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Sample records for multiple injection zones

  1. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Reges, José E. O.; Salazar, A. O.; Maitelli, Carla W. S. P.; Carvalho, Lucas G.; Britto, Ursula J. B.

    2016-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential) model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1); 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2). Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved. PMID:27420068

  2. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles.

    PubMed

    Reges, José E O; Salazar, A O; Maitelli, Carla W S P; Carvalho, Lucas G; Britto, Ursula J B

    2016-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential) model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1); 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2). Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved. PMID:27420068

  3. High-Throughput Analysis of Lidocaine in Pharmaceutical Formulation by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis Using Multiple Injections in a Single Run

    PubMed Central

    Valese, Andressa C.; Spudeit, Daniel A.; Dolzan, Maressa D.; Bretanha, Lizandra C.; Micke, Gustavo A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a subminute separation method by capillary zone electrophoresis in an uncoated capillary using multiple injection procedure for the determination of lidocaine in samples of pharmaceutical formulations. The separation was performed in less than a minute leading to doing four injections in a single run. The cathodic electroosmotic flow contributed to reducing the analyses time. The background electrolyte was composed of 20 mmol L−1 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol and 40 mmol L−1 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid at pH 6.1. The internal standard used was benzylamine. Separations were performed in a fused uncoated silica capillary (32 cm total length, 23.5 cm effective length, and 50 μm internal diameter) with direct UV detection at 200 nm. Samples and standards were injected hydrodynamically using 40 mbar/3 s interspersed with spacer electrolyte using 40 mbar/7 s. The electrophoretic system was operated under constant voltage of 30 kV with positive polarity on the injection side. The evaluation of some analytical parameters of the method showed good linearity (r2 > 0.999), a limit of detection 0.92 mg L−1, intermediate precision better than 3.2% (peak area), and recovery in the range of 92–102%. PMID:27069712

  4. Non-Stationary Hydrologic Transport in the Vadose Zone: Experimental Results of Multiple Tracer Injections in Lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queloz, P.; Rao, P. C.; Rinaldo, A.

    2012-12-01

    Travel and residence times are well-known descriptors of hydrologic and solute transport in the vadose zone. It has been observed that their probability density functions are stationary only under specific conditions, rarely encountered in natural catchments. This study aims at demonstrating the emergence of non-stationary solute transport in a highly monitored system, and identifying the factors controlling the variations of the observed solute travel-times. 2-meters deep weighing lysimeters are exposed to stochastic rainfall sequences. Multiple derivatives of difluorobenzoate compounds are sequentially injected at different times in the system, and are analyzed in the drainage flux at the bottom outlet and at different depth within the soil profiles. Willow trees planted in the systems create a stochastic soil water deficit by evapotranspiration. As each tracer injected is analytically differentiable from the others, the computation of the tracer breakthrough curves at the lysimeter outlet allows measuring the solute travel-time distributions conditional on the injection time. The observed breakthrough curves display a large variability, emphasizing the effects of the initial conditions at the injection time and the subsequent states encountered in the system on solute transport. Two types of climate have been simulated on the lysimeters. With the precision load cells installed under each lysimeter and the water content probes deployed in the soil profiles, a detailed comparison of the water balance and storage dynamics and their influence on solute transport timing can be done.

  5. High-Throughput Analysis of Lidocaine in Pharmaceutical Formulation by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis Using Multiple Injections in a Single Run.

    PubMed

    Valese, Andressa C; Spudeit, Daniel A; Dolzan, Maressa D; Bretanha, Lizandra C; Vitali, Luciano; Micke, Gustavo A

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a subminute separation method by capillary zone electrophoresis in an uncoated capillary using multiple injection procedure for the determination of lidocaine in samples of pharmaceutical formulations. The separation was performed in less than a minute leading to doing four injections in a single run. The cathodic electroosmotic flow contributed to reducing the analyses time. The background electrolyte was composed of 20 mmol L(-1) 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol and 40 mmol L(-1) 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid at pH 6.1. The internal standard used was benzylamine. Separations were performed in a fused uncoated silica capillary (32 cm total length, 23.5 cm effective length, and 50 μm internal diameter) with direct UV detection at 200 nm. Samples and standards were injected hydrodynamically using 40 mbar/3 s interspersed with spacer electrolyte using 40 mbar/7 s. The electrophoretic system was operated under constant voltage of 30 kV with positive polarity on the injection side. The evaluation of some analytical parameters of the method showed good linearity (r (2) > 0.999), a limit of detection 0.92 mg L(-1), intermediate precision better than 3.2% (peak area), and recovery in the range of 92-102%. PMID:27069712

  6. Injectable Multiple Sclerosis Medications

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Zung Vu

    2012-01-01

    Although injection-site reactions (ISRs) occur with US Food and Drug Administration–approved injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis, there are currently few reports of real-world data on ISR management strategies or possible correlations between ISRs and patient demographics, disease characteristics, and missed injections. Patient-reported data on the use of DMTs, patient demographic and disease characteristics, missed injections, and ISR reduction strategies were collected via e-mail, a patient registry (www.ms-cam.org), and a Web-based survey. Of the 1380 respondents, 1201 (87%) indicated that they had used injectable DMTs, of whom 377 (31%) had used intramuscular (IM) interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a), 172 (14%) had used subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, 183 (15%) had used SC IFNβ-1b, and 469 (39%) had used glatiramer acetate (GA). The majority of respondents were older (73% were ≥40 years), female (79%), married or living with a partner (72%), white (94%), and nonsmoking (82%). Injection-site reaction incidence, grouped according to severity, varied among DMTs, with IM IFNβ-1a causing significantly (P < .001) fewer mild, moderate, or severe ISRs than the other therapies. Female sex and younger age were significantly (P < .05) associated with more moderate ISRs among users of IM IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, and GA. Nonwhites reported severe ISRs more often than whites. For all DMTs injection-site massage and avoidance of sensitive sites were the most frequently used strategies to minimize ISRs. These data may help identify patients with characteristics associated with a higher risk for ISRs, allowing health-care professionals to provide anticipatory guidance to patients at risk for decreased adherence or discontinuation. PMID:24453732

  7. Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

  8. Persulfate injection into a gasoline source zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sra, Kanwartej S.; Thomson, Neil R.; Barker, Jim F.

    2013-07-01

    One pore volume of unactivated sodium persulfate was delivered into an emplaced gasoline residual source zone at CFB Borden. Concentrations of inorganic species (S2O82 -, SO42 -, Na+, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)) and selected gasoline compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes and naphthalene) were monitored across a transect equipped with 90 multilevel sampling points for > 10 months post-injection. Mass loading (M˙) of compounds constructed from the transect data was used for assessment purposes. Breakthrough of inorganic species was observed when the injection slug crossed the monitoring transect. An increase in M indicated persulfate consumption during oxidation of gasoline compounds or degradation due to the interaction with aquifer materials. M increased by > 100% suggesting some mineralization of gasoline compounds during treatment. Mass loading for all the monitored gasoline compounds reduced by 46 to 86% as the inorganic slug crossed the monitoring transect. The cumulative mass discharge across the monitoring transect was 19 to 58% lower than that expected without persulfate injection. After the inorganic injection slug was flushed from the source zone a partial rebound (40 to 80% of baseline levels) of mass discharge of the monitored gasoline compounds was observed. The ensemble of data collected provides insight into the fate and transport of the injected persulfate solution, and the accompanying treatment of a gasoline the source zone.

  9. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  10. Magnetic detection of ferrofluid injection zones

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, S.; Moridis, G.; Becker, A.

    1998-03-01

    Ferrofluids are stable colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles that can be stabilized in various carrier liquids. In this study the authors investigate the potential of ferrofluids to trace the movement and position of liquids injected in the subsurface using geophysical methods. An ability to track and monitor the movement and position of injected liquids is essential in assessing the effectiveness of the delivery system and the success of the process. Ferrofluids can also provide a significant detection and verification tool in containment technologies, where they can be injected with the barrier liquids to provide a strong signature allowing determination of the barrier geometry, extent, continuity and integrity. Finally, ferrofluids may have unique properties as tracers for detecting preferential flow features (such as fractures) in the subsurface, and thus allow the design of more effective remediation systems. In this report the authors review the results of the investigation of the potential of ferrofluids to trace the movement and position of liquids injected in the subsurface using geophysical methods. They demonstrate the feasibility of using conventional magnetometry for detecting subsurface zones of injected ferrofluids used to trace liquids injected for remediation or barrier formation. The geometrical shapes considered were a sphere, a thin disk, a rectangular horizontal slab, and a cylinder. Simple calculations based on the principles of magnetometry are made to determine the detection depths of FTs. Experiments involving spherical, cylindrical and horizontal slabs show a very good agreement between predictions and measurements.

  11. Injection of Nuclear Rocket Engine Exhaust into Deep Unsaturated Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. A.; Decker, D.

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear rocket engine technology is being considered as a means of interplanetary vehicle propulsion for a manned mission to Mars. To achieve this, a test and development facility must be constructed to safely run nuclear engines. The testing of nuclear engines in the 1950's and 1960's was accomplished by exhausting the engine gases into the atmosphere, a practice that is no longer acceptable. Injection into deep unsaturated zones of radioactive exhaust gases and water vapor associated with the testing of nuclear rocket engines is being considered as a way of sequestering radionuclides from the environment. Numerical simulations were conducted to determine the ability of an unsaturated zone with the hydraulic properties of Frenchman Flat alluvium at the Nevada Test Site to contain gas-phase radionuclides. Gas and water vapor were injected for two hours at rates of 14.5 kg s-1 and 15 kg s-1, respectively, in an interval between 100 and 430 m below the land surface into alluvium with an intrinsic permeability of 10-11 m2 and porosity of 0.35. The results show that during a test of an engine, radionuclides with at least greater than 10-year half-lives may reach the land surface within several years after injection. Radionuclide transport is primarily controlled by the upward pressure gradient from the point of injection to the lower (atmospheric) pressure boundary condition at the land surface. Radionuclides with half-lives on the order of days should undergo enough decay prior to reaching the land surface. A cooling water vapor injected into the unsaturated zone simultaneously with the exhaust gas will condense within several meters of the injection point and drain downward toward the water table. However, the nearly horizontal hydraulic groundwater gradient present in several of the basins at NTS should limit lateral migration of radionuclides away from the vicinity of injection.

  12. Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf D.; Thiel, Matthew P.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

  13. Multiple-injection high-throughput gas chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Wes; Wang, Heather; Welch, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Multiple-injection techniques have been shown to be a simple way to perform high-throughput analysis where the entire experiment resides in a single chromatogram, simplifying the data analysis and interpretation. In this study, multiple-injection techniques are applied to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and mass detection to significantly increase sample throughput. The unique issues of implementing a traditional "Fast" injection mode of multiple-injection techniques with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are discussed. Stacked injections are also discussed as means to increase the throughput of longer methods where mass detection is unable to distinguish between analytes of the same mass and longer retentions are required to resolve components of interest. Multiple-injection techniques are shown to increase instrument throughput by up to 70% and to simplify data analysis, allowing hits in multiple parallel experiments to be identified easily. PMID:27292909

  14. Multiple-orifice liquid injection into hypersonic air streams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Review of oblique water and fluorocarbon injection test results obtained in experimental studies of the effects of multiple-orifice liquid injection into hypersonic air streams. The results include the finding that maximum lateral penetration from such injections increases linearly with the square root of the jet-to-freestream dynamic-pressure ratio and is proportional to an equivalent orifice diameter.

  15. Separation window dependent multiple injection (SWDMI) for large scale analysis of therapeutic antibody N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Zsuzsanna; Szarka, Máté; Szigeti, Márton; Guttman, András

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing demand in the biopharmaceutical industry for large scale N-glycosylation analysis of biotherapeutics, especially monoclonal antibodies. To fulfill this high throughput analysis requirement with single column separation systems in most instances require finishing the entire analysis cycle including conditioning, injection and separation between sample injections. While in liquid chromatography it represents a challenge, multiple sample injection in capillary electrophoresis has already been demonstrated for one or two sample components by utilizing the concept of introducing sequential sample and buffer zones into the capillary tubing before the start of the separation process. It was also demonstrated in CE-MS mode, mostly to follow one sample component, identified by precise mass measurement. Here we introduce a novel multiple injection approach for rapid large scale capillary electrophoresis analysis of samples with biopharmaceutical interest supporting multicomponent optical detection with laser induced fluorescence. In Separation Window Dependent Multiple Injection (SWDMI) mode, the samples are consecutively injected in predefined time intervals, based on the window that covers the separation of all sample components. As a practical example, this newly developed SWDMI protocol was applied to rapid and large scale analysis of APTS labeled monoclonal antibody N-glycans using a short (20cm effective length) capillary column. Full analysis of 96 samples (injected from a well plate) was obtained in 4h, in contrast to consecutive individual separation cycle processing of the same samples that required 12h. PMID:27337190

  16. The Noisy Expectation-Maximization Algorithm for Multiplicative Noise Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osoba, Osonde; Kosko, Bart

    2016-03-01

    We generalize the noisy expectation-maximization (NEM) algorithm to allow arbitrary modes of noise injection besides just adding noise to the data. The noise must still satisfy a NEM positivity condition. This generalization includes the important special case of multiplicative noise injection. A generalized NEM theorem shows that all measurable modes of injecting noise will speed the average convergence of the EM algorithm if the noise satisfies a generalized NEM positivity condition. This noise-benefit condition has a simple quadratic form for Gaussian and Cauchy mixture models in the case of multiplicative noise injection. Simulations show a multiplicative-noise EM speed-up of more than 27% in a simple Gaussian mixture model. Injecting blind noise only slowed convergence. A related theorem gives a sufficient condition for an average EM noise benefit for arbitrary modes of noise injection if the data model comes from the general exponential family of probability density functions. A final theorem shows that injected noise slows EM convergence on average if the NEM inequalities reverse and the noise satisfies a negativity condition.

  17. Freja observations of multiple injection events in cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, O.; Yamauchi, M.; Eliasson, L.; Lundin, R.

    The TICS (Three-dimensional Ion Composition Spectrometer) instrument on board the Freja satellite provides particle data with high spatial, temporal, spectral, and mass resolution. The Freja orbit (inclination 63°) is suitable for studies of the cusp since the satellite traverses this region longitudinally when the cusp is located lower than 75° geomagnetic latitude, i.e. when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) points southward. The satellite traverses the dayside polar region during two weeks every 100 days due to orbit precession, and nearly 50 cusp traversals were recorded during the first year of operation. Both multiple injections and single injections are clearly identified and distinguished, the former being more frequently observed than the latter. Freja has also resolved overlapping injections (special cases of multiple injections), for the first time at low altitudes.

  18. Multiple-Zone Diffractive Optic Element for Laser Ranging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    A diffractive optic element (DOE) can be used as a beam splitter to generate multiple laser beams from a single input laser beam. This technology has been recently used in LRO s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to generate five laser beams that measure the lunar topography from a 50-km nominal mapping orbit (see figure). An extension of this approach is to use a multiple-zone DOE to allow a laser altimeter instrument to operate over a wider range of distances. In particular, a multiple-zone DOE could be used for applications that require both mapping and landing on a planetary body. In this case, the laser altimeter operating range would need to extend from several hundred kilometers down to a few meters. The innovator was recently involved in an investigation how to modify the LOLA instrument for the OSIRIS asteroid mapping and sample return mission. One approach is to replace the DOE in the LOLA laser beam expander assembly with a multiple-zone DOE that would allow for the simultaneous illumination of the asteroid with mapping and landing laser beams. The proposed OSIRIS multiple-zone DOE would generate the same LOLA five-beam output pattern for high-altitude topographic mapping, but would simultaneously generate a wide divergence angle beam using a small portion of the total laser energy for the approach and landing portion of the mission. Only a few percent of the total laser energy is required for approach and landing operations as the return signal increases as the inverse square of the ranging height. A wide divergence beam could be implemented by making the center of the DOE a diffractive or refractive negative lens. The beam energy and beam divergence characteristics of a multiple-zone DOE could be easily tailored to meet the requirements of other missions that require laser ranging data. Current single-zone DOE lithographic manufacturing techniques could also be used to fabricate a multiple-zone DOE by masking the different DOE zones during

  19. Measurement of injectivity indexes in geothermal wells with two permeable zones

    SciTech Connect

    Acuna, Jorge A.

    1994-01-20

    Injectivity tests in wells with two permeable zones and internal flow is analyzed in order to include the usually severe thermal transient effects. A theoretical analysis is performed and a method devised to obtain information from the thermal transient, provided that temperature is measured simultaneously with pressure. The technique is illustrated with two real tests performed at Miravalles, Costa Rica. It allows to estimate total injectivity index as well as the injectivity index of each one of the two zones separately. Correct position of measuring tools and nature of spontaneous internal flow is also discussed.

  20. Wide injection zone compression in gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gilar, Martin; McDonald, Thomas S; Johnson, Jay S; Murphy, James P; Jorgenson, James W

    2015-04-17

    Chromatographic zone broadening is a common issue in microfluidic chromatography, where the sample volume introduced on column often exceeds the column void volume. To better understand the propagation of wide chromatographic zones on a separation device, a series of MS Excel spreadsheets were developed to simulate the process. To computationally simplify these simulations, we investigated the effects of injection related zone broadening and its gradient related zone compression by tracking only the movements of zone boundaries on column. The effects of sample volume, sample solvent, gradient slope, and column length on zone broadening were evaluated and compared to experiments performed on 0.32mm I.D. microfluidic columns. The repetitive injection method (RIM) was implemented to generate experimental chromatograms where large sample volume scenarios can be emulated by injecting two discrete small injection plugs spaced in time. A good match between predicted and experimental RIM chromatograms was observed. We discuss the performance of selected retention models on the accuracy of predictions and use the developed spreadsheets for illustration of gradient zone focusing for both small molecules and peptides. PMID:25748538

  1. Induced seismicity and CO2 leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection in a multilayered sedimentary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio Rinaldi, Antonio; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jeanne, Pierre; Cappa, Frederic; Guglielmi, Yves

    2014-05-01

    Overpressure caused by the direct injection of CO2 into a deep sedimentary system may produce changes in the state of stress, as well as, have an impact on the sealing capabilities of the targeted system. The importance of geomechanics including the potential for reactivating faults associated with large-scale geologic carbon sequestration operations has recently become more widely recognized. However, not withstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO2 to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is more important from safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on both short- and long-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence of potential leakage of either brine or CO2 to shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. The first part of this work aims to study the fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term (5 years) integrity of the CO2 repository, and hence on the potential leakage of CO2 to shallow groundwater aquifers. Increased pore pressure can alter the stress distribution on a fault/fracture zone, which may produce changes in the permeability related to the elastic and/or plastic strain (or stress) during single (or multiple) shear ruptures. We account for stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes along with strain and stress variations. We analyze several scenarios related to the injected amount of CO2 (and hence related to potential overpressure) involving both involving minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain permeability coupling functions, as well as increasing the complexity of the system in terms of hydromechanical heterogeneities. We conclude that

  2. Intelligent emissions controller for substance injection in the post-primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers

    DOEpatents

    Reifman, Jaques; Feldman, Earl E.; Wei, Thomas Y. C.; Glickert, Roger W.

    2003-01-01

    The control of emissions from fossil-fired boilers wherein an injection of substances above the primary combustion zone employs multi-layer feedforward artificial neural networks for modeling static nonlinear relationships between the distribution of injected substances into the upper region of the furnace and the emissions exiting the furnace. Multivariable nonlinear constrained optimization algorithms use the mathematical expressions from the artificial neural networks to provide the optimal substance distribution that minimizes emission levels for a given total substance injection rate. Based upon the optimal operating conditions from the optimization algorithms, the incremental substance cost per unit of emissions reduction, and the open-market price per unit of emissions reduction, the intelligent emissions controller allows for the determination of whether it is more cost-effective to achieve additional increments in emission reduction through the injection of additional substance or through the purchase of emission credits on the open market. This is of particular interest to fossil-fired electrical power plant operators. The intelligent emission controller is particularly adapted for determining the economical control of such pollutants as oxides of nitrogen (NO.sub.x) and carbon monoxide (CO) emitted by fossil-fired boilers by the selective introduction of multiple inputs of substances (such as natural gas, ammonia, oil, water-oil emulsion, coal-water slurry and/or urea, and combinations of these substances) above the primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers.

  3. Multiple dopant injection system for small rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakala, G. G.; Raines, N. G.

    1992-07-01

    The Diagnostics Test Facility (DTF) at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) was designed and built to provide a standard rocket engine exhaust plume for use in the research and development of engine health monitoring instrumentation. A 1000 lb thrust class liquid oxygen (LOX)-gaseous hydrogen (GH2) fueled rocket engine is used as the subscale plume source to simulate the SSME during experimentation and instrument development. The ability of the DTF to provide efficient, and low cost test operations makes it uniquely suited for plume diagnostic experimentation. The most unique feature of the DTF is the Multiple Dopant Injection System (MDIS) that is used to seed the exhaust plume with the desired element or metal alloy. The dopant injection takes place at the fuel injector, yielding a very uniform and homogeneous distribution of the seeding material in the exhaust plume. The MDIS allows during a single test firing of the DTF, the seeding of the exhaust plume with up to three different dopants and also provides distilled water base lines between the dopants. A number of plume diagnostic-related experiments have already utilized the unique capabilities of the DTF.

  4. The processes controlling damage zone propagation induced by wellbore fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Induced seismicity by wellbore fluid injection is an important tool for enhancing permeability in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. We model nucleation and propagation of damage zones and seismicity patterns for two-dimensional plane strain configuration at a depth of 5 km using novel numerical software developed in the course of this study. Simulations include the coupling of poro-elastic deformation and groundwater flow with damage evolution (weakening and healing) and its effect on the elastic and hydrologic parameters. Results show that the process occurring during fluid injection can be divided into four stages. The duration of each stage depends on the hydrological and mechanical parameters. Initially, fluid flows into the rock with no seismic events (5 to 20 hr). At this stage, damage increases from 0 to 1 creating two sets of conjugate zones (four narrow damage zones). Thereafter, the occurrence of seismic events and faulting begins and accelerates for the next 20 to 70 hr. At the initial part of this stage, two of the damage zones create stress shadows on the other two damage zones that stop progressing. The velocity of the advancing damage is limited only by the rock parameters controlling damage evolution. At the third stage, which lasts for the following 20-30 hr, damage acceleration decreases because fluid transport becomes a limiting factor as the damage zones are too long to efficiently transfer the pressure from the well to the tip of the damage zones. Finally, the damage decelerates and even stops in some cases. The propagation of damage is controlled and limited by fluid transport from the injection well to the tip of the damage zones because fluid transport does not keep up with the dilatancy of the damage zones. The time and distance of propagation depend on the damage-permeability coupling and the remote shear stress. Higher remote shear stress causes shorter initial periods of no seismicity; strong damage-permeability coupling causes

  5. Investigation of Diesel combustion using multiple injection strategies for idling after cold start of passenger-car engines

    SciTech Connect

    Payri, F.; Broatch, A.; Salavert, J.M.; Martin, J.

    2010-10-15

    A comprehensive investigation was carried out in order to better understand the combustion behaviour in a low compression ratio DI Diesel engine when multiple injection strategies are applied just after the engine cold starts in low temperature conditions (idling). More specifically, the aim of this study was twofold: on one hand, to understand the effect of the multiple injection strategies on the indicated mean effective pressure; on the other hand, to contribute to the understanding of combustion stability characterized by the coefficient of variation of indicated mean effective pressure. The first objective was fulfilled by analyzing the rate of heat release obtained by in-cylinder pressure diagnosis. The results showed that the timing of the pilot injection closest to the main injection was the most influential parameter based on the behaviour of the rate of heat release (regardless of the multiple injection strategy applied). For the second objective, the combustion stability was found to be correlated with the combustion centroid angle. The results showed a trend between them and the existence of a range of centroid angles where the combustion stability is strong enough. In addition, it was also evident that convenient split injection allows shifting the centroid to such a zone and improves combustion stability after start. (author)

  6. Controlling electron injection in laser plasma accelerators using multiple pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Plateau, G. R.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.; Bruhwiler, D.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Chen, M.; Yu, L.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    Use of counter-propagating pulses to control electron injection in laser-plasma accelerators promises to be an important ingredient in the development of stable devices. We discuss the colliding pulse scheme and associated diagnostics.

  7. Enhancing resolution of free-flow zone electrophoresis via a simple sheath-flow sample injection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Kong, Fan-Zhi; Liu, Ji; Li, Jun-Min; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Qing; Wang, Ju-Fang; Xiao, Hua; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Li, Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a simple and novel sheath-flow sample injection method (SFSIM) is introduced to reduce the band broadening of free-flow zone electrophoresis separation in newly developed self-balance free-flow electrophoresis instrument. A needle injector was placed in the center of the separation inlet, into which the BGE and sample solution were pumped simultaneously. BGE formed sheath flow outside the sample stream, resulting in less band broadening related to hydrodynamics and electrodynamics. Hemoglobin and C-phycocyanin were successfully separated by the proposed method in contrast to the poor separation of free-flow electrophoresis with the traditional injection method without sheath flow. About 3.75 times resolution enhancement could be achieved by sheath-flow sample injection method. PMID:27121853

  8. A discrete-choice experiment to determine patient preferences for injectable multiple sclerosis treatments in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Poulos, Christine; Kinter, Elizabeth; Yang, Jui-Chen; Bridges, John F. P.; Posner, Joshua; Gleißner, Erika; Mühlbacher, Axel; Kieseier, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the relative importance of features of a hypothetical injectable disease-modifying treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis using a discrete-choice experiment. Methods: German residents at least 18 years of age with a self-reported physician diagnosis of multiple sclerosis completed a 25–30 minute online discrete-choice experiment. Patients were asked to choose one of two hypothetical injectable treatments for multiple sclerosis, defined by different levels of six attributes (disability progression, the number of relapses in the next 4 years, injection time, frequency of injections, presence of flu-like symptoms, and presence of injection-site reactions). The data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Results: Of 202 adults who completed the survey, results from 189 were used in the analysis. Approximately 50% of all patients reported a diagnosis of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, and 31% reported secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Approximately 71% of patients had current or prior experience with injectable multiple sclerosis medication. Approximately 53% had experienced flu-like symptoms caused by their medication, and 47% had experienced mild injection-site reactions. At least one significant difference was seen between levels in all attributes, except injection time. The greatest change in relative importance between levels of an attribute was years until symptoms get worse from 1 to 4 years. The magnitude of this difference was about twice that of relapses in the next 4 years, frequency of injections, and flu-like symptoms. Conclusions: Most attributes examined in this experiment had an influence on patient preference. Patients placed a significant value on improvements in the frequency of dosing and disability progression. Results suggest that changes in injection frequency can be as important as changes in efficacy and safety attributes. Understanding which attributes of

  9. Multiple-Event Relocation of Blanco Transform Fault Zone Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnot, J. M.; Ledger, A. S.; Perkins, M. L.; Ruddock, S.; Salentine, B. J.; Salentine, S. J.; Larsen, H. E.; Cronin, V. S.; Sverdrup, K. A.

    2001-12-01

    Earthquakes along the ~350 km long Blanco transform fault zone (BTFZ) between the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates are routinely mislocated northeast of the active transform boundary. A set of 111 magnitude >5 earthquakes recorded from 1964 through 2000 were relocated using the multiple-event relocation technique of Jordan and Sverdrup (1981). An earthquake on June 2, 2000, that was included in the relocated set had also been well located using independent data from the SOSUS hydrophone array (Fox, Dziak and Will, 2000), permitting specification of a static correction to improve absolute locations for the clusters. The static correction involved a rotation of all earthquake location vectors from the relocated positions by ~0.23° around a pole at latitude 11.14° N, longitude 28.99° W, resulting in an average change in location of 25 km toward azimuth 165° . The final locations resulting from the multiple-event relocation and static correction were an average distance of 30 +/-10 km toward azimuth 172 +/-31 degrees relative to the initial ISC locations. The 95% confidence-interval ellipses of these solutions generally fall on or very near active structural features along the BTFZ. The semi-major axis of the 95% CI error ellipse for most events in the set averaged 14.9 +/-5.9 km in length; however, the semi-major axis for 8 events recorded by <50 stations were >40 km long. The pattern of relocated epicenters does not indicate uniform spatial distribution of activity along the BTFZ; however, the sample time interval of just 36 years may be too short to expect uniform distribution. Focal mechanism solutions were obtained from the Harvard CMT catalog for 33 of the events. All but 2 of the focal mechanism solutions for earthquakes along the BTFZ indicate appropriate right-lateral strike-slip focal mechanisms. One event relocated to near the Surveyor Basin has a normal-fault focal mechanism. The focal mechanism solutions support the interpretation that these are plate

  10. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOEpatents

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  11. Simultaneous determination of three species with a single-injection step using batch injection analysis with multiple pulse amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Jhonys Machado; Oliveira, Thiago da Costa; Gimenes, Denise Tofanello; Munoz, Rodrigo Alejandro Abarza; Richter, Eduardo Mathias

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the possibility of simultaneous determination of three compounds with a single-injection step using batch injection analysis with multiple pulse amperometric detection (BIA-MPA) is demonstrated for the first time. A sequence of three potential pulses (+1.25 V, +1.60 V, and +1.80 V) was applied with the acquisition of three separate amperograms. 8-Chlorotheophylline was detected selectively at +1.25 V, both 8-chlorotheophylline and pyridoxine at +1.60V and 8-chlorotheophylline, pyridoxine, and diphenhydramine at +1.80 V. Subtraction between the currents detected at the three amperograms (with the help of correction factors) was used for the selective determination of pyridoxine and diphenhydramine. The proposed method is simple, inexpensive, fast (60 injections h(-1)), and present selectivity for the determination of the three compounds in pharmaceutical samples, with results similar to those obtained by HPLC (95% confidence level). PMID:26695316

  12. Modeling of brine migration through fault zones as a result of CO2 injection into a saline aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, E.; Kempka, T.; Nakaten, B.; Jolie, E.; Kühn, M.

    2012-04-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers has become a widely considered option for reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations. However, these storage operations also bear the risk of CO2 leakage and upward brine migration from deep saline formations into potable groundwater, especially in faulted reservoirs. This study investigates the impact of fault-permeability on upward brine migration as a result of CO2 injection into a saline aquifer. In a first step, we set up a static 3D geological structure model of a prospective CO2 storage site with a size of 40 km x 40 km x 23 m. Faults are implemented as multiple virtual discrete grid cells, allowing to assign individual flow-related petrophysical properties and taking into account the central fault core of low-permeability and the outer damage zone of high permeability. Subsequently, large-scale numerical multi-phase multi-component (CO2, NaCl, H2O) flow simulations were performed on a high performance computing cluster system. The prospective CO2 storage site is located in the Northeast German Basin and is characterized by saline multi-layer aquifers located in the Middle Bunter as a part of an anticline structure originating from salt-tectonic processes. The Middle Bunter, Muschelkalk and Keuper formations were selected to assess brine migration through faults triggered by the injection of 1.7 Mt CO2/year. The NE and SW boundaries of the study area are confined by the Fürstenwalde Gubener and the Lausitzer Abbruch fault systems represented by four discrete faults in the model with a thickness of 20 m each. In order to determine the impacts of fault core and damage zone transmissibility on upward brine migration and pressure elevation in the overburden, different leakage scenarios were investigated taking into account varying fault core and damage zone permeabilities. The undertaken simulation studies underline that detailed knowledge on fault permeability is of uttermost importance for the

  13. Managing self-injection difficulties in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cox, Darcy; Stone, Jerome

    2006-06-01

    Difficulties with self-injection, including inabillity to self-inject, are common for individuals taking home-administered injectable medications. In relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), all of the currently available disease-modifying medications are injectables marketed for self-injection. Problems with self-injection pose a barrier to treatment adherence for many patients. Clinicians at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Multiple Sclerosis Center have developed a number of strategies to help patients who experience anxiety associated with self-injection. These strategies have been empirically tested and found to be effective and easily implemented by mental health professionals and nurses. This article offers case examples and discussion of the principles of the techniques developed at UCSF to remediate patients' difficulties with self-injection. Nurses are most often the healthcare providers responsible for training MS patients in self-injection and monitoring their compliance. Nurses who are familiar with these tools have the opportunity to have a significant positive impact on patient comfort, confidence, and, ultimately, successful long-term adherence to disease-modifying medications. PMID:16817668

  14. Effect of primary-zone water injection on pollutants from a combustor burning liquid ASTM A-1 and vaporized propane fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    A combustor segment 0.457 meter (18 in.) long with a maximum cross section of 0.153 by 0.305 meter (6 by 12 in.) was operated at inlet-air temperatures of 590 and 700 K, inlet-air pressures of 4 and 10 atmospheres, and fuel-air ratios of 0.014 and 0.018 to determine the effect of primary-zone water injection on pollutants from burning either propane or ASTM A-1 fuel. At a simulated takeoff condition of 10 atmospheres and 700 K, multiple-orifice nozzles used to inject water at 1 percent of the airflow rate reduced nitrogen oxides 75 percent with propane and 65 percent with ASTM A-1 fuel. Although carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons increased with water injection, they remained relatively low; and smoke numbers were well below the visibility limit.

  15. Predicting the spatial extent of injection-induced zones of enhanced permeability at the Northwest Geysers EGS Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Dobson, P.F.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of coupled thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical (THM) modeling of a proposed stimulation injection associated with an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) demonstration project at the northwest part of The Geysers geothermal field, California. The project aims at creating an EGS by directly and systematically injecting cool water at relatively low pressure into a known High Temperature (about 280 to 350 C) Zone (HTZ) located under the conventional (240 C) steam reservoir at depths below 3 km. Accurate micro-earthquake monitoring from the start of the injection will be used as a tool for tracking the development of the EGS. We first analyzed historic injection and micro-earthquake data from an injection well (Aidlin 11), located about 3 miles to the west of the new EGS demonstration area. Thereafter, we used the same modeling approach to predict the likely extent of the zone of enhanced permeability for a proposed initial injection in two wells (Prati State 31 and Prati 32) at the new EGS demonstration area. Our modeling indicates that the proposed injection scheme will provide additional steam production in the area by creating a zone of permeability enhancement extending about 0.5 km from each injection well which will connect to the overlying conventional steam reservoir.

  16. Impact de l'utilisation des strategies d'injection multiple et de biodiesel sur un moteur diesel a rampe commune d'injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plamondon, Etienne

    Using biodiesel/diesel fuel blends and multiple injection strategies in diesel engines have shown promising results in improving the trade-off relationship between nitrous oxides and particulate matters, but their effects are still not completely understood. In this context, this thesis focuses on the characterization of the multiple injection strategies and biodiesel impacts on pollutant emissions, performances and injection system behavior. To reach this goal, an experimental campaign on a diesel engine was performed and a model simulating the injection process was developed. The engine tests at low load with pilot injection allowed the reduction of NOx emissions up to 27% and those of PM up to 22.3% compared to single injection, provided that a precise tuning of the injection parameters was previously realized. This simultaneous reduction is explained by the reduction of the premixed combustion phase and injected fuel quantity during principal injection when a pilot injection is used. With triple injection for the tested engine load, the post-injection did not result in PM reduction since it contributes by itself to the PM production while the preinjection occurred too soon to burn conveniently and caused perturbations in the injection system as well. Using B20 blend in single injection caused a PM increase and a NOx reduction which might be explained by the poorer fuel atomization. However, pilot injection with B20 allowed to get a simultaneous reduction of NOx and PM, as observed with diesel. An injection simulation model was also developed and experimentally validated for different injection pressures as well as different energizing times and dwell times. When comparing the use of biodiesel with diesel, simulation showed that there was a critical energizing time for which both fuels yielded the same injection duration. For shorter energizing times, the biodiesel injection duration was shorter than for diesel, while longer energizing times presented the

  17. Coastal Zone Color Scanner atmospheric correction algorithm: multiple scattering effects.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H R; Castaño, D J

    1987-06-01

    An analysis of the errors due to multiple scattering which are expected to be encountered in application of the current Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) atmospheric correction algorithm is presented in detail. This was prompted by the observations of others that significant errors would be encountered if the present algorithm were applied to a hypothetical instrument possessing higher radiometric sensitivity than the present CZCS. This study provides CZCS users sufficient information with which to judge the efficacy of the current algorithm with the current sensor and enables them to estimate the impact of the algorithm-induced errors on their applications in a variety of situations. The greatest source of error is the assumption that the molecular and aerosol contributions to the total radiance observed at the sensor can be computed separately. This leads to the requirement that a value epsilon'(lambda,lambda(0)) for the atmospheric correction parameter, which bears little resemblance to its theoretically meaningful counterpart, must usually be employed in the algorithm to obtain an accurate atmospheric correction. The behavior of '(lambda,lambda(0)) with the aerosol optical thickness and aerosol phase function is thoroughly investigated through realistic modeling of radiative transfer in a stratified atmosphere over a Fresnel reflecting ocean. A unique feature of the analysis is that it is carried out in scan coordinates rather than typical earth-sun coordinates allowing elucidation of the errors along typical CZCS scan lines; this is important since, in the normal application of the algorithm, it is assumed that the same value of can be used for an entire CZCS scene or at least for a reasonably large subscene. Two types of variation of ' are found in models for which it would be constant in the single scattering approximation: (1) variation with scan angle in scenes in which a relatively large portion of the aerosol scattering phase function would be examined

  18. 3D Electrical resistivity tomography monitoring of an artificial tracer injected within the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houzé, Clémence; Pessel, Marc; Durand, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    Due to the high complexity level of hyporheic flow paths, hydrological and biogeochemical processes which occur in this mixing place are not fully understood yet. Some previous studies made in flumes show that hyporheic flow is strongly connected to the streambed morphology and sediment heterogeneity . There is still a lack of practical field experiment considering a natural environment and representation of natural streambed heterogeneities will be always limited in laboratories. The purpose of this project is to propose an innovative method using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) monitoring of an artificial tracer injection directly within the streambed sediments in order to visualize the water pathways within the hyporheic zone. Field experiment on a small stream was conducted using a plastic tube as an injection piezometer and home-made electrodes strips arranged in a rectangular form made of 180 electrodes (15 strips of 12 electrodes each). The injection of tracer (NaCl) lasted approximatively 90 minutes, and 24h monitoring with increasing step times was performed. The physical properties of the water are controlled by CTD probes installed upstream and downstream within the river. Inverse time-lapse tomographs show development and persistence of a conductive water plume around the injection point. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments (clay and overlying loess), the tracer movement is barely visible, as it dilutes gradually in the pore water. Impact of boundary conditions on inversion results can lead to significant differences on images, especially in the shallow part of the profiles. Preferential paths of transport are not highlighted here, but this experiment allows to follow spatially and temporarily the evolution of the tracer in a complex natural environment .

  19. Vadose Zone Injection Monitoring with Electrical Geophysics Using Steel Casings as Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, J. B.; Ward, A. L.; Gee, G. W.

    2001-12-01

    In 1991 the EPA announced that 346 billion gallons of liquid waste had been dumped on the Hanford Nuclear site in Washington state. This is enough waste (over one million acre-feet) to bury the entire 670 square miles of Hanford 2 and 1/2 feet deep! Over the years, a great deal of time, money, and effort has been spent on remediating above-ground facilities. In 2000, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) embarked on a study to determine what subsurface monitoring or imaging methods would be the most capable and cost effective for detecting and monitoring liquid waste in the vadose zone. Two existing test sites were used for the evaluation; a 20-year-old radio-nuclide injection test site (Sisson and Lu site) and a "cold" test facility containing a mock tank. Each site is unique in its history, setting, and cultural conditions. This discussion deals with the conductive electrical methods deployed at the two sites. The Sisson and Lu site was used for the initial evaluation. The test site consists of a "forest" of 32 six-inch steel casings spaced two meters apart on eight radials emanating from the central injection well. Test conditions (2000) involved measuring several 1000-gallon injections of Columbia River water. Each injection was "leaked" at approximately 5 gallons per minute (gpm). In each monitoring well, neutron data were gathered before injections, during all injections, and after the final injection, to be used as a baseline for comparison of method results. Several "leaks" were performed so that each selected system could be evaluated without interference. In 2001, the tests were repeated with a 30% solution of sodium thiosulfate and a 0.5% solution of sodium chloride. This high ionic-strength solution has a very high electrical conductivity, relatively high density, and better represents the liquids of concern; i.e. solutions possibly leaking from various storage facilities. The six-year-old mock-tank site consists of a partially buried, 50-foot

  20. Fault-Tolerant, Multiple-Zone Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, James; Franklin, Brian; Michalik, Martin; Yates, Phillip; Peterson, Erik; Borders, James

    2008-01-01

    A computer program has been written as an essential part of an electronic temperature control system for a spaceborne instrument that contains several zones. The system was developed because the temperature and the rate of change of temperature in each zone are required to be maintained to within limits that amount to degrees of precision thought to be unattainable by use of simple bimetallic thermostats. The software collects temperature readings from six platinum resistance thermometers, calculates temperature errors from the readings, and implements a proportional + integral + derivative (PID) control algorithm that adjusts heater power levels. The software accepts, via a serial port, commands to change its operational parameters. The software attempts to detect and mitigate a host of potential faults. It is robust to many kinds of faults in that it can maintain PID control in the presence of those faults.

  1. Improving combustion characteristics and NO(x) emissions of a down-fired 350 MW(e) utility boiler with multiple injection and multiple staging.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Min; Li, Zhengqi; Xu, Shantian; Zhu, Qunyi

    2011-04-15

    Within a Mitsui Babcock Energy Limited down-fired pulverized-coal 350 MW(e) utility boiler, in situ experiments were performed, with measurements taken of gas temperatures in the burner and near the right-wall regions, and of gas concentrations (O(2) and NO) from the near-wall region. Large combustion differences between zones near the front and rear walls and particularly high NO(x) emissions were found in the boiler. With focus on minimizing these problems, a new technology based on multiple-injection and multiple-staging has been developed. Combustion improvements and NO(x) reductions were validated by investigating three aspects. First, numerical simulations of the pulverized-coal combustion process and NO(x) emissions were compared in both the original and new technologies. Good agreement was found between simulations and in situ measurements with the original technology. Second, with the new technology, gas temperature and concentration distributions were found to be symmetric near the front and rear walls. A relatively low-temperature and high-oxygen-concentration zone formed in the near-wall region that helps mitigate slagging in the lower furnace. Third, NO(x) emissions were found to have decreased by as much as 50%, yielding a slight decrease in the levels of unburnt carbon in the fly ash. PMID:21428379

  2. CO2 migration in the vadose zone: experimental and numerical modelling of controlled gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gasparini, andrea; credoz, anthony; grandia, fidel; garcia, david angel; bruno, jordi

    2014-05-01

    The mobility of CO2 in the vadose zone and its subsequent transfer to the atmosphere is a matter of concern in the risk assessment of the geological storage of CO2. In this study the experimental and modelling results of controlled CO2 injection are reported to better understanding of the physical processes affecting CO2 and transport in the vadose zone. CO2 was injected through 16 micro-injectors during 49 days of experiments in a 35 m3 experimental unit filled with sandy material, in the PISCO2 facilities at the ES.CO2 centre in Ponferrada (North Spain). Surface CO2 flux were monitored and mapped periodically to assess the evolution of CO2 migration through the soil and to the atmosphere. Numerical simulations were run to reproduce the experimental results, using TOUGH2 code with EOS7CA research module considering two phases (gas and liquid) and three components (H2O, CO2, air). Five numerical models were developed following step by step the injection procedure done at PISCO2. The reference case (Model A) simulates the injection into a homogeneous soil(homogeneous distribution of permeability and porosity in the near-surface area, 0.8 to 0.3 m deep from the atmosphere). In another model (Model B), four additional soil layers with four specific permeabilities and porosities were included to predict the effect of differential compaction on soil. To account for the effect of higher soil temperature, an isothermal simulation called Model C was also performed. Finally, the assessment of the rainfall effects (soil water saturation) on CO2 emission on surface was performed in models called Model D and E. The combined experimental and modelling approach shows that CO2 leakage in the vadose zone quickly comes out through preferential migration pathways and spots with the ranges of fluxes in the ground/surface interface from 2.5 to 600 g·m-2·day-1. This gas channelling is mainly related to soil compaction and climatic perturbation. This has significant implications to

  3. 77 FR 35852 - Safety Zones; Multiple Firework Displays in Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... the Port, Puget Sound Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... have questions on this rule, call or email ENS Anthony P. LaBoy, Coast Guard Sector Puget...

  4. 78 FR 38582 - Safety Zones; Multiple Firework Displays in Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... the Port, Puget Sound Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... have questions on this rule, call or email ENS Nathaniel P. Clinger, Coast Guard Sector Puget...

  5. Multiple routes of drug administration and HIV risk among injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Uusküla, Anneli; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Talu, Ave; Rüütel, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses relationships between drug administration routes and HIV serostatus, drug-use and sexual behaviors among current injecting drug users (IDUs) in Tallinn, Estonia. We recruited 350 IDUs for a cross-sectional risk behavior survey. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were calculated to explore injection risk behavior, sexual behavior and HIV serostatus associated with multiple route use. Focus groups explored reasons why injectors might use non-injecting routes of administration. Those reporting multiple drug administration routes were less likely to be HIV seropositive (AOR 0.49; 95%CI 0.25-0.97), had almost twice the odds of having more than one sexual partner (AOR 1.90; 95%CI 1.01-3.60) and of reporting having sexually transmitted diseases (AOR 2.38; 95%CI 1.02-5.59). IDUs who engage in non-injecting drug use may be reducing their risk of acquiring HIV though sharing injection equipment, but if infected may be a critical group for sexual transmission of HIV to people who do not inject drugs. PMID:22116012

  6. Monitoring in situ deformation induced by a fluid injection in a fault zone in shale using seismic velocity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, D.; De Barros, L.; Guglielmi, Y.; Castilla, R.

    2015-12-01

    We monitor seismic velocity changes during an experiment at decametric scale aimed at artificially reactivate a fault zone by a high-pressure hydraulic injection in a shale formation of the underground site of Tournemire, South of France. A dense and a multidisciplinary instrumentation, with measures of pressure, fluid flow, strain, seismicity, seismic properties and resistivity allow for the monitoring of this experiment. We couple hydromechanical and seismic observations of the fault and its adjacent areas to better understand the deformation process preceding ruptures, and the role played by fluids. 9 accelerometers recorded repeated hammers shots on the tunnel walls. For each hammer shot we measured small travel time delays on direct P and S waves. We then located the seismic velocity perturbations using a tomography method. At low injection pressure, i.e. P< 15 Bars, we observe an increase of P-waves velocity around the injection, while we measure no change in S waves velocity. When the pressure overcomes 15 Bars, velocity perturbations dramatically increase with both P and S waves affected. A decrease of velocity is observed close to the injection point and is surrounded by regions of increasing velocity. Our observations are consistent with hydromechanical measures. Below 15 Bars, we interpret the P-wave velocity increase to be related to the compression of the fault zone around the injection chamber. Above 15 Bars, we measure a shear and dilatant fault movement, and a rapid increase in the injected fluid flow. At this step, our measures are coherent with a poroelastic opening of the fault with velocities decrease at the injection source and velocities increase related to stress transfer in the far field. Velocity changes prove to be efficient to monitor stress/strain variation in an activated fault, even if these observations might produce complex signals due to the highly contrasted hydromechanical responses in a heterogeneous media such as a fault zone.

