unlikely to find relief from longer-term antibiotic therapy, according to a new Dutch study. Although ...

  5. Testing practices and volume of non-Lyme tickborne diseases in the United States.

    PubMed

    Connally, Neeta P; Hinckley, Alison F; Feldman, Katherine A; Kemperman, Melissa; Neitzel, David; Wee, Siok-Bi; White, Jennifer L; Mead, Paul S; Meek, James I

    2016-02-01

    Large commercial laboratories in the United States were surveyed regarding the number of specimens tested for eight tickborne diseases in 2008. Seven large commercial laboratories reported testing a total of 2,927,881 specimens nationally (including Lyme disease). Of these, 495,585 specimens (17%) were tested for tickborne diseases other than Lyme disease. In addition to large commercial laboratories, another 1051 smaller commercial, hospital, and government laboratories in four states (CT, MD, MN, and NY) were surveyed regarding tickborne disease testing frequency, practices, and results. Ninety-two of these reported testing a total of 10,091 specimens for four tickborne diseases other than Lyme disease. We estimate the cost of laboratory diagnostic testing for non-Lyme disease tickborne diseases in 2008 to be $9.6 million. These data provide a baseline to evaluate trends in tickborne disease test utilization and insight into the burden of these diseases. PMID:26565931

  6. Current Guidelines, Common Clinical Pitfalls, and Future Directions for Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease, United States.

    PubMed

    Moore, Andrew; Nelson, Christina; Molins, Claudia; Mead, Paul; Schriefer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks. Patients with an erythema migrans lesion and epidemiologic risk can receive a diagnosis without laboratory testing. For all other patients, laboratory testing is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, but proper interpretation depends on symptoms and timing of illness. The recommended laboratory test in the United States is 2-tiered serologic analysis consisting of an enzyme-linked immunoassay or immunofluorescence assay, followed by reflexive immunoblotting. Sensitivity of 2-tiered testing is low (30%-40%) during early infection while the antibody response is developing (window period). For disseminated Lyme disease, sensitivity is 70%-100%. Specificity is high (>95%) during all stages of disease. Use of other diagnostic tests for Lyme disease is limited. We review the rationale behind current US testing guidelines, appropriate use and interpretation of tests, and recent developments in Lyme disease diagnostics. PMID:27314832

  7. Current Guidelines, Common Clinical Pitfalls, and Future Directions for Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease, United States

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Andrew; Nelson, Christina; Molins, Claudia; Mead, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks. Patients with an erythema migrans lesion and epidemiologic risk can receive a diagnosis without laboratory testing. For all other patients, laboratory testing is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, but proper interpretation depends on symptoms and timing of illness. The recommended laboratory test in the United States is 2-tiered serologic analysis consisting of an enzyme-linked immunoassay or immunofluorescence assay, followed by reflexive immunoblotting. Sensitivity of 2-tiered testing is low (30%–40%) during early infection while the antibody response is developing (window period). For disseminated Lyme disease, sensitivity is 70%–100%. Specificity is high (>95%) during all stages of disease. Use of other diagnostic tests for Lyme disease is limited. We review the rationale behind current US testing guidelines, appropriate use and interpretation of tests, and recent developments in Lyme disease diagnostics. PMID:27314832

  8. Experiences of patients identifying with chronic Lyme disease in the healthcare system: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Lyme disease is a term that describes a constellation of persistent symptoms in patients with or without evidence of previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Patients labeled as having chronic Lyme disease have a substantial clinical burden. Little is known about chronic Lyme disease patient experiences in the healthcare system and their relationships with healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to gather insights about the experiences of patients who carry a diagnosis of chronic Lyme disease in the United States healthcare system. Methods Qualitative, phenomenological study in 12 adult participants who identified themselves as having chronic Lyme disease. Semi-structured face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted, 60–90 minutes in length, focusing on perceptions of disease burden and of their healthcare providers, using the dimensions of the Health Belief Model. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for emergent topics and themes in the categories of beliefs/understanding, personal history/narrative, consequences/limitations, management, and influences on care. Results Enrollment continued until theoretical saturation was obtained. Four major themes emerged from participants’ descriptions of their experiences and perceptions: 1) changes in health status and the social impact of chronic Lyme disease, 2) doubts about recovery and the future, 3) contrasting doctor-patient relationships, 4) and the use of unconventional therapies to treat chronic Lyme disease. Conclusions Participants reported a significant decline in health status associated with chronic Lyme disease and were often unsatisfied with care in conventional settings. Negative experiences were associated with reports of dismissive, patronizing, and condescending attitudes. Positive experiences were associated with providers who were reported to be attentive, optimistic, and supportive. Consultations with CAM practitioners and use of CAM therapies were common. Actively

  9. Forward genetic approaches for elucidation of novel regulators of Lyme arthritis severity

    PubMed Central

    Bramwell, Kenneth K.C.; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients experiencing natural infection with Borrelia burgdorferi display a spectrum of associated symptoms and severity, strongly implicating the impact of genetically determined host factors in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Herein, we provide a summary of the host genetic factors that have been demonstrated to influence the severity and chronicity of Lyme arthritis symptoms, and a review of the resources available, current progress, and added value of a forward genetic approach for identification of novel genetic regulators. PMID:24926442

  10. Did Garin and Bujadoux Actually Report a Case of Lyme Radiculoneuritis?

    PubMed Central

    Wormser, Gary P.; Wormser, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    A 1922 report by Garin and Bujadoux is widely regarded as describing the first case of neurologic Lyme borreliosis. Although the patient reported had a tick bite followed by the development of a rash and radiculoneuritis, there were a number of highly atypical features, raising the question of whether the patient, in fact, had neurologic Lyme borreliosis. The paper may not deserve the historic recognition that it has received. PMID:27419161

  11. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Characterizes Myocarditis in a 16-Year-Old Female With Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Catherine M; Harris, Matthew A; Chowdhury, Devyani

    2016-05-01

    Myocarditis may occur during early disseminated Lyme disease. A 16-year-old girl with serologic evidence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection and transient first-degree atrioventricular block underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, which demonstrated myocardial hyperemia, edema, and delayed gadolinium enhancement. We discuss the use of T1- and T2-weighted dark blood sequences in addition to inversion recovery delayed enhancement imaging to support the diagnosis of Lyme myocarditis. PMID:26701623

  12. Did Garin and Bujadoux Actually Report a Case of Lyme Radiculoneuritis?

    PubMed

    Wormser, Gary P; Wormser, Vanessa

    2016-04-01

    A 1922 report by Garin and Bujadoux is widely regarded as describing the first case of neurologic Lyme borreliosis. Although the patient reported had a tick bite followed by the development of a rash and radiculoneuritis, there were a number of highly atypical features, raising the question of whether the patient, in fact, had neurologic Lyme borreliosis. The paper may not deserve the historic recognition that it has received. PMID:27419161

  13. 5-hydroxytryptamine and Lyme disease. Opportunity for a novel therapy to reduce the cerebellar tremor?

    PubMed

    Maximov, G K; Maximov, K G; Chokoeva, A A; Lotti, T; Wollina, U; Patterson, J W; Guarneri, C; Tana, C; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G; Kanazawa, N; Tchernev, G

    2016-01-01

    Lyme boreliosis is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burdorferi, which is transmitted by ticks. A 59 year-old woman developed pyrexia, strong headaches, ataxia, dysarthria and tremor of the limbs after a tick bite. She was unable to work and eat on her own. She was hospitalized three times and diagnosed with cerebellar intention tremor, cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, bilateral horizontal gaze paralysis and a central lesion of the left facial nerve. There were no pyramidal, sensory or psychiatric disturbances. The brain MRI showed multifocal leucoencephalopathy with many hyperintense areas in both hemispheres, as well as in the left superior pedunculus cerebellaris. Diagnosis was confirmed by serologic examination. Treatment with cephtriaxone, doxycycline, methylprednisolone, cephixime and ciprofloxacine was administered without effect on the tremor, ataxia and horizontal gaze paralysis. Treatment was then administered with 5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT) in increased doses. The result of the three-month treatment with 5-HT was a gradual diminution of the tremor and the ataxia and an increase in the ability to eat, walk and work independently. PMID:27373127

  14. Fibronectin Binding Protein BBK32 of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Promotes Bacterial Attachment to Glycosaminoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Joshua R.; LeBlanc, Kimberly T.; Leong, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, causes a multisystemic illness that can affect the skin, heart, joints, and nervous system and is capable of attachment to diverse cell types. Among the host components recognized by this spirochete are fibronectin and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Three surface-localized GAG-binding bacterial ligands, Bgp, DbpA, and DbpB, have been previously identified, but recent studies suggested that at least one additional GAG-binding ligand is expressed on the spirochetal surface when the spirochete is adapted to the mammalian host environment. BBK32 is a surface lipoprotein that is produced during infection and that has been shown to bind to fibronectin. In this study, we show that, when BBK32 was produced from a shuttle vector in an otherwise nonadherent high-passage B. burgdorferi strain, the protein localized on the bacterial surface and conferred attachment to fibronectin and to mammalian cell monolayers. In addition, the high-passage strain producing BBK32 bound to purified preparations of the GAGs dermatan sulfate and heparin, as well as to these GAGs on the surfaces of cultured mammalian cells. Recombinant BBK32 recognized purified heparin, indicating that the bacterial attachment to GAGs was due to direct binding by BBK32. This GAG-binding activity of BBK32 is apparently independent of fibronectin recognition, because exogenous heparin had no effect on BBK32-mediated bacterial binding to fibronectin. PMID:16368999

  15. Seroprevalence of Lyme disease and associated risk factors in rural population of Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Xiangfeng; Lyu, Yanning; Jiang, Yi; Tian, Lili; Li, Xinyu; Lin, Changying; Sun, Yulan; Guan, Zengzhi; Zhang, Xiuchun; Wang, Quanyi

    2015-01-01

    A seroepidemiological survey of 801 local residents from 28 villages was conducted to assess the seroprevalence of Lyme disease and to identify the risk factors of becoming seropositive for Lyme disease in the northern suburb of Beijing. Forty-one serum samples were positive for IgG against B burgdorferi and the seroprevalence was 5.1% (41/801), indicating that Lyme disease is endemic in the rural population. In the multivariable analysis, sowing and harvesting in summer (OR, 2.377, 95% CI, 1.233-4.583), weed in the yard (OR, 1.914, 95% CI, 1.003-3.655) were positively associated with Lyme disease, while wearing protective clothes (OR, 0.173, 95% CI, 0.041-0.732) was negatively associated with Lyme disease. People living in the area are easily infected just near the house or in the cropland. They were barely diagnosed and cured. Without clear tick knowledge, the people are at high risk of exposure to tick bite and Lyme disease. PMID:26221360

  16. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Old Lyme Quadrangle, New London and Middlesex Counties, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Gregory J.; Scott, Robert B.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Armstrong, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    The bedrock geology of the Old Lyme quadrangle consists of Neoproterozoic and Permian gneisses and granites of the Gander and Avalon terranes, Silurian metasedimentary rocks of the Merrimack terrane, and Silurian to Devonian metasedimentary rocks of uncertain origin. The Avalon terrane rocks crop out within the Selden Neck block, and the Gander terrane rocks crop out within the Lyme dome. The Silurian to Devonian rocks crop out between these two massifs. Previous mapping in the Old Lyme quadrangle includes the work by Lawrence Lundgren, Jr. Lundgren's work provides an excellent resource for rock descriptions and detailed modal analyses of rock units that will not be duplicated in this current report. New research that was not covered in detail by Lundgren is the focus of this report and includes (1) evaluation of the rocks in the core of the Lyme dome in an effort to subdivide units in this area; (2) structural analysis of foliations and folds in and around the Lyme dome; (3) geochronology of selected units within the Lyme dome; and (4) analysis of joints and the fracture properties of the rocks.

  17. An Examination of the Demographic and Environmental Variables Correlated with Lyme Disease Emergence in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Seukep, Sara E; Kolivras, Korine N; Hong, Yili; Li, Jie; Prisley, Stephen P; Campbell, James B; Gaines, David N; Dymond, Randel L

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is the United States' most significant vector-borne illness. Virginia, on the southern edge of the disease's currently expanding range, has experienced an increase in Lyme disease both spatially and temporally, with steadily increasing rates over the past decade and disease spread from the northern to the southwestern part of the state. This study used a Geographic Information System and a spatial Poisson regression model to examine correlations between demographic and land cover variables, and human Lyme disease from 2006 to 2010 in Virginia. Analysis indicated that herbaceous land cover is positively correlated with Lyme disease incidence rates. Areas with greater interspersion between herbaceous and forested land were also positively correlated with incidence rates. In addition, income and age were positively correlated with incidence rates. Levels of development, interspersion of herbaceous and developed land, and population density were negatively correlated with incidence rates. Abundance of forest fragments less than 2 hectares in area was not significantly correlated. Our results support some findings of previous studies on ecological variables and Lyme disease in endemic areas, but other results have not been found in previous studies, highlighting the potential contribution of new variables as Lyme disease continues to emerge southward. PMID:26163019

  18. Multiple Independent Loci at Chromosome 15q25.1 Affect Smoking Quantity: a Meta-Analysis and Comparison with Lung Cancer and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, Nancy L.; Culverhouse, Robert C.; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Cannon, Dale S.; Chen, Xiangning; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Han, Shizhong; Han, Younghun; Keskitalo-Vuokko, Kaisu; Kong, Xiangyang; Landi, Maria Teresa; Ma, Jennie Z.; Short, Susan E.; Stephens, Sarah H.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Sun, Lingwei; Wang, Yufei; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Aggen, Steven H.; Breslau, Naomi; Broderick, Peter; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chen, Jingchun; Heath, Andrew C.; Heliövaara, Markku; Hoft, Nicole R.; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Niu, Tianhua; Payne, Thomas J.; Peltonen, Leena; Pergadia, Michele L.; Rice, John P.; Sherva, Richard; Spitz, Margaret R.; Sun, Juzhong; Wang, Jen C.; Weiss, Robert B.; Wheeler, William; Witt, Stephanie H.; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Caporaso, Neil E.; Ehringer, Marissa A.; Eisen, Tim; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gelernter, Joel; Houlston, Richard; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kraft, Peter; Leppert, Mark F.; Li, Ming D.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Pillai, Sreekumar; Rietschel, Marcella; Rujescu, Dan; Schwartz, Ann; Amos, Christopher I.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, genetic association findings for nicotine dependence, smoking behavior, and smoking-related diseases converged to implicate the chromosome 15q25.1 region, which includes the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 cholinergic nicotinic receptor subunit genes. In particular, association with the nonsynonymous CHRNA5 SNP rs16969968 and correlates has been replicated in several independent studies. Extensive genotyping of this region has suggested additional statistically distinct signals for nicotine dependence, tagged by rs578776 and rs588765. One goal of the Consortium for the Genetic Analysis of Smoking Phenotypes (CGASP) is to elucidate the associations among these markers and dichotomous smoking quantity (heavy versus light smoking), lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We performed a meta-analysis across 34 datasets of European-ancestry subjects, including 38,617 smokers who were assessed for cigarettes-per-day, 7,700 lung cancer cases and 5,914 lung-cancer-free controls (all smokers), and 2,614 COPD cases and 3,568 COPD-free controls (all smokers). We demonstrate statistically independent associations of rs16969968 and rs588765 with smoking (mutually adjusted p-values<10−35 and <10−8 respectively). Because the risk alleles at these loci are negatively correlated, their association with smoking is stronger in the joint model than when each SNP is analyzed alone. Rs578776 also demonstrates association with smoking after adjustment for rs16969968 (p<10−6). In models adjusting for cigarettes-per-day, we confirm the association between rs16969968 and lung cancer (p<10−20) and observe a nominally significant association with COPD (p = 0.01); the other loci are not significantly associated with either lung cancer or COPD after adjusting for rs16969968. This study provides strong evidence that multiple statistically distinct loci in this region affect smoking behavior. This study is also the first report of association between rs588765

  19. Some thoughts on error-contributions to reconstruct 3D coseismic displacement field using the model of combining multiple independent InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Jingfa; Luo, Yi

    2012-07-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has proved an immensely powerful tool in studying earthquakes with millimetre-scale accuracy at a high spatial resolution. However, each interferogram records only the component of displacement in the direction of the satellite line of sight (LOS). Thus previous InSAR studies of displacement due to earthquakes were generally limited to one or two components of the surface displacement field. Three- dimensional (3D) surface displacement maps can provide a more comprehensive understanding of source geometry associated with earthquake. By combining interferograms from multiple look angles, it is possible to constrain the three-dimensional components of displacement [Jung et al., 2011; Wright, et al., 2004; Hong et al., 2010]. In this work, we take 2008 Gaize Ms6.9 earthquake (Tibet) for example, derive LOS surface displacement from several paths of ENVISAT ASAR images (Image mode: Track 348, descending pass; Track 341, 427, and 155, ascending pass. ScanSAR mode: Track 341, 112, 155, and 384, ascending pass), and reconstruct the 3D coseismic displacement field with the model named multiple independent InSAR with different viewing angles. Because it is difficult to distinguish tectonic signal from phase noise (eg. orbital errors, atmospheric errors, and unwrapping errors), these error-contributions may be propagated to the 3D coseismic components (vertical, north, east). In addition, for ENVISAT ASAR, it is worth notice that the radar antenna is fixed with respect to the current satellite, which may lead to different LOS observations with nearly identical viewing angles in parallel passes. Thus, when inverting 3D components with least square solution, InSAR observation errors may be magnified by the ill-conditioned system of equations in the solution. Although the ill-conditioned system of equations may result in bad solution, some InSAR observation errors can be detected by the system. In our study, we will introduce the

  20. The Heterogeneity, Distribution, and Environmental Associations of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato, the Agent of Lyme Borreliosis, in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    James, Marianne C.; Gilbert, Lucy; Bowman, Alan S.; Forbes, Ken J.

    2014-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an emerging infectious human disease caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex of bacteria with reported cases increasing in many areas of Europe and North America. To understand the drivers of disease risk and the distribution of symptoms, which may improve mitigation and diagnostics, here we characterize the genetics, distribution, and environmental associations of B. burgdorferi s.l. genospecies across Scotland. In Scotland, reported Lyme borreliosis cases have increased almost 10-fold since 2000 but the distribution of B. burgdorferi s.l. is so far unstudied. Using a large survey of over 2200 Ixodes ricinus tick samples collected from birds, mammals, and vegetation across 25 sites we identified four genospecies: Borrelia afzelii (48%), Borrelia garinii (36%), Borrelia valaisiana (8%), and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (7%), and one mixed genospecies infection. Surprisingly, 90% of the sequence types were novel and, importantly, up to 14% of samples were mixed intra-genospecies co-infections, suggesting tick co-feeding, feeding on multiple hosts, or multiple infections in hosts. B. garinii (hosted by birds) was considerably more genetically diverse than B. afzelii (hosted by small mammals), as predicted since there are more species of birds than small mammals and birds can import strains from mainland Europe. Higher proportions of samples contained B. garinii and B. valaisiana in the west, while B. afzelii and B. garinii were significantly more associated with mixed/deciduous than with coniferous woodlands. This may relate to the abundance of transmission hosts in different regions and habitats. These data on the genetic heterogeneity within and between Borrelia genospecies are a first step to understand pathogen spread and could help explain the distribution of patient symptoms, which may aid local diagnosis. Understanding the environmental associations of the pathogens is critical for rational policy making for disease risk

  1. The association between tick-borne infections, Lyme borreliosis and autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Bransfield, Robert C; Wulfman, Jeffrey S; Harvey, William T; Usman, Anju I

    2008-01-01

    Chronic infectious diseases, including tick-borne infections such as Borrelia burgdorferi may have direct effects, promote other infections and create a weakened, sensitized and immunologically vulnerable state during fetal development and infancy leading to increased vulnerability for developing autism spectrum disorders. A dysfunctional synergism with other predisposing and contributing factors may contribute to autism spectrum disorders by provoking innate and adaptive immune reactions to cause and perpetuate effects in susceptible individuals that result in inflammation, molecular mimicry, kynurenine pathway changes, increased quinolinic acid and decreased serotonin, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and excitotoxicity that impair the development of the amygdala and other neural structures and neural networks resulting in a partial Klüver-Bucy Syndrome and other deficits resulting in autism spectrum disorders and/or exacerbating autism spectrum disorders from other causes throughout life. Support for this hypothesis includes multiple cases of mothers with Lyme disease and children with autism spectrum disorders; fetal neurological abnormalities associated with tick-borne diseases; similarities between tick-borne diseases and autism spectrum disorder regarding symptoms, pathophysiology, immune reactivity, temporal lobe pathology, and brain imaging data; positive reactivity in several studies with autistic spectrum disorder patients for Borrelia burgdorferi (22%, 26% and 20-30%) and 58% for mycoplasma; similar geographic distribution and improvement in autistic symptoms from antibiotic treatment. It is imperative to research these and all possible causes of autism spectrum disorders in order to prevent every preventable case and treat every treatable case until this disease has been eliminated from humanity. PMID:17980971

  2. Seasonal correlation of sporadic schizophrenia to Ixodes ticks and Lyme borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Markus

    2002-01-01

    Background Being born in winter and spring is considered one of the most robust epidemiological risk factors for schizophrenia. The aetiology and exact timing of this birth excess, however, has remained elusive so far. Since during phylogeny, Borrelia DNA has led to multiple germ-line mutations within the CB1 candidate gene for schizophrenia, a meta analysis has been performed of all papers on schizophrenic birth excesses with no less than 3000 cases each. All published numerical data were then plotted against the seasonal distributions of Ixodes ticks worldwide. Results In the United States, Europe and Japan the birth excesses of those individuals who later in life develop schizophrenia mirror the seasonal distribution of Ixodes ticks nine months earlier at the time of conception. South of the Wallace Line, which limits the spread of Ixodes ticks and Borrelia burgdorferi into Australia, seasonal trends are less significant, and in Singapore, being non-endemic for Ixodes ticks and Lyme disease, schizophrenic birth excesses are absent. Conclusion At present, it cannot be excluded that prenatal infection by B. burgdorferi is harmful to the implanting human blastocyst. The epidemiological clustering of sporadic schizophrenia by season and locality rather emphasises the risk to the unborn of developing a congenital, yet preventable brain disorder later in life. PMID:12453316

  3. Diversifying forest communities may change Lyme disease risk: extra dimension to the dilution effect in Europe.

    PubMed

    Ruyts, Sanne C; Ampoorter, Evy; Coipan, Elena C; Baeten, Lander; Heylen, Dieter; Sprong, Hein; Matthysen, Erik; Verheyen, Kris

    2016-09-01

    Lyme disease is caused by bacteria of the Borrelia burgdorferi genospecies complex and transmitted by Ixodid ticks. In North America only one pathogenic genospecies occurs, in Europe there are several. According to the dilution effect hypothesis (DEH), formulated in North America, nymphal infection prevalence (NIP) decreases with increasing host diversity since host species differ in transmission potential. We analysed Borrelia infection in nymphs from 94 forest stands in Belgium, which are part of a diversification gradient with a supposedly related increasing host diversity: from pine stands without to oak stands with a shrub layer. We expected changing tree species and forest structure to increase host diversity and decrease NIP. In contrast with the DEH, NIP did not differ between different forest types. Genospecies diversity however, and presumably also host diversity, was higher in oak than in pine stands. Infected nymphs tended to harbour Borrelia afzelii infection more often in pine stands while Borrelia garinii and Borrelia burgdorferi ss. infection appeared to be more prevalent in oak stands. This has important health consequences, since the latter two cause more severe disease manifestations. We show that the DEH must be nuanced for Europe and should consider the response of multiple pathogenic genospecies. PMID:27173094

  4. Serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis with bead based immunoassays using multiplex technology.

    PubMed

    Gerritzen, Andreas; Brandt, Sabine

    2012-04-01

    The serological diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis is accomplished by the detection of IgG and IgM antibodies specific for relevant antigens of the spirochetal pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. Instead of the usual enzyme immune assay for screening and the Western blot technique for confirmation, bead based multiplex assays with multiple simultaneously performed distinct reactions can provide quick, automatically derived and reliable results in a single run by flow cytometer technology. The broad analytical dynamic range of assay signals and the high sensitivity and specificity of the multiplex formats allow even for a reliable use in CSF based analyses for antibody specificity index in supposed neuroborreliosis. Fluorescence intensity of the bead based reactions can be transformed into quantified values as U/ml, either for each single antigen or summed up for a group of relevant key antigens. Additionally or alternatively distinct reactions of single bead populations can be transformed to Western blot band equivalents. Internal and external quality controls with the multiplex systems show characteristic data equivalent to the conventional assay formats, so that the advantages of the multiplex assays are ready for use in the routine diagnostic laboratory. PMID:22406491

  5. Community ecology and disease risk: lizards, squirrels, and the Lyme disease spirochete in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Lane, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Vector-borne zoonotic diseases are often maintained in complex transmission cycles involving multiple vertebrate hosts and their arthropod vectors. In the state of California, U.S.A., the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease, is transmitted between vertebrate hosts by the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus. Several mammalian species serve as reservoir hosts of the spirochete, but levels of tick infestation, reservoir competence, and Borrelia-infection prevalence vary widely among such hosts. Here, we model the host (lizards, Peromyscus mice, Californian meadow voles, dusky-footed wood rats, and western gray squirrels), vector, and pathogen community of oak woodlands in northwestern California to determine the relative importance of different tick hosts. Observed infection prevalence of B. burgdorferi in host-seeking I. pacificus nymphs was 1.8-5.3%, and our host-community model estimated an infection prevalence of 1.6-2.2%. The western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus) was the only source of infected nymphs. Lizards, which are refractory to Borrelia infection, are important in feeding subadult ticks but reduce disease risk (nymphal infection prevalence). Species identity is therefore critical in understanding and determining the local disease ecology. PMID:20380218

  6. Common and Low Frequency Variants in MERTK Are Independently Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility with Discordant Association Dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 Status.

