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Sample records for multiple kinematic edges

  1. Distinguishing dark matter stabilization symmetries using multiple kinematic edges and cusps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Kim, Doojin; Toharia, Manuel; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2010-07-01

    We emphasize that the stabilizing symmetry for dark matter (DM) particles does not have to be the commonly used parity (Z2) symmetry. We therefore examine the potential of the colliders to distinguish models with parity stabilized DM from models in which the DM is stabilized by other symmetries. We often take the latter to be a Z3 symmetry for illustration. We focus on signatures where a single particle, charged under the DM stabilization symmetry decays into the DM and standard model (SM) particles. Such a Z3-charged mother particle can decay into one or two DM particles along with the same SM particles. This can be contrasted with the decay of a Z2-charged mother particle, where only one DM particle appears. Thus, if the intermediate particles in these decay chains are off-shell, then the reconstructed invariant mass of the SM particles exhibits two kinematic edges for the Z3 case but only one for the Z2 case. For the case of on-shell intermediate particles, distinguishing the two symmetries requires more than the kinematic edges. In this case, we note that certain decay chain topologies of the mother particle which are present for the Z3 case (but absent for the Z2 case) generate a cusp in the invariant mass distribution of the SM particles. We demonstrate that this cusp is generally invariant of the various spin configurations. We further apply these techniques within the context of explicit models.

  2. Edge-driven microplate kinematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Gallo, David G.

    1993-01-01

    It is known from plate tectonic reconstructions that oceanic microplates undergo rapid rotation about a vertical axis and that the instantaneous rotation axes describing the microplate's motion relative to the bounding major plates are frequently located close to its margins with those plates, close to the tips of propagating rifts. We propose a class of edge-driven block models to illustrate how slip across the microplate margins, block rotation, and propagation of rifting may be related to the relative motion of the plates on either side. An important feature of these edge-driven models is that the instantaneous rotation axes are always located on the margins between block and two bounding plates. According to those models the pseudofaults or traces of disrupted seafloor resulting from the propagation of rifting between microplate and major plates may be used independently to approximately trace the continuous kinematic evolution of the microplate back in time. Pseudofault geometries and matching rotations of the Easter microplate show that for most of its 5 m.y. history, block rotation could be driven by the drag of the Nazca and Pacific plates on the microplate's edges rather than by a shear flow of mantle underneath.

  3. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints

    PubMed Central

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component. PMID:27043580

  4. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints.

    PubMed

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component. PMID:27043580

  5. Kinematically redundant arm formulations for coordinated multiple arm implementations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Robert W.; Quiocho, Leslie J.; Cleghorn, Timothy F.

    1990-01-01

    Although control laws for kinematically redundant robotic arms were presented as early as 1969, redundant arms have only recently become recognized as viable solutions to limitations inherent to kinematically sufficient arms. The advantages of run-time control optimization and arm reconfiguration are becoming increasingly attractive as the complexity and criticality of robotic systems continues to progress. A generalized control law for a spatial arm with 7 or more degrees of freedom (DOF) based on Whitney's resolved rate formulation is given. Results from a simulation implementation utilizing this control law are presented. Furthermore, results from a two arm simulation are presented to demonstrate the coordinated control of multiple arms using this formulation.

  6. Multiple-target tracking via kinematics, shape, and appearance-based data association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shunguang; Tan, Yi; Das, Subhodev; Broaddus, Christopher; Chiu, Ming-Yee

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a real time system for tracking multiple ground moving targets in aerial video. The state of a target is described by its kinematics as well as shape and appearance features: the kinematics include location and velocity in an earth fixed coordinate system; the shape is described by the parameters of an ellipse; the appearance features consist of color histogram, color correlogram, edge matching and/or orientation correlation information. The target kinematics is represented by a constant velocity model and the shape and appearance features are represented by static models between two observation instances. The motion layers of elliptical shapes containing moving targets in stabilized video sequence are identified. The location and velocity in geospace and the corresponding covariances are computed for each target within a motion layer using the platform metadata. A k-best joint probabilistic data association (JPDA) algorithm updates the target kinematics, while an α-β filter updates the shape and appearance features. Additionally, the JPDA assignment cost matrix is formulated using the kinematics, the appearance features, and the target heading information. The k-best Hungarian algorithm is used to obtain the best assignments. The issues of target life cycle management and target splitting and merging are also addressed in our framework. The system has been tested and evaluated for vehicle tracking in sparse, medium, and dense traffic using aerial EO and IR videos.

  7. Loops and multiple edges in modularity maximization of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafieri, Sonia; Hansen, Pierre; Liberti, Leo

    2010-04-01

    The modularity maximization model proposed by Newman and Girvan for the identification of communities in networks works for general graphs possibly with loops and multiple edges. However, the applications usually correspond to simple graphs. These graphs are compared to a null model where the degree distribution is maintained but edges are placed at random. Therefore, in this null model there will be loops and possibly multiple edges. Sharp bounds on the expected number of loops, and their impact on the modularity, are derived. Then, building upon the work of Massen and Doye, but using algebra rather than simulation, we propose modified null models associated with graphs without loops but with multiple edges, graphs with loops but without multiple edges and graphs without loops nor multiple edges. We validate our models by using the exact algorithm for clique partitioning of Grötschel and Wakabayashi.

  8. TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS OF THE EDGE-ON SPIRAL GALAXY ESO 379-006

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado, M.; Gabbasov, R. F.; Repetto, P.; Martos, M.; Fuentes-Carrera, I.; Amram, P.; Hernandez, O.

    2013-05-15

    We present a kinematical study of the nearly edge-on galaxy ESO 379-006 that shows the existence of extraplanar ionized gas. With Fabry-Perot spectroscopy at H{alpha}, we study the kinematics of ESO 379-006 using velocity maps and position-velocity diagrams parallel to the major and to the minor axis of the galaxy. We build the rotation curve of the disk and discuss the role of projection effects due to the fact of viewing this galaxy nearly edge-on. The twisting of the isovelocities in the radial velocity field of the disk of ESO 379-006 as well as the kinematical asymmetries found in some position-velocity diagrams parallel to the minor axis of the galaxy suggest the existence of deviations to circular motions in the disk that can be modeled and explained with the inclusion of a radial inflow probably generated by a bar or by spiral arms. We succeeded in detecting extraplanar diffuse ionized gas in this galaxy. At the same time, from the analysis of position-velocity diagrams, we found some evidence that the extraplanar gas could lag in rotation velocity with respect to the midplane rotation.

  9. Gas Kinematics In and Around Edge-on Galaxies from MaNGA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizyaev, D.

    2016-06-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) is a massive Integral Field Unit survey of a large number of relatively nearby galaxies that started in 2014 as a part of SDSS-IV at the Apache Point Observatory. After the first year of observations MaNGA has obtained IFU spectra of about a thousand of objects, with several dozens of edge-on galaxies among them. The two-dimensional spectra help us constrain parameters of galactic components with superior rotation curves. There is a significant fraction of galaxies in which the extra-planar gas emission is confidently detected. The extra-planar gas velocity fields in several galaxies show signs of lagging rotation with respect to the gas motion close to the galactic plane. We show progress of MaNGA survey in observations of edge-on galaxies and discuss their impact on our understanding of gas kinematics in and around spiral galaxies after finishing the survey.

  10. Orbital kinematics of edge-on bars with and without supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Caleb; Valluri, Monica; Shen, Juntai; Debattista, Victor P.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of external disk galaxies with bars frequently show boxy or peanut shaped bulges, which have a distinct X-shaped structure when the system is viewed edge-on. Such features are also well documented in N-body simulations, where they arise from the buckling of the bar. The precise nature of the orbits that create this structure is still uncertain. Some studies argue that the bulge/X-shape structure is formed and supported by resonant 2:1 "banana" orbit family, while other argue that they arise from 5:3 "brezel" orbits. Here we examine a set of N-body models of a barred disk galaxy (with and without a central black hole). We generate 2-D maps of projected kinematics both for specific orbit families as well as the full simulation of the bars at different orientations. By examining the line-of-sight velocities, velocity dispersions and 3rd and 4th Gauss-Hermite polynomials we attempt to deduce the type of orbits most likely to produce the X-shaped features. We also generate mock kinematics for the Milky Way bar and predict the kinematical features associated with the X-shape that will be observed with upcoming stellar surveys.

  11. Kinematics and dynamics of robotic systems with multiple closed loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chang-De

    The kinematics and dynamics of robotic systems with multiple closed loops, such as Stewart platforms, walking machines, and hybrid manipulators, are studied. In the study of kinematics, focus is on the closed-form solutions of the forward position analysis of different parallel systems. A closed-form solution means that the solution is expressed as a polynomial in one variable. If the order of the polynomial is less than or equal to four, the solution has analytical closed-form. First, the conditions of obtaining analytical closed-form solutions are studied. For a Stewart platform, the condition is found to be that one rotational degree of freedom of the output link is decoupled from the other five. Based on this condition, a class of Stewart platforms which has analytical closed-form solution is formulated. Conditions of analytical closed-form solution for other parallel systems are also studied. Closed-form solutions of forward kinematics for walking machines and multi-fingered grippers are then studied. For a parallel system with three three-degree-of-freedom subchains, there are 84 possible ways to select six independent joints among nine joints. These 84 ways can be classified into three categories: Category 3:3:0, Category 3:2:1, and Category 2:2:2. It is shown that the first category has no solutions; the solutions of the second category have analytical closed-form; and the solutions of the last category are higher order polynomials. The study is then extended to a nearly general Stewart platform. The solution is a 20th order polynomial and the Stewart platform has a maximum of 40 possible configurations. Also, the study is extended to a new class of hybrid manipulators which consists of two serially connected parallel mechanisms. In the study of dynamics, a computationally efficient method for inverse dynamics of manipulators based on the virtual work principle is developed. Although this method is comparable with the recursive Newton-Euler method for

  12. Quantitative Analysis Of Sperm Motion Kinematics From Real-Time Video-Edge Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Russell O...; Katz, David F.

    1988-02-01

    A new model of sperm swimming kinematics, which uses signal processing methods and multivariate statistical techniques to identify individual cell-motion parameters and unique cell populations, is presented. Swimming paths of individual cells are obtained using real-time, video-edge digitization. Raw paths are adaptively filtered to identify average paths, and measurements of space-time oscillations about average paths are made. Time-dependent frequency information is extracted from spatial variations about average paths using harmonic analysis. Raw-path and average-path measures such as curvature, curve length, and straight-line length, and measures of oscillations about average paths such as time-dependent amplitude and frequency variations, are used in a multivariate, cluster analysis to identify unique cell populations. The entire process, including digitization of sperm video images, is computer-automated. Preliminary results indicate that this method of tracking, digitization, and kinematic analysis accurately identifies unique cell subpopulations, including: the relative numbers of cells in each subpopulation, how subpopulations differ, and the extent and significance of such differences. With appropriate work, this approach may be useful for clinical discrimination between normal and abnormal semen specimens.

  13. Spectral CT using multiple balanced K-edge filters.

    PubMed

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; Worstell, William; El Fakhri, Georges; Bian, Junguo; Lorsakul, Auranuch; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2015-03-01

    Our goal is to validate a spectral computed tomography (CT) system design that uses a conventional X-ray source with multiple balanced K-edge filters. By performing a simultaneously synthetic reconstruction in multiple energy bins, we obtained a good agreement between measurements and model expectations for a reasonably complex phantom. We performed simulation and data acquisition on a phantom containing multiple rods of different materials using a NeuroLogica CT scanner. Five balanced K-edge filters including Molybdenum, Cerium, Dysprosium, Erbium, and Tungsten were used separately proximal to the X-ray tube. For each sinogram bin, measured filtered vector can be defined as a product of a transmission matrix, which is determined by the filters and is independent of the imaging object, and energy-binned intensity vector. The energy-binned sinograms were then obtained by inverting the transmission matrix followed by a multiplication of the filter measurement vector. For each energy bin defined by two consecutive K-edges, a synthesized energy-binned attenuation image was obtained using filtered back-projection reconstruction. The reconstructed attenuation coefficients for each rod obtained from the experiment was in good agreement with the corresponding simulated results. Furthermore, the reconstructed attenuation coefficients for a given energy bin, agreed with National Institute of Standards and Technology reference values when beam hardening within the energy bin is small. The proposed cost-effective system design using multiple balanced K-edge filters can be used to perform spectral CT imaging at clinically relevant flux rates using conventional detectors and integrating electronics. PMID:25252276

  14. Spectral CT Using Multiple Balanced K-Edge Filters

    PubMed Central

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; Worstell, William; Fakhri, Georges El; Bian, Junguo; Lorsakul, Auranuch; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Our goal is to validate a spectral CT system design that uses a conventional X-ray source with multiple balanced K-edge filters. By performing a simultaneously synthetic reconstruction in multiple energy bins, we obtained a good agreement between measurements and model expectations for a reasonably complex phantom. We performed simulation and data acquisition on a phantom containing multiple rods of different materials using a NeuroLogica CT scanner. Five balanced K-edge filters including Molybdenum, Cerium, Dysprosium, Erbium, and Tungsten were used separately proximal to the X-ray tube. For each sinogram bin, measured filtered vector can be defined as a product of a transmission matrix, which is determined by the filters and is independent of the imaging object, and energy-binned intensity vector. The energy-binned sinograms were then obtained by inverting the transmission matrix followed by a multiplication of the filter measurement vector. For each energy bin defined by two consecutive K-edges, a synthesized energy-binned attenuation image was obtained using filtered back-projection reconstruction. The reconstructed attenuation coefficients for each rod obtained from the experiment was in good agreement with the corresponding simulated results. Furthermore, the reconstructed attenuation coefficients for a given energy bin, agreed with National Institute of Standards and Technology reference values when beam hardening within the energy bin is small. The proposed cost-effective system design using multiple balanced K-edge filters can be used to perform spectral CT imaging at clinically relevant flux rates using conventional detectors and integrating electronics. PMID:25252276

  15. Geomorphic signal of active faulting at the northern edge of Lut Block: Insights on the kinematic scenario of Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolari, Gabriele; Della Seta, Marta; Rossetti, Federico; Nozaem, Reza; Vignaroli, Gianluca; Cosentino, Domenico; Faccenna, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Recent works documented Neogene to Quaternary dextral strike-slip tectonics along the Kuh-e-Sarhangi and Kuh-e-Faghan intraplate strike-slip faults at the northern edge of the Lut Block of Central Iran, previously thought to be dominated by sinistral strike-slip deformation. This work focuses on the evidence of Quaternary activity of one of these fault systems, in order to provide new spatiotemporal constraints on their role in the active regional kinematic scenario. Through geomorphological and structural investigation, integrated with optically stimulated luminescence dating of three generations of alluvial fans and fluvial terraces (at ~53, ~25, and ~6 ka), this study documents (i) the topographic inheritance of the long-term (Myr) punctuated history of fault nucleation, propagation, and exhumation along the northern edge of Lut Block; (ii) the tectonic control on drainage network evolution, pediment formation, fluvial terraces, and alluvial fan architecture; (iii) the minimum Holocene age of Quaternary dextral strike-slip faulting; and (iv) the evidence of Late Quaternary fault-related uplift localized along the different fault strands. The documented spatial and temporal constraints on the active dextral strike-slip tectonics at the northern edge of Lut Block provide new insights on the kinematic model for active faulting in Central Iran, which has been reinterpreted in an escape tectonic scenario.

  16. Investigating slab edge kinematics through seismological data: The northern boundary of the Ionian subduction system (south Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orecchio, B.; Presti, D.; Totaro, C.; D'Amico, S.; Neri, G.

    2015-08-01

    An integrated analysis of seismotomography models, earthquake spatial distribution and focal mechanism solutions has been performed in the still poorly constrained region marking the northern boundary of the Ionian subducting slab (south Italy). In this area, research findings related to the continuous- vs detached-slab transition are diffused on a wide sector running from central Calabria to the southern Apennines tip and different locations of a subduction-transform edge propagator (STEP) have also been proposed in the recent literature. We present seismic data and analyses aimed to investigate the location of the northern edge of the in-depth continuous slab and the present-day kinematics of the concerned boundary region by also focusing on the possible clues of STEP fault activity. We used both standard linearized and non-linear probabilistic methods to locate, in a recently developed shallow-to-intermediate 3D velocity model, the seismicity that occurred between 1997 and 2012 at the Ionian slab northern boundary. Earthquake kinematics have also been investigated by integrating high-quality focal mechanisms selected from the literature with 70 waveform inversion solutions obtained in the present study. The results allow to identify in central Calabria the northern edge of the in-depth continuous slab and just north of it a ca. 100 km-wide deformation zone reflecting lateral STEP migration in the slab edge area. The migration likely indicates an alternation of tear propagation along a slab edge and slab break-off progressively reducing the lateral extension of the subduction zone. In this framework, the recent seismicity seems also to suggest the possible location of an incipient shallow slab break-off beneath central Calabria.

  17. Simulating multiple merger pathways to the central kinematics of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Christopher E.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Cox, Thomas J.; Novak, G. S.; Primack, Joel R.

    2014-10-01

    Two-dimensional integral field surveys such as ATLAS3D are producing rich observational data sets yielding insights into galaxy formation. These new kinematic observations have highlighted the need to understand the evolutionary mechanisms leading to a spectrum of fast rotators and slow rotators in early-type galaxies. We address the formation of slow and fast rotators through a series of controlled, comprehensive hydrodynamical simulations, sampling idealized galaxy merger scenarios constructed from model spiral galaxies. Idealized and controlled simulations of this sort complement the more `realistic' cosmological simulations by isolating and analysing the effects of specific parameters, as we do in this paper. We recreate minor and major binary mergers, binary merger trees with multiple progenitors, and multiple sequential mergers. Within each of these categories of formation history, we correlate progenitor gas fraction, mass ratio, orbital pericentre, orbital ellipticity, and spin with remnant kinematic properties. We create kinematic profiles of these 95 simulations comparable to ATLAS3D data. By constructing remnant profiles of the projected specific angular momentum (λ _R= < R|V|rangle / < R √{V^2+σ ^2}rangle), triaxiality, and measuring the incidences of kinematic twists and kinematically decoupled cores, we distinguish between varying formation scenarios. We find that binary mergers nearly always form fast rotators. Slow rotators can be formed from zero initial angular momentum configurations and gas-poor mergers, but are not as round as the ATLAS3D galaxies. Remnants of binary merger trees are triaxial slow rotators. Sequential mergers form round slow rotators that most resemble the ATLAS3D rotators.

  18. Evidence for edge effects on multiple levels in tallgrass prairie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, M.; Johnson, D.H.; Faaborg, J.

    2000-01-01

    We tested how edges affect nest survival and predator distribution in a native tallgrass prairie system in southwestern Missouri using artificial nests, natural nests of Dickcissels (Spiza americana) and Henslow's Sparrows (Ammodramus henslowii), and mammal track stations. Survival of artificial nests was lower within 30 m of forest edge. Nesting success of Dickcissels and Henslow's Sparrows was lower within 50 m to a shrubby edge than at greater distances, whereas fates of nests were not related to distances to roads, agricultural fields, or forests. Evidence from clay eggs placed in artificial nests indicated that mid-sized carnivores were the major predators within 30 m of forest edges. Furthermore, mid-sized carnivores visited track stations most frequently within 50 m of forest edges. Because proximity of woody habitat explained more variation in nest survival and mammal activity than did fragment size, it appears that edge effects were more pronounced than area effects. Edge effects appeared to be caused mainly by greater exposure of nests to midsized carnivores. We argue that, based on edge avoidance behavior, 'grassland-interior' species such as the Henslow's Sparrow respond to edge effects mainly by a decrease in density, whereas habitat generalists such as the Dickcissel are affected mainly by a decrease in nesting success.

  19. Optimal edge detection using multiple operators for image understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannarou, Stamatia; Stathaki, Tania

    2011-12-01

    Extraction of features, such as edges for the understanding of aerial images, has been an important objective since the early days of remote sensing. This work aims at describing a new framework which allows for the quantitative combination of a preselected set of edge detectors based on the correspondence between their outcomes. This is inspired from the problem that despite the enormous amount of literature on edge detection techniques, there is no single technique that performs well in every possible image context. Two approaches are proposed for this purpose. The first approach is the well-known receiver operating characteristics analysis which is introduced for a sound quality evaluation of the edge maps estimated by combining different edge detectors. In the second approach, the so-called kappa statistics are employed in a novel fashion to amalgamate the above-mentioned selected edge maps to form an improved final edge image. This method is unique in the sense that the balance between the false detections (false positives and false negatives) is explicitly determined in advance and incorporated in the proposed method in a mathematical fashion. For the performance evaluation of the proposed techniques, a sample set of the RADIUS/DARPA-IU Fort Hood aerial image database with known ground truth has been used.

  20. Adaptive synchronised tracking control for multiple robotic manipulators with uncertain kinematics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongya; Li, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Quanmin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a new adaptive synchronised tracking control approach is developed for the operation of multiple robotic manipulators in the presence of uncertain kinematics and dynamics. In terms of the system synchronisation and adaptive control, the proposed approach can stabilise position tracking of each robotic manipulator while coordinating its motion with the other robotic manipulators. On the other hand, the developed approach can cope with kinematic and dynamic uncertainties. The corresponding stability analysis is presented to lay a foundation for theoretical understanding of the underlying issues as well as an assurance for safely operating real systems. Illustrative examples are bench tested to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. In addition, to face the challenging issues, this study provides an exemplary showcase with effectively to integrate several cross boundary theoretical results to formulate an interdisciplinary solution.

  1. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system’s trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  2. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system's trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  3. The edge of the M 87 halo and the kinematics of the diffuse light in the Virgo cluster core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, M.; Arnaboldi, M.; Das, P.; Gerhard, O.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Ciardullo, R.; Feldmeier, J. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Jacoby, G. H.; Murante, G.