  7. Multiple side-band generation for two-frequency components injected into a tapered amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hua; Li, Kai; Zhang, Dongfang; Gao, Tianyou; Jiang, Kaijun

    2013-04-01

    We have experimentally studied the multiple side-band generation for two-frequency components injected into a tapered amplifier and demonstrated its effects on atomic laser cooling. A heterodyne frequency-beat measurement and a Fabry Perot interferometer have been applied to analyze the side-band generation with different experimental parameters, such as frequency difference, injection laser power and tapered amplifier current. In laser cooling potassium40 and potassium41 with hyperfine splitting of 1.3GHz and 254MHz, respectively, the side-band generation with a small frequency difference has a significant effect on the number of trapped atoms.

  8. Multiple side-band generation for two-frequency components injected into a tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hua; Li, Kai; Zhang, Dongfang; Gao, Tianyou; Jiang, Kaijun

    2013-04-01

    We have experimentally studied multiple side-band generation for two-frequency components injected into a tapered amplifier (TA) and demonstrated its effects on atomic laser cooling. A heterodyne frequency-beat measurement and a Fabry-Perot interferometer have been applied to analyze the side-band generation with different experimental parameters, such as frequency difference, injection laser power, and TA current. In laser-cooling potassium40 and potassium41 with hyperfine splitting of 1.3 GHz and 254 MHz, respectively, the side-band generation with a small frequency difference has a significant effect on the number of trapped atoms. PMID:23546277

  9. Characterizing multiple timescales of stream and storage zone interaction that affect solute fate and transport in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Harvey, J.W.; Conklin, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of contaminants in streams and rivers is affected by exchange and biogeochemical transformation in slowly moving or stagnant flow zones that interact with rapid flow in the main channel. In a typical stream, there are multiple types of slowly moving flow zones in which exchange and transformation occur, such as stagnant or recirculating surface water as well as subsurface hyporheic zones. However, most investigators use transport models with just a single storage zone in their modeling studies, which assumes that the effects of multiple storage zones can be lumped together. Our study addressed the following question: Can a single-storage zone model reliably characterize the effects of physical retention and biogeochemical reactions in multiple storage zones? We extended an existing stream transport model with a single storage zone to include a second storage zone. With the extended model we generated 500 data sets representing transport of nonreactive and reactive solutes in stream systems that have two different types of storage zones with variable hydrologic conditions. The one storage zone model was tested by optimizing the lumped storage parameters to achieve a best fit for each of the generated data sets. Multiple storage processes were categorized as possessing I, additive; II, competitive; or III, dominant storage zone characteristics. The classification was based on the goodness of fit of generated data sets, the degree of similarity in mean retention time of the two storage zones, and the relative distributions of exchange flux and storage capacity between the two storage zones. For most cases (> 90%) the one storage zone model described either the effect of the sum of multiple storage processes (category I) or the dominant storage process (category III). Failure of the one storage zone model occurred mainly for category II, that is, when one of the storage zones had a much longer mean retention time (t(s) ratio > 5.0) and when the dominance of

  10. Multiple zone coal degasification potential in the Warrior coal field of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, S.L.; Beavers, W.M.; Patton, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Upper Pottsville formation in the Warrior Coal Field of Alabama has six recognized groups of bituminous coal seams. Three of these groups, the Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek consist of seams containing commercially significant quantities of methane. In parts of the Warrior Coal Field, where all three groups can be penetrated in one vertical borehole, the potential production from multiple zone completion wells can result in commercially profitable wells. Various open hole and through the casing completion procedures are being applied resulting in successful methane production from these multiple zone coal gas wells.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of medroxyprogesterone acetate after single and multiple injection of Cyclofem in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X F; Shao, Q X; Han, X J; Weng, L J; Sang, G W

    1998-06-01

    To provide pharmacokinetic data for safety evaluation on prolonged treatment with Cyclofem, which contains 25 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and 5 mg estradiol cypionate in 0.5 mL microcrystalline aqueous suspension, the pharmacokinetic profiles of MPA after single and multiple administration of this monthly injectable contraceptive were investigated in Chinese women. Nine healthy fertile women received Cyclofem based on a once-a-month regiment for up to 1 year. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to drug administration and on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after injection. After the 1st, 6th, and 12th injection, the maximum serum concentrations (Cmax) of MPA were observed on days 3.4 +/- 0.9, 4.3 +/- 2.2, and 3.7 +/- 2.6, respectively. Cmax of serum MPA during the 1st, 6th, and 12th treatment cycles were 3.75 +/- 1.27, 5.54 +/- 1.79, and 5.55 +/- 1.80 nmol/L, whereas the areas under the curve (AUC0-28 days) were 55.84 +/- 28.15, 95.45 +/- 26.56, and 98.81 +/- 21.84 nmol/L.day, respectively. There was significant interindividual variation in the pharmacokinetics of MPA after intramuscular injection of Cyclofem. No significant change was demonstrated in mean residence time (MRT) of MPA after single and multiple injection. There was a tendency of increase in Cmax and AUC0-28 days of MPA during the first 6 months of treatment, whereas no further enhancement was found between the 6th and 12th injection (p > 0.05). Peak levels of estradiol (E2) observed in Cyclofem users were within the normal range of the preovulatory phase. Results of this long-term study suggest that no drug accumulation occurred after repeated administration of Cyclofem in the Chinese women. PMID:9693401

  12. Multiple-orifice liquid injection into hypersonic airstreams and applications to ram C-3 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for the oblique injection of water and three electrophilic liquids (fluorocarbon compounds) through multiple-orifice nozzles from a flat plate and the sides of a hemisphere-cone (0.375 scale of RAM C spacecraft) into hypersonic airstreams. The nozzle patterns included single and multiple orifices, single rows of nozzles, and duplicates of the RAM C-III nozzles. The flat-plate tests were made at Mach 8. Total pressure was varied from 3.45 MN/m2 to 10.34 MN/m2, Reynolds number was varied form 9,840,000 per meter to 19,700,000 per meter, and liquid injection pressure was varied from 0.69 MN/m2 to 3.5 MN/m2. The hemisphere-cone tests were made at Mach 7.3. Total pressure was varied from 1.38 MN/m2, to 6.89 MN/m2, Reynolds number was varied from 3,540,000 per meter to 17,700,000 per meter, and liquid-injection pressure was varied from 0.34 MN/m2 to 4.14 MN/m2. Photographs of the tests and plots of liquid-penetration and spray cross-section area are presented. Maximum penetration was found to vary as the square root of the dynamic-pressure ratio and the square root of the total injection nozzle area. Spray cross-section area was linear with maximum penetration. The test results are used to compute injection parameters for the RAM C-3 flight injection experiment.

  13. Hybrid wireless-over-fiber transmission system based on multiple injection-locked FP LDs.

    PubMed

    Li, Chung-Yi; Lu, Hai-Han; Chu, Chien-An; Ying, Cheng-Ling; Lu, Ting-Chien; Peng, Peng-Chun

    2015-07-27

    A hybrid wireless-over-fiber (WoF) transmission system based on multiple injection-locked Fabry-Perot laser diodes (FP LDs) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Unlike the traditional hybrid WoF transmission systems that require multiple distributed feedback (DFB) LDs to support different kinds of services, the proposed system employs multiple injection-locked FP LDs to provide different kinds of applications. Such a hybrid WoF transmission system delivers downstream intensity-modulated 20-GHz microwave (MW)/60-GHz millimeter-wave (MMW)/550-MHz cable television (CATV) signals and upstream phase-remodulated 20-GHz MW signal. Excellent bit error rate (BER), carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), composite second-order (CSO), and composite triple-beat (CTB) are observed over a 40-km single-mode fiber (SMF) and a 4-m radio frequency (RF) wireless transport. Such a hybrid WoF transmission system has practical applications for fiber-wireless convergence to provide broadband integrated services, including telecommunication, data communication, and CATV services. PMID:26367647

  14. Injection of adult neurospheres induces recovery in a chronic model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Stefano; Quattrini, Angelo; Brambilla, Elena; Gritti, Angela; Salani, Giuliana; Dina, Giorgia; Galli, Rossella; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Amadio, Stefano; Bergami, Alessandra; Furlan, Roberto; Comi, Giancarlo; Vescovi, Angelo L; Martino, Gianvito

    2003-04-17

    Widespread demyelination and axonal loss are the pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. The multifocal nature of this chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system complicates cellular therapy and puts emphasis on both the donor cell origin and the route of cell transplantation. We established syngenic adult neural stem cell cultures and injected them into an animal model of multiple sclerosis--experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the mouse--either intravenously or intracerebroventricularly. In both cases, significant numbers of donor cells entered into demyelinating areas of the central nervous system and differentiated into mature brain cells. Within these areas, oligodendrocyte progenitors markedly increased, with many of them being of donor origin and actively remyelinating axons. Furthermore, a significant reduction of astrogliosis and a marked decrease in the extent of demyelination and axonal loss were observed in transplanted animals. The functional impairment caused by EAE was almost abolished in transplanted mice, both clinically and neurophysiologically. Thus, adult neural precursor cells promote multifocal remyelination and functional recovery after intravenous or intrathecal injection in a chronic model of multiple sclerosis. PMID:12700753

  15. Induced seismicity and CO2 leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection in a multilayered sedimentary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, A.; Rutqvist, J.; Jeanne, P.; Cappa, F.

    2013-12-01

    The importance of geomechanics including the potential for reactivating faults associated with large-scale geologic carbon sequestration operations has recently become more widely recognized. However, not withstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO2 to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is more important from safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence of potential leakage of either brine or CO2 to shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We account for a stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through a fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the injected amount of CO2 (and hence as a function of the overpressure) both involving minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain permeability coupling functions, as well as increasing the complexity of the fault zone in terms of hydromechanical heterogeneities. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. The presence of hydromechanical heterogeneity influences the pressure diffusion, as well as the effective normal and shear stress evolution. Hydromechanical heterogeneities (i) strengthen the fault zone resulting in earthquake of small magnitude, and (ii) prevent a good fluid migration upward along the fault. We also study the effects of the caprock and aquifer thickness on the resulting induced seismicity and CO2 leakage, both in heterogeneous and homogeneous fault zone. Results show that a thin caprock or aquifer allows smaller events

  16. Transverse Electron Motion and Multiple Electron Injection in Blowout Bubble of Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Cummings, P. G.; Horovitz, Y.; Dollar, F.; Schumaker, W.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Bulanov, S. S.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.

    2010-11-01

    An analytical formula for electron motion in a spherical bubble was compared with data from electron acceleration experiments using the HERCULES laser system showing reasonable agreement. This also provides evidence for continuous injection of electrons into the bubble with multiple bunches in the bubble separated both transversely and longitudinally. The only free parameter in the analytical model was radius of the bubble (rb) which was found to be close to the matched spot size for self focusing. The RMS electron beam divergence is found to increase with bunch charge also suggesting tradeoff between beam divergence and photon number in applications for such beams as an x-ray source.

  17. Multiple zone coal degasification potential in Warrior coal field of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, S.L.; Patton, A.F.; Beavers, W.M.

    1983-09-01

    The upper Pottsville Formation in the Warrior coal field of Alabama has seven recognized groups of bituminous coal seams. Three of these groups, the Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek, consist of seams containing commercially significant quantities of methane. Each group has several seams within a vertical interval that, in many areas, can be stimulated collectively. In parts of the Warrior coal field, where all three groups can be penetrated in one vertical borehole, the potential production from multiple zone completion wells can result in commerically profitable wells. Various open-hole and through-the-casing completion procedures are being applied, resulting in successful methane production from these multiple zone coal gas wells.

  18. Multiple zone coal degasification potential in the Warrior coal field of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, S.L.; Patton, A.F.; Beavers, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    The upper Pottsville Formation in the Warrior coal field of Alabama has 7 recognized groups of bituminous coal seams. Three of these groups, the Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek, consist of seams containing commercially significant quantities of methane. Each group has several seams within a vertical interval that, in many areas, can be collectively stimulated. In parts of the Warrior coal field, where all 3 groups can be penetrated in one vertical borehole, the potential production from multiple zone completion wells can result in commercially profitable wells. Various open hole and through-the-casing completion procedures are being applied, resulting in successful methane production from these multiple-zone-coal-gas wells.

  19. Cell electroporation chip using multiple electric field zones in a single channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Ji; Kim, Taeyoon; Cho, Young-Ho

    2012-11-01

    We present cell electroporation chip using a single channel with multiple electric field, E, zones. The present chip, where multiple E zones are generated by a pair of external electrodes across a stepwise single channel, provides the optimal E conditions for stable cell electroporation with high viability in a single experiment. The optimal E for both H23 and A549 cells was 0.4 kV/cm with the maximum percentage of the viable and electroporated cells of 51.4 ± 3.0% and 26.6 ± 0.7%, respectively. The present cell electroporation chip has potential for use in integrated cell chips to find the optimal E conditions for the electroporation study.

  20. Using multiple natural and injected tracers to evaluate spatial and temporal patterns of hyporheic flux and biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. A.; Lautz, L. K.; Gordon, R. P.; McKenzie, J. M.; Gonzalez Pinzon, R. A.; Hare, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    had weak, shallow flux (less than 0.4 md-1) that increased significantly as streamflow receded. The biogeochemical profiles at locations where flux had trends showed a transition to shallow oxic conditions when downward flux increased and residence times decreased; conversely, where flux decreased there was a transition to more anoxic conditions. Pools had persistently weak, shallow vertical flux and anoxic conditions, even when located very close to the dam step. The resazurin tracer revealed that hyporheic zones at glides were hotspots of aerobic microbial reactivity. These results show that comprehensive studies, making use of multiple natural and new injected tracers, can provide a more complete understanding of how patterns of physical hyporheic flux and biogeochemical processes are coupled in space and time.

  1. Multiple capillary isotachophoresis with repetitive hydrodynamic injections for performance improvement of the electromigration preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thanh Duc; Oukacine, Farid; Taverna, Myriam

    2016-07-01

    A novel electrokinetic preconcentration technique based on multiple isotachophoresis (M-ITP) realised in a micro-bored capillary to improve sensitivity for capillary electrophoresis with hydrodynamic injection was developed. The M-ITP operation relies on pressure-assisted pushing of a preconcentrated sample plug after the first ITP process back to the injection end of the capillary, followed by a large volume hydrodynamic injection prior to application of the second ITP step. This operational cycle was repeated as many times as desired with very good repeatability of the peak areas and peak heights at each ITP round (RSD less than 8%). Using imidazole and benzoate as models for cationic and anionic analytes, important insights into the mechanism of this electrokinetic preconcentration process with and without the presence of the electro-osmotic flow (EOF) at acidic and basic conditions were provided. Stacking of the benzoate ion, selected as one model analyte, in the presence of EOF and from a sample plug representing up to 300% of the total capillary length was successfully demonstrated. M-ITP was then demonstrated through the enrichment of the Aβ 1-40 amyloid peptide, considered as one of the biomarkers for biochemical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Quantification of Aβ 1-40 down to 50nM with UV detection was made possible with 6 M-ITP cycles. PMID:27236482

  2. Energy Simulation of Integrated Multiple-Zone Variable Refrigerant Flow System

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D

    2013-01-01

    We developed a detailed steady-state system model, to simulate the performance of an integrated five-zone variable refrigerant flow (VRF)heat pump system. The system is multi-functional, capable of space cooling, space heating, combined space cooling and water heating, and dedicated water heating. Methods were developed to map the VRF performance in each mode, based on the abundant data produced by the equipment system model. The performance maps were used in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. Using TRNSYS, we have successfully setup and run cases for a multiple-split, VRF heat pump and dehumidifier combination in 5-zone houses in 5 climates that control indoor dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity. We compared the calculated energy consumptions for the VRF heat pump against that of a baseline central air source heat pump, coupled with electric water heating and the standalone dehumidifiers. In addition, we investigated multiple control scenarios for the VRF heat pump, i.e. on/off control, variable indoor air flow rate, and using different zone temperature setting schedules, etc. The energy savings for the multiple scenarios were assessed.

  3. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Spanwise angled injection from multiple rows of holes. [gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckey, D. W.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The stagnation region of a cylinder in a cross flow was used in experiments conducted with both a single row and multiple rows of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio with a freestream to wall temperature ratio approximately equal to 1.7 and R(eD) = 90,000. Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, 58.7 deg from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d(o) = 5 and 10. Three multiple row configurations were also investigated. Data are presented for a uniform blowing distribution and for a nonuniform blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply. The data for local Stanton Number reduction demonstrated a lack of lateral spreading by the coolant jets. Heat flux levels larger than those without film cooling were observed directly behind the coolant holes as the blowing ratio exceeded a particular value. The data were spanwise averaged to illustrate the influence of injection location, blowing ratio and hole spacing. The large values of blowing ratio for the blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply resulted in heat flux levels behind the holes in excess of the values without film cooling. An increase in freestream turbulence intensity from 4.4 to 9.5 percent had a negligible effect on the film cooling performance.

  4. Ultrafast dynamics of multiple exciton harvesting in the CdSe-ZnO system: electron injection versus Auger recombination.

    PubMed

    Zídek, Karel; Zheng, Kaibo; Abdellah, Mohamed; Lenngren, Nils; Chábera, Pavel; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2012-12-12

    We study multiple electron transfer from a CdSe quantum dot (QD) to ZnO, which is a prerequisite for successful utilization of multiple exciton generation for photovoltaics. By using ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy we observe competition between electron injection into ZnO and quenching of multiexcitons via Auger recombination. We show that fast electron injection dominates over biexcitonic Auger recombination and multiple electrons can be transferred into ZnO. A kinetic component with time constant of a few tens of picoseconds was identified as the competition between injection of the second electron from a doubly excited QD and a trion Auger recombination. Moreover, we demonstrate that the multiexciton harvesting efficiency changes significantly with QD size. Within a narrow QD diameter range from 2 to 4 nm, the efficiency of electron injection from a doubly excited QD can vary from 30% to 70% in our system. PMID:23163524

  5. Dissimilar properties within a carbonate-reservoir's small fault zone, and their impact on the pressurization and leakage associated with CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanne, Pierre; Guglielmi, Yves; Cappa, Frédéric

    2013-02-01

    This paper focuses on a small fault zone (too small to be detected by geophysical imaging) affecting a carbonate reservoir composed of porous and low-porosity layers. In a gallery located at 250 m depth, the hydraulic properties of a 20 m thick section of the reservoir affected by the studied fault are characterized by structural measurements and hydraulic injection into boreholes. We conducted electrical tomographies before and after an 18 hour-long injection, to image the fluid flow through the fault zone. Our main finding is that the damage zone displays contrasting permeability values (up to two orders of magnitude) inherited from the differential alteration of the intact rock layers. To characterize the impact of these hydraulic-property variations on the fluid flow, we carried out numerical simulations of water and supercritical CO2 injections, using the TOUGH2 code. Two damage-zone models were compared, with heterogeneous (Model 1) and homogeneous (Model 2) hydraulic properties. In Model 1, injected fluids cannot escape through the fault zone; they generate a high fluid overpressure, located in the damage-zone layers having the highest permeability and storativity. In Model 2, fluids can easily migrate; the overpressure is lower and located in the host rock along the fault zone.

  6. Multiple infections and associated risk factors among non-injecting cocaine users in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Diana; Radulich, Graciela; Muzzio, Estela; Naveira, Jorge; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Rey, Jorge; Griemberg, Gloria; Friedman, Samuel R; Martínez-Peralta, Liliana; Weissenbacher, Mercedes

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV, core antibody), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and syphilis infections and analyze associated risk factors among 504 non-injecting cocaine users (NICU) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Participants were interviewed in face-to-face sessions through a short structured questionnaire. Using venipuncture, 10 mL of blood was collected. Seroprevalence rates were: HIV (6.3%), HBV (9%), HCV (7.5%), and VDRL (4.2%). The risk of being infected with HIV, HBV, and HCV was significantly associated with having had a sex partner who was either a drug injector or who was known to be HIV positive. HIV and HCV infections were associated with former imprisonment, and HCV was associated with having been tattooed. Because of the rising number of NICU and the multiple infections detected, it is essential to implement prevention strategies focused on this population. PMID:18461225

  7. Pneumatic Microvalve-Based Hydrodynamic Sample Injection for High-Throughput, Quantitative Zone Electrophoresis in Capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Wang, Chenchen; Rausch, Sarah J.; Lee, Cheng S.; Tang, Keqi

    2014-07-01

    A hybrid microchip/capillary CE system was developed to allow unbiased and lossless sample loading and high throughput repeated injections. This new hybrid CE system consists of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchip sample injector featuring a pneumatic microvalve that separates a sample introduction channel from a short sample loading channel and a fused silica capillary separation column that connects seamlessly to the sample loading channel. The sample introduction channel is pressurized such that when the pneumatic microvalve opens briefly, a variable-volume sample plug is introduced into the loading channel. A high voltage for CE separation is continuously applied across the loading channel and the fused silica capillary separation column. Analytes are rapidly separated in the fused silica capillary with high resolution. High sensitivity MS detection after CE separation is accomplished via a sheathless CE/ESI-MS interface. The performance evaluation of the complete CE/ESI-MS platform demonstrated that reproducible sample injection with well controlled sample plug volumes could be achieved by using the PDMS microchip injector. The absence of band broadening from microchip to capillary indicated a minimum dead volume at the junction. The capabilities of the new CE/ESI-MS platform in performing high throughput and quantitative sample analyses were demonstrated by the repeated sample injection without interrupting an ongoing separation and a good linear dependence of the total analyte ion abundance on the sample plug volume using a mixture of peptide standards. The separation efficiency of the new platform was also evaluated systematically at different sample injection times, flow rates and CE separation voltages.

  8. Perspectives and experiences of Dutch multiple sclerosis patients and multiple sclerosis-specialized neurologists on injectable disease-modifying treatment

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Leo H; Heerings, Marco A; Jongen, Peter J; van der Hiele, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background The adherence to treatment with injectable disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) may benefit from adequate information provision and management of expectations. The communication between patients and physicians is very important in this respect. The current study investigated the perspectives and experiences of the MS patients and neurologists concerning the choice and course of treatment with DMDs in the Netherlands. Methods The MS patients (aged 18–60 years; diagnosed with MS at least a year ago, currently treated with injectable DMD treatment) and MS-specialized neurologists (practicing for ≥3 years, treating ≥15 MS patients/month on average, and spending >60% of their time in clinical practice) were asked to complete semistructured Internet-based questionnaires. The neurologists in this study were not necessarily the treating neurologists of the participating MS patients. Results In all, 107 MS patients and 18 MS-specialized neurologists completed the questionnaires. The MS-specialized neurologists in this study reported discussing most of the suggested treatment goals with their patients. The MS patients indicated that certain important treatment goals, ie, reduction in disease progression, reduction or prolongation of time to long-term disability, and reduction in new magnetic resonance imaging lesions, were not discussed with them. More than one-quarter of the patients (27%) would appreciate more information about their treatment. We found evidence for suboptimal patient adherence to MS therapy (23% indicated taking a treatment break) due to diverse side effects, lack of efficacy, or practical issues. As compared to these patient reports, the scale of poor adherence was overestimated by more than half of the neurologists (on average, 30% estimated treatment breaks). Conclusion The MS patients and MS-specialized neurologists in this study differ in their experiences and perspectives on information provision and adherence

  9. One session treatment for pediatric blood-injection-injury phobia: A controlled multiple baseline trial.

    PubMed

    Oar, Ella L; Farrell, Lara J; Waters, Allison M; Conlon, Elizabeth G; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a modified One Session Treatment (OST), which included an e-therapy homework maintenance program over 4 weeks for Blood-Injection-Injury (BII) phobia in children and adolescents. Using a single case, non-concurrent multiple-baseline design, 24 children and adolescents (8-18 years; 7 males, 17 females) with a primary diagnosis of BII phobia were randomly assigned to a one, two or three week baseline prior to receiving OST. Primary outcome measures included diagnostic severity, diagnostic status, and child and parent fear ratings. Secondary outcome measures included avoidance during behavioural avoidance tasks (BAT), global functioning and self and parent reported anxiety, fear and depression. Efficacy was assessed at post-treatment, 1-month, and 3-month follow-up. BII symptoms and diagnostic severity remained relatively stable during the baseline periods and then significantly improved following implementation of the intervention. Treatment response was supported by changes across multiple measures, including child, parent and independent clinician ratings. At post-treatment 8 of the 24 (33.33%) children were BII diagnosis free. Treatment gains improved at follow-ups with 14 (58.33%) children diagnosis free at 1-month follow-up and 15 (62.5%) diagnosis free at 3-month follow-up. Preliminary findings support the effectiveness of a modified OST approach for BII phobic youth with treatment outcomes improving over follow-up intervals. PMID:26313620

  10. Multiple injected and natural conservative tracers quantify mixing in a stream confluence affected by acid mine drainage near Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, L.E.; Cox, M.H.; Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    The acidic discharge from Cement Creek, containing elevated concentrations of dissolved metals and sulphate, mixed with the circumneutral-pH Animas River over a several hundred metre reach (mixing zone) near Silverton, CO, during this study. Differences in concentrations of Ca, Mg, Si, Sr, and SO42- between the creek and the river were sufficiently large for these analytes to be used as natural tracers in the mixing zone. In addition, a sodium chloride (NaCl) tracer was injected into Cement Creek, which provided a Cl- 'reference' tracer in the mixing zone. Conservative transport of the dissolved metals and sulphate through the mixing zone was verified by mass balances and by linear mixing plots relative to the injected reference tracer. At each of seven sites in the mixing zone, five samples were collected at evenly spaced increments of the observed across-channel gradients, as determined by specific conductance. This created sets of samples that adequately covered the ranges of mixtures (mixing ratios, in terms of the fraction of Animas River water, %AR). Concentrations measured in each mixing zone sample and in the upstream Animas River and Cement Creek were used to compute %AR for the reference and natural tracers. Values of %AR from natural tracers generally showed good agreement with values from the reference tracer, but variability in discharge and end-member concentrations and analytical errors contributed to unexpected outlier values for both injected and natural tracers. The median value (MV) %AR (calculated from all of the tracers) reduced scatter in the mixing plots for the dissolved metals, indicating that the MV estimate reduced the effects of various potential errors that could affect any tracer.

  11. Multiple injected and natural conservative tracers quantify mixing in a stream confluence affected by acid mine drainage near Silverton, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schemel, Laurence E.; Cox, Marisa H.; Runkel, Robert L.; Kimball, Briant A.

    2006-08-01

    The acidic discharge from Cement Creek, containing elevated concentrations of dissolved metals and sulphate, mixed with the circumneutral-pH Animas River over a several hundred metre reach (mixing zone) near Silverton, CO, during this study. Differences in concentrations of Ca, Mg, Si, Sr, and SO42- between the creek and the river were sufficiently large for these analytes to be used as natural tracers in the mixing zone. In addition, a sodium chloride (NaCl) tracer was injected into Cement Creek, which provided a Cl- reference tracer in the mixing zone. Conservative transport of the dissolved metals and sulphate through the mixing zone was verified by mass balances and by linear mixing plots relative to the injected reference tracer. At each of seven sites in the mixing zone, five samples were collected at evenly spaced increments of the observed across-channel gradients, as determined by specific conductance. This created sets of samples that adequately covered the ranges of mixtures (mixing ratios, in terms of the fraction of Animas River water, %AR). Concentratis measured in each mixing zone sample and in the upstream Animas River and Cement Creek were used to compute %AR for the reference and natural tracers. Values of %AR from natural tracers generally showed good agreement with values from the reference tracer, but variability in discharge and end-member concentrations and analytical errors contributed to unexpected outlier values for both injected and natural tracers. The median value (MV) %AR (calculated from all of the tracers) reduced scatter in the mixing plots for the dissolved metals, indicating that the MV estimate reduced the effects of various potential errors that could affect any tracer.

  12. Multicommutated stepwise injection determination of ascorbic acid in medicinal plants and food samples by capillary zone electrophoresis ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Falkova, Marina T; Bulatov, Andrey V; Pushina, Maria O; Ekimov, Aleksey A; Alekseeva, Galina M; Moskvin, Leonid N

    2015-02-01

    An automation of the extraction of analytes from solid samples into the aqueous phase based on multicommutated stepwise injection analysis concept has been suggested. The feasibility of the approach has been demonstrated by determination of ascorbic acid as model analyte. The method includes automated extraction of ascorbic acid from solid sample into borate buffer solution pH 8 in mixing chamber during vigorous mixing by nitrogen stream, and subsequent detection by capillary zone electrophoresis at 254 nm. The method has a linear range of 0.1-5.0 mg g(-1) for ascorbic acid with the LOD of 0.03 mg g(-1). The sample throughput was 7 h(-1). This method was applied for determination of ascorbic acid in various medicinal plants and food samples. PMID:25435231

  13. Geomechanical effects on CO2 leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Rutqvist, Jonny; Cappa, Frédéric

    2013-12-01

    The importance of geomechanics—including the potential for faults to reactivate during large-scale geologic carbon sequestration operations—has recently become more widely recognized. However, notwithstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO2 to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is actually more important from public safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this paper extends the previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence on the potential for leakage of either brine or CO2 to reach the shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We consider stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the volume of CO2 injected (and hence as a function of the overpressure), involving both minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain-permeability coupling functions. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. Finally, and consequently, even if some changes in permeability occur, this does not mean that the CO2 will migrate up along the entire fault, breaking through the caprock to enter the overlying aquifer.

  14. Simultaneous Segmentation of Prostatic Zones Using Active Appearance Models With Multiple Coupled Levelsets

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Robert; Ribault, Justin; Gentile, John; Sperling, Dan; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an improvement to the popular Active Appearance Model (AAM) algorithm, that we call the Multiple-Levelset AAM (MLA). The MLA can simultaneously segment multiple objects, and makes use of multiple levelsets, rather than anatomical landmarks, to define the shapes. AAMs traditionally define the shape of each object using a set of anatomical landmarks. However, landmarks can be difficult to identify, and AAMs traditionally only allow for segmentation of a single object of interest. The MLA, which is a landmark independent AAM, allows for levelsets of multiple objects to be determined and allows for them to be coupled with image intensities. This gives the MLA the flexibility to simulataneously segmentation multiple objects of interest in a new image. In this work we apply the MLA to segment the prostate capsule, the prostate peripheral zone (PZ), and the prostate central gland (CG), from a set of 40 endorectal, T2-weighted MRI images. The MLA system we employ in this work leverages a hierarchical segmentation framework, so constructed as to exploit domain specific attributes, by utilizing a given prostate segmentation to help drive the segmentations of the CG and PZ, which are embedded within the prostate. Our coupled MLA scheme yielded mean Dice accuracy values of .81, .79 and .68 for the prostate, CG, and PZ, respectively using a leave-one-out cross validation scheme over 40 patient studies. When only considering the midgland of the prostate, the mean DSC values were .89, .84, and .76 for the prostate, CG, and PZ respectively. PMID:23997571

  15. Simultaneous Segmentation of Prostatic Zones Using Active Appearance Models With Multiple Coupled Levelsets.

    PubMed

    Toth, Robert; Ribault, Justin; Gentile, John; Sperling, Dan; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-09-01

    In this work we present an improvement to the popular Active Appearance Model (AAM) algorithm, that we call the Multiple-Levelset AAM (MLA). The MLA can simultaneously segment multiple objects, and makes use of multiple levelsets, rather than anatomical landmarks, to define the shapes. AAMs traditionally define the shape of each object using a set of anatomical landmarks. However, landmarks can be difficult to identify, and AAMs traditionally only allow for segmentation of a single object of interest. The MLA, which is a landmark independent AAM, allows for levelsets of multiple objects to be determined and allows for them to be coupled with image intensities. This gives the MLA the flexibility to simulataneously segmentation multiple objects of interest in a new image. In this work we apply the MLA to segment the prostate capsule, the prostate peripheral zone (PZ), and the prostate central gland (CG), from a set of 40 endorectal, T2-weighted MRI images. The MLA system we employ in this work leverages a hierarchical segmentation framework, so constructed as to exploit domain specific attributes, by utilizing a given prostate segmentation to help drive the segmentations of the CG and PZ, which are embedded within the prostate. Our coupled MLA scheme yielded mean Dice accuracy values of .81, .79 and .68 for the prostate, CG, and PZ, respectively using a leave-one-out cross validation scheme over 40 patient studies. When only considering the midgland of the prostate, the mean DSC values were .89, .84, and .76 for the prostate, CG, and PZ respectively. PMID:23997571

  16. Calculating the habitable zones of multiple star systems with a new interactive Web site

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Tobias W. A.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2014-02-10

    We have developed a comprehensive methodology and an interactive Web site for calculating the habitable zone (HZ) of multiple star systems. Using the concept of spectral weight factor, as introduced in our previous studies of the calculations of HZ in and around binary star systems, we calculate the contribution of each star (based on its spectral energy distribution) to the total flux received at the top of the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet, and use the models of the HZ of the Sun to determine the boundaries of the HZ in multiple star systems. Our interactive Web site for carrying out these calculations is publicly available at http://astro.twam.info/hz. We discuss the details of our methodology and present its application to some of the multiple star systems detected by the Kepler space telescope. We also present the instructions for using our interactive Web site, and demonstrate its capabilities by calculating the HZ for two interesting analytical solutions of the three-body problem.

  17. Practical aspects and considerations when switching between continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and multiple daily injections.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Luigi; Sparrow-Bodenmiller, Jane

    2010-06-01

    Insulin pump therapy is considered the gold standard for insulin management in patients requiring full physiologic insulin replacement. Compared to traditional delivery of short- and long-acting insulin preparations by multiple daily insulin injections, delivery of insulin via continuous subcutaneous infusion brings with it several advantages, which in the past have translated into better glycemic control and treatment satisfaction. Delivery of insulin via pump reduces the number needle insertions (from four or five per day to once every 2-3 days), allows for greater flexibility of insulin delivery with regard to both the basal and prandial component, facilitates portability of the insulin preparation, and allows for more accurate dosing. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion does have some drawbacks, including a greater risk of inadvertent insulin non-delivery, greater costs of therapy, and the need to be "tethered" with some systems that might be considered "burdensome" or even undesirable to some patients. For the most part patients who initiate insulin pump therapy are satisfied and continue using the technology, but there might be instances that arise that require the re-introduction of insulin delivery by pen or syringe. This article will review some of the reasons and strategies for switching from one mode of delivery to the other. PMID:20515298

  18. H.P. Acthar Gel (repository corticotropin injection) treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kutz, Christen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses can be complex in patients with concomitant diabetes. Corticosteroids and adrenocorticotropic hormones are known to cause alterations in glucose tolerance. Many patients have poor tolerability to therapy, necessitating alternative treatment options. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (H.P. Acthar Gel, repository corticotropin injection, Mallinckrodt ARD Inc., Hazelwood, MO, USA) is currently indicated for the treatment of MS relapses. Objectives: The objective of this study was to review patients’ experiences of Acthar Gel for the treatment of MS exacerbations in patients with MS and diabetes. Methods: A retrospective review of 13 patients’ experiences with treatment. Qualified healthcare providers completed a questionnaire following Acthar Gel treatment for MS relapse. Results: Previous corticosteroid treatment with either intravenous methylprednisolone or prednisone was reported by 84.6% of patients; eight patients had complications following administration of prior steroid treatment, seven of whom experienced elevated blood glucose levels. Acthar Gel was administered daily for a mean of 5.3 days, with 61.5% of patients reporting relapse resolution. Two patients experienced elevated blood glucose. Conclusion: The majority of patients experienced a timely resolution of their MS relapse with few hyperglycemic adverse events. Although more studies are necessary, these data suggest that Acthar Gel may be a well-tolerated and effective treatment option for patients with diabetes experiencing an MS relapse. PMID:27433309

  19. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Multiple Injection Ports in a Convergent-Divergent Nozzle for Fluidic Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waithe, Kenrick A.; Deere, Karen A.

    2003-01-01

    A computational and experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of multiple injection ports in a two-dimensional, convergent-divergent nozzle, for fluidic thrust vectoring. The concept of multiple injection ports was conceived to enhance the thrust vectoring capability of a convergent-divergent nozzle over that of a single injection port without increasing the secondary mass flow rate requirements. The experimental study was conducted at static conditions in the Jet Exit Test Facility of the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel Complex at NASA Langley Research Center. Internal nozzle performance was obtained at nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 with secondary nozzle pressure ratios up to 1 for five configurations. The computational study was conducted using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D with two-equation turbulence closure and linear Reynolds stress modeling. Internal nozzle performance was predicted for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 with a secondary nozzle pressure ratio of 0.7 for two configurations. Results from the experimental study indicate a benefit to multiple injection ports in a convergent-divergent nozzle. In general, increasing the number of injection ports from one to two increased the pitch thrust vectoring capability without any thrust performance penalties at nozzle pressure ratios less than 4 with high secondary pressure ratios. Results from the computational study are in excellent agreement with experimental results and validates PAB3D as a tool for predicting internal nozzle performance of a two dimensional, convergent-divergent nozzle with multiple injection ports.

  20. Approaches for Investigating Hydraulic and Biogeochemical Gradients at Multiple Scales in Critical Zone Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T. K.

    2011-12-01

    Transport and transformations of chemical species in soils and other near-surface terrestrial environments of Earth's critical zone reflect complex interactions among physical, chemical, and biological processes. Hydraulic and biogeochemical gradients driving transport and reactions occur over multiple scales in the subsurface. Thus, bulk measurements that average across hydraulic, chemical, and/or microbiological gradients limit identification of basic processes. Over the decades, a variety of tools and experimental methods have been developed with capabilities to resolve very steep environmental gradients. Although most of these methods are laboratory-based, they can provide insights into critical zone processes, especially when field-relevant conditions are reasonably replicated. In this presentation, examples of some novel experimental methods are reviewed, suitable for characterizing properties and processes at scales ranging from meters down to about 10 nm. The larger scale experimental approaches address dynamic processes in soil profiles. Intermediate scale experimental approaches are compatible with investigating biogeochemical dynamics within soil aggregates. Still finer scale techniques permit examination of heterogeneity within individual soil particles and micro-aggregates.

  1. Prediction of Probabilistic Sleep Distributions Following Travel Across Multiple Time Zones

    PubMed Central

    Darwent, David; Dawson, Drew; Roach, Greg D.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To parameterize and validate a model to estimate average sleep times for long-haul aviation pilots during layovers following travel across multiple time zones. The model equations were based on a weighted distribution of domicile- and local-time sleepers, and included algorithms to account for sleep loss and circadian re-synchronization. Design: Sleep times were collected from participants under normal commercial operating conditions using diaries and wrist activity monitors. Participants: Participants included a total of 306 long-haul pilots (113 captains, 120 first officers, and 73 second officers). Measurement and Results: The model was parameterized based on the average sleep/wake times observed during international flight patterns from Australia to London and Los Angeles (global R2 = 0.72). The parameterized model was validated against the average sleep/wake times observed during flight patterns from Australia to London (r2 = 0.85), Los Angeles (r2 = 0.79), New York (r2 = 0.80), and Johannesburg (r2 = 0.73). Goodness-of-fit was poorer when the parameterized model equations were used to predict the variance across the sleep/wake cycles of individual pilots (R2 = 0.42, 0.35, 0.31, and 0.28 for the validation flight patterns, respectively), in part because of substantial inter-individual variability in sleep timing and duration. Conclusions: It is possible to estimate average sleep times during layovers in international patterns with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Models of this type could form the basis of a stand-alone application to estimate the likelihood that a given duty schedule provides pilots, on average, with an adequate opportunity to sleep. Citation: Darwent D; Dawson D; Roach GD. Prediction of probabilistic sleep distributions following travel across multiple time zones. SLEEP 2010;33(2):185-195. PMID:20175402

  2. TOUGH-RDCA modeling of multiple fracture interactions in caprock during CO2 injection into a deep brine aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Peng-Zhi; Rutqvist, Jonny; Feng, Xia-Ting; Yan, Fei

    2014-04-01

    The interaction between multiple fractures (e.g., hydraulic fractures and pre-existing natural fractures) is important in the analysis of a number of geoengineering applications, such as in the evaluation of the stability and integrity of caprock during underground CO2 sequestration. Here, we present new developments and applications of a model for analyzing coupled multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical processes during fracturing involving multiple fractures and their interactions. Based on a numerical code, i.e., rock discontinuous cellular automaton (RDCA), we introduce a discontinuous displacement function for representing multiple discontinuities, and develop an algorithm to deal with a propagating fracture that interacts with other discontinuities. By applying multiphase fluid pressure to fracture surfaces, the RDCA has the ability to simulate multiphase fluid flow-driven fracturing. The RDCA technique incorporates the discontinuity of the crack independently of the mesh, such that the cracks can be arbitrarily located within an element. This method does not require any remeshing for multiple cracks growth, an aspect that greatly reduces the complexity and improves efficiency in modeling multiple-fracture propagation. The RDCA is integrated with the TOUGH2 multiphase flow and heat-transport simulator by a sequential coupling algorithm, using mixed FORTRAN and C++ programming. The coupled TOUGH2 and RDCA code is applied to simulate the multiple fracture interaction in caprock induced by CO2 injection into a deep brine aquifer. The simulation results show hydraulic fracture trajectory, fracture aperture, and pressures as a function of injection time. Fluid flow (driven by CO2 injection) into natural fractures and their transition to hydraulic fractures is simulated. The injection pressure profile shows the complexity of the fracturing and its impact on CO2 migration and caprock integrity.

  3. Multiple-Step Injection Molding for Fibrin-Based Tissue-Engineered Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Weber, Miriam; Gonzalez de Torre, Israel; Moreira, Ricardo; Frese, Julia; Oedekoven, Caroline; Alonso, Matilde; Rodriguez Cabello, Carlos J; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Mela, Petra

    2015-08-01

    Heart valves are elaborate and highly heterogeneous structures of the circulatory system. Despite the well accepted relationship between the structural and mechanical anisotropy and the optimal function of the valves, most approaches to create tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) do not try to mimic this complexity and rely on one homogenous combination of cells and materials for the whole construct. The aim of this study was to establish an easy and versatile method to introduce spatial diversity into a heart valve fibrin scaffold. We developed a multiple-step injection molding process that enables the fabrication of TEHVs with heterogeneous composition (cell/scaffold material) of wall and leaflets without the need of gluing or suturing components together, with the leaflets firmly connected to the wall. The integrity of the valves and their functionality was proved by either opening/closing cycles in a bioreactor (proof of principle without cells) or with continuous stimulation over 2 weeks. We demonstrated the potential of the method by the two-step molding of the wall and the leaflets containing different cell lines. Immunohistology after stimulation confirmed tissue formation and demonstrated the localization of the different cell types. Furthermore, we showed the proof of principle fabrication of valves using different materials for wall (fibrin) and leaflets (hybrid gel of fibrin/elastin-like recombinamer) and with layered leaflets. The method is easy to implement, does not require special facilities, and can be reproduced in any tissue-engineering lab. While it has been demonstrated here with fibrin, it can easily be extended to other hydrogels. PMID:25654448

  4. Multiple-Step Injection Molding for Fibrin-Based Tissue-Engineered Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Miriam; Gonzalez de Torre, Israel; Moreira, Ricardo; Frese, Julia; Oedekoven, Caroline; Alonso, Matilde; Rodriguez Cabello, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Heart valves are elaborate and highly heterogeneous structures of the circulatory system. Despite the well accepted relationship between the structural and mechanical anisotropy and the optimal function of the valves, most approaches to create tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) do not try to mimic this complexity and rely on one homogenous combination of cells and materials for the whole construct. The aim of this study was to establish an easy and versatile method to introduce spatial diversity into a heart valve fibrin scaffold. We developed a multiple-step injection molding process that enables the fabrication of TEHVs with heterogeneous composition (cell/scaffold material) of wall and leaflets without the need of gluing or suturing components together, with the leaflets firmly connected to the wall. The integrity of the valves and their functionality was proved by either opening/closing cycles in a bioreactor (proof of principle without cells) or with continuous stimulation over 2 weeks. We demonstrated the potential of the method by the two-step molding of the wall and the leaflets containing different cell lines. Immunohistology after stimulation confirmed tissue formation and demonstrated the localization of the different cell types. Furthermore, we showed the proof of principle fabrication of valves using different materials for wall (fibrin) and leaflets (hybrid gel of fibrin/elastin-like recombinamer) and with layered leaflets. The method is easy to implement, does not require special facilities, and can be reproduced in any tissue-engineering lab. While it has been demonstrated here with fibrin, it can easily be extended to other hydrogels. PMID:25654448

  5. Multiple-frequency tomography of the upper mantle beneath the African/Iberian collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnin, Mickaël; Nolet, Guust; Villaseñor, Antonio; Gallart, Josep; Thomas, Christine

    2014-09-01

    During the Cenozoic, the geodynamics of the western Mediterranean domain has been characterized by a complex history of subduction of Mesozoic oceanic lithosphere. The final stage of these processes is proposed to have led to the development of the Calabria and Gibraltar arcs, whose formation is still under debate. In this study, we take advantage of the dense broad-band station networks now available in the Alborán Sea region, to develop a high-resolution 3-D tomographic P velocity model of the upper mantle beneath the African/Iberian collision zone that will better constraint the past dynamics of this zone. The model is based on 13200 teleseismic arrival times recorded between 2008 and 2012 at 279 stations for which cross-correlation delays are measured with a new technique in different frequency bands centred between 0.03 and 1.0 Hz, and for the first time interpreted using multiple frequency tomography. Our model shows, beneath the Alborán Sea, a strong (4 per cent) fast vertically dipping anomaly observed to at least 650 km depth. The arched shape of this anomaly, and its extent at depth, are coherent with a lithospheric slab, thus favouring the hypothesis of a westward consumption of the Ligurian ocean slab by roll-back during Cenozoic. In addition to this fast anomaly in the deep upper mantle, high intensity slow anomalies are widespread in the lithosphere and asthenosphere beneath Morocco and southern Spain. These anomalies are correlated at the surface with the position of the Rif and Atlas orogens and with Cenozoic volcanic fields. We thus confirm the presence, beneath Morocco, of an anomalous (hot?) upper mantle, but without clear indication for a lateral spreading of the Canary plume to the east.