    PubMed

    Binder, Michele D; Fox, Andrew D; Merlo, Daniel; Johnson, Laura J; Giuffrida, Lauren; Calvert, Sarah E; Akkermann, Rainer; Ma, Gerry Z M; Perera, Ashwyn A; Gresle, Melissa M; Laverick, Louise; Foo, Grace; Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J; Spelman, Timothy; Jordan, Margaret A; Baxter, Alan G; Foote, Simon; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Field, Judith

    2016-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The risk of developing MS is strongly influenced by genetic predisposition, and over 100 loci have been established as associated with susceptibility. However, the biologically relevant variants underlying disease risk have not been defined for the vast majority of these loci, limiting the power of these genetic studies to define new avenues of research for the development of MS therapeutics. It is therefore crucial that candidate MS susceptibility loci are carefully investigated to identify the biological mechanism linking genetic polymorphism at a given gene to the increased chance of developing MS. MERTK has been established as an MS susceptibility gene and is part of a family of receptor tyrosine kinases known to be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. In this study we have refined the association of MERTK with MS risk to independent signals from both common and low frequency variants. One of the associated variants was also found to be linked with increased expression of MERTK in monocytes and higher expression of MERTK was associated with either increased or decreased risk of developing MS, dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. This discordant association potentially extended beyond MS susceptibility to alterations in disease course in established MS. This study provides clear evidence that distinct polymorphisms within MERTK are associated with MS susceptibility, one of which has the potential to alter MERTK transcription, which in turn can alter both susceptibility and disease course in MS patients. PMID:26990204

  7. c-Myc Regulates Cyclin D-Cdk4 and -Cdk6 Activity but Affects Cell Cycle Progression at Multiple Independent Points

    PubMed Central

    Mateyak, Maria K.; Obaya, Alvaro J.; Sedivy, John M.

    1999-01-01

    c-myc is a cellular proto-oncogene associated with a variety of human cancers and is strongly implicated in the control of cellular proliferation, programmed cell death, and differentiation. We have previously reported the first isolation of a c-myc-null cell line. Loss of c-Myc causes a profound growth defect manifested by the lengthening of both the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. To gain a clearer understanding of the role of c-Myc in cellular proliferation, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of the components that regulate cell cycle progression. The largest defect observed in c-myc−/− cells is a 12-fold reduction in the activity of cyclin D1-Cdk4 and -Cdk6 complexes during the G0-to-S transition. Downstream events, such as activation of cyclin E-Cdk2 and cyclin A-Cdk2 complexes, are delayed and reduced in magnitude. However, it is clear that c-Myc affects the cell cycle at multiple independent points, because restoration of the Cdk4 and -6 defect does not significantly increase growth rate. In exponentially cycling cells the absence of c-Myc reduces coordinately the activities of all cyclin–cyclin-dependent kinase complexes. An analysis of cyclin-dependent kinase complex regulators revealed increased expression of p27KIP1 and decreased expression of Cdk7 in c-myc−/− cells. We propose that c-Myc functions as a crucial link in the coordinate adjustment of growth rate to environmental conditions. PMID:10373516

  8. Common and Low Frequency Variants in MERTK Are Independently Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility with Discordant Association Dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 Status

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Michele D.; Fox, Andrew D.; Merlo, Daniel; Johnson, Laura J.; Giuffrida, Lauren; Calvert, Sarah E.; Akkermann, Rainer; Ma, Gerry Z. M.; Perera, Ashwyn A.; Gresle, Melissa M.; Laverick, Louise; Foo, Grace; Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J.; Spelman, Timothy; Jordan, Margaret A.; Baxter, Alan G.; Foote, Simon; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kilpatrick, Trevor J.; Field, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The risk of developing MS is strongly influenced by genetic predisposition, and over 100 loci have been established as associated with susceptibility. However, the biologically relevant variants underlying disease risk have not been defined for the vast majority of these loci, limiting the power of these genetic studies to define new avenues of research for the development of MS therapeutics. It is therefore crucial that candidate MS susceptibility loci are carefully investigated to identify the biological mechanism linking genetic polymorphism at a given gene to the increased chance of developing MS. MERTK has been established as an MS susceptibility gene and is part of a family of receptor tyrosine kinases known to be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. In this study we have refined the association of MERTK with MS risk to independent signals from both common and low frequency variants. One of the associated variants was also found to be linked with increased expression of MERTK in monocytes and higher expression of MERTK was associated with either increased or decreased risk of developing MS, dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. This discordant association potentially extended beyond MS susceptibility to alterations in disease course in established MS. This study provides clear evidence that distinct polymorphisms within MERTK are associated with MS susceptibility, one of which has the potential to alter MERTK transcription, which in turn can alter both susceptibility and disease course in MS patients. PMID:26990204

  9. Mapping of Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12) to five-dimension EuroQol (EQ-5D) health outcomes: an independent validation in a randomized control cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sidovar, Matthew F; Limone, Brendan L; Coleman, Craig I

    2016-01-01

    Background Mapping of patient-reported outcomes to the five-dimension EuroQol (EQ-5D) health index is increasingly being used for understanding the relationship of outcomes to health states and for predicting utilities that have application in economic evaluations. The 12-item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12) is a patient-reported outcome that assesses the impact of walking impairment in people with MS. An equation for mapping the MSWS-12 to the EQ-5D was previously developed and validated using a North American Research Committee on MS (NARCOMS) registry cohort. Materials and methods This analysis retested the validity of the equation mapping the MSWS-12 to the three-level EQ-5D (EQ-5D-3L) by using an independent cohort of patients with MS enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. Mapping was evaluated at two separate time points (baseline and week 4) during the clinical trial. The mapping equation’s performance was subsequently assessed with mean absolute error (MAE) and root-mean-square error (RMSE) by comparing equation-based estimates to values elicited in the trial using the actual EQ-5D-3L questionnaire. Results The mapping equation predicted EQ-5D-3L values in this external cohort with reasonable precision at both time points (MAE 0.116 and RMSE 0.155 at baseline; MAE 0.105 and RMSE 0.138 at week 4), and was similar to that reported in the original NARCOMS cohort (MAE 0.109 and RMSE 0.145). Also as observed in the original NARCOMS cohort, the mapping equation performed best in patients with EQ-5D-3L values between 0.50 and 0.75, and poorly in patients with values <0.50. Conclusion The mapping equation performed similarly in this external cohort as in the original derivation cohort, including a poorer performance in MS patients with more severe health-state severity. PMID:26893584

  10. Chronic Lyme disease: it's not all in our heads.

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    Those of us with chronic Lyme disease are not at all confused, as suggested by Sigal and Hassett (2002). We know from years of experience that we have real, specific symptoms that are usually painful and disabling and include severe headaches, crippling arthritis, and heart palpitations, which lead to serious heart disease. Many of us know that our symptoms are kept in check while we are on antibiotics, but they painfully reappear when the antibiotics are withdrawn. Just because the medical community cannot detect a specific causative bacterium and managed health care companies want to maximize profits doesn't mean that those of us afflicted with this terrible condition are delusional and not truly benefiting from antibiotic treatment. We are not all crazy; we are sick and we should not be required to prove it to get medical care. PMID:12573918

  11. The seroepidemiology of Lyme borreliosis in zoo animals in Germany.

    PubMed Central

    Stoebel, K.; Schoenberg, A.; Streich, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted the first seroepidemiological study to evaluate the exposure of zoo animals to Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. in German zoos and wildlife parks. A total of 1487 individuals representing 148 ungulate and carnivore species belonging to 19 families were examined using a non-species dependent ELISA. Specific antibodies were detected in 154 (10.4%) animals; 168 (11.3%) sera produced borderline results. The percentage of seropositive individuals was related to species and origin (zoo), and increased with age of the animals. Sex and season did not influence seroprevalence. Examination of 600 ticks (Ixodes ricinus; caught from vegetation in the zoos) by darkfield microscopy and indirect immunofluorescence technique revealed infection rates within the range typical for Central Europe. The results substantiate that there is an infection risk for zoo animals. A differential diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis should be taken into account in case of suspicious clinical symptoms and possible contact to ticks. PMID:14596540

  12. Forme atypique d'une maladie de Lyme

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    La maladie de Lyme est une zoonose qui se manifeste essentiellement par des signes cutanés, articulaires, neurologiques et cardiaques. Elle peut exceptionnellement mimer une dermatomyosite. Nous rapportons l'observation d'une patiente âgée de 37 ans qui a présenté des myalgies et un érythroedème de la face et en péri-orbitaire. Une dermatomyosite a été fortement suspectée devant une élévation des enzymes musculaires. Elle a été traitée par une corticothérapie à forte dose. L’évolution a été marquée par l'aggravation des myalgies et l'apparition d'un déficit musculaire. Elle a été alors hospitalisée dans notre service. Les enzymes musculaires étaient élevées. L’électromyogramme était sans anomalies. Le bilan immunologique était négatif. Une enquête infectieuse a été réalisée retrouvant une sérologie de Lyme positive. Après administration d'une antibiothérapie adaptée, l’évolution était bonne avec disparition du tableau clinico-biologique de dermatomyosite. La précocité du diagnostic et l'instauration d'un traitement efficace permet d’éviter des complications graves. PMID:26516401

  13. Multiple sulfur and carbon isotope composition of sediments from the Belingwe Greenstone Belt (Zimbabwe): A biogenic methane regulation on mass independent fractionation of sulfur during the Neoarchean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomazo, Christophe; Nisbet, Euan G.; Grassineau, Nathalie V.; Peters, Marc; Strauss, Harald

    2013-11-01

    To explore the linkage between mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation (MIF-S) and δ13Corg excursions during the Neoarchean, as well as the contemporary redox state and biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulfur, we report the results of a detailed carbon and multiple sulfur (δ34S, δ33S, δ36S) isotopic study of the ∼2.7 Ga Manjeri and ∼2.65 Ga Cheshire formations of the Ngezi Group (Belingwe Greenstone Belt, Zimbabwe). Multiple sulfur isotope data show non-zero Δ33S and Δ36S values for sediments older than 2.4 Ga (i.e. prior to the Great Oxidation Event, GOE), indicating MIF-S thought to be associated with low atmospheric oxygen concentration. However, in several 2.7-2.5 Ga Neoarchean localities, small-scale variations in MIF-S signal (magnitude) seem to correlate with negative excursion in δ13Corg, possibly reflecting a global connection between the relative reaction rate of different MIF-S source reaction and sulfur exit channels and the biogenic flux of methane into the atmosphere during periods of localized, microbiologically mediated, shallow surface-water oxygenation. The Manjeri Formation black shales studied here display a wide range of δ13Corg between -35.4‰ and -16.2‰ (average of -30.3 ± 6.0‰, 1σ), while the Cheshire Formation shales have δ13Corg between -47.7‰ and -35.1‰ (average -41.3 ± 3‰, 1σ). The δ34S values of sedimentary sulfides from Manjeri Formation vary between -15.15‰ and +2.37‰ (average -1.71 ± 4.76‰, 1σ), showing very small and mostly negative Δ33S values varying from -0.58‰ to 0.87‰ (average 0.02 ± 0.43‰, 1σ). Cheshire Formation black shale sulfide samples measured in this study have δ34S values ranging from -2.11‰ to 2.39‰ (average 0.25 ± 1.08‰, 1σ) and near zero and solely positive Δ33S anomalies between 0.14‰ and 1.17‰ (average 0.56 ± 0.29‰, 1σ). Moreover, Δ36S/Δ33S in the two formations are comparable with a slope of -1.38 (Manjeri Formation) and -1.67 (Cheshire

  14. Climate change influences on the annual onset of Lyme disease in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, A. J.; Moore, S. M.; Sampson, K. M.; Beard, C. B.; Eisen, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. Lyme disease occurrence is highly seasonal and the annual springtime onset of cases is modulated by meteorological conditions in preceding months. A meteorological-based empirical model for Lyme disease onset week in the United States is driven with downscaled simulations from five global climate models and four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios to project the impacts of 21st century climate change on the annual onset week of Lyme disease. Projections are made individually and collectively for the 12 eastern States where >90% of cases occur. The national average annual onset week of Lyme disease is projected to become 0.4-0.5 weeks earlier for 2025-2040 (p<0.05), and 0.7-1.9 weeks earlier for 2065-2080 (p<0.01), with the largest shifts for scenarios with the highest greenhouse gas emissions. The more southerly mid-Atlantic States exhibit larger shifts (1.0-3.5 weeks) compared to the Northeastern and upper Midwestern States (0.2-2.3 weeks) by 2065-2080. Winter and spring temperature increases primarily cause the earlier onset. Greater spring precipitation and changes in humidity partially counteract the temperature effects. The model does not account for the possibility that abrupt shifts in the life cycle of Ixodes scapularis, the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States, may alter the disease transmission cycle in unforeseen ways. The results suggest 21st century climate change will make environmental conditions suitable for earlier annual onset of Lyme disease cases in the United States with possible implications for the timing of public health interventions.

  15. Climate change influences on the annual onset of Lyme disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Andrew J.; Moore, Sean M.; Sampson, Kevin M.; Beard, Charles B.; Eisen, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. Lyme disease occurrence is highly seasonal and the annual springtime onset of cases is modulated by meteorological conditions in preceding months. A meteorological-based empirical model for Lyme disease onset week in the United States is driven with downscaled simulations from five global climate models and four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios to project the impacts of 21st century climate change on the annual onset week of Lyme disease. Projections are made individually and collectively for the 12 eastern States where >90% of cases occur. The national average annual onset week of Lyme disease is projected to become 0.4–0.5 weeks earlier for 2025–2040 (p < 0.05), and 0.7–1.9 weeks earlier for 2065–2080 (p < 0.01), with the largest shifts for scenarios with the highest greenhouse gas emissions. The more southerly mid-Atlantic States exhibit larger shifts (1.0–3.5 weeks) compared to the Northeastern and upper Midwestern States (0.2–2.3 weeks) by 2065–2080. Winter and spring temperature increases primarily cause the earlier onset. Greater spring precipitation and changes in humidity partially counteract the temperature effects. The model does not account for the possibility that abrupt shifts in the life cycle of Ixodes scapularis, the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States, may alter the disease transmission cycle in unforeseen ways. The results suggest 21st century climate change will make environmental conditions suitable for earlier annual onset of Lyme disease cases in the United States with possible implications for the timing of public health interventions. PMID:26025268

  16. Climate change influences on the annual onset of Lyme disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Andrew J; Moore, Sean M; Sampson, Kevin M; Beard, Charles B; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2015-07-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. Lyme disease occurrence is highly seasonal and the annual springtime onset of cases is modulated by meteorological conditions in preceding months. A meteorological-based empirical model for Lyme disease onset week in the United States is driven with downscaled simulations from five global climate models and four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios to project the impacts of 21st century climate change on the annual onset week of Lyme disease. Projections are made individually and collectively for the 12 eastern States where >90% of cases occur. The national average annual onset week of Lyme disease is projected to become 0.4-0.5 weeks earlier for 2025-2040 (p<0.05), and 0.7-1.9 weeks earlier for 2065-2080 (p<0.01), with the largest shifts for scenarios with the highest greenhouse gas emissions. The more southerly mid-Atlantic States exhibit larger shifts (1.0-3.5 weeks) compared to the Northeastern and upper Midwestern States (0.2-2.3 weeks) by 2065-2080. Winter and spring temperature increases primarily cause the earlier onset. Greater spring precipitation and changes in humidity partially counteract the temperature effects. The model does not account for the possibility that abrupt shifts in the life cycle of Ixodes scapularis, the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States, may alter the disease transmission cycle in unforeseen ways. The results suggest 21st century climate change will make environmental conditions suitable for earlier annual onset of Lyme disease cases in the United States with possible implications for the timing of public health interventions. PMID:26025268

  17. Multi-criteria decision analysis as an innovative approach to managing zoonoses: results from a study on Lyme disease in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Zoonoses are a growing international threat interacting at the human-animal-environment interface and call for transdisciplinary and multi-sectoral approaches in order to achieve effective disease management. The recent emergence of Lyme disease in Quebec, Canada is a good example of a complex health issue for which the public health sector must find protective interventions. Traditional preventive and control interventions can have important environmental, social and economic impacts and as a result, decision-making requires a systems approach capable of integrating these multiple aspects of interventions. This paper presents the results from a study of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) approach for the management of Lyme disease in Quebec, Canada. MCDA methods allow a comparison of interventions or alternatives based on multiple criteria. Methods MCDA models were developed to assess various prevention and control decision criteria pertinent to a comprehensive management of Lyme disease: a first model was developed for surveillance interventions and a second was developed for control interventions. Multi-criteria analyses were conducted under two epidemiological scenarios: a disease emergence scenario and an epidemic scenario. Results In general, we observed a good level of agreement between stakeholders. For the surveillance model, the three preferred interventions were: active surveillance of vectors by flagging or dragging, active surveillance of vectors by trapping of small rodents and passive surveillance of vectors of human origin. For the control interventions model, basic preventive communications, human vaccination and small scale landscaping were the three preferred interventions. Scenarios were found to only have a small effect on the group ranking of interventions in the control model. Conclusions MCDA was used to structure key decision criteria and capture the complexity of Lyme disease management. This facilitated the

  18. Prevalence of the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in Blacklegged Ticks, Ixodes scapularis at Hamilton-Wentworth, Ontario.

    PubMed

    Scott, John D; Anderson, John F; Durden, Lance A; Smith, Morgan L; Manord, Jodi M; Clark, Kerry L

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease has emerged as a major health concern in Canada, where the etiological agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), a spirochetal bacterium, is typically spread by the bite of certain ticks. This study explores the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. in blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, collected at Dundas, Ontario (a locality within the region of Hamilton-Wentworth). Using passive surveillance, veterinarians and pet groomers were asked to collect blacklegged ticks from dogs and cats with no history of travel. Additionally, I. scapularis specimens were submitted from local residents and collected by flagging. Overall, 12 (41%) of 29 blacklegged ticks were infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing, two borrelial amplicons were characterized as B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), a genospecies pathogenic to humans and certain domestic animals. Notably, three different vertebrate hosts each had two engorged I. scapularis females removed on the same day and, likewise, one cat had three repeat occurrences of this tick species. These multiple infestations suggest that a population of I. scapularis may be established in this area. The local public health unit has been underreporting the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected I. scapularis in the area encompassing Dundas. Our findings raise concerns about the need to erect tick warning signs in parkland areas. Veterinarians, medical professionals, public health officials, and the general public must be vigilant that Lyme disease-carrying blacklegged ticks pose a public health risk in the Dundas area and the surrounding Hamilton-Wentworth region. PMID:27226771

  19. Prevalence of the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in Blacklegged Ticks, Ixodes scapularis at Hamilton-Wentworth, Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John D.; Anderson, John F.; Durden, Lance A.; Smith, Morgan L.; Manord, Jodi M.; Clark, Kerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease has emerged as a major health concern in Canada, where the etiological agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), a spirochetal bacterium, is typically spread by the bite of certain ticks. This study explores the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. in blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, collected at Dundas, Ontario (a locality within the region of Hamilton-Wentworth). Using passive surveillance, veterinarians and pet groomers were asked to collect blacklegged ticks from dogs and cats with no history of travel. Additionally, I. scapularis specimens were submitted from local residents and collected by flagging. Overall, 12 (41%) of 29 blacklegged ticks were infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing, two borrelial amplicons were characterized as B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), a genospecies pathogenic to humans and certain domestic animals. Notably, three different vertebrate hosts each had two engorged I. scapularis females removed on the same day and, likewise, one cat had three repeat occurrences of this tick species. These multiple infestations suggest that a population of I. scapularis may be established in this area. The local public health unit has been underreporting the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected I. scapularis in the area encompassing Dundas. Our findings raise concerns about the need to erect tick warning signs in parkland areas. Veterinarians, medical professionals, public health officials, and the general public must be vigilant that Lyme disease-carrying blacklegged ticks pose a public health risk in the Dundas area and the surrounding Hamilton-Wentworth region. PMID:27226771

  20. Lyme Borreliosis: is there a preexisting (natural) variation in antimicrobial susceptibility among Borrelia burgdorferi strains?