    2009-08-01

    Aims: We study the kinematics and dynamics of the extreme outer halo of M 87, the central galaxy in the Virgo cluster, and its transition to the intracluster light (ICL). Methods: We present high resolution FLAMES/VLT spectroscopy of intracluster planetary nebula (PN) candidates, targeting three new fields in the Virgo cluster core with surface brightness down to μB = 28.5. Based on the projected phase space information (sky positions and line-of-sight velocities) we separate galaxy and cluster components in the confirmed PN sample. We then use the spherical Jeans equation and the total gravitational potential as traced by the X-ray emission to derive the orbital distribution in the outer stellar halo of M 87. We determine the luminosity-specific PN number for the M 87 halo and the ICL from the photometric PN catalogs and sampled luminosities, and discuss the origin of the ICL in Virgo based on its measured PN velocities. Results: We confirm a further 12 PNs in Virgo, five of which are bound to the halo of M 87, and the remainder are true intracluster planetary nebulas (ICPNs). The M 87 PNs are confined to the extended stellar envelope of M 87, within a projected radius of ~160 kpc, while the ICPNs are scattered across the whole surveyed region between M 87 and M 86, supporting a truncation of M 87's luminous outer halo at a 2σ level. The line-of-sight velocity distribution of the M 87 PNs at projected radii of 60 kpc and 144 kpc shows (i) no evidence for rotation of the halo along the photometric major axis; and (ii) that the velocity dispersion decreases in the outer halo, down to σ_last = 78±25 km s-1 at 144 kpc. The Jeans model for the M 87 halo stars fits the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile only if the stellar orbits are strongly radially anisotropic (β ≃ 0.4 at r ≃ 10 kpc increasing to 0.8 at the outer edge), and if additionally the stellar halo is truncated at ≃ 150 kpc average elliptical radius. The α-parameters for the M 87

  4. Kinematics and Kinetics of Multiple Sets Using Lifting Straps During Deadlift Training.

    PubMed

    Coswig, Victor S; Machado Freitas, Diogo Felipe; Gentil, Paulo; Fukuda, David H; Del Vecchio, Fabrício Boscolo

    2015-12-01

    The deadlift is a fundamental exercise used in the development of whole body strength and a common element in resistance training programs for all levels. However, many practitioners report the fatigue of forearm muscles and possibly a lack of grip strength as obstacles to exercise performance, which may lead to the use of ergogenic aids, such as lifting straps. The objective of this study was to evaluate kinematic variables during the execution of multiple sets of deadlift with (WS) and without (NS) lifting straps. Eleven subjects (25 ± 3.3 years) with an average of 4 ± 2.6 years of resistance training experience were enrolled in the study. After the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) test WS and NS, subjects performed separate trials of 3 sets to failure at 90% of 1RM in a counterbalanced fashion. With straps resulted in lower speed (0 to -25%) (-3 to -10%) and greater force (20-28%) and duration (concentric phase: 0-13%) when compared with NS. Therefore, it is concluded that the use of straps directly influences exercise performance that requires manual grip strength, increasing the amount of work performed by the target muscles. PMID:26595133

  5. Multiple-scattering calculations of the uranium L3-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, E. A.; Rehr, J. J.; Bucher, J. J.

    1995-11-01

    A theoretical study of the uranium L3-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) is presented for several uranium compounds, including oxides, intermetallics, uranyl fluoride, and α-uranium. Calculations were performed using feff6, an ab initio multiple-scattering (MS) code that includes the most important features of current theories. The results, which account for both the fine structure χ and the atomiclike background μ0 of the absorption coefficient μ, are compared to new and previously measured experimental spectra, reavealing very good agreement for most systems. For several compounds, a more detailed theoretical analysis determined the influence of cluster size and scattering order upon the calculated spectra. Results indicate that MS paths and scattering paths that include rather distant atoms make significant contributions for UO2, whereas XANES for crystals with lower symmetry and density can be modeled using only shorter single-scattering paths. In most cases, assumption of a screened final state in the calculation gives better agreement with experiment than use of an unscreened final state. The successful modeling of spectra for a variety of different uranium compounds, with differing spectral features, indicates that the semirelativistic treatment of XANES used here is adequate even for heavy elements. The well-known resonance, observed experimentally for uranyl (UO2+2) compounds ~=15 eV above the white line, is successfully modeled here for the first time, using multiple-scattering paths within the O-U-O axial bonds. Overlapping muffin-tin spheres were required in the calculation, probably as a result of the short uranyl axial bonds.

  6. K-edge ratio method for identification of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents by spectral CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, H; Ay, M R; Shiran, M B; Soltanian-Zadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recently introduced energy-sensitive X-ray CT makes it feasible to discriminate different nanoparticulate contrast materials. The purpose of this work is to present a K-edge ratio method for differentiating multiple simultaneous contrast agents using spectral CT. Methods: The ratio of two images relevant to energy bins straddling the K-edge of the materials is calculated using an analytic CT simulator. In the resulting parametric map, the selected contrast agent regions can be identified using a thresholding algorithm. The K-edge ratio algorithm is applied to spectral images of simulated phantoms to identify and differentiate up to four simultaneous and targeted CT contrast agents. Results: We show that different combinations of simultaneous CT contrast agents can be identified by the proposed K-edge ratio method when energy-sensitive CT is used. In the K-edge parametric maps, the pixel values for biological tissues and contrast agents reach a maximum of 0.95, whereas for the selected contrast agents, the pixel values are larger than 1.10. The number of contrast agents that can be discriminated is limited owing to photon starvation. For reliable material discrimination, minimum photon counts corresponding to 140 kVp, 100 mAs and 5-mm slice thickness must be used. Conclusion: The proposed K-edge ratio method is a straightforward and fast method for identification and discrimination of multiple simultaneous CT contrast agents. Advances in knowledge: A new spectral CT-based algorithm is proposed which provides a new concept of molecular CT imaging by non-iteratively identifying multiple contrast agents when they are simultaneously targeting different organs. PMID:23934964

  7. Design and analysis of rotor systems with multiple trailing edge flaps and resonant actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    The purpose of this thesis is to develop piezoelectric resonant actuation systems and new active control methods utilizing the multiple trailing-edge flaps' configuration for rotorcraft vibration suppression and blade loads control. An aeroelastic model is developed for a composite rotor blade with multiple trailing-edge flaps. The rotor blade airloads are calculated using quasi-steady blade element aerodynamics with a free wake model for rotor inflow. A compressible unsteady aerodynamics model is employed to accurately predict the incremental trailing edge flap airloads. Both the finite wing effect and actuator saturation for trailing-edge flaps are also included in an aeroelastic analysis. For a composite articulated rotor, a new active blade loads control method is developed and tested numerically. The concept involves straightening the blade by introducing dual trailing edge flaps. The objective function, which includes vibratory hub loads, bending moment harmonics and active flap control inputs, is minimized by an integrated optimal control/optimization process. A numerical simulation is performed for the steady-state forward flight of an advance ratio of 0.35. It is demonstrated that through straightening the rotor blade, which mimics the behavior of a rigid blade, both the bending moments and vibratory hub loads can be significantly reduced by 32% and 57%, respectively. An active vibration control method is developed and analyzed for a hingeless rotor. The concept involves deflecting each individual trailing-edge flap using a compact resonant actuation system. Each resonant actuation system could yield high authority, while operating at a single frequency. Parametric studies are conducted to explore the finite wing effect of trailing-edge flaps and actuator saturation. A numerical simulation has been performed for the steady-state forward flight (mu = 0.15 ˜ 0.35). It is demonstrated that multiple trailing-edge flap configuration with the resonant actuation

  8. Medium to Long Range Kinematic GPS Positioning with Position-Velocity-Acceleration Model Using Multiple Reference Stations

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Park, Chi Ho; Han, Joong-hee; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain precise kinematic global positioning systems (GPS) in medium to large scale networks, the atmospheric effects from tropospheric and ionospheric delays need to be properly modeled and estimated. It is also preferable to use multiple reference stations to improve the reliability of the solutions. In this study, GPS kinematic positioning algorithms are developed for the medium to large-scale network based on the position-velocity-acceleration model. Hence, the algorithm can perform even in cases where the near-constant velocity assumption does not hold. In addition, the estimated kinematic accelerations can be used for the airborne gravimetry. The proposed algorithms are implemented using Kalman filter and are applied to the in situ airborne GPS data. The performance of the proposed algorithms is validated by analyzing and comparing the results with those from reference values. The results show that reliable and comparable solutions in both position and kinematic acceleration levels can be obtained using the proposed algorithms. PMID:26184215

  9. Medium to Long Range Kinematic GPS Positioning with Position-Velocity-Acceleration Model Using Multiple Reference Stations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Park, Chi Ho; Han, Joong-hee; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain precise kinematic global positioning systems (GPS) in medium to large scale networks, the atmospheric effects from tropospheric and ionospheric delays need to be properly modeled and estimated. It is also preferable to use multiple reference stations to improve the reliability of the solutions. In this study, GPS kinematic positioning algorithms are developed for the medium to large-scale network based on the position-velocity-acceleration model. Hence, the algorithm can perform even in cases where the near-constant velocity assumption does not hold. In addition, the estimated kinematic accelerations can be used for the airborne gravimetry. The proposed algorithms are implemented using Kalman filter and are applied to the in situ airborne GPS data. The performance of the proposed algorithms is validated by analyzing and comparing the results with those from reference values. The results show that reliable and comparable solutions in both position and kinematic acceleration levels can be obtained using the proposed algorithms. PMID:26184215

  10. Stress Intensity Factor Solutions for Multiple Edge Cracks in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis

    1997-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center conducted a study to determine the stress intensity factor solutions for periodic arrays of bridged cracks for various crack spacings and crack lengths. Initially, the stress intensity factor of an array of unbridged multiple edge cracks was determined under constant global displacement as well as at a point load along the crack wake. These solutions are expected to contribute toward the development of a damage-based life-prediction methodology for CMC engine components.

  11. POSSIBLE STELLAR STREAMS IN THE EDGE-ON SPIRAL NGC 891 DISCOVERED FROM KINEMATICS OF PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Mendez, Roberto H. E-mail: mendez@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-12-10

    We have found 125 planetary nebulae (PNs) in NGC 891, using an [O III] {lambda}5007 on-band/off-band filter technique with the Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph (FOCAS) at the Cassegrain focus of the Subaru telescope, Mauna Kea. Radial velocities were measured for all detected sources, using a method of slitless spectroscopy which we briefly describe. The radial velocities allow us to study the motions of different stellar populations in NGC 891. The PN kinematics show rotation at large distances from the galactic plane. Of particular interest is the strong asymmetry of PN distribution at large height, which we interpret as two possible stellar streams that could be orbiting the galaxy at large angles to the main structure. These streams, if real, are probably remnants of a previous minor merging episode. This idea finds support in recent reports of clump-like, incompletely mixed structures from deep HST/ACS images of this galaxy.

  12. Enhanced resolution edge and surface estimation from ladar point clouds containing multiple return data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Kevin D.; Budge, Scott E.

    2013-11-01

    Signal processing enables the detection of more returns in a digital ladar waveform by computing the surface response. Prior work has shown that obtaining the surface response can improve the range resolution by a factor of 2. However, this advantage presents a problem when forming a range image-each ladar shot crossing an edge contains multiple values. To exploit this information, the location of each return inside the spatial beam footprint is estimated by dividing the footprint into sections that correspond to each return and assigning the coordinates of the return to the centroid of the region. Increased resolution results on the edges of targets where multiple returns occur. Experiments focus on angled and slotted surfaces for both simulated and real data. Results show that the angle of incidence on a 75-deg surface is computed only using a single waveform with an error of 1.4 deg and that the width of a 19-cm-wide by 16-cm-deep slot is estimated with an error of 3.4 cm using real data. Point clouds show that the edges of the slotted surface are sharpened. These results can be used to improve features extracted from objects for applications such as automatic target recognition.

  13. Vanadium K-edge XANES in vanadium-bearing model compounds: a full multiple scattering study.

    PubMed

    Benzi, Federico; Giuli, Gabriele; Della Longa, Stefano; Paris, Eleonora

    2016-07-01

    A systematic study is presented on a set of vanadium-bearing model compounds, representative of the most common V coordination geometries and oxidation states, analysed by means of vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy calculations in the full multiple scattering (FMS) framework. Analysis and calibration of the free parameters of the theory under the muffin-tin approximation (muffin-tin overlap and interstitial potential) have been carried out by fitting the experimental spectra using the MXAN program. The analysis shows a correlation of the fit parameters with the V coordination geometry and oxidation state. By making use of this correlation it is possible to approach the study of unknown V-bearing compounds with useful preliminary information. PMID:27359143

  14. Singularity analysis of multiple upward continuations to detect edges in potential field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Cheng, Q.; Lovejoy, S.

    2012-12-01

    In geophysical applications, a number of filters are available to sharpen, de-noise or enhance the data in order to facilitate the interpretation. However, such filters are often implemented in the Fourier domain. Hence, they are not local, acting on all features simultaneously. Detecting strong gradients and edges in potential field data are one of the important tasks to infer geological structures indicating the edges of source bodies. Edges are identified by local singularity analysis combing multiple depth level upward continuations are provided by authors. Sources close to the surface induce short-wavelength anomalies in the signal, whereas sources deep underground induce long-wavelength anomalies in the signal. Upward continuation allows the data to be smooth, attenuates short wavelengths in the signal stronger than long wavelengths so as to highlight deep sources that might be hidden by shallow sources or noise. A useful of local singularity model based on multifractal theory suggested by Qiuming Cheng has gained significant attention in characterizing mineralization and predicting mineral deposits. Especially, this model has had impressive successes in the weak anomaly identification, interpolation for geochemical data. Thus, we create the multiple upward continuation grids of the observed potential field data at various heights. We recommend to add a small value to shift the raw data (>0), and reduce the magnetic data to the pole firstly or even convert it to pseudogravity. Then the singularity indexes are estimated by the multiple heights versus upward continuations under the power law. We take the airborne gravity data and aeromagnetic data in the East Tianshan mountains with desert cover area in Xinjiang province, China as a case study. The singularity spatial distribution for the gravity data in the East Tianshan mountains area indicates the regional deep faults and The singularity spatial distribution for the aeromagnetic data implies the probable

  15. Multiple-constraints neural network solution for edge-pixel-based stereo correspondence problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Joe-E.; Siy, Pepe

    1993-03-01

    This paper describes a fast and robust artificial neural network algorithm for solving the stereo correspondence problem in binocular vision. In this algorithm, the stereo correspondence problem is modelled as a cost minimization problem where the cost is the value of the matching function between the edge pixels along the same epipolar line. A multiple-constraint energy minimization neural network is implemented for this matching process. This algorithm differs from previous works in that it integrates ordering and geometry constraints in addition to uniqueness, continuity, and epipolar line constraint into a neural network implementation. The processing procedures are similar to that of the human vision processes. The edge pixels are divided into different clusters according to their orientation and contrast polarity. The matching is performed only between the edge pixels in the same clusters and at the same epipolar line. By following the epipolar line, the ordering constraint (the left-right relation between pixels) can be specified easily without building extra relational graphs as in the earlier works. The algorithm thus assigns artificial neurons which follow the same order of the pixels along an epipolar line to represent the matching candidate pairs. The algorithm is discussed in detail and experimental results using real images are presented.

  16. Multiple leading edge vortices of unexpected strength in freely flying hawkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, L. Christoffer; Engel, Sophia; Kelber, Almut; Heerenbrink, Marco Klein; Hedenström, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The Leading Edge Vortex (LEV) is a universal mechanism enhancing lift in flying organisms. LEVs, generally illustrated as a single vortex attached to the wing throughout the downstroke, have not been studied quantitatively in freely flying insects. Previous findings are either qualitative or from flappers and tethered insects. We measure the flow above the wing of freely flying hawkmoths and find multiple simultaneous LEVs of varying strength and structure along the wingspan. At the inner wing there is a single, attached LEV, while at mid wing there are multiple LEVs, and towards the wingtip flow separates. At mid wing the LEV circulation is ~40% higher than in the wake, implying that the circulation unrelated to the LEV may reduce lift. The strong and complex LEV suggests relatively high flight power in hawmoths. The variable LEV structure may result in variable force production, influencing flight control in the animals. PMID:24253180

  17. Multiple leading edge vortices of unexpected strength in freely flying hawkmoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, L. Christoffer; Engel, Sophia; Kelber, Almut; Heerenbrink, Marco Klein; Hedenström, Anders

    2013-11-01

    The Leading Edge Vortex (LEV) is a universal mechanism enhancing lift in flying organisms. LEVs, generally illustrated as a single vortex attached to the wing throughout the downstroke, have not been studied quantitatively in freely flying insects. Previous findings are either qualitative or from flappers and tethered insects. We measure the flow above the wing of freely flying hawkmoths and find multiple simultaneous LEVs of varying strength and structure along the wingspan. At the inner wing there is a single, attached LEV, while at mid wing there are multiple LEVs, and towards the wingtip flow separates. At mid wing the LEV circulation is ~40% higher than in the wake, implying that the circulation unrelated to the LEV may reduce lift. The strong and complex LEV suggests relatively high flight power in hawmoths. The variable LEV structure may result in variable force production, influencing flight control in the animals.

  18. Singular Values of Products of Ginibre Random Matrices, Multiple Orthogonal Polynomials and Hard Edge Scaling Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijlaars, Arno B. J.; Zhang, Lun

    2014-12-01

    Akemann, Ipsen and Kieburg recently showed that the squared singular values of products of M rectangular random matrices with independent complex Gaussian entries are distributed according to a determinantal point process with a correlation kernel that can be expressed in terms of Meijer G-functions. We show that this point process can be interpreted as a multiple orthogonal polynomial ensemble. We give integral representations for the relevant multiple orthogonal polynomials and a new double contour integral for the correlation kernel, which allows us to find its scaling limits at the origin (hard edge). The limiting kernels generalize the classical Bessel kernels. For M = 2 they coincide with the scaling limits found by Bertola, Gekhtman, and Szmigielski in the Cauchy-Laguerre two-matrix model, which indicates that these kernels represent a new universality class in random matrix theory.

  19. The Relative Kinematics of Galaxy Emission and Multiple Gas Phases in z~0.5 Extended Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Evidence abounds from quasar absorption line data that the extended gaseous halos of galaxies comprise multiple phases {densities, temperatures, ionization conditions}. Developing a comprehensive and deeper understanding of the origin and persistence of extended galaxy halos, and their role in galaxy evolution, requires that these multiple phases be observed and analyzed. However, such studies that incorporate the host galaxies are virtually non-existent. The new COS instrument opens a new window in which the forest of FUV lines arising in neutral, low, AND high ionization halo gas can be probed with high resolution and sensitivity for multiple chemical species. For intermediate redshift galaxies, these lines are free of Ly-alpha forest contamination. We propose to obtain G160M COS/FUV high resolution spectra of the two quasars Q0454-220 {J0456-2159} and Q1038+064 {4c 06.41} in order to measure the neutral hydrogen Ly-beta, gamma, and delta transitions and the OVI 1031,1038 doublet and CII 1036 and CIII 977 transitions {as well as a few others that fall on the spectral format} in three intervening z 0.45 intervening gaseous halos. We augment the proposed observations with a similar pending COS spectrum {scheduled May 2010, PID 11667, PI Churchill} of the quasar TON 153, which will provide the multiphase absorption kinematics for two additional gaseous halos at z 0.67. The proposed observations will bring our final sample size to five.For these five systems, we have quantified the host galaxy morphologies {WFCP-2/HST images}, measured the galaxy emission lines and rotation curves {ESI/Keck spectra}, and analyzed the MgII 2796,2803 and FeII multiplet absorption {HIRES/Keck spectra}. Our goal is to undertake a comprehensive analysis of the multiphase physical conditions in these five galaxy-absorber pairs. We aim to perform the first ever quantitative comparison of the relative relationships between neutral, low, and high ionization absorbing halo gas kinematics with

  20. An analysis of simplified solutions for multiple knife-edge diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovaneli, C. L.

    1984-03-01

    A consideration of the diffraction angles used for the case of two knife-edge obstacles shows the pessimism of the solution proposed by Deygout in the determination of the total path loss when the hills have the same individual loss and are close to each other. This consideration is used to discuss a new approximation to compute the multiple diffraction losses of VHF/UHF radio waves over sharp ridges or hills, which yields very good estimates of the received signal level. The analytical basis for the method of Deygout, taking into account the rigorous spectral diffraction theory outside the transition regions surrounding the shadow boundaries, is used to explain the suggested modification. Two example paths are presented and an error smaller than 0.9 dB between the predictions and the measured values has been reported.

  1. Multiple Scattering Approach to Polarization Dependence of F K-Edge XANES Spectra for Highly Oriented Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Thin Film

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamatsu, S.; Ono, M.; Kera, S.; Okudaira, K. K.; Fujikawa, T.; Ueno, N.

    2007-02-02

    The polarization dependence of F K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of highly-oriented thin-film of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) has been analyzed by using multiple scattering theory. The spectra show clear polarization dependence due to the highly-oriented structure. The multiple scattering calculations reflects a local structure around an absorbing atom. The calculated results obtained by considering intermolecular-interactions are in good agreement with the observed polarization-dependence. We have also analyzed structural models of the radiation damaged PTFE films.

  2. Exploring clustering in alpha-conjugate nuclei using the thick target inverse kinematic technique for multiple alpha emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Gauthier, J.; Wuenschel, S.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Zheng, H.; Giuliani, G.; Rapisarda, G.; Kim, E.-J.; Liu, X.; Natowitz, J. B.; Desouza, R. T.; Hudan, S.; Fang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Searching for alpha cluster states analogous to the 12C Hoyle state in heavier alpha-conjugate nuclei can provide tests of the existence of alpha condensates in nuclear matter. Such states are predicted for 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, etc. at excitation energies slightly above the decay threshold. The Thick Target Inverse Kinematics (TTIK) technique can be successfully used to study the breakup of excited self-conjugate nuclei into many alpha particles. The reaction 20Ne + α at 11 and 13 AMeV was studied at Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. Here the TTIK method was used to study both single α-particle emission and multiple α-particle decays. Due to the limited statistics, only events with alpha multiplicity up to three were analyzed. The analysis of the three α-particle emission data allowed the identification of the Hoyle state and other 12C excited states decaying into three alpha particles. The results will be shown and compared with other data available in the literature. Another experiment is planned in August 2015 to study the system 28Si + α at 15 AMeV. Preliminary results will be shown. Supported by the U.S. DOE and the Robert A. Welch Foundation, Grant No. A0330.

  3. A holistic numerical model to predict strain hardening and damage of UHMWPE under multiple total knee replacement kinematics and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Willing, Ryan; Kim, Il Yong

    2009-11-13

    Experimental wear testing is an essential step in the evaluation of total knee replacement (TKR) design. Unfortunately, experiments can be prohibitively expensive and time consuming, which has made computational wear simulation a more desirable alternative for screening designs. While previous attempts have demonstrated positive results, few models have fully incorporated the affect of strain hardening (or cross shear), or tested the model under more than one loading condition. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate the performance of a new holistic TKR damage model, capable of predicting damage caused by wear, including the effects of strain hardening and creep. For the first time, a frictional work-based damage model was compared against multiple sets of experimental TKR wear testing data using different input kinematics. The wear model was tuned using experimental measurements and was then able to accurately predict the volumetric polyethylene wear volume during experiments with different kinematic inputs. The size and shape of the damage patch on the surface of the polyethylene inserts were also accurately predicted under multiple input kinematics. The ability of this model to predict implant damage under multiple loading profiles by accounting for strain hardening makes it ideal for screening new implant designs, since implant kinematics are largely a function of the shape of the components. PMID:19647828

  4. Multiple deformation at the western edge of the Carolina slate belt, north-central North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbard, J.P.; Shell, G.S.; Wilkins, J.K. ); Samson, S.; Wortman, G. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    In north-central North Carolina, volcanic-plutonic rocks of the Carolina slate belt are separated from gneisses of the Milton belt to the west by a wide, ENE-trending, polygenetic structural zone. Within a portion of this zone, the Country Line Creek complex (CLCC) forms the western edge of the slate belt. Rocks of the CLCC span a wide age range and include mafic and granitoid gneisses with subordinate pelitic schist, granitoid pegmatite, and a concordant sheet-like intrusion, the Yanceyville metagranite. The complex is heterogeneously deformed and metamorphosed. Along the SE margin of the structural zone, steeply-dipping, strongly foliated biotite granitoid and mafic gneisses of the complex appear to be intruded by the Roxboro metagranite of the Carolina slate belt. To the NW, in more interior portions of the zone, the CLCC is affected by multiphase foliations and folds that record a dextral oblique normal shear event. Here, the Yanceyville metagranite is affected by a strong foliation that is folded. A preliminary new date on the Roxboro pluton of ca. 545 Ma, indicates a Late Precambrian or older timing of deformation along the SE margin of the zone. In contrast, a preliminary, ca. 340 Ma, age on the Yanceyville metagranite indicates multiple stage Late Paleozoic deformation for interior portions of the zone. Regional structural and isotopic data hint that the Precambrian deformation may record initial interactions between the Milton and Carolina slate belts. Subsequently, this contact was reactivated during Alleghanian orogenesis.