  6. Injectable interferon beta-1b for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, Slobodan M

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease with either a progressive (10%–15%) or relapsing-remitting (85%–90%) course. The pathological hallmarks of MS are lesions of both white and grey matter in the central nervous system. The onset of the disease is usually around 30 years of age. The patients experience an acute focal neurologic dysfunction which is not characteristic, followed by partial or complete recovery. Acute episodes of neurologic dysfunction with diverse signs and symptoms will then recur throughout the life of a patient, with periods of partial or complete remission and clinical stability in between. Currently, there are several therapeutic options for MS with disease-modifying properties. Immunomodulatory therapy with interferon beta-1b (IFN-β1b) or -1a, glatiramer and natalizumab shows similar efficacy; in a resistant or intolerant patient, the most recently approved therapeutic option is mitoxantrone. IFN-β1b in patients with MS binds to specific receptors on surface of immune cells, changing the expression of several genes and leading to a decrease in quantity of cell-associated adhesion molecules, inhibition of major histocompatibility complex class II expression and reduction in inflammatory cells migration into the central nervous system. After 2 years of treatment, IFN-β1b reduces the risk of development of clinically defined MS from 45% (with placebo) to 28% (with IFN-β1b). It also reduces relapses for 34% (1.31 exacerbations annually with placebo and 0.9 with higher dose of IFN-β1b) and makes 31% more patients relapse-free. In secondary-progressive disease annual rate of progression is 3% lower with IFN-β1b. In recommended doses IFN-β1b causes the following frequent adverse effects: injection site reactions (redness, discoloration, inflammation, pain, necrosis and non-specific reactions), insomnia, influenza-like syndrome, asthenia, headache, myalgia, hypoesthesia, nausea, paresthesia, myasthenia

  7. Glatiramer Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... to inject glatiramer, inject it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription ...

  8. A nonlinear model for fluid flow in a multiple-zone composite reservoir including the quadratic gradient term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Lu; Fan, Xiang-Yu; He, Yong-Ming; Nie, Ren-Shi; Huang, Quan-Hua

    2013-08-01

    Based on material balance and Darcy's law, the governing equation with the quadratic pressure gradient term was deduced. Then the nonlinear model for fluid flow in a multiple-zone composite reservoir including the quadratic gradient term was established and solved using a Laplace transform. A series of standard log-log type curves of 1-zone (homogeneous), 2-zone and 3-zone reservoirs were plotted and nonlinear flow characteristics were analysed. The type curves governed by the coefficient of the quadratic gradient term (β) gradually deviate from those of a linear model with time elapsing. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were implemented to compare the solutions of the linear and nonlinear models. The results showed that differences of pressure transients between the linear and nonlinear models increase with elapsed time and β. At the end, a successful application of the theoretical model data against the field data shows that the nonlinear model will be a good tool to evaluate formation parameters more accurately.

  9. Clinical experience with repository corticotropin injection in patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing mood changes with intravenous methylprednisolone: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Stacey; Woo, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The elevated prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and disorders among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is well recognized, as are potential neuropsychiatric side effects of treatment with corticosteroids. Both methylprednisolone (MP) and repository corticotropin injection (HP Acthar® gel) have demonstrated efficacy in reducing short-term disability after exacerbations of MS. Although historical data are limited, repository corticotropin injection has not generally been associated with detrimental neuropsychiatric effects. We describe six cases of patients with relapsing-remitting MS who had previously experienced detrimental mood changes with MP treatment. Some of these patients had previous histories of mood disorders or other neuropsychiatric symptoms prior to MS diagnosis. All six patients were subsequently treated with repository corticotropin injection for MS exacerbations and each demonstrated improvements in MS symptoms. This clinical experience suggests that repository corticotropin injection should be considered as an alternative for patients who do not tolerate corticosteroids or have difficulties associated with intravenous medication. Furthermore, the rate of neuropsychiatric side effects observed in these patients was low. These observations support repository corticotropin injection as a viable alternative for the treatment of acute exacerbations of MS, particularly in patients who have a history of neuropsychiatric disorders or symptoms either independently or in response to MP treatment. In reviewing both the published data and our own clinical experience regarding potential neuropsychiatric adverse events with treatment for MS exacerbations, we hope to stimulate further research into the potential efficacy and safety of repository corticotropin injection among patients with some form of neuropsychiatric complications that must be considered when establishing a treatment plan for MS. PMID:27134674

  10. Clinical experience with repository corticotropin injection in patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing mood changes with intravenous methylprednisolone: a case series.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stacey; Woo, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The elevated prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and disorders among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is well recognized, as are potential neuropsychiatric side effects of treatment with corticosteroids. Both methylprednisolone (MP) and repository corticotropin injection (HP Acthar(®) gel) have demonstrated efficacy in reducing short-term disability after exacerbations of MS. Although historical data are limited, repository corticotropin injection has not generally been associated with detrimental neuropsychiatric effects. We describe six cases of patients with relapsing-remitting MS who had previously experienced detrimental mood changes with MP treatment. Some of these patients had previous histories of mood disorders or other neuropsychiatric symptoms prior to MS diagnosis. All six patients were subsequently treated with repository corticotropin injection for MS exacerbations and each demonstrated improvements in MS symptoms. This clinical experience suggests that repository corticotropin injection should be considered as an alternative for patients who do not tolerate corticosteroids or have difficulties associated with intravenous medication. Furthermore, the rate of neuropsychiatric side effects observed in these patients was low. These observations support repository corticotropin injection as a viable alternative for the treatment of acute exacerbations of MS, particularly in patients who have a history of neuropsychiatric disorders or symptoms either independently or in response to MP treatment. In reviewing both the published data and our own clinical experience regarding potential neuropsychiatric adverse events with treatment for MS exacerbations, we hope to stimulate further research into the potential efficacy and safety of repository corticotropin injection among patients with some form of neuropsychiatric complications that must be considered when establishing a treatment plan for MS. PMID:27134674

  11. Performance of a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine Using Multiple Orifice Fuel Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Foster, H H

    1930-01-01

    This report presents test results obtained at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics during an investigation to determine the relative performance of a single-cylinder, high-speed, compression-ignition engine when using fuel injection valve nozzles with different numbers, sizes, and directions of round orifices. A spring-loaded, automatic injection valve was used, centrally located at the top of a vertical disk-type combustion chamber formed between horizontally opposed inlet and exhaust valves of a 5 inch by 7 inch engine.

  12. Estimation of the heterogeneity of fracture permeability by simultaneous modeling of multiple air-injection tests in partially saturated fractured tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Y. W.; Huang, K.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    Air-injection tests were used to investigate the flow characteristics of the fractured volcanic tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Because the tuff matrix pores are saturated over 90% with water and the matrix permeability is on the order of microdarcies, the air component of flow is mainly in the fractures. Air-injection tests can therefore help to determine the flow characteristics and heterogeneity structure of the densely fractured welded tuff. The tests were carried out in the Exploratory Studies Facility, an 8 km long underground tunnel at the Yucca Mountain site, in twelve 40 m long boreholes, forming three clusters within a cubic rock volume of approximately 40 meters on each edge. Each borehole in the test block was packed off (or isolated) into four sections (or zones) by inflatable packers. The in situ field tests consisted of constant-rate air injection into one of the isolated borehole zones while the pressure response was monitored in all the isolated zones. The pressure data showed an almost universal response in all monitored zones to injection into any borehole-zone, indicating that the fractures are well connected for airflow. Air-injection tests were performed in succession for all isolated zones. A simultaneous inversion was performed for the pressure response of all the monitoring zones for all the injection tests in the test block. TOUGH2, a 3D numerical code for multiphase, multicomponent transport, was used for this purpose. Spatially variable fracture permeability was used as an adjustable parameter to fit the simulated pressure responses to those measured, assuming fixed fracture porosity. For most of the pneumatic experiments, the calculated pressure changes matched the data well, and the estimated permeability ranged over four orders of magnitude, from 10-15 m2 to 10-11 m2.

  13. Factors that influence adherence and strategies to maintain adherence to injected therapies for patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Carol; Caon, Christina; Smrtka, Jennifer; Shoemaker, Jennifer

    2010-10-01

    A key aspect of the management of care for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is identifying which patients are struggling with adherence. Disease-modifying therapies for the treatment of MS are primarily preventative, with modest efficacy, and they can possibly cause significant side effects. These factors can lead patients to stop taking their medication because they continue to experience symptoms or relapses of the disease, and/or they have painful injection-site reactions on most parts of their bodies. However, striving for 100% adherence to the prescribed treatment regimen remains the goal and is the surest way to reap all the benefits associated with immunomodulatory therapy. Building trust, promoting injection self-efficacy, and educating patients about proper injection techniques to prevent injection-site reactions have the greatest impact on patient adherence. Factors including family involvement, financial stability and support, hope, and faith can also have a positive impact on adherence. Identifying patients who may be struggling with depression, which is easily treatable but often not well addressed, and providing access to mental health services are important. Although many strides have been made with regard to MS patient care, outlining strategies that can maintain or encourage adherence can provide practitioners with tools to facilitate their patients' health and well-being. PMID:21049829

  14. Constraining physical properties of ultra-low velocity zones using multiple seismic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K. J.; Thorne, M. S.; Rost, S.; Nissen-Meyer, T.

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) are a prominent feature of the lower mantle and may be related to many lower mantle dynamic processes. Several studies have indicated a possible partial melt origin to ULVZs however chemical reactions between the mantle and outer core cannot be ruled out giving a compositional component to ULVZ makeup. In order to determine the true importance of ULVZs, it is first necessary to determine their physical properties and geographic location. ULVZ physical properties (P- and S-wave velocities, density, thickness, and lateral coverage) are not well constrained due to sparse coverage of seismic phases used to probe the CMB, and extensive modeling tradeoffs. In this study we focus on examining ULVZ structure in the western Pacific region. Although several studies have confirmed the presence of ULVZs in this region, these studies have primarily been conducted using a single seismic phase. Yet, these past studies indicate that multiple seismic phases may interact with the same ULVZ. We seek to further constrain ULVZ physical properties using the seismic phases SPdKS, ScP, and PcP. Our primary focus is on ULVZ structure where at least 2 of these 3 seismic phases pass through the same ULVZ. Our SPdKS data set consists of broadband seismic recordings from 150 deep earthquakes occurring between January 1990 to April 2010 along the west boundary of the Pacific plate, and the east and south boundaries of the Eurasian plate. Our ScP and PcP data sets consist of 785 and 819 events, respectively, occurring between the years 1995 and 2000 recorded at the short period arrays of the International Monitoring System. We constrain ULVZ properties by waveform modeling using two new techniques: (1) We use the axi-symmetric finite difference technique PSVaxi to model broadband SPdKS waveforms, and (2) we use the axi-symmetric spectral-element method (AXISEM) to model high frequency (1 Hz) ScP and PcP waveforms. We determine the acceptable model space for each

  15. A Journey Through the Mantle Transition Zone Under Western US From Single and Multiple Scattered Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauzin, B.; Trampert, J.; van der Hilst, R.; Wittlinger, G.; Vergne, J.

    2011-12-01

    Using data from the US Transportable Array, we combine observations of P-to-S single and multiple scattered waves to constrain the transition zone (TZ) structure beneath the Western US. From stacking the data by common conversion points along profiles, we produce depth images of seismic discontinuities. Systematic depth and amplitude measurements are performed for the '410', the '660', and some other minor seismic discontinuities identified as sharp reductions of wave velocities at ˜350 km depth (the '350') and ˜590 km depth (the '590'). The Gorda plate, subducted under Northern California, is traced back to the TZ where it seems to flatten and induces, due to cold temperatures or a high water content, a significant uplift of the '410' under Northern Nevada. The geographical maps of the '410'/'660' amplitude/topography reveal an anomalous TZ at the borders between Washington, Oregon and Idaho with: (i) a thickened TZ, (ii) a sharp jump in the topography of the '660' both in a South-North and West-East direction, and (iii) reduced '410' amplitudes at the North. Such anomalous structure might be inherited from the past history of plate subduction/accretion. A thinned TZ under the Yellowstone is likely the result of a deep hot thermal plume. Both the '350' and the '590' negative discontinuities extend over very large areas. They might be related either to an increased water content in the TZ and/or significant amount of oceanic material accumulated through the past 100 My. An estimation of the TZ water content is now possible based on observation of PPS reverberated phases on the '410' and '660' interfaces.

  16. Insulin pump therapy, multiple daily injections, and cardiovascular mortality in 18 168 people with type 1 diabetes: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Cederholm, Jan; Eliasson, Björn; Rawshani, Araz; Eeg-Olofsson, Katarina; Svensson, Ann-Marie; Zethelius, Björn; Avdic, Tarik; Landin-Olsson, Mona; Jendle, Johan; Gudbjörnsdóttir, Soffia

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the long term effects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pump therapy) on cardiovascular diseases and mortality in people with type 1 diabetes. Design Observational study. Setting Swedish National Diabetes Register, Sweden 2005-12. Participants 18 168 people with type 1 diabetes, 2441 using insulin pump therapy and 15 727 using multiple daily insulin injections. Main outcome measures Cox regression analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios for the outcomes, with stratification of propensity scores including clinical characteristics, risk factors for cardiovascular disease, treatments, and previous diseases. Results Follow-up was for a mean of 6.8 years until December 2012, with 114 135 person years. With multiple daily injections as reference, the adjusted hazard ratios for insulin pump treatment were significantly lower: 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.36 to 0.83) for fatal coronary heart disease, 0.58 (0.40 to 0.85) for fatal cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease or stroke), and 0.73 (0.58 to 0.92) for all cause mortality. Hazard ratios were lower, but not significantly so, for fatal or non-fatal coronary heart disease and fatal or non-fatal cardiovascular disease. Unadjusted absolute differences were 3.0 events of fatal coronary heart disease per 1000 person years; corresponding figures were 3.3 for fatal cardiovascular disease and 5.7 for all cause mortality. When lower body mass index and previous cardiovascular diseases were excluded, results of subgroup analyses were similar to the results from complete data. A sensitivity analysis of unmeasured confounders in all individuals showed that an unmeasured confounders with hazard ratio of 1.3 would have to be present in >80% of the individuals treated with multiple daily injections versus not presence in those treated with pump therapy to invalidate the significantly lower hazard ratios for fatal cardiovascular disease. Data on patient education and

  17. Combining steam injection with hydraulic fracturing for the in situ remediation of the unsaturated zone of a fractured soil polluted by jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Bertel; Tzovolou, Dimitra; Jeczalik, Maciej; Kasela, Tomasz; Slack, William; Klint, Knud E; Haeseler, Frank; Tsakiroglou, Christos D

    2011-03-01

    A steam injection pilot-scale experiment was performed on the unsaturated zone of a strongly heterogeneous fractured soil contaminated by jet fuel. Before the treatment, the soil was stimulated by creating sub-horizontal sand-filled hydraulic fractures at three depths. The steam was injected through one hydraulic fracture and gas/water/non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) was extracted from the remaining fractures by applying a vacuum to extraction wells. The injection strategy was designed to maximize the heat delivery over the entire cell (10 m × 10 m × 5 m). The soil temperature profile, the recovered NAPL, the extracted water, and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the gas phase were monitored during the field test. GC-MS chemical analyses of pre- and post-treatment soil samples allowed for the quantitative assessment of the remediation efficiency. The growth of the heat front followed the configuration of hydraulic fractures. The average concentration of total hydrocarbons (g/kg of soil) was reduced by ∼ 43% in the upper target zone (depth = 1.5-3.9 m) and by ∼ 72% over the entire zone (depth = 1.5-5.5 m). The total NAPL mass removal based on gas and liquid stream measurements and the free-NAPL product were almost 30% and 2%, respectively, of those estimated from chemical analyses of pre- and post-treatment soil samples. The dominant mechanisms of soil remediation was the vaporization of jet fuel compounds at temperatures lower than their normal boiling points (steam distillation) enhanced by the ventilation of porous matrix due to the forced convective flow of air. In addition, the significant reduction of the NAPL mass in the less-heated deeper zone may be attributed to the counter-current imbibition of condensed water from natural fractures into the porous matrix and the gravity drainage associated with seasonal fluctuations of the water table. PMID:21030134

  18. Time-lapse ERT interpretation methodology for leachate injection monitoring based on multiple inversions and a clustering strategy (MICS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, M.; Clément, R.; Touze-Foltz, N.; Günther, T.; Moreau, S.; Duquennoi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in municipal waste landfills functioning as bioreactors. To quantify the water content and to assess the leachate injection system, in-situ methods are required to obtain spatially distributed information, usually electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). This geophysical method is based on the inversion process, which presents two major problems in terms of delimiting the infiltration area. First, it is difficult for ERT users to choose an appropriate inversion parameter set. Indeed, it might not be sufficient to interpret only the optimum model (i.e. the model with the chosen regularisation strength) because it is not necessarily the model which best represents the physical process studied. Second, it is difficult to delineate the infiltration front based on resistivity models because of the smoothness of the inversion results. This paper proposes a new methodology called MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy), which allows ERT users to improve the delimitation of the infiltration area in leachate injection monitoring. The MICS methodology is based on (i) a multiple inversion step by varying the inversion parameter values to take a wide range of resistivity models into account and (ii) a clustering strategy to improve the delineation of the infiltration front. In this paper, MICS was assessed on two types of data. First, a numerical assessment allows us to optimise and test MICS for different infiltration area sizes, contrasts and shapes. Second, MICS was applied to a field data set gathered during leachate recirculation on a bioreactor.

  19. Immune response to an endotoxin challenge involves multiple immune parameters and is consistent among the annual-cycle stages of a free-living temperate zone bird.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Arne; Matson, Kevin D; Versteegh, Maaike A; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Tieleman, B Irene

    2013-07-15

    Trade-offs between immune function and other physiological and behavioural processes are central in ecoimmunology, but one important problem is how to distinguish a reallocation of resources away from the immune system from a reallocation or redistribution within the immune system. While variation in baseline values of individual immune parameters is well established, studies in wild animals on multiple parameters during an immune response are lacking. It also remains to be tested whether and how immune responses correlate with baseline values that vary, for example, over the course of an annual cycle. We studied immunological responses to an endotoxin challenge in skylarks (Alauda arvensis), a partial migrant bird breeding in temperate zones. We compared birds injected with the endotoxin LPS with un-injected controls, characterizing immunological responses with leukocyte profiles, titres of lytic enzymes and natural antibodies, and concentrations of haptoglobin and heat shock proteins. We did this in five annual-cycle stages to test whether the response varied throughout the year. The endotoxin challenge affected six of 10 measured parameters. Lysis titres and proportions of heterophils increased; haptoglobin concentrations and proportions of lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils decreased. The variable effects on different immune components demonstrate the complexity of an immune response. We found no evidence that the response differed between annual-cycle stages. The response was independent of baseline measures taken directly upon capture in the field, indicating that birds were facing no immunological ceiling when mounting an immune response. Values of five parameters collected under field conditions were significantly related to values taken under standardized laboratory conditions. We conclude that multiple parts of the immune system are modulated during an immunological response and that responses are not re-organized throughout the annual cycle. PMID

  20. Multiple energetic injections in a strong spike-like solar burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Dennis, B. R.; Hurford, G. H.; Brown, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    An intense and fast spike-like solar burst was built up of short time scale structures superimposed on an underlying gradual emission, the time evolution of which shows remarkable proportionality between hard X-ray and microwave fluxes. The finer time structure were best defined at mm-microwaves. At the peak of the event, the finer structures repeat every 30x60ms. The more slowly varying component with a time scale of about 1 second was identified in microwave hard X-rays throughout the burst duration. It is suggested that X-ray fluxes might also be proportional to the repetition rate of basic units of energy injection (quasi-quantized). The relevant parameters of one primary energy release site are estimated both in the case where hard X-rays are produced primarily by thick-target bremsstrahlung, and when they are purely thermal. The relation of this figure to global energy considerations is discussed.

  1. New modelling of transient well test and rate decline analysis for a horizontal well in a multiple-zone reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Ren-Shi; Guo, Jian-Chun; Jia, Yong-Lu; Zhu, Shui-Qiao; Rao, Zheng; Zhang, Chun-Guang

    2011-09-01

    The no-type curve with negative skin of a horizontal well has been found in the current research. Negative skin is very significant to transient well test and rate decline analysis. This paper first presents the negative skin problem where the type curves with negative skin of a horizontal well are oscillatory. In order to solve the problem, we propose a new model of transient well test and rate decline analysis for a horizontal well in a multiple-zone composite reservoir. A new dimensionless definition of rD is introduced in the dimensionless mathematical modelling under different boundaries. The model is solved using the Laplace transform and separation of variables techniques. In Laplace space, the solutions for both constant rate production and constant wellbore pressure production are expressed in a unified formula. We provide graphs and thorough analysis of the new standard type curves for both well test and rate decline analysis; the characteristics of type curves are the reflections of horizontal well production in a multiple-zone reservoir. An important contribution of our paper is that our model removed the oscillation in type curves and thus solved the negative skin problem. We also show that the characteristics of type curves depend heavily on the properties of different zones, skin factor, well length, formation thickness, etc. Our research can be applied to a real case study.

  2. Joints and decollement zones in Middle Devonian shales. Evidence for multiple deformation events in the central Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.A. )

    1994-04-01

    Fractures in oriented Middle Devonian shale cores from the Appalachian Plateau province provide evidence for multiple deformation events associated with the Alleghanian orogeny, post-orogenic stress relaxation, and neotectonic ( ) stresses. The orientation, distribution, and mineral paragenesis of these fractures are used to establish the timing, regional extent, and stress orientation of each deformation event. During the Alleghanian orogeny, the Middle Devonian shale section was a regional decollement zone in the central Appalachian Plateau province. The decollement extends from the Appalachian Structural Front to northwestern Pennsylvania and east-central Ohio. It is defined by abundant joints, veins, and slick-ensided fractures localized within multiple zones of organic-rich brown and black shale. These zones are distributed over tens to hundreds of meters of the Middle Devonian shale section. The shale cores record a continuous counterclockwise rotation of the maximum compressive stress direction in the west-central Appalachians during the Alleghanian orogeny. Three stages are recognized. 68 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Design requirements for ERD in diffusion-dominated media: how do injection interval, bioactive zones and reaction kinetics affect remediation performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambon, J.; Lemming, G.; Manoli, G.; Broholm, M. M.; Bjerg, P.; Binning, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination (ERD) has been successfully used in high permeability media, such as sand aquifers, and is considered to be a promising technology for low permeability settings. Pilot and full-scale applications of ERD at several sites in Denmark have shown that the main challenge is to get contact between the injected bacteria and electron donor and the contaminants trapped in the low-permeability matrix. Sampling of intact cores from the low-permeability matrix has shown that the bioactive zones (where degradation occurs) are limited in the matrix, due to the slow diffusion transport processes, and this affects the timeframes for the remediation. Due to the limited ERD applications and the complex transport and reactive processes occurring in low-permeability media, design guidelines are currently not available for ERD in such settings, and remediation performance assessments are limited. The objective of this study is to combine existing knowledge from several sites with numerical modeling to assess the effect of the injection interval, development of bioactive zones and reaction kinetics on the remediation efficiency for ERD in diffusion-dominated media. A numerical model is developed to simulate ERD at a contaminated site, where the source area (mainly TCE) is located in a clayey till with fractures and interbedded sand lenses. Such contaminated sites are common in North America and Europe. Hydro-geological characterization provided information on geological heterogeneities and hydraulic parameters, which are relevant for clay till sites in general. The numerical model couples flow and transport in the fracture network and low-permeability matrix. Sequential degradation of TCE to ethene is modeled using Monod kinetics, and the kinetic parameters are obtained from laboratory experiments. The influence of the reaction kinetics on remediation efficiency is assessed by varying the biomass concentration of the specific degraders. The injected

  4. A Case of Sustained Intraocular Pressure Elevation after Multiple Intravitreal Injection of Ranibizumab and Aflibercept for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Hisashi; Miyata, Ryohei; Kobayashi, Maki; Tsukitome, Hideyuki; Ikesugi, Kengo; Kondo, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents are widely used to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Although these treatments are effective, multiple injections have recently been recommended to ensure that there is a good long-term prognosis. However, sustained intraocular pressure (IOP) elevations have been reported to develop after multiple injections of anti-VEGF agents. We present our findings of a case of uncontrolled and persistent IOP elevation after switching from intravitreal ranibizumab injections to intravitreal aflibercept injections. A 74-year-old Japanese man without a history of glaucoma underwent 22 ranibizumab injections for nAMD and suddenly developed an elevated IOP after the 22nd injection. Although the subsequent medical treatment led to normalization of his IOP, the subretinal fluid under the central fovea remained even after the 25th injection of ranibizumab. Thus, ranibizumab treatment was switched to bimonthly intravitreal aflibercept injections in conjunction with glaucoma medications. His IOP recovered to within the normal range; however, after the 11th aflibercept injection, there was a sudden elevation of his IOP in spite of the continued glaucoma medications. Due to this sustained IOP elevation, his aflibercept injections were suspended for 16 weeks. Because his IOP could not be normalized by a full glaucoma medication regimen, the patient underwent trabeculotomy, which resulted in a lowering of the IOP to normal levels. We conclude that patients who receive serial intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF agents need to be closely monitored because severe and sustained ocular hypertension can develop. PMID:27462248

  5. The multiplicity of flow and transport models in unsaturated zone – curse or blessing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many conceptually different models have been developed to simulate flow and transport in vadose zone. For practical purposes, parameters in these models are often estimated from readily available data using pedotransfer functions. Many pedotransfer functions have been developed, and it is not known ...

  6. Millimeter wave imaging at up to 40 frames per second using an optoelectronic photo-injected Fresnel zone plate lens antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Gallacher, Thomas F.; Søndenâ, Rune; Macfarlane, David G.

    2016-05-01

    Optoelectronic methods are promising for rapid and highly reconfigurable beam steering across the microwave to the terahertz range. In particular, the photo-injected Fresnel zone plate antenna (piFZPA) offers high speed, wide angle, precise beam steering with good beam quality, to enable video rate millimeter wave imagery with no moving parts. We present a piFZPA demonstrator based on a commercial digital light projector (DLP) and high power laser which achieves steering rates up to 17,500 beams per second at 94 and 188 GHz. We also demonstrate radar imaging at 94 GHz at frame rates of 40 Hz (2D PPI) and 7 Hz (3D volumetric).

  7. Geochemical consequences of flow differentiation in a multiple injection dike (Trinity ophiolite, N. California)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brouxel, M.

    1991-01-01

    A clinopyroxene-rich dike of the Trinity ophiolite sheeted-dike complex shows three different magmatic pulses, probably injected in a short period of time (no well developed chilled margin) and important variations of the clinopyroxene and plagioclase percentages between its core (highly porphyritic) and margins (aphyric). This variation, interpreted as related to a flow differentiation phenomenon (mechanical phenocryst redistribution), has important geochemical consequences. It produces increases in the FeO, MgO, CaO, Cr and Ni contents from the margin to the core, together with increases in the clinopyroxene percentage, and decreases in the SiO2, Zr, Y, Nb and REE contents together with a decrease in the percentage of the fine-grained groundmass toward the core of the dike. This mineralogical redistribution, which also affects the incompatible trace element ratios because of the difference in plagioclase and clinopyroxene mineral/liquid partition coefficients, illustrate the importance of fractionation processes outside of a magma chamber. ?? 1991.

  8. Geomorphic evidences and chronology of multiple neotectonic events in a cratonic area: Results from the Gavilgarh Fault Zone, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Dipanjan; Jain, Vikrant; Chattopadhyay, Anupam; Biswas, Rabiul H.; Singhvi, Ashok K.

    2016-05-01

    The ENE-WSW trending Gavilgarh Fault Zone (GFZ) is an important tectonic lineament within the Central Indian shield. Geomorphological mapping and spatial analyses of rivers were carried out to elucidate the imprints of active tectonics on the fluvial systems of this region. The sinuosity index, width-depth ratio of river valleys, longitudinal profile, S-L index and hypsometric index of the rivers flowing from north to south across the GFZ lineament suggest that the northern side of GFZ was tectonically uplifted. Luminescence dating of sediments from river terraces and calculation of knickpoint migration rates in the rivers indicate occurrence of multiple neotectonic events in GFZ at ca. 65-80 ka, ca. 50 ka, ca. 30-40 ka, and ca. 14 ka. Evidences of neotectonic activity, presence of active geothermal springs, and occurrence of recent earthquakes along GFZ suggest that this lineament is tectonically active and there is a need for proper seismic monitoring of this fault zone.

  9. Industrial Application of an Improved Multiple Injection and Multiple Staging Combustion Technology in a 600 MWe Supercritical Down-Fired Boiler.

    PubMed

    Song, Minhang; Zeng, Lingyan; Chen, Zhichao; Li, Zhengqi; Zhu, Qunyi; Kuang, Min

    2016-02-01

    To solve the water wall overheating in lower furnace, and further reduce NOx emissions and carbon in fly ash, continuous improvement of the previously proposed multiple injection and multiple staging combustion (MIMSC) technology lies on three aspects: (1) along the furnace arch breadth, changing the previously centralized 12 burner groups into a more uniform pattern with 24 burners; (2) increasing the mass ratio of pulverized coal in fuel-rich flow to that in fuel-lean flow from 6:4 to 9:1; (3) reducing the arch-air momentum by 23% and increasing the tertiary-air momentum by 24%. Industrial-size measurements (i.e., adjusting overfire air (OFA) damper opening of 20-70%) uncovered that, compared with the prior MIMSC technology, the ignition distance of fuel-rich coal/air flow shortened by around 1 m. The gas temperature in the lower furnace was symmetric and higher, the flame kernel moved upward and therefore made the temperature in near-wall region of furnace hopper decrease by about 400 °C, the water wall overheating disappeared completely. Under the optimal OFA damper opening (i.e, 55%), NOx emissions and carbon in fly ash attained levels of 589 mg/m(3) at 6% O2 and 6.18%, respectively, achieving NOx and carbon in fly ash significant reduction by 33% and 37%, respectively. PMID:26752460

  10. Injectable disease-modifying therapy for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a review of adherence data.

    PubMed

    Caon, Christina; Saunders, Carol; Smrtka, Jennifer; Baxter, Nancy; Shoemaker, Jennifer

    2010-10-01

    Long-term adherence to disease-modifying therapy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) is associated with improved patient outcomes, including a reduced risk of relapse and a better preserved quality of life. However, the unpredictable nature of the disease--even when it is being treated--may make it difficult to convince patients of the importance of treatment adherence. A number of studies have attempted to pinpoint factors that affect adherence. Nursing interventions that address some of these factors may improve adherence and, thus, the disease course for a variety of RRMS patients. This article summarizes literature that approximates the prevalence and impact of nonadherence and reviews factors identified in clinical trials that affect adherence. Nursing interventions that can improve adherence, including telephone counseling and motivational interview techniques, are also addressed. PMID:21049828

  11. Multiple mantle upwellings through the transition zone beneath the Afar Depression?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, J. O.; Kendall, J. M.; Stuart, G. W.; Thompson, D. A.; Ebinger, C. J.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Goitom, B.; Ogubazghi, G.

    2012-12-01

    Previous seismic studies using regional deployments of sensors in East-Africa show that low seismic velocities underlie Africa, but their resolution is limited to the top 200-300km of the Earth. Thus, the connection between the low velocities in the uppermost mantle and those imaged in global studies in the lower mantle is unclear. We have combined new data from Afar, Ethiopia with 7 other regional experiments and global network stations across Kenya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti and Yemen, to produce high-resolution models of upper mantle P- and S-wave velocities to the base of the transition zone. Relative travel time tomographic inversions show that within the transition zone two focussed sharp-sided low velocity regions exist: one beneath the Western Ethiopian plateau outside the rift valley, and the other beneath the Afar depression. Estimates of transition zone thickness suggest that this is unlikely to be an artefact of mantle discontinuity topography as a transition zone of normal thickness underlies the majority of Afar and surrounding regions. However, a low velocity layer is evident directly above the 410 discontinuity, co-incident with some of the lowest seismic velocities suggesting that smearing of a strong low velocity layer of limited depth extent may contribute to the tomographic models in north-east Afar. The combination of seismic constraints suggests that small low temperature (<50K) upwellings may rise from a broader low velocity plume-like feature in the lower mantle. This interpretation is supported by numerical and analogue experiments that suggest the 660km phase change and viscosity jump may impede flow from the lower to upper mantle creating a thermal boundary layer at the base of the transition zone. This allows smaller, secondary upwellings to initiate and rise to the surface. These, combined with possible evidence of melt above the 410 discontinuity can explain the seismic velocity models. Our images of secondary upwellings suggest that

  12. Annular core liquid-salt cooled reactor with multiple fuel and blanket zones

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Per F.

    2013-05-14

    A liquid fluoride salt cooled, high temperature reactor having a reactor vessel with a pebble-bed reactor core. The reactor core comprises a pebble injection inlet located at a bottom end of the reactor core and a pebble defueling outlet located at a top end of the reactor core, an inner reflector, outer reflector, and an annular pebble-bed region disposed in between the inner reflector and outer reflector. The annular pebble-bed region comprises an annular channel configured for receiving pebble fuel at the pebble injection inlet, the pebble fuel comprising a combination of seed and blanket pebbles having a density lower than the coolant such that the pebbles have positive buoyancy and migrate upward in said annular pebble-bed region toward the defueling outlet. The annular pebble-bed region comprises alternating radial layers of seed pebbles and blanket pebbles.

  13. Ocean acidification in the coastal zone from an organism's perspective: multiple system parameters, frequency domains, and habitats.

    PubMed

    Waldbusser, George G; Salisbury, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    Multiple natural and anthropogenic processes alter the carbonate chemistry of the coastal zone in ways that either exacerbate or mitigate ocean acidification effects. Freshwater inputs and multiple acid-base reactions change carbonate chemistry conditions, sometimes synergistically. The shallow nature of these systems results in strong benthic-pelagic coupling, and marine invertebrates at different life history stages rely on both benthic and pelagic habitats. Carbonate chemistry in coastal systems can be highly variable, responding to processes with temporal modes ranging from seconds to centuries. Identifying scales of variability relevant to levels of biological organization requires a fuller characterization of both the frequency and magnitude domains of processes contributing to or reducing acidification in pelagic and benthic habitats. We review the processes that contribute to coastal acidification with attention to timescales of variability and habitats relevant to marine bivalves. PMID:23987912

  14. International aircrew sleep and wakefulness after multiple time zone flights - A cooperative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graeber, R. Curtis; Lauber, John K.; Connell, Linda J.; Gander, Philippa H.

    1986-01-01

    An international research team has carried out an electroencephalographic study of sleep and wakefulness in flight crews operating long-haul routes across seven or eight time zones. Following baseline recordings, volunteer crews (n = 56) from four airlines spent their first outbound layover at a sleep laboratory. This paper provides an overview of the project's history, its research design, and the standardization of procedures. The overall results are remarkably consistent among the four participating laboratories and strongly support the feasibility of cooperative international sleep research in the operational arena.

  15. Injection of colloidal size particles of Fe{sup 0} in porous media with shearthinning fluids as a method to emplace a permeable reactive zone

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.; Gilmore, T.J.

    1997-12-31

    Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of injecting suspensions of micron-size zero-valent (FeO) particles into porous media as a method to emplace a permeable reactive zone. Further studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of several shearthinning fluids on enhancing the injectability of micron-size FeO particles into porous media. In contrast to Newtonian fluids, whose viscosities are constant with shear rate, certain non-Newtonian fluids are shearthinning, that is, the viscosity of these fluids decreases with increasing shear rate. The primary benefit of using these fluids for this application is that they increase the viscosity of the aqueous phase without adversely decreasing the hydraulic conductivity. A suspension formulated with a shearthinning fluid will maintain a relatively high viscosity in solution near the FeO particles (where the shear stress is low) relative to locations near the surfaces of the porous media, where the shear stress is high. The increased viscosity decreases the rate of gravitational settling of the dense FeO colloids (7.6 9/cm3) while maintaining a relatively high hydraulic conductivity that permits pumping the colloid suspensions into porous media at greater flowrates and distances. Aqueous solutions of three polymers at different concentrations were investigated. It was determined that, the use of shear thinning fluids greatly increases the injectability of the colloidal FeO suspensions in porous media.

  16. Phylogeography and demographic history of Lacerta lepida in the Iberian Peninsula: multiple refugia, range expansions and secondary contact zones

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Iberian Peninsula is recognized as an important refugial area for species survival and diversification during the climatic cycles of the Quaternary. Recent phylogeographic studies have revealed Iberia as a complex of multiple refugia. However, most of these studies have focused either on species with narrow distributions within the region or species groups that, although widely distributed, generally have a genetic structure that relates to pre-Quaternary cladogenetic events. In this study we undertake a detailed phylogeographic analysis of the lizard species, Lacerta lepida, whose distribution encompasses the entire Iberian Peninsula. We attempt to identify refugial areas, recolonization routes, zones of secondary contact and date demographic events within this species. Results Results support the existence of 6 evolutionary lineages (phylogroups) with a strong association between genetic variation and geography, suggesting a history of allopatric divergence in different refugia. Diversification within phylogroups is concordant with the onset of the Pleistocene climatic oscillations. The southern regions of several phylogroups show a high incidence of ancestral alleles in contrast with high incidence of recently derived alleles in northern regions. All phylogroups show signs of recent demographic and spatial expansions. We have further identified several zones of secondary contact, with divergent mitochondrial haplotypes occurring in narrow zones of sympatry. Conclusions The concordant patterns of spatial and demographic expansions detected within phylogroups, together with the high incidence of ancestral haplotypes in southern regions of several phylogroups, suggests a pattern of contraction of populations into southern refugia during adverse climatic conditions from which subsequent northern expansions occurred. This study supports the emergent pattern of multiple refugia within Iberia but adds to it by identifying a pattern of refugia coincident

  17. Multiple Looser zones of osteomalacia in Byler disease with associated vitamin D deficiency, phosphaturia, and elevated FGF23

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, M.; Ellanti, P.; McKenna, M.J.; Kilbane, M.; McCormick, P.A.; Hurson, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Byler disease (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis) is associated metabolic bone disease as a consequence of chronic malabsorption. Case presentation A 33-year-old man with decompensated liver disease secondary to Byler disease was referred to the orthopaedic department with progressive pain over this right proximal tibia. On examination, he had an antalgic gait. Tenderness was localised to the proximal tibia just distal to the tibial tubercle and bilateral foot swelling. Radiographs showed multiple stress fractures characteristic of Looser zones at various stages of healing in both tibia, metatarsals (third, fourth, and fifth on the right side, and second and fourth on the left) and left femur. Bone mineral density was extremely low. Subsequent investigations were consistent with severe osteomalacia due to a combination of vitamin D deficiency and phosphaturia with elevated fibroblast factor 23 (FGF23). A good clinical response was achieved following supplementation with calcium 1000 mg and vitamin D 20 μg daily. Discussion Stress fractures are often associated with delay in diagnosis. Our patient presented to the orthopaedic service with multiple Looser zones that had not been previously detected. As expected, there was biochemical evidence of vitamin D deficiency. An unexpected finding was phosphaturia that was associated with marked elevation in FGF23, which has never been reported previously. Conclusion Byler disease may result in Looser zones of osteomalacia due to chronic malabsorption. Renal phosphorus wasting as a consequence of unexplained marked elevation in FGF23 is thought to have contributed to the onset of osteomalacia. PMID:26771453

  18. Daclizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... injections. Before you use daclizumab yourself the first time, read the written instructions that come with it. ...

  19. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of disability in patients with certain forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Mitoxantrone injection is also used together with steroid ... a class of medications called anthracenediones. Mitoxantrone treats MS by stopping certain cells of the immune system ...

  20. Liraglutide in people treated for type 2 diabetes with multiple daily insulin injections: randomised clinical trial (MDI Liraglutide trial)

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Irl B; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Dahlqvist, Sofia; Ahrén, Bo; Torffvit, Ole; Attvall, Stig; Ekelund, Magnus; Filipsson, Karin; Tengmark, Bengt-Olov; Sjöberg, Stefan; Pehrsson, Nils-Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Study question What are the effects of liraglutide, an incretin based treatment, on glycaemic control in people with type 2 diabetes treated with multiple daily insulin injections? Methods The study was a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial with a parallel group design carried out at 13 hospital based outpatient clinics and one primary care unit in Sweden. Patients were considered eligible for inclusion if they had type 2 diabetes and inadequate glycaemic control (HbA1c concentrations ≥58 mmol/mol (7.5%) and ≤102 mmol/mol (11.5%)), a body mass index of 27.5-45 kg/m2, and required multiple daily insulin injections. Overall, 124 participants were randomised 1:1 to subcutaneous liraglutide or placebo by minimisation allocation. The main outcome measure was change in HbA1c level from baseline to week 24. Study answer and limitations Liraglutide was associated with a significant reduction of 16.9 mmol/mol (1.5%) in HbA1c versus 4.6 mmol/mol (0.4%) for placebo, difference −12.3 mmol/mol (95% confidence interval −15.8 to −8.8 mmol/mol; −1.13%, −1.45 to −0.81 mmol/mol). Body weight was significantly reduced in participants in the liraglutide compared with placebo group (3.8 v 0.0 kg, difference −3.8, −4.9 to −2.8 kg), and total daily insulin doses were significantly reduced, by 18.1 units and 2.3 units (difference −15.8, −23.1 to −8.5 units). Reductions in mean and standard deviation of glucose levels estimated by masked continuous glucose monitoring were significantly greater in the liraglutide group than placebo group (−1.9 and −0.5 mmol/L). Neither group experienced severe hypoglycaemic events nor were there any significant differences in symptomatic or asymptomatic non-severe hypoglycaemia (<4.0 or <3.0 mmol/L). The mean number of non-severe symptomatic hypoglycaemic events (<4.0 mmol/L) during follow-up was 1.29 in the liraglutide group and 1.24 in the placebo group (P=0.96). One of the study’s limitations was its

  1. Using Oil and Gas Well Log Records to Understand Possible Connections Between Wastewater Injection Zones and Usable Groundwater Aquifers in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimabukuro, D.; Haugen, E. A.; Battistella, C.; Treguboff, E. W.; Kale, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Although the disposal of produced water in wastewater injection wells has been occurring in California for decades, it is not clear whether injected fluids may be migrating into usable groundwater aquifers. One problem is the poor characterization of federally-protected (<10,000 ppm TDS) water in the state. Another is the lack of publically-accessible information about the hydrological properties of confining strata adjacent to injection zones. In effort to better understand these two problems, we have begun studying the archived oil and gas well records collected by the California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR). These scanned records contain two useful sources of information. First, geophysical well logs, such those measuring resistivity and porosity, can be used to determine aquifer salinity. This allows a three-dimensional understanding of the distribution of protected groundwater. Second, driller's logs contain lithological descriptions at depth. These lithologies can be used to construct a three-dimensional texture model, which can then be used in a groundwater flow model. A large number of undergraduate researchers at CSU Sacramento and CSU Long Beach have been collecting information on well records in the Ventura Basin and the Southern San Joaquin Valley. Each well record is examined with basic metadata entered into an online database in an effort to identify appropriate geophysical well logs and driller's logs. High-quality driller's logs are coded and used to create three-dimensional framework models for each well field. The geophysical logs are digitized and will be used to determine aquifer salinity. In addition, we are using information from the DOGGR well records to investigate wellbore integrity, waste disposal and waterflood injection volumes, and the possibility of induced seismicity. This project is part of the broader effort of the California State Water Resources Control Board to implement Senate Bill 4.

  2. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismic moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.

  3. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismicmore » moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.« less

  4. Deep low-frequency earthquakes in tremor localize to the plate interface in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.R.; Beroza, G.C.; Ide, S.; Ohta, K.; Shelly, D.R.; Schwartz, S.Y.; Rabbel, W.; Thorwart, M.; Kao, H.

    2009-01-01

    Deep tremor under Shikoku, Japan, consists primarily, and perhaps entirely, of swarms of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as shear slip on the plate interface. Although tremor is observed at other plate boundaries, the lack of cataloged low-frequency earthquakes has precluded a similar conclusion about tremor in those locales. We use a network autocorrelation approach to detect and locate LFEs within tremor recorded at three subduction zones characterized by different thermal structures and levels of interplate seismicity: southwest Japan, northern Cascadia, and Costa Rica. In each case we find that LFEs are the primary constituent of tremor and that they locate on the deep continuation of the plate boundary. This suggests that tremor in these regions shares a common mechanism and that temperature is not the primary control on such activity. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Simulations of Convection Zone Flows and Measurements from Multiple Viewing Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L.; Hanasoge, Shravan

    2011-01-01

    A deep-focusing time-distance measurement technique has been applied to linear acoustic simulations of a solar interior perturbed by convective flows. The simulations are for the full sphere for r/R greater than 0.2. From these it is straightforward to simulate the observations from different viewing angles and to test how multiple viewing angles enhance detectibility. Some initial results will be presented.

  6. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... age; episodes of symptoms in people who have multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which the nerves do ... When corticotropin repository injection is used to treat multiple sclerosis, it is usually injected once a day for ...

  7. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  8. Multiple mafic and felsic magma interaction as exhibited in the Dartmouth Pluton, Avalon zone, southeastern Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamidzada, N.A.; Hermes, O.D.; Murray, D.P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Dioritic to quartz monzonitic rocks of the Dartmouth Pluton exhibit excellently preserved, diverse features produced by mingling and mixing of mafic and felsic magma during multiple events. The related mafic and hybridized intermediate composition rocks occur both as discrete outcrop-sized masses or as enclaves within quartz monzonite or early-stage mixed rocks. Enclaves are rounded, lack chilled margins, and in some cases exhibit cuspate margins; they range in size from 1m--<1cm. Outcrops dominated by dioritic rock consist of well developed mafic pillows with inter-pillow infillings of hybridized rock that had been subjected to magma mixing during or prior to the final mingling process. Dioritic rocks are fine-grained with sparse plagioclase phenocrysts; they contain small, darker-colored enclaves indicative of preceding magma interaction. Major and trace element variation diagrams for this suite of rocks exhibit general linear trends consistent with mixing processes. Overall, field, petrographic, and geochemical relationships in the Dartmouth Pluton demonstrate: (1) widespread mingling of mafic and felsic magma, (2) variable degrees of mafic and felsic magma mixing, and (3) multiple and repeated episodes of mafic and felsic magma interaction. Significantly, some spatially associated dioritic and granitic rocks, including a 595 Ma alkali feldspar granite formerly considered to be part of the Dartmount Pluton, are geochemically related. Field mapping demonstrates that rocks of the mixed suite are intrusive into these rocks, thus establishing a maximum age, but raising the questions that the suite may be considerably younger.