    PubMed Central

    Hodzic, Emir

    2015-01-01

    The development of antibiotics changed the world of medicine and has saved countless human and animal lives. Bacterial resistance/tolerance to antibiotics have spread silently across the world and has emerged as a major public health concern. The recent emergence of pan-resistant bacteria can overcome virtually any antibiotic and poses a major problem for their successful control. Selection for antibiotic resistance may take place where an antibiotic is present in the skin, gut, and other tissues of humans and animals and in the environment. Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agents of Lyme borreliosis, evades host immunity and establishes persistent infections in its mammalian hosts. The persistent infection poses a challenge to the effective antibiotic treatment, as demonstrated in various animal models. An increasingly heterogeneous subpopulation of replicatively attenuated spirochetes arises following treatment, and these persistent antimicrobial tolerant/resistant spirochetes are non-cultivable. The non-cultivable spirochetes resurge in multiple tissues at 12 months after treatment, with B. burgdorferi-specific DNA copy levels nearly equivalent to those found in shame-treated experimental animals. These attenuated spirochetes remain viable, but divide slowly, thereby being tolerant to antibiotics. Despite the continued non-cultivable state, RNA transcription of multiple B. burgdorferi genes was detected in host tissues, spirochetes were acquired by xenodiagnostic ticks, and spirochetal forms could be visualized within ticks and mouse tissues. A number of host cytokines were up- or down-regulated in tissues of both shame- and antibiotic-treated mice in the absence of histopathology, indicating a lack of host response to the presence of antimicrobial tolerant/resistant spirochetes. PMID:26295288

  1. Risk of Lyme disease: perceptions of residents of a Lone Star tick-infested community.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, P. M.; Brunet, L. R.; Spielman, A.; Telford, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lone Star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) have been suggested as a vector of the agent of Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato) in the USA, based on associations with an infection manifesting mainly as erythema migrans. In laboratory experiments, however, they failed to transmit B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. METHODS: In this study, carried out from 1994 to 1996, we determined the seroprevalences of B. burgdorferi (1.2%), Ehrlichia chaffeensis (7%), E. phagocytophila (0%), Rickettsia rickettsii (0%), R. typhi (0%), Coxiella burneti (0%), Francisella tularensis (0%), and Babesia microti (0%) by standard serological methods for 325 residents (97% of the total population) of Gibson Island, coastal Maryland, USA, where 15% of the residents reported having had Lyme disease within a recent 5-year span. FINDINGS: Of the 167 seronegative individuals who were followed up prospectively for 235 person-years of observation, only 2 (0.85%) seroconverted for B. burgdorferi. Of 1556 ticks submitted from residents, 95% were identified as Lone Star ticks; only 3% were deer ticks (Ixodes dammini), the main American vector of Lyme disease. B. burgdorferi s.s. infected 20% of host-seeking immature deer ticks, and borreliae ("B. lonestari") were detected in 1-2% of Lone Star ticks. Erythema migrans was noted in 65% of self-reports of Lyme disease, but many such reports indicated that the rash was present while the tick was still attached, suggesting a reaction to the bite itself rather than true Lyme disease. Sera from individuals reporting Lyme disease generally failed to react to B. burgdorferi or any other pathogen antigens. CONCLUSION: The residents of Gibson Island had an exaggerated perception of the risk of Lyme disease because they were intensely infested with an aggressively human-biting and irritating nonvector tick. In addition, a Lyme disease mimic of undescribed etiology (named Masters' disease) seems to be associated with Lone Star ticks, and may confound

  2. Passive tick surveillance, dog seropositivity, and incidence of human Lyme disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.L.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Zhioua, E.; Whitworth, U.G., Jr.; Markowski, D.; Hyland, K.E.; Hu, R.

    2004-01-01

    Data on nymphal Ixodes scapularis ticks submitted by the public to the University of Rhode Island Tick Research Laboratory for testing from 1991 to 2000 were compared with human case data from the Rhode Island Department of Health to determine the efficacy of passive tick surveillance at assessing human risk of Lyme disease. Numbers of ticks submitted were highly correlated with human cases by county (r = 0.998, n = 5 counties) and by town (r = 0.916, n = 37 towns), as were the numbers of positive ticks submitted (r = 0.989 by county, r = 0.787 by town). Human cases were correlated with ticks submitted by town each year, and with positive ticks in all but 2 years. Thus, passive tick surveillance effectively assessed geographical risk of human Lyme disease. In contrast, tick submissions through time were not correlated with human cases from year to year. Dog seropositivity was significantly correlated with human cases by county in both years tested, but by town in only one of two years. Numbers of ticks submitted were correlated with dog seropositivity by county but not by town, apparently because of high variability among towns with small sample sizes. Our results suggest that passive tick surveillance, using ticks submitted by the public for Lyme spirochete testing, can be used to assess the geographical distribution of Lyme disease risk, but cannot reliably predict Lyme incidence from year to year.

  3. Diversity of tick species biting humans in an emerging area for Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R P; Lacombe, E H; Rand, P W; Dearborn, R

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although most tick bites in humans in areas of the northeastern United States in which Lyme disease is highly endemic are due to Ixodes dammini, no study documents the frequency of I. dammini bites in low-prevalence or emerging areas for Lyme disease. Data on the proportion of tick bites in humans that are due to I. dammini in a region may have implications for public health policy and clinical management. METHODS. A statewide survey of the tick species that parasitized humans in Maine was conducted during 1989 and 1990. Tick submissions from throughout the state were elicited through media announcements. All ticks that had been removed from humans were identified, and data were collected that included bite seasonality and geography and demographics of tick bite victims. RESULTS. Of 709 ticks submitted, only 17% were I. dammini. Ixodes cookei, a vector for Powassan encephalitis, accounted for 34% of bites, and Dermacentor variabilis accounted for 45%. Other tick species were occasionally implicated. CONCLUSIONS. The likelihood that a tick bite was due to I. dammini was lower in Maine than in areas in the northeastern United States in which Lyme disease is highly endemic. Other tick vectors, associated with diseases other than Lyme disease, were more frequently implicated. Regional tick bite surveys may prove useful in assessing the risk of Lyme disease following a tick bite. PMID:1536337

  4. Antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease. Current recommendations by stage and extent of infection.

    PubMed

    Rahn, D W

    1992-05-15

    Much has been learned about Lyme disease over the past several years, but much remains to be learned. Careful clinical observation has led to elucidation of the natural history of this disease, and further clinical observations are needed to unravel the remaining areas of uncertainty. It is by no means clear that all the symptoms attributed to Lyme disease today actually represent true manifestations of Borrelia burgdorferi infection or that patients with well-documented Lyme disease whose symptoms do not respond to antibiotic therapy have persistent infection. Immunologically mediated mechanisms may be responsible for the chronic disease manifestations that seem so resistant to antibiotics. Uncovering answers to these questions requires the close collaboration of astute practicing physicians and biomedical scientists working together for their patients' benefit. PMID:1589368

  5. Stroke-like Phenomena Revealing Multifocal Cerebral Vasculitis in Pediatric Lyme Neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Mary; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Fluss, Joel

    2015-08-01

    Stroke-like presentation in Lyme neuroborreliosis is rare in the pediatric age group. We report a previously healthy 12-year-old boy who presented with acute left hemiparesis and meningeal signs. Neuroimaging failed to reveal any cerebral infarction but demonstrated a multifocal cerebral vasculitis involving small, medium and large-sized vessels affecting both the anterior and posterior circulation. Concentric contrast enhancement of the basilar artery was also observed. Further investigations and laboratory findings were consistent with Lyme neuroborreliosis. A rapidly favorable clinical outcome was obtained with appropriate antibiotic treatment along with antiaggregants and steroids. Lyme neuroborreliosis should be considered in the diagnostic differential, not only in adults but also among children, especially in the context of an unexplained cerebral vasculitis. PMID:25316727

  6. Sensitive multiplex PCR assay to differentiate Lyme spirochetes and emerging pathogens Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The infection with Borrelia burgdorferi can result in acute to chronic Lyme disease. In addition, coinfection with tick-borne pathogens, Babesia species and Anaplasma phagocytophilum has been increasing in endemic regions of the USA and Europe. The currently used serological diagnostic tests are often difficult to interpret and, moreover, antibodies against the pathogens persist for a long time making it difficult to confirm the cure of the disease. In addition, these tests cannot be used for diagnosis of early disease state before the adaptive immune response is established. Since nucleic acids of the pathogens do not persist after the cure, DNA-based diagnostic tests are becoming highly useful for detecting infectious diseases. Results In this study, we describe a real-time multiplex PCR assay to detect the presence of B. burgdorferi, B. microti and A. phagocytophilum simultaneously even when they are present in very low copy numbers. Interestingly, this quantitative PCR technique is also able to differentiate all three major Lyme spirochete species, B. burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. garinii by utilizing a post-PCR denaturation profile analysis and a single molecular beacon probe. This could be very useful for diagnosis and discrimination of various Lyme spirochetes in European countries where all three Lyme spirochete species are prevalent. As proof of the principle for patient samples, we detected the presence of low number of Lyme spirochetes spiked in the human blood using our assay. Finally, our multiplex assay can detect all three tick-borne pathogens in a sensitive and specific manner irrespective of the level of each pathogen present in the sample. We anticipate that this novel diagnostic method will be able to simultaneously diagnose early to chronic stages of Lyme disease, babesiosis and anaplasmosis using the patients’ blood samples. Conclusion Real-time quantitative PCR using specific primers and molecular beacon probes for the selected

  7. Antagonistic Interplay between MicroRNA-155 and IL-10 during Lyme Carditis and Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lochhead, Robert B.; Zachary, James F.; Dalla Rosa, Luciana; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H.; O’Connell, Ryan M.; Weis, Janis J.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 has been shown to play a role in immune activation and inflammation, and is suppressed by IL-10, an important anti-inflammatory cytokine. The established involvement of IL-10 in the murine model of Borrelia burgdorferi-induced Lyme arthritis and carditis allowed us to assess the interplay between IL-10 and miR-155 in vivo. As reported previously, Mir155 was highly upregulated in joints from infected severely arthritic B6 Il10-/- mice, but not in mildly arthritic B6 mice. In infected hearts, Mir155 was upregulated in both strains, suggesting a role of miR-155 in Lyme carditis. Using B. burgdorferi-infected B6, Mir155-/-, Il10-/-, and Mir155-/- Il10-/- double-knockout (DKO) mice, we found that anti-inflammatory IL-10 and pro-inflammatory miR-155 have opposite and somewhat compensatory effects on myeloid cell activity, cytokine production, and antibody response. Both IL-10 and miR-155 were required for suppression of Lyme carditis. Infected Mir155-/- mice developed moderate/severe carditis, had higher B. burgdorferi numbers, and had reduced Th1 cytokine expression in hearts. In contrast, while Il10-/- and DKO mice also developed severe carditis, hearts had reduced bacterial numbers and elevated Th1 and innate cytokine expression. Surprisingly, miR-155 had little effect on Lyme arthritis. These results show that antagonistic interplay between IL-10 and miR-155 is required to balance host defense and immune activation in vivo, and this balance is particularly important for suppression of Lyme carditis. These results also highlight tissue-specific differences in Lyme arthritis and carditis pathogenesis, and reveal the importance of IL-10-mediated regulation of miR-155 in maintaining healthy immunity. PMID:26252010

  8. Antagonistic Interplay between MicroRNA-155 and IL-10 during Lyme Carditis and Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lochhead, Robert B; Zachary, James F; Dalla Rosa, Luciana; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H; O'Connell, Ryan M; Weis, Janis J

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 has been shown to play a role in immune activation and inflammation, and is suppressed by IL-10, an important anti-inflammatory cytokine. The established involvement of IL-10 in the murine model of Borrelia burgdorferi-induced Lyme arthritis and carditis allowed us to assess the interplay between IL-10 and miR-155 in vivo. As reported previously, Mir155 was highly upregulated in joints from infected severely arthritic B6 Il10-/- mice, but not in mildly arthritic B6 mice. In infected hearts, Mir155 was upregulated in both strains, suggesting a role of miR-155 in Lyme carditis. Using B. burgdorferi-infected B6, Mir155-/-, Il10-/-, and Mir155-/- Il10-/- double-knockout (DKO) mice, we found that anti-inflammatory IL-10 and pro-inflammatory miR-155 have opposite and somewhat compensatory effects on myeloid cell activity, cytokine production, and antibody response. Both IL-10 and miR-155 were required for suppression of Lyme carditis. Infected Mir155-/- mice developed moderate/severe carditis, had higher B. burgdorferi numbers, and had reduced Th1 cytokine expression in hearts. In contrast, while Il10-/- and DKO mice also developed severe carditis, hearts had reduced bacterial numbers and elevated Th1 and innate cytokine expression. Surprisingly, miR-155 had little effect on Lyme arthritis. These results show that antagonistic interplay between IL-10 and miR-155 is required to balance host defense and immune activation in vivo, and this balance is particularly important for suppression of Lyme carditis. These results also highlight tissue-specific differences in Lyme arthritis and carditis pathogenesis, and reveal the importance of IL-10-mediated regulation of miR-155 in maintaining healthy immunity. PMID:26252010

  9. Experimental Lyme disease in dogs produces arthritis and persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Appel, M J; Allan, S; Jacobson, R H; Lauderdale, T L; Chang, Y F; Shin, S J; Thomford, J W; Todhunter, R J; Summers, B A

    1993-03-01

    Lyme disease was reproduced in specific pathogen-free beagle dogs by exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi-infected ticks (Ixodes dammini). Seroconversion and disease frequency were higher after exposure to infected adult ticks than to infected nymphs. Young pups developed clinical disease more readily than older dogs. The incubation period lasted 2-5 months. Acute recurrent lameness with fibrinopurulent arthritis was the dominant clinical sign. Dogs recovered but developed persistent mild polyarthritis. B. burgdorferi persisted in recovered dogs for at least 1 year. Isolation of B. burgdorferi and detection by polymerase chain reaction was most successful from skin biopsies at the site of the tick bite. Antibody to B. burgdorferi antigens was first detected by ELISA and Western blots by 4-6 weeks after exposure. High serum levels persisted during 17 months of observation. In contrast to infection from ticks, inoculation of dogs with cultured B. burgdorferi resulted in seroconversion with a shorter duration of antibody persistence and no clinical disease. PMID:8440936

  10. Epidemiology of Lyme Disease, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2002–2013

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, B. Lynn; Schleihauf, Emily; Mask, Angela; Haldane, David; Drebot, Michael; Baikie, Maureen; Cole, Teri J.; Fleming, Sarah; Gould, Richard; Lindsay, Robbin

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis ticks, which transmit Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease (LD), are endemic to at least 6 regions of Nova Scotia, Canada. To assess the epidemiology and prevalence of LD in Nova Scotia, we analyzed data from 329 persons with LD reported in Nova Scotia during 2002–2013. Most patients reported symptoms of early localized infection with rash (89.7%), influenza-like illness (69.6%), or both; clinician-diagnosed erythema migrans was documented for 53.2%. In a separate serosurvey, of 1,855 serum samples screened for antibodies to B. burgdorferi, 2 were borderline positive (both with an indeterminate IgG on Western blot), resulting in an estimated seroprevalence of 0.14% (95% CI 0.02%–0.51%). Although LD incidence in Nova Scotia has risen sharply since 2002 and is the highest in Canada (16/100,000 population in 2013), the estimated number of residents with evidence of infection is low, and risk is localized to currently identified LD-endemic regions. PMID:26401788

  11. Massage Therapy for Lyme Disease Symptoms: a Prospective Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Meghan J.; Moyer, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To study the effects of massage therapy (MT) on Lyme disease (LD) symptoms and affect. Methods A 21-year-old female college student previously diagnosed with LD was recruited for a prospective case study that incorporated alternating periods of treatment and nontreatment across 65 days. Her self-reported symptoms of pain, fatigue, and impairment of concentration were assessed by means of a daily diary with corresponding visual analog scales. Immediate effects of MT on affect were assessed by completion of the Positive and Negative Affect Scales before and after each treatment session. Results LD symptoms decreased during treatment periods and increased during nontreatment periods. Positive affect was increased at every MT session. Conclusions MT is a promising treatment for the symptoms pain, fatigue, and impaired concentration associated with LD. In addition, MT reliably increased positive affect. Massage therapists should consider using light-to-medium pressure MT for treatment of persons who present with a similar pattern of LD symptoms, and further research with this population is warranted. PMID:23429967

  12. Interaction of the Lyme disease spirochete with its tick vector.

    PubMed

    Caimano, Melissa J; Drecktrah, Dan; Kung, Faith; Samuels, D Scott

    2016-07-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease (along with closely related genospecies), is in the deeply branching spirochete phylum. The bacterium is maintained in nature in an enzootic cycle that involves transmission from a tick vector to a vertebrate host and acquisition from a vertebrate host to a tick vector. During its arthropod sojourn, B. burgdorferi faces a variety of stresses, including nutrient deprivation. Here, we review some of the spirochetal factors that promote persistence, maintenance and dissemination of B. burgdorferi in the tick, and then focus on the utilization of available carbohydrates as well as the exquisite regulatory systems invoked to adapt to the austere environment between blood meals and to signal species transitions as the bacteria traverse their enzootic cycle. The spirochetes shift their source of carbon and energy from glucose in the vertebrate to glycerol in the tick. Regulation of survival under limiting nutrients requires the classic stringent response in which RelBbu controls the levels of the alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate (collectively termed (p)ppGpp), while regulation at the tick-vertebrate interface as well as regulation of protective responses to the blood meal require the two-component system Hk1/Rrp1 to activate production of the second messenger cyclic-dimeric-GMP (c-di-GMP). PMID:27147446

  13. Epidemiology of Lyme Disease, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Hatchette, Todd F; Johnston, B Lynn; Schleihauf, Emily; Mask, Angela; Haldane, David; Drebot, Michael; Baikie, Maureen; Cole, Teri J; Fleming, Sarah; Gould, Richard; Lindsay, Robbin

    2015-10-01

    Ixodes scapularis ticks, which transmit Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease (LD), are endemic to at least 6 regions of Nova Scotia, Canada. To assess the epidemiology and prevalence of LD in Nova Scotia, we analyzed data from 329 persons with LD reported in Nova Scotia during 2002-2013. Most patients reported symptoms of early localized infection with rash (89.7%), influenza-like illness (69.6%), or both; clinician-diagnosed erythema migrans was documented for 53.2%. In a separate serosurvey, of 1,855 serum samples screened for antibodies to B. burgdorferi, 2 were borderline positive (both with an indeterminate IgG on Western blot), resulting in an estimated seroprevalence of 0.14% (95% CI 0.02%-0.51%). Although LD incidence in Nova Scotia has risen sharply since 2002 and is the highest in Canada (16/100,000 population in 2013), the estimated number of residents with evidence of infection is low, and risk is localized to currently identified LD-endemic regions. PMID:26401788

  14. Lyme disease spirochetes in ticks from northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Takada, N; Ishiguro, F; Fujita, H; Wang, H P; Wang, J C; Masuzawa, T

    1998-06-01

    During May 1996, field surveys on Lyme disease spirochetes were conducted in Beijing, Shenyang, Fushun, and Inner Mongolia in northeastern China. The ticks collected consisted of 3 genera and 12 species. Of these, Ixodes persulcatus was dominant in sun-exposed vegetation in forests in Inner Mongolia; 57 Borrelia strains (55/123 unfed adults and 2/5 immature stages fed on a rodent) were obtained from this tick by BSK culture. Additionally, 2/2 Apodemus peninsulae were positive. Ixodes nipponensis, Ixodes pavlovskyi, Haemaphysalis douglasi, and Haemaphysalis megaspinosa, newly recorded in China, and other Haemaphysalis spp. were all negative for Borrelia. Based on a polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 45 strains successfully subcultured, these were classified as 29 Borrelia garinii and 16 Borrelia afelii. These strains seemed to be more closely related to Japanese strains in genetic features than to those from Europe. The result of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggested more diversity in both genospecies, but Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto was not found. PMID:9645846

  15. Mitigation of Variability among 3D Echocardiography-Derived Regional Strain Values Acquired by Multiple Ultrasound Systems by Vendor Independent Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Streiff, Cole; Zhu, Meihua; Shimada, Eriko; Sahn, David J.; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study compared the variability of 3D echo derived circumferential and longitudinal strain values computed from vendor-specific and vendor-independent analyses of images acquired using ultrasound systems from different vendors. Methods Ten freshly harvested porcine hearts were studied. Each heart was mounted on a custom designed phantom and driven to simulate normal cardiac motion. Cardiac rotation was digitally controlled and held constant at 5°, while pumped stroke volume (SV) ranged from 30-70ml. Full-volume image data was acquired using three different ultrasound systems from different vendors. The image data was analyzed for longitudinal and circumferential strains (LS, CS) using both vendor-specific and vendor-independent analysis packages. Results Good linear relationships were observed for each vendor-specific analysis package for both CS and LS at the mid-anterior segment, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.82–0.91 (CS) and 0.86–0.89 (LS). Comparable linear regressions were observed for results determined by a vendor independent program (CS: R = 0.82–0.89; LS: R = 0.86–0.89). Variability between analysis packages was examined via a series of ANOVA tests. A statistical difference was found between vendor-specific analysis packages (p<0.001), while no such difference was observed between ultrasound systems when using the vendor-independent program (p>0.05). Conclusions Circumferential and longitudinal regional strain values differ when quantified by vendor-specific analysis packages; however, this variability is mitigated by use of a vendor-independent quantification method. These results suggest that echocardiograms acquired using different ultrasound systems could be meaningfully compared using vendor-independent software. PMID:27149685

  16. Lyme Carditis in the Fast Lane: From Alternating Bundle Branch Block to Asystole in 12 Hours.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Sara; Padala, Santosh K; Hui, Chui Man Carmen; Steckman, David A; Sidhu, Mandeep S; Torosoff, Mikhail T

    2015-10-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a multisystem infectious disease with well-known cardiac involvement, including potential carditis as well as conduction abnormalities. We report a case of Lyme disease in a previously healthy 24-year-old male presenting with alternating right- and left-bundle branch block, indicating infra-Hisian atrioventricular (infra-His) block with an accelerated fascicular escape rhythm. Inless than 12 hours, the conduction abnormalities progressed to asystole requiring the urgent placement of a temporary transvenous pacemaker. Subsequently, with appropriate antibiotic treatment, the patient's conduction abnormalities resolved in a week without the need for a permanent pacemaker. PMID:26630701

  17. [Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis co-incident with Lyme borreliosis in pregnant woman--a case study].

    PubMed

    Brzostek, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    A case of 25 years old woman, living in an endemic area for Lyme borreliosis was examined. In 29 th week of pregnancy thrombocytopenia, fever and fatigue were observed, in the last 7 weeks erythema migrans was present. The woman was not treated by that time. The infant presented thrombocytopenia in the first few weeks of life. 3 months after delivery erythema migrans disseminata was observed, by that time Lyme borreliosis and HGE were serologically confirmed. It was not confirmed that the infection was transferred to the infant, but it is possible that thrombocytopenia was caused by the infection with A. phagocytophila. PMID:15517809

  18. Of ticks, mice and men: understanding the dual-host lifestyle of Lyme disease spirochaetes

    PubMed Central

    Radolf, Justin D.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Stevenson, Brian; Hu, Linden T.