  5. Optimization of multiple edge barriers with genetic algorithms coupled with a Nelder--Mead local search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baulac, Marine; Defrance, Jérôme; Jean, Philippe

    2007-02-01

    This research work aims at developing a new multi-criteria optimization method dedicated to complex road noise barriers. Numerical simulations of the acoustical propagation have been achieved using MICADO, a 2D boundary element method (BEM) code developed at CSTB. The optimization part is carried out with the help of a Nelder-Mead algorithm (direct local search method) coupled with an evolutionary strategy in order to globalize the approach. A first application of this combination between an outdoor sound propagation numerical code and an optimization algorithm concerns the optimization of noise barrier caps with the following varying parameters: the cap size, its shape and its surface impedance. The cost function to be minimized is defined through a mean value of the insertion loss due to the added crowning compared to the straight, rigid barrier solution of same overall height, averaged on several receiver points within the barrier shadow zone. Final results show a significant improvement of the efficiency of a multiple edge noise barrier by optimizing values of both size and impedance.

  6. Multiple-scattering calculations of the uranium {ital L}{sub 3}-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Rehr, J.J.; Bucher, J.J.

    1995-11-15

    A theoretical study of the uranium {ital L}{sub 3}-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) is presented for several uranium compounds, including oxides, intermetallics, uranyl fluoride, and {alpha}-uranium. Calculations were performed using FEFF6, an {ital ab} {ital initio} multiple-scattering (MS) code that includes the most important features of current theories. The results, which account for both the fine structure {chi} and the atomiclike background {mu}{sub 0} of the absorption coefficient {mu}, are compared to new and previously measured experimental spectra, reavealing very good agreement for most systems. For several compounds, a more detailed theoretical analysis determined the influence of cluster size and scattering order upon the calculated spectra. Results indicate that MS paths and scattering paths that include rather distant atoms make significant contributions for UO{sub 2}, whereas XANES for crystals with lower symmetry and density can be modeled using only shorter single-scattering paths. In most cases, assumption of a screened final state in the calculation gives better agreement with experiment than use of an unscreened final state. The successful modeling of spectra for a variety of different uranium compounds, with differing spectral features, indicates that the semirelativistic treatment of XANES used here is adequate even for heavy elements. The well-known resonance, observed experimentally for uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) compounds {approx}15 eV above the white line, is successfully modeled here for the first time, using multiple-scattering paths within the O-U-O axial bonds. Overlapping muffin-tin spheres were required in the calculation, probably as a result of the short uranyl axial bonds.

  7. Near-field ray calculation for multiple knife-edge diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitteker, J. H.

    1984-08-01

    A new ray approximation for calculating the diffraction attenuation due to several knife edges takes into account the wave-normal direction of the diffracted wave in the near field, using the Fresnel approximation. The theory is intended for terrestrial radio wave propagation and for other situations where obstructions are nearly collinear. The far-field form of the wave is adopted, as in asymptotic theories, but the focal line of the diffracted ray pencil coincides with the diffracting edge only in the limit as the field point moves deep into the geometric shadow. In general, the ray passes above the diffracting edges rather than through them. The theory is developed for knife edges only, but may be adaptable to other shapes of diffracting obstruction. In the examples given, the calculated attenuations are much more accurate than if the far-field approximation is assumed, but less accurate than if the complete Fresnel integration is done. In a comparison with the complete Fresnel integration, the difference turns out to be less than 1 dB for five or fewer knife edges.

  8. Structure determination by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) at the Pr L III edge

    PubMed Central

    Puehringer, Sandra; Hellmig, Michael; Liu, Sunbin; Weiss, Manfred S.; Wahl, Markus C.; Mueller, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The use of longer X-ray wavelengths in macromolecular crystallography has grown significantly over the past few years. The main reason for this increased use of longer wavelengths has been to utilize the anomalous signal from sulfur, providing a means for the experimental phasing of native proteins. Here, another possible application of longer X-ray wavelengths is presented: MAD at the L III edges of various lanthanide compounds. A first experiment at the L III edge of Pr was conducted on HZB MX beamline BL14.2 and resulted in the successful structure determination of the C-terminal domain of a spliceosomal protein. This experiment demonstrates that L III edges of lanthanides constitute potentially attractive targets for long-wavelength MAD experiments. PMID:22869138

  9. Kinematic and Thermodynamic Study of a Shallow Hailstorm Sampled by the McGill Bistatic Multiple-Doppler Radar Network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protat, Alain; Zawadzki, Isztar; Caya, Alain

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, the authors examine the kinematic and thermodynamic characteristics of a shallow hailstorm sampled by the McGill bistatic multiple-Doppler radar network on 26 May 1997. This storm consists of two main shallow convective cells (depth less than 5 km) aligned along a SW-NE convective line propagating to the southeast. The authors also analyze the interactions between the two cells during the life cycle of the convective line. In particular it is shown that dynamic interactions play a major role in the intensification of the second cell. This storm is found to evolve in a manner that shares some characteristics with both multicell and supercell storms. A rotating updraft associated with a mesocyclone develops in the mature stage of the storm, which is characteristic of a supercell. However, the lack of a `vault' structure on the precipitation field, the relatively fast evolution of the cells, and other characteristics detailed henceforth seem to indicate that this storm only shares a few of the typical characteristics of supercells. Some morphological and thermodynamic similarities are found between this storm and recent numerical simulations of shallow supercell storms. While the first cell starts dissipating, a cold downward rear inflow is developing, which resembles the `rear-flank' downdraft documented in several numerical and observational studies of tornadic storms. This downdraft acts to intensify the updraft associated with the second cell and produces a precipitation overhang within which hail eventually forms. When this pocket of hail falls to the ground a bit later, it accelerates the low-level rear inflow that progressively cuts off the inflow ahead of the storm, leading to the progressive dissipation of the second cell.The physical processes involved in the evolution of rotation at low levels to midlevels within this storm are evaluated using the vorticity equation. It is shown that the time tendency of the positive and negative vertical

  10. A transverse aperture-integral equation solution for edge diffraction by multiple layers of homogeneous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, L. W.; Whitaker, R. A.

    1991-02-01

    The transverse-aperture/integral-equation method provides a means of computation for diffraction coefficients at blunt edges of a broad class of stratified layers, including sheet-anisotropy models for conducting composites. This paper concentrates on the application of the method when the material profile comprises layers of homogeneous, potentially lossy material. The method proceeds from defining an artificial aperture perpendicular to a semiinfinite, planar, stratified region and passing through the terminal edge of the region. An integral equation is formulated over this infinite-extent aperture, and the solution to the integral equation represents the influence of the edge. The kernel in the integral equation is a weighted sum of the Green functions for the respective half spaces lying on either side of the aperture plane. The vector wave equation is separable in each of these half spaces, resulting in Green functions that are expressible analytically. The Green function for the stratified half space is stated in terms of a Sommerfeld-type integral.

  11. THE KINEMATICS OF MULTIPLE-PEAKED Ly{alpha} EMISSION IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2-3

    SciTech Connect

    Kulas, Kristin R.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Zheng Zheng; Steidel, Charles C.; Hainline, Kevin N.

    2012-01-20

    We present new results on the Ly{alpha} emission-line kinematics of 18 z {approx} 2-3 star-forming galaxies with multiple-peaked Ly{alpha} profiles. With our large spectroscopic database of UV-selected star-forming galaxies at these redshifts, we have determined that {approx}30% of such objects with detectable Ly{alpha} emission display multiple-peaked emission profiles. These profiles provide additional constraints on the escape of Ly{alpha} photons due to the rich velocity structure in the emergent line. Despite recent advances in modeling the escape of Ly{alpha} from star-forming galaxies at high redshifts, comparisons between models and data are often missing crucial observational information. Using Keck II NIRSPEC spectra of H{alpha} (z {approx} 2) and [O III]{lambda}5007 (z {approx} 3), we have measured accurate systemic redshifts, rest-frame optical nebular velocity dispersions, and emission-line fluxes for the objects in the sample. In addition, rest-frame UV luminosities and colors provide estimates of star formation rates and the degree of dust extinction. In concert with the profile sub-structure, these measurements provide critical constraints on the geometry and kinematics of interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies. Accurate systemic redshifts allow us to translate the multiple-peaked Ly{alpha} profiles into velocity space, revealing that the majority (11/18) display double-peaked emission straddling the velocity-field zero point with stronger red-side emission. Interstellar absorption-line kinematics suggest the presence of large-scale outflows for the majority of objects in our sample, with an average measured interstellar absorption velocity offset of ({Delta}v{sub abs}) = -230 km s{sup -1}. A comparison of the interstellar absorption kinematics for objects with multiple- and single-peaked Ly{alpha} profiles indicate that the multiple-peaked objects are characterized by significantly narrower absorption line widths. We compare our data with the

  12. The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters: The Internal Kinematics of the Multiple Stellar Populations in NGC 2808

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, A.; Vesperini, E.; Piotto, G.; Milone, A. P.; Hong, J.; Anderson, J.; van der Marel, R. P.; Bedin, L. R.; Cassisi, S.; D'Antona, F.; Marino, A. F.; Renzini, A.

    2015-09-01

    Numerous observational studies have revealed the ubiquitous presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters and cast many difficult challenges for the study of the formation and dynamical history of these stellar systems. In this Letter we present the results of a study of the kinematic properties of multiple populations in NGC 2808 based on high-precision Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion measurements. In a recent study, Milone et al. identified five distinct populations (A-E) in NGC 2808. Populations D and E coincide with the helium-enhanced populations in the middle and the blue main sequences (mMS and bMS) previously discovered by Piotto et al.; populations A-C correspond to the redder main sequence that, in Piotto et al., was associated with the primordial stellar population. Our analysis shows that, in the outermost regions probed (between about 1.5 and 2 times the cluster half-light radius), the velocity distribution of populations D and E is radially anisotropic (the deviation from an isotropic distribution is significant at the ˜3.5σ level). Stars of populations D and E have a smaller tangential velocity dispersion than those of populations A-C, while no significant differences are found in the radial velocity dispersion. We present the results of a numerical simulation showing that the observed differences between the kinematics of these stellar populations are consistent with the expected kinematic fingerprint of the diffusion toward the cluster outer regions of stellar populations initially more centrally concentrated. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  13. Unconfined, melt edge electrospinning from multiple, spontaneous, self-organized polymer jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingqing; Curtis, Colin K.; Muthuraman Thoppey, Nagarajan; Bochinski, Jason R.; Gorga, Russell E.; Clarke, Laura I.

    2014-12-01

    Commercial grade polyethylene is melt electrospun from a thin film of unconfined molten polymer on a heated, electrically-grounded plate. Under the influence of an applied electric field, the melt spontaneously forms fingering perturbations at the plate edge which then evolve into emitting fiber-forming jets. Jet-to-jet spacing (˜5 mm), which is dependent on the applied voltage amplitude, is in agreement with estimates from a simple theoretical treatment. The broad applicability of the approach is verified by spinning a second polymer—polycaprolactone. In both cases, the fabricated fibers are similar in quality to those obtained under needle melt electrospinning; however for this method, there are no nozzles to clog and an enhanced production rate up to 80 mg min-1 is achieved from approximately 20-25 simultaneous parallel jets. The process of jet formation, effective flow rates, cone-jet diameters, as well as limits on jet density and differences with polymer type are compared with theoretical models. This particular approach allows facile, high throughput micro- and nano-fiber formation from a wide variety of thermoplastics and other high viscosity fluids without the use of solvents or the persistent issues of clogging and pumping that hamper traditional methods, resulting in mechanically strong meso-scale fibers highly desirable for industrial applications.

  14. Consistent formulation of the growth process at the kinematic and constitutive level for soft tissues composed of multiple constituents.

    PubMed

    Schmid, H; Pauli, L; Paulus, A; Kuhl, E; Itskov, M

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the possibilities of modelling the change in volume and change in density of biomaterials. This can be modelled at the constitutive or the kinematic level. This work introduces a consistent formulation at the kinematic and constitutive level for growth processes. Most biomaterials consist of many constituents and can be approximated as being incompressible. These two conditions (many constituents and incompressibility) suggest a straightforward implementation in the context of the finite element (FE) method which could now be validated more easily against histological measurements. Its key characteristic variable is the normalised partial mass change. Using the concept of homeostatic equilibrium, we suggest two complementary growth laws in which the evolution of the normalised partial mass change is governed by an ordinary differential equation in terms of either the Piola-Kirchhoff stress or the Green-Lagrange strain. We combine this approach with the classical incompatibility condition and illustrate its algorithmic implementation within a fully nonlinear FE approach. This approach is first illustrated for a simple uniaxial tension and extension test for pure volume change and pure density change and is validated against previous numerical results. Finally, a physiologically based example of a two-phase model is presented which is a combination of volume and density changes. It can be concluded that the effect of hyper-restoration may be due to the systemic effect of degradation and adaptation of given constituents. PMID:21347909

  15. Historical comparisons reveal multiple drivers of decadal change of an ecosystem engineer at the range edge

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Louise B; Mieszkowska, Nova; Grant, Lisa M; Bush, Laura E; Davies, Andrew J; Frost, Matthew T; Moschella, Paula S; Burrows, Michael T; Cunningham, Paul N; Dye, Stephen R; Hawkins, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Biogenic reefs are important for habitat provision and coastal protection. Long-term datasets on the distribution and abundance of Sabellaria alveolata (L.) are available from Britain. The aim of this study was to combine historical records and contemporary data to (1) describe spatiotemporal variation in winter temperatures, (2) document short-term and long-term changes in the distribution and abundance of S. alveolata and discuss these changes in relation to extreme weather events and recent warming, and (3) assess the potential for artificial coastal defense structures to function as habitat for S. alveolata. A semi-quantitative abundance scale (ACFOR) was used to compare broadscale, long-term and interannual abundance of S. alveolata near its range edge in NW Britain. S. alveolata disappeared from the North Wales and Wirral coastlines where it had been abundant prior to the cold winter of 1962/1963. Population declines were also observed following the recent cold winters of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Extensive surveys in 2004 and 2012 revealed that S. alveolata had recolonized locations from which it had previously disappeared. Furthermore, it had increased in abundance at many locations, possibly in response to recent warming. S. alveolata was recorded on the majority of artificial coastal defense structures surveyed, suggesting that the proliferation of artificial coastal defense structures along this stretch of coastline may have enabled S. alveolata to spread across stretches of unsuitable natural habitat. Long-term and broadscale contextual monitoring is essential for monitoring responses of organisms to climate change. Historical data and gray literature can be invaluable sources of information. Our results support the theory that Lusitanian species are responding positively to climate warming but also that short-term extreme weather events can have potentially devastating widespread and lasting effects on organisms. Furthermore, the proliferation of

  16. Historical comparisons reveal multiple drivers of decadal change of an ecosystem engineer at the range edge.

    PubMed

    Firth, Louise B; Mieszkowska, Nova; Grant, Lisa M; Bush, Laura E; Davies, Andrew J; Frost, Matthew T; Moschella, Paula S; Burrows, Michael T; Cunningham, Paul N; Dye, Stephen R; Hawkins, Stephen J

    2015-08-01

    Biogenic reefs are important for habitat provision and coastal protection. Long-term datasets on the distribution and abundance of Sabellaria alveolata (L.) are available from Britain. The aim of this study was to combine historical records and contemporary data to (1) describe spatiotemporal variation in winter temperatures, (2) document short-term and long-term changes in the distribution and abundance of S. alveolata and discuss these changes in relation to extreme weather events and recent warming, and (3) assess the potential for artificial coastal defense structures to function as habitat for S. alveolata. A semi-quantitative abundance scale (ACFOR) was used to compare broadscale, long-term and interannual abundance of S. alveolata near its range edge in NW Britain. S. alveolata disappeared from the North Wales and Wirral coastlines where it had been abundant prior to the cold winter of 1962/1963. Population declines were also observed following the recent cold winters of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Extensive surveys in 2004 and 2012 revealed that S. alveolata had recolonized locations from which it had previously disappeared. Furthermore, it had increased in abundance at many locations, possibly in response to recent warming. S. alveolata was recorded on the majority of artificial coastal defense structures surveyed, suggesting that the proliferation of artificial coastal defense structures along this stretch of coastline may have enabled S. alveolata to spread across stretches of unsuitable natural habitat. Long-term and broadscale contextual monitoring is essential for monitoring responses of organisms to climate change. Historical data and gray literature can be invaluable sources of information. Our results support the theory that Lusitanian species are responding positively to climate warming but also that short-term extreme weather events can have potentially devastating widespread and lasting effects on organisms. Furthermore, the proliferation of

  17. The Stellar Kinematic Fields of NGC 3379

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statler, Thomas S.; Smecker-Hane, Tammy

    1999-02-01

    We have measured the stellar kinematic profiles of NGC 3379 along four position angles, using absorption lines in spectra obtained with the Multiple Mirror Telescope. We derive a far more detailed description of the kinematic fields through the main body of the galaxy than could be obtained from previous work. Our data extend 90" from the center, at essentially seeing-limited resolution out to 17". The derived mean velocities and dispersions have total errors (internal and systematic) better than +/-10 km s^-1, and frequently better than 5 km s^-1, out to 55". We find very weak (3 km s^-1) rotation on the minor axis interior to 12" and no detectable rotation above 6 km s^-1 from 12" to 50" or above 16 km s^-1 out to 90" (95% confidence limits). However, a Fourier reconstruction of the mean velocity field from all four sampled PAs does indicate a ~5 deg twist of the kinematic major axis, in the direction opposite to the known isophotal twist. The h_3 and h_4 parameters are found to be generally small over the entire observed region. The azimuthally averaged dispersion profile joins smoothly at large radii with the velocity dispersions of planetary nebulae. Unexpectedly, we find sharp bends in the major axis rotation curve, also visible (though less pronounced) on the diagonal position angles. The outermost bend closely coincides in position with other sharp kinematic features: an abrupt flattening of the dispersion profile, and local peaks in h_3 and h_4. All of these features are in a photometrically interesting region in which the surface brightness profile departs significantly from an r^1/4 law. Features such as these are not generally known in elliptical galaxies owing to a lack of data at comparable resolution. Very similar behavior, however, is seen the kinematics of the edge-on S0 galaxy NGC 3115. We discuss the suggestion that NGC 3379 could be a misclassified S0 galaxy; preliminary results from dynamical modeling indicate that it may be a flattened, weakly

  18. Towards atomic resolution in sodium titanate nanotubes using near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure spectromicroscopy combined with multichannel multiple-scattering calculations

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Peter; Lagos, Maureen J; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ewels, Chris; Umek, Polona; Guttmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy coupled with transmission X-ray microscopy (NEXAFS–TXM) allow large-area mapping investigations of individual nano-objects with spectral resolution up to E/ΔE = 104 and spatial resolution approaching 10 nm. While the state-of-the-art spatial resolution of X-ray microscopy is limited by nanostructuring process constrains of the objective zone plate, we show here that it is possible to overcome this through close coupling with high-level theoretical modelling. Taking the example of isolated bundles of hydrothermally prepared sodium titanate nanotubes ((Na,H)TiNTs) we are able to unravel the complex nanoscale structure from the NEXAFS–TXM data using multichannel multiple-scattering calculations, to the extent of being able to associate specific spectral features in the O K-edge and Ti L-edge with oxygen atoms in distinct sites within the lattice. These can even be distinguished from the contribution of different hydroxyl groups to the electronic structure of the (Na,H)TiNTs. PMID:23213642

  19. Towards atomic resolution in sodium titanate nanotubes using near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure spectromicroscopy combined with multichannel multiple-scattering calculations.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Carla; Krüger, Peter; Lagos, Maureen J; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ewels, Chris; Umek, Polona; Guttmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy coupled with transmission X-ray microscopy (NEXAFS-TXM) allow large-area mapping investigations of individual nano-objects with spectral resolution up to E/ΔE = 10(4) and spatial resolution approaching 10 nm. While the state-of-the-art spatial resolution of X-ray microscopy is limited by nanostructuring process constrains of the objective zone plate, we show here that it is possible to overcome this through close coupling with high-level theoretical modelling. Taking the example of isolated bundles of hydrothermally prepared sodium titanate nanotubes ((Na,H)TiNTs) we are able to unravel the complex nanoscale structure from the NEXAFS-TXM data using multichannel multiple-scattering calculations, to the extent of being able to associate specific spectral features in the O K-edge and Ti L-edge with oxygen atoms in distinct sites within the lattice. These can even be distinguished from the contribution of different hydroxyl groups to the electronic structure of the (Na,H)TiNTs. PMID:23213642

  20. Kinematic resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlin, Fergal P.

    1995-01-01

    A new geometric formulation is given for the problem of determining position and orientation of a satellite scanner from error-prone ground control point observations in linear pushbroom imagery. The pushbroom satellite resection problem is significantly more complicated than that of the conventional frame camera because of irregular platform motion throughout the image capture period. Enough ephemeris data are typically available to reconstruct satellite trajectory and hence the interior orientation of the pushbroom imagery. The new approach to resection relies on the use of reconstructed scanner interior orientation to determine the relative orientations of a bundle of image rays. The absolute position and orientation which allows this bundle to minimize its distance from a corresponding set of ground control points may then be found. The interior orientation is represented as a kinematic chain of screw motions, implemented as dual-number quaternions. The motor algebra is used in the analysis since it provides a means of line, point, and motion manipulation. Its moment operator provides a metric of distance between the image ray and the ground control point.

  1. Kinematic analyses of orogen-parallel L-tectonites from Pelling-Munsiari thrust of Sikkim Himalayan fold thrust belt: Insights from multiple, incremental strain markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jyoti Prasad; Bhattacharyya, Kathakali; Mookerjee, Matty; Ghosh, Pritam

    2016-09-01

    Fault rocks associated with the Pelling thrust (PT) in the Sikkim Himalayan fold thrust belt (FTB) change from SL tectonites to local, transport-parallel L-tectonites that are exposed in discontinuous klippen south of the PT zone. By estimating the incremental kinematic vorticity number (Wk) from quartz c-axes fabric, oblique fabric, and subgrains, we reconstruct a first-order, kinematic path of these L-tectonites. Quartz c-axes fabric suggests that the deformation initiated as pure-shear dominated (∼56-96%) that progressively became simple-shear dominated (∼29-54%), as recorded by the oblique fabric and subgrains in the L-tectonites. These rocks record a non-steady deformation where the kinematic vorticity varied spatially and temporally within the klippen. The L-tectonites record ∼30% greater pure-shear than the PT fault rocks outside the klippen, and the greatest pure-shear dominated flow among the published vorticity data from major fault rocks of the Himalayan FTB. The relative decrease in the transport-parallel simple-shear component within the klippen, and associated relative increase of transport-perpendicular, pure-shear component, support the presence of a sub-PT lateral ramp in the Sikkim Himalayan FTB. This study demonstrates the influence of structural architecture for fault systems for controlling spatial and temporal variations of deformation fabrics and kinematic path of deforming thrust wedges.