  9. Surface analysis of diffusion zones in multiple chemical vapor deposition coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.L.; Salvati, L. Jr.; Sundberg, G.; Greenhut, V.

    1985-11-01

    In this investigation, a multilayer carbide coated cutting tool was examined. The cutting tool was produced through the sequential chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of TaC, TiC, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and TiN layers over a WC/Co substrate. The purpose of this study was to characterize the interdiffusion of materials at each of the interfacial regions as a function of deposition conditions. To accomplish this, several surface analysis techniques were used including scanning Auger microscopy (SAM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small spot x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The samples were prepared using a modified lapping technique. The lapping angle used was approx. 0.25/sup 0/, which yielded at least a 250 x expansion of the interfacial regions. This allowed interface characterization without instrumental resolution limitations. Scanning AES and small spot XPS were performed on interfaces to investigate interface chemistry and interdiffusion. Argon sputter depth profiling was also used to further characterize diffusion zone composition and dimension.

  10. Efficacy of fingolimod is superior to injectable disease modifying therapies in second-line therapy of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Braune, Stefan; Lang, M; Bergmann, A

    2016-02-01

    Although fingolimod is registered in Europe for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) if earlier disease modifying therapy (DMT) has failed, no data regarding its efficacy in this patient group are available. This observational cohort study of the NeuroTransData network includes German RRMS outpatients with failure of earlier therapy with injectable DMT (iDMT), therefore switching to either another iDMT (n = 133) or to fingolimod (n = 300). Statistical comparison of clinical baseline characteristics showed more severely affected patients in the fingolimod group. A propensity-score matched group comparison was performed (n = 99 in each group) covering more than 2-year observation time. Fingolimod showed statistically significant superior efficacy in comparison to iDMT regarding annualized relapse rate (0.21 versus 0.33 per year), time-to-relapse and likelihood of relapse (iDMT hazard ratio 1.7), proportion and likelihood of patients with EDSS progression (15.10 versus 31.00%; iDMT hazard ratio 1.7), persistence on medication and likelihood of discontinuation (iDMT hazard ratio 3.0). Significantly more patients were free of relapse and EDSS progression with fingolimod than with their second iDMT (64.4 versus 46.5%, p < 0.03). This real-life evidence in German RRMS outpatients support data from controlled clinical studies and can quantitatively support clinical decision finding processes if iDMT therapy fails in RRMS. PMID:26645389

  11. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250 nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2014-08-01

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al0.7Ga0.3N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250 nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246 nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235 nm and 263 nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234 nm with 14.5 μW integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2 A/cm2.

  12. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250 nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mehnke, Frank Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim; Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2014-08-04

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250 nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246 nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235 nm and 263 nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234 nm with 14.5 μW integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2 A/cm{sup 2}.

  13. The role of multiple-point statistics and model selection in quantitative hydrogeophysical studies of the critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, N.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical data are routinely used to provide qualitative insights about the main lithologies and the distribution of soil moisture in the critical zone. Quantitative hydrogeophysical inferences of critical zone properties and processes are much more challenging because of the multitude of interacting physical, biological and chemical gradients that may affect the geophysical measurement response. In this context, it is essential to incorporate the geophysical data within a wider modeling framework that centers on a conceptual model that describes the properties and processes under study together with appropriate boundary conditions. Based on recent groundwater applications, I describe how it is now possible to build geologically meaningful realizations of subsurface structure using multiple-point statistics (MPS) and to make uncertainty estimates. I will demonstrate conditioning of MPS simulations to geophysical tomograms, inclusion of summary statistics derived from MPS simulations within a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion, and full MPS MCMC inversion based on fast (speed-up of 40 times) model proposal algorithms that we have adapted from computer vision. For future applications in the critical zone, I suggest that MPS simulations should be used to derive and perturb primary lithological properties and that biological, chemical, and hydrological state variables (given appropriate boundary conditions) are subsequently simulated using domain-specific algorithms. The geophysical data (an individual snap shot or time-series) are then used to guide the model update of the primary properties (and nuisance parameters such as petrophysical parameters) that in turn influence the predicted state variables and their associated fluxes. Instead of classical parameter estimation, I argue that it is often more appropriate to focus on model selection, in which alternative conceptual models of the subsurface are compared and ranked given the available data.

  14. Multiple-code benchmark simulation study of coupled THMC processesin the excavation disturbed zone associated with geological nuclear wasterepositories

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Feng, X-T.; Hudson, J.; Jing, L.; Kobayashi, A.; Koyama, T.; Pan, P-Z.; Lee, H-S.; Rinne, M.; Sonnenthal, E.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-05-10

    An international, multiple-code benchmark test (BMT) studyis being conducted within the international DECOVALEX project to analysecoupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processesin the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around emplacement drifts of anuclear waste repository. This BMT focuses on mechanical responses andlong-term chemo-mechanical effects that may lead to changes in mechanicaland hydrological properties in the EDZ. This includes time-de-pendentprocesses such as creep, and subcritical crack, or healing of fracturesthat might cause "weakening" or "hardening" of the rock over the longterm. Five research teams are studying this BMT using a wide range ofmodel approaches, including boundary element, finite element, and finitedifference, particle mechanics, and elasto-plastic cellular automatamethods. This paper describes the definition of the problem andpreliminary simulation results for the initial model inception part, inwhich time dependent effects are not yet included.

  15. Functional traits drive the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition among multiple arid-zone species

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xu; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Ye, Xue-Hua; Cornwell, William K.; Prinzing, Andreas; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H.C.

    2015-01-01

    In arid zones, strong solar radiation has important consequences for ecosystem processes. To better understand carbon and nutrient dynamics, it is important to know the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition of different arid-zone species. Here we investigated: (1) whether such contribution varies among plant species at given irradiance regime, (2) whether interspecific variation in such contribution correlates with interspecific variation in the decomposition rate under shade; and (3) whether this correlation can be explained by leaf traits. We conducted a factorial experiment to determine the effects of solar radiation and environmental moisture for the mass loss and the decomposition constant k-values of 13 species litters collected in Northern China. The contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition varied significantly among species. Solar radiation accelerated decomposition in particular in the species that already decompose quickly under shade. Functional traits, notably specific leaf area, might predict the interspecific variation in that contribution. Our results provide the first empirical evidence for how the effect of solar radiation on decomposition varies among multiple species. Thus, the effect of solar radiation on the carbon flux between biosphere and atmosphere may depend on the species composition of the vegetation. PMID:26282711

  16. Functional traits drive the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition among multiple arid-zone species.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xu; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Ye, Xue-Hua; Cornwell, William K; Prinzing, Andreas; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2015-01-01

    In arid zones, strong solar radiation has important consequences for ecosystem processes. To better understand carbon and nutrient dynamics, it is important to know the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition of different arid-zone species. Here we investigated: (1) whether such contribution varies among plant species at given irradiance regime, (2) whether interspecific variation in such contribution correlates with interspecific variation in the decomposition rate under shade; and (3) whether this correlation can be explained by leaf traits. We conducted a factorial experiment to determine the effects of solar radiation and environmental moisture for the mass loss and the decomposition constant k-values of 13 species litters collected in Northern China. The contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition varied significantly among species. Solar radiation accelerated decomposition in particular in the species that already decompose quickly under shade. Functional traits, notably specific leaf area, might predict the interspecific variation in that contribution. Our results provide the first empirical evidence for how the effect of solar radiation on decomposition varies among multiple species. Thus, the effect of solar radiation on the carbon flux between biosphere and atmosphere may depend on the species composition of the vegetation. PMID:26282711

  17. Structural evolution of fault zones in sandstone by multiple deformation mechanisms: Moab fault, southeast Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davatzes, N.C.; Eichhubl, P.; Aydin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Faults in sandstone are frequently composed of two classes of structures: (1) deformation bands and (2) joints and sheared joints. Whereas the former structures are associated with cataclastic deformation, the latter ones represent brittle fracturing, fragmentation, and brecciation. We investigated the distribution of these structures, their formation, and the underlying mechanical controls for their occurrence along the Moab normal fault in southeastern Utah through the use of structural mapping and numerical elastic boundary element modeling. We found that deformation bands occur everywhere along the fault, but with increased density in contractional relays. Joints and sheared joints only occur at intersections and extensional relays. In all locations , joints consistently overprint deformation bands. Localization of joints and sheared joints in extensional relays suggests that their distribution is controlled by local variations in stress state that are due to mechanical interaction between the fault segments. This interpretation is consistent with elastic boundary element models that predict a local reduction in mean stress and least compressive principal stress at intersections and extensional relays. The transition from deformation band to joint formation along these sections of the fault system likely resulted from the combined effects of changes in remote tectonic loading, burial depth, fluid pressure, and rock properties. In the case of the Moab fault, we conclude that the structural heterogeneity in the fault zone is systematically related to the geometric evolution of the fault, the local state of stress associated with fault slip , and the remote loading history. Because the type and distribution of structures affect fault permeability and strength, our results predict systematic variations in these parameters with fault evolution. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  18. Surface-Wave Multiple-Event Relocation and Detection of Earthquakes along the Romanche Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, M.; Ammon, C. J.; VanDeMark, T. F.

    2011-12-01

    The Romanche Transform system, located along the equatorial Mid-Atlantic Ridge, is approximately 900 km in length and separates plates moving with a relative plate speed of three cm/yr. We use cross-correlation of globally recorded Rayleigh waves to estimate precise relative epicentroids of moderate-size earthquakes along the Romanche Fracture Zone system. The Romanche transform has an even distribution of large events along its entire length that provide a good base of events with excellent signal-to-noise observations. Two distinct moderate-magnitude event clusters occur along the eastern half of the transform and the region between the clusters hosted a large event in the last decade. Based on initial results (Van DeMark, 2006), unlike those of shorter transform systems, the events along the Romanche do not follow narrow features, the event clusters seem to spread perpendicular as well as laterally to the transform trend. These patterns are consistent with parallel, en echelon and/or braided fault systems, which have been previously observed on the Romanche through the use of side scanning sonar (Parson and Searle, 1986). We also explore the character and potential of seismic body waves to extend the method to help improve relative event depth estimates. Relying on a good base of larger and moderate-magnitude seismicity, we attempt to extend the analysis by processing continuous data streams through processes measuring waveform similarity (e.g. cross-correlation) in an attempt to detect smaller events using a subset of nearest seismic stations.

  19. Seismic‐wave attenuation determined from tectonic tremor in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yabe, Suguru; Baltay, Annemarie S.; Ide, Satoshi; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Tectonic tremor provides a new source of observations that can be used to constrain the seismic attenuation parameter for ground‐motion prediction and hazard mapping. Traditionally, recorded earthquakes of magnitude ∼3–8 are used to develop ground‐motion prediction equations; however, typical earthquake records may be sparse in areas of high hazard. In this study, we constrain the distance decay of seismic waves using measurements of the amplitude decay of tectonic tremor, which is plentiful in some regions. Tectonic tremor occurs in the frequency band of interest for ground‐motion prediction (i.e., ∼2–8  Hz) and is located on the subducting plate interface, at the lower boundary of where future large earthquakes are expected. We empirically fit the distance decay of peak ground velocity from tremor to determine the attenuation parameter in four subduction zones: Nankai, Japan; Cascadia, United States–Canada; Jalisco, Mexico; and southern Chile. With the large amount of data available from tremor, we show that in the upper plate, the lower crust is less attenuating than the upper crust. We apply the same analysis to intraslab events in Nankai and show the possibility that waves traveling from deeper intraslab events experience more attenuation than those from the shallower tremor due to ray paths that pass through the subducting and highly attenuating oceanic crust. This suggests that high pore‐fluid pressure is present in the tremor source region. These differences imply that the attenuation parameter determined from intraslab earthquakes may underestimate ground motion for future large earthquakes on the plate interface.

  20. Multiple transition zone seismic discontinuities and low velocity layers below western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauzin, B.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Wittlinger, G.; Ricard, Y.

    2013-05-01

    With P-to-S converted waves recorded at seismic stations of the U.S. Transportable Array, we image the fine structure of upper mantle and transition zone (TZ) beneath the western U.S. We map the topographies of seismic discontinuities by stacking data by common conversion points along profiles. Systematic depth and amplitude measurements are performed not only for the well-known "410" and "660" interfaces but also for minor seismic discontinuities identified around 350, 590, and 630 km depths. The amplitude of conversion suggests shear wave velocity (Vs) increase by 4% at the 410 and the 660. The observed 660 velocity contrast is smaller than expected from the 6% in IASP91 but consistent with a pyrolitic model of mantle composition. The Gorda plate, subducted under northern California, is tracked to the TZ where it seems to flatten and induce uplift of the 410 under northern Nevada. Maps of 410/660 amplitude/topography reveal that the TZ is anomalous beneath the geographical borders of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, with (1) a thickened TZ, (2) a sharp change in depth of the 660, (3) a reduced 410 conversion amplitude in the North, and (4) a positive "630" discontinuity. Such anomalous structure might be inherited from the past history of plate subduction/accretion. A thinned TZ under the Yellowstone suggests higher-than-average temperatures, perhaps due to a deep thermal plume. Both the "350" and the "590" negative discontinuities extend over very large areas. They might be related either to an increased water content in the TZ, a significant amount of oceanic material accumulated through the past 100 Myr, or both.

  1. The Dynamic Hyporheic Zone: Variability of Groundwater-Surface Water Exchange at Multiple Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A. M.; Dudley-Southern, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The pathways of exchange of surface water and groundwater can have a significant influence on the delivery of nutrient-rich groundwater to streams. Many studies have revealed how the spatial variability of physical properties (sediment permeability, bedform structures, etc.) at the interface of groundwater and surface water can impact on flow pathways and residence times of hyporheic exchange flow. Here we explore the temporal variability of flow pathways at this interface. We focus on observations made on a study reach of the River Leith, UK but also provide evidence of dynamic exchanges at a number of other study sites. Under baseflow conditions, the study reach of the River Leith shows a predominance of upwelling of groundwater to the river, and in some sections of the reach a significant groundwater discharge zone in evident. However, from observations of piezometric heads made over a two year study period, repeated reversal of flow direction was observed during storm events. By deploying novel miniature electrode sensors in the river bed we were able to monitor the migration of surface water during these events. Penetration of river water to depths of 30cm was observed during monitored events, which support the reported reversal of hydraulic gradients. We, therefore, observed event-driven hyporheic exchange flow. The duration and frequency of such events may have significant impact on the biogeochemistry of shallow river bed sediments within this reach. Furthermore, temporal variability of exchange is not limited to such events: changes in regional groundwater flow pathways over longer time scales may have a significant impact on the location of localised upwelling; at much shorter timescales we see evidence of diurnal fluctuations in hydraulic heads due to evapotranspiration processes. We report on similar observations at companion study sites and discuss implications on the management of water quality in these groundwater fed systems.

  2. Cell-matrix adhesion characterization using multiple shear stress zones in single stepwise microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Ji; Doh, Il; Bae, Gab-Yong; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Cho, Young-Ho

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a cell chip capable to characterize cell-matrix adhesion by monitoring cell detachment rate. The proposed cell chip can supply multiple levels of shear stress in single stepwise microchannel. As epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), one of hallmarks of cancer metastasis is closely associated to the interaction with extracelluar matrix (ECM), we took advantage of two lung cancer cell models with different adhesion properties to ECM depending their epithelial or mesenchymal properties, including the pair of lung cancer cells with (A549sh) or without E-cadherin expression (A549sh-Ecad), which would be optimal model to examine the alteration of adhesion properties after EMT induction. The cell-matrix adhesion resisting to shear stress appeared to be remarkably differed between lung cancer cells. The detachment rate of epithelial-like H358 and mesenchymal-like H460 cells was 53%-80% and 25%-66% in the shear stress range of 34-60 dyn/cm2, respectively. A549sh-Ecad cells exhibits lower detachment rate (5%-9%) compared to A549sh cells (14%-40%). By direct comparison of adhesion between A549sh and A549sh-Ecad, we demonstrated that A549shE-cad to mimic EMT were more favorable to the ECM attachment under the various levels of shear stress. The present method can be applied to quantitative analysis of tumor cell-ECM adhesion.

  3. Minimizing systematic errors from atmospheric multiple scattering and satellite viewing geometry in coastal zone color scanner level IIA imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. L.; Perry, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    Water-leaving radiances and phytoplankton pigment concentrations are calculated from coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) radiance measurements by removing atmospheric Rayleigh and aerosol radiances from the total radiance signal measured at the satellite. The single greatest source of error in CZCS atmospheric correction algorithms in the assumption that these Rayleigh and aerosol radiances are separable. Multiple-scattering interactions between Rayleigh and aerosol components cause systematic errors in calculated aerosol radiances, and the magnitude of these errors is dependent on aerosol type and optical depth and on satellite viewing geometry. A technique was developed which extends the results of previous radiative transfer modeling by Gordon and Castano to predict the magnitude of these systematic errors for simulated CZCS orbital passes in which the ocean is viewed through a modeled, physically realistic atmosphere. The simulated image mathematically duplicates the exact satellite, Sun, and pixel locations of an actual CZCS image. Errors in the aerosol radiance at 443 nm are calculated for a range of aerosol optical depths. When pixels in the simulated image exceed an error threshhold, the corresponding pixels in the actual CZCS image are flagged and excluded from further analysis or from use in image compositing or compilation of pigment concentration databases. Studies based on time series analyses or compositing of CZCS imagery which do not address Rayleigh-aerosol multiple scattering should be interpreted cautiously, since the fundamental assumption used in their atmospheric correction algorithm is flawed.

  4. [Pharmacokinetics and safety of aripiprazole long-acting injection, following multiple deltoid administrations in schizophrenia patients in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ishigooka, Jun; Noda, Takamasa; Nishiyama, Kosuke; Tamaru, Noriko; Shima, Tomoko; Yamasaki, Yumiko; Tadori, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    Aripiprazole once-monthly (AOM) was previously approved for treatment of schizophrenia as monthly injections in the gluteal muscle. The deltoid muscle provides a more accessible injection site. The present study was conducted in Japanese schizophrenia patients as a 24-week, open-label trial that assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of 5 sequential doses of AOM 400 mg (AOM 400) once every 4 weeks administered in the deltoid muscle. Patients treated with an oral atypical antipsychotic (other than aripiprazole) continued to receive their pre-study medication up to 14 days after the first AOM 400 injection. The completion rate was 76.5% (n = 13/17). Mean aripiprazole plasma C(min) almost reached steady-state by the fourth AOM 400 injection. After the fifth AOM 400 injection, mean aripiprazole AUC(28d), C(max) and C(min) were 165 μg x h/ml, 331 ng/ml and 201 ng/ml, respectively, which were similar to previously published pharmacokinetic parameters after the fifth gluteal injection of AOM 400. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE) was injection site pain (35.3%). Most TEAEs were classified as mild in intensity. In conclusion, the deltoid injection of AOM can be considered an alternative route of administration, as deltoid and gluteal injections are interchangeable in terms of aripiprazole plasma concentrations, with no additional safety issues. PMID:27506082

  5. Multiple Daily Injections OR Insulin Pump Therapy: Choosing the Best Option for Your Patient-An Evidence-based Approach.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mamta; Choudhary, Pratik

    2015-10-01

    Achieving optimal glucose control with minimal hypoglycemia and minimizing the impact of diabetes on quality of life are the aims of management of type 1 diabetes. The main therapeutic options for patients include multiple daily injections (MDI) and continuous subcutaneous insulin therapy (CSII). It is important to differentiate fixed dose MDI with more flexible use, based on carbohydrate counting and structured education programmes, often termed functional insulin therapy (FIT), shown to deliver better outcomes. A significant proportion of patients can achieve optimal glucose control with either therapy, and for those who are unable to achieve desired glucose control with MDI, there is a large body of observational data showing CSII enables them to reduce HbA1c and hypoglycemia, with associated improvements in diabetes-related quality of life. However, in many healthcare systems, guidelines restrict the use of CSII on the basis of cost, with only 20-35 % of patients with type 1 diabetes across Europe using CSII. Although data support improved glucose control and quality of life with CSII, we must recognize that insulin pump therapy is not for everyone and has some downsides such as being attached to a device or issues with cannulas. When we sit down with our patients, we have a responsibility to support those patients with the therapeutic strategy that is best suited to them. In this paper, we review some of the literature that informs this decision-making, highlighting areas where CSII offers clear benefits and also some areas where it may not be appropriate. PMID:26338287

  6. Comparison of Whole-stream and Hyporheic-zone Estimates of Denitrification Determined Simultaneously During an Isotope Tracer Injection in a Nitrate-Rich Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Bohlke, J. K.; Voytek, M. A.

    2005-05-01

    15N labeled nitrate is increasingly being used as a reactive tracer in stream tracer tests to estimate whole-stream denitrification averaged at a spatial scale large enough to allow comparisons across disparate stream ecosystems. No matter how valuable, these whole-stream estimates are not very informative about controlling processes and will have limited transfer value unless processes controlling denitrification are investigated simultaneously at finer scales. Insights about the processes that influence the whole-stream rates could be especially informative if simultaneous rate measurements are made representing variable hydrologic and biogeochemical conditions near reactive surfaces in the stream and in the streambed. Our approach was to investigate factors that control denitrification by simultaneously measuring denitrification in-situ in a variety of streambed environments by sampling evolution of the (15NO3-) tracer during transport through shallow hyporheic flow paths. Here we report results from two tracer studies conducted in Sugar Creek, western Indiana, in a basin dominated by corn and soybean agriculture. The two tracer experiments were conducted in September 2001 and September 2003, when streamflows (40 and 20 L s-1) and stream NO3- concentrations (70 and 175 μmoles L-1) in the two reaches were near their annual minimum values. The experiments involved co-injection of conservative (Br), reactive (15NO3-), and dissolved gas (SF6) tracers into streamflow allowing quantification of advection, dispersion, gas evasion, hydrologic retention in "storage" zones, and also allowing in-situ estimation of denitrification within selected hyporheic flow paths. The experiments resulted in estimates of both whole-stream and hyporheic-zone rates of denitrification and related nitrogen reactions. The streambed of Sugar Creek is covered in most areas with a relatively thin layer (ranging from <1 to 3 cm) of fine granular and organic sediment and periphyton, overlying a

  7. Quartz and feldspar zoning in the eastern Erzgebirge volcano-plutonic complex (Germany, Czech Republic): evidence of multiple magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Axel; Breiter, Karel; Seltmann, Reimar; Pécskay, Zoltán

    2005-03-01

    Zoned quartz and feldspar phenocrysts of the Upper Carboniferous eastern Erzgebirge volcano-plutonic complex were studied by cathodoluminescence and minor and trace element profiling. The results verify the suitability of quartz and feldspar phenocrysts as recorders of differentiation trends, magma mixing and recharge events, and suggest that much heterogeneity in plutonic systems may be overlooked on a whole-rock scale. Multiple resorption surfaces and zones, element concentration steps in zoned quartz (Ti) and feldspar phenocrysts (anorthite content, Ba, Sr), and plagioclase-mantled K-feldspars etc. indicate mixing of silicic magma with a more mafic magma for several magmatic phases of the eastern Erzgebirge volcano-plutonic complex. Generally, feldspar appears to be sensitive to the physicochemical changes of the melt, whereas quartz phenocrysts are more stable and can survive a longer period of evolution and final effusion of silicic magmas. The regional distribution of mixing-compatible textures suggests that magma mingling and mixing was a major process in the evolution of these late-Variscan granites and associated volcanic rocks. Quartz phenocrysts from 14 magmatic phases of the eastern Erzgebirge volcano-plutonic complex provide information on the relative timing of different mixing processes, storage and recharge, allowing a model for the distribution of magma reservoirs in space and time. At least two levels of magma storage are envisioned: deep reservoirs between 24 and 17 km (the crystallisation level of quartz phenocrysts) and subvolcanic reservoirs between 13 and 6 km. Deflation of the shallow reservoirs during the extrusion of the Teplice rhyolites triggered the formation of the Altenberg-Teplice caldera above the eastern Erzgebirge volcano-plutonic complex. The deep magma reservoir of the Teplice rhyolite also has a genetic relationship to the younger mineralised A-type granites, as indicated by quartz phenocryst populations. The pre

  8. Intravitreal injection

    MedlinePlus

    Retinal vein occlusion-intravitreal injection; Triamcinolone-intravitreal injection; Dexamethasone-intravitreal injection; Lucentis-intravitreal injection; Avastin-intravitreal injection; Bevacizumab-intravitreal injection; Ranibizumab- ...

  9. 40 CFR 146.88 - Injection well operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., the owner or operator must ensure that injection pressure does not exceed 90 percent of the fracture pressure of the injection zone(s) so as to ensure that the injection does not initiate new fractures or propagate existing fractures in the injection zone(s). In no case may injection pressure initiate...

  10. 40 CFR 146.88 - Injection well operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., the owner or operator must ensure that injection pressure does not exceed 90 percent of the fracture pressure of the injection zone(s) so as to ensure that the injection does not initiate new fractures or propagate existing fractures in the injection zone(s). In no case may injection pressure initiate...

  11. 40 CFR 146.88 - Injection well operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., the owner or operator must ensure that injection pressure does not exceed 90 percent of the fracture pressure of the injection zone(s) so as to ensure that the injection does not initiate new fractures or propagate existing fractures in the injection zone(s). In no case may injection pressure initiate...

  12. 40 CFR 146.88 - Injection well operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., the owner or operator must ensure that injection pressure does not exceed 90 percent of the fracture pressure of the injection zone(s) so as to ensure that the injection does not initiate new fractures or propagate existing fractures in the injection zone(s). In no case may injection pressure initiate...

  13. Off-fault shear failure potential enhanced by high-stiff/low-permeable damage zone during fluid injection in porous reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohmer, J.; Nguyen, T. K.; Torabi, A.

    2015-09-01

    Several studies have focused on the role of damage zone (DZ) on the hydromechanical behaviour of faults by assuming a fractured DZ (i.e. low stiffness/high permeability). Yet, this vision may not be valid in all geological settings, in particular, in high-porosity reservoirs as targeted by several underground exploitations. We investigate the impact of a high-stiff/low-permeable DZ on the shear reactivation of a blind, undetectable normal fault (1 km long, ≤10 m offset), with a 0.5 m thick low-porosity/permeability fault core during fluid injection into a high-porosity reservoir. The spatial distribution of effective properties (elastic moduli, Biot's coefficients and permeability) of DZ including deformation bands (DB; elliptic inclusions) and intact rock were derived using upscaling analytical expressions. The influence of DZ on the hydromechanical behaviour of the fault zone was numerically explored using 2-D plane-strain finite-element simulations within the framework of fully saturated isothermal porous media by accounting for an orthotropic elastic rheology. The numerical results showed that the presence of DB plays a protective role by reducing the potential for shear reactivation inside the fault core. On the other hand, they favour shear failure in the vicinity of the fault core (off-fault damage) by accelerating the decrease of the minimum principal effective stress while limiting the decrease of the maximum one. This behaviour is strongly enhanced by the fault-parallel DZ effective stiffness, but limited by the combined effect of fault-normal DZ effective permeability and of the Biot's coefficients. This can have implications for the location and size of aftershocks during fault reactivation.

  14. Performance of multiple mini-tube heat exchangers as an internal heat exchanger of a vapor-injection cycle heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jin Yong; Jeong, Ji Hwan

    2016-04-01

    A multiple mini-tube (MMT) heat exchanger was considered as an internal heat exchanger of vapor-injection cycle heat pump. Heat transfer and pressure drop in multiple mini-tube heat exchangers were numerically and experimentally investigated. Results show that the best performance of the MMT heat exchanger can be obtained when the intermediate-pressure two-phase refrigerant is supplied to the shell-side and this refrigerant reaches a saturated vapor state at the exit of the heat exchanger.

  15. V-Go Insulin Delivery System Versus Multiple Daily Insulin Injections for Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Winter, Abigail; Lintner, Michaela; Knezevich, Emily

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus affects over 29.1 million Americans, diagnosed and undiagnosed. Achieving and maintaining glycemic control for these patients is of extreme importance when working to prevent complications and improve quality of life for patients. The V-Go is a newly developed insulin delivery system. The push of a button inserts a needle into the patient once daily and remains attached for 24 hours. The V-Go is designed to release a set basal rate throughout the day, while allowing patients to provide up to 36 units of on-demand bolus insulin with the manual click of 2 buttons. It is a spring-loaded device filled daily with rapid-acting insulin that runs without the use of batteries or computer software. The main objective of this prospective active comparator study was to observe the A1C lowering effects of multiple daily insulin injections (MDII) versus the use of the V-Go insulin delivery system for patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus over a 3-month period. In addition, the effect on insulin requirement for these patients was assessed with secondary comparisons of weight, blood pressure, prevalence of hypoglycemic events, and quality of life before and after 3 months of intensified insulin therapy with regular monitoring by a clinical pharmacist at an internal medicine clinic. The average A1C lowering experienced by the 3 patients in the V-Go group was 1.5%, while the average A1C change in the 3 patients in the MDII group was an increase of 0.2%. All patients in the V-Go group experienced a decrease in insulin total daily dose (TDD), with an average decrease of 26.3 units. All patients in the MDII group experienced an increase in insulin TDD with an average of 15 units daily to achieve therapeutic goals individualized for each patient. All patients who underwent intensification of insulin therapy experienced an increase in subjective quality of life (QOL) as determined using the Diabetes-39 (D-39) questionnaire, though QOL results lacked

  16. Thinking science with thinking machines: The multiple realities of basic and applied knowledge in a research border zone.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Steve G

    2015-04-01

    Some scholars dismiss the distinction between basic and applied science as passé, yet substantive assumptions about this boundary remain obdurate in research policy, popular rhetoric, the sociology and philosophy of science, and, indeed, at the level of bench practice. In this article, I draw on a multiple ontology framework to provide a more stable affirmation of a constructivist position in science and technology studies that cannot be reduced to a matter of competing perspectives on a single reality. The analysis is grounded in ethnographic research in the border zone of Artificial Intelligence science. I translate in-situ moments in which members of neighboring but differently situated labs engage in three distinct repertoires that render the reality of basic and applied science: partitioning, flipping, and collapsing. While the essences of scientific objects are nowhere to be found, the boundary between basic and applied is neither illusion nor mere propaganda. Instead, distinctions among scientific knowledge are made real as a matter of course. PMID:26477207

  17. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip-based immunoassay with multiple reaction zones: Toward on-chip multiplex detection platform

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhaohui; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-09-20

    In this work, a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchip-based immuno-sensing platform with integrated pneumatic micro valves is described. The microchip was fabricated with multiple layer soft lithography technology. By controlling the activation status of corresponding valves, reagent flows in the microchannel network can be well manipulated so that immuno-reactions only take place at designated reaction zones (DRZs). Four DRZs are included in the prototype microchip. Since these DRZs are all isolated from each other by micro valves, cross contamination is prevented. Using the inner surface of the all-PDMS microchannel as immunoassay substrate, on-chip sandwich format solid phase immunoassay was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this immuno-sensing platform. Mouse IgG and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were used as the model analyte and the signal reporter respectively. Only 10 ul sample is needed for the assay and low detection limit of 5 ng/ml (≈33 pM) was achieved though low-cost polyclonal antibodies were used in our experiment for feasibility study only. The encouraging results from mouse IgG immunoassay proved the feasibility of our microchip design. With slight modification of the assay protocol, the same chip design can be used for multi-target detection and can provide a simple, cost-effective and integrated microchip solution for multiplex immunoassay applications.

  18. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  19. On-Line Organic Solvent Field Enhanced Sample Injection in Capillary Zone Electrophoresis for Analysis of Quetiapine in Beagle Dog Plasma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuqing; Wen, Jun; Zhou, Tingting; Fan, Guorong

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method with field enhanced sample injection (FESI) was developed and validated for the determination of quetiapine fumarate in beagle dog plasma, with a sample pretreatment by LLE in 96-well deep format plate. The optimum separation was carried out in an uncoated 31.2 cm × 75 μm fused-silica capillary with an applied voltage of 13 kV. The electrophoretic analysis was performed by 50 mM phosphate at pH 2.5. The detection wavelength was 210 nm. Under these optimized conditions, FESI with acetonitrile enhanced the sensitivity of quetiapine about 40-50 folds in total. The method was suitably validated with respect to stability, specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation, accuracy, precision and extraction recovery. Using mirtazapine as an internal standard (100 ng/mL), the response of quetiapine was linear over the range of 1-1000 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification was 1 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precisions for the assay were within 4.8% and 12.7%, respectively. The method represents the first application of FESI-CZE to the analysis of quetiapine fumarate in beagle dog plasma after oral administration. PMID:26805796

  20. Quantitative determination of the β-methyl carbapenem doripenem in powder for injection by a stability-indicating capillary zone electrophoresis method.

    PubMed

    Paliosa, P K; Garcia, C V; Schapoval, E E S; Mendez, A S L; Steppe, M

    2015-09-01

    A capillary zone electrophoresis method for quantitative determination of doripenem in synthetic matrix was developed. The stability-indicating capability was performed applying stress testing protocols. The selected analytical conditions include 100 mM sodium borate buffer (pH 8.0) as run electrolyte, voltage of +15 kV, hydrodynamic injection of 5s (50 mBar), detection at 298 nm and temperature of analysis of 25 degrees C. The electrophoretic separation was carried out in a fused silica capillary (effective length 40 cm, 50 μm i.d.), using procainamide hydrochloride as internal standard. The proposed method showed quickness and reproducibility, with an analytical run in a total time of 5 min. The percentage of drug amount estimated was 101.33% (RSD = 0.80), with satisfactory intra-day and inter-day precision. In the recovery test, the method was found to be reliable and accurate in the drug quantitation (mean recovery = 101.86%). The robustness was performed applying the Plackett-Burman experimental design which confirmed the assay reliability. Based on results from forced degradation study, the stability-indicating capability was established, being observed a major degradation in alkaline, photolytic and thermal conditions. In comparison to HPLC method previously developed, the proposed capillary electrophoresis assay is statistically equivalent. PMID:26492640

  1. Groundwater Hydrology and Chemistry in and near an Emulsified Vegetable-Oil Injection Zone, Solid Waste Management Unit 17, Naval Weapons Station Charleston, North Charleston, South Carolina, 2004-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Petkewich, Matthew D.; Lowery, Mark A.; Conlon, Kevin J.; Casey, Clifton C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast investigated the hydrology and groundwater chemistry in the vicinity of an emulsified vegetable-oil injection zone at Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 17, Naval Weapons Station Charleston, North Charleston, South Carolina. In May 2004, Solutions-IES initiated a Phase-I pilot-scale treatability study at SWMU17 involving the injection of an edible oil emulsion into the aquifer near wells 17PS-01, 17PS-02, and 17PS-03 to treat chlorinated solvents. The Phase-I injection of emulsified vegetable oil resulted in dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), but the dechlorination activity appeared to stall at cDCE, with little further dechlorination of cDCE to vinyl chloride (VC) or to ethene. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the groundwater hydrology and chemistry in and near the injection zone to gain a better understanding of the apparent remediation stall. It is unlikely that the remediation stall was due to the lack of an appropriate microbial community because groundwater samples showed the presence of Dehalococcoides species (sp.) and suitable enyzmes. The probable causes of the stall were heterogeneous distribution of the injectate and development of low-pH conditions in the injection area. Because groundwater pH values in the injection area were below the range considered optimum for dechlorination activity, a series of tests was done to examine the effect on dechlorination of increasing the pH within well 17PS-02. During and following the in-well pH-adjustment tests, VC concentrations gradually increased in some wells in the injection zone that were not part of the in-well pH-adjustment tests. These data possibly reflect a gradual microbial acclimation to the low-pH conditions produced by the injection. In contrast, a distinct increase in VC concentration was observed in well 17PS-02 following the in-well pH increase. Adjustment

  2. Experimental investigation on the effect of liquid injection by multiple orifices in the formation of droplets in a Venturi scrubber.

    PubMed

    Guerra, V G; Gonçalves, J A S; Coury, J R

    2009-01-15

    Venturi scrubbers are widely utilized in gas cleaning. The cleansing elements in these scrubbers are droplets formed from the atomization of a liquid into a dust-laden gas. In industrial scrubbers, this liquid is injected through several orifices so that the cloud of droplets can be evenly distributed throughout the duct. The interaction between droplets when injected through many orifices, where opposite clouds of atomized liquid can reach each other, is to be expected. This work presents experimental measurements of droplet size measured in situ and the evidence of cloud interaction within a Venturi scrubber operating with multi-orifice jet injection. The influence of gas velocity, liquid flow rate and droplet size variation in the axial position after the point of the injection of the liquid were also evaluated for the different injection configurations. The experimental results showed that an increase in the liquid flow rate generated greater interaction between jets. The number of orifices had a significant influence on droplet size. In general, the increase in the velocity of the liquid jet and in the gas velocity favored the atomization process by reducing the size of the droplets. PMID:18462874

  3. Architectural Characteristics and Distribution of Hydromechanical Properties within a Small Strike-Slip Fault Zone in a Carbonates Reservoir: Impact on fault stability, induced seismicity, and leakage during CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanne, P.; Cappa, F.; Guglielmi, Y.; Rinaldi, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Within the LSBB National Underground Research Laboratory (France), we performed an in situ multidisciplinary and multi-scale analysis of a small fault zone intersecting a layered carbonates reservoir. The study area is located in a gallery at 250 m depth in the unsaturated and unaltered zone of the reservoir. In order to study the distribution of the fault zone properties, we took advantage of the gallery wall and of three vertical 20 m long boreholes located near the fault core, in the damage zone, and in the host rock. Geological, petrophysical (porosity observations and measurements), geotechnical (Q-value) and geophysical measurements (acoustic velocities, uniaxial compressive strength, electrical resistivity, borehole logging), and injection tests were conducted at various scales. We show that horizontal and vertical variations in hydromechanical properties within the damage zone are related to the initial petrophysical properties of the host rock. In the initial low-porosity and fractured layers, the deformations are accommodated by fractures and micro-cracks extending significantly from the fault core. In these layers, the Young modulus of the rock mass (Em) is low and the permeability of the rock mass (Km) is high. In the initial porous and low fractured layers, deformations are accommodated by micro-mechanical processes resulting in a decrease in micro-porosity near the fault core. There is a rapid attenuation of the damage zone. In these layers, Em is high and Km is low. The seismic signature of this kind of fault is complex and the seismic visibility low making them hard to detect. Finally, to assess fault zone stability in case of CO2 injection and the risk of CO2 leakage through the fault itself, we performed some geomechanical numerical simulations and some field hydromechanical tests. We show that the presence of hydromechanical heterogeneity favors the fluid accumulation but strengthen the fault zone and impede fluid migration upward along the fault.

  4. Hole injection from the sidewall of V-shaped pits into c-plane multiple quantum wells in InGaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiaoming; Liu, Junlin Jiang, Fengyi

    2015-10-28

    The role which the V-shaped pits (V-pits) play in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) has been proposed to enable the formation of sidewall MQWs, whose higher bandgap than that of the c-plane MQWs is considered to act as an energy barrier to prevent carriers from reaching the dislocations. Here, with increasing proportion of current flowing via the V-pits, the emission of the c-plane MQWs broadens across the short-wavelength band and shows a blueshift successively. This phenomenon is attributed to hole injection from the sidewall of V-pits into the c-plane MQWs, which is a new discovery in the injection mechanism of InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs.

  5. Optimising geological storage of CO2 by development of multiple injection sites in regionally extensive storage sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhurst, Maxine; McDermott, Christopher; Williams, John; Mackay, Eric; Jin, Min; Tucker, Owain; Mallows, Tom; Hannis, Sarah; Pearce, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Carbon capture, transport and storage (CCS) is considered a key technology to provide secure, low-carbon energy supply and industrial processes to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to the adverse effects of climatic change. Geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), captured during hydrocarbon production at the Sleipner Field, in strata beneath the Norwegian sector of the North Sea has been in operation since 1996. Projects to store CO2 captured at power plants in strata underlying the North Sea are currently in design. Storage of the CO2 is planned in depleted hydrocarbon fields or regionally extensive sandstones containing brine (saline aquifer sandstones). The vast majority of the UK potential storage resource is within brine-saturated sandstone formations. The sandstone formations are each hundreds to thousands of square kilometres in extent and underlie all sectors of the North Sea. The immense potential to store CO2 in these rocks can only be fully achieved by the operation of more than one injection site within each formation. Here we report an investigation into the operation of more than one injection site within a storage formation using a UK North Sea case study of the Captain Sandstone and the included Goldeneye Field, which is part of the mature hydrocarbon province offshore Scotland. Research by the CO2MultiStore project was targeted to increase understanding and confidence in the operation of two sites within the Captain Sandstone. Methods were implemented to reduce the effort and resources needed to characterise the sandstone, and increase understanding of its stability and performance during operation of more than one injection site. Generic learning was captured throughout the research relevant to the characterisation of extensive storage sandstones, management of the planned injection operations and monitoring of CO2 injection at two (or more) sites within any connected sandstone formation. The storage of CO2 can be optimised

  6. Continuous insulin therapy versus multiple insulin injections in the management of type 1 diabetes: a longitutinal study

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria Estela Bellini; Liberatore, Raphael Del Roio; Custodio, Rodrigo; Martinelli, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy as treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: 40 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (21 female) with ages between 10 and 20 years (mean=14.2) and mean duration of diabetes of 7 years used multiple doses of insulin for at least 6 months and after that, continuous insulin infusion therapy for at least 6 months. Each one of the patients has used multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy. For analysis of HbA1c, mean glycated hemoglobin levels (mHbA1c) were obtained during each treatment period (multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy period). Results: Although mHbA1c levels were lower during continuous insulin infusion therapy the difference was not statistically significant. During multiple doses of insulin, 14.2% had mHbA1c values below 7.5% vs. 35.71% while on continuous insulin infusion therapy; demonstrating better glycemic control with the use of continuous insulin infusion therapy. During multiple doses of insulin, 15–40 patients have severe hypoglycemic events versus 5–40 continuous insulin infusion therapy. No episodes of ketoacidosis events were recorded. Conclusions: This is the first study with this design comparing multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy in Brazil showing no significant difference in HbA1c; hypoglycemic events were less frequent during continuous insulin infusion therapy than during multiple doses of insulin and the percentage of patients who achieved a HbA1c less than 7.5% was greater during continuous insulin infusion therapy than multiple doses of insulin therapy. PMID:26826879

  7. Chemical constituents in groundwater from multiple zones in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, 2009-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hopkins, Candice B.; Maimer, Neil V.

    2015-01-01

    Tritium concentrations in relation to basaltic flow units indicate the presence of wastewater influence in multiple basalt flow groups; however, tritium is most abundant in the South Late Matuyama flow group in the southern boundary wells. The concentrations of wastewater constituents in deep zones in wells Middle 2051, USGS 132, USGS 105, and USGS 103 support the concept of groundwater flow deepening in the southwestern corner of the INL, as indicated by the INL groundwater-flow model.

  8. Biodistribution of a High Dose of Diamond, Graphite, and Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles After Multiple Intraperitoneal Injections in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Lipińska, Ludwika; Mitura, Katarzyna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have recently drawn intense attention in biomedical applications. Hence, there is a need for further in vivo investigations of their biocompatibility and biodistribution via various exposure routes. We hypothesized that intraperitoneally injected diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles may have different biodistribution and exert different effects on the intact organism. Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the control and treated with nanoparticles by intraperitoneal injection (4 mg of nanoparticles/kg body weight) eight times during the 4-week period. Blood was collected for evaluation of blood morphology and biochemistry parameters. Photographs of the general appearance of each rat's interior were taken immediately after sacrifice. The organs were excised and their macroscopic structure was visualized using a stereomicroscope. The nanoparticles were retained in the body, mostly as agglomerates. The largest agglomerates (up to 10 mm in diameter) were seen in the proximity of the injection place in the stomach serous membrane, between the connective tissues of the abdominal skin, muscles, and peritoneum. Numerous smaller, spherical-shaped aggregates (diameter around 2 mm) were lodged among the mesentery. Moreover, in the connective and lipid tissue in the proximity of the liver and spleen serosa, small aggregates of graphite and graphene oxide nanoparticles were observed. However, all tested nanoparticles did not affect health and growth of rats. The nanoparticles had no toxic effects on blood parameters and growth of rats, suggesting their potential applicability as remedies or in drug delivery systems. PMID:26459428

  9. Biodistribution of a High Dose of Diamond, Graphite, and Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles After Multiple Intraperitoneal Injections in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Lipińska, Ludwika; Mitura, Katarzyna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have recently drawn intense attention in biomedical applications. Hence, there is a need for further in vivo investigations of their biocompatibility and biodistribution via various exposure routes. We hypothesized that intraperitoneally injected diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles may have different biodistribution and exert different effects on the intact organism. Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the control and treated with nanoparticles by intraperitoneal injection (4 mg of nanoparticles/kg body weight) eight times during the 4-week period. Blood was collected for evaluation of blood morphology and biochemistry parameters. Photographs of the general appearance of each rat's interior were taken immediately after sacrifice. The organs were excised and their macroscopic structure was visualized using a stereomicroscope. The nanoparticles were retained in the body, mostly as agglomerates. The largest agglomerates (up to 10 mm in diameter) were seen in the proximity of the injection place in the stomach serous membrane, between the connective tissues of the abdominal skin, muscles, and peritoneum. Numerous smaller, spherical-shaped aggregates (diameter around 2 mm) were lodged among the mesentery. Moreover, in the connective and lipid tissue in the proximity of the liver and spleen serosa, small aggregates of graphite and graphene oxide nanoparticles were observed. However, all tested nanoparticles did not affect health and growth of rats. The nanoparticles had no toxic effects on blood parameters and growth of rats, suggesting their potential applicability as remedies or in drug delivery systems.

  10. Chemical Constituents in Groundwater from Multiple Zones in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, 2005-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Twining, Brian V.

    2010-01-01

    From 2005 to 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey's Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Project office, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected water-quality samples from multiple water-bearing zones in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Water samples were collected from six monitoring wells completed in about 350-700 feet of the upper part of the aquifer, and the samples were analyzed for major ions, selected trace elements, nutrients, selected radiochemical constituents, and selected stable isotopes. Each well was equipped with a multilevel monitoring system containing four to seven sampling ports that were each isolated by permanent packer systems. The sampling ports were installed in aquifer zones that were highly transmissive and that represented the water chemistry of the top four to five model layers of a steady-state and transient groundwater-flow model. The model's water chemistry and particle-tracking simulations are being used to better define movement of wastewater constituents in the aquifer. The results of the water chemistry analyses indicated that, in each of four separate wells, one zone of water differed markedly from the other zones in the well. In four wells, one zone to as many as five zones contained radiochemical constituents that originated from wastewater disposal at selected laboratory facilities. The multilevel sampling systems are defining the vertical distribution of wastewater constituents in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and the concentrations of wastewater constituents in deeper zones in wells Middle 2051, USGS 132, and USGS 103 support the concept of groundwater flow deepening in the southwestern part of the INL.