    2012-01-01

    In little more than 30 years, Lyme disease, which is caused by the spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi, has risen from relative obscurity to become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. During this period, there has been an extraordinary accumulation of knowledge on the phylogenetic diversity, molecular biology, genetics and host interactions of B. burgdorferi. In this Review, we integrate this large body of information into a cohesive picture of the molecular and cellular events that transpire as Lyme disease spirochaetes transit between their arthropod and vertebrate hosts during the enzootic cycle. PMID:22230951

  19. [The modification of a medium for culturing and isolating the causative agent of Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Gorelova, N B; Shcherbakov, S V

    1991-01-01

    Possible use of three types of media (prepared on the basis of 199, RPMI and MEM, the rest of receipt being recommended for BSK-II) for cultivation of the agent of Lyme's disease is reviewed. The most satisfactory Borrelia burgdorferi growth has been noted on the medium with base 199. Using the same medium 5 spirochaete isolates have been obtained from 10 passages of the material from 41 ticks, Ixodes persulcatus Sch. and I. ricinus L. The results seem promising for further studies on the elaboration of Soviet medium with base 199 for the cultivation and isolation of the agent of Lyme's disease. PMID:1770889

  20. Borrelia burgdorferi, the Causative Agent of Lyme Disease, Forms Drug-Tolerant Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bijaya; Brown, Autumn V; Matluck, Nicole E; Hu, Linden T; Lewis, Kim

    2015-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease, which affects an estimated 300,000 people annually in the United States. When treated early, the disease usually resolves, but when left untreated, it can result in symptoms such as arthritis and encephalopathy. Treatment of the late-stage disease may require multiple courses of antibiotic therapy. Given that antibiotic resistance has not been observed for B. burgdorferi, the reason for the recalcitrance of late-stage disease to antibiotics is unclear. In other chronic infections, the presence of drug-tolerant persisters has been linked to recalcitrance of the disease. In this study, we examined the ability of B. burgdorferi to form persisters. Killing growing cultures of B. burgdorferi with antibiotics used to treat the disease was distinctly biphasic, with a small subpopulation of surviving cells. Upon regrowth, these cells formed a new subpopulation of antibiotic-tolerant cells, indicating that these are persisters rather than resistant mutants. The level of persisters increased sharply as the culture transitioned from the exponential to stationary phase. Combinations of antibiotics did not improve killing. Daptomycin, a membrane-active bactericidal antibiotic, killed stationary-phase cells but not persisters. Mitomycin C, an anticancer agent that forms adducts with DNA, killed persisters and eradicated growing and stationary cultures of B. burgdorferi. Finally, we examined the ability of pulse dosing an antibiotic to eliminate persisters. After addition of ceftriaxone, the antibiotic was washed away, surviving persisters were allowed to resuscitate, and the antibiotic was added again. Four pulse doses of ceftriaxone killed persisters, eradicating all live bacteria in the culture. PMID:26014929

  1. Lyme disease-related intracranial hypertension in children: clinical and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Obeid, Rawad; Zuccoli, Giulio; Cleves-Bayon, Catalina; Nowalk, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a tick-borne infection that is endemic to multiple areas of the United States. Patients with LD may present with sign and symptoms of intracranial hypertension (IH). The objective of this study is to evaluate the history, clinical findings, CSF analysis, and brain imaging results in pediatric patients with increased intracranial pressure secondary to LD. A retrospective database search was performed using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 9/10 codes to identify patients diagnosed with LD and IH between 2004 and 2014 at a tertiary referral pediatric hospital. Clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging data for each patient were reviewed. Seven patients met inclusion criteria; mean age was 9.6 years (standard deviation 4.0 years); 4/7 patients were male. Average body mass index was 18.8 kg/m(2) (standard deviation 3.0 kg/m(2)). Fever was present in four patients. Four had a history of LD related erythema migrans. All had elevated CSF opening pressure with leukocytosis and lymphocytic predominance. MRI obtained in six patients showed contrast enhancement of various cranial nerves. Tentorial enhancement was noted in all patients. In addition, patients had widening of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve protrusion, and flattening of the posterior globe consistent with increased intracranial pressure. All patients had resolution of their symptoms after initiation of antibiotic therapy. In endemic areas, LD should be included in the differential of IH. MRI can help distinguish IH due to LD from its idiopathic form due to the presence of tentorial and cranial nerve enhancement in the former in addition to abnormal CSF showing leukocytosis with lymphocyte predominance. PMID:26739381

  2. Borrelia burgdorferi, the Causative Agent of Lyme Disease, Forms Drug-Tolerant Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bijaya; Brown, Autumn V.; Matluck, Nicole E.; Hu, Linden T.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease, which affects an estimated 300,000 people annually in the United States. When treated early, the disease usually resolves, but when left untreated, it can result in symptoms such as arthritis and encephalopathy. Treatment of the late-stage disease may require multiple courses of antibiotic therapy. Given that antibiotic resistance has not been observed for B. burgdorferi, the reason for the recalcitrance of late-stage disease to antibiotics is unclear. In other chronic infections, the presence of drug-tolerant persisters has been linked to recalcitrance of the disease. In this study, we examined the ability of B. burgdorferi to form persisters. Killing growing cultures of B. burgdorferi with antibiotics used to treat the disease was distinctly biphasic, with a small subpopulation of surviving cells. Upon regrowth, these cells formed a new subpopulation of antibiotic-tolerant cells, indicating that these are persisters rather than resistant mutants. The level of persisters increased sharply as the culture transitioned from the exponential to stationary phase. Combinations of antibiotics did not improve killing. Daptomycin, a membrane-active bactericidal antibiotic, killed stationary-phase cells but not persisters. Mitomycin C, an anticancer agent that forms adducts with DNA, killed persisters and eradicated growing and stationary cultures of B. burgdorferi. Finally, we examined the ability of pulse dosing an antibiotic to eliminate persisters. After addition of ceftriaxone, the antibiotic was washed away, surviving persisters were allowed to resuscitate, and the antibiotic was added again. Four pulse doses of ceftriaxone killed persisters, eradicating all live bacteria in the culture. PMID:26014929

  3. Are Independent Probes Truly Independent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Gino; Pecher, Diane; Schmidt, Henk G.; Zeelenberg, Rene

    2009-01-01

    The independent cue technique has been developed to test traditional interference theories against inhibition theories of forgetting. In the present study, the authors tested the critical criterion for the independence of independent cues: Studied cues not presented during test (and unrelated to test cues) should not contribute to the retrieval…

  4. Bull's-Eye and Nontarget Skin Lesions of Lyme Disease: An Internet Survey of Identification of Erythema Migrans

    PubMed Central

    Aucott, John N.; Crowder, Lauren A.; Yedlin, Victoria; Kortte, Kathleen B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Lyme disease is an emerging worldwide infectious disease with major foci of endemicity in North America and regions of temperate Eurasia. The erythema migrans rash associated with early infection is found in approximately 80% of patients and can have a range of appearances including the classic target bull's-eye lesion and nontarget appearing lesions. Methods. A survey was designed to assess the ability of the general public to distinguish various appearances of erythema migrans from non-Lyme rashes. Participants were solicited from individuals who visited an educational website about Lyme disease. Results. Of 3,104 people who accessed a rash identification survey, 72.7% of participants correctly identified the classic target erythema migrans commonly associated with Lyme disease. A mean of 20.5% of participants was able to correctly identify the four nonclassic erythema migrans. 24.2% of participants incorrectly identified a tick bite reaction in the skin as erythema migrans. Conclusions. Participants were most familiar with the classic target erythema migrans of Lyme disease but were unlikely to correctly identify the nonclassic erythema migrans. These results identify an opportunity for educational intervention to improve early recognition of Lyme disease and to increase the patient's appropriate use of medical services for early Lyme disease diagnosis. PMID:23133445

  5. Decorin-binding proteins A and B confer distinct mammalian cell type-specific attachment by Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Joshua R.; Parveen, Nikhat; Magoun, Loranne; Leong, John M.

    2003-01-01

    Host cell binding is an essential step in colonization by many bacterial pathogens, and the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, which colonizes multiple tissues, is capable of attachment to diverse cell types. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are ubiquitously expressed on mammalian cells and are recognized by multiple B. burgdorferi surface proteins. We previously showed that B. burgdorferi strains differ in the particular spectrum of GAGs that they recognize, leading to differences in the cultured mammalian cell types that they efficiently bind. The molecular basis of these binding specificities remains undefined, due to the difficulty of analyzing multiple, potentially redundant cell attachment pathways and to the paucity of genetic tools for this pathogen. In the current study, we show that the expression of decorin-binding protein (Dbp) A and/or DbpB, two B. burgdorferi surface proteins that bind GAGs, is sufficient to convert a high-passage nonadherent B. burgdorferi strain into one that efficiently binds 293 epithelial cells. Epithelial cell attachment was mediated by dermatan sulfate, and, consistent with this GAG-binding specificity, these recombinant strains did not bind EA-Hy926 endothelial cells. The GAG-binding properties of bacteria expressing DbpB or DbpA were distinguishable, and DbpB but not DbpA promoted spirochetal attachment to C6 glial cells. Thus, DbpA and DbpB may each play central but distinct roles in cell type-specific binding by Lyme disease spirochetes. This study illustrates that transformation of high-passage B. burgdorferi strains may provide a relatively simple genetic approach to analyze virulence-associated phenotypes conferred by multiple bacterial factors. PMID:12773620

  6. Interrogating the complex role of chromosome 16p13.13 in multiple sclerosis susceptibility: independent genetic signals in the CIITA-CLEC16A-SOCS1 gene complex.

    PubMed

    Zuvich, Rebecca L; Bush, William S; McCauley, Jacob L; Beecham, Ashley H; De Jager, Philip L; Ivinson, Adrian J; Compston, Alastair; Hafler, David A; Hauser, Stephen L; Sawcer, Stephen J; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Barcellos, Lisa F; Mortlock, Douglas P; Haines, Jonathan L

    2011-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, and numerous studies have shown that MS has a strong genetic component. Independent studies to identify MS-associated genes have often indicated multiple signals in physically close genomic regions, although by their proximity it is not always clear if these data indicate redundant or truly independent genetic signals. Recently, three MS study samples were genotyped in parallel using an Illumina Custom BeadChip. These revealed multiple significantly associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms within a 600 kb stretch on chromosome 16p13. Here we present a detailed analysis of variants in this region that clarifies the independent nature of these signals. The linkage disequilibrium patterns in the region and logistic regression analysis of the associations suggest that this region likely harbors three independent MS disease loci. Further, we examined cis-expression QTLs, histone modifications and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) binding data in the region. We also tested for correlated expression of the genes from the region using whole-genome expression array data from lymphoblastoid cell lines. Three of the genes show expression correlations across loci. Furthermore, in the GM12878 lymphoblastoid cell line, these three genes are in a continuous region devoid of H3K27 methylation, suggesting an open chromatin configuration. This region likely only contributes minimal risk to MS; however, investigation of this region will undoubtedly provide insight into the functional mechanisms of these genes. These data highlight the importance of taking a closer look at the expression and function of chromosome 16p13 in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:21653641

  7. Independent Prognostic Value of Single and Multiple Non-Specific 12-Lead Electrocardiographic Findings for Long-Term Cardiovascular Outcomes: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sawano, Mitsuaki; Kohsaka, Shun; Okamura, Tomonori; Inohara, Taku; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Higashiyama, Aya; Kadota, Aya; Okuda, Nagako; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki; Okayama, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2016-01-01

    Aims The long-term prognostic effect of non-specific 12-lead electrocardiogram findings is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the cumulative prognostic impact of axial, structural, and repolarization categorical abnormalities on cardiovascular death, independent from traditional risk scoring systems such as the Framingham risk score and the NIPPON DATA80 risk chart. Methods and Results A total of 16,816 healthy men and women from two prospective, longitudinal cohort studies were evaluated. 3,794 (22.6%) individuals died during a median follow-up of 15 years (range, 2.0–24 years). Hazard ratios for cardiovascular death, all-cause death, coronary death and stroke death were calculated for the cumulative and independent axial, structural, and repolarization categorical abnormalities adjusted for the Framingham risk score and the NIPPON DATA80 risk chart. Individuals with two or more abnormal categories had a higher risk of cardiovascular death after adjustment for Framingham risk score (men: HR 4.27, 95%CI 3.35–5.45; women: HR 4.83, 95%CI 3.76–6.22) and NIPPON DATA80 risk chart (men: HR 2.39, 95%CI 1.87–3.07; women: HR 2.04, 95%CI 1.58–2.64). Conclusion Cumulative findings of axial, structural, and repolarization abnormalities are significant predictors of long-term cardiovascular death in asymptomatic, healthy individuals independent of traditional risk stratification systems. PMID:27362562

  8. Evolutionary Aspects of Emerging Lyme Disease in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Feil, E. J.; Leighton, P. A.; Lindsay, L. R.; Margos, G.; Mechai, S.; Michel, P.; Moriarty, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    In North America, Lyme disease (LD) is a tick-borne zoonosis caused by the spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, which is maintained by wildlife. Tick vectors and bacteria are currently spreading into Canada and causing increasing numbers of cases of LD in humans and raising a pressing need for public health responses. There is no vaccine, and LD prevention depends on knowing who is at risk and informing them how to protect themselves from infection. Recently, it was found in the United States that some strains of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto cause severe disease, whereas others cause mild, self-limiting disease. While many strains occurring in the United States also occur in Canada, strains in some parts of Canada are different from those in the United States. We therefore recognize a need to identify which strains specific to Canada can cause severe disease and to characterize their geographic distribution to determine which Canadians are particularly at risk. In this review, we summarize the history of emergence of LD in North America, our current knowledge of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto diversity, its intriguing origins in the ecology and evolution of the bacterium, and its importance for the epidemiology and clinical and laboratory diagnosis of LD. We propose methods for investigating associations between B. burgdorferi sensu stricto diversity, ecology, and pathogenicity and for developing predictive tools to guide public health interventions. We also highlight the emergence of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto in Canada as a unique opportunity for exploring the evolutionary aspects of tick-borne pathogen emergence. PMID:26296723

  9. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Lyme disease in children.

    PubMed

    Eppes, Stephen C

    2003-01-01

    The approaches to diagnosing and treating Lyme disease (LD) have been improved and refined as a result of basic and clinical research, and considerable practical experience. In addition, there have been recent studies that have allowed improvements in the ability to prevent infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. This paper will review the relevant literature and address recent developments in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of LD. Issues specifically related to the management of children will be identified. Controversies regarding treatment approaches will be examined in some detail. Understanding the clinical manifestations, or stage, of LD is crucial when approaching both diagnosis and treatment. Early localized disease is best diagnosed by recognizing the characteristic skin lesion, erythema migrans. Early disease will frequently, but not always, be accompanied by a detectable antibody response, particularly IgM antibody to the spirochete. Late disease, chiefly arthritis, is generally associated with high levels of IgG antibody. Western blot technology allows confirmation of enzyme immunoassay results and is especially useful when the latter is in the low or equivocal range. Early localized disease responds well to oral antibacterial therapy. Early disseminated disease, often associated with neurologic findings, may require parenteral therapy. The arthritis associated with LD frequently responds to oral antibacterials, but some refractory cases may require intravenous therapy, and occasionally surgery. Doxycycline is the oral antibacterial of choice, while amoxicillin and cefuroxime axetil are alternatives that may be preferred in young children. Owing to its long half-life and once daily dose administration, intravenous ceftriaxone has become the accepted standard for parenteral therapy. Tick avoidance has long been the mainstay for preventing LD. Antibacterial prophylaxis, using doxycycline, for tick bites has been shown to be an effective approach to

  10. Evolutionary aspects of emerging Lyme disease in Canada.

    PubMed

    Ogden, N H; Feil, E J; Leighton, P A; Lindsay, L R; Margos, G; Mechai, S; Michel, P; Moriarty, T J

    2015-11-01

    In North America, Lyme disease (LD) is a tick-borne zoonosis caused by the spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, which is maintained by wildlife. Tick vectors and bacteria are currently spreading into Canada and causing increasing numbers of cases of LD in humans and raising a pressing need for public health responses. There is no vaccine, and LD prevention depends on knowing who is at risk and informing them how to protect themselves from infection. Recently, it was found in the United States that some strains of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto cause severe disease, whereas others cause mild, self-limiting disease. While many strains occurring in the United States also occur in Canada, strains in some parts of Canada are different from those in the United States. We therefore recognize a need to identify which strains specific to Canada can cause severe disease and to characterize their geographic distribution to determine which Canadians are particularly at risk. In this review, we summarize the history of emergence of LD in North America, our current knowledge of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto diversity, its intriguing origins in the ecology and evolution of the bacterium, and its importance for the epidemiology and clinical and laboratory diagnosis of LD. We propose methods for investigating associations between B. burgdorferi sensu stricto diversity, ecology, and pathogenicity and for developing predictive tools to guide public health interventions. We also highlight the emergence of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto in Canada as a unique opportunity for exploring the evolutionary aspects of tick-borne pathogen emergence. PMID:26296723

  11. Cryptic vector divergence masks vector-specific patterns of infection: an example from the marine cycle of Lyme borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Doherty, Paul F; Duneau, David; McCoy, Karen D

    2010-01-01

    Vector organisms are implicated in the transmission of close to a third of all infectious diseases. In many cases, multiple vectors (species or populations) can participate in transmission but may contribute differently to disease ecology and evolution. The presence of cryptic vector populations can be particularly problematic as differences in infection can be difficult to evaluate and may lead to erroneous evolutionary and epidemiological inferences. Here, we combine site-occupancy modeling and molecular assays to evaluate patterns of infection in the marine cycle of Lyme borreliosis, involving colonial seabirds, the tick Ixodes uriae, and bacteria of the Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. complex. In this cycle, the tick vector consists of multiple, cryptic (phenotypically undistinguishable but genetically distinct) host races that are frequently found in sympatry. Our results show that bacterial detection varies strongly among tick races leading to vector-specific biases if raw counts are used to calculate Borrelia prevalence. These differences are largely explained by differences in infection intensity among tick races. After accounting for detection probabilities, we found that overall prevalence in this system is higher than previously suspected and that certain vector–host combinations likely contribute more than others to the local dynamics and large-scale dispersal of Borrelia spirochetes. These results highlight the importance of evaluating vector population structure and accounting for detection probability when trying to understand the evolutionary ecology of vector-borne diseases. PMID:25567933

  12. Analysis of the Genetic Phylogeny of Multifocal Prostate Cancer Identifies Multiple Independent Clonal Expansions in Neoplastic and Morphologically Normal Prostate Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gundem, Gunes; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Kremeyer, Barbara; Butler, Adam; Lynch, Andrew G; Camacho, Niedzica; Massie, Charlie E; Kay, Jonathan; Luxton, Hayley J; Edwards, Sandra; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Dennis, Nening; Merson, Sue; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Zamora, Jorge; Corbishley, Cathy; Thomas, Sarah; Nik-Zainal, Serena; O’Meara, Sarah; Matthews, Lucy; Clark, Jeremy; Hurst, Rachel; Mithen, Richard; Bristow, Robert G; Boutros, Paul C; Fraser, Michael; Cooke, Susanna; Raine, Keiran; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Stebbings, Lucy; Hinton, Jon; Teague, Jon; McLaren, Stuart; Mudie, Laura; Hardy, Claire; Anderson, Elizabeth; Joseph, Olivia; Goody, Victoria; Robinson, Ben; Maddison, Mark; Gamble, Stephen; Greenman, Christopher; Berney, Dan; Hazell, Steven; Livni, Naomi; Fisher, Cyril; Ogden, Christopher; Kumar, Pardeep; Thompson, Alan; Woodhouse, Christopher; Nicol, David; Mayer, Erik; Dudderidge, Tim; Shah, Nimish C; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Voet, Thierry; Campbell, Peter; Futreal, Andrew; Easton, Douglas; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome DNA sequencing was used to decrypt the phylogeny of multiple samples from distinct areas of cancer and morphologically normal tissue taken from the prostates of three men. Mutations were present at high levels in morphologically normal tissue distant from the cancer reflecting clonal expansions, and the underlying mutational processes at work in morphologically normal tissue were also at work in cancer. Our observations demonstrate the existence of on-going abnormal mutational processes, consistent with field-effects, underlying carcinogenesis. This mechanism gives rise to extensive branching evolution and cancer clone mixing as exemplified by the coexistence of multiple cancer lineages harboring distinct ERG fusions within a single cancer nodule. Subsets of mutations were shared either by morphologically normal and malignant tissue or between different ERG-lineages, indicating earlier or separate clonal cell expansions. Our observations inform on the origin of multifocal disease and have implications for prostate cancer therapy in individual cases. PMID:25730763

  13. Lyme Borrelia positive serology associated with spontaneous abortion in an endemic Italian area.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, G; Luksa, V; Candussi, G; Rizzi, G M; Trevisan, G

    1988-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis acquired during pregnancy may be associated with stillbirth and fetal malformations. This paper reports preliminary results of a study intended to evaluate the frequency of Borrelia burgdorferi infection associated with spontaneous abortion in an endemic Italian area. PMID:3252658

  14. Toll-Like Receptors: Insights into Their Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Lyme Neuroborreliosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Bernardino, Andrea L. F.; Myers, Tereance A.; Alvarez, Xavier; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis is likely caused by inflammatory effects of the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi on the nervous system. Microglia, the resident macrophage cells within the central nervous system (CNS), are important in initiating an immune response to microbial products. In addition, astrocytes, the major CNS glial cell type, also can contribute to brain inflammation. TLRs (Toll-like receptors) are used by glial cells to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), mediate innate responses, and initiate an acquired immune response. Here we hypothesize that because of their PAMP specificities, TLR1, -2, -5, and -9 may be involved in the pathogenesis of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Previous reports have shown that the rhesus monkey is the only animal model to exhibit signs of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Therefore, we used primary cultures of rhesus astrocytes and microglia to determine the role of TLRs in mediating proinflammatory responses to B. burgdorferi. The results indicate that microglia and astrocytes respond to B. burgdorferi through TLR1/2 and TLR5. In addition, we observed that phagocytosis of B. burgdorferi by microglia enhances not only the expression of TLR1, -2, and -5, but also that of TLR4. Taken together, our data provide proof of the concept that astrocyte and microglial TLR1, -2, and -5 are involved in the in vivo response of primate glial cells to B. burgdorferi. The proinflammatory molecules elicited by these TLR-mediated responses could be a significant factor in the pathogenesis of Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:18694963

  15. Course and outcome of Early Lyme borreliosis in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Maraspin, Vera; Ružić-Sabljić, Eva; Lusa, Lara; Strle, Franc

    2015-08-01

    Patients with erythema migrans and underlying hematological malignancy more often had signs of disseminated Lyme borreliosis and more frequently needed antibiotic retreatment than sex-, age-, and antibiotic treatment-matched immunocompetent persons with erythema migrans. However, the outcome was excellent in both groups. PMID:25956890

  16. Laboratory diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis: a comparison of three CSF anti-Borrelia antibody assays.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, A J; Christiansson, M; Tjernberg, I; Löfgren, S; Matussek, A

    2014-05-01

    The diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) requires the detection of intrathecal synthesis of Borrelia-specific antibodies, but in very early disease, the sensitivity may be low. We compared the performance of the second-generation IDEIA Lyme Neuroborreliosis test (Oxoid), based on purified native flagellum antigen, with two newly developed tests based on several recombinant antigens for the diagnosis of LNB. Patients investigated for LNB during 2003 through 2007 were included (n = 175); 52 with definite LNB, four with possible LNB and 119 non-LNB patients. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were analysed with the IDEIA Lyme Neuroborreliosis (Oxoid), VIDAS Lyme IgG (bioMérieux) and recomBead Borrelia IgM and IgG (Mikrogen) assays. Intrathecal antibody indices (AIs) were calculated according to the manufacturers' protocols. The IDEIA test performed with an overall sensitivity (IgM and IgG AIs taken together) of 88 % and a specificity of 99 %. The VIDAS test showed a sensitivity of 86 % and a specificity of 97 %. An overall sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 97 % were achieved by the recomBead test. We conclude that the three assays performed equally well regarding specificity, but our data suggest an improved diagnostic sensitivity with the recomBead Borrelia test. PMID:24263552

  17. Preliminary Bedrock Geologic Map of the Old Lyme Quadrangle, New London and Middlesex Counties, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Gregory J.; Scott, Robert B.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Armstrong, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary map of the bedrock geology of the Old Lyme quadrangle, New London and Middlesex Counties, Connecticut. The map depicts contacts of bedrock geologic units, faults, outcrops, and structural geologic information. The map was published as part of a study of fractured bedrock aquifers and regional tectonics.

  18. A COMPARISON OF ANALYSIS UNITS FOR ASSOCIATING LYME DISEASE WITH FOREST-EDGE HABITAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assessed the relationship between land-cover pattern and Lyme disease incidence rate when modeled under three designs for data aggregation. Incidence rates were calculated from passive surveillance data reported in 12 Maryland counties during 1996 – 2000. A design usin...

  19. Local Production of Interferon Gamma by Invariant Natural Killer T cells Modulates Acute Lyme Carditis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Chris M.; Bates, Tonya C.; Izadi, Hooman; Radolf, Justin D.; Huber, Sally A.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Anguita, Juan

    2009-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is the only known human pathogen that directly activates invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. The number and activation kinetics of iNKT cells vary greatly among different strains of mice. We now report the role of the iNKT cell response in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease using C57Bl/6 mice, a strain with optimal iNKT cell activation that is resistant to the development of spirochetal-induced inflammation. During experimental infection of B6 mice with B. burgdorferi, iNKT cells localize to the inflamed heart where they are activated by CD1d-expressing macrophages. Activation of iNKT cells in vivo results in the production of IFNγ, which we demonstrate ameliorates the severity of murine Lyme carditis by at least two mechanisms. First, IFNγ enhances the recognition of B. burgdorferi by macrophages, leading to increased phagocytosis of the spirochete. Secondly, IFNγ activation of macrophages increases the surface expression of CD1d, thereby facilitating further iNKT activation. Collectively, our data demonstrate that in the resistant background, B6, iNKT cells modulate the severity of murine Lyme carditis through the action of IFNγ, which appears to self-renew through a positive feedback loop during infection. PMID:19265151

  20. 76 FR 35978 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulations. SUMMARY: The...