  2. Robust design of multiple trailing edge flaps for helicopter vibration reduction: A multi-objective bat algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Rajnish; Ganguli, Ranjan; Seetharama Bhat, M.

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine an optimal trailing edge flap configuration and flap location to achieve minimum hub vibration levels and flap actuation power simultaneously. An aeroelastic analysis of a soft in-plane four-bladed rotor is performed in conjunction with optimal control. A second-order polynomial response surface based on an orthogonal array (OA) with 3-level design describes both the objectives adequately. Two new orthogonal arrays called MGB2P-OA and MGB4P-OA are proposed to generate nonlinear response surfaces with all interaction terms for two and four parameters, respectively. A multi-objective bat algorithm (MOBA) approach is used to obtain the optimal design point for the mutually conflicting objectives. MOBA is a recently developed nature-inspired metaheuristic optimization algorithm that is based on the echolocation behaviour of bats. It is found that MOBA inspired Pareto optimal trailing edge flap design reduces vibration levels by 73% and flap actuation power by 27% in comparison with the baseline design.

  3. The binding of multiple nuclear receptors to a single regulatory region is important for the proper expression of EDG84A in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Kazutaka; Kageyama, Yuji; Kayashima, Yasunari; Takakura, Yusuke; Hirose, Susumu; Ueda, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptor transcription factor family members share target sequence similarity; however, little is known about how these factors exert their specific regulatory control. Here, we examine the mechanism regulating the expression of the Drosophila EDG84A gene, a target gene of the orphan nuclear receptor βFTZ-F1, as a model to study the cooperative behavior among nuclear receptors. We show that the three nuclear receptors βFTZ-F1, DHR3, and DHR39 bind to a common element in the EDG84A promoter. The expression level of the EDG84A promoter-lacZ reporter genes in DHR39-induced and mutant animals, respectively, suggests that DHR39 works as a repressor. The activity of a reporter gene carrying a mutation preventing DHR3 binding was reduced in ftz-f1 mutants and rescued by the induced expression of βFTZ-F1, suggesting that DHR3 and βFTZ-F1 activate the EDG84A gene in a redundant manner. A reporter gene carrying a mutation that abolishes DHR39 and FTZ-F1 binding was prematurely expressed, and the expression level of the reporter gene carrying a mutation preventing DHR3 binding was reduced. These findings suggest that the temporal expression of this gene is mainly controlled by βFTZ-F1 but that the binding of DHR3 is also important. Comparison of the binding site sequence among Drosophila species suggests that DHR3 binding ability was gained after the melanogaster subgroup evolved, and this ability may contribute to the robust expression of this gene. These results show the complicated regulatory mechanisms utilized by multiple nuclear receptors to properly regulate the expression of their target gene through a single target site. PMID:23137796

  4. Edge-based lightweight image encryption using chaos-based reversible hidden transform and multiple-order discrete fractional cosine transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yushu; Xiao, Di; Wen, Wenying; Tian, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    In some special multimedia applications, only the regions with semantic information should be provided better protection whereas the other smooth regions can be free of encryption. However, most of the existing multimedia security schemes only consider bits and pixels rather than semantic information during their encryption. Motivated by this, we propose an edge-based lightweight image encryption scheme using chaos-based reversible hidden transform and multiple-order discrete fractional cosine transform. An image is first carried out by the edge detection based on advanced CNN structure with adaptive thresholds to assess data significance in the image. The detection output is a binary image, in which a “1” reflects the detected pixel whereas a “0” is opposite. Both the detected image and the original image are divided into non-overlapping pixel blocks in the same way, respectively. Whether each block is encrypted or not depends on the significance judged by the corresponding detected block. The significant block is performed by reversible hidden transform followed by multiple-order discrete fractional cosine transform parameters and orders of these two transforms are determined by a two dimensional cross chaotic map. Experiment results show the significant contour features of an image that have been largely hidden only by encrypting about half pixels in the average sense. The keys are extremely sensitive and the proposed scheme can resist noise attack to some extent.

  5. An application of the edge effect in measuring accessibility to multiple food retailer types in Southwestern Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Trends in food retailing associated with the consolidation of smaller-format retailers into fewer, larger-format supercentres have left some rural areas with fewer sources of nutritious, affordable food. Access to nutritious, affordable food is essential for good dietary habits and combating health issues such as type-2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Many studies on food environments use inaccurate or incomplete methods for locating food retailers, which may be responsible for mischaracterising food deserts. This study uses databases of every residence in and every food retailer in and around Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada. Residences were geocoded to their precise address, and network analysis techniques were performed in a geographic information system (GIS) to determine distances between every residence and different types of food retailers (grocery stores, fast food, fruit and vegetable sources, grocery stores plus fruit and vegetable sources, variety stores), both when considering and neglecting facilities outside the area of study, to account for a deficiency in analysis termed the 'edge effect'. Results Analysis of household accessibility to food outlets by neighbourhood socioeconomic distress level indicated that residents in the most distressed neighbourhoods tended to have better accessibility to all types of food retailers. In the most distressed neighbourhoods, 79 percent of residences were within walking distance of a grocery store, compared to only 10 percent in the least distressed neighbourhoods. When the edge effect was neglected, 37 percent of distance estimates proved inaccurate. Average accessibility to all food retailer types improved dramatically when food outlets adjacent to the study area were considered, thereby controlling for the edge effect. Conclusion By neglecting to consider food retailers just outside study area boundaries, previous studies may significantly over-report the actual distance necessary to

  6. Multiple mobility edges in a 1D Aubry chain with Hubbard interaction in presence of electric field: Controlled electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Srilekha; Maiti, Santanu K.; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    Electronic behavior of a 1D Aubry chain with Hubbard interaction is critically analyzed in presence of electric field. Multiple energy bands are generated as a result of Hubbard correlation and Aubry potential, and, within these bands localized states are developed under the application of electric field. Within a tight-binding framework we compute electronic transmission probability and average density of states using Green's function approach where the interaction parameter is treated under Hartree-Fock mean field scheme. From our analysis we find that selective transmission can be obtained by tuning injecting electron energy, and thus, the present model can be utilized as a controlled switching device.

  7. Dragonfly (Sympetrum flaveolum) flight: Kinematic measurement and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. H.; Skote, M.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, W. M.

    2013-07-01

    The kinematics of the flapping hindwing of the dragonfly Sympetrum flaveolum is investigated. Several tracking points along the leading edge and trailing edge of the hindwing are recorded and studied using high-speed videography. By applying more tracking points along the leading edge around the nodus, it is shown that the leading edge is not one rigid piece, but two pieces hinged at the nodus with physical constraint of forty degrees. Such arrangement also eases the difficulties in rotating the wing during pronation by bending the leading edge forward and flattening the wing. From the kinematic experiments, two flapping patterns of the dragonfly wing are revealed as a simple figure-eight and a double figure-eight flapping pattern. Kinematic modelling of the two flapping patterns is then established by transforming the flapping motions into angular rotations about the pivoting wing root in a local body-fixed spherical coordinate system.

  8. Multiple marker effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms in three genes, AKIRIN2, EDG1 and RPL27A, for marbling development in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Sukegawa, Shin; Miyake, Takeshi; Ibi, Takayuki; Takahagi, Yoichi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Yamada, Takahisa

    2014-03-01

    Marbling in beef, measured by Beef Marbling Standard (BMS) number, is an economically important trait for beef cattle breeding and markets in Japan. We previously detected three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMS number of Japanese Black in Oita prefecture: c.*188G>A in AKIRIN2, g.1471620G>T in EDG1 and g.3109537C>T in RPL27A. Here, we carried out single and multiple marker association analyses for the three SNPs in a different commercial Japanese Black population of 892 genotyped animals. The single marker analyses with the model including a single SNP showed significant associations of all SNPs with BMS number. The multiple marker analysis with the model including the main effects of the three SNPs and their interactions detected only significant main effects of g.1471620G>T and g.3109537C>T and a significant interaction between c.*188G>A and g.1471620G>T. These findings suggest the presence of inter-allelic interactions among genes affecting the development of beef marbling. For effective marker-assisted selection for BMS number, interactions among these markers need to be considered. PMID:24033432

  9. Why Teach Kinematics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykstra, Dewey

    2002-05-01

    The development of two new units for the Powerful Ideas in Physical Science (PIPS) Project of the American Association of Physics Teachers, funded by the National Science Foundation has motivated another look at the learning and teaching of kinematics and force. These and some of the other units of the PIPS Project are unique in that they advocate and model a particular student understanding driven approach to instruction as opposed to the more common content driven approach. Several novel ways to view the results of using these new motion and force materials are introduced and made possible by a diagnostic capable of indicating the degree of presence of multiple views (the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation by Thornton and Sokoloff). The performance of individuals on pre and post diagnostic measures ranges widely from almost no change to more than 6 standard deviations. Factors are identified which appear to differentiate the student performances. The identification of these factors motivated additional rounds of modifications to the materials, departing even further from a content driven orientation toward an even more student understanding driven approach. The resulting instruction appears to induce routinely even under adverse teaching and learning conditions 2.5 standard deviations change in the class average on the pre to the post instruction diagnostic scores.

  10. The kinematic footprints of five stellar streams in Andromeda's halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. C.; Ibata, R.; Irwin, M.; Koch, A.; Letarte, B.; Martin, N.; Collins, M.; Lewis, G. F.; McConnachie, A.; Peñarrubia, J.; Rich, R. M.; Trethewey, D.; Ferguson, A.; Huxor, A.; Tanvir, N.

    2008-11-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of five stellar streams (`A', `B', `Cr', `Cp' and `D') as well as the extended star cluster, EC4, which lies within Stream`C', all discovered in the halo of M31 from our Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam survey. These spectroscopic results were initially serendipitous, making use of our existing observations from the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph mounted on the Keck II telescope, and thereby emphasizing the ubiquity of tidal streams that account for ~70 per cent of the M31 halo stars in the targeted fields. Subsequent spectroscopy was then procured in Stream`C' and Stream`D' to trace the velocity gradient along the streams. Nine metal-rich ([Fe/H] ~ -0.7) stars at vhel = -349.5kms-1,σv,corr ~ 5.1 +/- 2.5km s-1 are proposed as a serendipitous detection of Stream`Cr', with follow-up kinematic identification at a further point along the stream. Seven metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~-1.3) stars confined to a narrow, 15 km s-1 velocity bin centred at vhel = -285.6, σv,corr = 4.3+1.7-1.4 km s-1 represent a kinematic detection of Stream`Cp', again with follow-up kinematic identification further along the stream. For the cluster EC4, candidate member stars with average [Fe/H] ~-1.4, are found at vhel = -282 suggesting it could be related to Stream`Cp'. No similarly obvious cold kinematic candidate is found for Stream`D', although candidates are proposed in both of two spectroscopic pointings along the stream (both at ~ -400km s-1). Spectroscopy near the edge of Stream`B' suggests a likely kinematic detection at vhel ~ -330, σv,corr ~ 6.9km s-1, while a candidate kinematic detection of Stream`A' is found (plausibly associated to M33 rather than M31) with vhel ~ -170, σv,corr = 12.5km s-1. The low dispersion of the streams in kinematics, physical thickness and metallicity makes it hard to reconcile with a scenario whereby these stream structures as an ensemble are related to the giant southern stream. We conclude that the M31 stellar

  11. Edge remap for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C.; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  12. Edge Bioinformatics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in amore » genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance« less

  13. Edge Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien-Chi

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in a genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance

  14. A Novel Algorithm for the Generation of Distinct Kinematic Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medapati, Sreenivasa Reddy; Kuchibhotla, Mallikarjuna Rao; Annambhotla, Balaji Srinivasa Rao

    2016-07-01

    Generation of distinct kinematic chains is an important topic in the design of mechanisms for various industrial applications i.e., robotic manipulator, tractor, crane etc. Many researchers have intently focused on this area and explained various processes of generating distinct kinematic chains which are laborious and complex. It is desirable to enumerate the kinematic chains systematically to know the inherent characteristics of a chain related to its structure so that all the distinct chains can be analyzed in depth, prior to the selection of a chain for a purpose. This paper proposes a novel and simple method with set of rules defined to eliminate isomorphic kinematic chains generating distinct kinematic chains. Also, this method simplifies the process of generating distinct kinematic chains even at higher levels i.e., 10-link, 11-link with single and multiple degree of freedom.

  15. Habitual Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy Improves Gait Kinematics and Walking Performance, but Not Patient-Reported Functional Outcomes, of People with Multiple Sclerosis who Present with Foot-Drop

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Marietta L.; Hooper, Julie E.; Cowan, Paula; Weller, Belinda B.; Mercer, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Background People with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS) often experience a disturbed gait function such as foot-drop. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the medium term effects of using Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) to treat foot-drop over a period 12 weeks on gait and patient reported outcomes of pwMS. Methods and Findings Nine pwMS aged 35 to 64 (2 males, 7 females) were assessed on four occasions; four weeks before baseline, at baseline and after six weeks and twelve weeks of FES use. Joint kinematics and performance on the 10 meter and 2 minute walk tests (10WT, 2 minWT) were assessed with and without FES. Participants also completed the MS walking Scale (MSWS), MS impact scale (MSIS29), Fatigue Severity Score (FSS) and wore an activity monitor for seven days after each assessment. Compared to unassisted walking, FES resulted in statistically significant improvements in peak dorsiflexion in swing (p = 0.006), 10MWT (p = 0.006) and 2 minWT (p = 0.002). Effect sizes for the training effect, defined as the change from unassisted walking at baseline to that at 12 weeks, indicated improved ankle angle at initial contact (2.6°, 95% CI −1° to 4°, d = 0.78), and a decrease in perceived exertion over the 2 min walking tests (−1.2 points, 95% CI −5.7 to 3.4, d = −0.86). Five participants exceeded the Minimally Detectable Change (MDC) for a training effect on the 10mWT, but only two did so for the 2 minWT. No effects of the use of FES for 12 weeks were found for MSWS, MSIS29, FSS or step count. Conclusion Although FES to treat foot-drop appears to offer the potential for a medium term training effect on ankle kinematics and walking speed, this was not reflected in the patient reported outcomes. This observed lack of relationship between objective walking performance and patient reported outcomes warrants further investigation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01977287 PMID:25133535

  16. Full multiple scattering analysis of XANES at the Cd L3 and O K edges in CdO films combined with a soft-x-ray emission investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Demchenko, I. N.; Denlinger, J. D.; Chernyshova, M.; Yu, K. M.; Speaks, D. T.; Olalde-Velasco, P.; Hemmers, O.; Walukiewicz, W.; Derkachova, A.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.

    2010-07-05

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the cadmium L3 and oxygen K edges for CdO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition method, is interpreted within the real-space multiple scattering formalism, FEFF code. The features in the experimental spectra are well reproduced by calculations for a cluster of about six and ten coordination shells around the absorber for L3 edge of Cd and K edge of O, respectively. The calculated projected electronic density of states is found to be in good agreement with unoccupied electronic states in experimental data and allows to conclude that the orbital character of the lowest energy of the conductive band is Cd-5s-O-2p. The charge transfer has been quantified and not purely ionic bonding has been found. Combined XANES and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements allow us to determine the direct and indirect band gap of investigated CdO films to be {approx}2.4-eV and {approx}0.9-eV, respectively.

  17. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  18. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.C.

    2000-05-23

    A three tooth kinematic coupling is disclosed based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  19. Gait alterations can reduce the risk of edge loading.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; Meyer, Christophe; De Groote, Friedl; Corten, Kristoff; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Desloovere, Kaat; Jonkers, Ilse

    2016-06-01

    Following metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty, edge loading (i.e., loading near the edge of a prosthesis cup) can increase wear and lead to early revision. The position and coverage angle of the prosthesis cup influence the risk of edge loading. This study investigates the effect of altered gait patterns, more specific hip, and pelvis kinematics, on the orientation of hip contact force and the consequent risk of antero-superior edge loading using muscle driven simulations of gait. With a cup orientation of 25° anteversion and 50° inclination and a coverage angle of 168°, many gait patterns presented risk of edge loading. Specifically at terminal double support, 189 out of 405 gait patterns indicated a risk of edge loading. At this time instant, the high hip contact forces and the proximity of the hip contact force to the edge of the cup indicated the likelihood of the occurrence of edge loading. Although the cup position contributed most to edge loading, altering kinematics considerably influenced the risk of edge loading. Increased hip abduction, resulting in decreasing hip contact force magnitude, and decreased hip extension, resulting in decreased risk on edge loading, are gait strategies that could prevent edge loading. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1069-1076, 2016. PMID:26632197

  20. Teaching about Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Written by Jim and Jane Nelson, Teaching About Kinematics is the latest AAPT/PTRA resource book. Based on physics education research, the book provides teachers with the resources needed to introduce students to some of the fundamental building blocks of physics. It is a carefully thought-out, step-by-step laboratory-based introduction to the…

  1. Kinematically redundant robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baillieul, J.; Hollerbach, J.; Brockett, R.; Martin, D.; Percy, R.; Thomas, R.

    1987-01-01

    Research on control, design and programming of kinematically redundant robot manipulators (KRRM) is discussed. These are devices in which there are more joint space degrees of freedom than are required to achieve every position and orientation of the end-effector necessary for a given task in a given workspace. The technological developments described here deal with: kinematic programming techniques for automatically generating joint-space trajectories to execute prescribed tasks; control of redundant manipulators to optimize dynamic criteria (e.g., applications of forces and moments at the end-effector that optimally distribute the loading of actuators); and design of KRRMs to optimize functionality in congested work environments or to achieve other goals unattainable with non-redundant manipulators. Kinematic programming techniques are discussed, which show that some pseudo-inverse techniques that have been proposed for redundant manipulator control fail to achieve the goals of avoiding kinematic singularities and also generating closed joint-space paths corresponding to close paths of the end effector in the workspace. The extended Jacobian is proposed as an alternative to pseudo-inverse techniques.

  2. Kinematics of Tape Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes mathematics of the nonliner relationships between a constant-speed, capstan-driven magnetic tape transport mechanism and a constant-angular-velocity take-up reel. The relationship, derived from the sum of a partial, serves in recognition of a finite tape. Thickness can serve as an example of rotational kinematics. (Author/SK)

  3. Edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildreth, E. C.

    1985-09-01

    For both biological systems and machines, vision begins with a large and unwieldly array of measurements of the amount of light reflected from surfaces in the environment. The goal of vision is to recover physical properties of objects in the scene such as the location of object boundaries and the structure, color and texture of object surfaces, from the two-dimensional image that is projected onto the eye or camera. This goal is not achieved in a single step: vision proceeds in stages, with each stage producing increasingly more useful descriptions of the image and then the scene. The first clues about the physical properties of the scene are provided by the changes of intensity in the image. The importance of intensity changes and edges in early visual processing has led to extensive research on their detection, description and use, both in computer and biological vision systems. This article reviews some of the theory that underlies the detection of edges, and the methods used to carry out this analysis.

  4. Kinematics and wing shape across flight speed in the bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae

    PubMed Central

    Von Busse, Rhea; Hedenström, Anders; Winter, York; Johansson, L. Christoffer

    2012-01-01

    Summary The morphology and kinematics of a flying animal determines the resulting aerodynamic lift through the regulation of the speed of the air moving across the wing, the wing area and the lift coefficient. We studied the detailed three-dimensional wingbeat kinematics of the bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, flying in a wind tunnel over a range of flight speeds (0–7 m/s), to determine how factors affecting the lift production vary across flight speed and within wingbeats. We found that the wing area, the angle of attack and the camber, which are determinants of the lift production, decreased with increasing speed. The camber is controlled by multiple mechanisms along the span, including the deflection of the leg relative to the body, the bending of the fifth digit, the deflection of the leading edge flap and the upward bending of the wing tip. All these measures vary throughout the wing beat suggesting active or aeroelastic control. The downstroke Strouhal number, Std, is kept relatively constant, suggesting that favorable flow characteristics are maintained during the downstroke, across the range of speeds studied. The Std is kept constant through changes in the stroke plane, from a strongly inclined stroke plane at low speeds to a more vertical stroke plane at high speeds. The mean angular velocity of the wing correlates with the aerodynamic performance and shows a minimum at the speed of maximum lift to drag ratio, suggesting a simple way to determine the optimal speed from kinematics alone. Taken together our results show the high degree of adjustments that the bats employ to fine tune the aerodynamics of the wings and the correlation between kinematics and aerodynamic performance. PMID:23259057

  5. The Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    6 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the edge (running diagonally from the lower left to the upper right) of a trough, which is part of a large pit crater complex in Noachis Terra. This type of trough forms through the collapse of surface materials into the subsurface, and often begins as a series of individual pit craters. Over time, continued collapse increases the diameter of individual pits until finally, adjacent pits merge to form a trough such as the one captured in this image. The deep shadowed area is caused in part by an overhang; layered rock beneath this overhang is less resistant to erosion, and thus has retreated tens of meters backward, beneath the overhang. A person could walk up inside this 'cave' formed by the overhanging layered material.

    Location near: 47.0oS, 355.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  6. Competing edge networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Mark; Grindrod, Peter

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a model for a pair of nonlinear evolving networks, defined over a common set of vertices, subject to edgewise competition. Each network may grow new edges spontaneously or through triad closure. Both networks inhibit the other's growth and encourage the other's demise. These nonlinear stochastic competition equations yield to a mean field analysis resulting in a nonlinear deterministic system. There may be multiple equilibria; and bifurcations of different types are shown to occur within a reduced parameter space. This situation models competitive communication networks such as BlackBerry Messenger displacing SMS; or instant messaging displacing emails.