  11. Managing the critical zone to obtain and sustain multiple benefits from working landscapes: The value of partnerships between LTAR and NSF CZO networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, K. A.; Seyfried, M. S.; Pierson, F. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Critical Zone Observatories add value to earth system science and society by addressing research gaps to understand the critical zone, the surface skin of the earth that extends from the top of the tree canopy to the lower limits of the groundwater. The Critical Zone (CZ) sustains life on earth and provides food, shelter, forage, and fuel and other services to human well-being. This Zone is also where most of human activities take place and thus subject to change and degradation. Managing the critical zone to obtain and sustain these services will require initiatives, policies and incentives that maintain and enhance this zone. The Critical Zone Observatories are seeking to address major gaps in understanding how earth surface evolves over time and how it will respond to future changes. Many of these gaps in our understanding occur at the interface between disciplines, across space and deep time scales, and multiple dimensions. For example, the Reynolds Creek CZO seeks to understand the role of soil environmental variables such as soil moisture and depth that vary across complex terrain in governing soil carbon storage and turnover in a semi-arid environment. For this reason, soil samples are being collected to depth of bedrock. Other networks and agencies such as the new LTAR and NEON are quantifying soil carbon at more shallow depths that will likely capture the variability in near surface soil carbon that is more sensitive to management and climate changes but may underestimate the total stores of carbon on the landscape. The CZOs also provide a platform to conduct interdisciplinary to transdisciplinary science by integrating across geological, soil, hydrologic, ecological, and social sciences to understand the critical zone. The emergence of the CZO Network and the LTAR network brings the opportunity to standardize methods and test hypotheses and ask questions across broad environmental conditions and gradients that could not be achieved with single

  12. Geochemical evidence for multiple magma injections in the formation of the Spruce Road Cu-Ni deposit, Duluth Complex, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, I.; Ripley, E.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    The Spruce Road Cu-Ni deposit is located in the northeast portion of the Duluth Complex, and consists of disseminated sulfide mineralization within gabbroic to troctolitic rock types. Mineralization occurs along basal contacts with footwall rocks of the Giants Range Massif, and is in general similar to that found in other basal zone deposits located to the southwest. Sulfide mineral assemblages are composed principally of chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, cubanite, and pentlandite. Several distinct zones are recognized in drill core 34870-A (740 m in length) based on mineral modes and textures, plus major and trace element variations. Unit 6 exhibits well-defined trends related to in situ fractional crystallization. Sulfide is thought to have accumulated at the base of this pulse due to gravitational segregation of an immiscible sulfide liquid. Unit 5 represents emplacement of a more evolved, but sulfide-free magmatic pulse. Unit 4 is composed of two well-differentiated pulses, whereas Unit 3 appears to have fractionated very little, but may have been saturated in sulfide at the time of emplacement. Unit 1 is a more evolved and sulfide-rich pulse (or series of pulses) that may have mixed with more primitive magma of Unit 2. Sulfur in Units 1, 3, and 6 is characterized by [delta][sup 34]S values of 4.1 to 10.2 per mil CDT, and is thought to have been derived from crustal sources. The sequence in the Spruce Road area represents periodic emplacement of magmas that had undergone various degrees of fractionation and crustal contamination in sub-volcanic staging chambers.

  13. Cycle-to-cycle extraction synchronization of the Fermilab Booster for multiple batch injection to the Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, R.; Kopp, S.; Pellico, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    We report on a system to ensure cycle-to-cycle synchronization of beam extraction from the Fermilab Booster accelerator to the Main Injector. Such synchronization is necessary for multiple batch operation of the Main Injector for the Run II upgrade of anti-proton production using slip-stacking in the Main Injector, and for the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) neutrino beam. To perform this task a system of fast measurements and feedback controls the longitudinal progress of the Booster beam throughout its acceleration period by manipulation of the transverse position maintained by the LLRF (Low-level Radio Frequency) system.

  14. Reverse Genetic Morpholino Approach Using Cardiac Ventricular Injection to Transfect Multiple Difficult-to-target Tissues in the Zebrafish Larva

    PubMed Central

    Konantz, Judith; Antos, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish is an important model to understand the cell and molecular biology of organ and appendage regeneration. However, molecular strategies to employ reverse genetics have not yet been adequately developed to assess gene function in regeneration or tissue homeostasis during larval stages after zebrafish embryogenesis, and several tissues within the zebrafish larva are difficult to target. Intraventricular injections of gene-specific morpholinos offer an alternative method for the current inability to genomically target zebrafish genes in a temporally controlled manner at these stages. This method allows for complete dispersion and subsequent incorporation of the morpholino into various tissues throughout the body, including structures that were formerly impossible to reach such as those in the larval caudal fin, a structure often used to noninvasively research tissue regeneration. Several genes activated during larval finfold regeneration are also present in regenerating adult vertebrate tissues, so the larva is a useful model to understand regeneration in adults. This morpholino dispersion method allows for the quick and easy identification of genes required for the regeneration of larval tissues as well as other physiological phenomena regulating tissue homeostasis after embryogenesis. Therefore, this delivery method provides a currently needed strategy for temporal control to the evaluation of gene function after embryogenesis.  PMID:24961304

  15. Multiple reactivation of a crustal-scale weakness zone - the Sveconorwegian Sokna-Saggrenda tectonic contact of southern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, Thomas; Viola, Giulio; Peters, Max; Bingen, Bernard; Henderson, Iain

    2014-05-01

    The Sokna-Saggrenda tectonic contact (SSTC) is traditionally drawn on maps of southern Norway as the first-order, curved boundary between the Kongsberg-Modum terrane in the east and the Telemark terrane in the west, which were assembled during the Grenvillian-Sveconorwegian orogeny. New field observations along the entire length (120 km) of this deformation zone together with microstructural and textural data from selected transects suggest a more complex structural architecture and evolution than previously assumed. The following five structural elements resulting from several deformation episodes can be distinguished: (1) Amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages occurring together with a prominent E-dipping ductile foliation and a mineral lineation plunging moderately towards the NE. This fabric is associated with top-to-the-SW kinematics and is well preserved west of the SSTC. (2) Static overprint of the dynamically recrystallized quartz microstructure of (1) indicates cessation of deformation at relatively high temperatures. (3) (Ultra-)mylonites thoroughly overprinting the previous structures are confined to large-scale subvertical to moderately E-dipping shear zones bearing a gently SE-plunging stretching lineation. At the micro-scale, these structures are characterized by domains of older statically recrystallized quartz (2), being progressively reworked through dynamic recrystallization into quartz-rich aggregates. In the shear zone centers severe grain size reduction by mechanical comminution and phase mixing indicates granular flow. At the map-scale, the shear zones are arranged geometrically in a sinistral transpressional en-échelon network defining parts of the SSTC. Three crustal blocks can be identified as less-affected units in between these shear zones: the Telemark block, a western Kongsberg block and an eastern Modum block. A tens of kilometer-scale fold structure reorients the main ductile fabric (1) in the northern part of the Modum block and is

  16. Multiple injections of leukoreduced platelet rich plasma reduce pain and functional impairment in a canine model of ACL and meniscal deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cook, James L; Smith, Patrick A; Bozynski, Chantelle C; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Stoker, Aaron M; Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2016-04-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is used to treat many musculoskeletal disorders. We used a canine model to determine the effects of multiple intra-articular injections of leukoreduced PRP (ACP) on anterior cruciate ligament healing, meniscal healing, and progression of osteoarthritis (OA). With Animal Care and Use Committee (ACUC) approval, 12 dogs underwent partial ACL transection and meniscal release in one knee. At weeks 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 after insult, dogs were treated with intra-articular injections (2 ml) of either ACP (n = 6) or saline (n = 6). Dogs were assessed over 6 months to determine comfortable range of motion (CROM), lameness, pain, effusion, kinetics, and radiographic and arthroscopic assessments. At 6-month endpoint, dogs were assessed for ACL material properties and histopathology. Saline-treated dogs had significantly (p < 0.04) more CROM loss, significantly (p < 0.01) more pain, significantly (p < 0.05) more severe lameness, significantly (p < 0.05) lower function, and significantly (p < 0.05) lower %Total Pressure Index in affected hindlimbs compared to ACP-treated dogs. Radiographic OA increased significantly (p < 0.01) over time within each group. Arthroscopically, saline-treated knees showed moderate to severe synovitis, further ACL disruption, and medial compartment cartilage loss, and ACP-treated knees showed evidence of ACL repair and less severe synovitis. ACL material properties in ACP-treated knees were closer to normal than in saline-treated knees, however, the differences were not statistically significant. ACL histopathology was significantly (p< 0.05) less severe in ACP-treated knees compared to saline-treated knees. Five intra-articular injections of leukoreduced PRP had beneficial effects for ACL healing, improved range of motion, decreased pain, and improved limb function for up to 6 months in this model. PMID:26403590

  17. Injection of Aβ1-40 into hippocampus induced cognitive lesion associated with neuronal apoptosis and multiple gene expressions in the tree shrew.

    PubMed

    Lin, Na; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Zhang, Rong-Ping; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Lei; Qian, Zhong-Yi; Zhang, Piao; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Gao, Fa-Bao; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can incur significant health care costs to the patient, their families, and society; furthermore, effective treatments are limited, as the mechanisms of AD are not fully understood. This study utilized twelve adult male tree shrews (TS), which were randomly divided into PBS and amyloidbetapeptide1-40 (Aβ1-40) groups. AD model was established via an intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of Aβ1-40 after being incubated for 4 days at 37 °C. Behavioral, pathophysiological and molecular changes were evaluated by hippocampal-dependent tasks, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), silver staining, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, TUNEL assay and gene sequencing, respectively. At 4 weeks post-injection, as compared with the PBS group, in Aβ1-40 injected animals: cognitive impairments happened, and the hippocampus had atrophied indicated by MRI findings; meanwhile, HE staining showed the cells of the CA3 and DG were significantly thinner and smaller. The average number of cells in the DG, but not the CA3, was also significantly reduced; furthermore, silver staining revealed neurotic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the hippocampi; TUNEL assay showed many cells exhibited apoptosis, which was associated with downregulated BCL-2/BCL-XL-associated death promoter (Bad), inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP), Cytochrome c (CytC) and upregulated tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1); lastly, gene sequencing reported a total of 924 mobilized genes, among which 13 of the downregulated and 19 of the upregulated genes were common to the AD pathway. The present study not only established AD models in TS, but also reported on the underlying mechanism involved in neuronal apoptosis associated with multiple gene expression. PMID:26897171

  18. Baseline Predictors of A1C Reduction in Adults Using Sensor-Augmented Pump Therapy or Multiple Daily Injection Therapy: The STAR 3 Experience

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, George; Ahmann, Andrew A.; Bergenstal, Richard M.; Green, Jennifer B.; Peoples, Tim; Tanenberg, Robert J.; Yang, Qingqing

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Baseline characteristics from the adult cohort of a randomized controlled trial comparing sensor-augmented pump (SAP) and multiple daily injection (MDI) therapy were analyzed for significant relationships with −0.5% A1C change at 1 year of therapy without incidence of severe hypoglycemia (defined as A1C benefit). Methods Baseline characteristics were compared with A1C benefit. Statistically significant predictors were analyzed further to determine appropriate cutpoints of relative A1C benefit. Results Baseline A1C ≥9.1%, age at randomization ≥36 years, and age at diabetes diagnosis of ≥17 years were associated with a greater SAP benefit relative to MDI than other cutpoints. Conclusions People with type 1 diabetes who had a high A1C and who were older at diagnosis and older at randomization experienced the most benefit from SAP therapy. PMID:21488717

  19. Architecture, implementation, and testing of a multiple-shell gas injection system for high current implosions on the Z accelerator.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Elliott, Kristi Wilson; Madden, Robert E; Coleman, P L; Thompson, John R; Bixler, Alex; Lamppa, D C; McKenney, J L; Strizic, T; Johnson, D; Johns, O; Vigil, M P; Jones, B; Ampleford, D J; Savage, M E; Cuneo, M E; Jones, M C

    2013-06-01

    Tests are ongoing to conduct ~20 MA z-pinch implosions on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratory using Ar, Kr, and D2 gas puffs as the imploding loads. The relatively high cost of operations on a machine of this scale imposes stringent requirements on the functionality, reliability, and safety of gas puff hardware. Here we describe the development of a prototype gas puff system including the multiple-shell nozzles, electromagnetic drivers for each nozzle's valve, a UV pre-ionizer, and an inductive isolator to isolate the ~2.4 MV machine voltage pulse present at the gas load from the necessary electrical and fluid connections made to the puff system from outside the Z vacuum chamber. This paper shows how the assembly couples to the overall Z system and presents data taken to validate the functionality of the overall system. PMID:23822342

  20. Architecture, implementation, and testing of a multiple-shell gas injection system for high current implosions on the Z accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Elliott, Kristi Wilson; Madden, Robert E.; Coleman, P. L.; Thompson, John R.; Bixler, Alex; Lamppa, D. C.; McKenney, J. L.; Strizic, T.; Johnson, D.; Johns, O.; Vigil, M. P.; Jones, B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Savage, M. E.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, M. C.

    2013-06-15

    Tests are ongoing to conduct {approx}20 MA z-pinch implosions on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratory using Ar, Kr, and D{sub 2} gas puffs as the imploding loads. The relatively high cost of operations on a machine of this scale imposes stringent requirements on the functionality, reliability, and safety of gas puff hardware. Here we describe the development of a prototype gas puff system including the multiple-shell nozzles, electromagnetic drivers for each nozzle's valve, a UV pre-ionizer, and an inductive isolator to isolate the {approx}2.4 MV machine voltage pulse present at the gas load from the necessary electrical and fluid connections made to the puff system from outside the Z vacuum chamber. This paper shows how the assembly couples to the overall Z system and presents data taken to validate the functionality of the overall system.

  1. Sustained macrophage infiltration upon multiple intra-articular injections: an improved rat model of rheumatoid arthritis for PET guided therapy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chandrupatla, Durga M S H; Weijers, Karin; Gent, Yoony Y J; de Greeuw, Inge; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Jansen, Gerrit; van der Laken, Conny J; Molthoff, Carla F M

    2015-01-01

    To widen the therapeutic window for PET guided evaluation of novel anti-RA agents, modifications were made in a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Arthritis was induced in the right knee of Wistar rats with repeated boosting to prolong articular inflammation. The contralateral knee served as control. After immunization with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) in complete Freund's adjuvant and custom Bordetella pertussis antigen, one or more intra-articular (i.a.) mBSA injections were given over time in the right knee. Serum anti-mBSA antibodies, DTH response, knee thickness, motion, and synovial macrophages were analyzed and [18F]FDG(-general inflammation) and (R)-[11C]PK11195 (macrophages-)PET was performed followed by ex vivo tissue distribution. Significant anti-mBSA levels, DTH, swelling of arthritic knee, and sustained and prolonged macrophage infiltration in synovial tissue were found, especially using multiple i.a. injections. Increased [18F]FDG and (R)-[11C]PK11195 accumulation was demonstrated in arthritic knees as compared to contralateral knees, which was confirmed in ex vivo tissue distribution studies. Boosting proved advantageous for achieving a chronic model without remission. The model will offer excellent opportunities for repeated PET studies to monitor progression of disease and efficacy of novel therapeutic agents for RA in the same animal. PMID:25695087

  2. Precise and high-speed control of partial pressures of multiple gas species in plasma process chamber using pulse-controlled gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Morishita, Sadaharu; Goto, Tetsuya; Nagase, Masaaki; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2009-05-15

    Multiprocesses in a single plasma process chamber with high throughput require precise, sequential, high-speed alteration of partial pressures of multiple gas species. A conventional gas-distribution system cannot realize this because the system seriously overshoots gas pressure immediately following valve operation. Furthermore, chamber volume and conductance of gas piping between the system and chamber should both be considered because they delay the stabilizing time of gas pressure. Therefore, the authors proposed a new gas-distribution system without overshoot by controlling gas flow rate based on pressure measurement, as well as a method of pulse-controlled gas injection immediately following valve operation. Time variation of measured partial pressure agrees well with a calculation based on an equivalent-circuit model that represents the chamber and gas piping between the system and chamber. Using pulse-controlled gas injection, the stabilizing time can be reduced drastically to 0.6 s for HBr added to pure Ar plasma, and 0.7 s for O{sub 2} added to Ar/HBr plasma; without the pulse control, the stabilizing times are 3 and 7 s, respectively. In the O{sub 2} addition case, rapid stabilization can be achieved during the period of line/space pattern etching of poly-Si on a thin SiO{sub 2} film. This occurs without anomalous etching of the underlying SiO{sub 2} film or the Si substrate near the sidewall, thus obtaining a wide process margin with high throughput.

  3. Development of a novel high-throughput analytical methodology, multiple injection method, for quantitative analysis in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukari; Ohkawa, Tomoyuki; Yasui, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we developed a novel methodology, multiple injection method (MIM), for higher-throughput screening of compounds by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). MIM involves continuous injections of multiple samples containing a different compound respectively into the column, and then temporarily trapping of analytes at the column head in high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. This is followed by elution of all the compounds from the column and detection of them by MS/MS. In this study, fexofenadine, verapamil, risperidone, ondansetron, and imipramine were used as model compounds to investigate the effectiveness of MIM in pharmacokinetic studies. Analytical time of validation samples of these model compounds could be shortened to one third by MIM, compared with the conventional method. In addition, both the accuracy and precision of MIM met the general criteria for quantitative analysis. The peak intensity was found to be unaffected by overlapping compounds even if they have wide range of ionization efficiency. As a result of the comparison of MIM and conventional method in the analysis of samples in pharmacokinetic studies using model compounds, no difference was shown in the quantification values. Consequently, this method has some advantages, reduction of analytical time, the improvement of sensitivity, and the simplicity of system, compared to the conventional methods. MIM should be very useful and powerful method for drug development without an additional hardware and can be used for the measurement of compounds in biological samples for pharmacokinetic studies, especially it greatly contributes to accelerating drug development in its discovery stages. PMID:21804204

  4. Structural evolution of the Irtysh Shear Zone: implication for the Late Paleozoic amalgamation of multiple arc systems in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengfei; Sun, Min; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2015-04-01

    The NW-SE Irtysh Shear Zone represents a major tectonic boundary in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, recording the amalgamation history between the peri-Siberian orogenic system and the Kazakhstan orogenic system. The structural evolution and geodynamics of this shear zone is still poorly documented. Here we present new structural data complemented by chronological data in an attempt to unravel the geodynamic significance of the Irtysh Shear Zone in the context of accretion history of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Our results show three episodes of deformation for the shear zone. D1 foliation is locally recognized in low strain area and recorded by garnet inclusions, whereas D2 is represented by a sub-horizontal fabric and related NW-SE lineation. D3 is characterized by a transpersonal deformation event, to form a series of NW-SE mylonitic belts with sinistral kinematics, and to overprint D2 fabric forming regional-scale NW-SE upright folds. A paragneiss sample from the shear zone yielded the youngest detrital zircon peaks in the late Carboniferous, placing a maximum age constraint on the deformation, which overlaps in time with the late Paleozoic collision between the Chinese Altai and the intraoceanic arc system of the East Junggar and West Junggar. We interpret three episodes of deformation to represent orogenic thickening (D1), collapse (D2) and thickening (D3) in response to this collisional event. Sinistral shearing (D3) together with the coeval dextral shearing in the Tianshan accommodate eastward extrusion of the Kazakhstan orogenic system during the late Paleozoic amalgamation of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Acknowledgements: This study was financially supported by the Major Basic Research Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant: 2014CB440801), Hong Kong Research Grant Council (HKU705311P and HKU704712P), National Science Foundation of China (41273048, 41273012) and a HKU CRCG grant. The work is a contribution of the Joint

  5. Separation of somatropin charge variants by multiple-injection CZE with Polybrene/chondroitin sulfate A double-coated capillaries.

    PubMed

    Amini, Ahmad

    2013-08-01

    The performance of dynamic double-coated fused-silica capillaries with Polybrene and chondroitin sulfate A has been compared with uncoated fused-silica capillaries for the determination of recombinant human growth factor (somatropin) charge variants. The separations were carried out under the same electrophoretic conditions as described in the European Pharmacopoeia, i.e. at pH 6.0 and 30°C. The coating significantly reduced the interactions between the proteins and the surface of the fused-silica capillary. The first five separations performed in a new bare fused-silica capillary were discarded because of very poor separation performance as a result of protein-surface interactions. There was an approximate twofold increase in the interday migration time precision (%RSD ≤ 6.5%) in the double-coated capillaries. The method was successfully transferred to a multiple CZE mode where two samples were analyzed in a single electrophoretic run. The average purity of somatropin certified reference standard was 98.0% (%RSD ≤ 0.3%) determined by using uncoated and coated capillaries. PMID:23780627

  6. Combining Phylogeography with Distribution Modeling: Multiple Pleistocene Range Expansions in a Parthenogenetic Gecko from the Australian Arid Zone

    PubMed Central

    Strasburg, Jared L.; Kearney, Michael; Moritz, Craig; Templeton, Alan R.

    2007-01-01

    Phylogenetic and geographic evidence suggest that many parthenogenetic organisms have evolved recently and have spread rapidly. These patterns play a critical role in our understanding of the relative merits of sexual versus asexual reproductive modes, yet their interpretation is often hampered by a lack of detail. Here we present a detailed phylogeographic study of a vertebrate parthenogen, the Australian gecko Heteronotia binoei, in combination with statistical and biophysical modeling of its distribution during the last glacial maximum. Parthenogenetic H. binoei occur in the Australian arid zone and have the widest range of any known vertebrate parthenogen. They are broadly sympatric with their sexual counterparts, from which they arose via hybridization. We have applied nested clade phylogeographic, effective migration, and mismatch distribution analyses to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences obtained for 319 individuals sampled throughout the known geographic ranges of two parthenogenetic mitochondrial lineages. These analyses provide strong evidence for past range expansion events from west to east across the arid zone, and for continuing eastward range expansion. Parthenogen formation and range expansion events date to the late Pleistocene, with one lineage expanding from the northwest of its present range around 240,000 years ago and the second lineage expanding from the far west around 70,000 years ago. Statistical and biophysical distribution models support these inferences of recent range expansion, with suitable climatic conditions during the last glacial maximum most likely limited to parts of the arid zone north and west of much of the current ranges of these lineages. Combination of phylogeographic analyses and distribution modeling allowed considerably stronger inferences of the history of this complex than either would in isolation, illustrating the power of combining complementary analytical approaches. PMID:17712408

  7. 76 FR 33155 - Safety Zones; Multiple Firework Displays in Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule..., or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes...; Multiple Firework Displays in Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility (a) Location....

  8. Field-enhanced sample injection micelle-to-solvent stacking capillary zone electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of antibiotics in seawater after solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Wuethrich, Alain; Haddad, Paul R; Quirino, Joselito P

    2016-05-01

    The synergistic stacking approach of field-enhanced sample injection-micelle-to-solvent stacking was used for high sensitivity CZE-ESI-MS of eight penicillins and sulfonamides. Sensitivity enhancement factors (peak height) were 1629-3328 compared to typical injection, with LODs from 0.11 to 0.55 ng/mL. The analytical figures of merit were acceptable. SPE on a fortified seawater sample resulted in 50-fold enrichment with recoveries of 85-110%. The overall method LODs were 0.002-0.011 ng/mL. PMID:27135307

  9. Clinical evaluation of expanded mesh connective tissue graft in the treatment for multiple adjacent gingival recessions in the esthetic zone

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, M.; Shivakumar, B.; Meenapriya, B.; Anitha, V.; Ashwath, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple approaches have been used to replace lost, damaged or diseased gingival tissues. The connective tissue graft (CTG) procedure is the golden standard method for root coverage. Although multiple sites often need grafting, the palatal mucosa supplies only a limited area of grafting material. To overcome this limitation, expanded mesh graft provides a method whereby a graft can be stretched to cover a large area. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and the predictability of expanded mesh CTG (e-MCTG) in the treatment of adjacent multiple gingival recessions. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients aged 20–50 years contributed to 55 sites, each site falling into at least three adjacent Miller's Class 1 or Class 2 gingival recession. The CTG obtained from the palatal mucosa was expanded to cover the recipient bed, which was 1.5 times larger than the graft. Clinical measurements were recorded at baseline and 3 months, 12 months postoperatively. Results: A mean coverage of 1.96 mm ± 0.66 mm and 2.22 mm ± 0.68 mm was obtained at the end of 3rd and 12th month, respectively. Twelve months after surgery a statistically significant increase in CAL (2.2 mm ± 0.68 mm, P < 0.001) and increasing WKT (1.75 ± 0.78, P < 0.001) were obtained. In 80% of the treated sites, 100% root coverage was achieved (mean 93.5%). Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrated that multiple adjacent recessions were treated by using e-MCTG technique can be applied and highly predictable root coverage can be achieved. PMID:26321829

  10. Can we use Electrical Resistivity Tomography to measure root zone moisture dynamics in fields with multiple crops?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garre, S.; Coteur, I.; Wongleecharoen, C.; Diels, J.; Vanderborght, J.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture on shallow or steep soils in the humid tropics often leads to low resource use efficiency. Contour hedgerow intercropping systems have been proposed to reduce run-off and control soil erosion. However, competition for water and nutrients between crops and associated hedgerows may reduce the overall performance of contour hedgerow systems. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a valuable technique to assess the distribution and dynamics of soil moisture non-invasively. Root water uptake is a spatially variable and small-scale process, which requires at least decimeter resolution and a high sensitivity in order to be able to monitor changes in time and space. Careful experimental design is of uttermost importance in order to maximize the information content of the ERT survey and to gain insights in the possibilities and limitations of the survey. Virtual experiments in combination with absolute and spatial performance measures provide a way to optimize the information that can be retrieved from an ERT experiment. We used this approach to identify a suitable measurement methodology to monitor water fluxes in a contour hedgerow intercropping system in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. The virtual experiment showed that there are important differences between the tested measurement configurations. We saw that the optimal ERT array was capable of recognizing distinct water depletion zones under the different crops. However, sharp contrasts in the 1-D water depletion profile are smoothened. ERT measurements conducted in Thailand showed that the soils of our experimental plots were very heterogeneous both along the slope as with depth. This observation highlighted some constraints of the ERT method for soil moisture monitoring in the field, such as the difficulty to define a relationship between electrical conductivity and soil moisture in very heterogeneous soils. Nevertheless, the data indeed revealed contrasting water depletion patterns under monocropping

  11. Multiple fault reactivations within the intra-continental Rhine-Bresse Transfer Zone (La Serre Horst, eastern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madritsch, Herfried; Kounov, Alexandre; Schmid, Stefan M.; Fabbri, Olivier

    2009-06-01

    Thermochronological, structural and kinematic analyses demonstrate the influence of Late Paleozoic basement structures on the localization and evolution of the Rhine-Bresse Transfer Zone (RBTZ), a central segment of the European Cenozoic Rift System. Zircon and apatite fission track data indicate that the Paleozoic crystalline basement and its Permo-Triassic cover, exposed in the La Serre Horst, experienced a Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous heating event which was followed by two distinct periods of cooling. A first cooling event occurred in the Early Cretaceous and is probably related to thermal relaxation. A second one, started at around 38 Ma, is interpreted to reflect exhumation that was induced by fault reactivation along the Late Paleozoic Burgundy Trough System during Eocene-Oligocene rifting and the formation of the RBTZ. This fault reactivation resulted in a complex fault pattern and local stress field perturbations in the surroundings of the pre-existing horst structure. Substantial extension was achieved by ENE-WSW striking normal faults that trend highly oblique to the dominant strike of the Rhine and Bresse Graben rifts. Seismic reflection data show that these major normal faults are typically associated with extensional flexures and oriented parallel to pre-existing Late Paleozoic basement faults of the Burgundy Trough. Paleostress analyses yield overall NW-SE extension during the Eo-Oligocene, slightly oblique to the structural trend of the RBTZ, and additionally, local stress field perturbations induced by the reactivation of pre-existing faults. Reactivation of Paleozoic structures in the RBTZ is of extensional rather than of strike-slip character indicating that the RBTZ is forming a separate oblique graben segment within the European Cenozoic Rift System rather than a sinistral strike slip transform zone supposedly connecting Rhine and Bresse graben structures.

  12. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... it.Golimumab injection comes in prefilled syringes and auto-injection devices for subcutaneous injection. Use each syringe ... method.Do not remove the cap from the auto-injection device or the cover from the prefilled ...

  13. Structure and evolution of the seismically active Ostler Fault Zone (New Zealand) based on interpretations of multiple high resolution seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Fiona M.; Ghisetti, Francesca; Kaiser, Anna E.; Green, Alan G.; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Gorman, Andrew R.

    2010-12-01

    To improve our understanding of active faulting away from the main plate boundary on New Zealand's South Island, we have acquired high resolution seismic data across the Ostler Fault Zone Twelve 1.2 km long lines perpendicular to fault strike and a 1.6 km long crossline were collected in a region of the MacKenzie Basin where surface mapping delineates significant complexity in the form of two non-overlapping reverse fault strands separated by a transfer zone characterised by multiple smaller strands and increased folding. Interpretation of the resultant images includes a 45-55° west-dipping principal fault and two 25-30° west-dipping subsidiary faults, one in the hanging wall and one in the footwall of the principal fault. The geologically mapped complexities are shown to be caused by shallow variations in the structure of the principal fault, which breaks the surface in the north and south but not within the transfer zone, where it forms a triangle zone with associated backthrusting and minor faulting. These complexities only extend to ~ 300 m depth. Structures below this level are markedly simpler and much more 2D in nature, with the principal fault strand extending over a much longer distance than the individual strands observed at the surface. Since longer faults are susceptible to larger earthquakes than shorter ones, seismic hazard at the study site may be higher than previously thought. Multiple surface fault strands that give way to a single more major stand at relatively shallow depths may be a common feature of segmented fault systems. The deepest layered reflections at our site are consistent with the presence of a Late Cretaceous (?)-Tertiary basin underlying the present-day MacKenzie Basin. Structural restoration of the seismic images back to the base of Quaternary fluvioglacial terraces and back to the top of a Late Pliocene-Pleistocene fluviolacustrine unit indicate that compression was initiated prior to the Late Pliocene and that it has continued

  14. ExtaviJect® 30G device for subcutaneous self-injection of interferon beta-1b for multiple sclerosis: a prospective European study

    PubMed Central

    Boeru, Gabriel; Milanov, Ivan; De Robertis, Francesca; Kozubski, Wojciech; Lang, Michael; Rojas-Farreras, Sònia; Tomlinson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background The ExtaviJect® 30G autoinjector was developed to facilitate parenteral self-administration of interferon beta-1b (Extavia®), a first-line disease-modifying therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to assess patient compliance with treatment when using the autoinjector, patients’ and nurses’ experiences of using the device, its tolerability, and patient satisfaction. Methods This was a 12-week, real-world, prospective, observational, noninterventional study conducted in nine European countries. Questionnaires were used to measure patient compliance and to assess patients’ and nurses’ experiences. All adverse events were recorded by severity, including injection site reactions or pain. Patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life were assessed using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-9 (TSQM-9) and EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) instruments, respectively. Results Of 582 patients enrolled, 568 (98%) received at least one injection and attended the first follow-up visit at 6 weeks, and 542 (93%) attended the second follow-up visit at 12 weeks. For the whole study, 548 of 568 (97%) patients were compliant with treatment. Among the various questions assessing whether the device was easy and quick to use accurately, without fear of the needle, 56%–98% of patients and 59%–98% of nurses were in agreement. There were nine serious adverse events (four disease-related) reported among the 227 (39%) patients reporting adverse events. Scores increased in the TSQM-9 convenience domain between weeks 6 and 12 (P=0.0009), and in the EQ-5D visual analog scale between baseline and week 12 (P<0.0001), indicating improvement in health-related quality of life. Conclusion ExtaviJect 30G was convenient to use and was associated with high levels of compliance. PMID:24255602

  15. Interferon Beta-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1b injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  16. Peginterferon Beta-1a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... peginterferon beta-1a injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  17. A Coupled Formulation for Vadose Zone Transport of Multiple Gas Species With Plant Exchange Under Variable Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Most plants require a balance between water availability and oxygen availability in the rooting zone. Procedures for raising plants under microgravity conditions, such as might be encountered in long-term space missions, face a special challenge: water redistribution is not affected by gravity, leading to difficulty in maintaining both water and oxygen levels in the rooting zone because flow is dominated by capillary properties. The plant substrate used for microgravity conditions is typically a coarse material that drains extremely rapidly under the fluctuating gravity conditions (0 to 1.8 G) experienced on KC-135 aircraft during flight parabolas. To evaluate control strategies for meeting plant water uptake and respiration needs under microgravity and to characterize flow redistribution under fluctuating gravity, a single formulation considering partial to full saturation was developed to cover this range of conditions. The fully coupled system of equations considers N>1 gaseous species, including water, that are all constituents in the liquid phase and in equilibrium between the gas and liquid phases where both phases are present. Plants are considered as separate quasi steady continua. Plant uptake and respiration, when considered, are defined using (possibly age dependent) transfer functions characterized by root length density. The formulation avoids complexities arising from switching variables when going from very dry to saturated conditions by using variables that are continuous throughout the domain: liquid pressure and N-1 mass fraction variables, expressed as partial capillary pressure. The mass fractions of all species in both phases are recovered from the standard equilibrium conditions used to define the partial capillary pressures. The use of partial capillary pressure state variables is inspired by mass balance considerations near saturation (where capillary pressure is almost zero), because mass balance convergence rates are dominated by the phase

  18. Multiple mantle upwellings in the transition zone beneath the northern East-African Rift system from relative P-wave travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiero, Chiara; Hammond, James O. S.; Goes, Saskia; Fishwick, Stewart; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Ayele, Atalay; Doubre, Cecile; Goitom, Berhe; Keir, Derek; Kendall, J.-Michael; Leroy, Sylvie; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Rümpker, Georg; Stuart, Graham W.

    2015-09-01

    Mantle plumes and consequent plate extension have been invoked as the likely cause of East African Rift volcanism. However, the nature of mantle upwelling is debated, with proposed configurations ranging from a single broad plume connected to the large low-shear-velocity province beneath Southern Africa, the so-called African Superplume, to multiple lower-mantle sources along the rift. We present a new P-wave travel-time tomography model below the northern East-African, Red Sea, and Gulf of Aden rifts and surrounding areas. Data are from stations that span an area from Madagascar to Saudi Arabia. The aperture of the integrated data set allows us to image structures of ˜100 km length-scale down to depths of 700-800 km beneath the study region. Our images provide evidence of two clusters of low-velocity structures consisting of features with diameter of 100-200 km that extend through the transition zone, the first beneath Afar and a second just west of the Main Ethiopian Rift, a region with off-rift volcanism. Considering seismic sensitivity to temperature, we interpret these features as upwellings with excess temperatures of 100 ± 50 K. The scale of the upwellings is smaller than expected for lower mantle plume sources. This, together with the change in pattern of the low-velocity anomalies across the base of the transition zone, suggests that ponding or flow of deep-plume material below the transition zone may be spawning these upper mantle upwellings. This article was corrected on 28 SEP 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  19. Multiple-Code BenchMaek Simulation Stidy of Coupled THMC Processes IN the EXCAVATION DISTURBED ZONE Associated with Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    J. Rutqvist; X. Feng; J. Hudson; L. Jing; A. Kobayashi; T. Koyama; P.Pan; H. Lee; M. Rinne; E. Sonnenthal; Y. Yamamoto

    2006-05-08

    An international, multiple-code benchmark test (BMT) study is being conducted within the international DECOVALEX project to analyze coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes in the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around emplacement drifts of a nuclear waste repository. This BMT focuses on mechanical responses and long-term chemo-mechanical effects that may lead to changes in mechanical and hydrological properties in the EDZ. This includes time-dependent processes such as creep, and subcritical crack, or healing of fractures that might cause ''weakening'' or ''hardening'' of the rock over the long term. Five research teams are studying this BMT using a wide range of model approaches, including boundary element, finite element, and finite difference, particle mechanics, and elasto-plastic cellular automata methods. This paper describes the definition of the problem and preliminary simulation results for the initial model inception part, in which time dependent effects are not yet included.

  20. Network Location and Risk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission among Injecting Drug Users: Results of Multiple Membership Multilevel Modeling of Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shahesmaeili, Armita; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Soori, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the implementation of harm reduction program, some injecting drug users (IDU) continue to engage in high-risk behaviors. It seems that there are some social factors that contribute to risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in IDUs. The aim of this study was to analysis the social network of IDUs and examines the effect of network location on HIV transmission risk using the multiple membership multilevel models. Methods From October 2013 to March 2014 we conducted face-to-face interviews on 147 IDUs. We asked participants to nominate up to 20 people whom they had more than causal contact with them during the last month and specify if each nominee is drug injector or not. We defined four Network locations as Core and Peripheries of main components. The risk of HIV transmission for each individual was measured based on 7 items scale. We applied Multiple Membership Multilevel Linear Regression analysis to examine the relationship between network location and HIV transmission risk. We used Stata and UCINET software’s for the analysis of data. Findings The mean age of participants was 37 ± 9.32. Most of the individuals were male, single and educated up to guidance school. Being a core member of the main component as like as being a member of other small components in comparison with Isolates/unlinked significantly increased the HIV Transmission risk. Engagement in methadone maintenance therapies (MMT) was associated with a decrease in HIV transmission score. Conclusion Network analysis is a useful guide to find the most influential members of IDUs network and may have a complementary role for harm reduction program. The efficacy of interventions programs can be reinforced by addressing them to core individuals within the network. Furthermore, it provides the harm reduction staff to find the broader number of IDUs who are usually hard to reach by routine outreach case-finding tasks. PMID:26322205

  1. Estimating fate and transport of multiple contaminants in the vadose zone using a multi-layered soil column and three-phase equilibrium partitioning model

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, Gregory G.

    2007-07-01

    Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and pollute drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminants. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: decay processes, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use. (authors)

  2. ESTIMATING FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING A MULTI-LAYERED SOIL COLUMN AND THREE-PHASE EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, G

    2007-05-01

    Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and contaminate drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminates. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: contaminant decay, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use.

  3. Direct analysis of eight chlorophenols in urine by large volume injection online turbulent flow solid-phase extraction liquid chromatography with multiple wavelength ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Liu, Qian; Shi, Jian-bo; Wei, Fu-sheng; Jiang, Gui-bin

    2014-02-01

    A novel method for determining eight chlorophenols (CPs) by large volume injection online turbulent flow solid-phase extraction high performance liquid chromatography in urine samples was developed. An aliquot of 1.0 mL urine sample could be analyzed directly after centrifugation. The analytes were preconcentrated online on a Turboflow C18-P SPE column, eluted in back-flush mode, and then separated on an Acclaim PA2 analytical column. Major parameters such as SPE column type, sample loading flow rate and elution time were optimized in detail. Eight CPs from monochlorophenol to pentacholophenol were measured by multiple-wavelength UV detection at four different wavelengths. The limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.5 and 2 ng/mL. The linearity range was from the limit of quantification to 1000 ng/mL for each compound, with the coefficients of determination (r(2)) ranging from 0.9990 to 0.9996. The reproducibility of intraday and interday relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 0.6% to 4.5% (n=5). The method was successfully applied to analyze eight CPs in urine samples. Good recoveries, ranging from 76.3% to 122.9%, were obtained. This simple, sensitive and accurate method provides an alternative way to rapidly analyze and monitor CPs in urine samples, especially for matters of occupational exposure. PMID:24401430

  4. Comparative Effectiveness of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Using Insulin Analogs and Multiple Daily Injections in Pregnant Women with Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maruthur, Nisa M.; Nicholson, Wanda K.; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Brown, Todd; Suh, Yong; Wilson, Lisa M.; Nannes, Elisabeth B.; Berger, Zack; Bass, Eric B.; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We systematically reviewed the effectiveness and safety of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) with insulin analogs compared with multiple daily injections (MDI) in pregnant women with diabetes mellitus. We searched Medline®, Embase®, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials through May 2013. Studies comparing CSII with MDI in pregnant women with diabetes mellitus were included. Studies using regular insulin CSII were excluded. We conducted meta-analyses where there were two or more comparable studies based on the type of insulin used in the MDI arm. Seven cohort studies of pregnant women with type 1 diabetes reported improvement in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in both groups. Meta-analysis showed no difference in maternal and fetal outcomes for CSII versus MDI. Results were similar when CSII was compared with MDI with insulin analogs or regular insulin. Studies had moderate to high risk bias with incomplete descriptions of study methodology, populations, treatments, follow up, and outcomes. We conclude that observational studies reported similar improvements in HbA1c with CSII and MDI during pregnancy, but evidence was insufficient to rule out possible important differences between CSII and MDI for maternal and fetal outcomes. This highlights the need for future studies to examine the effectiveness and safety of CSII with insulin analogs and MDI in pregnant women with diabetes mellitus. PMID:25713996

  5. Expression of multiple Sox genes through embryonic development in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi is spatially restricted to zones of cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Sox genes, a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of a high mobility group (HMG) box domain, are among the central groups of developmental regulators in the animal kingdom. They are indispensable in progenitor cell fate determination, and various Sox family members are involved in managing the critical balance between stem cells and differentiating cells. There are 20 mammalian Sox genes that are divided into five major groups (B, C, D, E, and F). True Sox genes have been identified in all animal lineages but not outside Metazoa, indicating that this gene family arose at the origin of the animals. Whole-genome sequencing of the lobate ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi allowed us to examine the full complement and expression of the Sox gene family in this early-branching animal lineage. Results Our phylogenetic analyses of the Sox gene family were generally in agreement with previous studies and placed five of the six Mnemiopsis Sox genes into one of the major Sox groups: SoxB (MleSox1), SoxC (MleSox2), SoxE (MleSox3, MleSox4), and SoxF (MleSox5), with one unclassified gene (MleSox6). We investigated the expression of five out of six Mnemiopsis Sox genes during early development. Expression patterns determined through in situ hybridization generally revealed spatially restricted Sox expression patterns in somatic cells within zones of cell proliferation, as determined by EdU staining. These zones were located in the apical sense organ, upper tentacle bulbs, and developing comb rows in Mnemiopsis, and coincide with similar zones identified in the cydippid ctenophore Pleurobrachia. Conclusions Our results are consistent with the established role of multiple Sox genes in the maintenance of stem cell pools. Both similarities and differences in juvenile cydippid stage expression patterns between Mnemiopsis Sox genes and their orthologs from Pleurobrachia highlight the importance of using multiple species to characterize the evolution of

  6. Vertical distribution, transport, and exchange of carbon in the northeast Pacific Ocean: evidence for multiple zones of biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, David M.; Knauer, George A.

    1984-03-01

    A sediment trap experiment was conducted to investigate the production, decomposition, and transport of organic matter from 0 to 2000 m at a station 100 km northeast of Point Sur, California. Parameters measured included (1) rates of autotrophic production of carbon, (2) vertical depth distributions of total carbon, nitrogen, and living biomass, and (3) downward flux of organic carbon, nitrogen, ATP, RNA, and fecal pellets. Metabolic activity and microbial growth rates (RNA and DNA synthesis) were also estimated in situ, for both the 'suspended' (i.e., samples captured in standard water bottles) and 'sinking' (i.e., samples captured in sediment traps) particles. Daily depth-integrated rates of primary production averaged 564 mg C m -2, of which 10 to 15% was removed from the euphotic zone by sinking, assuming steady-state conditions. The profiles of suspended carbon, nitrogen, C:N ratios, and ATP conformed to previously published concentration-depth profiles from the region. The vertical flux profiles of organic matter, however, revealed two important features that were not evident in the suspended particulate matter profiles. First, there was an obvious mid-water depth increase (i.e., an increase in organic carbon and nitrogen flux with increasing depth) between 700 and 900 m, suggesting horizontal advection or in situ production. Similar flux profiles were also observed for ATP, RNA, and total fecal pellets. Second, the C:N ratios for the sediment trap materials collected at mid-ocean depths (600 to 1200 m) were low compared to values measured for 'suspended' particulate organic materials collected from comparable depths, supporting the in situ production hypothesis. An observed maximum in the rate of RNA and DNA synthesis for microorganisms associated with particles collected at 700 m confirmed that the flux anomalies were the result of in situ microbiological processes rather than horizontal advection. We hypothesize that the in situ activity measured at 700 m

  7. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... at golimumab injection before injecting it. Check the expiration date printed on the auto-injection device or carton and do not use the medication if the expiration date has passed. Do not use a prefilled syringe ...

  8. Injection current dependences of electroluminescence transition energy in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells light emitting diodes under pulsed current conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ikeda, Masao Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Shuming; Zhou, Kun; Yang, Hui; Liu, Zongshun

    2015-07-21

    Injection current dependences of electroluminescence transition energy in blue InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells light emitting diodes (LEDs) with different quantum barrier thicknesses under pulsed current conditions have been analyzed taking into account the related effects including deformation caused by lattice strain, quantum confined Stark effects due to polarization field partly screened by carriers, band gap renormalization, Stokes-like shift due to compositional fluctuations which are supposed to be random alloy fluctuations in the sub-nanometer scale, band filling effect (Burstein-Moss shift), and quantum levels in finite triangular wells. The bandgap renormalization and band filling effect occurring at high concentrations oppose one another, however, the renormalization effect dominates in the concentration range studied, since the band filling effect arising from the filling in the tail states in the valence band of quantum wells is much smaller than the case in the bulk materials. In order to correlate the carrier densities with current densities, the nonradiative recombination rates were deduced experimentally by curve-fitting to the external quantum efficiencies. The transition energies in LEDs both with 15 nm quantum barriers and 5 nm quantum barriers, calculated using full strengths of theoretical macroscopic polarization given by Barnardini and Fiorentini [Phys. Status Solidi B 216, 391 (1999)] are in excellent accordance with experimental results. The LED with 5 nm barriers has been shown to exhibit a higher transition energy and a smaller blue shift than those of LED with 15 nm barriers, which is mainly caused by the smaller internal polarization field in the quantum wells.