  1. 77 FR 6465 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulations. SUMMARY: The...

  2. Genome Sequence of Borrelia chilensis VA1, a South American Member of the Lyme Borreliosis Group

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weihua; Ojaimi, Caroline; Fallon, John T.; Travisany, Dante; Maass, Alejandro; Ivanova, Larisa; Tomova, Alexandra; González-Acuña, Daniel; Cabello, Felipe C.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia chilensis strain VA1 is a recently described South American member of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex from Chile. Whole-genome sequencing analysis determined its linear chromosome and plasmids lp54 and cp26, confirmed its membership in the Lyme borreliosis group, and will open new research avenues regarding its pathogenic potential. PMID:25676758

  3. GlpQ: an antigen for serological discrimination between relapsing fever and Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, T G; Schrumpf, M E; Hinnebusch, B J; Anderson, D E; Konkel, M E

    1996-01-01

    Tick-borne relapsing fever is caused by numerous Borrelia species maintained in nature by Ornithodoros tick-mammal cycles. Serological confirmation is based on either an immunofluorescence assay or an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using whole cells or sonicated Borrelia hermsii as the antigen. However, antigenic variability of this bacterium's outer surface proteins and antigens shared with the Lyme disease spirochete (B. burgdorferi), may cause both false-negative and false-positive results when testing sera of patients suspected to have either relapsing fever or Lyme disease. To develop a specific serological test for relapsing fever, we created a genomic DNA library of B. hermsii, screened transformed Escherichia coli cells for immunoreactivity with high-titered (> or = 1:2,048) human anti-B. hermsii antiserum, and selected an immunoreactive clone (pSPR75) expressing a 39-kDa protein. DNA sequencing, subcloning, and serum adsorption experiments identified the immunoreactive protein as a homolog of GlpQ, a glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase identified previously in E. coli, Haemophilus influenzae, and Bacillus subtilis. Serum samples from humans and mice infected with B. hermsii or other species of relapsing fever spirochetes contained antibodies recognizing GlpQ, whereas serum samples from Lyme disease and syphilis patients were nonreactive. Serologic tests based on this antigen will identify people exposed previously to relapsing fever spirochetes and help clarify the distribution of relapsing fever and Lyme disease in situations in which the occurrence of their causative agents is uncertain. PMID:8880505

  4. Cotton wool spots as possible indicators of retinal vascular pathology in ocular lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Klaeger, Andres J; Herbort, Carl P

    2010-10-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an underdiagnosed infectious disease caused by a spirochete and transmitted by certain Ixodes ticks. In Lyme disease diagnostic problems are still discussed extensively as the laboratory workup is not standardized and a positive antibody result is not proof of active infection. It is therefore important to appreciate all clinical signs that can prompt us to the diagnostic investigation of Lyme borreliosis. We present a case of a woman with Lyme borreliosis and recurrent unilateral anterior uveitis in her right eye for 2 years, who developed cotton wool spots (CWS) in her left eye, followed by acute and recurrent anterior uveitis in this second eye. An extensive general examination, including blood coagulopathies and ultrasound of the carotid arteries, did not reveal any pathology. The CWS resolved within a few months. The recurrent anterior uveitis could be controlled by topical steroids. After treatment with 2 g of i.v. ceftriaxone for 3 weeks, she remained free of recurrences for 1 year of observation time. CWS can be the first clinical sign of ocular vascular pathology and/or uveitis. Further investigation will be necessary to confirm the relationship between CWS and ocular borreliosis. In patients with otherwise unexplained CWS, the possibility of an infection with borreliosis should be ruled out carefully. PMID:18854948

  5. Applying Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology to Health Care Issues: Combating Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Kimberly A.; Brown, Scott W.; Cartter, Matthew

    1997-01-01

    Examines the effects of an instructional video on knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of high school students concerning Lyme disease. Results indicate a positive and sustained increase of students' knowledge as a result of the short intervention but show less positive results for the long-term effect on students' attitudes and behaviors.…

  6. Investigating Alternatives to Broad-Scale Pesticide Spraying for Control of Lyme Disease Risk

    EPA Science Inventory

    More than 20,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported annually in the US. Here in the Northeast, the geographic range of the disease and infection rates continue to increase. Beginning this summer, scientists from EPA Region 1 (Robert Koethe, Bart Hoskins) and ORD (Jason Grear) w...

  7. Lyme Disease: A Sourcebook for Teaching about a Major Environmental Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Norman D.; Stubbs, Harriett S.

    This book and others in the Changes in the Environment Series were produced as part of the GLOBE-NET Project, a partnership of science teachers and research scientists working on various aspects of global change. This book contains up-to-date information about Lyme disease, activities for the classroom, and other resources useful in teaching about…

  8. Role of Experience and Context in Learning To Diagnose Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakken, Lori L.

    2002-01-01

    Using grounded theory, the learning processes used by nine physicians to diagnose Lyme Disease were investigated. Repetition and counterexperiences served to frame the problem along a continuum of familiarity. Results suggest ways to prepare case studies that include variety, repetition, and counterexperiences to teach diagnosis. (Contains 28…

  9. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Lyme Disease Infected Ticks in the Texas-Mexico Border Region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lyme disease (LD) is the most prevalent arthropod-borne infection in the United States, with 33,097 cases of LD reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2011. The disease is transmitted to a mammalian host by Ixodes ticks infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Efforts to unde...

  10. Repeated holdout Cross-Validation of Model to Estimate Risk of Lyme Disease by Landscape Attributes

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously modeled Lyme disease (LD) risk at the landscape scale; here we evaluate the model's overall goodness-of-fit using holdout validation. Landscapes were characterized within road-bounded analysis units (AU). Observed LD cases (obsLD) were ascertained per AU. Data were ...

  11. Impacts of an introduced forest pathogen on the risk of Lyme disease in California.

    PubMed

    Swei, Andrea; Briggs, Cheryl J; Lane, Robert S; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2012-08-01

    Global changes such as deforestation, climate change, and invasive species have the potential to greatly alter zoonotic disease systems through impacts on biodiversity. This study examined the impact of the invasive pathogen that causes sudden oak death (SOD) on the ecology of Lyme disease in California. The Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, is maintained in the far western United States by a suite of animal reservoirs including the dusky-footed woodrat (Neotoma fuscipes) and deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and is transmitted by the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus). Other vertebrates, such as the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis), are important tick hosts but are not reservoirs of the pathogen. Previous work found that higher levels of SOD are correlated with greater abundance of P. maniculatus and S. occidentalis and lower N. fuscipes abundance. Here we model the contribution of these tick hosts to Lyme disease risk and also evaluate the potential impact of SOD on infection prevalence of the tick vector. By empirically parameterizing a static model with field and laboratory data on tick hosts, we predict that SOD reduces an important index of disease risk, nymphal infection prevalence, leading to a reduction in Lyme disease risk in certain coastal woodlands. Direct observational analysis of the impact of SOD on nymphal infection prevalence supports these model results. This study underscores the important direct and indirect impacts of invasive plant pathogens on biodiversity, the transmission cycles of zoonotic diseases, and ultimately human health. PMID:22607076

  12. Community Partnership Designed to Promote Lyme Disease Prevention and Engagement in Citizen Science †

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Veronica A.; Wilson, Shane; Toivonen, Samantha; Clarke, Benjamin; Prunuske, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project is to promote Lyme disease prevention and to cultivate an interest in science through a citizen-science project coordinated by researchers at a public university and teachers at rural high schools. The lesson plan is designed to increase student interest in pursuing a science career through participation in an authentic research experience, utilizing a topic that has implications on the health of the surrounding community. Students are introduced in the classroom to zoonotic diseases transmitted by the Ixodes tick, the health risks of Lyme disease, and disease prevention strategies. Students then participate in a research experience collecting field data and ticks from their community, which are used in university research. To measure changes in student knowledge and attitudes toward Lyme disease and science careers, students completed surveys related to the learning objectives associated with the experience. We found participation in the activity increased student confidence and ability to correctly differentiate a deer tick from a wood tick and to recognize the symptoms of Lyme disease. In addition, students reported increased interest in pursuing a science degree in college or graduate school. Authentic research experience related to a disease relevant to the local community is effective at enhancing high school student engagement in science. PMID:27047593

  13. Impacts of an Introduced Forest Pathogen on the Risk of Lyme Disease in California

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Cheryl J.; Lane, Robert S.; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Global changes such as deforestation, climate change, and invasive species have the potential to greatly alter zoonotic disease systems through impacts on biodiversity. This study examined the impact of the invasive pathogen that causes sudden oak death (SOD) on the ecology of Lyme disease in California. The Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, is maintained in the far western United States by a suite of animal reservoirs including the dusky-footed woodrat (Neotoma fuscipes) and deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and is transmitted by the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus). Other vertebrates, such as the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis), are important tick hosts but are not reservoirs of the pathogen. Previous work found that higher levels of SOD are correlated with greater abundance of P. maniculatus and S. occidentalis and lower N. fuscipes abundance. Here we model the contribution of these tick hosts to Lyme disease risk and also evaluate the potential impact of SOD on infection prevalence of the tick vector. By empirically parameterizing a static model with field and laboratory data on tick hosts, we predict that SOD reduces an important index of disease risk, nymphal infection prevalence, leading to a reduction in Lyme disease risk in certain coastal woodlands. Direct observational analysis of the impact of SOD on nymphal infection prevalence supports these model results. This study underscores the important direct and indirect impacts of invasive plant pathogens on biodiversity, the transmission cycles of zoonotic diseases, and ultimately human health. PMID:22607076

  14. Community Partnership Designed to Promote Lyme Disease Prevention and Engagement in Citizen Science.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Veronica A; Wilson, Shane; Toivonen, Samantha; Clarke, Benjamin; Prunuske, Amy

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this project is to promote Lyme disease prevention and to cultivate an interest in science through a citizen-science project coordinated by researchers at a public university and teachers at rural high schools. The lesson plan is designed to increase student interest in pursuing a science career through participation in an authentic research experience, utilizing a topic that has implications on the health of the surrounding community. Students are introduced in the classroom to zoonotic diseases transmitted by the Ixodes tick, the health risks of Lyme disease, and disease prevention strategies. Students then participate in a research experience collecting field data and ticks from their community, which are used in university research. To measure changes in student knowledge and attitudes toward Lyme disease and science careers, students completed surveys related to the learning objectives associated with the experience. We found participation in the activity increased student confidence and ability to correctly differentiate a deer tick from a wood tick and to recognize the symptoms of Lyme disease. In addition, students reported increased interest in pursuing a science degree in college or graduate school. Authentic research experience related to a disease relevant to the local community is effective at enhancing high school student engagement in science. PMID:27047593

  15. The Multiple Personalities of the Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase CK2: CK2 Dependent and CK2 Independent Roles Reveal a Secret Identity for CK2β

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly casein kinase II), an enzyme that participates in a wide variety of cellular processes, has traditionally been classified as a stable tetrameric complex consisting of two catalytic CK2α or CK2α' subunits and two regulatory CK2β subunits. While consideration of CK2 as a tetrameric complex remains relevant, significant evidence has emerged to challenge the view that its individual subunits exist exclusively within these complexes. This review will summarize biochemical and genetic evidence indicating that the regulatory CK2β subunit exists and performs functions independently of CK2 tetramers. For example, unbalanced expression of catalytic and regulatory CK2 subunits has been observed in a variety of tissues and tumors. Furthermore, localization studies including live cell imaging have demonstrated that while the catalytic and regulatory subunits of CK2 exhibit extensive co-localization, independent mobility of the individual CK2 subunits can also be observed within cells. Identification of proteins that interact with CK2β in the absence of catalytic CK2 subunits reinforces the notion that CK2β has functions distinct from CK2 and begins to offer insights into these CK2-independent functions. In this respect, the discovery that CK2β can interact with and modulate the activity of a number of other serine/threonine protein kinases including A-Raf, c-Mos and Chk1 is particularly striking. This review will discuss the interactions between CK2β and these protein kinases with special emphasis on the properties of CK2β that mediate these interactions and on the implications of these interactions in yielding new prospects for elucidation of the cellular functions of CK2β. PMID:15951851

  16. Role of interleukin-23 (IL-23) receptor signaling for IL-17 responses in human Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Oosting, Marije; ter Hofstede, Hadewych; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Sturm, Patrick; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; van der Meer, Jos W M; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2011-11-01

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is known to play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of T helper 17 cells. It has been previously demonstrated that IL-17 is involved in experimental Lyme arthritis, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria. However, the precise role of the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) for the B. burgdorferi-induced IL-17 responses or human Lyme disease has not yet been elucidated. IL-23R single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11209026 was genotyped using the TaqMan assay. Functional studies were performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and cytokines were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Dose-dependent production of IL-23 and IL-17 by B. burgdorferi could be observed. Interestingly, when IL-23 bioactivity was inhibited by a specific antibody against IL-23p19, IL-17 production was significantly downregulated. In contrast, production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was not affected after the blockade of IL-23 activity. Moreover, individuals bearing a single nucleotide polymorphism in the IL-23R gene (Arg381Gln) produced significantly less IL-17 after B. burgdorferi stimulation compared with that of the individuals bearing the wild type. Despite lower IL-17 production, the IL-23R gene polymorphism did not influence the development of chronic Lyme disease in a cohort of patients with Lyme disease. This study demonstrates that IL-23R signaling is needed for B. burgdorferi-induced IL-17 production in vitro and that an IL-23R gene SNP leads to impaired IL-17 production. However, the IL-23R gene polymorphism is not crucial for the pathogenesis of chronic Lyme. PMID:21896776

  17. Immunochip analyses identify a novel risk locus for primary biliary cirrhosis at 13q14, multiple independent associations at four established risk loci and epistasis between 1p31 and 7q32 risk variants

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Brian D.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Invernizzi, Pietro; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Li, Yafang; Xie, Gang; Kosoy, Roman; Ransom, Michael; Sun, Ye; Bianchi, Ilaria; Schlicht, Erik M.; Lleo, Ana; Coltescu, Catalina; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Podda, Mauro; Lammert, Craig; Shigeta, Russell; Chan, Landon L.; Balschun, Tobias; Marconi, Maurizio; Cusi, Daniele; Heathcote, E. Jenny; Mason, Andrew L.; Myers, Robert P.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Odin, Joseph A.; Luketic, Velimir A.; Bacon, Bruce R.; Bodenheimer, Henry C.; Liakina, Valentina; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Franke, Andre; Gregersen, Peter K.; Bossa, Fabrizio; Gershwin, M. Eric; deAndrade, Mariza; Amos, Christopher I.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Seldin, Michael F.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    To further characterize the genetic basis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), we genotyped 2426 PBC patients and 5731 unaffected controls from three independent cohorts using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array (Immunochip) enriched for autoimmune disease risk loci. Meta-analysis of the genotype data sets identified a novel disease-associated locus near the TNFSF11 gene at 13q14, provided evidence for association at six additional immune-related loci not previously implicated in PBC and confirmed associations at 19 of 22 established risk loci. Results of conditional analyses also provided evidence for multiple independent association signals at four risk loci, with haplotype analyses suggesting independent SNP effects at the 2q32 and 16p13 loci, but complex haplotype driven effects at the 3q25 and 6p21 loci. By imputing classical HLA alleles from this data set, four class II alleles independently contributing to the association signal from this region were identified. Imputation of genotypes at the non-HLA loci also provided additional associations, but none with stronger effects than the genotyped variants. An epistatic interaction between the IL12RB2 risk locus at 1p31and the IRF5 risk locus at 7q32 was also identified and suggests a complementary effect of these loci in predisposing to disease. These data expand the repertoire of genes with potential roles in PBC pathogenesis that need to be explored by follow-up biological studies. PMID:22936693

  18. Immunochip analyses identify a novel risk locus for primary biliary cirrhosis at 13q14, multiple independent associations at four established risk loci and epistasis between 1p31 and 7q32 risk variants.

    PubMed

    Juran, Brian D; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Invernizzi, Pietro; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Li, Yafang; Xie, Gang; Kosoy, Roman; Ransom, Michael; Sun, Ye; Bianchi, Ilaria; Schlicht, Erik M; Lleo, Ana; Coltescu, Catalina; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Podda, Mauro; Lammert, Craig; Shigeta, Russell; Chan, Landon L; Balschun, Tobias; Marconi, Maurizio; Cusi, Daniele; Heathcote, E Jenny; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Odin, Joseph A; Luketic, Velimir A; Bacon, Bruce R; Bodenheimer, Henry C; Liakina, Valentina; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Franke, Andre; Gregersen, Peter K; Bossa, Fabrizio; Gershwin, M Eric; deAndrade, Mariza; Amos, Christopher I; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Seldin, Michael F; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2012-12-01

    To further characterize the genetic basis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), we genotyped 2426 PBC patients and 5731 unaffected controls from three independent cohorts using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array (Immunochip) enriched for autoimmune disease risk loci. Meta-analysis of the genotype data sets identified a novel disease-associated locus near the TNFSF11 gene at 13q14, provided evidence for association at six additional immune-related loci not previously implicated in PBC and confirmed associations at 19 of 22 established risk loci. Results of conditional analyses also provided evidence for multiple independent association signals at four risk loci, with haplotype analyses suggesting independent SNP effects at the 2q32 and 16p13 loci, but complex haplotype driven effects at the 3q25 and 6p21 loci. By imputing classical HLA alleles from this data set, four class II alleles independently contributing to the association signal from this region were identified. Imputation of genotypes at the non-HLA loci also provided additional associations, but none with stronger effects than the genotyped variants. An epistatic interaction between the IL12RB2 risk locus at 1p31and the IRF5 risk locus at 7q32 was also identified and suggests a complementary effect of these loci in predisposing to disease. These data expand the repertoire of genes with potential roles in PBC pathogenesis that need to be explored by follow-up biological studies. PMID:22936693

  19. Multiple elements regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FOXO1: characterization of phosphorylation- and 14-3-3-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiangshan; Gan, Lixia; Pan, Haiyun; Kan, Donghui; Majeski, Michael; Adam, Stephen A; Unterman, Terry G

    2004-01-01

    FOXO1, a Forkhead transcription factor, is an important target of insulin and growth factor action. Phosphorylation of Thr-24, Ser-256 and Ser-319 promotes nuclear exclusion of FOXO1, yet the mechanisms regulating nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FOXO1 are poorly understood. Previous studies have identified an NLS (nuclear localization signal) in the C-terminal basic region of the DBD (DNA-binding domain), and a leucine-rich, leptomycin-B sensitive NES (nuclear export signal) located further downstream. Here, we find that other elements in the DBD also contribute to nuclear localization, and that multiple mechanisms contribute to nuclear exclusion of FOXO1. Phosphorylation of Ser-319 and a cluster of nearby residues (Ser-322, Ser-325 and Ser-329) functions co-operatively with the nearby NES to promote nuclear exclusion. The N-terminal region of FOXO1 (amino acids 1-149) also is sufficient to promote nuclear exclusion, and does so through multiple mechanisms. Amino acids 1-50 are sufficient to promote nuclear exclusion of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins, and the phosphorylation of Thr-24 is required for this effect. A leucine-rich, leptomycin B-sensitive export signal is also present nearby. Phosphorylated FOXO1 binds 14-3-3 proteins, and co-precipitation studies with tagged proteins indicate that 14-3-3 binding involves co-operative interactions with both Thr-24 and Ser-256. Ser-256 is located in the C-terminal region of the DBD, where 14-3-3 proteins may interfere both with DNA-binding and with nuclear-localization functions. Together, these studies demonstrate that multiple elements contribute to nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FOXO1, and that phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding regulate the cellular distribution and function of FOXO1 through multiple mechanisms. The presence of these redundant mechanisms supports the concept that the regulation of FOXO1 function plays a critical role in insulin and growth factor action. PMID:14664696

  20. Salam's independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    In his kind review of my biography of the Nobel laureate Abdus Salam (December 2008 pp45-46), John W Moffat wrongly claims that Salam had "independently thought of the idea of parity violation in weak interactions".

  1. Longitudinal Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Sustained Differential Gene Expression Signature in Patients Treated for Acute Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouquet, Jerome; Soloski, Mark J.; Swei, Andrea; Cheadle, Chris; Federman, Scot; Billaud, Jean-Noel; Rebman, Alison W.; Kabre, Beniwende; Halpert, Richard; Boorgula, Meher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, and approximately 10 to 20% of patients report persistent symptoms lasting months to years despite appropriate treatment with antibiotics. To gain insights into the molecular basis of acute Lyme disease and the ensuing development of post-treatment symptoms, we conducted a longitudinal transcriptome study of 29 Lyme disease patients (and 13 matched controls) enrolled at the time of diagnosis and followed for up to 6 months. The differential gene expression signature of Lyme disease following the acute phase of infection persisted for at least 3 weeks and had fewer than 44% differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in common with other infectious or noninfectious syndromes. Early Lyme disease prior to antibiotic therapy was characterized by marked upregulation of Toll-like receptor signaling but lack of activation of the inflammatory T-cell apoptotic and B-cell developmental pathways seen in other acute infectious syndromes. Six months after completion of therapy, Lyme disease patients were found to have 31 to 60% of their pathways in common with three different immune-mediated chronic diseases. No differential gene expression signature was observed between Lyme disease patients with resolved illness to those with persistent symptoms at 6 months post-treatment. The identification of a sustained differential gene expression signature in Lyme disease suggests that a panel of selected human host-based biomarkers may address the need for sensitive clinical diagnostics during the “window period” of infection prior to the appearance of a detectable antibody response and may also inform the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:26873097

  2. Does high biodiversity reduce the risk of Lyme disease invasion?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that increasing biodiversity, specifically host diversity, reduces pathogen and parasite transmission amongst wildlife (causing a “dilution effect”), whereby transmission amongst efficient reservoir hosts, (e.g. Peromyscus spp. mice for the agent of Lyme disease Borrelia burgdorferi) is reduced by the presence of other less efficient host species. If so, then increasing biodiversity should inhibit pathogen and parasite invasion. Methods We investigated this hypothesis by studying invasion of B. burgdorferi and its tick vector Ixodes scapularis in 71 field sites in southeastern Canada. Indices of trapped rodent host diversity, and of biodiversity of the wider community, were investigated as variables explaining the numbers of I. scapularis collected and B. burgdorferi infection in these ticks. A wide range of alternative environmental explanatory variables were also considered. Results The observation of low I. scapularis abundance and low B. burgdorferi infection prevalence in sites where I. scapularis were detected was consistent with early-stage invasion of the vector. There were significant associations between the abundance of ticks and season, year of study and ambient temperature. Abundance of host-seeking larvae was significantly associated with deer density, and abundance of host-seeking larvae and nymphs were positively associated with litter layer depth. Larval host infestations were lower where the relative proportion of non-Peromyscus spp. was high. Infestations of hosts with nymphs were lower when host species richness was higher, but overall nymphal abundance increased with species richness because Peromyscus spp. mouse abundance and host species richness were positively correlated. Nymphal infestations of hosts were lower where tree species richness was higher. B. burgdorferi infection prevalence in ticks varied significantly with an index of rates of migratory bird-borne vector and pathogen invasion. Conclusions

  3. Notes from the field: update on Lyme carditis, groups at high risk, and frequency of associated sudden cardiac death--United States.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Meiman, Jonathan; Mullins, Jocelyn; Nelson, Randall; Ertel, Starr-Hope; Cartter, Matt; Brown, Catherine M; Lijewski, Virginia; Schiffman, Elizabeth; Neitzel, David; Daly, Elizabeth R; Mathewson, Abigail A; Howe, Whitney; Lowe, Lindsay A; Kratz, Natalie R; Semple, Shereen; Backenson, P Bryon; White, Jennifer L; Kurpiel, Phillip M; Rockwell, Russell; Waller, Kirsten; Johnson, Diep Hoang; Steward, Christopher; Batten, Brigid; Blau, Dianna; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Drew, Clifton; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Ritter, Jana; Sanders, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R; Molins, Claudia; Schriefer, Martin; Perea, Anna; Kugeler, Kiersten; Nelson, Christina; Hinckley, Alison; Mead, Paul

    2014-10-31

    On December 13, 2013, MMWR published a report describing three cases of sudden cardiac death associated with Lyme carditis. State public health departments and CDC conducted a follow-up investigation to determine 1) whether carditis was disproportionately common among certain demographic groups of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease, 2) the frequency of death among patients diagnosed with Lyme disease and Lyme carditis, and 3) whether any additional deaths potentially attributable to Lyme carditis could be identified. Lyme disease cases are reported to CDC through the Nationally Notifiable Disease Surveillance System; reporting of clinical features, including Lyme carditis, is optional. For surveillance purposes, Lyme carditis is defined as acute second-degree or third-degree atrioventricular conduction block accompanying a diagnosis of Lyme disease. During 2001-2010, a total of 256,373 Lyme disease case reports were submitted to CDC, of which 174,385 (68%) included clinical information. Among these, 1,876 (1.1%) were identified as cases of Lyme carditis. Median age of patients with Lyme carditis was 43 years (range = 1-99 years); 1,209 (65%) of the patients were male, which is disproportionately larger than the male proportion among patients with other clinical manifestations (p<0.001). Of cases with this information available, 69% were diagnosed during the months of June-August, and 42% patients had an accompanying erythema migrans, a characteristic rash. Relative to patients aged 55-59 years, carditis was more common among men aged 20-39 years, women aged 25-29 years, and persons aged ≥75 years. PMID:25356607

  4. Mitochondrial phylogeny shows multiple independent ecological transitions and northern dispersion despite of Pleistocene glaciations in meadow and steppe vipers (Vipera ursinii and Vipera renardi).