  7. Unified EDGE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-06-18

    UEDGE is an interactive suite of physics packages using the Python or BASIS scripting systems. The plasma is described by time-dependent 2D plasma fluid equations that include equations for density, velocity, ion temperature, electron temperature, electrostatic potential, and gas density in the edge region of a magnetic fusion energy confinement device. Slab, cylindrical, and toroidal geometries are allowed, and closed and open magnetic field-line regions are included. Classical transport is assumed along magnetic field lines,more » and anomalous transport is assumed across field lines. Multi-charge state impurities can be included with the corresponding line-radiation energy loss. Although UEDGE is written in Fortran, for efficient execution and analysis of results, it utilizes either Python or BASIS scripting shells. Python is easily available for many platforms (http://www.Python.org/). The features and availability of BASIS are described in “Basis Manual Set” by P.F. Dubois, Z.C. Motteler, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report UCRL-MA-1 18541, June, 2002 and http://basis.llnl.gov. BASIS has been reviewed and released by LLNL for unlimited distribution. The Python version utilizes PYBASIS scripts developed by D.P. Grote, LLNL. The Python version also uses MPPL code and MAC Perl script, available from the public-domain BASIS source above. The Forthon version of UEDGE uses the same source files, but utilizes Forthon to produce a Python-compatible source. Forthon has been developed by D.P. Grote at LBL (see http://hifweb.lbl.gov/Forthon/ and Grote et al. in the references below), and it is freely available. The graphics can be performed by any package importable to Python, such as PYGIST.« less

  8. Unified EDGE

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-18

    UEDGE is an interactive suite of physics packages using the Python or BASIS scripting systems. The plasma is described by time-dependent 2D plasma fluid equations that include equations for density, velocity, ion temperature, electron temperature, electrostatic potential, and gas density in the edge region of a magnetic fusion energy confinement device. Slab, cylindrical, and toroidal geometries are allowed, and closed and open magnetic field-line regions are included. Classical transport is assumed along magnetic field lines, and anomalous transport is assumed across field lines. Multi-charge state impurities can be included with the corresponding line-radiation energy loss. Although UEDGE is written in Fortran, for efficient execution and analysis of results, it utilizes either Python or BASIS scripting shells. Python is easily available for many platforms (http://www.Python.org/). The features and availability of BASIS are described in “Basis Manual Set” by P.F. Dubois, Z.C. Motteler, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report UCRL-MA-1 18541, June, 2002 and http://basis.llnl.gov. BASIS has been reviewed and released by LLNL for unlimited distribution. The Python version utilizes PYBASIS scripts developed by D.P. Grote, LLNL. The Python version also uses MPPL code and MAC Perl script, available from the public-domain BASIS source above. The Forthon version of UEDGE uses the same source files, but utilizes Forthon to produce a Python-compatible source. Forthon has been developed by D.P. Grote at LBL (see http://hifweb.lbl.gov/Forthon/ and Grote et al. in the references below), and it is freely available. The graphics can be performed by any package importable to Python, such as PYGIST.

  9. APOGEE Kinematics. I. Overview of the Kinematics of the Galactic Bulge as Mapped By APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, M.; Zasowski, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Athanassoula, E.; Majewski, S. R.; García Pérez, A. E.; Bird, J.; Nidever, D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Sobeck, J.; Frinchaboy, P.; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    We present the stellar kinematics across the Galactic bulge and into the disk at positive longitudes from the SDSS-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way. APOGEE includes extensive coverage of the stellar populations of the bulge along the midplane and near-plane regions. From these data, we have produced kinematic maps of 10,000 stars across longitudes of 0° < l < 65°, and primarily across latitudes of | b| < 5° in the bulge region. The APOGEE data reveal that the bulge is cylindrically rotating across all latitudes and is kinematically hottest at the very center of the bulge, with the smallest gradients in both kinematic and chemical space inside the innermost region (| l,b| ) < (5°, 5°). The results from APOGEE show good agreement with data from other surveys at higher latitudes and a remarkable similarity to the rotation and dispersion maps of barred galaxies viewed edge-on. The thin bar that is reported to be present in the inner disk within a narrow latitude range of | b| < 2° appears to have a corresponding signature in [{Fe}/{{H}}] and [α /{Fe}]. Stars with [{Fe}/{{H}}] > -0.5 have dispersion and rotation profiles that are similar to that of N-body models of boxy/peanut bulges. There is a smooth kinematic transition from the thin bar and boxy bulge (l,| b| ) < (15°, 12°) out to the disk for stars with [{Fe}/{{H}}] > -1.0, and the chemodynamics across (l, b) suggests that the stars in the inner Galaxy with [{Fe}/{{H}}] > -1.0 originate in the disk.

  10. Shot-put kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, R.

    2005-11-01

    The problem of the optimum throw in the shot-put discipline is analysed by relaxing the assumption that the height H, from which the athlete releases the shot, does not depend on the angle θ which the arm of the putter makes with the horizontal axis. In this context, the kinematics of the shot-put is studied and results are compared with the traditional analysis, which considers the height H, the angle θ and the modulus V0 of the initial velocity of the metal sphere as independent parameters.

  11. An efficient and robust design optimisation of multi-state flow network for multiple commodities using generalised reliability evaluation algorithm and edge reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Po Ting

    2015-10-01

    The network of delivering commodities has been an important design problem in our daily lives and many transportation applications. The reliability of delivering commodities from a source node to a sink node in the network is maximised to find the optimal routing. However, the design problem is not simple due to randomly distributed attributes in each path, multiple commodities with variable path capacities and the allowable time constraints for delivery. This paper presents the design optimisation of the multi-state flow network (MSFN) for multiple commodities. We propose an efficient and robust approach to evaluate the system reliability in the MSFN with respect to randomly distributed path attributes and to find the optimal routing subject to the allowable time constraints. The delivery rates of the path segments are evaluated and the minimal-speed arcs are eliminated to reduce the complexity of the MSFN. Accordingly, the correct optimal routing is found and the worst-case reliability is evaluated. The reliability of the optimal routing is at least higher than worst-case measure. Three benchmark examples are utilised to demonstrate the proposed method. The comparisons between the original and the reduced networks show that the proposed method is very efficient.

  12. Kinematics of Strong Discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, K.; Nguyen, G.; Sulsky, D.

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides a detailed view of the Arctic ice cover. When processed with the RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System (RGPS), it provides estimates of sea ice motion and deformation over large regions of the Arctic for extended periods of time. The deformation is dominated by the appearance of linear kinematic features that have been associated with the presence of leads. The RGPS deformation products are based on the assumption that the displacement and velocity are smooth functions of the spatial coordinates. However, if the dominant deformation of multiyear ice results from the opening, closing and shearing of leads, then the displacement and velocity can be discontinuous. This presentation discusses the kinematics associated with strong discontinuities that describe possible jumps in displacement or velocity. Ice motion from SAR data are analyzed using this framework. It is assumed that RGPS cells deform due to the presence of a lead. The lead orientation is calculated to optimally account for the observed deformation. It is shown that almost all observed deformation can be represented by lead opening and shearing. The procedure used to reprocess motion data to account for leads will be described and applied to regions of the Beaufort Sea. The procedure not only provides a new view of ice deformation, it can be used to obtain information about the presence of leads for initialization and/or validation of numerical simulations.

  13. Enhancement of Kinematic Accelerations by Wavenumber Correlation Filtering.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2016-01-01

    To obtain kinematic accelerations with high accuracy and reliability, multiple Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers with a single antenna can be used for airborne gravimetry. The data collected from each receiver can be processed for kinematic accelerations that may be combined using simple averaging. Here, however, uncorrelated errors from instrument errors in each receiver also will be included that degrade the final solutions. Therefore, in this study, the wavenumber correlation filter (WCF) is applied to extract only the higher positively correlated wavenumber components of the kinematic accelerations for the enhancement of the final solution. The in situ airborne GPS data from two receivers were wavenumber-correlation-filtered to show about 0.07835 Gal improvement in accuracy relative to the solution from the raw kinematic accelerations. PMID:27608026

  14. Kinematically Detected Halo Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Martin C.

    Clues to the origins and evolution of our Galaxy can be found in the kinematics of stars around us. Remnants of accreted satellite galaxies produce over-densities in velocity-space, which can remain coherent for much longer than spatial over-densities. This chapter reviews a number of studies that have hunted for these accretion relics, both in the nearby solar-neighborhood and the more-distant stellar halo. Many observational surveys have driven this field forwards, from early work with the Hipparcos mission, to contemporary surveys like RAVE and SDSS. This active field continues to flourish, providing many new discoveries, and will be revolutionized as the Gaia mission delivers precise proper motions for a billion stars in our Galaxy.

  15. Rattlesnake strike behavior: kinematics

    PubMed

    Kardong; v

    1998-03-01

    The predatory behavior of rattlesnakes includes many distinctive preparatory phases leading to an extremely rapid strike, during which venom is injected. The rodent prey is then rapidly released, removing the snake's head from retaliation by the prey. The quick action of the venom makes possible the recovery of the dispatched prey during the ensuing poststrike period. The strike is usually completed in less than 0.5 s, placing a premium on an accurate strike that produces no significant errors in fang placement that could result in poor envenomation and subsequent loss of the prey. To clarify the basis for effective strike performance, we examined the basic kinematics of the rapid strike using high-speed film analysis. We scored numerous strike variables. Four major results were obtained. (1) Neurosensory control of the strike is based primarily upon sensory inputs via the eyes and facial pits to launch the strike, and upon tactile stimuli after contact. Correction for errors in targeting occurs not by a change in strike trajectory, but by fang repositioning after the jaws have made contact with the prey. (2) The rattlesnake strike is based upon great versatility and variation in recruitment of body segments and body postures. (3) Forces generated during acceleration of the head are transferred to posterior body sections to decelerate the head before contact with the prey, thereby reducing impact forces upon the snake's jaws. (4) Body acceleration is based on two patterns of body displacement, one in which acute sections of the body open like a gate, the other in which body segments flow around postural curves similar to movements seen during locomotion. There is one major implication of these results: recruitment of body segments, launch postures and kinematic features of the strike may be quite varied from strike to strike, but the overall predatory success of each strike by a rattlesnake is very consistent.

    PMID:9464964

  16. Real-time edge tracking using a tactile sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Alan D.; Volpe, Richard; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1989-01-01

    Object recognition through the use of input from multiple sensors is an important aspect of an autonomous manipulation system. In tactile object recognition, it is necessary to determine the location and orientation of object edges and surfaces. A controller is proposed that utilizes a tactile sensor in the feedback loop of a manipulator to track along edges. In the control system, the data from the tactile sensor is first processed to find edges. The parameters of these edges are then used to generate a control signal to a hybrid controller. Theory is presented for tactile edge detection and an edge tracking controller. In addition, experimental verification of the edge tracking controller is presented.

  17. CME Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-H.; Gallagher, P. T.

    The goal of this study is to investigate the driving mechanisms of CMEs and to infer the magnetic field properties at the onset of the instability. We use EIT 195 Å images and LASCO white-light coronagraph data of a CME event that occurred on 17 December 2006. It was a long-duration event, and was associated with an occulted C2.1 class flare. To determine the driving mechanism, we quantitatively and qualitatively compared the observationally obtained kinematic evolution with that predicted by three CME models: the breakout model (BO, see Antiochos et al. 1999; Lynch et al. 2008; DeVore and Antiochos 2008), the catastrophe model (CM, see Priest and Forbes 2000), and the toroidal instability model (TI, see Chen 1989; Kliem and Török 2006). Our results indicate that this CME is best represented by the CM model. We infer that, at the onset of the instability, the Alfvén speed is approximately 120 km s-1 and the height of the flux rope is roughly 100-200Mm. These parameter values are related to the magnetic environment and the loop geometry and can be used to infer the magnetic condition at the onset of the eruption.We intend to submit the full analysis to A&A.

  18. Joint kinematic calculation based on clinical direct kinematic versus inverse kinematic gait models.

    PubMed

    Kainz, H; Modenese, L; Lloyd, D G; Maine, S; Walsh, H P J; Carty, C P

    2016-06-14

    Most clinical gait laboratories use the conventional gait analysis model. This model uses a computational method called Direct Kinematics (DK) to calculate joint kinematics. In contrast, musculoskeletal modelling approaches use Inverse Kinematics (IK) to obtain joint angles. IK allows additional analysis (e.g. muscle-tendon length estimates), which may provide valuable information for clinical decision-making in people with movement disorders. The twofold aims of the current study were: (1) to compare joint kinematics obtained by a clinical DK model (Vicon Plug-in-Gait) with those produced by a widely used IK model (available with the OpenSim distribution), and (2) to evaluate the difference in joint kinematics that can be solely attributed to the different computational methods (DK versus IK), anatomical models and marker sets by using MRI based models. Eight children with cerebral palsy were recruited and presented for gait and MRI data collection sessions. Differences in joint kinematics up to 13° were found between the Plug-in-Gait and the gait 2392 OpenSim model. The majority of these differences (94.4%) were attributed to differences in the anatomical models, which included different anatomical segment frames and joint constraints. Different computational methods (DK versus IK) were responsible for only 2.7% of the differences. We recommend using the same anatomical model for kinematic and musculoskeletal analysis to ensure consistency between the obtained joint angles and musculoskeletal estimates. PMID:27139005

  19. The edges of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuyun; Xin, John; Ding, Feng

    2013-04-01

    The edge of two dimensional (2D) graphene, as the surface of a three dimensional (3D) crystal, plays a crucial role in the determination of its physical, electronic and chemical properties and thus has been extensively studied recently. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the study of graphene edges, including edge formation energy, edge reconstruction, method of graphene edge synthesis and the recent progress on metal-passivated graphene edges and the role of edges in graphene CVD growth. We expect this review to provide a guideline for readers to gain a clear picture of graphene edges from several aspects, especially the catalyst-passivated graphene edges and their role in graphene CVD growth. PMID:23420074

  20. The edges of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuyun; Xin, John; Ding, Feng

    2013-03-01

    The edge of two dimensional (2D) graphene, as the surface of a three dimensional (3D) crystal, plays a crucial role in the determination of its physical, electronic and chemical properties and thus has been extensively studied recently. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the study of graphene edges, including edge formation energy, edge reconstruction, method of graphene edge synthesis and the recent progress on metal-passivated graphene edges and the role of edges in graphene CVD growth. We expect this review to provide a guideline for readers to gain a clear picture of graphene edges from several aspects, especially the catalyst-passivated graphene edges and their role in graphene CVD growth.

  1. Bayesian Inference of Kinematics and Memberships of Open Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Z. Y.; Chen, L.; Zhong, J.; Hou, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    Based on the Bayesian Inference (BI) method, the Multiple-modelling approach is improved to combine coordinative positions, proper motions (PM) and radial velocities (RV), to separate the motion of the open cluster from field stars, as well as to describe the intrinsic kinematic status of the cluster.

  2. Tensor networks from kinematic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2016-07-01

    We point out that the MERA network for the ground state of a 1+1-dimensional conformal field theory has the same structural features as kinematic space — the geometry of CFT intervals. In holographic theories kinematic space becomes identified with the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. We argue that in these settings MERA is best viewed as a discretization of the space of bulk geodesics rather than of the bulk geometry itself. As a test of this kinematic proposal, we compare the MERA representation of the thermofield-double state with the space of geodesics in the two-sided BTZ geometry, obtaining a detailed agreement which includes the entwinement sector. We discuss how the kinematic proposal can be extended to excited states by generalizing MERA to a broader class of compression networks.

  3. Tensor networks from kinematic space

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2016-07-20

    We point out that the MERA network for the ground state of a 1+1-dimensional conformal field theory has the same structural features as kinematic space — the geometry of CFT intervals. In holographic theories kinematic space becomes identified with the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. We argue that in these settings MERA is best viewed as a discretization of the space of bulk geodesics rather than of the bulk geometry itself. As a test of this kinematic proposal, we compare the MERA representation of the thermofield-double state with the space of geodesics in the two-sided BTZ geometry,more » obtaining a detailed agreement which includes the entwinement sector. In conclusion, we discuss how the kinematic proposal can be extended to excited states by generalizing MERA to a broader class of compression networks.« less

  4. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory.

  5. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory. Previously announced in STAR as N82-32733

  6. pynoddy 1.0: an experimental platform for automated 3-D kinematic and potential field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian Wellmann, J.; Thiele, Sam T.; Lindsay, Mark D.; Jessell, Mark W.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel methodology for performing experiments with subsurface structural models using a set of flexible and extensible Python modules. We utilize the ability of kinematic modelling techniques to describe major deformational, tectonic, and magmatic events at low computational cost to develop experiments testing the interactions between multiple kinematic events, effect of uncertainty regarding event timing, and kinematic properties. These tests are simple to implement and perform, as they are automated within the Python scripting language, allowing the encapsulation of entire kinematic experiments within high-level class definitions and fully reproducible results. In addition, we provide a link to geophysical potential-field simulations to evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainties on maps of gravity and magnetics. We provide relevant fundamental information on kinematic modelling and our implementation, and showcase the application of our novel methods to investigate the interaction of multiple tectonic events on a pre-defined stratigraphy, the effect of changing kinematic parameters on simulated geophysical potential fields, and the distribution of uncertain areas in a full 3-D kinematic model, based on estimated uncertainties in kinematic input parameters. Additional possibilities for linking kinematic modelling to subsequent process simulations are discussed, as well as additional aspects of future research. Our modules are freely available on github, including documentation and tutorial examples, and we encourage the contribution to this project.

  7. pynoddy 1.0: an experimental platform for automated 3-D kinematic and potential field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmann, J. F.; Thiele, S. T.; Lindsay, M. D.; Jessell, M. W.

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel methodology for performing experiments with subsurface structural models using a set of flexible and extensible Python modules. We utilise the ability of kinematic modelling techniques to describe major deformational, tectonic, and magmatic events at low computational cost to develop experiments testing the interactions between multiple kinematic events, effect of uncertainty regarding event timing, and kinematic properties. These tests are simple to implement and perform, as they are automated within the Python scripting language, allowing the encapsulation of entire kinematic experiments within high-level class definitions and fully reproducible results. In addition, we provide a~link to geophysical potential-field simulations to evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainties on maps of gravity and magnetics. We provide relevant fundamental information on kinematic modelling and our implementation, and showcase the application of our novel methods to investigate the interaction of multiple tectonic events on a pre-defined stratigraphy, the effect of changing kinematic parameters on simulated geophysical potential-fields, and the distribution of uncertain areas in a full 3-D kinematic model, based on estimated uncertainties in kinematic input parameters. Additional possibilities for linking kinematic modelling to subsequent process simulations are discussed, as well as additional aspects of future research. Our modules are freely available on github, including documentation and tutorial examples, and we encourage the contribution to this project.

  8. THE PHOTOMETRIC AND KINEMATIC STRUCTURE OF FACE-ON DISK GALAXIES. III. KINEMATIC INCLINATIONS FROM H{alpha} VELOCITY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A. E-mail: mab@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained H{alpha} velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i{sub kin} = 23 Degree-Sign for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20 Degree-Sign and 6% at 30 Degree-Sign . Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical ''face-on'' Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15 Degree-Sign and 5% at 30 Degree-Sign . This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  9. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace. PMID:25740899

  10. Aero-optimum hovering kinematics.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2015-08-01

    Hovering flight for flapping wing vehicles requires rapid and relatively complex reciprocating movement of a wing relative to a stationary surrounding fluid. This note develops a compact analytical aero-kinematic model that can be used for optimization of flapping wing kinematics against aerodynamic criteria of effectiveness (maximum lift) and efficiency (minimum power for a given amount of lift). It can also be used to make predictions of required flapping frequency for a given geometry and basic aerodynamic parameters. The kinematic treatment is based on a consolidation of an existing formulation that allows explicit derivation of flapping velocity for complex motions whereas the aerodynamic model is based on existing quasi-steady analysis. The combined aero-kinematic model provides novel explicit analytical expressions for both lift and power of a hovering wing in a compact form that enables exploration of a rich kinematic design space. Good agreement is found between model predictions of flapping frequency and observed results for a number of insects and optimal hovering kinematics identified using the model are consistent with results from studies using higher order computational models. For efficient flight, the flapping angle should vary using a triangular profile in time leading to a constant velocity flapping motion, whereas for maximum effectiveness the shape of variation should be sinusoidal. For both cases the wing pitching motion should be rectangular such that pitch change at stroke reversal is as rapid as possible. PMID:26248884

  11. Kinematics of Haro 11: The miniature Antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östlin, G.; Marquart, T.; Cumming, R. J.; Fathi, K.; Bergvall, N.; Adamo, A.; Amram, P.; Hayes, M.

    2015-11-01

    Luminous blue compact galaxies are among the most active galaxies in the local Universe in terms of their star formation rate per unit mass. They are rare at the current cosmic epoch, but were more abundant in the past and may be seen as the local analogues of higher red shift Lyman break galaxies. Studies of their kinematics is key to understanding what triggers their unusually active star formation. In this work, we investigate the kinematics of stars and ionised gas in Haro 11, one of the most luminous blue compact galaxies in the local Universe. Previous works have indicated that many of these galaxies may be triggered by galaxy mergers. We have employed Fabry-Perot interferometry, long-slit spectroscopy, and integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy to explore the kinematics of Haro 11. We target the near-infrared calcium triplet, and use cross-correlation and penalised pixel fitting techniques to derive the stellar velocity field and velocity dispersion. We analyse ionised gas through emission lines from hydrogen, [O iii], and [S iii]. When spectral resolution and signal to noise allows, we investigate the line profile in detail and identify multiple velocity components when present. The spectra reveal a complex velocity field whose components, both stellar and gaseous, we attempt to disentangle. We find that to first order, the velocity field and velocity dispersions derived from stars and ionised gas agree. Hence the complexities reveal real dynamical disturbances providing further evidence for a merger in Haro 11. Through decomposition of emission lines, we find evidence for kinematically distinct components, for instance, a tidal arm. The ionised gas velocity field can be traced to large galactocentric radii, and shows significant velocity dispersion even far out in the halo. If interpreted as virial motions, this indicates that Haro 11 may have a mass of ~1011 M⊙. Haro 11 shows many resemblances with the famous Antennae galaxies both morphologically and

  12. Clifford Fibrations and Possible Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, Alan S.

    2009-07-01

    Following Herranz and Santander [Herranz F.J., Santander M., Mem. Real Acad. Cienc. Exact. Fis. Natur. Madrid 32 (1998), 59-84, physics/9702030] we will construct homogeneous spaces based on possible kinematical algebras and groups [Bacry H., Levy-Leblond J.-M., J. Math. Phys. 9 (1967), 1605-1614] and their contractions for 2-dimensional spacetimes. Our construction is different in that it is based on a generalized Clifford fibration: Following Penrose [Penrose R., Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., New York, 2005] we will call our fibration a Clifford fibration and not a Hopf fibration, as our fibration is a geometrical construction. The simple algebraic properties of the fibration describe the geometrical properties of the kinematical algebras and groups as well as the spacetimes that are derived from them. We develop an algebraic framework that handles all possible kinematic algebras save one, the static algebra.

  13. Functional kinematics of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Rainbow, M J; Wolff, A L; Crisco, J J; Wolfe, S W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review past and present concepts concerning functional kinematics of the healthy and injured wrist. To provide a context for students of the wrist, we describe the progression of techniques for measuring carpal kinematics over the past century and discuss how this has influenced today's understanding of functional kinematics. Next, we provide an overview of recent developments and highlight the clinical relevance of these findings. We use these findings and recent evidence that supports the importance of coupled motion in early rehabilitation of radiocarpal injuries to develop the argument that coupled motion during functional activities is a clinically relevant outcome; therefore, clinicians should develop a framework for its dynamic assessment. This should enable a tailored and individualized approach to the treatment of carpal injuries. PMID:26568538

  14. Study of human body: Kinematics and kinetics of a martial arts (Silat) performers using 3D-motion capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Ahmad Afiq Sabqi Awang; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Azraai, Nur Zaidi

    2015-04-01

    The Interest in this studies of human kinematics goes back very far in human history drove by curiosity or need for the understanding the complexity of human body motion. To find new and accurate information about the human movement as the advance computing technology became available for human movement that can perform. Martial arts (silat) were chose and multiple type of movement was studied. This project has done by using cutting-edge technology which is 3D motion capture to characterize and to measure the motion done by the performers of martial arts (silat). The camera will detect the markers (infrared reflection by the marker) around the performer body (total of 24 markers) and will show as dot in the computer software. The markers detected were analyzing using kinematic kinetic approach and time as reference. A graph of velocity, acceleration and position at time,t (seconds) of each marker was plot. Then from the information obtain, more parameters were determined such as work done, momentum, center of mass of a body using mathematical approach. This data can be used for development of the effectiveness movement in martial arts which is contributed to the people in arts. More future works can be implemented from this project such as analysis of a martial arts competition.