  9. A Comparison of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion vs. Multiple Daily Insulin Injection in Children with Type I Diabetes in Kuwait: Glycemic Control, Insulin Requirement, and BMI

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Mohammad; Al-Mahdi, Maria; Al-Sanaa, Hala; Al-Kandari, Hessa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and multiple daily insulin injections (MDI) are two methods currently used to manage type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Here we compare our experiences with CSII and MDI in a large cohort of pediatric patients in Kuwait. Methods Data on 326 patients with T1DM who were started on CSII between 2007 and 2012 were retrospectively compared with those of 326 patients on MDI. They were matched for sex, age at diagnosis, T1DM duration, glycemic control, insulin requirement, and body mass index (BMI). Data were collected at baseline and every three months and included glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin dose, and adverse events (severe hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, and skin problems). Results The main reason for switching to CSII was to achieve better glycemic control (37%), followed by reducing hypoglycemia, and improving the quality of life (13.3% each). Although HbA1c decrease was most significant in the first year, it continued to be significantly lower in the CSII group compared to the MDI throughout the study period. Total daily insulin requirements were significantly lower in the CSII group. BMI increased in both groups, but the difference was significant only at the end of the fifth year. There was no significant change in the rate of diabetic ketoacidosis in either group. The CSII patients had more severe hypoglycemic episodes at baseline; however, it significantly decreased throughout the study period. Only five patients discontinued CSII therapy and two of these restarted within three months. Conclusion CSII is a safe intensive insulin therapy in youngsters with T1DM and achieved markedly fewer severe hypoglycemic episodes and lower daily insulin requirements PMID:26421114

  10. The carbocyanine dye DiD labels in vitro and in vivo neural stem cells of the subventricular zone as well as myelinated structures following in vivo injection in the lateral ventricle.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Dario; Barreau, Kristell; Eyer, Joël

    2016-02-01

    Carbocyanines are fluorescent lipophilic cationic dyes used since the early 1980s as neuronal tracers. Several applications of these compounds have been developed thanks to their low cell toxicity, lateral diffusion within the cellular membranes, and good photostability. 1,1'-Dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindodicarbocyanine 4-chlorobenzenesulfonate (DiD) is an interesting component of this family because, in addition to the classic carbocyanine properties, it has a longer wavelength compared with its analogues. That makes DiD an excellent carbocyanine for labeling cells and tissues with significant intrinsic fluorescence. Drug encapsulation, drug delivery, and cellular transplantation are also fields using DiD-based systems where having detailed knowledge about its behavior as a single entity is important. Recently, promising studies concerned neural stem cells from the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle in the brain (their natural niche) and their potential therapeutic use. Here, we show that DiD is able to label these stem cells in vitro and present basilar information concerning its pharmacokinetics, concentrations, and microscope protocols. Moreover, when DiD is injected in vivo in the cerebrospinal fluid present in the lateral ventricle of rat, it also labels stem cells as well as myelinated structures of the caudoputamen. This analysis provides a database to consult when planning experiments concerning DiD and neural stem cells from the subventricular zone. PMID:26566852

  11. Self-optimizing MPC of melt temperature in injection moulding.

    PubMed

    Dubay, R

    2002-01-01

    The parameters in plastic injection moulding are highly nonlinear and interacting. Good control of plastic melt temperature for injection moulding is very important in reducing operator setup time, assuring consistent product quality, and preventing thermal degradation of the melt. Step response testing was performed on the barrel heating zones on an industrial injection moulding machine (IMM). The open loop responses indicated a high degree of process coupling between the heating zones. From these experimental step responses, a multiple-input-multiple-output model predictive control strategy was developed and practically implemented. The requirement of negligible overshoot is important to the plastics industry for preventing material overheating and wastage, and reducing machine operator setup time. A generic learning and self-optimizing MPC methodology was developed and implemented on the IMM to control melt temperature for any polymer to be moulded on any machine having different electrical heater capacities. The control performance was tested for varying setpoint trajectories typical of normal machine operations. The results showed that the predictive controller provided good control of melt temperature for all zones with negligible oscillations, and, therefore, eliminated material degradation and extended machine setup time. PMID:12014805

  12. Injectable barriers for waste isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Apps, J.; Pruess, K.; Muller, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper the authors report laboratory work and numerical simulation done in support of development and demonstration of injectable barriers formed from either of two fluids: colloidal silica or polysiloxane. Two principal problems addressed here are control of gel time and control of plume emplacement in the vadose zone. Gel time must be controlled so that the viscosity of the barrier fluid remains low long enough to inject the barrier, but increases soon enough to gel the barrier in place. During injection, the viscosity must be low enough to avoid high injection pressures which could uplift or fracture the formation. To test the grout gel time in the soil, the injection pressure was monitored as grouts were injected into sandpacks. When grout is injected into the vadose zone, it slumps under the influence of gravity, and redistributes due to capillary forces as it gels. The authors have developed a new module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection into the vadose zone, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of gel concentration and time. They have also developed a model to calculate soil properties after complete solidification of the grout. The numerical model has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests. The authors present the results of computer simulations of grout injection, redistribution, and solidification.

  13. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... cancer, and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  14. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... become pregnant during your treatment, stop using mipomersen injection and call your doctor immediately. ... Mipomersen injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these ... and tiredness that are most likely to occur during the first 2 days ...

  15. Levofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections. Levofloxacin injection is also used to prevent anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air. Levofloxacin injection is in ...

  16. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used to prevent or treat anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air. Ciprofloxacin injection is in ...

  17. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with at least one other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a ... antifungals such as itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), and voriconazole (Vfend); cisapride (Propulsid) (not available in the U.S.); ...

  18. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  19. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  20. Daratumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... any laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are receiving or received daratumumab injection. ... a blood transfusion, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are receiving or received daratumumab injection. ...

  1. Pralatrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... will need to take folic acid and vitamin B12 during your treatment with pralatrexate injection to help ... that you will need to receive a vitamin B12 injection no more than 10 weeks before your ...

  2. Cefoxitin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephamycin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefoxitin injection will not work ...

  3. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work ...

  4. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat infections caused by certain bacteria. Oxacillin injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as oxacillin injection will not work ...

  5. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat infections caused by certain types of bacteria. Nafcillin injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as nafcillin injection will not work ...

  6. Doripenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract, kidney, and abdomen that are caused by bacteria. Doripenem injection is not approved by the Food ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as doripenem injection will not work ...

  7. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of birth control but does not prevent the spread of human ... you have been using a different method of birth control and are switching to medroxyprogesterone injection, your doctor ...

  8. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Chloramphenicol injection is used to treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection is in a class of medications called ...

  9. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of ... people who have accidentally received an overdose of methotrexate or similar medications. Levoleucovorin injection is in a ...

  10. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  11. Palonosetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Palonosetron injection is used to prevent nausea and vomiting that may occur within 24 hours after receiving ... occur several days after receiving certain chemotherapy medications. Palonosetron injection is in a class of medications called ...

  12. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal number of red blood cells) caused by uterine fibroids (noncancerous growths in the uterus). Leuprolide injection is ... Your doctor will tell you how long your treatment with leuprolide injection will last. When used in ...

  13. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large ... injection is also used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped abusing opiate ...

  14. Posaconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Posaconazole injection is used to prevent fungal infections in people with a weakened ability to fight infection. Posaconazole injection is in a class of medications called azole antifungals. It works ...

  15. Epinephrine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Adrenalin® Chloride Solution ... a pre-filled automatic injection device containing a solution (liquid) to inject under the skin or into ... device when this date passes. Look at the solution in the device from time to time. If ...

  16. Trastuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Trastuzumab injection is used along with other medications or after other medications have been used to treat ... has spread to other parts of the body. Trastuzumab injection is also used during and after treatment ...

  17. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... using fondaparinux injection while you are in the hospital at least 6 to 8 hours after your ... you will continue to use fondaparinux after your hospital stay, you can inject fondaparinux yourself or have ...

  18. Doxycycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxycycline injection is used to treat or prevent bacterial infections, including pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections. ... certain skin, genital, intestine, and urinary system infections. Doxycycline injection may be used to treat or prevent ...

  19. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis (a condition in which the type of tissue ... parts of the body in women who have endometriosis. Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of ...

  20. Ferumoxytol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Ferumoxytol injection is in a class of medications called ...

  1. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... aripiprazole injection and aripiprazole extended-release injection developed gambling problems or other intense urges or behaviors that ... even if you do not realize that your gambling or any other intense urges or unusual behaviors ...

  2. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOEpatents

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  3. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    SciTech Connect

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  4. Integration of paleoseismic data from multiple sites to develop an objective earthquake chronology: Application to the Weber segment of the Wasatch fault zone, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DuRoss, Christopher B.; Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Olig, Susan S.; Lund, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to evaluate and integrate paleoseismic data from multiple sites into a single, objective measure of earthquake timing and recurrence on discrete segments of active faults. We apply this method to the Weber segment (WS) of the Wasatch fault zone using data from four fault-trench studies completed between 1981 and 2009. After systematically reevaluating the stratigraphic and chronologic data from each trench site, we constructed time-stratigraphic OxCal models that yield site probability density functions (PDFs) of the times of individual earthquakes. We next qualitatively correlated the site PDFs into a segment-wide earthquake chronology, which is supported by overlapping site PDFs, large per-event displacements, and prominent segment boundaries. For each segment-wide earthquake, we computed the product of the site PDF probabilities in common time bins, which emphasizes the overlap in the site earthquake times, and gives more weight to the narrowest, best-defined PDFs. The product method yields smaller earthquake-timing uncertainties compared to taking the mean of the site PDFs, but is best suited to earthquakes constrained by broad, overlapping site PDFs. We calculated segment-wide earthquake recurrence intervals and uncertainties using a Monte Carlo model. Five surface-faulting earthquakes occurred on the WS at about 5.9, 4.5, 3.1, 1.1, and 0.6 ka. With the exception of the 1.1-ka event, we used the product method to define the earthquake times. The revised WS chronology yields a mean recurrence interval of 1.3 kyr (0.7–1.9-kyr estimated two-sigma [2δ] range based on interevent recurrence). These data help clarify the paleoearthquake history of the WS, including the important question of the timing and rupture extent of the most recent earthquake, and are essential to the improvement of earthquake-probability assessments for the Wasatch Front region.

  5. Integration of paleoseismic data from multiple sites to develop an objective earthquake chronology: Application to the Weber segment of the Wasatch fault zone, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DuRoss, C.B.; Personius, S.F.; Crone, A.J.; Olig, S.S.; Lund, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to evaluate and integrate paleoseismic data from multiple sites into a single, objective measure of earthquake timing and recurrence on discrete segments of active faults. We apply this method to the Weber segment (WS) of the Wasatch fault zone using data from four fault-trench studies completed between 1981 and 2009. After systematically reevaluating the stratigraphic and chronologic data from each trench site, we constructed time-stratigraphic OxCal models that yield site probability density functions (PDFs) of the times of individual earthquakes. We next qualitatively correlated the site PDFs into a segment-wide earthquake chronology, which is supported by overlapping site PDFs, large per-event displacements, and prominent segment boundaries. For each segment-wide earthquake, we computed the product of the site PDF probabilities in common time bins, which emphasizes the overlap in the site earthquake times, and gives more weight to the narrowest, best-defined PDFs. The product method yields smaller earthquake-timing uncertainties compared to taking the mean of the site PDFs, but is best suited to earthquakes constrained by broad, overlapping site PDFs. We calculated segment-wide earthquake recurrence intervals and uncertainties using a Monte Carlo model. Five surface-faulting earthquakes occurred on the WS at about 5.9, 4.5, 3.1, 1.1, and 0.6 ka. With the exception of the 1.1-ka event, we used the product method to define the earthquake times. The revised WS chronology yields a mean recurrence interval of 1.3 kyr (0.7-1.9-kyr estimated two-sigma [2??] range based on interevent recurrence). These data help clarify the paleoearthquake history of the WS, including the important question of the timing and rupture extent of the most recent earthquake, and are essential to the improvement of earthquake-probability assessments for the Wasatch Front region.

  6. Direct measurements and analysis of skin friction and cooling downstream of multiple flush-slot injection into a turbulent Mach 6 boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, F. G.; Strokowski, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the reduction in surface skin friction and the effectiveness of surface cooling downstream of one to four successive flush slots injecting cold air at an angle of 10 deg into a turbulent Mach 6 boundary layer. Data were obtained by direct measurement of surface shear and equilibrium temperatures, respectively. Increasing the number of slots decreased the skin friction, but the incremental improvement in skin-friction reduction decreased as the number of slots was increased. Cooling effectiveness was found to improve, for a given total mass injection, as the number of slots was increased from one to four. Comparison with previously reported step-slot data, however, indicated that step slots with tangential injection are more effective for both reducing skin friction and cooling than the present flush-slot configuration. Finite-difference predictions are in reasonable agreement with skin-friction data and with boundary-layer profile data.

  7. Bayesian Inversion for Ultra Low Velocity Zone parameters in the Earth's Lowermost Mantle: Multiple-Layered Structure Confirmed Beneath the East of the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachhai, Surya; Tkalcic, Hrvoje; Dettmer, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Ultra low velocity zones (ULVZs) are structures sitting on the top of the core mantle boundary with a strong reduction in P- and S-wave velocity and increased density. ULVZs have been extensively studied using 1-D and 2-D modelling of seismic waves reflected from and transmitted through the core mantle boundary. However, their physical origin and associated dynamics are currently debated. In addition, the forward problem (waveform modelling) is highly non-linear and non-unique with strong correlations between ULVZ parameters. We develop a rigorous Bayesian inversion to address these challenges. Sampling of the posterior probability density (the solution to a Bayesian inverse problem) is based on parallel interacting Markov chains (parallel tempering), which allows efficient sampling of difficult parameter spaces including multiple modes and strong parameter correlations. Uncertainties of ULVZ parameters are naturally addressed by the posterior distribution. In addition, noise on the data (residual errors) is addressed by a hierarchical Bayesian model which estimates the standard deviation from the data. Results are examined in terms of marginal densities of the ULVZ posterior, including profile-marginal and joint-marginal densities. After demonstrating the feasibility of the method with synthetic examples, we apply the hierarchical Bayesian inversion to the waveforms of core reflected phases (ScP) from earthquakes originating in the Indonesian region and recorded on Hi-Net array stations in Japan. These waves sample the CMB beneath the east of the Philippines. The Bayesian information criterion (BIC) is applied to select the optimal parametrization (i.e., the number of layers) from competing ULVZ models. The BIC confirms the existence of a two-layer ULVZ in the lowermost mantle beneath the east of the Philippines. The upper ULVZ layer shows a sharp decrease in P- and S-wave velocity of up to ~11% and ~29%, and an increase in density of up to ~28%. This layer could

  8. Multiple episodes of breccia formation by particle fluidization in fault zones: implications repeated, rupture-controlled fluid flow and seismicity styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Breccias in the Rusey Fault (Cornwall, UK) provide insights about the dynamics of fault behaviour, fluid flow and flow velocities when fault ruptures breach overpressured reservoirs of hydrothermal fluid. The 3 m wide fault core comprises a mix of breccias, banded cataclasites, probable psuedotachylites and extension veins. The damage products are dominated by high dilation breccias with cockade-like textures in which rock fragments are mantled by spheroidal overgrowths of quartz. Although none of the rock fragment cores of accretionary spheroids are in contact with their neighbours, the spheroidal overgrowths do contact each other and are at least partially cemented together. The hydrothermal overgrowths mostly comprise either outwards coarsening crystals that radiate from the surface of the core particle, or finer-grained, inequigranular to mesh-like intergrowths. Concentric textural banding and oscillatory growth zones are present in some hydrothermal overgrowths. The breccias occur as fault-parallel layers and lenses, each up to several tens of centimeter thick. Adjacent layers are characterised by texturally-distinct ranges of clast sizes and different proportions of clasts to hydrothermal overgrowths. Many texturally-distinct breccia layers are present within the fault core. Some breccia layers truncate others and many breccia layers exhibit grainsize grading or banding. Clasts in the breccias include fragments of wall-rock, veins and various fault damage products, including fragments of earlier generations of cemented breccia. As brecciation was episodic and separated by periods of cementation, the breccias are interpreted to have formed as a consequence of repeated seismogenic failure. The distinctive textures in the breccias are interpreted to have formed by fluidization of fault damage products in a high fluid flux regime, with each breccia layer being the product of one, rupture-related flow episode. Hydrothermal coatings developed while clasts were in a

  9. Time of interferon-beta 1a injection and duration of treatment affect clinical side effects and acute changes of plasma hormone and cytokine levels in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kümpfel, T; Schwan, M; Pollmächer, Th; Yassouridis, A; Uhr, M; Trenkwalder, C; Weber, F

    2007-11-01

    During initiation of interferon-beta (IFN-beta) therapy, many multiple sclerosis (MS) patients experience systemic side effects which may depend on the time point of IFN-beta injection. We investigated the time course of plasma hormone-, cytokine- and cytokine-receptor concentrations after the first injection of IFN-beta either at 8.00 a.m. (group A) or at 6.00 p.m. (group B) and quantified clinical side effects within the first 9 h in 16 medication free patients with relapsing-remitting MS. This investigation was repeated after 6-month IFN-beta therapy. Plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations followed their physiological rhythms, with lower levels in the evening compared to the morning, but raised earlier and stronger in group B after IFN-beta administration. IFN-beta injection in the evening led to a prompter increase of plasma IL-6 concentrations and temperature during the first hours and correlated to more intense clinical side effects compared to group A. Plasma IL-10 concentrations increased more in group A compared to group B, but sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII concentrations raised 7 h after IFN-beta injection only in group B. Acute effects on plasma hormone and cytokine concentrations adapted after 6-month IFN-beta treatment, while diurnal variations were still present. Baseline sTNF-RII concentrations were elevated after 6-month IFN-beta therapy only in group A. Our results show that time point of IFN-beta injection has differential effects on acute changes of plasma hormone and cytokine concentrations and is related to systemic side effects. This may have implications on the tolerability and effectiveness of IFN-beta therapy. PMID:17967841

  10. Rapid separation and identification of multiple constituents in Danhong Injection by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun-Qun; Dong, Xin; Liu, Xin-Guang; Gao, Wen; Li, Ping; Yang, Hua

    2016-02-01

    To characterize and identify multiple constituents in Danhong injection (DHI), a fast ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-QTOF/MS) method was established and validated in the present study. A total of 63 compounds, including 33 phenolic acids, 2 C-glycosyl quinochalcones, 6 flavonoid O-glycosides, 4 iridoid glycosides, 6 organic acids, 5 amino acids, and 3 nucleosides, were identified or tentatively characterized. In conclusion, the UHPLC-ESI-QTOF/MS method is useful and efficient for in-depth structural elucidation of chemical compounds in complex matrices of herbal medicines such as DHI. PMID:26968681

  11. Interferon Beta-1a Subcutaneous Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... under the skin). It is usually injected three times a week. You should inject this medication on ...

  12. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. ... Before using lacosamide injection,tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to lacosamide, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in lacosamide injection. Ask your pharmacist for a ...

  13. Dexamethasone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... lines under the skin skin depressions at the injection site increased body fat or movement to different areas of your body inappropriate happiness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep extreme ... increased appetite injection site pain or redness Some side effects can ...

  14. Pralatrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... you that you will need to receive a vitamin B12 injection no more than 10 weeks before your first ... tests to check your body's response to pralatrexate injection.Ask your ... such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  15. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... lack of vitamin B12 or inability to absorb vitamin B12. Your doctor will not prescribe leucovorin injection to treat this type of anemia.tell your ... tests to check your body's response to leucovorin injection.It is ... such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  16. Etanercept Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and colorless. The liquid may contain small white particles, but should not contain large or colored particles. Do not use a syringe or dosing pen ... liquid is cloudy or contains large or colored particles.The best place to inject etanercept injection is ...

  17. Quantitative analysis of fragrance in selectable one dimensional or two dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with simultaneous detection of multiple detectors in single injection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Peng; Wan, Tow Shi; Min, Christina Liew Shu; Osborne, Murray; Ng, Khim Hui

    2014-03-14

    A selectable one-dimensional ((1)D) or two-dimensional ((2)D) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system coupled with flame ionization detector (FID) and olfactory detection port (ODP) was employed in this study to analyze perfume oil and fragrance in shower gel. A split/splitless (SSL) injector and a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) injector are connected via a 2-way splitter of capillary flow technology (CFT) in this selectable (1)D/(2)D GC-MS/FID/ODP system to facilitate liquid sample injections and thermal desorption (TD) for stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) technique, respectively. The dual-linked injectors set-up enable the use of two different injector ports (one at a time) in single sequence run without having to relocate the (1)D capillary column from one inlet to another. Target analytes were separated in (1)D GC-MS/FID/ODP and followed by further separation of co-elution mixture from (1)D in (2)D GC-MS/FID/ODP in single injection without any instrumental reconfiguration. A (1)D/(2)D quantitative analysis method was developed and validated for its repeatability - tR; calculated linear retention indices (LRI); response ratio in both MS and FID signal, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), as well as linearity over a concentration range. The method was successfully applied in quantitative analysis of perfume solution at different concentration level (RSD≤0.01%, n=5) and shower gel spiked with perfume at different dosages (RSD≤0.04%, n=5) with good recovery (96-103% for SSL injection; 94-107% for stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption (SBSE-TD). PMID:24548435

  18. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  19. THE DETERMINATION OF MERCURY AND MULTIPLE METALS IN DIETARY MATRICES USING DIRECT INJECTION NEBULIZATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY (DIN-ICP/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury (Hg) is a Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxin. Currently, low-level mercury (Hg) and low-level multiple-metals analyses require separate methods. Due to the high costs of performing both types of analyses, research planners often have to choose one or the other. For examp...

  20. Fuel injection

    SciTech Connect

    Iiyoshi, A.; Vogoshi, S.

    1983-12-01

    The Plasma Physics Laboratory and the Dept. of Electrical Engineering report on three types of pellet injectors which have different applications: injection of a pellet into a magnetic bottle for magnetic confinement; injection of a pellet into a vacuum chamber for an inertial confinement experiment; and injection of a pellet into a magnetic bottle where the pellet is ionized by high-power laser irradiation for target plasma production. The requirements of pellet injectors are summarized in a table. Theoretical studies on pellet ablation in hot plasma and ablated particle diffusion are underway.

  1. Multiple daily injection of insulin regimen for a 10-month-old infant with type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hyun; Shin, So Young; Shim, Ye Jee; Choi, Jin Hyeok; Kim, Heung Sik

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing worldwide, and the greatest increase has been observed in very young children under 4 years of age. A case of infantile diabetic ketoacidosis in a 10-month-old male infant was encountered by these authors. The infant's fasting glucose level was 490 mg/dL, his PH was 7.13, his pCO2 was 15 mmHg, and his bicarbonate level was 5.0 mmol/L. The glycosylated hemoglobin level had increased to 9.4%. Ketonuria and glucosuria were detected in the urinalysis. The fasting C-peptide and insulin levels had decreased. The infant was positive for anti-insulin and antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. Immediately after the infant's admission, fluid therapy and intravenous insulin infusion therapy were started. On the second day of the infant's hospitalization and after fluid therapy, he recovered from his lethargic condition, and his general condition improved. Feeding was started on the third day, and he was fed a formula 5 to 7 times a day and ate rice, vegetables, and lean meat. Due to the frequent feeding, the frequency of rapid-acting insulin injection was increased from 3 times before feeding to 5 times, adjusted according to the feeding frequency. The total dose of insulin that was injected was 0.8-1.1 IU/kg/day, and the infant was discharged on the 12th day of his hospitalization. The case is presented herein with a brief review of the relevant literature. PMID:27462587

  2. Multiple daily injection of insulin regimen for a 10-month-old infant with type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Hyun; Shin, So Young; Shim, Ye Jee; Choi, Jin Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing worldwide, and the greatest increase has been observed in very young children under 4 years of age. A case of infantile diabetic ketoacidosis in a 10-month-old male infant was encountered by these authors. The infant's fasting glucose level was 490 mg/dL, his PH was 7.13, his pCO2 was 15 mmHg, and his bicarbonate level was 5.0 mmol/L. The glycosylated hemoglobin level had increased to 9.4%. Ketonuria and glucosuria were detected in the urinalysis. The fasting C-peptide and insulin levels had decreased. The infant was positive for anti-insulin and antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. Immediately after the infant's admission, fluid therapy and intravenous insulin infusion therapy were started. On the second day of the infant's hospitalization and after fluid therapy, he recovered from his lethargic condition, and his general condition improved. Feeding was started on the third day, and he was fed a formula 5 to 7 times a day and ate rice, vegetables, and lean meat. Due to the frequent feeding, the frequency of rapid-acting insulin injection was increased from 3 times before feeding to 5 times, adjusted according to the feeding frequency. The total dose of insulin that was injected was 0.8–1.1 IU/kg/day, and the infant was discharged on the 12th day of his hospitalization. The case is presented herein with a brief review of the relevant literature. PMID:27462587

  3. Paleostress reconstruction from calcite twin and fault-slip data using the multiple inverse method in the East Walanae fault zone: Implications for the Neogene contraction in South Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaya, Asri; Nishikawa, Osamu

    2013-10-01

    A new approach for paleostress analysis using the multiple inverse method with calcite twin data including untwinned e-plane was performed in the East Walanae fault (EWF) zone in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. Application of untwinned e-plane data of calcite grain to constrain paleostress determination is the first attempt for this method. Stress states caused by the collision of the south-east margin of Sundaland with the Australian microcontinents during the Pliocene were successfully detected from a combination of calcite-twin data and fault-slip data. This Pliocene NE-SW-to-E-W-directed maximum compression activated the EWF as a reverse fault with a dextral component of slip with pervasive development of secondary structures in the narrow zone between Bone Mountain and Walanae Depression.

  4. Certolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has not improved when treated with other medications, rheumatoid arthritis (a condition in which the body attacks its ... continues. When certolizumab injection is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, it is usually given every other week and ...

  5. Ramucirumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... dose of ramucirumab injection. Tell your doctor or nurse if you experience any of the following while you receive ramucirumab: uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body; back pain or spasms; chest pain and tightness; chills; flushing; ...

  6. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs where eggs are formed) and small cell lung cancer (a type of cancer that begins in the ... topotecan injection is used to treat ovarian or lung cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  7. Colistimethate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotic, to help treat your infection. The drug will be either injected directly into a vein through ... catheter or added to an intravenous fluid that will drip through a needle or catheter into a ...

  8. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications to relieve pain in people with advanced prostate cancer who did not respond to other medications. Mitoxantrone ... doses). When mitoxantrone injection is used to treat prostate cancer, it is usually given once every 21 days. ...

  9. Palivizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this medicine each month during RSV season. Your health care provider will let you know when the monthly injections are no longer needed.Your child's health care provider (doctor, nurse, or pharmacist) may measure ...

  10. Terbutaline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Terbutaline injection is used to treat wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness caused by asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. Terbutaline is in a class of medications called beta ...

  11. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body and causes pain, heavy or irregular menstruation [periods], and other symptoms). Leuprolide injection (Lupron ... mention any of the following: certain medications for irregular heartbeat such as amiodarone (Cordarone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide ( ...

  12. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to treat the ... children. Store it at room temperature, away from light, excess heat, and moisture (not in the bathroom). ...

  13. Insulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraceptives (birth control pills, patches, rings, injections, or implants); niacin (Niacor, Niaspan, Slo-Niacin); octreotide (Sandostatin);oral ... cramps abnormal heartbeat large weight gain in a short period of time swelling of the arms, hands, ...

  14. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... had a serious allergic reaction (difficulty breathing or swallowing or swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, ... the face, throat, tongue, lips, or eyes difficulty swallowing or breathing Fondaparinux injection may cause other side ...

  15. Haloperidol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emotions). Haloperidol injection is also used to control motor tics (uncontrollable need to repeat certain body movements) ... people who have Tourette's disorder (condition characterized by motor or verbal tics). Haloperidol is in a class ...

  16. Certolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes pain, swelling, and damage) including the following: Crohn's disease (a condition in which the body attacks the ... home. When certolizumab injection is used to treat Crohn's disease, it is usually given every two weeks for ...

  17. Natalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent episodes of symptoms in people who have Crohn's disease (a condition in which the body attacks the ... If you are receiving natalizumab injection to treat Crohn's disease, your symptoms should improve during the first few ...

  18. Daptomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood infections or serious skin infections caused by bacteria. Daptomycin injection is in a class of medications called cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for treating colds, flu, ...

  19. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Ciprofloxacin injection is also used to prevent or ... of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections. Antibiotics will not work for ...

  20. Gentamicin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as gentamicin injection will not work ...

  1. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. It is also used for the prevention of ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ertapenem injection will not work ...

  2. Cefepime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia, and skin, urinary tract, and kidney ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefepime injection will not work ...

  3. Ceftriaxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as gonorrhea (a sexually transmitted disease), pelvic ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftriaxone injection will not work ...

  4. Moxifloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin, and abdominal (stomach area) infections caused by bacteria. Moxifloxacin injection is in a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing the bacteria that cause infections. Antibiotics will not work against ...

  5. Ceftaroline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections and pneumonia (lung infection) caused by certain bacteria. Ceftaroline is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftaroline injection will not work ...

  6. Tobramycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as tobramycin injection will not work ...

  7. Cefazolin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including skin, bone, joint, genital, blood, heart valve, ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefazolin injection will not work ...

  8. Cefotaxime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefotaxime injection will not work ...

  9. Amikacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as amikacin injection will not work ...

  10. Ampicillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ampicillin injection will not work ...

  11. Cefuroxime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefuroxime injection will not work ...

  12. Vancomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called glycopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as vancomycin injection ... infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

  13. Ceftazidime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftazidime injection will not work ...

  14. Telavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious skin infections caused by certain types of bacteria. Telavancin injection is in a class of medications ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for colds, flu, or ...

  15. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection, prefilled syringes containing diluent (liquid to be mixed with teduglutide powder), needles to attach to the diluent syringe, dosing syringes with needles attached, and alcohol swab pads. Throw away needles, syringes, and vials ...

  16. Cefoxitin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called cephamycin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefoxitin injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  17. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as nafcillin injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  18. Cefepime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefepime injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Using antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  19. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as oxacillin injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  20. Dexamethasone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe allergic reactions. It is used in the management of certain types of edema (fluid retention and ... needed for normal body functioning) and in the management of certain types of shock. Dexamethasone injection is ...

  1. Pembrolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat a certain type of non-small-cell lung cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or to ... successfully with other medications for non-small-cell lung cancer. Pembrolizumab injection is in a class of medications ...

  2. Ibandronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ibandronate is in a class of medications called bisphosphonates. It works by preventing bone breakdown and increasing ... while receiving this medication.Being treated with a bisphosphonate medication such as ibandronate injection for osteoporosis may ...

  3. Omalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma attacks (sudden episodes of wheezing, shortness of breath, and trouble breathing) in people with allergic asthma ( ... receiving a dose of omalizumab injection shortness of breath coughing up blood skin sores severe pain, numbness ...

  4. Necitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest pain; shortness of breath; dizziness; loss of consciousness; or fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeat.Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory.Talk to your doctor about the risks of receiving necitumumab injection.

  5. Dolasetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... receiving cancer chemotherapy medications. Dolasetron is in a class of medications called serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. ... stiff or twitching muscles seizures coma (loss of consciousness) Dolasetron injection may cause other side effects. Call ...

  6. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... also used together with other medications to treat cervical cancer (cancer that begins in the opening of the ... days. When topotecan injection is used to treat cervical cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  7. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ertapenem injection is used to treat certain serious infections, including pneumonia and urinary tract, skin, diabetic foot, ... for the prevention of infections following colorectal surgery. Ertapenem is in a class of medications called carbapenem ...

  8. Octreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediate-release injection is also used to control diarrhea and flushing caused by carcinoid tumors (slow-growing ... symptoms are severe or do not go away: diarrhea constipation pale, bulky, foul-smelling stools constantly feeling ...

  9. Infliximab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for 2 hours afterward. A doctor or ... the following symptoms during or shortly after your infusion: hives; rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, ...

  10. Vedolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for several hours afterward. A doctor or ... of the following symptoms during or after your infusion: rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, ...

  11. Panitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a solution (liquid) to be given by infusion (injected into a vein). It is usually given ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. Panitumumab is usually given once every 2 ...

  12. Tositumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive tositumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  13. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive ibritumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  14. Temozolomide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Temozolomide is used to treat certain types of brain tumors. Temozolomide is in a class of medications called ... injected once a day. For some types of brain tumors, temozolomide is given daily for 42 to 49 ...

  15. Tigecycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain serious infections including community acquired pneumonia (a lung infection that developed in a person ... Tigecycline injection should not be used to treat pneumonia that developed in people who were in a ...

  16. Acetaminophen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used in combination with opioid (narcotic) medications to relieve moderate to severe pain. Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing ...

  17. Dexrazoxane Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain side effects that may be caused by chemotherapy medications. Dexrazoxane injection (Zinecard) is used to prevent ... tissues that may be caused when an anthracycline chemotherapy medication such as daunorubicin (Daunoxome, Cerubidine), doxorubicin (Doxil), ...

  18. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... menstrual periods), who have an increased risk for fractures (broken bones) or who cannot take or did ... receiving certain treatments that increase their risk for fractures. Denosumab injection (Xgeva) is used to reduce fractures ...

  19. Dexrazoxane Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to dexrazoxane injection or any other medications.tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  20. Oritavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... for at least 5 days after receiving oritavancin injection.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  1. Ferumoxytol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over ...

  2. Exenatide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... month. Exenatide extended-release solution is injected once weekly at any time of day without regard to ... you remember it and then continue your regular weekly schedule. However, if there are less than 3 ...

  3. Fluconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the mouth, throat, esophagus (tube leading from ... by fungus. Fluconazole is also used to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become infected ...

  4. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Mipomersen injection is used to decrease levels of cholesterol and other fatty substances in the blood in people who have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH; a rare inherited condition that ...

  5. Cefuroxime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) infections; meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround the brain ... hearing loss, if you are being treated for meningitis Cefuroxime injection may cause other side effects. Call ...

  6. Busulfan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer cells in preparation for a bone marrow transplant. Busulfan is in a class of medications called ... a total of 16 doses) before bone marrow transplant.Busulfan injection may cause seizures during therapy with ...

  7. Methylnaltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat constipation caused by opioid (narcotic) pain medications in patients with advanced illnesses ... a class of medications called peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists. It works by protecting the bowel ...

  8. Methylprednisolone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment.You may receive methylprednisolone injection in a hospital or medical facility, or you may be given ... doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with ...

  9. Ampicillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... have.You may receive ampicillin injection in a hospital or you may administer the medication at home. ... doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with ...

  10. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... bleeding fever, cough, flu-like symptoms, muscle aches, burning on urination, worsening skin problems, and other signs of infection rash blistering or peeling skin Romidepsin injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual ...

  11. Ranitidine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pancreas and small intestine that caused increased production of stomach acid). Ranitidine injection is in a ... your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response ...

  12. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is for intravenous (into a vein) use only. Giving ganciclovir through intramuscular (into a muscle) or ... the storage of ganciclovir solution. Store your medication only as directed. Make sure you understand what you ...

  13. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome in people who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) therapy. Teduglutide injection is in ... analogs. It works by improving the absorption of fluids and nutrients in the intestines.

  14. Olanzapine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Olanzapine extended-release injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... treat episodes of agitation in people who have schizophrenia or in people who have bipolar I disorder ( ...

  15. Risperidone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release (long-acting) injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... do not already have diabetes. If you have schizophrenia, you are more likely to develop diabetes than ...

  16. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injections (Abilify Maintena, Aristada) are used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... treat episodes of agitation in people who have schizophrenia or in people who have bipolar I disorder ( ...

  17. Secukinumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to see if you need to receive any vaccinations. It is important to have all vaccines appropriate ... treatment with secukinumab injection. Do not have any vaccinations during your treatment without talking to your doctor. ...

  18. Tesamorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... fat in the stomach area in adults with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have lipodystrophy (increased body ... injection is in a class of medications called human growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) analogs. It works ...

  19. Naloxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency medical treatment to reverse the life-threatening effects of a known or suspected opiate (narcotic) overdose. ... is also used after surgery to reverse the effects of opiates given during surgery. Naloxone injection is ...

  20. Methotrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Methotrexate injection is also used to treat severe psoriasis (a skin disease in which red, scaly patches ... slowing the growth of cancer cells. Methotrexate treats psoriasis by slowing the growth of skin cells to ...

  1. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes are accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to ... stomach pain sudden weight loss paleness or blue color of the fingers and toes shortness of breath ...

  2. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called RANK ligand inhibitors. It works by decreasing bone breakdown ... medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. ...

  3. Omacetaxine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... for CML and can no longer benefit from these medications or cannot take these medications due to side effects. Omacetaxine injection is ... side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: ...

  4. Basiliximab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used with other medications to prevent immediate transplant rejection (attack of the transplanted organ by the immune system of the person receiving the organ) in people who are receiving kidney transplants. Basiliximab injection is in a class of medications ...

  5. Metoclopramide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to relieve symptoms caused by slow stomach emptying in people who have diabetes. These symptoms include ... When metoclopramide injection is used to treat slowed stomach emptying due to diabetes, it may be given up ...

  6. Intrathymic Injection.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sugata; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Intrathymic injection is used in several T cell-associated immunological studies to deliver cells or other substances directly into the thymus. Here, we describe the intrathymic injection procedure involving surgical incision of the mouse with or without a thoracotomy. Though this procedure can result in poor recovery, postsurgical complications, and distress to the animal, it is actually a simple procedure that can be carried out relatively easily and quickly with experience. PMID:26294410

  7. Particles in small volume injections.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S A; Spence, J

    1983-12-01

    The level of particulate contamination in small volume injections has been examined using the light blockage (HIAC) and electrical sensing zone (Coulter counter) techniques, the HIAC system being found to be the more suitable. Particle counts on the same batch of injection showed a large and variable difference between the HIAC and the Coulter counter results, especially below 5 micron. None of the injections examined complied with the British Pharmacopoeia limits for particulates in large volume parenterals, suggesting the unsuitability of the limits for small volume parenterals. PMID:6141237

  8. Glatiramer Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which the nerves do ... minutes, but do not rub it. Glatiramer controls multiple sclerosis but does not cure it. Continue to use ...

  9. Safe and Efficacious Use of Automated Bolus Advisors in Individuals Treated With Multiple Daily Insulin Injection (MDI) Therapy: Lessons Learned From the Automated Bolus Advisor Control and Usability Study (ABACUS).

    PubMed

    Parkin, Christopher G; Barnard, Katharine; Hinnen, Deborah A

    2015-09-01

    Numerous studies have shown that use of integrated automated bolus advisors (BAs) provides significant benefits to individuals using insulin pump devices, including improved glycemic control and greater treatment satisfaction. Within the past few years, BA devices have been developed specifically for individuals treated with multiple daily insulin injection (MDI) therapy; however, many clinicians who treat these individuals may be unfamiliar with insulin pump therapy and, thus, BA use. Findings from the Automated Bolus Advisor Control and Usability Study (ABACUS) revealed that BA use can be efficacious and clinically meaningful in MDI therapy, and that most patients are willing and able to use this technology appropriately when adequate clinical support is provided. The purpose of this article is to review key learnings from ABACUS and provide practical advice for initiating BA use and monitoring therapy. PMID:25795641

  10. Use of Polyphosphate to Decrease Uranium Leaching in Hanford 300 Area Smear Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.

    2012-09-30

    The primary objective of this study is to summarize the laboratory investigations performed to evaluate short- and long-term effects of phosphate treatment on uranium leaching from 300 area smear zone sediments. Column studies were used to compare uranium leaching in phosphate-treated to untreated sediments over a year with multiple stop flow events to evaluate longevity of the uranium leaching rate and mass. A secondary objective was to compare polyphosphate injection, polyphosphate/xanthan injection, and polyphosphate infiltration technologies that deliver phosphate to sediment.

  11. Aflibercept Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD; an ongoing disease of the eye that causes loss of the ability to see straight ahead and may make it more ... used to treat macular edema after retinal vein occlusion (an eye disease ...

  12. Cabazitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... prednisone to treat prostate cancer (cancer of a male reproductive organ) that has already been treated with other medications. Cabazitaxel injection is in a class of medications called microtubule inhibitors. It works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells.

  13. Hydrocortisone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... purple blotches or lines under the skin skin depressions at the injection site increased body fat or movement to different areas of your body difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme ... increased sweating muscle weakness joint pain dizziness irregular ...

  14. Methylprednisolone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... purple blotches or lines under the skin skin depressions at the injection site increased body fat or movement to different areas of your body difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme ... increased sweating muscle weakness joint pain dizziness irregular ...

  15. Triptorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sudden wave of mild or intense body heat) decreased sexual ability or desire leg or joint pain breast pain pain, itching, swelling, or redness at the place where injection was given difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of ...

  16. Eribulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests to check your body's response to eribulin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  17. Pegaptanib Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 7 days after you receive each pegaptanib injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  18. Omalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: allergy shots (a series of injections given regularly to prevent the body from developing ...

  19. Famotidine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat ulcers (sores in the lining of the stomach or intestine) that were not successfully treated with other medications. ... Ellison syndrome (tumors in the pancreas and small intestine that caused increased production of stomach acid). Famotidine injection is in a class of ...

  20. Ranitidine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat ulcers (sores in the lining of the stomach or intestine) that were not successfully treated with other medications. ... Ellison syndrome (tumors in the pancreas and small intestine that caused increased production of stomach acid). Ranitidine injection is in a class of ...

  1. Oxytocin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider immediately: chest pain or difficulty breathing confusion fast or irregular heartbeat severe headache irritation at the injection site If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting ...

  2. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... will be given to you two times a day for 2 to 3 weeks, and then once a day, 5 to 7 days of each week.Your dose of ganciclovir will ... may give you several doses (enough for a day's supply) of premixed ganciclovir injection solution at one ...

  3. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... have received ibritumomab injection.do not have any vaccinations without talking to your doctor.you should know ... cells) and myelodysplastic syndrome (condition in which blood cells do not ... online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

  4. Tositumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... have received tositumomab injection.do not have any vaccinations without talking to your doctor.you should know ... blood cells), myelodysplastic syndrome (condition in which blood cells do not ... online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

  5. Dulaglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other body tissues where it is used for energy. Dulaglutide injection also works by slowing the movement ... In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at ...

  6. Liraglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other body tissues where it is used for energy. Liraglutide injection also slows the emptying of the ... In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at ...

  7. Albiglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other body tissues where it is used for energy. Albiglutide injection also works by slowing the movement ... In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at ...

  8. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, a novel mutated butyrylcholinesterase treatment for cocaine addiction, after single and multiple intramuscular injections in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Barak, Orit; Wildeman, Jacqueline; van de Wetering, Jeroen; Hettinga, Judith; Schuilenga-Hut, Petra; Gross, Aviva; Clark, Shane; Bassan, Merav; Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi; Mendzelevski, Boaz; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-05-01

    Human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) contributes to cocaine metabolism and has been considered for use in treating cocaine addiction and cocaine overdose. TV-1380 is a recombinant protein composed of the mature form of human serum albumin fused at its amino terminus to the carboxy-terminus of a truncated and mutated BChE. In preclinical studies, TV-1380 has been shown to rapidly eliminate cocaine in the plasma thus forestalling entry of cocaine into the brain and heart. Two randomized, blinded phase I studies were conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, following single and multiple administration in healthy subjects. TV-1380 was found to be safe and well tolerated with a long half-life (43-77 hours) and showed a dose-proportional increase in systemic exposure. Consistent with preclinical results, the ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis, TV-1380 activity clearly increased upon treatment in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, there was a direct relationship between ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis (kel ) and TV-1380 serum concentrations. There was no evidence that TV-1380 affected heart rate, the uncorrected QT interval, or the heart-rate-corrected QTcF interval. TV-1380, therefore, offers a safe once-weekly therapy to increase cocaine hydrolysis. PMID:25524052

  9. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, a novel mutated butyrylcholinesterase treatment for cocaine addiction, after single and multiple intramuscular injections in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Barak, Orit; Wildeman, Jacqueline; van de Wetering, Jeroen; Hettinga, Judith; Schuilenga-Hut, Petra; Gross, Aviva; Clark, Shane; Bassan, Merav; Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi; Mendzelevski, Boaz; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) contributes to cocaine metabolism and has been considered for use in treating cocaine addiction and cocaine overdose. TV-1380 is a recombinant protein composed of the mature form of human serum albumin fused at its amino terminus to the carboxy-terminus of a truncated and mutated BChE. In preclinical studies, TV-1380 has been shown to rapidly eliminate cocaine in the plasma thus forestalling entry of cocaine into the brain and heart. Two randomized, blinded phase I studies were conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, following single and multiple administration in healthy subjects. TV-1380 was found to be safe and well tolerated with a long half-life (43–77 hours) and showed a dose-proportional increase in systemic exposure. Consistent with preclinical results, the ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis, TV-1380 activity clearly increased upon treatment in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, there was a direct relationship between ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis (kel) and TV-1380 serum concentrations. There was no evidence that TV-1380 affected heart rate, the uncorrected QT interval, or the heart-rate-corrected QTcF interval. TV-1380, therefore, offers a safe once-weekly therapy to increase cocaine hydrolysis. PMID:25524052

  10. Modeling field-scale multiple tracer injection at a low-level waste disposal site in fractured rocks: effect of multiscale heterogeneity and source term uncertainty on conceptual understanding of mass transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Gwo, Jin-Ping; Jardine, Philip M; Sanford, William E

    2005-03-01

    Multiple factors may affect the scale-up of laboratory multi-tracer injection into structured porous media to the field. Under transient flow conditions and with multiscale heterogeneities in the field, previous attempts to scale-up laboratory experiments have not answered definitely the questions about the governing mechanisms and the spatial extent of the influence of small-scale mass transfer processes such as matrix diffusion. The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of multiscale heterogeneity, mechanistic and site model conceptualization, and source term density effect on elucidating and interpreting tracer movement in the field. Tracer release and monitoring information previously obtained in a field campaign of multiple, conservative tracer injection under natural hydraulic gradients at a low-level waste disposal site in eastern Tennessee, United States, is used for the research. A suite of two-pore-domain, or fracture-matrix, groundwater flow and transport models are calibrated and used to conduct model parameter and prediction uncertainty analyses. These efforts are facilitated by a novel nested Latin-hypercube sampling technique. Our results verify, at field scale, a multiple-pore-domain, multiscale mechanistic conceptual model that was used previously to interpret only laboratory observations. The results also suggest that, integrated over the entire field site, mass flux rates attributable to small-scale mass transfer are comparable to that of field-scale solute transport. The uncertainty analyses show that fracture spacing is the most important model parameter and model prediction uncertainty is relatively higher at the interface between the preferred flow path and its parent bedrock. The comparisons of site conceptual models indicate that the effect of matrix diffusion may be confined to the immediate neighborhood of the preferential flow path. Finally, because the relatively large amount of tracer needed for field studies, it is

  11. Natalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... of an infusion, but may happen at any time during your treatment. You will have to stay ...