    PubMed

    Zinenko, Oleksandr; Stümpel, Nikolaus; Mazanaeva, Lyudmila; Bakiev, Andrey; Shiryaev, Konstantin; Pavlov, Aleksey; Kotenko, Tatiana; Kukushkin, Oleg; Chikin, Yury; Duisebayeva, Tatiana; Nilson, Göran; Orlov, Nikolai L; Tuniyev, Sako; Ananjeva, Natalia B; Murphy, Robert W; Joger, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    The phylogeny and historical demography of small Eurasian vipers of the Vipera ursinii and V. renardi complexes were studied using mitochondrial DNA sequences analysed with Bayesian inference, Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony approaches, and mismatch distributions. Diversification in the group resulted from an initial dispersion in the later Pliocene - Pleistocene in two directions: north-westwards via the Balkans (V. ursinii complex) and north-eastwards from Asia Minor via the Caucasus (V. renardi complex). An independent, comparatively recent transition occurred from montane habitats to lowland grasslands in different mitochondrial lineages during the Late Pleistocene, when representatives of the both complexes had reached lowland steppes to the north. Effective population size showed clear signs of rapid growth in eastern V. renardi, triggered by colonization of vast lowland steppes, but in western V. ursinii complex grew during the Last Glaciation and experienced stabilization in Holocene. Expansion and population growth in lowland lineages of V. renardi was not strongly affected by Pleistocene climatic oscillations, when cold, dry conditions could have favoured species living in open grasslands. The high diversity of closely related haplotypes in the Caucasus and Tien-Shan could have resulted from repetitive expansion-constriction-isolation events in montane regions during Pleistocene climate fluctuations. The mitochondrial phylogeny pattern conflicts with the current taxonomy. PMID:25527984

  5. Characterization and multiple applications of a highly thermostable and Ca²⁺-independent amylopullulanase of the extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans.

    PubMed

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2014-12-01

    The amylopullulanase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 (apu105) is Ca(2+)-independent with a molecular mass of 105 kDa and optimum activity at 80 °C and pH 7.0. The apu105 is extremely thermostable with T 1/2 of 7.8 h at 90 °C and hydrolyzes starch, pullulan, and malto-oligosaccharides, but not panose and cyclodextrins. The low K m values of apu105 (starch, pullulan, amylose, and amylopectin) indicates higher affinity of apu105 than others. The action of the enzyme on mixed substrates (starch and pullulan) confirmed the presence of only one active site for cleaving both α-1,4- and α-1,6- glycosidic linkages. The raw starches are efficiently hydrolyzed into glucose, maltose, and malto-oligosaccharides. Two-step starch saccharification involving pretreatment with apu105 followed by glucoamylase enhanced glucose yield. The supplementation of whole wheat dough with apu105 markedly enhanced the loaf volume, shelf-life, and the texture of bread. The enzyme is compatible with detergents and useful in desizing of cotton fabrics. PMID:25267353

  6. Gardenin B-induced cell death in human leukemia cells involves multiple caspases but is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Javier; Saavedra, Ester; Del Rosario, Henoc; Perdomo, Juan; Loro, Juan F; Cifuente, Diego A; Tonn, Carlos E; García, Celina; Quintana, José; Estévez, Francisco

    2016-08-25

    Flavonoids have attracted great interest due to their possible anticancer activities. Here we investigated the antiproliferative activity of the flavonoids isolated from Baccharis scandens against human leukemia cell lines and found that the methoxyflavonoid gardenin B was the most cytotoxic compound against HL-60 and U-937 cells, showing IC50 values between 1.6 and 3.0 μM, but had no significant cytotoxic effects against quiescent or proliferating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These effects on viability were accompanied by the concentration- and time-dependent appearance of apoptosis as evidenced by DNA fragmentation, formation of apoptotic bodies and a sub-G1 ratio increase. Comparative studies with the best-studied bioflavonoid quercetin indicate that gardenin B is a more cytotoxic and more apoptotic inducer than quercetin. Cell death induced by gardenin B was associated with: (i) a significant induction of caspase-2, -3, -8 and -9 activities; (ii) cleavage of the initiator caspases (caspase-2, -8 and -9), of the executioner caspase-3, and of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase; and (iii) a concentration-dependent reactive oxygen species generation. In conclusion, apoptosis induced by gardenin B is associated with activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways of cell death and occurs through a mechanism that is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:27423764

  7. mtDNA control-region sequence variation suggests multiple independent origins of an "Asian-specific" 9-bp deletion in sub-Saharan Africans.

    PubMed Central

    Soodyall, H.; Vigilant, L.; Hill, A. V.; Stoneking, M.; Jenkins, T.

    1996-01-01

    The intergenic COII/tRNA(Lys) 9-bp deletion in human mtDNA, which is found at varying frequencies in Asia, Southeast Asia, Polynesia, and the New World, was also found in 81 of 919 sub-Saharan Africans. Using mtDNA control-region sequence data from a subset of 41 individuals with the deletion, we identified 22 unique mtDNA types associated with the deletion in Africa. A comparison of the unique mtDNA types from sub-Saharan Africans and Asians with the 9-bp deletion revealed that sub-Saharan Africans and Asians have sequence profiles that differ in the locations and frequencies of variant sites. Both phylogenetic and mismatch-distribution analysis suggest that 9-bp deletion arose independently in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia and that the deletion has arisen more than once in Africa. Within Africa, the deletion was not found among Khoisan peoples and was rare to absent in western and southwestern African populations, but it did occur in Pygmy and Negroid populations from central Africa and in Malawi and southern African Bantu-speakers. The distribution of the 9-bp deletion in Africa suggests that the deletion could have arisen in central Africa and was then introduced to southern Africa via the recent "Bantu expansion." PMID:8644719

  8. Comparison of Algorithm-based Estimates of Occupational Diesel Exhaust Exposure to Those of Multiple Independent Raters in a Population-based Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Melissa C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Algorithm-based exposure assessments based on patterns in questionnaire responses and professional judgment can readily apply transparent exposure decision rules to thousands of jobs quickly. However, we need to better understand how algorithms compare to a one-by-one job review by an exposure assessor. We compared algorithm-based estimates of diesel exhaust exposure to those of three independent raters within the New England Bladder Cancer Study, a population-based case–control study, and identified conditions under which disparities occurred in the assessments of the algorithm and the raters. Methods: Occupational diesel exhaust exposure was assessed previously using an algorithm and a single rater for all 14 983 jobs reported by 2631 study participants during personal interviews conducted from 2001 to 2004. Two additional raters independently assessed a random subset of 324 jobs that were selected based on strata defined by the cross-tabulations of the algorithm and the first rater’s probability assessments for each job, oversampling their disagreements. The algorithm and each rater assessed the probability, intensity and frequency of occupational diesel exhaust exposure, as well as a confidence rating for each metric. Agreement among the raters, their aggregate rating (average of the three raters’ ratings) and the algorithm were evaluated using proportion of agreement, kappa and weighted kappa (κw). Agreement analyses on the subset used inverse probability weighting to extrapolate the subset to estimate agreement for all jobs. Classification and Regression Tree (CART) models were used to identify patterns in questionnaire responses that predicted disparities in exposure status (i.e., unexposed versus exposed) between the first rater and the algorithm-based estimates. Results: For the probability, intensity and frequency exposure metrics, moderate to moderately high agreement was observed among raters (κw = 0.50–0.76) and between the

  9. Reviewing molecular adaptations of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes in the context of reproductive fitness in natural transmission cycles

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jean I.

    2009-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is caused by a group of pathogenic spirochetes – most often Borrelia burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. garinii – that are vectored by hard ticks in the Ixodes ricinus-persulcatus complex, which feed on a variety of mammals, birds, and lizards. Although LB is one of the best-studied vector-borne zoonoses, the annual incidence in North America and Europe leads other vector-borne diseases and continues to increase. What factors make the LB system so successful, and how can researchers hope to reduce disease risk – either through vaccinating humans or reducing the risk of contacting infected ticks in nature? Discoveries of molecular interactions involved in the transmission of LB spirochetes have accelerated recently, revealing complex interactions among the spirochete-tick-vertebrate triad. These interactions involve multiple, and often redundant, pathways that reflect the evolution of general and specific mechanisms by which the spirochetes survive and reproduce. Previous reviews have focused on the molecular interactions or population biology of the system. Here molecular interactions among the LB spirochete, its vector, and vertebrate hosts are reviewed in the context of natural maintenance cycles, which represent the ecological and evolutionary contexts that shape these interactions. This holistic system approach may help researchers develop additional testable hypotheses about transmission processes, interpret laboratory results, and guide development of future LB control measures and management. PMID:19368764

  10. Reviewing molecular adaptations of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes in the context of reproductive fitness in natural transmission cycles.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Jean I

    2009-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is caused by a group of pathogenic spirochetes - most often Borrelia burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. garinii - that are vectored by hard ticks in the Ixodes ricinus-persulcatus complex, which feed on a variety of mammals, birds, and lizards. Although LB is one of the best-studied vector-borne zoonoses, the annual incidence in North America and Europe leads other vector-borne diseases and continues to increase. What factors make the LB system so successful, and how can researchers hope to reduce disease risk - either through vaccinating humans or reducing the risk of contacting infected ticks in nature? Discoveries of molecular interactions involved in the transmission of LB spirochetes have accelerated recently, revealing complex interactions among the spirochete-tick-vertebrate triad. These interactions involve multiple, and often redundant, pathways that reflect the evolution of general and specific mechanisms by which the spirochetes survive and reproduce. Previous reviews have focused on the molecular interactions or population biology of the system. Here molecular interactions among the LB spirochete, its vector, and vertebrate hosts are reviewed in the context of natural maintenance cycles, which represent the ecological and evolutionary contexts that shape these interactions. This holistic system approach may help researchers develop additional testable hypotheses about transmission processes, interpret laboratory results, and guide development of future LB control measures and management. PMID:19368764

  11. Meta-analysis of the independent and cumulative effects of multiple genetic modifications on pig lung xenograft performance during ex vivo perfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Donald G.; Quinn, Kevin J.; French, Beth M.; Schwartz, Evan; Kang, Elizabeth; Dahi, Siamak; Phelps, Carol J.; Ayares, David L.; Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    and pathway-specific injury, and explore why some genes apparently exhibit neutral (hTBM, HLA-E) or inconclusive (CD39) effects, GalTKO, hCD46, HO-1, hCD55, and hEPCR modifications were associated with significant lung xenograft protection. This analysis supports the hypothesis that multiple genetic modifications targeting different known mechanisms of xenograft injury will be required to optimize lung xenograft survival. PMID:25470239

  12. Understanding independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annan, James; Hargreaves, Julia

    2016-04-01

    In order to perform any Bayesian processing of a model ensemble, we need a prior over the ensemble members. In the case of multimodel ensembles such as CMIP, the historical approach of ``model democracy'' (i.e. equal weight for all models in the sample) is no longer credible (if it ever was) due to model duplication and inbreeding. The question of ``model independence'' is central to the question of prior weights. However, although this question has been repeatedly raised, it has not yet been satisfactorily addressed. Here I will discuss the issue of independence and present a theoretical foundation for understanding and analysing the ensemble in this context. I will also present some simple examples showing how these ideas may be applied and developed.

  13. Pathological manifestations in murine Lyme disease: association with tissue invasion and spirochete persistence.

    PubMed

    Weis, J J; Yang, L; Seiler, K P; Silver, R M

    1997-07-01

    The clinical manifestations of human Lyme disease present with a spectrum of tissue or organ involvement and severity of symptoms. The murine model of Lyme disease has proved to be an accurate reflection of many of the human symptoms of disease and has been particularly useful for studying development of subacute arthritis and tendonitis. Direct tissue invasion by Borrelia burgdorferi and persistence of high levels of spirochetes in tissues are important components of arthritis development. The outer-surface lipoproteins contain a biologically active lipid-modified moiety with potent ability to stimulate inflammatory cytokine production and other inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide. Localized inflammation stimulated by these lipoproteins may be the trigger for neutrophil infiltration, synovial proliferation, and other events associated with this arthritis. Invasion of maternal uterine tissue, but not direct invasion of fetal tissue, is associated with low levels of pregnancy loss in mice infected during gestation, consistent with the detrimental effect of inflammatory cytokines on pregnancy. PMID:9233659

  14. How do I manage tick bites and Lyme borreliosis in pregnant women?

    PubMed

    Maraspin, Vera; Strle, Franc

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we present basic data pertinent to the current understanding of borrelial infection in pregnancy, and propose a rationale for the management of Lyme borreliosis in pregnant women. We advocate early detection of attached ticks and their prompt removal. We do not recommend the use of prophylactic antibiotics in pregnant women but support the 'wait and watch' strategy, including early treatment with antibiotics if signs/symptoms of the disease arise. We encourage the approach that antibiotic treatment of pregnant patients is restricted to those having a reliable clinical diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, and propose intravenous antibiotic treatment with penicillin, or preferably ceftriaxone 2 g daily for 14 days, not only for patients with early disseminated disease but also for those with solitary erythema migrans. PMID:19367103

  15. GIS and Remote Sensing Use in the Exploration of Lyme Disease Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Ozdenerol, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Given the relatively recent recognition of Lyme disease (LD) by CDC in 1990 as a nationally notifiable infectious condition, the rise of reported human cases every year argues for a better understanding of its geographic scope. The aim of this inquiry was to explore research conducted on spatiotemporal patterns of Lyme disease in order to identify strategies for implementing vector and reservoir-targeted interventions. The focus of this review is on the use of GIS-based methods to study populations of the reservoir hosts, vectors and humans in addition to the spatiotemporal interactions between these populations. New GIS-based studies are monitoring occurrence at the macro-level, and helping pinpoint areas of occurrence at the micro-level, where spread within populations of reservoir hosts, clusters of infected ticks and tick to human transmission may be better understood. PMID:26633445

  16. GIS and Remote Sensing Use in the Exploration of Lyme Disease Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Ozdenerol, Esra

    2015-12-01

    Given the relatively recent recognition of Lyme disease (LD) by CDC in 1990 as a nationally notifiable infectious condition, the rise of reported human cases every year argues for a better understanding of its geographic scope. The aim of this inquiry was to explore research conducted on spatiotemporal patterns of Lyme disease in order to identify strategies for implementing vector and reservoir-targeted interventions. The focus of this review is on the use of GIS-based methods to study populations of the reservoir hosts, vectors and humans in addition to the spatiotemporal interactions between these populations. New GIS-based studies are monitoring occurrence at the macro-level, and helping pinpoint areas of occurrence at the micro-level, where spread within populations of reservoir hosts, clusters of infected ticks and tick to human transmission may be better understood. PMID:26633445

  17. Reservoir Targeted Vaccine Against Borrelia burgdorferi: A New Strategy to Prevent Lyme Disease Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Luciana Meirelles; Brisson, Dustin; Melo, Rita; Ostfeld, Richard S.; Zeidner, Nordin; Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A high prevalence of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi in ixodid ticks is correlated with a high incidence of Lyme disease. The transmission of B. burgdorferi to humans can be disrupted by targeting 2 key elements in its enzootic cycle: the reservoir host and the tick vector. In a prospective 5-year field trial, we show that oral vaccination of wild white-footed mice resulted in outer surface protein A–specific seropositivity that led to reductions of 23% and 76% in the nymphal infection prevalence in a cumulative, time-dependent manner (2 and 5 years, respectively), whereas the proportion of infected ticks recovered from control plots varied randomly over time. Significant decreases in tick infection prevalence were observed within 3 years of vaccine deployment. Implementation of such a long-term public health measure could substantially reduce the risk of human exposure to Lyme disease. PMID:24523510

  18. Seroprevalence of Lyme disease in gray wolves from Minnesota and Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieking, A.; Goyal, S.M.; Bey, R.F.; Loken, K.I.; Mech, L.D.; Thiel, R.P.; O'Connor, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of Lyme disease in gray wolves (Canis lupus) from various counties of Minnesota and Wisconsin (USA), 589 serum samples were collected from 528 wolves from 1972 to 1989. An indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test was used to detect the presence of antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi. Titers of greater than or equal to 1:100 were considered positive. Results were confirmed by testing a few selected sera by Western blotting. Of the 589 sera tested, 15 (3%) had IFA titers of greater than or equal to 1:100. Three of the positive samples were collected from Douglas County in Wisconsin and twelve were from Minnesota counties. This study indicates that wolves are exposed to B. burgdorferi and are susceptible to Lyme disease.

  19. Interactions of phagocytes with the Lyme disease spirochete: role of the Fc receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Benach, J.L.; Fleit, H.B.; Habicht, G.S.; Coleman, J.L.; Bosler, E.M.; Lane, B.P.

    1984-10-01

    The phagocytic capacity of murine and human mononuclear and polymorphonuclear phagocytes (including peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils), rabbit and murine peritoneal exudate cells, and the murine macrophage cell line P388D1 against the Lyme disease spirochete was studied. All of these cells were capable of phagocytosing the spirochete; phagocytosis was measured by the uptake of radiolabeled spirochetes, the appearance of immunofluorescent bodies in phagocytic cells, and electron microscopy. Both opsonized and nonopsonized organisms were phagocytosed. The uptake of opsonized organisms by neutrophils was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for the Fc receptor and by immune complexes; these findings suggested that most phagocytosis is mediated by the Fc receptor. Similarly, the uptake of opsonized organisms by human monocytes was inhibited by human monomeric IgG1 and by immune complexes. These results illustrate the role of immune phagocytosis of spirochetes in host defense against Lyme disease.

  20. Meteorological Influences on the Seasonality of Lyme Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean M.; Eisen, Rebecca J.; Monaghan, Andrew; Mead, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi infection) is the most common vector-transmitted disease in the United States. The majority of human Lyme disease (LD) cases occur in the summer months, but the timing of the peak occurrence varies geographically and from year to year. We calculated the beginning, peak, end, and duration of the main LD season in 12 highly endemic states from 1992 to 2007 and then examined the association between the timing of these seasonal variables and several meteorological variables. An earlier beginning to the LD season was positively associated with higher cumulative growing degree days through Week 20, lower cumulative precipitation, a lower saturation deficit, and proximity to the Atlantic coast. The timing of the peak and duration of the LD season were also associated with cumulative growing degree days, saturation deficit, and cumulative precipitation, but no meteorological predictors adequately explained the timing of the end of the LD season. PMID:24470565

  1. How do Lyme Borrelia Organisms Cause Disease? The Quest for Virulence Determinants#

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease Borrelia are invasive, nontoxigenic, persistent pathogens, and little is known about their mechanisms of pathogenesis. In our laboratory, a signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) library of over 4,000 Borrelia burgdorferi transposon mutants has been constructed and is being screened for infectivity in mice. In this manner, a global view of the virulence determinants (factors required for full infectivity) is being developed. Additionally, the mechanisms of immune evasion involving the VMP-like system (vls) are under analysis, and cryo-electron microscopy is providing a detailed view of the three-dimensional structure of B. burgdorferi. These approaches will contribute to the improved understanding of how Lyme disease Borrelia cause disease. PMID:23091573

  2. Population genetic structure of the Lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis at an apparent spatial expansion front.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Rebecca R; Gaines, David; Gilliam, Will F; Brinkerhoff, R Jory

    2014-10-01

    Modeling and empirical evidence suggests that Lyme disease is undergoing geographic expansion from principal foci in the midwestern and northeastern United States. Virginia is at the southern edge of the current expansion zone and has seen dramatic rise in human Lyme disease cases since 2007, potentially owing to a recent increase in vector abundance. Ixodes scapularis is known throughout the eastern US but behavioral or physiological variation between northern and southern lineages might lead northern-variant ticks to more frequently parasitize humans. We hypothesized that recent spatial and numerical increase in Lyme disease cases is associated with demographic and/or spatial expansion of I. scapularis and that signals of these phenomena would be detectable and discernable in population genetic signals. In summer and fall 2011, we collected nymphal I. scapularis by drag sampling and adult I. scapularis from deer carcasses at hunting check stations at nine sites arranged along an east-west transect through central Virginia. We analyzed 16S mtDNA sequences data from up to 24 I. scapularis individuals collected from each site and detected a total of 24 haplotypes containing 29 segregating sites. We found no evidence for population genetic structure among these sites but we did find strong signals of both demographic and spatial expansion throughout our study system. We found two haplotypes (one individual each) representing a lineage of ticks that is only found in the southeastern United States, with the remaining individuals representing a less genetically diverse clade that is typical of the northern United States, but that has also been detected in the American South. Taken together, these results lead us to conclude that I. scapularis populations in Virginia are expanding and that this expansion may account for recent observed increases in Lyme disease. PMID:24882702

  3. Emergence of Ixodes scapularis and Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease vector and agent, in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Glowacki, Meaghan N; Hoet, Armando E; Needham, Glen R; Smith, Kathleen A; Gary, Richard E; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne disease in the United States, is caused by a tick-borne infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Currently, Ohio is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to be non-endemic for Lyme disease. The low incidence of Lyme disease in this state was largely attributed to the absence of the transmitting vector, Ixodes scapularis, commonly known as the blacklegged tick. However, a tick surveillance program established by Ohio Department of Health indicated that the number of I. scapularis in Ohio had increased sharply in recent years, from 0 - 5 ticks per year during 1983-2008 to 15 in 2009, 40 in 2010, and 184 in 2011. During the fall deer hunting season, examination of deer heads submitted to Ohio Department of Agriculture found 29 I. scapularis from 7 counties in 2010 and 1,830 from 25 counties in 2011. As of 2012, the tick had been found in 57 of the 88 counties of Ohio. In addition, all three active stages (larva, nymph, and adult) of I. scapularis were found in Tiverton Township of Coshocton County, demonstrating the presence of established tick populations at this central Ohio location. Of 530 nymphal or adult I. scapularis analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), 32 (6.1%) tested positive for the B. burgdorferi flaB gene, ranging from 36 to 390,000 copies per tick. Antibodies to B. burgdorferi antigens were detected in 2 of 10 (20%) field-captured Peromyscus leucopus from Tiverton Township, and in 41 of 355 (11.5%) dogs residing in Ohio. Collectively, these data suggest that the enzootic life cycle of B. burgdorferi has become established in Ohio, which poses risk of Lyme disease to people and animals in the area. PMID:24926441

  4. Emergence of Ixodes scapularis and Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease vector and agent, in Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Glowacki, Meaghan N.; Hoet, Armando E.; Needham, Glen R.; Smith, Kathleen A.; Gary, Richard E.; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne disease in the United States, is caused by a tick-borne infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Currently, Ohio is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to be non-endemic for Lyme disease. The low incidence of Lyme disease in this state was largely attributed to the absence of the transmitting vector, Ixodes scapularis, commonly known as the blacklegged tick. However, a tick surveillance program established by Ohio Department of Health indicated that the number of I. scapularis in Ohio had increased sharply in recent years, from 0 - 5 ticks per year during 1983–2008 to 15 in 2009, 40 in 2010, and 184 in 2011. During the fall deer hunting season, examination of deer heads submitted to Ohio Department of Agriculture found 29 I. scapularis from 7 counties in 2010 and 1,830 from 25 counties in 2011. As of 2012, the tick had been found in 57 of the 88 counties of Ohio. In addition, all three active stages (larva, nymph, and adult) of I. scapularis were found in Tiverton Township of Coshocton County, demonstrating the presence of established tick populations at this central Ohio location. Of 530 nymphal or adult I. scapularis analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), 32 (6.1%) tested positive for the B. burgdorferi flaB gene, ranging from 36 to 390,000 copies per tick. Antibodies to B. burgdorferi antigens were detected in 2 of 10 (20%) field-captured Peromyscus leucopus from Tiverton Township, and in 41 of 355 (11.5%) dogs residing in Ohio. Collectively, these data suggest that the enzootic life cycle of B. burgdorferi has become established in Ohio, which poses risk of Lyme disease to people and animals in the area. PMID:24926441

  5. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Other Psychological Factors in Patients with “Chronic Lyme Disease”

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, Afton L.; Radvanski, Diane C.; Buyske, Steven; Savage, Shantal V.; Sigal, Leonard H.