  15. 2D kinematic signatures of boxy/peanut bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannuzzi, Francesca; Athanassoula, E.

    2015-07-01

    We study the imprints of boxy/peanut structures on the 2D line-of-sight kinematics of simulated disc galaxies. The models under study belong to a family with varying initial gas fraction and halo triaxiality, plus few other control runs with different structural parameters; the kinematic information was extracted using the Voronoi-binning technique and parametrized up to the fourth order of a Gauss-Hermite series. Building on a previous work for the long-slit case, we investigate the 2D kinematic behaviour in the edge-on projection as a function of the boxy/peanut strength and position angle; we find that for the strongest structures the highest moments show characteristic features away from the mid-plane in a range of position angles. We also discuss the masking effect of a classical bulge and the ambiguity in discriminating kinematically this spherically symmetric component from a boxy/peanut bulge seen end-on. Regarding the face-on case, we extend existing results to encompass the effect of a second buckling and find that this phenomenon spurs an additional set of even deeper minima in the fourth moment. Finally, we show how the results evolve when inclining the disc away from perfectly edge-on and face-on. The behaviour of stars born during the course of the simulations is discussed and confronted to that of the pre-existing disc. The general aim of our study is providing a handle to identify boxy/peanut structures and their properties in latest generation Integral Field Unit observations of nearby disc galaxies.

  16. Kinematics of KPG 390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, P.; Rosado, M.; Gabbasov, R.; Fuentes-Carrera, I.

    2010-06-01

    In this work we present scanning Fabry-Perot Hα observations of the isolated interacting galaxy pair NGC 5278/9 obtained with the PUMA Fabry-Perot interferometer. We derived velocity fields, various kinematic parameters and rotation curves for both galaxies. Our kinematical results together with the fact that dust lanes have been detected in both galaxies, as well as the analysis of surface brightness profiles along the minor axis, allowed us to determine that both components of the interacting pair are trailing spirals.

  17. Kinematic sensitivity of robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, Marko I.

    1989-01-01

    Kinematic sensitivity vectors and matrices for open-loop, n degrees-of-freedom manipulators are derived. First-order sensitivity vectors are defined as partial derivatives of the manipulator's position and orientation with respect to its geometrical parameters. The four-parameter kinematic model is considered, as well as the five-parameter model in case of nominally parallel joint axes. Sensitivity vectors are expressed in terms of coordinate axes of manipulator frames. Second-order sensitivity vectors, the partial derivatives of first-order sensitivity vectors, are also considered. It is shown that second-order sensitivity vectors can be expressed as vector products of the first-order sensitivity vectors.

  18. Bayesian Kinematic Finite Fault Source Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minson, S. E.; Simons, M.; Beck, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Finite fault earthquake source models are inherently under-determined: there is no unique solution to the inverse problem of determining the rupture history at depth as a function of time and space when our data are only limited observations at the Earth's surface. Traditional inverse techniques rely on model constraints and regularization to generate one model from the possibly broad space of all possible solutions. However, Bayesian methods allow us to determine the ensemble of all possible source models which are consistent with the data and our a priori assumptions about the physics of the earthquake source. Until now, Bayesian techniques have been of limited utility because they are computationally intractable for problems with as many free parameters as kinematic finite fault models. We have developed a methodology called Cascading Adaptive Tempered Metropolis In Parallel (CATMIP) which allows us to sample very high-dimensional problems in a parallel computing framework. The CATMIP algorithm combines elements of simulated annealing and genetic algorithms with the Metropolis algorithm to dynamically optimize the algorithm's efficiency as it runs. We will present synthetic performance tests of finite fault models made with this methodology as well as a kinematic source model for the 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake. This earthquake was well recorded by multiple ascending and descending interferograms and a network of high-rate GPS stations whose records can be used as near-field seismograms.

  19. KINEMATIC AND PHOTOMETRIC EVIDENCE FOR A BAR IN NGC 2683

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Zagursky, Matthew J.; McGaugh, Stacy S. E-mail: mzagursk@umd.edu

    2009-10-15

    We present optical long-slit and SparsePak Integral Field Unit emission line spectroscopy along with optical broadband and near-IR images of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 2683. We find a multi-valued, figure-of-eight velocity structure in the inner 45'' of the long-slit spectrum and twisted isovelocity contours in the velocity field. We also find, regardless of wavelength, that the galaxy isophotes are boxy. We argue that taken together, these kinematic and photometric features are evidence for the presence of a bar in NGC 2683. We use our data to constrain the orientation and strength of the bar.

  20. Kinematic support using elastic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geirsson, Arni; Debra, Daniel B.

    1988-01-01

    The design of kinematic supports using elastic elements is reviewed. The two standard methods (cone, Vee and flat and three Vees) are presented and a design example involving a machine tool metrology bench is given. Design goals included thousandfold strain attenuation in the bench relative to the base when the base strains due to temperature variations and shifting loads. Space applications are also considered.

  1. Top quark mass and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Barberis, Emanuela; /Northeastern U.

    2006-05-01

    A summary of the results on the measurement of the Top Quark mass and the study of the kinematics of the t{bar t} system at the Tevatron collider is presented here. Results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations are reported.

  2. Kinematic Parameters of Signed Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.; Milkovic, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Sign language users recruit physical properties of visual motion to convey linguistic information. Research on American Sign Language (ASL) indicates that signers systematically use kinematic features (e.g., velocity, deceleration) of dominant hand motion for distinguishing specific semantic properties of verb classes in production…

  3. Deployable antenna kinematics using tensegrity structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Byron Franklin

    With vast changes in spacecraft development over the last decade, a new, cheaper approach was needed for deployable kinematic systems such as parabolic antenna reflectors. Historically, these mesh-surface reflectors have resembled folded umbrellas, with incremental redesigns utilized to save packaging size. These systems are typically over-constrained designs, the assumption being that high reliability necessary for space operations requires this level of conservatism. But with the rapid commercialization of space, smaller launch platforms and satellite buses have demanded much higher efficiency from all space equipment than can be achieved through this incremental approach. This work applies an approach called tensegrity to deployable antenna development. Kenneth Snelson, a student of R. Buckminster Fuller, invented Tensegrity structures in 1948. Such structures use a minimum number of compression members (struts); stability is maintain using tension members (ties). The novelty introduced in this work is that the ties are elastic, allowing the struts to extend or contract, and in this way changing the surface of the antenna. Previously, the University of Florida developed an approach to quantify the stability and motion of parallel manipulators. This approach was applied to deployable, tensegrity, antenna structures. Based on the kinematic analyses for the 3-3 (octahedron) and 4-4 (square anti-prism) structures, the 6-6 (hexagonal anti-prism) analysis was completed which establishes usable structural parameters. The primary objective for this work was to prove the stability of this class of deployable structures, and their potential application to space structures. The secondary objective is to define special motions for tensegrity antennas, to meet the subsystem design requirements, such as addressing multiple antenna-feed locations. This work combines the historical experiences of the artist (Snelson), the mathematician (Ball), and the space systems engineer

  4. Kinematic analysis of the ARID manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L

    1992-01-01

    The kinematic structure of the ARID manipulator lends itself to simple forward and inverse kinematics analysis. The purpose of this paper is to fully document and verify an existing analysis. The symbolic software package MATHEMATICA was used to produce and verify the equations presented here. In the analysis to follow, the standard Devenit-Hartenberg kinematic parameters of the ARID were employed.

  5. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  6. The Edge, Fall 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, 1999

    1999-01-01

    "The Edge" is a Canadian publication for youth. The mandate of the Edge is to support and celebrate all career journeys embraced by youth. This issue contains career profile articles covering three jobs: crane operator, indoor climbing instructor, and product certification tester. Career trends and the state of today's workplace are also…

  7. Galaxy simulations: Kinematics and mock observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Christopher E.

    2013-08-01

    There are six topics to my thesis, which are: (1) slow rotator production in varied simulation schemes and kinematically decoupled cores and twists in those simulations, (2) the change in number of clumps in radiation pressure and no-radiation pressure simulations, (3) Sunrise experiments and failures including UVJ color-color dust experiments and UVbeta slopes, (4) the Sunrise image pipeline and algorithms. Cosmological simulations of have typically produced too many stars at early times. We find that the additional radiation pressure (RP) feedback suppresses star formation globally by a factor of ~ 3. Despite this reduction, the simulation still overproduces stars by a factor of ~ 2 with respect to the predictions provided by abundance matching methods. In simulations with RP the number of clumps falls dramatically. However, only clumps with masses Mclump/Mdisk ≤ 8% are impacted by the inclusion of RP, and clump counts above this range are comparable. Above this mass, the difference between and RP and no-RP contrast ratios diminishes. If we restrict our selection to galaxies hosting at least a single clump above this mass range then clump numbers, contrast ratios, survival fractions and total clump masses show little discrepancy between RP and no-RP simulations. By creating mock Hubble Space Telescope observations we find that the number of clumps is slightly reduced in simulations with RP. We demonstrate that clumps found in any single gas, stellar, or mock observation image are not necessarily clumps found in another map, and that there are few clumps common to multiple maps. New kinematic observations from ATLAS3D have highlighted the need to understand the evolutionary mechanism leading to a spectrum of fast-rotator and slow-rotators in early-type galaxies. We address the formation of slow and fast rotators through a series of controlled, comprehensive hydrodynamic simulations sampling idealized galaxy merger formation scenarios constructed from model

  8. Exploring MaNGA's kinematic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijmans, Anne-Marie; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Different galaxy formation processes leave different imprints on the gas and stellar kinematic patterns for a galaxy. With MaNGA, we now have after one year of observations an unprecedented sample of 1400 nearby galaxies for which we can study gas and stellar kinematics in much detail, based on integral-field spectroscopy. We are measuring kinematic quantities such as LambdaR (angular momentum) and their (possible) correlations with other galaxy properties such as mass, morphology and environment. By quantifying the kinematic (sub)structures in velocity and dispersion maps, we will construct a kinematic galaxy classification that can be linked to their formation processes.

  9. Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ranajay; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-12-08

    Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate.

  10. Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Ranajay; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-12-01

    Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate.

  11. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Mattione

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  12. Measurement of reed valve kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenkl, Michael; Dvořák, Václav; Vít, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of key kinematic parameters of a reed valve movement is necessary for the further development of the reed valve system. These parameters are dependent on the geometry and material properties of the valve. As they directly affect the quantity of air flowing around the valve, a simple and easy to implement measurement of various valve configuration based on the air flow has been devised and is described in this paper, along with its technical parameters and drawbacks when evaluating reed valves used in reciprocating air compressors. Results are presented for a specimen of a compressor under examination. All kinematic parameters, and timing of the opening and closing of the valve, obtained from the measurement are presented and discussed.

  13. Kinematics of planetary nebulae. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgathofer, A.; Perinotto, M.

    1981-08-01

    In a program of study of radial velocities of planetary nebulae, 84 spectra of eight planetary nebulae in the direction of the galactic anticenter have been obtained at the L. Figl Observatory near Vienna with an image tube spectrograph giving a reciprocal dispersion of 26 A/mm. With this material, the kinematical behavior of the objects was studied, and it is shown that most of them deviate significantly from circular motion in the Galaxy.

  14. Of cilium and flagellum kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Hansen, Joshua C.

    2009-11-01

    The kinematics of propulsion of small animals such as paramecium and spermatozoa is considered. Larger scale models of the cilium and flagellum have been built and a four-motor apparatus has been constructed to reproduce their known periodic motions. The cilium model has transverse deformational ability in one plane only, while the flagellum model has such ability in two planes. When the flagellum model is given a push-pull in one diametral plane, instead of transverse deflection in one plane, it forms a coil. Berg & Anderson's postulation (Nature 245 1973) that a flagellum rotates, is recalled. The kinematics of cilia of paramecium, of the whipping motion of the spermatozoa flagella, and of the flapping motion (rolling and pitching) of the pectoral fins of much larger animals such penguins, have been reproduced in the same basic paramecium apparatus. The results suggest that each of the tiny individual paramecium propulsors have the intrinsic dormant kinematic and structural building blocks to optimize into higher Reynolds number propulsors. A synthetic hypothesis on how small might have become large is animated.

  15. Kinematic top analyses at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Cobal-Grassman, M.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    We present an update of the top quark analysis using kinematic techniques in {rho}{ovr string {rho}} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We reported before on a study which used 19.3 pb{sup -1} of data from the 1992-93 collider run, but now we use a larger data sample of 67 pb{sup -1}. First, we analyze the total transverse energy of the hard collision in W+{ge}3 jet events, showing the likely presence of a t{ovr string t} component in the event sample. Next, we compare in more detail the kinematic structure of W+{ge}3 jet events with expectations for top pair production and with background processes, predominantly direct W+ jet production. We again find W+{ge}3 jet events which cannot be explained in terms of background, but show kinematic features as expected from top. These events also show evidence for beauty quarks. The findings confirm the observation of top events made earlier in the data of the 1992-93 collider run.

  16. Kinematic models of cometary comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacconi-Garman, Lowell Evan

    As a first step towards understanding the kinematics of cometary comae, an analysis was undertaken of the 18-cm OH lines in comets. This work builds on past OH excitation and kinematic studies to meld them into a complete and self-consistent model for a cometary coma. The kinematics were modeled via the vectorial formalism and the powerful Monte Carlo technique was used in an effort to reproduce the high sensitivity, high spectral resolution 18-cm OH line profiles of Comets Halley, Giacobini-Zinner, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Wilson which were obtained at the 43 meter telescope of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. For the first time a zeroth order A-doublet quenching correction was applied to the 18-cm data and the long standing UV/radio gas production rate disparity was accounted for. Gas expansion velocities and coma anisotropies were derived from observations covering a wide range of heliocentric distances and gas production rates. The inferred ratio of dayside gas emission to nightside gas emission for all comets in this study, except P/Giacobini-Zinner, is approx. two. This value is consistent with that derived from in situ observations of the neutral gas in the coma of Comet Halley and is independent of both gas productivity and heliocentric distance. For P/Giacobini-Zinner, anomalously high gas outflow anisotropies were inferred for which there is no clear explanation.

  17. Agile robotic edge finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.

    1996-08-01

    Edge finishing processes have seemed like ideal candidates for automation. Most edge finishing processes are unpleasant, dangerous, tedious, expensive, not repeatable and labor intensive. Estimates place the cost of manual edge finishing processes at 12% of the total cost of fabricating precision parts. For small, high precision parts, the cost of hand finishing may be as high as 305 of the total part cost. Up to 50% of this cost could be saved through automation. This cost estimate includes the direct costs of edge finishing: the machining hours required and the 30% scrap and rework rate after manual finishing. Not included in these estimates are the indirect costs resulting from cumulative trauma disorders and retraining costs caused by the high turnover rate for finishing jobs.. Despite the apparent economic advantages, edge finishing has proven difficult to automate except in low precision and/or high volume production environments. Finishing automation systems have not been deployed successfully in Department of Energy defense programs (DOE/DP) production, A few systems have been attempted but have been subsequently abandoned for traditional edge finishing approaches: scraping, grinding, and filing the edges using modified dental tools and hand held power tools. Edge finishing automation has been an elusive but potentially lucrative production enhancement. The amount of time required for reconfiguring workcells for new parts, the time required to reprogram the workcells to finish new parts, and automation equipment to respond to fixturing errors and part tolerances are the most common reasons cited for eliminating automation as an option for DOE/DP edge finishing applications. Existing automated finishing systems have proven to be economically viable only where setup and reprogramming costs are a negligible fraction of overall production costs.

  18. Influence of kinematic parameters on result efficiency in javelin throw.

    PubMed

    Saratlija, Predrag; Zagorac, Nebojsa; Babić, Vesna

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the research was to define the influence of the kinematic parameters in the javelin throw success in the top junior athletes at the European Junior Athletics Championships in Novi Sad. A set, consisting of 17 kinematic variables, was applied on a sample of 16 athletes, and the same variables were registered at the 2009 Novi Sad European Junior Championships. The criteria variable was the achieved throw length (javelin throw). The subjects were represented by 113 successful javelin throws. The results of the chosen kinematic variables correlation analysis showed the existence of multiple significant relations between the observed variables. Based on the observed kinematic variables correlation analysis, the next conclusion can be made: the javelin release speed has the most important role, followed by the fast front support leg placing. The results are expected and logical, and can be used in kinesiology practice, especially in the process of young throwers' technique learning and in development of motor abilities relevant for this athletic discipline. PMID:23914486

  19. Edge detection: a tutorial review

    SciTech Connect

    Kunt, M.

    1982-01-01

    Major edge detection methods are reviewed from the signal processing and artificial intelligence point of views. In the first class, images are processed first to enhance edges. Then a decision is made to label each picture point as edge or not edge. In the second class edges are viewed as the border-lines of regions whose points share a common property. 21 references.

  20. Spiral galaxy HI models, rotation curves and kinematic classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Theresa B. V.

    Although galaxy interactions cause dramatic changes, galaxies also continue to form stars and evolve when they are isolated. The dark matter (DM) halo may influence this evolution since it generates the rotational behaviour of galactic disks which could affect local conditions in the gas. Therefore we study neutral hydrogen kinematics of non-interacting, nearby spiral galaxies, characterising their rotation curves (RC) which probe the DM halo; delineating kinematic classes of galaxies; and investigating relations between these classes and galaxy properties such as disk size and star formation rate (SFR). To generate the RCs, we use GalAPAGOS (by J. Fiege). My role was to test and help drive the development of this software, which employs a powerful genetic algorithm, constraining 23 parameters while using the full 3D data cube as input. The RC is here simply described by a tanh-based function which adequately traces the global RC behaviour. Extensive testing on artificial galaxies show that the kinematic properties of galaxies with inclination >40 degrees, including edge-on galaxies, are found reliably. Using a hierarchical clustering algorithm on parametrised RCs from 79 galaxies culled from literature generates a preliminary scheme consisting of five classes. These are based on three parameters: maximum rotational velocity, turnover radius and outer slope of the RC. To assess the relationship between DM content and the kinematic classes, we generate mass models for 10 galaxies from the THINGS and WHISP surveys, and J. Irwin's sample. In most cases mass models using GalAPAGOS RCs were similar to those using traditional "tilted-ring'' method RCs. The kinematic classes are mainly distinguished by their rotational velocity. We confirm correlations between increasing velocity and B-magnitude, optical disk size, and find earlier type galaxies among the strong rotators. SFR also increases with maximum rotational velocity. Given our limited subsample, we cannot discern a

  1. The gait standard deviation, a single measure of kinematic variability.

    PubMed

    Sangeux, Morgan; Passmore, Elyse; Graham, H Kerr; Tirosh, Oren

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of gait kinematic variability provides relevant clinical information in certain conditions affecting the neuromotor control of movement. In this article, we present a measure of overall gait kinematic variability, GaitSD, based on combination of waveforms' standard deviation. The waveform standard deviation is the common numerator in established indices of variability such as Kadaba's coefficient of multiple correlation or Winter's waveform coefficient of variation. Gait data were collected on typically developing children aged 6-17 years. Large number of strides was captured for each child, average 45 (SD: 11) for kinematics and 19 (SD: 5) for kinetics. We used a bootstrap procedure to determine the precision of GaitSD as a function of the number of strides processed. We compared the within-subject, stride-to-stride, variability with the, between-subject, variability of the normative pattern. Finally, we investigated the correlation between age and gait kinematic, kinetic and spatio-temporal variability. In typically developing children, the relative precision of GaitSD was 10% as soon as 6 strides were captured. As a comparison, spatio-temporal parameters required 30 strides to reach the same relative precision. The ratio stride-to-stride divided by normative pattern variability was smaller in kinematic variables (the smallest for pelvic tilt, 28%) than in kinetic and spatio-temporal variables (the largest for normalised stride length, 95%). GaitSD had a strong, negative correlation with age. We show that gait consistency may stabilise only at, or after, skeletal maturity. PMID:27131201

  2. Surgical gesture classification from video and kinematic data.

    PubMed

    Zappella, Luca; Béjar, Benjamín; Hager, Gregory; Vidal, René

    2013-10-01

    Much of the existing work on automatic classification of gestures and skill in robotic surgery is based on dynamic cues (e.g., time to completion, speed, forces, torque) or kinematic data (e.g., robot trajectories and velocities). While videos could be equally or more discriminative (e.g., videos contain semantic information not present in kinematic data), they are typically not used because of the difficulties associated with automatic video interpretation. In this paper, we propose several methods for automatic surgical gesture classification from video data. We assume that the video of a surgical task (e.g., suturing) has been segmented into video clips corresponding to a single gesture (e.g., grabbing the needle, passing the needle) and propose three methods to classify the gesture of each video clip. In the first one, we model each video clip as the output of a linear dynamical system (LDS) and use metrics in the space of LDSs to classify new video clips. In the second one, we use spatio-temporal features extracted from each video clip to learn a dictionary of spatio-temporal words, and use a bag-of-features (BoF) approach to classify new video clips. In the third one, we use multiple kernel learning (MKL) to combine the LDS and BoF approaches. Since the LDS approach is also applicable to kinematic data, we also use MKL to combine both types of data in order to exploit their complementarity. Our experiments on a typical surgical training setup show that methods based on video data perform equally well, if not better, than state-of-the-art approaches based on kinematic data. In turn, the combination of both kinematic and video data outperforms any other algorithm based on one type of data alone. PMID:23706754

  3. The Edge supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  4. Kinematic correction for roller skewing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is developed for high-speed cylindrical roller bearings. This stabilization requires race and roller crowning to product changes in the rolling geometry as the roller shifts axially. These changes put a reverse skew in the rolling elements by changing the rolling taper. Twelve basic possible bearing modifications are identified in this paper. Four have single transverse convex curvature in the rollers while eight have rollers with compound transverse curvature composed of a central cylindrical band of constant radius surrounded by symmetric bands with both slope and transverse curvature.

  5. Camera Edge Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisk, Stanley H.; Wittels, Norman

    1988-02-01

    Edge location is an important machine vision task. Machine vision systems perform mathematical operations on rectangular arrays of numbers that are intended to faithfully represent the spatial distribution of scene luminance. The numbers are produced by periodic sampling and quantization of the camera's video output. This sequence can cause artifacts to appear in the data with a noise spectrum that is high in power at high spatial frequencies. This is a problem because most edge detection algorithms are preferentially sensitive to the high-frequency content in an image. Solid state cameras can introduce errors because of the spatial periodicity of their sensor elements. This can result in problems when image edges are aligned with camera pixel boundaries: (a) some cameras introduce transients into the video signal while switching between sensor elements; (b) most cameras use analog low-pass filters to minimize sampling artifacts and these introduce video phase delays that shift the locations of edges. The problems compound when the vision system samples asynchronously with the camera's pixel rate. Moire patterns (analogous to beat frequencies) can result. In this paper, we examine and model quantization effects in a machine vision system with particular emphasis on edge detection performance. We also compare our models with experimental measurements.