  12. Incompletely Mixed Surface Transient Storage Zones at River Restoration Structures: Modeling Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endreny, T. A.; Robinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    River restoration structures, also known as river steering deflectors, are designed to reduce bank shear stress by generating wake zones between the bank and the constricted conveyance region. There is interest in characterizing the surface transient storage (STS) and associated biogeochemical processing in the STS zones around these structures to quantify the ecosystem benefits of river restoration. This research explored how the hydraulics around river restoration structures prohibits application of transient storage models designed for homogenous, completely mixed STS zones. We used slug and constant rate injections of a conservative tracer in a 3rd order river in Onondaga County, NY over the course of five experiments at varying flow regimes. Recovered breakthrough curves spanned a transect including the main channel and wake zone at a j-hook restoration structure. We noted divergent patterns of peak solute concentration and times within the wake zone regardless of transect location within the structure. Analysis reveals an inhomogeneous STS zone which is frequently still loading tracer after the main channel has peaked. The breakthrough curve loading patterns at the restoration structure violated the assumptions of simplified "random walk" 2 zone transient storage models which seek to identify representative STS zones and zone locations. Use of structure-scale Weiner filter based multi-rate mass transfer models to characterize STS zones residence times are similarly dependent on a representative zone location. Each 2 zone model assumes 1 zone is a completely mixed STS zone and the other a completely mixed main channel. Our research reveals limits to simple application of the recently developed 2 zone models, and raises important questions about the measurement scale necessary to identify critical STS properties at restoration sites. An explanation for the incompletely mixed STS zone may be the distinct hydraulics at restoration sites, including a constrained

  13. Neurological complications associated with epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-05-01

    Multiple case reports of neurological complications resulting from intraarterial injection of corticosteroids have led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue a warning, requiring label changes, warning of serious neurological events, some resulting in death. The FDA has identified 131 cases of neurological adverse events, including 41 cases of arachnoiditis. A review of the literature reveals an overwhelming proportion of the complications are related to transforaminal epidural injections, of which cervical transforaminal epidural injections constituted the majority of neurological complications. Utilization data of epidural injections in the Medicare population revealed that cervical transforaminal epidural injections constitute only 2.4 % of total epidural injections and <5 % of all transforaminal epidural injections. Multiple theories have been proposed as the cause of neurological injury including particulate steroid, arterial intimal flaps, arterial dissection, dislodgement of plaque causing embolism, arterial muscle spasm, and embolism of a fresh thrombus following disruption of the intima. PMID:25795154

  14. Vincristine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... multiple myeloma (a type of cancer of the bone marrow), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL; a type of cancer ... interfere with the normal menstrual cycle (period) in women and may temporarily or permanently stop sperm production in men. Tell your doctor if you ...

  15. Are landslides in the New Madrid Seismic Zone the result of the 1811-1812 earthquake sequence or multiple prehistoric earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Ryan; Williams, Robert; Jibson, Randall

    2014-05-01

    Previous research indicates that deep translational and rotational landslides along the bluffs east of the Mississippi River in western Tennessee were triggered by the M7-8 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquake sequence. Analysis of recently acquired airborne LiDAR data suggests the possibility of multiple generations of landslides, possibly triggered by older, similar magnitude earthquake sequences, which paleoliquifaction studies show occurred circa 1450 and about 900 A.D. Using these LiDAR data, we have remapped recent landslides along two sections of the bluffs: a northern section near Reelfoot Lake and a southern section near Meeman-Shelby State Park (20 km north of Memphis, Tennessee). The bare-earth, digital-elevation models derived from these LiDAR data have a resolution of 0.5 m and reveal valuable details of topography given the region's dense forest canopy. Our mapping confirms much of the previous landslide mapping, refutes a few previously mapped landslides, and reveals new, undetected landslides. Importantly, we observe that the landslide deposits in the Reelfoot region are characterized by rotated blocks with sharp uphill-facing scarps and steep headwall scarps, indicating youthful, relatively recent movement. In comparison, landslide deposits near Meeman-Shelby are muted in appearance, with headwall scarps and rotated blocks that are extensively dissected by gullies, indicating they might be an older generation of landslides. Because of these differences in morphology, we hypothesize that the landslides near Reelfoot Lake were triggered by the 1811-1812 earthquake sequence and that landslides near Meeman-Shelby resulted from shaking associated with earlier earthquake sequences. To test this hypothesis, we will evaluate differences in bluff height, local geology, vegetation, and proximity to known seismic sources. Furthermore, planned fieldwork will help evaluate whether the observed landslide displacements occurred in single earthquakes or if they might

  16. Evidence for multiple mechanisms of crustal contamination of magma from compositionally zoned plutons and associated ultramafic intrusions of the Alaska Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiners, P.W.; Nelson, B.K.; Nelson, S.W.

    1996-01-01

    Models of continental crustal magmagenesis commonly invoke the interaction of mafic mantle-derived magma and continental crust to explain geochemical and petrologic characteristics of crustal volcanic and plutonic rocks. This interaction and the specific mechanisms of crustal contamination associated with it are poorly understood. An excellent opportunity to study the progressive effects of crustal contamination is offered by the composite plutons of the Alaska Range, a series of nine early Tertiary, multiply intruded, compositionally zoned (peridotite to granite) plutons. Large initial Sr and Nd isotopic contrasts between the crustal country rock and likely parental magmas allow evaluation of the mechanisms and extents of crustal contamination that accompanied the crystallization of these ultramafic through granitic rocks. Three contamination processes are distinguished in these plutons. The most obvious of these is assimilation of crustal country rock concurrent with magmatic fractional crystallization (AFC), as indicated by a general trend toward crustal-like isotopic signatures with increasing differentiation. Second, many ultramafic and mafic rocks have late-stage phenocryst reaction and orthocumulate textures that suggest interaction with felsic melt. These rocks also have variable and enriched isotopic compositions that suggest that this felsic melt was isotopically enriched and probably derived from crustal country rock. Partial melt from the flysch country rock may have reacted with and contaminated these partly crystalline magmas following the precipitation and accumulation of the cumulus phenocrysts but before complete solidification of the magma. This suggests that in magmatic mush (especially of ultramafic composition) crystallizing in continental crust, a second distinct process of crustal contamination may be super-imposed on AFC or magma mixing involving the main magma body. Finally, nearly all rocks, including mafic and ultramafic rocks, have (87Sr

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Prostate Multiparametric MR Images for Detection of Aggressive Prostate Cancer in the Peripheral Zone: A Multiple Imager Study.

    PubMed

    Hoang Dinh, Au; Melodelima, Christelle; Souchon, Rémi; Lehaire, Jérôme; Bratan, Flavie; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Ruffion, Alain; Crouzet, Sébastien; Colombel, Marc; Rouvière, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To assess the intermanufacturer variability of quantitative models in discriminating cancers with a Gleason score of at least 7 among peripheral zone (PZ) lesions seen at 3-T multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods An institutional review board-approved prospective database of 257 patients who gave written consent and underwent T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast material-enhanced imaging before prostatectomy was retrospectively reviewed. It contained outlined lesions found to be suspicious for malignancy by two independent radiologists and classified as malignant or benign after correlation with prostatectomy whole-mount specimens. One hundred six patients who underwent imaging with 3-T MR systems from two manufacturers were selected (data set A, n = 72; data set B, n = 34). Eleven parameters were calculated in PZ lesions: normalized T2-weighted signal intensity, skewness and kurtosis of T2-weighted signal intensity, T2 value, wash-in rate, washout rate, time to peak (TTP), mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), 10th percentile of the ADC, and skewness and kurtosis of the histogram of the ADC values. Parameters were selected on the basis of their specificity for a sensitivity of 0.95 in diagnosing cancers with a Gleason score of at least 7, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the models was calculated. Results The model of the 10th percentile of the ADC with TTP yielded the highest AUC in both data sets. In data set A, the AUC was 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85, 0.95) or 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82, 0.94) when it was trained in data set A or B, respectively. In data set B, the AUC was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.94) or 0.86 (95% CI: 0.76, 0.95) when it was trained in data set A or B, respectively. No third variable added significantly independent information in any data set. Conclusion The model of the 10th percentile of the ADC with TTP yielded accurate results in

  18. Rapid analysis of multiple pesticide residues in fruit-based baby food using programmed temperature vaporiser injection-low-pressure gas chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cajka, Tomas; Hajslova, Jana; Lacina, Ondrej; Mastovska, Katerina; Lehotay, Steven J

    2008-04-01

    A rapid method using programmed temperature vaporiser injection-low-pressure gas chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTV-LP-GC-HR-TOF-MS) for the analysis of multiple pesticide residues in fruit-based baby food was developed. The fast and inexpensive buffered QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) extraction method and "conventional" approach that employs ethyl acetate extraction followed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) cleanup were employed for sample preparation. A PTV injector in solvent venting mode was used to reduce volume of acetonitrile and acetic acid (from the buffered QuEChERS extracts) that caused higher column bleed without their elimination. Otherwise, the time-to-digital converter would become saturated in HR-TOF-MS. For fast GC separation allowing analysis of 100 analytes within a 7 min runtime, both a high temperature programming rate and vacuum conditions in a megabore GC column were employed. The use of HR-TOF-MS allowed the unbiased identification and reliable quantification of target analytes through the application of a narrow mass window (0.02 Da) for extracting analyte ions and the availability of full spectral information even at very low levels. With only a few exceptions, the lowest calibration levels for the pesticides tested were

  19. Comparison of a Multiple Daily Insulin Injection Regimen (Glargine or Detemir Once Daily Plus Prandial Insulin Aspart) and Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (Aspart) in Short-Term Intensive Insulin Therapy for Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wen-shan; Li, Li; Wen, Jun-ping; Pan, Rong-fang; Sun, Rui-xia; Wang, Jing; Xian, Yu-xin; Cao, Cai-xia; Gao, Yan-yan

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To examine the potential differences between multiple daily injection (MDI) regimens based on new long-acting insulin analogues (glargine or detemir) plus prandial insulin aspart and continuous subcutaneous insulin aspart infusion (CSII) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods. Patients (n = 119) with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes of a duration exceeding five years were randomly assigned into three groups: Group A treated with CSII using insulin aspart; Group B treated with glargine-based MDI and Group C treated with detemir-based MDI. Results. Good glycemic control was achieved by patients in Group A in a significantly shorter duration than patients in Groups B and C. Total daily insulin, basal insulin dose and dose per kg body weight in Group A were significantly less than those in Groups B and C. Daily blood glucose fluctuation in Group A was significantly less than that in Groups B and C. There were no differences between Groups B and C. Conclusions. Aspart-based CSII may achieve good blood glucose control with less insulin doses over a shorter period compared with glargine or detemir-based MDI. No differences between glargine- and detemir-based MDI were detected in poorly controlled subjects with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23737776

  20. A marginal structural model for multiple-outcome survival data:assessing the impact of injection drug use on several causes of death in the Canadian Co-infection Cohort.

    PubMed

    Moodie, Erica E M; Stephens, David A; Klein, Marina B

    2014-04-15

    It is often the case that interest lies in the effect of an exposure on each of several distinct event types. For example, we are motivated to investigate in the impact of recent injection drug use on deaths due to each of cancer, end-stage liver disease, and overdose in the Canadian Co-infection Cohort (CCC). We develop a marginal structural model that permits estimation of cause-specific hazards in situations where more than one cause of death is of interest. Marginal structural models allow for the causal effect of treatment on outcome to be estimated using inverse-probability weighting under the assumption of no unmeasured confounding; these models are particularly useful in the presence of time-varying confounding variables, which may also mediate the effect of exposures. An asymptotic variance estimator is derived, and a cumulative incidence function estimator is given. We compare the performance of the proposed marginal structural model for multiple-outcome data to that of conventional competing risks models in simulated data and demonstrate the use of the proposed approach in the CCC. PMID:24272681

  1. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOEpatents

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  2. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  3. Common Rail Injection System Development

    SciTech Connect

    Electro-Motive,

    2005-12-30

    % improvement in fuel economy over EMD's traditional Tier I engine hardware configuration. the common rail fuel injection system enabled this added benefit by virtue of an inherent capability to provide multiple injections per power stroke at high fuel rail pressures. On the basis of the findings in this study, EMD concludes that the new electronically-controlled high-pressure common rail injection system has the potential to meet locomotive Tier 2 NOx and particulates emission standards without sacrificing the fuel economy. A number of areas to further improve the injection hardware and engine operating characteristics to further exploit the benefits of common rail injection system have also been identified.

  4. 40 CFR 148.20 - Petitions to allow injection of a waste prohibited under subpart B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... interface with an Underground Source of Drinking Water (USDW) as defined in 40 CFR part 146; or (ii) Before... free of known transmissive faults of fractures and that there is a confining zone above the injection... transmissive faults or fractures and that there is a confining zone above the injection zone. (d)...

  5. 40 CFR 148.20 - Petitions to allow injection of a waste prohibited under subpart B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... interface with an Underground Source of Drinking Water (USDW) as defined in 40 CFR part 146; or (ii) Before... free of known transmissive faults of fractures and that there is a confining zone above the injection... transmissive faults or fractures and that there is a confining zone above the injection zone. (d)...

  6. 75 FR 30392 - Approval of a Petition for Exemption from Hazardous Waste Disposal Injection Restrictions to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ..., penetrations of the confining zone, and computational models of the injection zone. EPA has determined that the... fluid migration out of the injection zone within 10,000 years, as required under 40 CFR part 148. The... sequence of permeable and less permeable sedimentary rocks, which provide additional protection from...

  7. Parametric study of injection rates with solenoid injectors in an injection quantity and rate measuring device

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Stephen; Miles, Paul C.

    2015-03-31

    A Moehwald HDA (HDA is a German acronym: Hydraulischer Druckanstieg: hydraulic pressure increase) injection quantity and rate measuring unit is used to investigate injection rates obtained with a fast-acting, preproduction diesel solenoid injector. Experimental parametric variations are performed to determine their impact on measured injection rate traces. A pilot–main injection strategy is investigated for various dwell times; these preproduction injectors can operate with very short dwell times with distinct pilot and main injection events. Dwell influences the main injection rate shape. Furthermore, a comparison between a diesel-like fuel and a gasoline-like fuel shows that injection rates are comparable for a single injection but dramatically different for multiple injections with short dwells.

  8. Parametric study of injection rates with solenoid injectors in an injection quantity and rate measuring device

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Busch, Stephen; Miles, Paul C.

    2015-03-31

    A Moehwald HDA (HDA is a German acronym: Hydraulischer Druckanstieg: hydraulic pressure increase) injection quantity and rate measuring unit is used to investigate injection rates obtained with a fast-acting, preproduction diesel solenoid injector. Experimental parametric variations are performed to determine their impact on measured injection rate traces. A pilot–main injection strategy is investigated for various dwell times; these preproduction injectors can operate with very short dwell times with distinct pilot and main injection events. Dwell influences the main injection rate shape. Furthermore, a comparison between a diesel-like fuel and a gasoline-like fuel shows that injection rates are comparable for amore » single injection but dramatically different for multiple injections with short dwells.« less

  9. Complex fluid flow revealed by monitoring CO2 injection in a fluvial formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiemin; Cook, Paul J.; Hosseini, Seyyed A.; Yang, Changbing; Romanak, Katherine D.; Zhang, Tongwei; Freifeld, Barry M.; Smyth, Rebecca C.; Zeng, Hongliu; Hovorka, Susan D.

    2012-03-01

    At Cranfield, Mississippi, United States, a large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection through an injection well (˜3,080 m deep) was continuously monitored using U-tube samplers in two observation wells located 68 and 112 m east of the injector. The Lower Tuscaloosa Formation injection zone, which consists of amalgamated fluvial point-bar and channel-fill deposits, presents an interesting environment for studying fluid flow in heterogeneous formations. Continual fluid sampling was carried out during the first month of CO2 injection. Two subsequent tracer tests using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and krypton were conducted at different injection rates to measure flow velocity change. The field observations showed significant heterogeneity of fluid flow and for the first time clearly demonstrated that fluid flow evolved with time and injection rate. It was found the wells were connected through numerous, separate flow pathways. CO2 flowed through an increasing fraction of the reservoir and sweep efficiency improved with time. The field study also first documented in situ component exchange between brine and gas phases during CO2 injection. It was found that CH4 degassed from brine and is enriched along the gas-water contact. Multiple injectate flow fronts with high CH4 concentration arrived at different times and led to gas composition fluctuations in the observation wells. The findings provide valuable insights into heterogeneous multiphase flow in rock formations and show that conventional geological models and static fluid flow simulations are unable to fully describe the heterogeneous and dynamic flow during fluid injection.

  10. FOAM: NOVEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY FOR REMEDIATION OF VADOSE ZONE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Wu, Yuxin; Foote, Martin; Zhang, Z. F.; Hubbard, Susan

    2011-07-05

    Deep vadose zone environments can be a primary source and pathway for contaminant migration to groundwater. These environments present unique characterization and remediation challenges that necessitate scrutiny and research. The thickness, depth, and intricacies of the deep vadose zone, combined with a lack of understanding of the key subsurface processes (e.g., biogeochemical and hydrologic) affecting contaminant migration, make it difficult to create validated conceptual and predictive models of subsurface flow dynamics and contaminant behavior across multiple scales. These factors also make it difficult to design and deploy sustainable remedial approaches and monitor long-term contaminant behavior after remedial actions. Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in the arid western United States where the vadose zone is hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous deep vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges which limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to the underlying aquifer prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Surfactants can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams

  11. Interferon Beta-1a Intramuscular Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1a intramuscular at around the same time of day on your injection days. Follow the ...

  12. Coupled Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2 Injection in Mt. Simon Sandstone Formation, Midwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Lu, P.; Zhu, C.; Xiao, Y.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 sequestration in deep geological formations is one of the promising options for CO2 emission reduction. While several large scale CO2 injections in saline aquifers have shown to be successful for the short-term, there is still a lack of fundamental understanding on key issues such as CO2 storage capacity, injectivity, and security over multiple spatial and temporal scales that need to be addressed. To advance these understandings, we applied multi-phase coupled reactive mass transport modeling to investigate the fate of injected CO2 and reservoir responses to the injection into Mt. Simon Formation. We developed both 1-D and 2-D reactive transport models in a radial region of 10,000 m surrounding a CO2 injection well to represent the Mt. Simon sandstone formation, which is a major regional deep saline reservoir in the Midwest, USA. Supercritical CO2 is injected into the formation for 100 years, and the modeling continues till 10,000 years to monitor both short-term and long-term behavior of injected CO2 and the associated rock-fluid interactions. CO2 co-injection with H2S and SO2 is also simulated to represent the flue gases from coal gasification and combustion in the Illinois Basin. The injection of CO2 results in acidified zones (pH ~3 and 5) adjacent to the wellbore, causing progressive water-rock interactions in the surrounding region. In accordance with the extensive dissolution of authigenic K-feldspar, sequential precipitations of secondary carbonates and clay minerals are predicted in this zone. The vertical profiles of CO2 show fingering pattern from the top of the reservoir to the bottom due to the density variation of CO2-impregnated brine, which facilitate convection induced mixing and solubility trapping. Most of the injected CO2 remains within a radial distance of 2500 m at the end of 10,000 years and is sequestered and immobilized by solubility and residual trapping. Mineral trapping via secondary carbonates, including calcite, magnesite

  13. Application of a Persistent Dissolved-phase Reactive Treatment Zone for Mitigation of Mass Discharge from Sources Located in Lower-Permeability Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Marble, J.C.; Brusseau, M.L.; Carroll, K.C.; Plaschke, M.; Fuhrig, L.; Brinker, F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the development and effectiveness of a persistent dissolved-phase treatment zone, created by injecting potassium permanganate solution, for mitigating discharge of contaminant from a source zone located in a relatively deep, low-permeability formation. A localized 1,1-dichloroethene (DCE) source zone comprising dissolved- and sorbed-phase mass is present in lower permeability strata adjacent to a sand/gravel unit in a section of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) Superfund Site. The results of bench-scale studies conducted using core material collected from boreholes drilled at the site indicated that natural oxidant demand was low, which would promote permanganate persistence. The reactive zone was created by injecting a permanganate solution into multiple wells screened across the interface between the lower-permeability and higher-permeability units. The site has been monitored for nine years to characterize the spatial distribution of DCE and permanganate. Permanganate continues to persist at the site, and a substantial and sustained decrease in DCE concentrations in groundwater has occurred after the permanganate injection.. These results demonstrate successful creation of a long-term, dissolved-phase reactive-treatment zone that reduced mass discharge from the source. This project illustrates the application of in-situ chemical oxidation as a persistent dissolved-phase reactive-treatment system for lower-permeability source zones, which appears to effectively mitigate persistent mass discharge into groundwater. PMID:26300570

  14. Stratospheric aerosols in the intertropical convergence zone, Panama Canal zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farlow, N. H.; Ferry, G. V.; Lem, H. Y.; Hayes, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    To investigate whether injection sources of the stratospheric aerosol layer could be detected in the tropical stratosphere, an examination of the aerosol vertical and horizontal size distribution around the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) at the Panama Canal Zone was performed during the summer of 1977. By comparing these data with similar measurements in temperate and polar regions, it was hoped to discover variations in particle size that would indicate whether a young aerosol is forming and entering the stratosphere at the ITCZ; where the aerosol matures; and finally, where it reenters the troposphere. The methods used in the investigations and the results obtained from the analyses are described.

  15. Staged direct injection diesel engine

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Quentin A.

    1985-01-01

    A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

  16. A Phase IIb, Multicenter, Open-Label, Safety, and Efficacy Study of High-Dose, Propylene Glycol-Free Melphalan Hydrochloride for Injection (EVOMELA) for Myeloablative Conditioning in Multiple Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hari, Parameswaran; Aljitawi, Omar S; Arce-Lara, Carlos; Nath, Rajneesh; Callander, Natalie; Bhat, Gajanan; Allen, Lee F; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith

    2015-12-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) after high-dose melphalan conditioning is considered a standard of care procedure for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Current formulations of melphalan (eg, Alkeran for Injection [melphalan hydrochloride]; GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA) have marginal solubility and limited chemical stability upon reconstitution. Alkeran requires the use of propylene glycol as a co-solvent, which itself has been reported to cause such complications as metabolic/renal dysfunction and arrhythmias. EVOMELA (propylene glycol-free melphalan HCl; Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) is a new i.v. melphalan formulation that incorporates Captisol (Ligand Pharmaceuticals, Inc., La Jolla, CA, USA), a specially modified cyclodextrin that improves the solubility and stability of melphalan and eliminates the need for propylene glycol. This new formulation has been shown to be bioequivalent to Alkeran. EVOMELA (200 mg/m(2)) was administered as 2 doses of 100 mg/m(2) each in a phase IIb, open-label, multicenter study to confirm its safety and efficacy as a high-dose conditioning regimen for patients with MM undergoing ASCT. At 5 centers, 61 patients (26 women) with a median age of 62 years (range, 32-73) were enrolled. All patients achieved myeloablation with a median time of 5 days post-ASCT, and all successfully achieved neutrophil and platelet engraftment with median times of 12 days post-ASCT and 13 days post-ASCT, respectively; treatment-related mortality on day 100 was 0%. Overall response rate (according to independent, blinded review) was high (100%), with an overall complete response rate of 21% (13% stringent complete response; 8% complete response) and overall partial response rate of 79% (61% very good partial response; 18% partial response). The incidence of grade 3 mucositis and stomatitis was low (10% and 5%, respectively) with no grade 4 mucositis or stomatitis reported (graded according to National

  17. Molecular Diversity of HIV-1 among People Who Inject Drugs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Massive Expansion of Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF) 33_01B and Emergence of Multiple Unique Recombinant Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Ng, Kim Tien; Yong, Yean Kong; Azmel, Azureen; Takebe, Yutaka; Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF) 33_01B in Malaysia in the early 2000 s, continuous genetic diversification and active recombination involving CRF33_01B and other circulating genotypes in the region including CRF01_AE and subtype B′ of Thai origin, have led to the emergence of novel CRFs and unique recombinant forms. The history and magnitude of CRF33_01B transmission among various risk groups including people who inject drugs (PWID) however have not been investigated despite the high epidemiological impact of CRF33_01B in the region. We update the most recent molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 among PWIDs recruited in Malaysia between 2010 and 2011 by population sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 128 gag-pol sequences. HIV-1 CRF33_01B was circulating among 71% of PWIDs whilst a lower prevalence of other previously dominant HIV-1 genotypes [subtype B′ (11%) and CRF01_AE (5%)] and CRF01_AE/B′ unique recombinants (13%) were detected, indicating a significant shift in genotype replacement in this population. Three clusters of CRF01_AE/B′ recombinants displaying divergent yet phylogenetically-related mosaic genomes to CRF33_01B were identified and characterized, suggestive of an abrupt emergence of multiple novel CRF clades. Using rigorous maximum likelihood approach and the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of CRF33_01Bpol sequences to elucidate the past population dynamics, we found that the founder lineages of CRF33_01B were likely to have first emerged among PWIDs in the early 1990 s before spreading exponentially to various high and low-risk populations (including children who acquired infections from their mothers) and later on became endemic around the early 2000 s. Taken together, our findings provide notable genetic evidence indicating the widespread expansion of CRF33_01B among PWIDs and into the general population. The emergence of numerous previously unknown recombinant clades highlights the

  18. Molecular diversity of HIV-1 among people who inject drugs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: massive expansion of circulating recombinant form (CRF) 33_01B and emergence of multiple unique recombinant clusters.

    PubMed

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Ong, Lai Yee; Razak, Siti Humaira; Lee, Yeat Mei; Ng, Kim Tien; Yong, Yean Kong; Azmel, Azureen; Takebe, Yutaka; Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF) 33_01B in Malaysia in the early 2000 s, continuous genetic diversification and active recombination involving CRF33_01B and other circulating genotypes in the region including CRF01_AE and subtype B' of Thai origin, have led to the emergence of novel CRFs and unique recombinant forms. The history and magnitude of CRF33_01B transmission among various risk groups including people who inject drugs (PWID) however have not been investigated despite the high epidemiological impact of CRF33_01B in the region. We update the most recent molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 among PWIDs recruited in Malaysia between 2010 and 2011 by population sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 128 gag-pol sequences. HIV-1 CRF33_01B was circulating among 71% of PWIDs whilst a lower prevalence of other previously dominant HIV-1 genotypes [subtype B' (11%) and CRF01_AE (5%)] and CRF01_AE/B' unique recombinants (13%) were detected, indicating a significant shift in genotype replacement in this population. Three clusters of CRF01_AE/B' recombinants displaying divergent yet phylogenetically-related mosaic genomes to CRF33_01B were identified and characterized, suggestive of an abrupt emergence of multiple novel CRF clades. Using rigorous maximum likelihood approach and the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of CRF33_01Bpol sequences to elucidate the past population dynamics, we found that the founder lineages of CRF33_01B were likely to have first emerged among PWIDs in the early 1990 s before spreading exponentially to various high and low-risk populations (including children who acquired infections from their mothers) and later on became endemic around the early 2000 s. Taken together, our findings provide notable genetic evidence indicating the widespread expansion of CRF33_01B among PWIDs and into the general population. The emergence of numerous previously unknown recombinant clades highlights the escalating

  19. Non-Injection Drug Use Patterns and History of Injection among Street Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hadland, Scott E.; Kerr, Thomas; Marshall, Brandon D.L.; Small, William; Lai, Calvin; Montaner, Julio S.; Wood, Evan

    2010-01-01

    Aims Efforts to prevent youth from initiating injection drug use require an understanding of the drug use patterns that predispose to injecting. Here we identify such patterns and describe the circumstances of first injection among street youth. Methods From October 2005 to November 2007, data were collected for the At Risk Youth Study, a prospective cohort of 560 street-recruited youth aged 14–26 in Vancouver, Canada. Non-injection drug use behaviors were compared between those with and without a history of injection through multiple logistic regression. The circumstances of first injection were also examined in gender-stratified analyses. Results Youth who had previously injected were more likely to have engaged in non-injection use of heroin or of crystal methamphetamine. Daily users of marijuana were less likely to have injected. Among prior injectors, the median age of first injection was lower among females. Females were also more likely to have had a sexual partner present at first injection and to have become a regular injector within one week of initiation. Conclusion Preventing transition to injection among street youth may require special attention to predisposing drug use patterns and should acknowledge gender differences in the circumstances of first injection. PMID:20130409

  20. Reducing Ultrafine Particle Emissions Using Air Injection in Wood-Burning Cookstoves.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Vi H; Caubel, Julien J; Wilson, Daniel L; Gadgil, Ashok J

    2016-08-01

    In order to address the health risks and climate impacts associated with pollution from cooking on biomass fires, researchers have focused on designing new cookstoves that improve cooking performance and reduce harmful emissions, specifically particulate matter (PM). One method for improving cooking performance and reducing emissions is using air injection to increase turbulence of unburned gases in the combustion zone. Although air injection reduces total PM mass emissions, the effect on PM size distribution and number concentration has not been thoroughly investigated. Using two new wood-burning cookstove designs from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, this research explores the effect of air injection on cooking performance, PM and gaseous emissions, and PM size distribution and number concentration. Both cookstoves were created using the Berkeley-Darfur Stove as the base platform to isolate the effects of air injection. The thermal performance, gaseous emissions, PM mass emissions, and particle concentrations (ranging from 5 nm to 10 μm in diameter) of the cookstoves were measured during multiple high-power cooking tests. The results indicate that air injection improves cookstove performance and reduces total PM mass but increases total ultrafine (less than 100 nm in diameter) PM concentration over the course of high-power cooking. PMID:27348315

  1. SODIUM DITHIONITE INJECTIONS USED FOR CHROMIUM REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field-scale pilot study was conducted in 1999 at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, NC, to evaluate the effectiveness of injecting sodium dithionite into the upper aquifer and lower vadose zone to create a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) system utilizing na...

  2. Liquid zone seal

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

  3. Assessment of hydrogeologic conditions with emphasis on water quality and wastewater injection, southwest Sarasota and West Charlotte counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    water-quality characteristics, construction of single-zone wells would eliminate cross-contamination and borehole interflow. Such a program, when combined with the plugging of shallow-cased wells having long open-hole intervals connecting multiple zones, would safeguard ground-water resources in the study area. The study area encompasses seven wastewater injection sites that have a projected capacity for injecting 29 million gallons per day into the zone 1,100 to 2,050 feet below land surface. There are six additional sites within 20 miles. The first well began injecting reverse-osmosis wastewater in 1984, and since then, other wells have been drilled and permitted for injection of treated sewage. A numerical model was used to evaluate injection-well design and potential for movement of injected wastewater within the hydrogeologic framework. The numerical model was used to simulate injection through a representative well at a rate of 1 million gallons per day for 10 years. In this simulation, a convection cell developed around the injection well with the buoyant fresh injectant rising to form a lens within the injection zone below the lower Suwannee-Ocala semiconfining unit. Around an ideal, fully penetrating well cased 50 feet into the injection zone and open from a depth of 1,150 feet to 2,050 feet, simulations show that the injectant moves upward to a depth of 940 feet, forms a lens about 600 feet thick, and spreads radially outward to a distance of about 2,300 feet after 10 years. Comparison simulations of injection through wells having open depth intervals of 1,150 to 1,400 feet and 1,450 to 2,050 feet demonstrate that such changes in well construction have little effect on the areal spread of the injectant lens or the rate of upward movement. Simulations also indicate that reverse-osmosis wastewater injected beneath a supply well field, where water levels above the semiconfining unit are lowered 20 feet by pumping, would move upward after 10 years to a de

  4. Treating Self-Injection Phobia in Patients Prescribed Injectable Medications: A Case Example Illustrating a Six-Session Treatment Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Darcy; Mohr, David C.; Epstein, Lucy

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a case description of a patient with multiple sclerosis prescribed interferon beta-1a (IFN[beta]-1a), a weekly intramuscular injection, who met "DSM-IV" criteria for specific phobia, blood/injection type. This patient successfully completed a 6-week manualized cognitive-behavioral treatment for self-injection anxiety. Issues…

  5. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste

  6. Worldwide Injection Technique Questionnaire Study: Injecting Complications and the Role of the Professional.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anders H; Hirsch, Laurence J; Menchior, Astrid R; Morel, Didier R; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    From February 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015, 13,289 insulin-injecting patients from 423 centers in 42 countries participated in one of the largest surveys ever performed in diabetes. The first results of this survey are published elsewhere in this issue. Herein we report that the most common complication of injecting insulin is lipohypertrophy (LH), which was self-reported by 29.0% of patients and found by physical examination in 30.8% by health care professionals (HCPs). Patients with LH consumed a mean of 10.1 IU more insulin daily than patients without LH. Glycated hemoglobin levels averaged 0.55% higher in patients with vs without LH. Lipohypertrophy was associated with higher rates of unexplained hypoglycemia and glycemic variability as well as more frequent diabetic ketoacidosis, incorrect rotation of injection sites, use of smaller injection zones, longer duration of insulin use, and reuse of pen needles (each P<.05). Routine inspection of injection sites by the HCP was associated with lower glycated hemoglobin levels, less LH, and more correct injection site rotation. Patients were also more likely to rotate correctly if they received injection instructions from their HCP in the past 6 months. Fewer than 40% of patients claimed to have gotten such instructions in the past 6 months, and 10% said that they have never received training on how to inject correctly despite injecting for a mean of nearly 9 years. Use of these data should stimulate renewed commitment to optimizing insulin injection practices. PMID:27594186

  7. Hydrologic characteristics of the Bandelier Tuff as determined through an injection well system

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Enyart, E.A.; McLin, S.G.

    1989-08-01

    Injection wells were used to determine some of the hydrologic transmitting characteristics of the unsaturated Bandelier Tuff. At site 1, a 60-ft injection well with a 5-ft injection zone was used to conduct four tests. These preliminary tests were made in order to design an injection-well monitoring system that could track the movement of fluids in the tuff. At site 2, a second injection well with a 10-ft injection zone and seven observation holes was used to monitor the movement of 335,000 gal. of water injected into the tuff. The initial injection rate at site 2 was 5.8 gallons per minute (gpm), but that rate gradually declined to 0.4 gpm after 89 days of the test; 289 days after the test ended, the pear-shaped nephol (the shape of moisture injected into the tuff) reached a maximum depth of 210 ft and had a diameter of about 120 ft. A second test at site 2 indicated that intermittent use of an injection system would allow for short periods of higher injection rates, thereby extending the life of the system. Finally, a third test at site 2 was made using a 50-ft injection zone, which resulted in an injection rate of 15.8 gpm, or about 3 times the initial rate achieved when a 10-ft injection zone was used. 8 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Injection plume behavior in fractured, vapor-dominated reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    1996-01-24

    We discuss fluid flow and heat transfer processes during water injection into hot, fluid-depleted vapor zones. Numerical simulations of injection plumes in fractures, modeled as two-dimensional heterogeneous porous media, indicate complex behavior. Under certain conditions it is possible to make detailed quantitative predictions of vaporization behavior. However, when effects of reservoir heterogeneity are dominant it will only be possible to predict the behavior of injection plumes in general terms.

  9. Method for controlling corrosion in thermal vapor injection gases

    DOEpatents

    Sperry, John S.; Krajicek, Richard W.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in the method for producing high pressure thermal vapor streams from combustion gases for injection into subterranean oil producing formations to stimulate the production of viscous minerals is described. The improvement involves controlling corrosion in such thermal vapor gases by injecting water near the flame in the combustion zone and injecting ammonia into a vapor producing vessel to contact the combustion gases exiting the combustion chamber.

  10. Natural attenuation of xenobiotic compounds: Anaerobic field injection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruegge, K.; Bjerg, P.L.; Mosbaek, H.; Christensen, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    Currently, a continuous field injection experiment is being performed in the anaerobic part of a pollution plume downgradient of the Grindsted Landfill in Denmark. This natural gradient experiment includes an injection of 18 different xenobiotic compounds with bromide as a tracer. The injection is taking place under methanogenic/sulfate-reducing conditions and the compounds will, as they migrate with the groundwater, pass through a zone where the redox conditions have been determined as iron-reducing.

  11. Effect of primary-zone equivalence ratio on pollutant formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Test were conducted to determine the effect of primary-zone equivalence ratio on the formation of smoke and other gaseous pollutants in an experimental can combustor. Several fuel injection techniques were examined at primary-zone equivalence ratios from 0.8 to 2.0. The main emphasis was on reducing fuel-rich-combustion smoke levels. Two of the four fuel injection configurations studied produced smoke levels below a smoke number of 20 at a primary-zone equivalence ratio of about 1.7. As the fuel mixing and atomization were recorded at primary-zone equivalence ratios as high as 2.0. The gaseous emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and oxides of nitrogen were quite sensitive to the fuel injection configuration as well as to the primary-zone equilvalence ratio.

  12. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to help control urine leakage ( urinary incontinence ) caused by a ... into the tissue next to the sphincter. The implant procedure is usually done in the hospital. Or ...

  13. Calcitonin Salmon Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Calcitonin salmon injection is used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to weaken and break more easily. Calcitonin salmon injection is also used to treat Paget's disease ...

  14. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Botox® Cosmetic ... OnabotulinumtoxinA injection (Botox, Botox Cosmetic) is used to treat a number of conditions.OnabotulinumtoxinA injection (Botox) is used to relieve the symptoms of cervical dystonia ( ...

  15. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007633.htm Hip joint injection To use the sharing features on this ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ...

  16. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a ... as a liquid to be injected subcutaneously (just under the skin) by a doctor. Your doctor will ...

  17. RimabotulinumtoxinB Injection

    MedlinePlus

    (rim a bott' you lye num bee)RimabotulinumtoxinB injection may spread from the area of injection and ... Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

  18. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  19. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  20. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  1. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  2. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to relieve the symptoms of cervical dystonia (spasmodic torticollis; uncontrollable tightening of the neck ... is injected into a muscle, it blocks the nerve signals that cause uncontrollable tightening and movements of ...

  3. High exhaust temperature, zoned, electrically-heated particulate matter filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.; Bhatia, Garima

    2015-09-22

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, an electric heater, and a control circuit. The electric heater includes multiple zones, which each correspond to longitudinal zones along a length of the PM filter. A first zone includes multiple discontinuous sub-zones. The control circuit determines whether regeneration is needed based on an estimated level of loading of the PM filter and an exhaust flow rate. In response to a determination that regeneration is needed, the control circuit: controls an operating parameter of an engine to increase an exhaust temperature to a first temperature during a first period; after the first period, activates the first zone; deactivates the first zone in response to a minimum filter face temperature being reached; subsequent to deactivating the first zone, activates a second zone; and deactivates the second zone in response to the minimum filter face temperature being reached.

  4. An Evaluation of Geopressured Brine Injectability

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, L.B.; Blair, C.K.; Harrar, J.E.; Netherton, R.

    1980-12-16

    We-have developed an apparatus with a capability for evaluating geopressured brine injectability at elevated pressures and temperatures. The apparatus utilizes membrane filters as injection zone reservoir analogs and permits injectability tests to be performed in accordance with Barkman and Davidson Methdology. A field evaluation of geopressured brine injectability was completed during September 22-25, 1980 at the DOE, Brazoria test site in Texas. Membrane filters, with pore sizes of 0.4-{micro}m and 10.0-{micro}m, were used as the basis for obtaining suspended solids data and for developing performance-life estimates of typical spent brine injection wells. Field measurements were made at 130{degree}C and line pressures up to 3800 psig. Scale inhibited (phosphonate-polyacrylate threshold-type, carbonate scale inhibitor), prefiltered-scale-inhibited, and raw (untreated) brine were evaluated. Test results indicated raw brine was highly injectable, while scale-inhibited brine had extremely low quality. The poor injectability of scale-inhibited brine resulted from partial precipitation of the scale inhibitor.

  5. Method for selectively plugging highly permeable zones in a subterranean formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefner, M.L.

    1989-03-07

    A method for selectively plugging relatively high permeability zones in a subterranean formation having relatively high permeability zones and relatively low permeability zones penetrated by at least one injection well in fluid communication with a substantial portion of the formation comprising the sequential steps of: (a) injecting a predetermined amount of a solidifiable selective gel solution comprising xanthan chromium (in the 3+ state), sodium hydroxide and formaldehyde in a brine solution containing sodium chloride and calcium chloride into the formation via the injection well at a predetermined pressure sufficient to cause the gel solution to coat and temporarily plug the face of the relatively low permeability zones near the injection well without any significant amount of gel penetrating the relatively low permeability zones while allowing the gel solution to flow into the relatively high permeability zones; (b) thereafter injecting a predetermined amount of a solidifiable non-selective solution comprising polyacrylamides, polysaccharides and unpolymerized acrylamide monomers into the formation via the injection well before the previously injected selective gel solution solidifies in the relatively high permeability zones that preferentially enters the relatively high permeability zones and allowing the injected non-selective solution to solidify and plug the relatively high permeability zones; and (c) injecting a predetermined amount of a flushing agent having a gel breaker into the formation via the injection well that removes the selective gel coating from the face of the relatively low permeability zones thereby restoring permeability of the face of the relatively low permeability zones to fluids subsequently injected into the formation.

  6. Climate change and dead zones.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Andrew H; Gedan, Keryn B

    2015-04-01

    Estuaries and coastal seas provide valuable ecosystem services but are particularly vulnerable to the co-occurring threats of climate change and oxygen-depleted dead zones. We analyzed the severity of climate change predicted for existing dead zones, and found that 94% of dead zones are in regions that will experience at least a 2 °C temperature increase by the end of the century. We then reviewed how climate change will exacerbate hypoxic conditions through oceanographic, ecological, and physiological processes. We found evidence that suggests numerous climate variables including temperature, ocean acidification, sea-level rise, precipitation, wind, and storm patterns will affect dead zones, and that each of those factors has the potential to act through multiple pathways on both oxygen availability and ecological responses to hypoxia. Given the variety and strength of the mechanisms by which climate change exacerbates hypoxia, and the rates at which climate is changing, we posit that climate change variables are contributing to the dead zone epidemic by acting synergistically with one another and with recognized anthropogenic triggers of hypoxia including eutrophication. This suggests that a multidisciplinary, integrated approach that considers the full range of climate variables is needed to track and potentially reverse the spread of dead zones. PMID:25385668

  7. Acupuncture Sample Injection for Microchip Capillary Electrophoresis and Electrokinetic Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji Won; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A simple nanoliter-scale injection technique was developed for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices to form the well-defined sample plugs in microfluidic channels. Sample injection was achieved by performing acupuncture on a channel with a needle and applying external pressure to a syringe. This technique allowed us to achieve reproducible injection of a 3-nL segment into a microchannel for PDMS microchip-based capillary electrophoresis (CE). Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with bead packing were successfully performed by applying a single potential in the most simplified straight channel. The advantages of this acupuncture injection over the electrokinetic injection in microchip CE include capability of minimizing sample loss and voltage control hardware, capability of serial injections of different sample solutions into a same microchannel, capability of injecting sample plugs into any position of a microchannel, independence on sample solutions during the loading step, and ease in making microchips due to the straight channel, etc. PMID:27056036

  8. Development of a Persistent Reactive Treatment Zone for Containment of Sources Located in Lower-Permeability Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marble, J.; Carroll, K. C.; Brusseau, M. L.; Plaschke, M.; Brinker, F.

    2013-12-01

    Source zones located in relatively deep, low-permeability formations provide special challenges for remediation. Application of permeable reactive barriers, in-situ thermal, or electrokinetic methods would be expensive and generally impractical. In addition, the use of enhanced mass-removal approaches based on reagent injection (e.g., ISCO, enhanced-solubility reagents) is likely to be ineffective. One possible approach for such conditions is to create a persistent treatment zone for purposes of containment. This study examines the efficacy of this approach for containment and treatment of contaminants in a lower permeability zone using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) as the reactant. A localized 1,1-dichloroethene (DCE) source zone is present in a section of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) Superfund Site. Characterization studies identified the source of DCE to be located in lower-permeability strata adjacent to the water table. Bench-scale studies were conducted using core material collected from boreholes drilled at the site to measure DCE concentrations and determine natural oxidant demand. The reactive zone was created by injecting ~1.7% KMnO4 solution into multiple wells screened within the lower-permeability unit. The site has been monitored for ~8 years to characterize the spatial distribution of DCE and permanganate. KMnO4 continues to persist at the site, demonstrating successful creation of a long-term reactive zone. Additionally, the footprint of the DCE contaminant plume in groundwater has decreased continuously with time. This project illustrates the application of ISCO as a reactive-treatment system for lower-permeability source zones, which appears to effectively mitigate persistent mass flux into groundwater.

  9. Two decades of subcutaneous glatiramer acetate injection: current role of the standard dose, and new high-dose low-frequency glatiramer acetate in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Caporro, Matteo; Disanto, Giulio; Gobbi, Claudio; Zecca, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Glatiramer acetate, a synthetic amino acid polymer analog of myelin basic protein, is one of the first approved drugs for the treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. Several clinical trials have shown consistent and sustained efficacy of glatiramer acetate 20 mg subcutaneously daily in reducing relapses and new demyelinating lesions on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, as well as comparable efficacy to high-dose interferon beta. Some preclinical and clinical data suggest a neuroprotective role for glatiramer acetate in multiple sclerosis. Glatiramer acetate is associated with a relatively favorable side-effect profile, and importantly this was confirmed also during long-term use. Glatiramer acetate is the only multiple sclerosis treatment compound that has gained the US Food and Drug Administration pregnancy category B. All these data support its current use as a first-line treatment option for patients with clinical isolated syndrome or relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. More recent data have shown that high-dose glatiramer acetate (ie, 40 mg) given three times weekly is effective, safe, and well tolerated in the treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, prompting the approval of this dosage in the US in early 2014. This high-dose, lower-frequency glatiramer acetate might represent a new, more convenient regimen of administration, and this might enhance patients’ adherence to the treatment, crucial for optimal disease control. PMID:25170258

  10. Hydrogeophysical imaging of deposit heterogeneity and groundwater chemistry changes during DNAPL source zone bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. E.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Wealthall, G. P.; Loke, M. H.; Dearden, R.; Wilson, R.; Allen, D.; Ogilvy, R. D.