    2009-01-01

    Background There is no evidence of current or previous B. burgdorferi infection in most patients evaluated at University-based Lyme disease referral centers. Instead, psychological factors likely exacerbate the persistent diffuse symptoms or “Chronic Multisymptom Illness” incorrectly ascribed to an ongoing chronic infection with B. burgdorferi. The objective of this study was to assess the medical and psychiatric status of such patients and compare these findings to those from patients without CMI. Methods 240 consecutive patients undergoing medical evaluation at an academic Lyme disease referral center in New Jersey were screened for clinical disorders (e.g. depression and anxiety) with diagnoses confirmed by structured clinical interviews. Personality disorders, catastrophizing, and negative and positive affect were also evaluated and all factors were compared between groups and to functional outcomes. Results 60.4% of our sample had symptoms that could not be explained by current Lyme disease or another medical condition other than CMI. After adjusting for age and gender, clinical disorders were more common in CMI than in the comparison group (p<.001, OR 3.54, 95% CI, 1.97 to 6.55), but personality disorders were not significantly more common. CMI patients had higher negative affect, lower positive affect and a greater tendency to catastrophize pain (p<.001) than did the comparison group. Except for personality disorders, all psychological factors were related to worse functioning. Our explanatory model based on these factors was confirmed. Conclusions Psychiatric comorbidity and other psychological factors are prominent in the presentation and outcome of some patients who inaccurately ascribe long-standing symptoms to “chronic Lyme disease.” PMID:19699380

  6. Integrated Assessment of Behavioral and Environmental Risk Factors for Lyme Disease Infection on Block Island, Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Peter J.; Niccolai, Linda; Steeves, Tanner; O’Keefe, Corrine Folsom; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Peridomestic exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi-infected Ixodes scapularis nymphs is considered the dominant means of infection with black-legged tick-borne pathogens in the eastern United States. Population level studies have detected a positive association between the density of infected nymphs and Lyme disease incidence. At a finer spatial scale within endemic communities, studies have focused on individual level risk behaviors, without accounting for differences in peridomestic nymphal density. This study simultaneously assessed the influence of peridomestic tick exposure risk and human behavior risk factors for Lyme disease infection on Block Island, Rhode Island. Tick exposure risk on Block Island properties was estimated using remotely sensed landscape metrics that strongly correlated with tick density at the individual property level. Behavioral risk factors and Lyme disease serology were assessed using a longitudinal serosurvey study. Significant factors associated with Lyme disease positive serology included one or more self-reported previous Lyme disease episodes, wearing protective clothing during outdoor activities, the average number of hours spent daily in tick habitat, the subject’s age and the density of shrub edges on the subject’s property. The best fit multivariate model included previous Lyme diagnoses and age. The strength of this association with previous Lyme disease suggests that the same sector of the population tends to be repeatedly infected. The second best multivariate model included a combination of environmental and behavioral factors, namely hours spent in vegetation, subject’s age, shrub edge density (increase risk) and wearing protective clothing (decrease risk). Our findings highlight the importance of concurrent evaluation of both environmental and behavioral factors to design interventions to reduce the risk of tick-borne infections. PMID:24416278

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid T-regulatory cells recognize Borrelia burgdorferi NAPA in chronic Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Amedei, A; Codolo, G; Ozolins, D; Ballerini, C; Biagioli, T; Jaunalksne, I; Zilevica, A; D Elios, S; De Bernard, M; D' Elios, M M

    2013-01-01

    The NapA protein of B. burgdorferi is essential for the persistence of spirochetes in ticks. One of the most intriguing aspects of NapA is its potential to interfere with the host immune system. Here, we investigated the role of the acquired immune responses induced by NapA in the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of patients with chronic Lyme borreliosis. We evaluated the cytokine profile induced in microglia cells and CSF T cells following NapA stimulation. We report here that NapA induced a regulatory T (Treg) response in the CSF of patients with chronic Lyme borreliosis and it is able to expand this suppressive response by promoting the production of TGF-beta and IL-10 by microglia cells. Collectively, these data strongly support a central role of NapA in promoting both Treg response and immune suppression in the CSF of patients with chronic Lyme borreliosis and suggest that NapA and the Treg pathway may represent novel therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of the disease. PMID:24355226

  8. Gestational attenuation of Lyme arthritis is mediated by progesterone and IL-4.

    PubMed

    Moro, M H; Bjornsson, J; Marietta, E V; Hofmeister, E K; Germer, J J; Bruinsma, E; David, C S; Persing, D H

    2001-06-15

    Infection of different strains of laboratory mice with the agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, results in arthritis, the severity of which has been correlated with the dominance of Th1 cytokines. In this study, we demonstrate that changes in B. burgdorferi-specific immunologic responses associated with pregnancy can alter the outcome of Lyme arthritis in mice. Whereas nonpregnant female C3H mice consistently developed severe Lyme arthritis, pregnant mice had a marked reduction in arthritis severity that was associated with a slight reduction in IFN-gamma and markedly increased levels of IL-4 production by B. burgdorferi-specific T cells. Similar reductions in arthritis severity and patterns of cytokine production were observed in nonpregnant, progesterone-implanted mice. Ab neutralization of IL-4 in progesterone-implanted mice resulted in severe arthritis. Our results are consistent with the known shift toward Th2 cytokine expression at the maternal-fetal interface, and are the first to show a pregnancy-related therapeutic effect in an infectious model. PMID:11390492

  9. Development of a Public Health Assessment Tool to Prevent Lyme Disease: Tool Construction and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Jennifer Hornung; Gordon, Thomas F; Haignere, Clara; DuCette, Joseph P

    2005-01-01

    This study involved the design and validation of a new Lyme disease risk assessment instrument. The study was funded in part by a research grant from the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) Foundation on Research and Education (FORE). The resulting instrument measured theoretical constructs such as attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, skills, and knowledge relative to Lyme disease. The survey assessment tool is described here, and the tool development process, the validation and reliability process, and results are presented. The assessment tool was created by using a standard instrument development process that first involved constructing possible items (questions) based on several health behavior theories and known health risk behaviors. These items were then further refined by using focus groups, a small pilot study, factor analysis, and a large-scale pilot study. Validity and reliability indices were established with a test-retest reliability coefficient of .66, and finally the tool was used among a population living in a Lyme-disease-endemic area. Cronbach's alpha coefficients of .737 for behavioral items, .573 for cognitive items, and .331 for environmental items were established. PMID:18066379

  10. Effect of Climate Change on Lyme Disease Risk in North America

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, John S.; Holford, Theodore R.; Fish, Durland

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of the influence of climate change on Ixodes scapularis, the main vector of Lyme disease in North America, is a fundamental component in assessing changes in the spatial distribution of human risk for the disease. We used a climate suitability model of I. scapularis to examine the potential effects of global climate change on future Lyme disease risk in North America. A climate-based logistic model was first used to explain the current distribution of I. scapularis in North America. Climate change scenarios were then applied to extrapolate the model in time and produce forecasts of vector establishment. The spatially modeled relationship between I. scapularis presence and large-scale environmental data generated the current pattern of I. scapularis across North America with an accuracy of 89% (p<0.0001). Extrapolation of the model revealed a significant expansion of I. scapularis north into Canada with an increase in suitable habitat of 213% by the 2080’s. Climate change will also result in a retraction of the vector from southern United States, and movement into the central United States. This report predicts the effect of climate change on Lyme disease risk and specifically forecasts the emergence of a tick-borne infectious disease in Canada. Our modeling approach could thus be used to outline where future control strategies and prevention efforts need to be applied. PMID:19008966

  11. The Lyme Disease Pathogen Has No Effect on the Survival of Its Rodent Reservoir Host

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, Maarten J.; Lachish, Shelly; Dolan, Marc C.

    2015-01-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause devastating morbidity and mortality in humans may be relatively harmless in their natural reservoir hosts. The tick-borne bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi causes Lyme disease in humans but few studies have investigated whether this pathogen reduces the fitness of its reservoir hosts under natural conditions. We analyzed four years of capture-mark-recapture (CMR) data on a population of white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, to test whether B. burgdorferi and its tick vector affect the survival of this important reservoir host. We used a multi-state CMR approach to model mouse survival and mouse infection rates as a function of a variety of ecologically relevant explanatory factors. We found no effect of B. burgdorferi infection or tick burden on the survival of P. leucopus. Our estimates of the probability of infection varied by an order of magnitude (0.051 to 0.535) and were consistent with our understanding of Lyme disease in the Northeastern United States. B. burgdorferi establishes a chronic avirulent infection in their rodent reservoir hosts because this pathogen depends on rodent mobility to achieve transmission to its sedentary tick vector. The estimates of B. burgdorferi infection risk will facilitate future theoretical studies on the epidemiology of Lyme disease. PMID:25688863

  12. Cardiac Tropism of Borrelia burgdorferi: An Autopsy Study of Sudden Cardiac Death Associated with Lyme Carditis.

    PubMed

    Muehlenbachs, Atis; Bollweg, Brigid C; Schulz, Thadeus J; Forrester, Joseph D; DeLeon Carnes, Marlene; Molins, Claudia; Ray, Gregory S; Cummings, Peter M; Ritter, Jana M; Blau, Dianna M; Andrew, Thomas A; Prial, Margaret; Ng, Dianna L; Prahlow, Joseph A; Sanders, Jeanine H; Shieh, Wun Ju; Paddock, Christopher D; Schriefer, Martin E; Mead, Paul; Zaki, Sherif R

    2016-05-01

    Fatal Lyme carditis caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi rarely is identified. Here, we describe the pathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular findings of five case patients. These sudden cardiac deaths associated with Lyme carditis occurred from late summer to fall, ages ranged from young adult to late 40s, and four patients were men. Autopsy tissue samples were evaluated by light microscopy, Warthin-Starry stain, immunohistochemistry, and PCR for B. burgdorferi, and immunohistochemistry for complement components C4d and C9, CD3, CD79a, and decorin. Post-mortem blood was tested by serology. Interstitial lymphocytic pancarditis in a relatively characteristic road map distribution was present in all cases. Cardiomyocyte necrosis was minimal, T cells outnumbered B cells, plasma cells were prominent, and mild fibrosis was present. Spirochetes in the cardiac interstitium associated with collagen fibers and co-localized with decorin. Rare spirochetes were seen in the leptomeninges of two cases by immunohistochemistry. Spirochetes were not seen in other organs examined, and joint tissue was not available for evaluation. Although rare, sudden cardiac death caused by Lyme disease might be an under-recognized entity and is characterized by pancarditis and marked tropism of spirochetes for cardiac tissues. PMID:26968341

  13. Five-Antigen Fluorescent Bead-Based Assay for Diagnosis of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Embers, Monica E; Hasenkampf, Nicole R; Barnes, Mary B; Didier, Elizabeth S; Philipp, Mario T; Tardo, Amanda C

    2016-04-01

    The systematically difficult task of diagnosing Lyme disease can be simplified by sensitive and specific laboratory tests. The currently recommended two-tier test for serology is highly specific but falls short in sensitivity, especially in the early acute phase. We previously examined serially collected serum samples fromBorrelia burgdorferi-infected rhesus macaques and defined a combination of antigens that could be utilized for detection of infection at all phases of disease in humans. The fiveB. burgdorferiantigens, consisting of OspC, OspA, DbpA, OppA2, and the C6 peptide, were combined into a fluorescent cytometric bead-based assay for the detection ofB. burgdorferiantigen-specific IgG antibodies. Samples from Lyme disease patients and controls were used to determine the diagnostic value of this assay. Using this sample set, we found that our five-antigen multiplex IgG assay exhibited higher sensitivity (79.5%) than the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (76.1%), the two-tier test (61.4%), and the C6 peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (77.2%) while maintaining specificity over 90%. When detection of IgM was added to the bead-based assay, the sensitivity improved to 91%, but at a cost of reduced specificity (78%). These results indicate that the rational combination of antigens in our multiplex assay may offer an improved serodiagnostic test for Lyme disease. PMID:26843487

  14. The effectiveness of permethrin-treated deer stations for control of the Lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis on Cape Cod and the islands: a five year experiment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of animal host-targeted pesticide application to control blacklegged ticks, which transmit the Lyme disease bacterium between wildlife hosts and humans, is receiving increased attention as an approach to Lyme disease risk management. Included among the attractive features...

  15. The effectiveness of permethrin-treated deer stations for control of the Lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis on Cape Cod and the Islands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of animal host-targeted pesticide application to control blacklegged ticks, which transmit the Lyme disease bacterium between wildlife hosts and humans, is receiving increased attention as an approach to Lyme disease risk management. Included among the attractive feature...

  16. New-onset panic, depression with suicidal thoughts, and somatic symptoms in a patient with a history of lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Garakani, Amir; Mitton, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    Lyme Disease, or Lyme Borreliosis, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and spread by ticks, is mainly known to cause arthritis and neurological disorders but can also cause psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety. We present a case of a 37-year-old man with no known psychiatric history who developed panic attacks, severe depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation, and neuromuscular complaints including back spasms, joint pain, myalgias, and neuropathic pain. These symptoms began 2 years after being successfully treated for a positive Lyme test after receiving a tick bite. During inpatient psychiatric hospitalization his psychiatric and physical symptoms did not improve with antidepressant and anxiolytic treatments. The patient's panic attacks resolved after he was discharged and then, months later, treated with long-term antibiotics for suspected "chronic Lyme Disease" (CLD) despite having negative Lyme titers. He however continued to have subsyndromal depressive symptoms and chronic physical symptoms such as fatigue, myalgias, and neuropathy. We discuss the controversy surrounding the diagnosis of CLD and concerns and considerations in the treatment of suspected CLD patients with comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:25922779

  17. Confirmation of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes by polymerase chain reaction in placentas of women with reactive serology for Lyme antibodies.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, R; Bracero, L A; Aguero-Rosenfeld, M; Beneck, D; Coleman, J; Schwartz, I

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine whether Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes were present in placentas of asymptomatic women with reactive Lyme serology using a silver stain, and to confirm the identity of the spirochetes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sixty placentas of asymptomatic women with ELISA-positive or-equivocal serology for Lyme antibodies during pregnancy were examined for spirochetes using a silver stain. The results of the ELISA serology were confirmed by Western blot analysis. PCR amplification for B. burgdorferi was performed on placentas identified to have spirochetes and on a group of placentas negative for spirochetes. Spirochetes were identified by silver staining in 3 (5%) of the 60 placentas. PCR confirmed B. burgdorferi nucleotide sequences in 2 of the placentas. The 5 women had equivocal Lyme ELISA and negative syphilis serology. The results of the Western blot analysis were negative in 2 cases and indeterminate in 1 case. Six controls were negative for spirochetes by silver staining and PCR. A normal perinatal outcome was observed in all cases. Spirochetes identified in placental tissue of pregnancies with reactive Lyme serology were confirmed by PCR to be B. burgdorferi. There was no relationship between the presence of placental spirochetes and the results of Lyme serology or the pregnancy outcome. PMID:8793493

  18. New-Onset Panic, Depression with Suicidal Thoughts, and Somatic Symptoms in a Patient with a History of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garakani, Amir; Mitton, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Lyme Disease, or Lyme Borreliosis, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and spread by ticks, is mainly known to cause arthritis and neurological disorders but can also cause psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety. We present a case of a 37-year-old man with no known psychiatric history who developed panic attacks, severe depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation, and neuromuscular complaints including back spasms, joint pain, myalgias, and neuropathic pain. These symptoms began 2 years after being successfully treated for a positive Lyme test after receiving a tick bite. During inpatient psychiatric hospitalization his psychiatric and physical symptoms did not improve with antidepressant and anxiolytic treatments. The patient's panic attacks resolved after he was discharged and then, months later, treated with long-term antibiotics for suspected “chronic Lyme Disease” (CLD) despite having negative Lyme titers. He however continued to have subsyndromal depressive symptoms and chronic physical symptoms such as fatigue, myalgias, and neuropathy. We discuss the controversy surrounding the diagnosis of CLD and concerns and considerations in the treatment of suspected CLD patients with comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:25922779

  19. Lyme Disease Risk Influences Human Settlement in the Wildland–Urban Interface: Evidence from a Longitudinal Analysis of Counties in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Ashley E.; MacDonald, Andrew J.; Plantinga, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of human settlement into wildland areas, including forests in the eastern United States, has resulted in fragmented forest habitat that has been shown to drive higher entomological risk for Lyme disease. We investigated an alternative pathway between fragmentation and Lyme disease, namely whether increased risk of Lyme disease results in a reduced propensity to settle in high-risk areas at the interface of developed and undeveloped lands. We used longitudinal data analyses at the county level to determine whether Lyme disease incidence (LDI) influences the proportion of the population residing in the wildland–urban interface in 12 high LDI states in the eastern United States. We found robust evidence that a higher LDI reduces the proportion of a county's population residing in the wildland–urban interface in high-LDI states. This study provides some of the first evidence of human behavioral responses to Lyme disease risk via settlement decisions. PMID:25048372

  20. Evidence assessments and guideline recommendations in Lyme disease: the clinical management of known tick bites, erythema migrans rashes and persistent disease

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Daniel J; Johnson, Lorraine B; Maloney, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with Lyme disease were developed by the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS). The guidelines address three clinical questions – the usefulness of antibiotic prophylaxis for known tick bites, the effectiveness of erythema migrans treatment and the role of antibiotic retreatment in patients with persistent manifestations of Lyme disease. Healthcare providers who evaluate and manage patients with Lyme disease are the intended users of the new ILADS guidelines, which replace those issued in 2004 (Exp Rev Anti-infect Ther 2004;2:S1–13). These clinical practice guidelines are intended to assist clinicians by presenting evidence-based treatment recommendations, which follow the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. ILADS guidelines are not intended to be the sole source of guidance in managing Lyme disease and they should not be viewed as a substitute for clinical judgment nor used to establish treatment protocols. PMID:25077519

  1. 'Independence' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for 'Independence' Panorama (QTVR)

    This is the Spirit 'Independence' panorama, acquired on martian days, or sols, 536 to 543 (July 6 to 13, 2005), from a position in the 'Columbia Hills' near the summit of 'Husband Hill.' The summit of 'Husband Hill' is the peak near the right side of this panorama and is about 100 meters (328 feet) away from the rover and about 30 meters (98 feet) higher in elevation. The rocky outcrops downhill and on the left side of this mosaic include 'Larry's Lookout' and 'Cumberland Ridge,' which Spirit explored in April, May, and June of 2005.

    The panorama spans 360 degrees and consists of 108 individual images, each acquired with five filters of the rover's panoramic camera. The approximate true color of the mosaic was generated using the camera's 750-, 530-, and 480-nanometer filters. During the 8 martian days, or sols, that it took to acquire this image, the lighting varied considerably, partly because of imaging at different times of sol, and partly because of small sol-to-sol variations in the dustiness of the atmosphere. These slight changes produced some image seams and rock shadows. These seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see. However, it is often not possible or practical to smooth out such seams for regions of rock, soil, rover tracks or solar panels. Such is the nature of acquiring and assembling large panoramas from the rovers.

  2. [A case of lyme disease requiring over 1 year to diagnose at an infectious-disease clinic].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kentaro; Shimada, Tomoe; Kawabata, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman presenting with years of fever and vague symptoms could not be satisfactorily diagnosed in physical examination or conventional workups. She was presumptively diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome and treated symptomatically. Fourteen months after the initial visit, she developed left facial palsy. Lyme disease serology was positive. Four weeks of oral amoxicillin ameliorated symptoms. Only 5 to 15 cases of Lyme disease are reported annually in Japan, mostly from the northeastern-most island of Hokkaido. It may occur anywhere in Japan, however; probably is underdiagnosed. Lyme disease may cause fevers of unknown origin. Astute clinical suspicion and appropriate workups are thus needed to diagnose this infection. PMID:23484378

  3. Spatial patterns of Lyme disease risk in California based on disease incidence data and modeling of vector-tick exposure.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Rebecca J; Lane, Robert S; Fritz, Curtis L; Eisen, Lars

    2006-10-01

    Ixodes pacificus, particularly the nymphal life stage, is the primary vector to humans of the Lyme disease agent Borrelia burgdorferi in California. During 2004, we collected I. pacificus nymphs from 78 woodland sites in ecologically diverse Mendocino County, which has a moderately high incidence of Lyme disease. Within this county, nymphal density was elevated in forested areas with a growing degree day range of 2,600-3,000 (10 degrees C base). Using a geographic information systems approach, we identified all areas in California sharing these environmental characteristics and thus projected to pose high acarologic risk of exposure to host-seeking nymphal ticks. Such areas were most commonly detected in the northwestern part of the state and along the Sierra Nevada foothills in the northeast, but the analysis also identified isolated areas with high acarologic risk in southern California. This mirrors the spatial distribution of endemic Lyme disease during 1993-2005; most cases occurred in counties to the northwest (58%) or northeast (26%), whereas fewer cases were reported from southern California (16%). Southern zip-codes from which Lyme disease cases had been reported were commonly located in close proximity to areas with high projected acarologic risk. Overall, Lyme disease incidence in zip code areas containing habitat with high projected acarologic risk was 10-fold higher than in zip code areas lacking such habitat and 27 times higher than for zip code areas without this habitat type within 50 km. A comparison of spatial Lyme disease incidence patterns based on county versus zip code units showed that calculating and displaying disease incidence at the zip code scale is a useful method to detect small, isolated areas with elevated disease risk that otherwise may go undetected. PMID:17038692

  4. Different Populations of Blacklegged Tick Nymphs Exhibit Differences in Questing Behavior That Have Implications for Human Lyme Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Arsnoe, Isis M.; Hickling, Graham J.; Ginsberg, Howard S.; McElreath, Richard; Tsao, Jean I.