  6. Finite rotation and nonlinear beam kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.

    1987-01-01

    Standard means of representing finite rotation in rigid-body kinematics, including orientation angles, Euler parameters, and Rodrigues parameters, are reviewed and compared. General kinematical relations for a beam theory that treats arbitrarily large rotation are then presented. The standard methods of representing finite rotations are applied to these kinematical expressions, and comparison is made among the standard methods and additional methods found in the literature, such as quasi-coordinates and linear combinations of projection angles. The method of Rodrigues parameters is shown to stand out for both its simplicity and generality when applied to beam kinematics, a result that is really missing from the literature.

  7. Basic concepts of kinematic-wave models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The kinematic-wave model is one of a number of approximations of the dynamic-wave model. The dynamic-wave model describes one-dimensional shallow-water waves (unsteady, gradually varied, open-channel flow). The report provides a basic reference on the theory and application of kinematic-wave models and describes the limitations of the model in relation to the other approximations of the dynamic-wave model. In the kinematic-wave approximation, a number of the terms in the equation of motion are assumed to be insignificant. The equation of motion is replaced by an equation describing uniform flow. Thus, the kinematic-wave model is described by the continuity equation and a uniform flow equation such as the well-known Chezy or Manning formulas. Kinematic-wave models are applicable to overland flow where lateral inflow is continuously added and is a large part of the total flow. For channel-routing applications, the kinematic-wave model always predicts a steeper wave with less dispersion and attenuation than actually occurs. The effect of the accumulation of errors in the kinematic-wave model shows that the approximations made in the development of the kinematic-wave equations are not generally justified for most channel-routing applications. Modified flow-routing models can be used which help to stop the accumulation of error that occurs when the kinematic-wave model is applied. (USGS)

  8. A multichannel PWM telemetry system for kinematic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Harris, G F; Jeutter, D C; Bergner, B C; Matesi, D V; Pelc, N J

    1987-12-01

    A multichannel biotelemetry system using pulse-width modulation-frequency modulation (PWM-FM) is described in detail for laboratory construction. Its application in a kinematic gait-analysis system is demonstrated, employing minimally encumbering electrogoniometry and foot-contact switches. The triaxial electrogoniometers sense rotational joint motion, and four foot-switches under the sole of each foot provide information on placement and temporal contact. Signals from the multiple sensors are amplified, encoded by pulse-width modulation, and transmitted at an FM radio frequency of 107 MHz. Received data are decoded and then sampled by a minicomputer for analysis. Results from a comparative study of kinematic gait in five normal subjects and five children with cerebral palsy demonstrate system effectiveness in providing quantitative data and various intrasubject and intersubject gait differences. Factors reviewed in the analysis include swing and stance times; cadence; hip-joint motion in sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes; and sequence of foot placement. PMID:3431495

  9. Psychological, muscular and kinematic factors mediate performance under pressure.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Andrew; Kavussanu, Maria; McIntyre, David; Ring, Christopher

    2010-11-01

    It is well established that performance is influenced by pressure, but the underlying mechanisms of the pressure-performance relationship are poorly understood. To address this important issue, the current experiment evaluated psychological, physiological, and kinematic factors as mediators of the pressure-performance relationship. Psychological, physiological, and kinematic responses to three levels of competitive pressure were measured in 23 males and 35 females during a golf putting task. Pressure manipulations impaired putting performance. Self-reported anxiety, effort, and perceived pressure were increased. Heart rate, heart rate variability, muscle activity, and lateral clubhead acceleration were also elevated. Mediation analyses revealed that effort, muscle activity, and lateral acceleration partially mediated the decline in performance. Results confirmed that pressure elicits effects on performance through multiple pathways. PMID:20409012

  10. A comparison of acromion marker cluster calibration methods for estimating scapular kinematics during upper extremity ergometry.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R Tyler; Nicholson, Kristen F; Rapp, Elizabeth A; Johnston, Therese E; Richards, James G

    2016-05-01

    Accurate measurement of joint kinematics is required to understand the musculoskeletal effects of a therapeutic intervention such as upper extremity (UE) ergometry. Traditional surface-based motion capture is effective for quantifying humerothoracic motion, but scapular kinematics are challenging to obtain. Methods for estimating scapular kinematics include the widely-reported acromion marker cluster (AMC) which utilizes a static calibration between the scapula and the AMC to estimate the orientation of the scapula during motion. Previous literature demonstrates that including additional calibration positions throughout the motion improves AMC accuracy for single plane motions; however this approach has not been assessed for the non-planar shoulder complex motion occurring during UE ergometry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of single, dual, and multiple AMC calibration methods during UE ergometry. The orientations of the UE segments of 13 healthy subjects were recorded with motion capture. Scapular landmarks were palpated at eight evenly-spaced static positions around the 360° cycle. The single AMC method utilized one static calibration position to estimate scapular kinematics for the entire cycle, while the dual and multiple AMC methods used two and four static calibration positions, respectively. Scapulothoracic angles estimated by the three AMC methods were compared with scapulothoracic angles determined by palpation. The multiple AMC method produced the smallest RMS errors and was not significantly different from palpation about any axis. We recommend the multiple AMC method as a practical and accurate way to estimate scapular kinematics during UE ergometry. PMID:26976228

  11. Ballistic representation for kinematic access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    This work uses simple two-body orbital dynamics to initially determine the kinematic access for a ballistic vehicle. Primarily this analysis was developed to assess when a rocket body might conjunct with an orbiting satellite platform. A family of access opportunities can be represented as a volume for a specific rocket relative to its launch platform. Alternately, the opportunities can be represented as a geographical footprint relative to aircraft or satellite position that encompasses all possible launcher locations for a specific rocket. A thrusting rocket is treated as a ballistic vehicle that receives all its energy at launch and follows a coasting trajectory. To do so, the rocket's burnout energy is used to find its equivalent initial velocity for a given launcher's altitude. Three kinematic access solutions are then found that account for spherical Earth rotation. One solution finds the maximum range for an ascent-only trajectory while another solution accommodates a descending trajectory. In addition, the ascent engagement for the descending trajectory is used to depict a rapid access scenario. These preliminary solutions are formulated to address ground-, sea-, or air-launched vehicles.

  12. Kinematic features of wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, D J; Sommer, H J

    1985-01-01

    Three male paraplegics volunteered to push their wheelchairs on a motor driven treadmill, for a total of 80 min each, at a work rate of 60-65% of their VO2 maximum, determined on an earlier test session. At 20 min intervals 16 mm high-speed film of the subjects was taken for three consecutive push cycles. The digitized film was used to compute the angular kinematics of the shoulder and elbow joints, the variations in the position of the trunk (as measured by a marker on the neck) and hand relative to the axle of the rear wheel. There were no intrasubject variations over the 80 min testing period for any of the recorded variables. This was interpreted as implying that at that work rate, fatigue was not exhibited as variations in the kinematics of movement. There were considerable differences between the style of one subject when compared to the other two over all the trials of each subject. This variation in style was most obvious in subject number PT who had a pumping style of push and recovery whereas subjects CA and GW employed a more continuous circular motion. The differences in the amount of forward lean of each subject were related to residual muscle strength. The discussion centered on the influence of the different styles on performance. PMID:4030799

  13. Kinematic design NC optical generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, William P.

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to design a low cost, versatile, 3-axis numerical control aspheric generator using all rotary motions. In addition, the generator was to have the capability of grinding glass, metals and ceramics and the ability to generate off axis or non-rotationally symmetric aspherics. The research carried out during this study was a review of various methods of implementing 3 axis motion using all rotary bearings. Traditional orthogonal axis methods of achieving this motion were found lacking in accuracy and very costly. The study then turned to a generator based on kinematic design with a minimum number of constraints to the rotary motions. The results of this research showed that the kinematic design met or exceeded all the proposed goals for this study. The design has a minimum number of components and depends for its accuracy only on the lengths of the two actuators controlling the grinding wheel position. The rotary motion joints are all spherical ball joints except for one that is a flexure pivot. The proposed generator uses commercially available components and has few custom parts to keep the cost down. Special software allows the easy fabrication of non-rotationally symmetric optics and a large grinding wheel radius minimizes mid spatial frequency surface errors and roughness.

  14. High fidelity numerical simulation of airfoil thickness and kinematics effects on flapping airfoil propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meilin; Wang, Z. J.; Hu, Hui

    2013-10-01

    High-fidelity numerical simulations with the spectral difference (SD) method are carried out to investigate the unsteady flow over a series of oscillating NACA 4-digit airfoils. Airfoil thickness and kinematics effects on the flapping airfoil propulsion are highlighted. It is confirmed that the aerodynamic performance of airfoils with different thickness can be very different under the same kinematics. Distinct evolutionary patterns of vortical structures are analyzed to unveil the underlying flow physics behind the diverse flow phenomena associated with different airfoil thickness and kinematics and reveal the synthetic effects of airfoil thickness and kinematics on the propulsive performance. Thickness effects at various reduced frequencies and Strouhal numbers for the same chord length based Reynolds number (=1200) are then discussed in detail. It is found that at relatively small Strouhal number (=0.3), for all types of airfoils with the combined pitching and plunging motion (pitch angle 20°, the pitch axis located at one third of chord length from the leading edge, pitch leading plunge by 75°), low reduced frequency (=1) is conducive for both the thrust production and propulsive efficiency. Moreover, relatively thin airfoils (e.g. NACA0006) can generate larger thrust and maintain higher propulsive efficiency than thick airfoils (e.g. NACA0030). However, with the same kinematics but at relatively large Strouhal number (=0.45), it is found that airfoils with different thickness exhibit diverse trend on thrust production and propulsive efficiency, especially at large reduced frequency (=3.5). Results on effects of airfoil thickness based Reynolds numbers indicate that relative thin airfoils show superior propulsion performance in the tested Reynolds number range. The evolution of leading edge vortices and the interaction between the leading and trailing edge vortices play key roles in flapping airfoil propulsive performance.

  15. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  16. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  17. Internal kinematic and physical properties in a BCD galaxy: Haro 15 in detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firpo, V.; Bosch, G.; Hägele, G. F.; Díaz, A. I.; Morrell, N.

    2011-11-01

    We present a detailed study of the kinematic and physical properties of the ionized gas in multiple knots of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Haro 15. Using echelle and long slit spectroscopy data, obtained with different instruments at Las Campanas Observatory, we study the internal kinematic and physical conditions (electron density and temperature), ionic and total chemical abundances of several atoms, reddening and ionization structure. Applying direct and empirical methods for abundance determination, we perform a comparative analysis between these regions and in their different components. On the other hand, our echelle spectra show complex kinematics in several conspicuous knots within the galaxy. To perform an in-depth 2D spectroscopic study we complete this work with high spatial and spectral resolution spectroscopy using the Integral Field Unit mode on the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument at the Gemini South telescope. With these data we are able to resolve the complex kinematical structure within star forming knots in Haro 15 galaxy.

  18. Edge control in CNC polishing, paper 2: simulation and validation of tool influence functions on edges.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Walker, David; Yu, Guoyu; Sayle, Andrew; Messelink, Wilhelmus; Evans, Rob; Beaucamp, Anthony

    2013-01-14

    Edge mis-figure is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues for manufacturing the segments of extremely large telescopes, which can dominate key aspects of performance. A novel edge-control technique has been developed, based on 'Precessions' polishing technique and for which accurate and stable edge tool influence functions (TIFs) are crucial. In the first paper in this series [D. Walker Opt. Express 20, 19787-19798 (2012)], multiple parameters were experimentally optimized using an extended set of experiments. The first purpose of this new work is to 'short circuit' this procedure through modeling. This also gives the prospect of optimizing local (as distinct from global) polishing for edge mis-figure, now under separate development. This paper presents a model that can predict edge TIFs based on surface-speed profiles and pressure distributions over the polishing spot at the edge of the part, the latter calculated by finite element analysis and verified by direct force measurement. This paper also presents a hybrid-measurement method for edge TIFs to verify the simulation results. Experimental and simulation results show good agreement. PMID:23388930

  19. Swords with Blunt Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2004-01-01

    Many U.S. educators now wonder whether they're teachers or targets. This mentality stems from the specter of their school being sanctioned for failing the state accountability tests mandated under No Child Left Behind (NCLB). According to this author, most of those tests are like blunt-edged swords: They function badly in two directions. While…

  20. Oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-09-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns in zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. We propose that these oscillations are nothing more than a manifestation of the large Lewis number instability well known in chemical reactor studies and in combustion studies, one that is exacerbated by heat losses. As evidence of this we examine an edge-flame confined within a fuel-supply boundary and an oxygen-supply boundary, anchored by a discontinuity in data at the fuel-supply boundary. We show that when the Lewis number of the fuel is 2, and the Lewis number of the oxidizer is 1, oscillations of the edge occur when the Damköhler number is reduced below a critical value. During a single oscillation period there is a short premixed propagation stage and a long diffusion stage, behaviour that has been observed in flame spread experiments. Oscillations do not occur when both Lewis numbers are equal to 1.

  1. The Inner Urban Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferebee, Ann; Carpenter, Edward K.

    1974-01-01

    In this article, renewal of the inner urban edge is discussed. Norfolk (Virginia) is attempting to blur the difference between old and new neighbor hoods through zoning and architectural controls. Cincinnati (Ohio) is developing an environmentally sound hillside design. Reading (Pennsylvania) is utilizing old railyards for greenbelts of hiking and…

  2. Kinematic Event Patterns in Speech: Special Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbury, John R.; Severson, Elizabeth J.; Lindstrom, Mary J.

    2000-01-01

    Results from a new analysis of synchronous acoustic and fleshpoint-kinematic data, recorded from 53 normal young-adult speakers of American English, are reported. The kinematic data represent speech-related actions of the tongue blade and dorsum, both lips, and the mandible, during the test words, "special" and "problem," and were drawn from an…

  3. Kinematics of the free throw in basketball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, A.; Miller, G.

    1981-06-01

    The kinematics of the two basic styles of free throw in basketball are discussed. It is shown that from a purely kinematic and trajectory point of view, the overhand push shot is preferable to the underhand loop shot. The advantages of the underhand shot lie in the actual execution of the shot.

  4. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; Cannon, John M.; SHIELD Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" (SHIELD) is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational study of 12 low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered in Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey data products. Here we present new results of detailed kinematic analyses of these systems using multi-configuration, high spatial (˜300 pc) and spectral (0.82 - 2.46 km s-1 ch-1) resolution HI observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For each source, we produce velocity fields and dispersion maps using different spatial and spectral resolution representations of the data in order to attempt derivation of an inclination-corrected rotation curve. While both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make multiple position-velocity cuts across each galaxy to determine the maximum circular rotation velocity (≤ 30 km-1 for the survey population). Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish H I fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical masses estimated from the position-velocity analysis. The SHIELD galaxies are contextualized on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  5. Bayesian kinematic earthquake source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minson, S. E.; Simons, M.; Beck, J. L.; Genrich, J. F.; Galetzka, J. E.; Chowdhury, F.; Owen, S. E.; Webb, F.; Comte, D.; Glass, B.; Leiva, C.; Ortega, F. H.

    2009-12-01

    Most coseismic, postseismic, and interseismic slip models are based on highly regularized optimizations which yield one solution which satisfies the data given a particular set of regularizing constraints. This regularization hampers our ability to answer basic questions such as whether seismic and aseismic slip overlap or instead rupture separate portions of the fault zone. We present a Bayesian methodology for generating kinematic earthquake source models with a focus on large subduction zone earthquakes. Unlike classical optimization approaches, Bayesian techniques sample the ensemble of all acceptable models presented as an a posteriori probability density function (PDF), and thus we can explore the entire solution space to determine, for example, which model parameters are well determined and which are not, or what is the likelihood that two slip distributions overlap in space. Bayesian sampling also has the advantage that all a priori knowledge of the source process can be used to mold the a posteriori ensemble of models. Although very powerful, Bayesian methods have up to now been of limited use in geophysical modeling because they are only computationally feasible for problems with a small number of free parameters due to what is called the "curse of dimensionality." However, our methodology can successfully sample solution spaces of many hundreds of parameters, which is sufficient to produce finite fault kinematic earthquake models. Our algorithm is a modification of the tempered Markov chain Monte Carlo (tempered MCMC or TMCMC) method. In our algorithm, we sample a "tempered" a posteriori PDF using many MCMC simulations running in parallel and evolutionary computation in which models which fit the data poorly are preferentially eliminated in favor of models which better predict the data. We present results for both synthetic test problems as well as for the 2007 Mw 7.8 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake, the latter of which is constrained by InSAR, local high

  6. Efficient kinematics for jet-propelled swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alben, Silas; Miller, Laura; Peng, Jifeng

    2013-11-01

    We use vortex sheet and viscous simulations and an analytical model to search for efficient jet-propelled swimming kinematics at large Reynolds numbers (1000 and above). We prescribe different power-law kinematics for the bell contraction and expansion. In the simulations, two types of efficient kinematics are found: a bell radius velocity which is a nearly linear function of time, and a ``burst-and-coast'' kinematics. The analytical model studies the contraction phase only, and finds that the efficiency-optimizing kinematics transition from a nearly linear bell radius velocity (similar to the numerics) for small-to-moderate output power to an exponentially-decaying bell radius velocity for large output power.

  7. On the kinematic analysis of robotic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.; Roth, B.

    1999-12-01

    The kinematic analyses, of manipulators and other robotic devices composed of mechanical links, usually depend on the solution of sets of nonlinear equations. There are a variety of both numerical and algebraic techniques available to solve such systems of equations and to give bounds on the number of solutions. These solution methods have also led to an understanding of how special choices of the various structural parameters of a mechanism influence the number of solutions inherent to the kinematic geometry of a given structure. In this paper, results from studying the kinematic geometry of such systems are reviewed, and the three most useful solution techniques are summarized. The solution techniques are polynomial continuation, Groebner bases, and elimination. The authors then discuss the results that have been obtained with these techniques in the solution of two basic problems, namely, the inverse kinematics for serial-chain manipulators, and the direct kinematics of in-parallel platform devices.

  8. Superpixel edges for boundary detection

    DOEpatents

    Moya, Mary M.; Koch, Mark W.

    2016-07-12

    Various embodiments presented herein relate to identifying one or more edges in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image comprising a plurality of superpixels. Superpixels sharing an edge (or boundary) can be identified and one or more properties of the shared superpixels can be compared to determine whether the superpixels form the same or two different features. Where the superpixels form the same feature the edge is identified as an internal edge. Where the superpixels form two different features, the edge is identified as an external edge. Based upon classification of the superpixels, the external edge can be further determined to form part of a roof, wall, etc. The superpixels can be formed from a speckle-reduced SAR image product formed from a registered stack of SAR images, which is further segmented into a plurality of superpixels. The edge identification process is applied to the SAR image comprising the superpixels and edges.

  9. Reproducing the kinematics of damped Lyman α systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Simeon; Haehnelt, Martin; Neeleman, Marcel; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-02-01

    We examine the kinematic structure of damped Lyman α systems (DLAs) in a series of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations using the AREPO code. We are able to match the distribution of velocity widths of associated low-ionization metal absorbers substantially better than earlier work. Our simulations produce a population of DLAs dominated by haloes with virial velocities around 70 km s-1, consistent with a picture of relatively small, faint objects. In addition, we reproduce the observed correlation between velocity width and metallicity and the equivalent width distribution of Si II. Some discrepancies of moderate statistical significance remain; too many of our spectra show absorption concentrated at the edge of the profile and there are slight differences in the exact shape of the velocity width distribution. We show that the improvement over previous work is mostly due to our strong feedback from star formation and our detailed modelling of the metal ionization state.

  10. Dust destruction and kinematics in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolovy, Susan R.; Herter, Terry; Gull, George E.; Pirger, Bruce; Vogt, Nicole P.

    1995-01-01

    We present observations of the 34.815 micron (SiII) line and continuum emission from the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy obtained with the KAO Echelle Grating Spectrograph (KEGS) in June 1993. The SiII emission, which has been spectrally resolved at 64 km/s and spatially resolved at 10 arcsec, in kinematically consistent with the motions of ionized and neutral gas interior to the circumnuclear disk (CND). In addition, the emission in the (SiII) line as well as the continuum extends northward along the 'northern arm' past the inner edge of the CND. A peak in the (SiII) line/continuum ratio is observed at approx. 25 arcsec W and 75 arcsec N of Sgr A* with a large velocity dispersion. This may be an indication of dust destruction via cloud-cloud collisions.

  11. The Effect of Direction on Cursor Moving Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ling-Fu; Chen, Hsin-Yung; Lu, Chiu-Ping; Chen, Ming-Chung; Chu, Chi-Nung

    2012-01-01

    There have been only few studies to substantiate the kinematic characteristics of cursor movement. In this study, a quantitative experimental research method was used to explore the effect of moving direction on the kinematics of cursor movement in 24 typical young persons using our previously developed computerized measuring program. The results of multiple one way repeated measures ANOVAs and post hoc LSD tests demonstrated that the moving direction had effects on average velocity, movement time, movement unit and peak velocity. Moving leftward showed better efficiency than moving rightward, upward and downward from the kinematic evidences such as velocity, movement unit and time. Moreover, the unique pattern of the power spectral density (PSD) of velocity (strategy for power application) explained why the smoothness was still maintained while moving leftward even under an unstable situation with larger momentum. Moreover, the information from this cursor moving study can guide us to relocate the toolbars and icons in the window interface, especially for individuals with physical disabilities whose performances are easily interrupted while controlling the cursor in specific directions. PMID:22438745

  12. Photometric and kinematic studies of extragalactic globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jessica

    Globular clusters (GCs) are old, luminous, compact collections of stars found in galaxy halos that formed during the early stages of galaxy formation. Because of this, GCs serve as excellent tracers of the formation, structure, and merger history of their host galaxies. My dissertation will examine both the photometric and kinematic properties of GC systems and their relationship to their host galaxies. In the first section, I will present the analysis of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055. I will discuss the photometric methods used to detect GCs using wide-field BVR imaging and to quantify the global properties of the system such as the total number of GCs and their radial distribution. My results for these two GC systems were compared to those of other galaxies. I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). I measured the radial velocities of GCs in these two galaxies, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and mass-to-light (M/L) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). For both galaxies, I found that the M/L profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of my data. I also looked for evidence of rotation in the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. I examined the velocity dispersion profile of each GC system and found kinematic differences between the red and blue GC subpopulations. Finally, I compared my results to mass estimates for these galaxies from other kinematic tracers and considered them in the context of galaxy formation models.