    2010-10-01

    Robust characterization and monitoring of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones is essential for designing effective remediation strategies, and for assessing the efficacy of treatment. In this study high-resolution cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was evaluated as a means of monitoring a field-scale in-situ bioremediation experiment, in which emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) electron donor was injected into a trichloroethene source zone. Baseline ERT scans delineated the geometry of the interface between the contaminated alluvial aquifer and the underlying mudstone bedrock, and also the extent of drilling-induced physical heterogeneity. Time-lapse ERT images revealed major preferential flow pathways in the source and plume zones, which were corroborated by multiple lines of evidence, including geochemical monitoring and hydraulic testing using high density multilevel sampler arrays within the geophysical imaging planes. These pathways were shown to control the spatial distribution of the injected EVO, and a bicarbonate buffer introduced into the cell for pH control. Resistivity signatures were observed within the preferential flow pathways that were consistent with elevated chloride levels, providing tentative evidence from ERT of the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents.

  11. Strategies for safe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, A.; Feilden, R.; Stoeckel, P.; Da Silva, A.; Nelson, C.; Bass, A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, faced with growing international concern, WHO set out an approach for achieving injection safety that encompassed all elements from patients' expectations and doctors' prescribing habits to waste disposal. This article follows that lead and describes the implications of the approach for two injection technologies: sterilizable and disposable. It argues that focusing on any single technology diverts attention from the more fundamental need for health services to develop their own comprehensive strategies for safe injections. National health authorities will only be able to ensure that injections are administered safely if they take an approach that encompasses the whole system, and choose injection technologies that fit their circumstances. PMID:10680247

  12. 3-D simulation of gases transport under condition of inert gas injection into goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao-Xi; Shi, Guo-Qing; Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Yan-Ming; Ma, Li-Yang

    2016-02-01

    To prevent coal spontaneous combustion in mines, it is paramount to understand O2 gas distribution under condition of inert gas injection into goaf. In this study, the goaf was modeled as a 3-D porous medium based on stress distribution. The variation of O2 distribution influenced by CO2 or N2 injection was simulated based on the multi-component gases transport and the Navier-Stokes equations using Fluent. The numerical results without inert gas injection were compared with field measurements to validate the simulation model. Simulations with inert gas injection show that CO2 gas mainly accumulates at the goaf floor level; however, a notable portion of N2 gas moves upward. The evolution of the spontaneous combustion risky zone with continuous inert gas injection can be classified into three phases: slow inerting phase, rapid accelerating inerting phase, and stable inerting phase. The asphyxia zone with CO2 injection is about 1.25-2.4 times larger than that with N2 injection. The efficacy of preventing and putting out mine fires is strongly related with the inert gas injecting position. Ideal injections are located in the oxidation zone or the transitional zone between oxidation zone and heat dissipation zone.

  13. Subsurface injection of treated sewage into a saline-water aquifer at St. Petersburg, Florida - Water-quality changes and potential for recovery of injected sewage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, J.J.; Ehrlich, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    The city of St. Petersburg is testing subsurface injection of treated sewage into the Floridan aquifer as a means of eliminating discharge of sewage to surface waters and as a means of storing treated sewage for future nonpotable reuse. The injection zone at the test site at the start of injection contained saline water with chloride concentrations ranging from 14,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter (mg/l). Treated sewage with a mean chloride concentration of 170 mg/ml was injected through a single well for 12 months at a mean rate of 4.7 x 105 cubic feet per day. The volume of water injected during the year was 1.7x108 cubic feet. Dissolved oxygen was contained in the sewage prior to injection. Water removed from the injection zone during injection was essentially free of oxygen. Probable growth of denitrifying bacteria and, thus, microbial denitrification, was suggested by bacterial counts in water from two observation wells that were close to the injection well. The volume fraction of treated sewage in water from wells located 35 feet and 733 feet from the injection well and open to the upper part of the injection zone stabilized at about 0.9 and 0.75, respectively. Chloride concentrations stabilized at about 1,900 mg/l in water from the well that was 35 feet from the injection well and stabilized at about 4,000 mg/l in water from the well that was 733 feet from the injection well. These and other data suggest that very little near injection-quality treated sewage would be recoverable from storage in the injection zone.The city of St. Petersburg is testing subsurface injection of treated sewage into the Floridan aquifer as a means of eliminating discharge of sewage to surface waters and as a means of storing treated sewage for future nonpotable reuse. The injection zone at the test site at the start of injection contained saline water with chloride concentrations ranging from 14,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter (mg/l). Data suggest that very little near

  14. Modeling Hydrogeological and Geomenchanical Processes Related toCO2 Injection in a Faulted Multilayer System

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of coupled hydrological and geomechanical processes during a deep underground injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} in a hypothetical brine aquifer. We consider a multilayer system in which the injection zone is situated below a sequence of caprock and aquifer layers that are intersected by a vertical fault zone. The fault zone consists of highly fractured shale across the first caprock layers that are located just above the injection zone. Initially, the fractured shale zones are considered sealed with minerals, but we allow fractures (and the fractured zones) to open as a result of injection induced reductions in effective stresses. Our results indicate that even when assuming a very sensitive relationship between effective stress and fractured-zone permeability, the injection-induced changes in permeability across are only moderate with largest changes occurring in the first caprock layer, just above the injection zone. As a result, the upward leakage rate remains relatively small and therefore changes in fluid pressure and hydromechanical effects in overlying zones are also relatively small for the case studied in this paper.

  15. Mass transfer from bypassed zones during gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Gasflooding in oil reservoirs leads to bypassing of the oil due to gravitational, viscous and/or heterogeneity effects. The bypassed oil can be recovered by the flowing solvent by pressure-driven, gravity-driven, dispersion/diffusion-driven and capillarity-driven crossflow/mass transfer. It is difficult to represent all of these mechanisms explicitly in large-scale simulations. In this work, we have studied the effect of the orientation of the bypassed region and the enrichment of the solvent on the mass transfer. Laboratory-scale mass transfer and coreflood experiments were conducted. Numerical simulation was used to identify the role of the different mechanisms. Results indicate that the mass transfer is the least for the vertical orientation, intermediate for the inverted orientation and the highest for the horizontal orientation. The mass transfer increases with enrichment for all orientations. Liquid phase diffusion controls vertical orientation mass transfer for the fluids studied. Phase behavior determines the liquid phase saturation. Capillary pumping does not contribute to the mass transfer of oil because the interfacial tension decreases towards the flowing region. Gravity-driven flow contributes the most to the mass transfer in the horizontal and the inverted orientations. The gravity-driven flow, however, is impeded by the capillarity whose magnitude decreases with solvent enrichment. Oil recovery in the horizontal gasfloods is nonmonotonic with enrichment for this fluid system in an almost homogeneous Berea core. Multiphase flow in the near-miscible floods leads to less gravity override compared to the FCM floods. In the heterogeneous core studied, the heterogeneity is very strong and the capillary forces do not prevent bypassing. The capillary forces, in fact, reduce oil recovery by diminishing mass transfer from the bypassed regions.

  16. Office-based laryngeal injections.

    PubMed

    Mallur, Pavan S; Rosen, Clark A

    2013-02-01

    Office-based vocal fold injection (VFI), though initially described more than a century ago, has recently reemerged as an attractive alternative to VFI performed during microsuspension laryngoscopy. Multiple office-based approaches exist, including percutaneous, peroral, and transnasal endoscopic approaches. Surgeon preference typically dictates the approach, although patient tolerance or anatomic variations are also key factors. Regardless of the approach or indication, a myriad of technical considerations make preparation and familiarity requisite for optimal patient outcomes. Office-based VFI offers several distinct advantages over traditional direct or microsuspension laryngoscopy VFI, making it a standard of treatment for a variety of indications. PMID:23177408

  17. An unfortunate injection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavik Sandip; Yarbrough, Chase; Price, Amy; Biswas, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular injection has been used to administer medications for more than a hundred years. However, despite our profession's long experience with intramuscular administration, preventable complications such as injection nerve palsies are still prevalent in developing countries. Injections account for one-fifth of all traumatic nerve injuries. These injuries largely occur due to indiscriminate use of intramuscular injections for treating common illnesses, frequently by unlicensed or undertrained practitioners administering unnecessary treatment to impoverished patients. The sciatic nerve is the most commonly injured, and frequently the resulting muscle weakness and associated disability are irreversible. This case report includes a video of a patient with foot drop 6 weeks after gluteal intramuscular injection. Such injuries can be prevented by proper awareness and training, the implementation of safer injection techniques, and quality assurance methods. PMID:26931130

  18. Sciatic nerve injection injury.

    PubMed

    Jung Kim, Hyun; Hyun Park, Sang

    2014-06-11

    Nerve injury is a common complication following intramuscular injection and the sciatic nerve is the most frequently affected nerve, especially in children, the elderly and underweight patients. The neurological presentation may range from minor transient pain to severe sensory disturbance and motor loss with poor recovery. Management of nerve injection injury includes drug treatment of pain, physiotherapy, use of assistive devices and surgical exploration. Early recognition of nerve injection injury and appropriate management are crucial in order to reduce neurological deficit and to maximize recovery. Sciatic nerve injection injury is a preventable event. Total avoidance of intramuscular injection is recommended if other administration routes can be used. If the injection has to be administered into the gluteal muscle, the ventrogluteal region (gluteal triangle) has a more favourable safety profile than the dorsogluteal region (the upper outer quadrant of the buttock). PMID:24920643

  19. Data requirements for simulation of hydrogeologic effects of liquid waste injection, Harrison and Jackson Counties, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rebich, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Available literature and data were reviewed to quantify data requirements for computer simulation of hydrogeologic effects of liquid waste injection in southeastern Mississippi. Emphasis of each review was placed on quantifying physical properties of current Class I injection zones in Harrison and Jackson Counties. Class I injection zones are zones that are used for injection of hazardous or non-hazardous liquid waste below a formation containing the lowermost underground source of drinking water located within one-quarter of a mile of the injection well. Several mathematical models have been developed to simulate injection effects. The Basic Plume Method was selected because it is commonly used in permit applications, and the Intercomp model was selected because it is generally accepted and used in injection-related research. The input data requirements of the two models were combined into a single data requirement list inclusive of physical properties of injection zones only; injected waste and well properties are not included because such information is site-specific by industry, which is beyond the scope of this report. Results of the reviews of available literature and data indicated that Class I permit applications and standard-reference chemistry and physics texts were the primary sources of information to quantify physical properties of injection zones in Harrison and Jackson Counties. With the exception of a few reports and supplementary data for one injection zone in Jackson County, very little additional information pertaining to physical properties of the injection zones was available in sources other than permit applications and standard-reference texts.

  20. Results of deep-well injection testing at Mulberry, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.; Wilson, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    At the Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation plant, Mulberry, Fla., high-chloride, acidic liquid wastes are injected into a dolomite section at depths below about 4,000 feet below land surface. In 1975, a satellite monitor well was drilled 2,291 feet from the injection well and a series of three injection tests were performed. Duration of the tests ranged from 240 to 10,020 minutes and injection rates ranged from 110 to 230 gallons per minute. Based on an evaluation of factors that affect hydraulic response, water-level data suitable for interpretation of hydraulic characteristics of the injection zone were identified to occur from 200 to 1,000 minutes during the 10,020-minute test. Transmissivity of the injection zone was computed to be within the range from 700 to 1,000 feet squared per day and storage coefficient of the injection zone was computed to be within the range from .00001 to .00005. The confining bed accepting most of the leakage appears to be the underlying bed. Also, it appears that the overlying beds are probably relatively impermeable and significantly retard the vertical movement of neutralized waste effluent. (USGS)

  1. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy- ...

  2. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al. Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education ...

  3. Hydrogen scramjet with side wall injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Paull, A.; Morris, N.; Stalker, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from an experimental evaluation of a hydrogen-burning wall-injection scramjet engine, performed in the free-piston shock tunnel at the Australian National University. The advantages of scramjet propulsion for high-Mach-number high-altitude flight are reviewed, and the need for an alternative to injection struts is indicated. Pressure profiles and heat-transfer measurements for constant-area and diverging ducts are presented graphically and characterized in detail. The ability of the injected flow to shield the chamber wall from the heat of the freestream flow is demonstrated. The extrapolation of the shock-tunnel results to flight conditions, however, is made difficult by the fact that a significant amount of fuel passes through a quenched zone without burning, seriously degrading overall performance.

  4. Hydrologic monitoring of a waste-injection well near Milton, Florida, June 1975 - December 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascale, Charles A.; Martin, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Hydraulic and chemical data were collected through a monitoring program conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey at an industrial liquid-waste injection site 6 mi southwest of Milton, Fla., in Santa Rosa County. The injection system is described. Data include injection rates, volumes, and pressures; water-level data at three monitor wells and a standby injection well, and field and laboratory analyses of water samples from four wells. Hydraulic and geochemical effects of the waste-injection system at the plant as of December 31, 1976, have been detected only in the injection zone, the lower limestone of the Floridan aquifer. Increased pressures are evident at the three wells used to monitor the injection zone. Geochemical changes have been noted only at the deep-test monitor well closest to the injection well. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results in the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.

  6. Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Duracillin A-S ® ... Pfizerpen A-S® ... injection should not be used to treat gonorrhea (a sexually transmitted disease) or early in the treatment ... serious infections. Penicillin G procaine injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by ...

  7. Tolerability of hypertonic injectables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-07-25

    Injectable drug products are ideally developed as isotonic solutions. Often, hypertonic injectables may have to be marketed for a variety of reasons such as product solubilization and stabilization. A key concern during product formulation development is the local and systemic tolerability of hypertonic products upon injection. This report reviews and discusses the tolerability in terms of local discomfort, irritation, sensation of heat and pain, along with other observed side effects of hypertonicity in both in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal and human models. These side effects clearly depend on the degree of hypertonicity. The sensation of pain among different injection routes seems to follow this order: intramuscular>subcutaneous>intravenous or intravascular. It is recommended that the upper osmolality limit should be generally controlled under 600 mOsm/kg for drug products intended for intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. For drug products intended for intravenous or intravascular injection, the recommended upper limit should be generally controlled under 1,000 mOsm/kg for small-volume injections (≤ 100 mL) and 500 mOsm/kg for large-volume injections (>100mL). Several options are available for minimization of hypertonicity-induced pain upon product administration. PMID:26027488

  8. Tevatron reverse injection

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-25

    In the new injection scenario antiprotons are injected onto a helical orbit in the Tevatron in order to avoid the detrimental effects of the beam-beam interaction at 150 GeV. The new scenario required changes in the tuning procedure. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning, therefore the antiproton injection line has to be tuned with protons by reverse injecting them from the Tevatron into the Main Pang (MR). Previously, the reverse injection was performed in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS dock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus marking it possible to inject 6 proton batches and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR.

  9. Health Instruction Packages: Injections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleman, Ellie; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct nursing students in techniques and equipment utilized for intramuscular injections. The first module, "Equipment for Intramuscular Injections" by Ellie Dunkleman, presents guidelines for selecting needles of the proper length and gauge…

  10. Spin injection into semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestreich, M.; Hübner, J.; Hägele, D.; Klar, P. J.; Heimbrodt, W.; Rühle, W. W.; Ashenford, D. E.; Lunn, B.

    1999-03-01

    The injection of spin-polarized electrons is presently one of the major challenges in semiconductor spin electronics. We propose and demonstrate a most efficient spin injection using diluted magnetic semiconductors as spin aligners. Time-resolved photoluminescence with a Cd0.98Mn0.02Te/CdTe structure proves the feasibility of the spin-alignment mechanism.

  11. Dystrophic calcifications after autologous fat injection on face.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dai Hyun; Jang, Hee Won; Kim, Hee Joo; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-06-01

    Autologous fat injection is widely used procedure for various functional and aesthetic purposes. However, it could result in many immediate or delayed complications including dystrophic calcifications. Almost all of the case reports about dystrophic calcification after autologous fat injection were result from the iatrogenic tissue trauma of breast augmentation. This is a report of a 30-year-old patient who developed pathologically proven multiple dystrophic calcifications on the face after autologous fat injection. PMID:24131074

  12. Use of Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections to Treat Spasticity

    MedlinePlus

    ... walking. These problems, called spasticity, are common in cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and spinal ... How does BoNT control spasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP)? There is strong evidence that BoNT injections ...

  13. High temperature pseudotachylytes and ductile shear zones in dry rocks from the continental lower crust (Lofoten, Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, Luca; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Harris, Katherine; Wood, Elliot

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of initiation and growth of shear zones under lower crustal conditions is of fundamental importance when assessing lithosphere rheology and strength. In this study we investigate brittle-ductile shear zones developed under lower crustal conditions in anorthosites from Nusfjord, Lofoten (northern Norway). Steep ductile shear zones trend E-W to ESE-WSW and have a stretching lineation plunging steeply to the SSW or SSE. The shear sense is normal (south block down to the south) as indicated by SC and SC' fabrics and sigmoidal foliations. The shear zone show a mylonitic to ultramylonitic fabric, sharp boundaries to the host anorthosites, and abundant anastomosing dark fine-grained layers along the main foliation. The fine-grained layers localized much of the strain. Relatively lower strain domains within or adjacent to shear zones indicate that the fine dark bands of mylonites represent transposed pseudotachylyte which still locally preserve the pristine structures such as chilled margins, breccia textures with angular clasts of the host rock and injection veins; intersecting veins of pseudotachylyte record multiple stages of seismic slip. The orientation of injection veins and marker offset along the most preserved pseudotachylyte fault veins indicate approximately a sinistral strike slip kinematic during faulting event responsible for the friction-induced melting. These observations indicate that ductile shear zones exploited pre-existing brittle fault zones including a network of pseudotachylytes, and that the fine-grained "ultramylonites" derive from former fine-grained pseudotachylytes. The pseudotachylyte microstructure is dominated by plagioclase microlites dispersed in a groundmass of fine-grained clinopyroxene. Clinopyroxene recrystallizes in the damage zone flanking the pseudotachylytes, indicating high metamorphic grade during pseudotachylyte formation. Small idioblastic or cauliflower garnet are scattered through the matrix and

  14. Simultaneous Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Multiple Chemical Constituents in YiQiFuMai Injection by Ultra-Fast Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Ion Trap Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunhua; Ju, Aichun; Zhou, Dazheng; Li, Dekun; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang; Qi, Jin

    2016-01-01

    YiQiFuMai injection (YQFM) is a modern lyophilized powder preparation derived from the traditional Chinese medicine Sheng-mai san (SMS) used for treating cardiovascular diseases, such as chronic heart failure. However, its chemical composition has not been fully elucidated, particularly for the preparation derived from Ophiopogon japonicus. This study aimed to establish a systematic and reliable method to quickly and simultaneously analyze the chemical constituents in YQFM by ultra-fast liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UFLC-IT-TOF/MS). Sixty-five compounds in YQFM were tentatively identified by comparison with reference substances or literature data. Furthermore, twenty-one compounds, including three ophiopogonins, fifteen ginsenosides and three lignans were quantified by UFLC-IT-TOF/MS. Notably, this is the first determination of steroidal saponins from O. japonicus in YQFM. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of intra- and inter-day precision, reproducibility and stability were <4.9% and all analytes showed good linearity (R² ≥ 0.9952) and acceptable recovery of 91.8%-104.2% (RSD ≤ 5.4%), indicating that the methods were reliable. These methods were successfully applied to quantitative analysis of ten batches of YQFM. The developed approach can provide useful and comprehensive information for quality control, further mechanistic studies in vivo and clinical application of YQFM. PMID:27213307

  15. Circulation convection during subsurface injection of liquid waste, St. Petersburg, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Injection of liquid waste into a highly transmissive, saltwater-bearing, fractured dolomite underlying the city of St. Petersburg, Florida, provided an opportunity to study density-dependent flow associated with two miscible and density-different liquids. The injection zone was 98 m thick with a radial hydraulic conductivity of 762 m/d and a vertical hydraulic conductivity of 152 m/d. Mean chloride concentrations of the injectant during two tests of 91 and 366 days duration were 180 and 170 mg/L, respectively, whereas chloride concentration of native salt water ranged from 19,000 to 20,000 mg/L. During the 366-day test, chloride concentration in water from a well open to the upper part of the injection zone 223 m from the injection well approximately stabilized at about 4000 mg/L. Relatively constant chloride concentrations in water from this observation well at a level significantly greater than the injectant concentration suggested the hypothesis that circular convection with saltwater flow added chloride ions to the injection zone flow sampled at the observation well. In order to assess the acceptability of the circular convection hypothesis, information was required about the velocity field during injection. Mass transport model simulations were used to provide this information, after determining that the fractured injection zone could be treated as an equivalent porous medium with a single porosity. The mass transport model was calibrated using the 91-day test data from two observation wells 223 m from the injection well. The model was then run without parameter changes to simulate the 366-day test. Mass fractions of injectant computed for four observation wells during the 366-day test compared favorably with observed mass fractions. Observed mass fractions were calculated as a function of chloride concentration and density. Comparisons between model-computed mass fraction and velocity fields in a radial section showed circular convection, with salt water

  16. Microseismic Monitoring of the Mounds Drill Cuttings Injection Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, P.T.; Mahrer, K.D.; Moschovidis, Z.A.; Warpinski, N.R.; Wolhart, S.L.

    1999-01-25

    This paper describes the microseismic mapping of repeated injections of drill cuttings into two separate formations at a test site near Mounds, OK. Injections were performed in sandstone and shale formations at depths of 830 and 595 m, respectively. Typical injection disposal was simulated using multiple small-volume injections over a three-day period, with long shut-in periods interspersed between the injections. Microseismic monitoring was achieved using a 5-level array of wireline-run, triaxial- accelerometer receivers in a monitor well 76 m from the disposed well. Results of the mapped microseismic locations showed that the disposal domti W= generally aligns with the major horizontal stress with some variations in azimuth and that wide variations in height and length growth occurred with continued injections. These experiments show that the cuttings injection process cm be adequately monitored from a downhole, wireline-run receiver array, thus providing process control and environmental assurance.

  17. Re-evaluation of a subsurface injection experiment for testing flow and transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Lewis, R.E.; Engelman, R.E.; Pearson, A.L.; Murray, C.J.; Smoot, J.L. Lu, A.H.; Randall, P.R.; Wegener, W.H.

    1995-12-01

    The current preferred method for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site is to vitrify the wastes so they can be stored in a near-surface, shallow-land burial facility (Shord 1995). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) managed the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a disposal facility for the vitrified LLW. Vadose zone flow and transport models are recognized as necessary tools for baseline risk assessments of stored waste forms. The objective of the Controlled Field Testing task of the PVTD Project is to perform and analyze field experiments to demonstrate the appropriateness of conceptual models for the performance assessment. The most convincing way to demonstrate appropriateness is to show that the model can reproduce the movement of water and contaminants in the field. Before expensive new experiments are initiated, an injection experiment conducted at the Hanford Site in 1980 (designated the ``Sisson and the Lu experiment``) should be completely analyzed and understood. Briefly, in that test, a solution containing multiple tracers was injected at a single point into the subsurface sediments. The resulting spread of the water and tracers was monitored in wells surrounding the injection point. Given the advances in knowledge, computational capabilities, and models over the last 15 years, it is important to re-analyze the data before proceeding to other experiments and history-matching exercises.

  18. Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Low Permeability Zones in Subsurface Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Oostrom, M.; Wietsma, T.; Cantrell, K.

    2006-12-01

    Heterogeneity is often encountered in subsurface contamination characterization and remediation. Low- permeability zones are typically bypassed when remedial fluids are injected into subsurface heterogeneous aquifer systems. Therefore, contaminants in the bypassed areas may not be contacted by the amendments in the remedial fluid, which may significantly prolong the remediation operations. An experimental and numerical study has been completed to demonstrate the capability of Mobility-Controlled Flood (MCF) technology to enhance the remedial amendments delivery to the lower permeability zones. This technology, developed in the petroleum industry, has been demonstrated to significantly improve the sweeping efficiency in heterogeneous petroleum reservoirs. Xanthan gum, a water-soluble bio-polymer, was used to modify the viscosity of the amendment-added remedial solutions. Surfactants and (poly)phosphate were the remedial amendments for non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) and uranium remediation, respectively. Batch and column experiments were conducted to select the polymer-amendment solutions. The enhanced delivery of the remedial solutions was demonstrated in two- dimensional (2-D) flow cell experiments, packed with heterogeneous systems, as a function of polymer concentration and injection flow rate. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator was modified to include polymer-induced shear thinning effects. The results clearly show that the MCF technology is capable of enhancing the delivery of remedial amendments to subsurface lower permeability zones. The enhanced delivery significantly improved the NAPL removal from these zones and the sweeping efficiency on a heterogeneous system was remarkably increased when a polymer fluid was applied. MCF technology is also able to stabilize the fluid displacing front when there is a density difference between the fluids. The modified STOMP simulator was able to predict the experimental observed fluid

  19. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  20. Coanda injection system for axially staged low emission combustors

    DOEpatents

    Evulet, Andrei Tristan; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; ElKady, Ahmed Mostafa; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2012-05-15

    The low emission combustor includes a combustor housing defining a combustion chamber having a plurality of combustion zones. A liner sleeve is disposed in the combustion housing with a gap formed between the liner sleeve and the combustor housing. A secondary nozzle is disposed along a centerline of the combustion chamber and configured to inject a first fluid comprising air, at least one diluent, fuel, or combinations thereof to a downstream side of a first combustion zone among the plurality of combustion zones. A plurality of primary fuel nozzles is disposed proximate to an upstream side of the combustion chamber and located around the secondary nozzle and configured to inject a second fluid comprising air and fuel to an upstream side of the first combustion zone. The combustor also includes a plurality of tertiary coanda nozzles. Each tertiary coanda nozzle is coupled to a respective dilution hole. The tertiary coanda nozzles are configured to inject a third fluid comprising air, at least one other diluent, fuel, or combinations thereof to one or more remaining combustion zones among the plurality of combustion zones.

  1. Constant Rate or Stepwise Injection of Cold Fluid into a Geologic Formation: A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Operations such as CO2 geologic storage, enhanced geothermal systems, and wastewater injection are rendering fluid injection as important as fluid extraction. In particular, injecting fluid colder than the original fluid causes thermal contraction and ensuing decreases in stresses, which yield an effect opposite of what volume expansion driven by the fluid injection imposes. In this study, we conduct numerical simulations to investigate pore-pressure buildup, thermal diffusion, and stress changes for two conditions: (1) constant rate, and (2) stepwise injection of cold fluid. The numerical-simulation method—which combines fluid flow, poroelasticity, thermal diffusion, and thermal stress—is based on the single-phase flow condition to simplify a computation model and thus facilitate a focus on mechanical responses. We also examine temporal evolutions of stress states and mobilized friction angles across base, injection-zone, and caprock layers for two different stress regimes: normal-faulting and reverse-faulting. Under the normal-faulting stress regime, the maximum mobilized friction angle occurs inside of the injection zone, which may act to improve the stability of the caprock. Special attention is required, however, because the location of the maximum mobilized friction angle is close to interfaces with the caprock and base layers. The hypothetical stepwise injection of cold fluid is shown to improve the stability of the injection zone to some extent. Under the reverse-faulting stress regime, the maximum mobilized friction angle occurs near the middle of the injection zone; stability in the injection zone is enhanced while that in the caprock/base is aggravated with time. The hypothetical stepwise injection not only helps improve the stability of the injection zone but also delays the moment when the maximum friction angle is mobilized. Finally, we suggest using dimensionless parameters to determine a prevalence of the thermal-stress effect in the injection

  2. Enhanced phytoremediation in the vadose zone: Modeling and column studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K.; Chang, Y.; Corapcioglu, M.; Cho, C.

    2002-05-01

    Phytoremediation is a plant-based technique with potential for enhancing the remediation of vadoese zone soils contaminated by pollutants. The use of deep-rooted plants is an alternative to conventional methodologies. However, when the phytoremediation is applied to the vadose zone, it might have some restrictions since it uses solely naturally driven energy and mechanisms in addition to the complesxity of the vadose zone. As a more innovative technique than conventional phytoremediation methods, air injected phytoremediation technique is introduced to enhance the remediation efficiency or to apply at the former soil vapor extraction or bio venting sites. Effects of air injection, vegetation treatment, and air injection with vegetation treatments on the removal of hydrocarbon were investigated by column studies to simulate the field situation. Both the removal efficiency and the microbial activity were highest in air-injected and vegetated column soils. It was suggested that increased microorganisms activity stimulated by plant root exudates enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon compounds. Air injection provided sufficient opportunity for promoting the microbial activity at depths where the conditions are anaerobic. Air injection can enhance the physicochemical properties of the medium and contaminant and increase the bioavailability i.e., the plant and microbial accessibility to the contaminant. A mathematical model that can be applied to phytoremediation, especially to air injected phytoremediation, for simulating the fate and the transport of a diesel contaminant in the vadose zone is developed. The approach includes a two-phase model of water flow in vegetated and unplanted vadose zone soil. A time-specific root distribution model and a microbial growth model in the rhizosphere of vegetated soil were combined with an unsaturated soil water flow equation as well as with a contaminant transport equation. The proposed model showed a satisfactory representation of

  3. Simulation of subsurface storage and recovery of effluent using multiple wells, St Petersburg, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.

    1997-01-01

    rate to injection rate increased, and (5) was not significantly affected by any particular geometric arrangement of wells or by the number of wells when the volume of water injected remained constant. Recovery efficiency from multiple wells was nearly the same as from a single well. Recovery efficiency ranged from about 7 to 56 percent, in several tests. Sensitivity of recovery efficiency to variations in selected parameters such as dissolved-solids concentration of the injection zone, permeability, vertical anisotropy, longitudinal and transverse dispersivities, and effective porosity was tested. Changes in the dissolved-solids concentration of the injection zone produced the greatest change in recovery efficiency. Uniform changes in dispersivity values produced the second greatest change in recovery efficiency. Generally, recovery efficiency increased when the above parameter values were decreased and recovery efficiency decreased when these parameter values were increased. Density difference between native and injected waters was the most important factor affecting recovery efficiency in this study. For the base simulation, sensitivity tests indicated that recovery efficiency increased from about 15 to 78 percent when the dissolved-solids concentration of the native water decreased from about 7,800 to 500 milligrams per liter. Dispersivity is another important factor affecting recovery efficiency. For the base simulation, sensitivity tests indicated that recovery efficiencies from about 9 to 24 percent can be obtained for different dispersivity values. A field determination of dispersivity was not made as part of this study, and values used may not be representative of the actual dispersive characteristics of the aquifer system at the study site. However, dispersivity values tested are within the range of values used in previous studies.

  4. Penicillin G Benzathine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat and prevent certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G benzathine injection is in a class of antibiotics called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  5. Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G procaine injection should not be used ... of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  6. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy-guided botulinum toxin Treatment; ...

  7. Giving an insulin injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... One Type of Insulin Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin ... syringe before injecting it. Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin ...

  8. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works ... hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; loss of consciousness; or seizures. If you experience a severe reaction, ...

  9. Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... on dialysis. Ferric carboxymaltose injection is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works ... rapid, weak pulse; chest pain; or loss of consciousness. If you experience a severe reaction, your doctor ...

  10. Epoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to decrease the chance that blood transfusions (transfer of one person's blood to another person's body) ... wheezing difficulty breathing or swallowing hoarseness lack of energy dizziness fainting Epoetin alfa injection may cause other ...

  11. Sipuleucel-T Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. It is usually given once every 2 ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for about 30 minutes afterwards. A doctor ...

  12. Quinupristin and Dalfopristin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a class of medications called streptogramin antibiotics. They work by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as quinupristin and dalfopristin injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking ...

  13. Amphotericin B Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called antifungals. It works by slowing the growth of fungi ... amikacin, gentamicin, or tobramycin (Bethkis, Kitabis Pak, Tobi); antifungals such as clotrimazole, fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Onmel, Sporanox), ...

  14. Epoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of surgery to decrease the chance that blood transfusions (transfer of one person's blood to another person's ... injection is used to decrease the risk that blood transfusions will be required due to surgery, it is ...

  15. Darbepoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... may tell you not to use darbepoetin alfa injection.tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  16. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in people with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over ...

  17. Insulin Lispro Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to inject subcutaneously ( ... if it is colored, cloudy, or contains solid particles. If you are using insulin lispro suspension, the ...

  18. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (a thickening of tissue [plaque] inside the penis that causes the penis to curve). Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is in ... the plaque of thickened tissue and allows the penis to be straightened.

  19. Ceftazidime and Avibactam Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... may receive ceftazidime and avibactam injection in a hospital or you may administer the medication at home. ... doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with ...

  20. Sipuleucel-T Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure you are not having a serious reaction to the medication. You will be given other medications 30 minutes before your infusion to prevent reactions to sipuleucel-T injection. Tell your doctor or ...

  1. Supersonic Pulsed Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Harding, G. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    2001-01-01

    An injector has been developed to provide high-speed high-frequency (order 10 kHz) pulsed a supersonic crossflow. The injector nozzle is formed between the fixed internal surface of the nozzle and a freely rotating three- or four-sided wheel embedded within the device. Flow-induced rotation of the wheel causes the nozzle throat to open and close at a frequency proportional to the speed of sound of the injected gas. Measurements of frequency and mass flow rate as a function of supply pressure are discussed for various injector designs. Preliminary results are presented for wall-normal injection of helium into a Mach-2 ducted airflow. The data include schlieren images in the injectant plume in a plane normal to the flow, downstream of injection.

  2. AbobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is also used to temporarily smooth frown lines (wrinkles between the eyebrows). AbobotulinumtoxinA injection is in a ... to treat excessive sweating, many types of facial wrinkles, anal fissures, and to prevent headaches in patients ...

  3. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys to stop working) who are on dialysis and are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, ... gluconate injection is usually given during 8 consecutive dialysis sessions for a total of 8 doses. If ...

  4. Premixed direct injection disk

    SciTech Connect

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  5. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  6. Monitoring a large volume CO2 injection: Year two results from SECARB project at Denbury's Cranfield, Mississippi, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hovorka, S.D.; Meckel, T.A.; Trevino, R.H.; Lu, J.; Nicot, J.-P.; Choi, J.-W.; Freeman, D.; Cook, P.; Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J. B.; Freifeild, B.M.; Doughty, C.; Carrigan, C.R.; La-Brecque, D.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Thordsen, J.J.; Phelps, T.J.; Yang, C.; Romanak, K.D.; Zhang, T.; Holt, R.M.; Lindler, J.S.; Butsch, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    variability. A repeat seismic survey of the HiVIT is planned for late 2010 to assess saturation change especially in downdip brine-only areas. A study focused on feasibility of monitoring the shallow subsurface to separate leakage from normal complex surface fluxes is underway at an monitoring array installed in October 2009 to assess the interactions of recharge, soil gas, and shallow groundwater aquifers. Recent well re-entry and tracer injection will provide further information to interpret observed elevated deep-sourced methane. The Detailed Area Study (DAS) is collecting dense time-lapse data from closely-spaced three well array of an injector and two observation wells. The observation wells were completed with fiberglass casing to facilitate electrical resistance tomography (ERT) measurements, and a diverse array of instrumentation was both cemented behind casing and suspended on tubing. Injection started at the DAS December 1, 2009. We have measured pulsed neutron and resistivity via wireline, downhole and above-zone pressure, distributed temperature, and fluid chemistry including introduced pulses of perfluorocarbons, noble gases, and SF6 as tracers. Between wells, time-lapse crosswell seismic and electrical resistance tomography (ERT) are used to measure saturation change. The goals are to measure changes as fluids evolve from single phase (brine) to two phase (CO2-brine) in order to document linkages between pressure and sweep efficiency. A time-lapse VSP survey bridges the vertical resolution and areal coverage between cross-well and surface seismic. The repeat surveys for many tools are scheduled for September, 2010. Reservoir characterization based on cores, historic and new wireline log data, production history, hydrologic tests, fluid analysis, and a three-D seismic survey have been used in multiple numerical models to predict reservoir response in order to design effective monitoring strategies and optimize deployment. History matching of observed respons

  7. Optimized atom injection in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G.J.M.; Boniface, C.; Boeuf, J.P.

    2004-11-29

    An improvement of the neutral gas injection in order to increase the Hall thruster lifetime capabilities is demonstrated using a two-dimensional model. An additional atom injection through the channel ceramics in a region located between the ionization and the acceleration zones leads to an efficient ionization of the neutral flux, with a flattening of the plasma density and potential profiles in the radial direction. Thanks to this modified injection of the atom flow, a focusing electric field is produced, reducing the ion flux impacting on ceramic walls.

  8. Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Soluble Substrate Field Test: Interim Data Summary for the Substrate Injection and Process Monitoring Phases of the Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Mackley, Rob D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Johnson, Christian D.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.

    2008-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier by reducing the concentration of the primary oxidizing species in groundwater (i.e., nitrate and dissolved oxygen) and chromate, and thereby increasing the longevity of the ISRM barrier. This report summarizes the initial results from field testing of an in situ biological treatment zone implemented through injection of a soluble substrate. The field test is divided into operational phases that include substrate injection, process monitoring, and performance monitoring. The results summarized herein are for the substrate injection and process monitoring phase encompassing the first approximately three months of field testing. Performance monitoring is ongoing at the time this report was prepared and is planned to extend over approximately 18 months. As such, this report is an interim data summary report for the field test. The treatability testing has multiple objectives focused on evaluating the performance of biostimulation as a reducing barrier for nitrate, oxygen, and chromate. The following conclusions related to these objectives are supported by the data provided in this report. Substrate was successfully distributed to a radius of about 15 m (50 ft) from the injection well. Monitoring data indicate that microbial growth initiated rapidly, and this rapid growth would limit the ability to inject substrate to significantly larger zones from a single injection well. As would be expected, the uniformity of substrate distribution was impacted by subsurface heterogeneity. However, subsequent microbial activity and ability to reduce the targeted species was observed throughout the monitored zone during the process monitoring

  9. Monitoring CO2 gas-phase injection in a shallow sand aquifer using cross borehole GPR and modeled with T2VOC multi-phase code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, R. N.; Jensen, K.; Looms, M. C.; Sonnenborg, T.; Gudbjerg, J.

    2013-12-01

    Risk assessment of potential leakage is an important issue that needs attention in designing effective storage schemes for CO2 storage. Leaking gas may threat groundwater resources and be a liability if pooled up in buildings. We have designed an experiment where we were track the movement of an injected CO2 gas-phase using cross borehole GPR in an unconfined sandy aquifer located in the southwestern part of Denmark. The geology at the field site has been determined using GPR- data, natural gamma ray logging in boreholes, cores sampled with a Geoprobe soil-sampling tool and grain size analysis of the cores. From these measurements the field site geology can be divided into three geological zones. The first zone is an approximately 4 m fine aeolian sand; the second zone is poorly sorted glacial deposits dominated by sand down to 9 m; and the the last zone from 9 m and down consist of well-sorted medium melt water sand. In total we conducted four short injection experiments all of them producing very similar results. The screen of the injection well was 10 m below ground level or 8 m below the water table. An array of six GPR boreholes was installed around the injection well and downwards of dominating gas flow direction. GPR-data were acquired in zero-offset (1D) and multiple-offset (2D) configurations prior and during the injection. All sets of GPR data showed that a plume developed at the depth of the injection screen and that the injected gas primarily spread towards South-East and never breach a barrier around 5 m depth. This corresponded very well with the natural gamma logs, which resulted in higher readings from 4-6.5 m depth. The grain size analyses confirmed that there is a fine sediment layer throughout the area at 4-6 meters depth. We guesstimated van Genucthen parameters from the grain size analysis and used as input to the numerical model and GPR data were used for calibration. The numerical model enabled us to test minimum entry pressure required for

  10. TASK 2: QUENCH ZONE SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fusselman, Steve

    2015-09-30

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. A key feature of the AR gasifier design is the transition from the gasifier outlet into the quench zone, where the raw syngas is cooled to ~ 400°C by injection and vaporization of atomized water. Earlier pilot plant testing revealed a propensity for the original gasifier outlet design to accumulate slag in the outlet, leading to erratic syngas flow from the outlet. Subsequent design modifications successfully resolved this issue in the pilot plant gasifier. In order to gain greater insight into the physical phenomena occurring within this zone, AR developed a cold flow simulation apparatus with Coanda Research & Development with a high degree of similitude to hot fire conditions with the pilot scale gasifier design, and capable of accommodating a scaled-down quench zone for a demonstration-scale gasifier. The objective of this task was to validate similitude of the cold flow simulation model by comparison of pilot-scale outlet design performance, and to assess demonstration scale gasifier design feasibility from testing of a scaled-down outlet design. Test results did exhibit a strong correspondence with the two pilot scale outlet designs, indicating credible similitude for the cold flow simulation device. Testing of the scaled-down outlet revealed important considerations in the design and operation of the demonstration scale gasifier, in particular pertaining to the relative momentum between the downcoming raw syngas and the sprayed quench water and associated impacts on flow patterns within the quench zone. This report describes key findings from the test program, including assessment of pilot plant configuration simulations relative to actual

  11. Injections--how safe.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Saurabh

    2005-04-01

    Injection, is a skin-piercing event performed by a syringe and needle with the purpose of introducing a curative substance or vaccine in a patient. According to WHO, safe injection is one which does not harm to the recepient, does not expose the health worker to any risk and does not result in waste that is dangerous for the community. To achieve this injection should be prepared on a clean workspace, provider should clean his hands appropriately, sterility of the syringe and needle to be maintained, skin of the recipient should be cleaned and above all sharps waste should be managed appropriately. Common danger of unsafe injection is infection. Most medication used in primary care can be administered orally. So firstly the behaviour of healthcare providers and patients must be changed so as to decrease overuse of injections, secondly provision of sufficient quantities of appropriate injection equipment and infection control supplies should be made available and thirdly a sharp waste management system should be set up. PMID:16173426

  12. Protocol for multiple node network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a multiple interconnected network of intelligent message-repeating remote nodes which employs an antibody recognition message termination process performed by all remote nodes and a remote node polling process performed by other nodes which are master units controlling remote nodes in respective zones of the network assigned to respective master nodes. Each remote node repeats only those messages originated in the local zone, to provide isolation among the master nodes.

  13. Protocol for multiple node network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a multiple interconnected network of intelligent message-repeating remote nodes which employs an antibody recognition message termination process performed by all remote nodes and a remote node polling process performed by other nodes which are master units controlling remote nodes in respective zones of the network assigned to respective master nodes. Each remote node repeats only those messages originated in the local zone, to provide isolation among the master nodes.

  14. Shale fracturing injections at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: 1977-1979 series

    SciTech Connect

    Weeren, H.O.

    1980-09-01

    Intermediate-level waste solution generated at ORNL is periodically mixed with a cement-base blend of dry solids and injected into an impermeable shale formation at an approximate depth of 240 m (800 ft). The grout mix sets shortly after the injection, permanently fixing the radionuclides in the shale formation. A series of four injections of intermediate-level waste solution was made between 1977 and 1979. A total of 1.2 million l (314,000 gal) of waste solution containing 81,780 Ci of radionuclides was injected. This report is an account of this injection series - preparations, injections, results, and conclusions. The volumes and activities that were injected are summarized. In Injection ILW-15 a small leak of grout to the waste pit eroded the drain valves and forced a shutdown of the injection while repairs were made. The injection was completed 2 days later. Injection ILW-16 was terminated about two-thirds through the injection when the diesel drive of the injection pump blew a connecting rod through the block. The facility and well were washed down with the standby pump. Prior to Injection ILW-17, air pads were installed on all bulk solids storage bins. All subsequent injections have been marked by a much more even flow of solids and a resulting improvement in the mix ratio control. Injections ILW-17 and ILW-18 were made without notable incidents. Logs of the observation wells indicated that all grout sheets were within the disposal zone.

  15. Neonatal Subventricular Zone Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, David M.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Bordey, Angélique

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) line the postnatal lateral ventricles and give rise to multiple cell types which include neurons, astrocytes, and ependymal cells1. Understanding the molecular pathways responsible for NSC self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation is critical for harnessing their unique potential to repair the brain and better understand central nervous system disorders. Previous methods for the manipulation of mammalian systems required the time consuming and expensive endeavor of genetic engineering at the whole animal level2. Thus, the vast majority of studies have explored the functions of NSC molecules in vitro or in invertebrates. Here, we demonstrate the simple and rapid technique to manipulate neonatal NPCs that is referred to as neonatal subventricular zone (SVZ) electroporation. Similar techniques were developed a decade ago to study embryonic NSCs and have aided studies on cortical development3,4 . More recently this was applied to study the postnatal rodent forebrain5-7. This technique results in robust labeling of SVZ NSCs and their progeny. Thus, postnatal SVZ electroporation provides a cost and time effective alternative for mammalian NSC genetic engineering. PMID:23426329

  16. 40 CFR 148.20 - Petitions to allow injection of a waste prohibited under subpart B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... interface with an Underground Source of Drinking Water (USDW) as defined in 40 CFR part 146; or (ii) Before... of hazardous constituents within the injection zone by hydrolysis, chemical interactions or...

  17. 40 CFR 148.20 - Petitions to allow injection of a waste prohibited under subpart B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... interface with an Underground Source of Drinking Water (USDW) as defined in 40 CFR part 146; or (ii) Before... of hazardous constituents within the injection zone by hydrolysis, chemical interactions or...

  18. 40 CFR 148.20 - Petitions to allow injection of a waste prohibited under subpart B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... interface with an Underground Source of Drinking Water (USDW) as defined in 40 CFR part 146; or (ii) Before... of hazardous constituents within the injection zone by hydrolysis, chemical interactions or...

  19. Aeromagnetic anomalies and discordant lineations beneath the Niger Delta - Implications for new fracture zones and multiple sea-floor spreading directions in the 'meso-Atlantic' Gulf of Guinea cul-de-sac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babalola, Olufemi O.; Gipson, Mack, Jr.

    1991-06-01

    An aeromagnetic map eliminating data gaps in the Nigerian continental margin is presented, and the implications of the mapped fracture zone structure and the interpretation of two triple junctions beneath the Niger Delta Basin for its early tectonic history are discussed. Sea-floor spreading was found to occur in two different directions, and not only the well-documented NE-SW spreading in the 'meso-Atlantic' ocean. The existence of two triple junctions located where the Niger Delta Basin abuts the southern ends of the Abakaliki and Anambra troughs is shown. The two newly interpreted triple junctions beneath the Niger Delta demonstrate the previously recognized structural complexity of the region, necessitating a review of models for its early tectonic history.

  20. Modeling the vertical confinement of injection-well thermal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, P.J.; Berry, P.J.; Gu, H. )

    1991-11-01

    Cooling of rock by water injection frequently causes fracturing of wells. This paper describes a 3D simulation model of thermally induced fracturing. It is used to show that fractures often tend to grow vertically into permeable zones. Procedures are outlined for confining fracture growth in wells where it will assist waterflood sweep performance.