    2015-01-01

    Animal behavior can have profound effects on pathogen transmission and disease incidence. We studied the questing (= host-seeking) behavior of blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) nymphs, which are the primary vectors of Lyme disease in the eastern United States. Lyme disease is common in northern but not in southern regions, and prior ecological studies have found that standard methods used to collect host-seeking nymphs in northern regions are unsuccessful in the south. This led us to hypothesize that there are behavior differences between northern and southern nymphs that alter how readily they are collected, and how likely they are to transmit the etiological agent of Lyme disease to humans. To examine this question, we compared the questing behavior of I. scapularis nymphs originating from one northern (Lyme disease endemic) and two southern (non-endemic) US regions at field sites in Wisconsin, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Florida. Laboratory-raised uninfected nymphs were monitored in circular 0.2 m2 arenas containing wooden dowels (mimicking stems of understory vegetation) for 10 (2011) and 19 (2012) weeks. The probability of observing nymphs questing on these stems (2011), and on stems, on top of leaf litter, and on arena walls (2012) was much greater for northern than for southern origin ticks in both years and at all field sites (19.5 times greater in 2011; 3.6–11.6 times greater in 2012). Our findings suggest that southern origin I. scapularis nymphs rarely emerge from the leaf litter, and consequently are unlikely to contact passing humans. We propose that this difference in questing behavior accounts for observed geographic differences in the efficacy of the standard sampling techniques used to collect questing nymphs. These findings also support our hypothesis that very low Lyme disease incidence in southern states is, in part, a consequence of the type of host-seeking behavior exhibited by southern populations of the key Lyme disease vector. PMID

  5. Different populations of blacklegged tick nymphs exhibit differences in questing behavior that have implications for human lyme disease risk.

    PubMed

    Arsnoe, Isis M; Hickling, Graham J; Ginsberg, Howard S; McElreath, Richard; Tsao, Jean I

    2015-01-01

    Animal behavior can have profound effects on pathogen transmission and disease incidence. We studied the questing (= host-seeking) behavior of blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) nymphs, which are the primary vectors of Lyme disease in the eastern United States. Lyme disease is common in northern but not in southern regions, and prior ecological studies have found that standard methods used to collect host-seeking nymphs in northern regions are unsuccessful in the south. This led us to hypothesize that there are behavior differences between northern and southern nymphs that alter how readily they are collected, and how likely they are to transmit the etiological agent of Lyme disease to humans. To examine this question, we compared the questing behavior of I. scapularis nymphs originating from one northern (Lyme disease endemic) and two southern (non-endemic) US regions at field sites in Wisconsin, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Florida. Laboratory-raised uninfected nymphs were monitored in circular 0.2 m2 arenas containing wooden dowels (mimicking stems of understory vegetation) for 10 (2011) and 19 (2012) weeks. The probability of observing nymphs questing on these stems (2011), and on stems, on top of leaf litter, and on arena walls (2012) was much greater for northern than for southern origin ticks in both years and at all field sites (19.5 times greater in 2011; 3.6-11.6 times greater in 2012). Our findings suggest that southern origin I. scapularis nymphs rarely emerge from the leaf litter, and consequently are unlikely to contact passing humans. We propose that this difference in questing behavior accounts for observed geographic differences in the efficacy of the standard sampling techniques used to collect questing nymphs. These findings also support our hypothesis that very low Lyme disease incidence in southern states is, in part, a consequence of the type of host-seeking behavior exhibited by southern populations of the key Lyme disease vector. PMID

  6. Different populations of blacklegged tick nymphs exhibit differences in questing behavior that have implications for human lyme disease risk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arsnoe, Isis M.; Hickling, Graham J.; Ginsberg, Howard S.; McElreath, Richard; Tsao, Jean I.

    2015-01-01

    Animal behavior can have profound effects on pathogen transmission and disease incidence. We studied the questing (= host-seeking) behavior of blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) nymphs, which are the primary vectors of Lyme disease in the eastern United States. Lyme disease is common in northern but not in southern regions, and prior ecological studies have found that standard methods used to collect host-seeking nymphs in northern regions are unsuccessful in the south. This led us to hypothesize that there are behavior differences between northern and southern nymphs that alter how readily they are collected, and how likely they are to transmit the etiological agent of Lyme disease to humans. To examine this question, we compared the questing behavior of I. scapularis nymphs originating from one northern (Lyme disease endemic) and two southern (non-endemic) US regions at field sites in Wisconsin, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Florida. Laboratory-raised uninfected nymphs were monitored in circular 0.2 m2 arenas containing wooden dowels (mimicking stems of understory vegetation) for 10 (2011) and 19 (2012) weeks. The probability of observing nymphs questing on these stems (2011), and on stems, on top of leaf litter, and on arena walls (2012) was much greater for northern than for southern origin ticks in both years and at all field sites (19.5 times greater in 2011; 3.6-11.6 times greater in 2012). Our findings suggest that southern origin I. scapularis nymphs rarely emerge from the leaf litter, and consequently are unlikely to contact passing humans. We propose that this difference in questing behavior accounts for observed geographic differences in the efficacy of the standard sampling techniques used to collect questing nymphs. These findings also support our hypothesis that very low Lyme disease incidence in southern states is, in part, a consequence of the type of host-seeking behavior exhibited by southern populations of the key Lyme disease vector.

  7. The Western progression of lyme disease: infectious and Nonclonal Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato populations in Grand Forks County, North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Stone, Brandee L; Russart, Nathan M; Gaultney, Robert A; Floden, Angela M; Vaughan, Jefferson A; Brissette, Catherine A

    2015-01-01

    Scant attention has been paid to Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, Ixodes scapularis, or reservoirs in eastern North Dakota despite the fact that it borders high-risk counties in Minnesota. Recent reports of B. burgdorferi and I. scapularis in North Dakota, however, prompted a more detailed examination. Spirochetes cultured from the hearts of five rodents trapped in Grand Forks County, ND, were identified as B. burgdorferi sensu lato through sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, the 16S rRNA gene-ileT intergenic spacer region, flaB, ospA, ospC, and p66. OspC typing revealed the presence of groups A, B, E, F, L, and I. Two rodents were concurrently carrying multiple OspC types. Multilocus sequence typing suggested the eastern North Dakota strains are most closely related to those found in neighboring regions of the upper Midwest and Canada. BALB/c mice were infected with B. burgdorferi isolate M3 (OspC group B) by needle inoculation or tick bite. Tibiotarsal joints and ear pinnae were culture positive, and B. burgdorferi M3 was detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the tibiotarsal joints, hearts, and ear pinnae of infected mice. Uninfected larval I. scapularis ticks were able to acquire B. burgdorferi M3 from infected mice; M3 was maintained in I. scapularis during the molt from larva to nymph; and further, M3 was transmitted from infected I. scapularis nymphs to naive mice, as evidenced by cultures and qPCR analyses. These results demonstrate that isolate M3 is capable of disseminated infection by both artificial and natural routes of infection. This study confirms the presence of unique (nonclonal) and infectious B. burgdorferi populations in eastern North Dakota. PMID:25304515

  8. Serum Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor A3 (LILRA3) Is Increased in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Is a Strong Independent Indicator of Disease Severity; 6.7kbp LILRA3 Gene Deletion Is Not Associated with Diseases Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    An, Hongyan; Lim, Chai; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Vollmer-Conna, Ute; Rawlinson, William; Bryant, Katherine; Tedla, Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor A3 (LILRA3) is a soluble immune regulatory molecule primarily expressed by monocytes and macrophages. A homozygous 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion that removes the first seven of its eight exons is predicted to lead to lack of LILRA3 protein, although this has not been experimentally confirmed. Moreover, there are conflicting results with regards to the link between the LILRA3 homozygous genetic deletion and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) in different European populations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LILRA3 gene deletion is associated with MS susceptibility in a North American cohort of European ancestry and assess if serum LILRA3 protein level is a marker of clinical subtype and/or disease severity in MS. A total of 456 patients with MS and 99 unrelated healthy controls were genotyped for the 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion and levels of LILRA3 protein in sera determined by in-house sandwich ELISA. We showed that LILRA3 gene deletion was not associated with MS susceptibility and did not affect the age of disease onset, clinical subtype or disease severity. However, we discovered for the first time that homozygous LILRA3 gene deletion results in lack of production of LILRA3 protein. Importantly, LILRA3 protein level was significantly increased in sera of patients with MS when compared with control subjects, particularly in more severe type primary progressive MS. Multiple regression analysis showed that LILRA3 level in serum was one of the strongest independent markers of disease severity in MS, which potentially can be used as a diagnostic marker. PMID:26871720

  9. Discovery and Targeted Proteomics on Cutaneous Biopsies Infected by Borrelia to Investigate Lyme Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Gilles; Boeuf, Amandine; Westermann, Benoît; Jaulhac, Benoît; Lipsker, Dan; Carapito, Christine; Boulanger, Nathalie; Ehret-Sabatier, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most important vector-borne disease in the Northern hemisphere and represents a major public health challenge with insufficient means of reliable diagnosis. Skin is rarely investigated in proteomics but constitutes in the case of Lyme disease the key interface where the pathogens can enter, persist, and multiply. Therefore, we investigated proteomics on skin samples to detect Borrelia proteins directly in cutaneous biopsies in a robust and specific way. We first set up a discovery gel prefractionation-LC-MS/MS approach on a murine model infected by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto that allowed the identification of 25 Borrelia proteins among more than 1300 mouse proteins. Then we developed a targeted gel prefractionation-LC-selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assay to detect 9/33 Borrelia proteins/peptides in mouse skin tissue samples using heavy labeled synthetic peptides. We successfully transferred this assay from the mouse model to human skin biopsies (naturally infected by Borrelia), and we were able to detect two Borrelia proteins: OspC and flagellin. Considering the extreme variability of OspC, we developed an extended SRM assay to target a large set of variants. This assay afforded the detection of nine peptides belonging to either OspC or flagellin in human skin biopsies. We further shortened the sample preparation and showed that Borrelia is detectable in mouse and human skin biopsies by directly using a liquid digestion followed by LC-SRM analysis without any prefractionation. This study thus shows that a targeted SRM approach is a promising tool for the early direct diagnosis of Lyme disease with high sensitivity (<10 fmol of OspC/mg of human skin biopsy). PMID:25713121

  10. Severity of chronic Lyme disease compared to other chronic conditions: a quality of life survey.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lorraine; Wilcox, Spencer; Mankoff, Jennifer; Stricker, Raphael B

    2014-01-01

    Overview. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) health-related quality of life (HRQoL) indicators are widely used in the general population to determine the burden of disease, identify health needs, and direct public health policy. These indicators also allow the burden of illness to be compared across different diseases. Although Lyme disease has recently been acknowledged as a major health threat in the USA with more than 300,000 new cases per year, no comprehensive assessment of the health burden of this tickborne disease is available. This study assesses the HRQoL of patients with chronic Lyme disease (CLD) and compares the severity of CLD to other chronic conditions. Methods. Of 5,357 subjects who responded to an online survey, 3,090 were selected for the study. Respondents were characterized as having CLD if they were clinically diagnosed with Lyme disease and had persisting symptoms lasting more than 6 months following antibiotic treatment. HRQoL of CLD patients was assessed using the CDC 9-item metric. The HRQoL analysis for CLD was compared to published analyses for the general population and other chronic illnesses using standard statistical methods. Results. Compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases reviewed here, patients with CLD reported significantly lower health quality status, more bad mental and physical health days, a significant symptom disease burden, and greater activity limitations. They also reported impairment in their ability to work, increased utilization of healthcare services, and greater out of pocket medical costs. Conclusions. CLD patients have significantly impaired HRQoL and greater healthcare utilization compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases. The heavy burden of illness associated with CLD highlights the need for earlier diagnosis and innovative treatment approaches that may reduce the burden of illness and concomitant costs posed by this

  11. Evidence for Ixodes holocyclus (Acarina: Ixodidae) as a vector for human lyme Borreliosis infection in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mayne, P; Song, S; Shao, R; Burke, J; Wang, Y; Roberts, T

    2014-01-01

    Ixodes holocyclus (Acarina: Ixodidae) and Ixodes cornuatus (Acarina: Ixodidae) are two tick species found in the more densely populated areas of Australia and are known to be the cause of the neurotoxic disease tick paralysis in humans and mammals. Borreliosis otherwise known as Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease in humans in Australia. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) and sensu lato are closely related spirochetal species that are the causative agents of Lyme disease in humans. Clinical transmission of this tick-borne disease can be identified in several but not all cases by a characteristic rash known as erythema migrans. However, there has been no study of the tick vectors of this infection in Australia. We used morphological and molecular techniques to identify unequivocally the ticks on the patients of this study to be I. holocyclus and then show the presence of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto infection in erythema migrans biopsies. I. holocyclus has not previously been associated with erythema migrans or Lyme disease. Two patients presented to the lead author's medical practice with erythema migrans in mid and late 2012. The morphology and cytochrome oxidase 1 and ITS2 genes of the two ticks were studied. The skin at the attachment site was sampled by central biopsy for both real time and endpoint Borrelia polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and subsequent sequencing. Morphologically, the two ticks were either I. holocyclus or I. cornuatus. Molecular studies and nucleotide sequencing revealed that both ticks were I. holocyclus. Real time and endpoint PCR on the central tissue biopsy samples returned positive results for B. burgdorferi DNA. Our results are evidence for transmission of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto species to humans by the tick I. holocyclus in Australia. I. holocyclus is commonly associated with human tick bites on virtually the entire eastern coastline of Australia. PMID:25434042

  12. Severity of chronic Lyme disease compared to other chronic conditions: a quality of life survey

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lorraine; Wilcox, Spencer; Mankoff, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Overview. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) health-related quality of life (HRQoL) indicators are widely used in the general population to determine the burden of disease, identify health needs, and direct public health policy. These indicators also allow the burden of illness to be compared across different diseases. Although Lyme disease has recently been acknowledged as a major health threat in the USA with more than 300,000 new cases per year, no comprehensive assessment of the health burden of this tickborne disease is available. This study assesses the HRQoL of patients with chronic Lyme disease (CLD) and compares the severity of CLD to other chronic conditions. Methods. Of 5,357 subjects who responded to an online survey, 3,090 were selected for the study. Respondents were characterized as having CLD if they were clinically diagnosed with Lyme disease and had persisting symptoms lasting more than 6 months following antibiotic treatment. HRQoL of CLD patients was assessed using the CDC 9-item metric. The HRQoL analysis for CLD was compared to published analyses for the general population and other chronic illnesses using standard statistical methods. Results. Compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases reviewed here, patients with CLD reported significantly lower health quality status, more bad mental and physical health days, a significant symptom disease burden, and greater activity limitations. They also reported impairment in their ability to work, increased utilization of healthcare services, and greater out of pocket medical costs. Conclusions. CLD patients have significantly impaired HRQoL and greater healthcare utilization compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases. The heavy burden of illness associated with CLD highlights the need for earlier diagnosis and innovative treatment approaches that may reduce the burden of illness and concomitant costs posed by this

  13. Persisting atypical and cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi and local inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith; Kasas, Sandor; Zurn, Anne D; McCall, Sherman; Yu, Sheng; McGeer, Patrick L

    2008-01-01

    Background The long latent stage seen in syphilis, followed by chronic central nervous system infection and inflammation, can be explained by the persistence of atypical cystic and granular forms of Treponema pallidum. We investigated whether a similar situation may occur in Lyme neuroborreliosis. Method Atypical forms of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes were induced exposing cultures of Borrelia burgdorferi (strains B31 and ADB1) to such unfavorable conditions as osmotic and heat shock, and exposure to the binding agents Thioflavin S and Congo red. We also analyzed whether these forms may be induced in vitro, following infection of primary chicken and rat neurons, as well as rat and human astrocytes. We further analyzed whether atypical forms similar to those induced in vitro may also occur in vivo, in brains of three patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis. We used immunohistochemical methods to detect evidence of neuroinflammation in the form of reactive microglia and astrocytes. Results Under these conditions we observed atypical cystic, rolled and granular forms of these spirochetes. We characterized these abnormal forms by histochemical, immunohistochemical, dark field and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. The atypical and cystic forms found in the brains of three patients with neuropathologically confirmed Lyme neuroborreliosis were identical to those induced in vitro. We also observed nuclear fragmentation of the infected astrocytes using the TUNEL method. Abundant HLA-DR positive microglia and GFAP positive reactive astrocytes were present in the cerebral cortex. Conclusion The results indicate that atypical extra- and intracellular pleomorphic and cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi and local neuroinflammation occur in the brain in chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. The persistence of these more resistant spirochete forms, and their intracellular location in neurons and glial cells, may explain the long latent stage and persistence of Borrelia infection

  14. Statins reduce spirochetal burden and modulate immune responses in the C3H/HeN mouse model of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Van Laar, Tricia A; Hole, Camaron; Rajasekhar Karna, S L; Miller, Christine L; Reddick, Robert; Wormley, Floyd L; Seshu, J

    2016-06-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a systemic disorder caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme spirochetes encode for a functional 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR EC 1.1.1.88) serving as a rate limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that contribute to components critical for cell wall biogenesis. Statins have been shown to inhibit B. burgdorferi in vitro. Using a mouse model of Lyme disease, we found that statins contribute to reducing bacterial burden and altering the murine immune response to favor clearance of spirochetes. PMID:26993029

  15. Spatial Analysis of Environmental Factors Related to Lyme Disease in Alabama by Means of NASA Earth Observation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renneboog, Nathan; Capilouto, Emily G.; Firsing, Stephen L., III; Levy, Kyle; McAllister, Marilyn; Roa, Kathryn; Setia,Shveta; Xie, Lili; Burnett, Donna; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the epidemiology of Lyme Disease that accounts for more than 95% or vector borne diseases in the United States. The history, symptoms and the life cycle of the tick, the transmitting agent of Lyme Disease, a map that shows the cases reported to the CDC between1990 and 2006 and the number of cases in Alabama by year from 1986 to 2007. A NASA project is described, the goals of which are to (1) Demonstrate the presence of the chain of infection of Lyme disease in Alabama (2) Identify areas with environmental factors that support tick population using NASA Earth Observation Systems data in selected areas of Alabama and (3) Increase community awareness of Lyme disease and recommend primary and secondary prevention strategies. The remote sensing methods included: Analyzed Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and DigitalGlobe Quickbird satellite imagery from summer months and Performed image analyses in ER Mapper 7.1. Views from the ASTER and Quickbird land cover are shown, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) algorithm was applied to all ASTER and Quickbird imagery. The use of the images to obtain the level of soil moisture is reviewed, and this analysis was used along with the NDVI, was used to identify the areas that support the tick population.

  16. Evaluation of Borrelia burgdorferi BbHtrA Protease as a Vaccine Candidate for Lyme Borreliosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Amy J.; Russell, Theresa M.; Dolan, Marc C.; Williams, Martin; Hojgaard, Andrias; Weiner, Zachary P.; Johnson, Barbara J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi synthesizes an HtrA protease (BbHtrA) which is a surface-exposed, conserved protein within Lyme disease spirochetes with activity toward CheX and BmpD of Borrelia spp, as well as aggrecan, fibronectin and proteoglycans found in skin, joints and neural tissues of vertebrates. An antibody response against BbHtrA is observed in Lyme disease patients and in experimentally infected laboratory mice and rabbits. Given the surface location of BbHtrA on B. burgdorferi and its ability to elicit an antibody response in infected hosts, we explored recombinant BbHtrA as a potential vaccine candidate in a mouse model of tick-transmitted Lyme disease. We immunized mice with two forms of BbHtrA: the proteolytically active native form and BbHtrA ablated of activity by a serine to alanine mutation at amino acid 226 (BbHtrAS226A). Although inoculation with either BbHtrA or BbHtrAS226A produced high-titer antibody responses in C3H/HeJ mice, neither antigen was successful in protecting mice from B. burgdorferi challenge. These results indicate that the search for novel vaccine candidates against Lyme borreliosis remains a challenge. PMID:26076465

  17. A Controlled Trial of a Novel Primary Prevention Program for Lyme Disease and Other Tick-Borne Illnesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daltroy, Lawren H.; Phillips, Charlotte; Lew, Robert; Wright, Elizabeth; Shadick, Nancy A.; Liang, Matthew H.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate a theory-based educational program to prevent Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses (TBI), a randomized controlled trial of an educational program was delivered to ferry passengers traveling to an endemic area in southeastern Massachusetts. Rates of TBI and precautionary and tick check behaviors were measured over three summers…

  18. A case of hemifacial paresis in a patient with Lyme neuroborreliosis treated with antibiotics in whom Borrelia meningitis developed.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hisao; Haratani, Koji; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Kakehi, Yoshiaki; Nagami, Shuhei; Katanami, Yuichi; Kawabata, Hiroki; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-28

    A 38-year-old man visited our hospital because of hemifacial paresis that developed 2 months after being bit by a tick. We diagnosed idiopathic peripheral facial palsy and gave the patient oral prednisolone and valacyclovir. Although the symptoms completely resolved in about 2 weeks, there was a risk of Lyme neuroborreliosis. The patient therefore received doxycycline (100 mg twice daily) and amoxicillin (1,000 mg 3 times daily) for 14 days. Two months later, he had symptoms of meningitis such as headache and fever accompanied by lymphocytic cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Viral meningitis was diagnosed and treated with parenteral acyclovir. The symptoms of meningitis improved. Tests for serum IgG antibodies against borrelia were positive. We gave the patient a diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis. The patient received intravenous ceftriaxone and had no relapse. It is a rare for meningitis to develop in a patient with cranial neuropathy who received doxycycline. Lyme neuroborreliosis is a rare disease in Japan. Care should therefore be exercised in the diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis and evaluation of the response to treatment. PMID:27356734

  19. Maternal Lyme disease and congenital malformations: a cord blood serosurvey in endemic and control areas.

    PubMed

    Williams, C L; Strobino, B; Weinstein, A; Spierling, P; Medici, F

    1995-07-01

    This report describes a cohort study of over 5000 infants and their mothers who participated in a cord blood serosurvey designed to examine the relationship between maternal exposure to Lyme disease and adverse pregnancy outcome. Based on serology and reported clinical history, mothers of infants in an endemic hospital cohort are 5 to 20 times more likely to have been exposed to B. burgdorferi as compared with mothers of infants in a control hospital cohort. The incidence of total congenital malformations was not significantly different in the endemic cohort compared with the control cohort, but the rate of cardiac malformations was significantly higher in the endemic cohort [odds ratio (OR) 2.40; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25, 4.59] and the frequencies of certain minor malformations (haemangiomas, polydactyly, and hydrocele), were significantly increased in the control group. Demographic variations could only account for differences in the frequency of polydactyly. Within the endemic cohort, there were no differences in the rate of major or minor malformations or mean birthweight by category of possible maternal exposure to Lyme disease or cord blood serology. The disparity between observations at the population and individual levels requires further investigation. The absence of association at the individual level in the endemic area could be because of the small number of women who were actually exposed either in terms of serology or clinical history. The reason for the findings at the population level is not known but could be because of artifact or population differences. PMID:7479280

  20. Absence of transplacental transmission of Lyme disease spirochetes from reservoir mice (Peromyscus leucopus) to their offspring.

    PubMed

    Mather, T N; Telford, S R; Adler, G H

    1991-09-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi) are naturally maintained in an enzootic cycle mainly by vector ticks (Ixodes dammini) infesting white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). Suggestions that mice may become infected without exposure to ticks prompted a study to evaluate whether mice could transmit spirochetes transplacentally to their offspring. Mice were live-captured in two Massachusetts sites where Lyme disease spirochetes are intensely enzootic. Pregnant females were housed separately in the laboratory through delivery, and mothers and their offspring were caged together until weaning. Each female and two offspring were then examined for evidence of infection serologically and by tick xenodiagnosis. All 14 mother mice examined produced infected ticks and exhibited serum antibodies to B. burgdorferi. However, none of 28 offspring tested produced infected ticks and only a few had evidence of circulating antibody. In a separate experiment, no young CD-1 mice, born of infected mothers, had IgM antibody to B. burgdorferi. It would appear that immature mice are not transplacentally infected with spirochetes and must be exposed to infected ticks before becoming infected and infective themselves. PMID:1869842