  13. Edge detection by nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiu-fai

    1994-07-01

    We demonstrate how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, our scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step-edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  14. Partnership for Edge Physics Simulation (EPSI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, Peter

    2015-02-11

    We propose to develop advanced simulation codes, based upon an extreme parallelism, first principles kinetic approach, to address the challenges associated with the edge region of magnetically confined plasmas. This work is relevant to both existing magnetic fusion facilities and essential for next-generation burning plasma experiments, such as ITER where success is critically dependent upon H-mode operation achieving an edge pedestal of sufficient height for good core plasma performance without producing deleterious large scale edge localized instabilities. The plasma edge presents a well-known set of multi-physics, multi-scale problems involving complex 3D magnetic geometry. Perhaps the greatest computational challenge is the lack of scale separation – temporal scales for drift waves, Alfven waves, ELM dynamics for example have strong overlap. Similar overlap occurs on the spatial scales for the ion poloidal gyro-radius, drift wave and pedestal width. The traditional approach of separating fusion problems into weakly interacting spatial or temporal domains clearly breaks down in the edge. A full kinetic model (full-f model) must be solved to understand and predict the edge physics including non-equilibrium thermodynamic issues arising from the magnetic topology (the open field lines producing a spatially sensitive velocity hole), plasma wall interactions, neutral and atomic physics. The plan here is to model these phenomena within a comprehensive first principles set of equations without the need for the insurmountable multiple-codes coupling issues by building on the XGC1 code developed under the SciDAC Proto-FSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES). This proposal includes the critical participants in the XGC1 development. We propose enhancing the capability of XGC1 by including all the important turbulence physics contained in kinetic ion and electron electromagnetic dynamics, by extending the PIC technology to incorporate several positive features found

  15. Kinematic and ground reaction force accommodation during weighted walking.

    PubMed

    James, C Roger; Atkins, Lee T; Yang, Hyung Suk; Dufek, Janet S; Bates, Barry T

    2015-12-01

    Weighted walking is a functional activity common in daily life and can influence risks for musculoskeletal loading, injury and falling. Much information exists about weighted walking during military, occupational and recreational tasks, but less is known about strategies used to accommodate to weight carriage typical in daily life. The purposes of the study were to examine the effects of weight carriage on kinematics and peak ground reaction force (GRF) during walking, and explore relationships between these variables. Twenty subjects walked on a treadmill while carrying 0, 44.5 and 89 N weights in front of the body. Peak GRF, sagittal plane joint/segment angular kinematics, stride length and center of mass (COM) vertical displacement were measured. Changes in peak GRF and displacement variables between weight conditions represented accommodation. Effects of weight carriage were tested using analysis of variance. Relationships between peak GRF and kinematic accommodation variables were examined using correlation and regression. Subjects were classified into sub-groups based on peak GRF responses and the correlation analysis was repeated. Weight carriage increased peak GRF by an amount greater than the weight carried, decreased stride length, increased vertical COM displacement, and resulted in a more extended and upright posture, with less hip and trunk displacement during weight acceptance. A GRF increase was associated with decreases in hip extension (|r|=.53, p=.020) and thigh anterior rotation (|r|=.57, p=.009) displacements, and an increase in foot anterior rotation displacement (|r|=.58, p=.008). Sub-group analysis revealed that greater GRF increases were associated with changes at multiple sites, while lesser GRF increases were associated with changes in foot and trunk displacement. Weight carriage affected walking kinematics and revealed different accommodation strategies that could have implications for loading and stability. PMID:26540454

  16. Kinematic Characterization of Left Ventricular Chamber Stiffness and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossahebi, Sina

    Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization today, and diastolic heart failure accounts for 40-50% of cases. Therefore, it is critical to identify diastolic dysfunction at a subclinical stage so that appropriate therapy can be administered before ventricular function is further, and perhaps irreversibly impaired. Basic concepts in physics such as kinematic modeling provide a unique method with which to characterize cardiovascular physiology, specifically diastolic function (DF). The advantage of an approach that is standard in physics, such as the kinematic modeling is its causal formulation that functions in contrast to correlative approaches traditionally utilized in the life sciences. Our research group has pioneered theoretical and experimental quantitative analysis of DF in humans, using both non-invasive (echocardiography, cardiac MRI) and invasive (simultaneous catheterization-echocardiography) methods. Our group developed and validated the Parametrized Diastolic Filling (PDF) formalism which is motivated by basic physiologic principles (LV is a mechanical suction pump at the mitral valve opening) that obey Newton's Laws. PDF formalism is a kinematic model of filling employing an equation of motion, the solution of which accurately predicts all E-wave contours in accordance with the rules of damped harmonic oscillatory motion. The equation's lumped parameters---ventricular stiffness, ventricular viscoelasticity/relaxation and ventricular load---are obtained by solving the 'inverse problem'. The parameters' physiologic significance and clinical utility have been repeatedly demonstrated in multiple clinical settings. In this work we apply our kinematic modeling approach to better understand how the heart works as it fills in order to advance the relationship between physiology and mathematical modeling. Through the use of this modeling, we thereby define and validate novel, causal indexes of diastolic function such as early rapid filling energy

  17. Central nervous system integration of sensorimotor signals in oral and pharyngeal structures: oropharyngeal kinematics response to recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion.

    PubMed

    Gould, Francois D H; Ohlemacher, Jocelyn; Lammers, Andrew R; Gross, Andrew; Ballester, Ashley; Fraley, Luke; German, Rebecca Z

    2016-03-01

    Safe, efficient liquid feeding in infant mammals requires the central coordination of oropharyngeal structures innervated by multiple cranial and spinal nerves. The importance of laryngeal sensation and central sensorimotor integration in this system is poorly understood. Recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion (RLN) results in increased aspiration, though the mechanism for this is unclear. This study aimed to determine the effect of unilateral RLN lesion on the motor coordination of infant liquid feeding. We hypothesized that 1) RLN lesion results in modified swallow kinematics, 2) postlesion oropharyngeal kinematics of unsafe swallows differ from those of safe swallows, and 3) nonswallowing phases of the feeding cycle show changed kinematics postlesion. We implanted radio opaque markers in infant pigs and filmed them pre- and postlesion with high-speed videofluoroscopy. Markers locations were digitized, and swallows were assessed for airway protection. RLN lesion resulted in modified kinematics of the tongue relative to the epiglottis in safe swallows. In lesioned animals, safe swallow kinematics differed from unsafe swallows. Unsafe swallow postlesion kinematics resembled prelesion safe swallows. The movement of the tongue was reduced in oral transport postlesion. Between different regions of the tongue, response to lesion was similar, and relative timing within the tongue was unchanged. RLN lesion has a pervasive effect on infant feeding kinematics, related to the efficiency of airway protection. The timing of tongue and hyolaryngeal kinematics in swallows is a crucial locus for swallow disruption. Laryngeal sensation is essential for the central coordination in feeding of oropharyngeal structures receiving motor inputs from different cranial nerves. PMID:26679618

  18. Milky Way halo gas kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of high resolution, short wavelength absorption data taken by IUE toward high latitude O and B stars are presented in a discussion of the large scale kinematic properties of Milky Way Halo gas. An analysis of these data demonstrates that: (1) the obsrved absorption widths (FWHM) of Si II are very large, ranging up to 150 Km/s for the most distant halo star; this is much larger than is generally appreciated from optical data; (2) the absorption is observed to be systematically negative in radial velocity, indicating that cool material is, on the whole, flowing toward the disk of the galaxy; (3) there is some evidence for asymmetry between the northern and southern galactic hemispheres, in accordance with the HI 21 cm data toward the galactic poles; (4) low column density gas with highly negative radial LSR velocity (V less than -70 km/s) can be found toward stars beyond 1-3 kpc in the northern galactic hemisphere in all four quadrants of galactic longitude; and (5) only the profiles toward stars in the direction of known high velocity HI features show a clear two component structure.

  19. Kinematic modeling of scanner trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlin, Fergal P.

    1994-12-01

    Satellites are free-moving rigid bodies subject to various external forces which make them deviate from their predetermined positional and rotational trajectories. Since many remote sensing imaging devices use the linear pushbroom scanning model, trajectory deviation during the image scanning period causes geometric distortion in the imagery. Unless actual satellite trajectory during imaging is modeled, accurate rectification of imagery is impossible. A means of recovering the trajectory from known satellite motion is presented here. Rotational motion is usually sensed by gyroscopes which measure angular velocity. Translational motion can be determined in several ways including telemetry analysis and linear accelerometers. In more recent satellites GPS receivers may be used to determine motion data. We show how to interpolate and subsequently integrate angular velocity to yield a rotational trajectory. The screw, implemented as a dual-number quaternion, is shown to be a suitable parameterization of motion to model the trajectory as a kinematic chain. This representation is useful for image geometry analysis and hence for correction of image distortion. Applications of this parameterization to scanned image resampling and rectification are mentioned.

  20. Applying Clustering to Statistical Analysis of Student Reasoning about Two-Dimensional Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springuel, R. Padraic; Wittman, Michael C.; Thompson, John R.

    2007-01-01

    We use clustering, an analysis method not presently common to the physics education research community, to group and characterize student responses to written questions about two-dimensional kinematics. Previously, clustering has been used to analyze multiple-choice data; we analyze free-response data that includes both sketches of vectors and…

  1. Saybolt universal viscosity converted to kinematic

    SciTech Connect

    Anaya, C.; Bermudez, O.

    1987-09-21

    This article describes a program for personal and handheld computers, written in Basic, which has been developed for the conversion of Saybolt universal viscosity in Saybolt Universal Seconds (SSU or SUS) to kinematic viscosity in centistokes (cSt), at any selected temperature. It was developed using the mathematical relationship presented in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D2161-82. In the standard, an equation is presented to convert kinematic viscosity to Saybolt universal viscosity, but nothing is presented to convert from Saybolt to kinematic because it is necessary to find the roots of a nonexplicit function. There are several numerical methods that can be used to determine the roots of the nonexplicit function, and therefore, convert Saybolt universal viscosity to kinematic viscosity. In the program, the first iteration of the second-order Newton-Raphson method is followed by the Wegstein method as a convergence accelerator.

  2. The cutting edge.

    PubMed

    Hagland, M; Lumsdon, K; Montague, J; Serb, C

    1995-08-01

    With managed care payment becoming the norm, employers actively pursuing keener benefits management, health care markets evolving at warp speed, and clinical and information technologies spawning new capabilities every day, the cutting edge in health care keeps slicing ever-deeper. With that in mind, we at Hospitals & Health Networks have developed a browser's compendium of some of the leading people, places (organizations and programs) and technologies that are helping move the field forward into the next stage. Each entry is unique; what they all share is an innovative quality that others will emulate. PMID:7627230

  3. Topological number of edge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kimura, Taro

    2016-05-01

    We show that the edge states of the four-dimensional class A system can have topological charges, which are characterized by Abelian/non-Abelian monopoles. The edge topological charges are a new feature of relations among theories with different dimensions. From this novel viewpoint, we provide a non-Abelian analog of the TKNN number as an edge topological charge, which is defined by an SU(2) 't Hooft-Polyakov BPS monopole through an equivalence to Nahm construction. Furthermore, putting a constant magnetic field yields an edge monopole in a noncommutative momentum space, where D-brane methods in string theory facilitate study of edge fermions.

  4. Modal kinematics for multisection continuum arms.

    PubMed

    Godage, Isuru S; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo A; Branson, David T; Guglielmino, Emanuele; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a novel spatial kinematic model for multisection continuum arms based on mode shape functions (MSF). Modal methods have been used in many disciplines from finite element methods to structural analysis to approximate complex and nonlinear parametric variations with simple mathematical functions. Given certain constraints and required accuracy, this helps to simplify complex phenomena with numerically efficient implementations leading to fast computations. A successful application of the modal approximation techniques to develop a new modal kinematic model for general variable length multisection continuum arms is discussed. The proposed method solves the limitations associated with previous models and introduces a new approach for readily deriving exact, singularity-free and unique MSF's that simplifies the approach and avoids mode switching. The model is able to simulate spatial bending as well as straight arm motions (i.e., pure elongation/contraction), and introduces inverse position and orientation kinematics for multisection continuum arms. A kinematic decoupling feature, splitting position and orientation inverse kinematics is introduced. This type of decoupling has not been presented for these types of robotic arms before. The model also carefully accounts for physical constraints in the joint space to provide enhanced insight into practical mechanics and impose actuator mechanical limitations onto the kinematics thus generating fully realizable results. The proposed method is easily applicable to a broad spectrum of continuum arm designs. PMID:25969947

  5. Iterative inverse kinematics with manipulator configuration control

    SciTech Connect

    Grudic, G.Z.; Lawrence, P.D.

    1993-08-01

    A new method, termed the offset modification method (OM method), for solving the manipulator inverse kinematics problem is presented. The OM method works by modifying the link offset values of a manipulator until it is possible to derive closed-form inverse kinematics equations for the resulting manipulator (termed the model manipulator). This procedure allows one to derive a set of three nonlinear equations in three unknowns that, when numerically solved, give an inverse kinematics solution for the original manipulator. The OM method can be applied to manipulators with any number of degrees of freedom, as long as the manipulator satisfies a given set of conditions (Theorem 1). The OM method is tested on a 6-degree-of-freedom manipulator that has no known closed-form inverse kinematics equations. It is shown that the OM method is applicable to real-time manipulator control, can be used to guarantee convergence to a desired endpoint position and orientation (if it exists), and allows one to directly choose which inverse kinematics solution the algorithm will converge to (as specified in the model manipulator closed-form inverse kinematics equations). Applications of the method to other 6-DOF manipulator geometries and to redundant manipulators (i.e. greater than 6 DOF geometries) are discussed.

  6. Kinematic description of crystal plasticity in the finite kinematic framework: A micromechanical understanding of F=FeFp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, C.; Conti, S.

    2014-07-01

    The plastic component of the deformation gradient plays a central role in finite kinematic models of plasticity. However, its characterization has been the source of extended debates in the literature and many important issues still remain unresolved. Some examples are the micromechanical understanding of F=FeFp with multiple active slip systems, the uniqueness of the decomposition, or the characterization of the plastic deformation without reference to the so-called intermediate configuration. In this paper, we shed some light to these issues via a two-dimensional kinematic analysis of the plastic deformation induced by discrete slip surfaces and the corresponding dislocation structures. In particular, we supply definitions for the elastic and plastic components of the deformation gradient as a function of the active slip systems without any a priori assumption on the decomposition of the total deformation gradient. These definitions are explicitly and uniquely given from the microstructure and do not make use of any unrealizable intermediate configuration. The analysis starts from a semi-continuous mathematical description of the deformation at the microscale, where the displacements are considered continuous everywhere in the domain except at the discrete slip surfaces, over which there is a displacement jump. At this scale, where the microstructure is resolved, the deformation is uniquely characterized from purely kinematic considerations and the elastic and plastic components of the deformation gradient can be defined based on physical arguments. These quantities are then passed to the continuous limit via homogenization, i.e. by increasing the number of slip surfaces to infinity and reducing the lattice parameter to zero. This continuum limit is computed for several illustrative examples, where the well-known multiplicative decomposition of the total deformation gradient is recovered. Additionally, by similar arguments, an expression of the dislocation

  7. Distorted mass edges at LHC from supersymmetric leptoquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Jürgen; Wiesler, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) grand unified theories based on exceptional gauge groups such as E6 have recently triggered a lot of interest. Aside from top-down motivations, they contain phenomenologically interesting states with leptoquark quantum numbers. Their SUSY partners, leptoquarkinos, will appear similar to all R-odd particles in decay cascades, but mass edges in kinematic distributions—originating from the same semiexclusive final states—will however have major differences to the corresponding edges of ordinary squarks. This distortion of standard observables bears the opportunity to detect them at the LHC, but may also pose significant confusion of underlying model assumptions, which should be handled with care and, if interpreted falsely, might even prevent a possible discovery.

  8. 2D CFD Analysis of an Airfoil with Active Continuous Trailing Edge Flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksich, Dylan; Shen, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and quieter helicopter rotors can be achieved through on-blade control devices, such as active Continuous Trailing-Edge Flaps driven by embedded piezoelectric material. This project aims to develop a CFD simulation tool to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with CTEF using open source code: OpenFOAM. Airfoil meshes used by OpenFOAM are obtained with MATLAB scripts. Once created it is possible to rotate the airfoil to various angles of attack. When the airfoil is properly set up various OpenFOAM properties, such as kinematic viscosity and flow velocity, are altered to achieve the desired testing conditions. Upon completion of a simulation, the program gives the lift, drag, and moment coefficients as well as the pressure and velocity around the airfoil. The simulation is then repeated across multiple angles of attack to give full lift and drag curves. The results are then compared to previous test data and other CFD predictions. This research will lead to further work involving quasi-steady 2D simulations incorporating NASTRAN to model aeroelastic deformation and eventually to 3D aeroelastic simulations. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  9. Investigating Actinide Molecular Adducts From Absorption Edge Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Den Auwer, C.; Conradson, S.D.; Guilbaud, P.; Moisy, P.; Mustre de Leon, J.; Simoni, E.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-27

    Although Absorption Edge Spectroscopy has been widely applied to the speciation of actinide elements, specifically at the L{sub III} edge, understanding and interpretation of actinide edge spectra are not complete. In that sense, semi-quantitative analysis is scarce. In this paper, different aspects of edge simulation are presented, including semi-quantitative approaches. Comparison is made between various actinyl (U, Np) aquo or hydroxy compounds. An excursion into transition metal osmium chemistry allows us to compare the structurally related osmyl and uranyl hydroxides. The edge shape and characteristic features are discussed within the multiple scattering picture and the role of the first coordination sphere as well as contributions from the water solvent are described.

  10. Leading and trailing edge noise of an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiet, R. K.

    Theoretical and experimental predictions of the noise produced when a rigid surface, e.g., an airfoil, with a sharp edge is introduced into a turbulent flow are compared. For an airfoil in rectilinear motion agreement is good. It is better for leading edge than for trailing edge noise because of lack of knowledge of boundary layer surface pressure. For a rotating airfoil, leading edge noise produces spectral peaking around harmonics of blade passage frequency because of multiple eddy chopping. Trailing edge noise produces a broad spectrum. For skewed inflow to a rotor, e.g., a helicopter in forward flight, narrow band tones rapidly degenerate because of the turbulent eddies in the rotor plane. Theory and measurement agree well for helicopters, but not as closely as for airfoils.

  11. Cervical facet joint kinematics during bilateral facet dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Panjabi, Manohar M.; Simpson, Andrew K.; Pearson, Adam M.; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Yue, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Previous biomechanical models of cervical bilateral facet dislocation (BFD) are limited to quasi-static loading or manual ligament transection. The goal of the present study was to determine the facet joint kinematics during high-speed BFD. Dislocation was simulated using ten cervical functional spinal units with muscle force replication by frontal impact of the lower vertebra, tilted posteriorly by 42.5°. Average peak rotations and anterior sliding (displacement of upper articulating facet surface along the lower), separation and compression (displacement of upper facet away from and towards the lower), and lateral shear were determined at the anterior and posterior edges of the right and left facets and statistically compared (P < 0.05). First, peak facet separation occurred, and was significantly greater at the left posterior facet edge, as compared to the anterior edges. Next, peak flexion rotation and anterior facet sliding occurred, followed by peak facet compression. The highest average facet translation peaks were 22.0 mm for anterior sliding, 7.9 mm for separation, 9.9 mm for compression and 3.6 mm for lateral shear. The highest average rotation of 63° occurred in flexion, significantly greater than all other directions. These events occurred, on average, within 0.29 s following impact. During BFD, the main sagittal motions included facet separation, flexion rotation, anterior sliding, followed by compression, however, non-sagittal motions also existed. These motions indicated that unilateral dislocation may precede bilateral dislocation. PMID:17566792

  12. Edge-on!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    Peering at Uranus's Rings as they Swing Edge-on to Earth for the First Time Since their Discovery in 1977 As Uranus coasts through a brief window of time when its rings are edge-on to Earth - a view of the planet we get only once every 42 years - astronomers peering at the rings with ESO's Very Large Telescope and other space or ground-based telescopes are getting an unprecedented view of the fine dust in the system, free from the glare of the bright rocky rings. They may even find a new moon or two. ESO PR Photo 37/07 ESO PR Photo 37/07 The Uranus System "ESO's VLT took data at the precise moment when the rings were edge-on to Earth," said Imke de Pater, of University of California, Berkeley who coordinated the worldwide campaign. She worked with two team members observing in Chile: Daphne Stam of the Technical University Delft in the Netherlands and Markus Hartung of ESO. The observations were done with NACO, one of the adaptive optics instruments installed at the VLT. With adaptive optics, it is possible to obtain images almost free from the blurring effect of the atmosphere. It is as if the 8.2-m telescope were observing from space. Observations were also done with the Keck telescope in Hawaii, the Hubble Space Telescope, and at the Palomar Observatory. "Using different telescopes around the world allows us to observe as much of the changes during the ring-plane crossing as possible: when Uranus sets as seen from the VLT, it can still be observed by the Keck," emphasised Stam. Uranus orbits the Sun in 84 years. Twice during a Uranian year, the rings appear edge-on to Earth for a brief period. The rings were discovered in 1977, so this is the first time for a Uranus ring-crossing to be observed from Earth. The advantage of observations at a ring-plane crossing is that it becomes possible to look at the rings from the shadowed or dark side. From that vantage point, the normally bright outer rings grow fainter because their centimetre- to metre-sized rocks obscure

  13. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-07-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements.

  14. Edge phonons in black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, H B; Villegas, C E P; Bahamon, D A; Muraca, D; Castro Neto, A H; de Souza, E A T; Rocha, A R; Pimenta, M A; de Matos, C J S

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  15. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  16. Inverse kinematic-based robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolovich, W. A.; Flueckiger, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    A fundamental problem which must be resolved in virtually all non-trivial robotic operations is the well-known inverse kinematic question. More specifically, most of the tasks which robots are called upon to perform are specified in Cartesian (x,y,z) space, such as simple tracking along one or more straight line paths or following a specified surfacer with compliant force sensors and/or visual feedback. In all cases, control is actually implemented through coordinated motion of the various links which comprise the manipulator; i.e., in link space. As a consequence, the control computer of every sophisticated anthropomorphic robot must contain provisions for solving the inverse kinematic problem which, in the case of simple, non-redundant position control, involves the determination of the first three link angles, theta sub 1, theta sub 2, and theta sub 3, which produce a desired wrist origin position P sub xw, P sub yw, and P sub zw at the end of link 3 relative to some fixed base frame. Researchers outline a new inverse kinematic solution and demonstrate its potential via some recent computer simulations. They also compare it to current inverse kinematic methods and outline some of the remaining problems which will be addressed in order to render it fully operational. Also discussed are a number of practical consequences of this technique beyond its obvious use in solving the inverse kinematic question.

  17. Incremental inverse kinematics based vision servo for autonomous robotic capture of non-cooperative space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Gangqi; Zhu, Z. H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposed a new incremental inverse kinematics based vision servo approach for robotic manipulators to capture a non-cooperative target autonomously. The target's pose and motion are estimated by a vision system using integrated photogrammetry and EKF algorithm. Based on the estimated pose and motion of the target, the instantaneous desired position of the end-effector is predicted by inverse kinematics and the robotic manipulator is moved incrementally from its current configuration subject to the joint speed limits. This approach effectively eliminates the multiple solutions in the inverse kinematics and increases the robustness of the control algorithm. The proposed approach is validated by a hardware-in-the-loop simulation, where the pose and motion of the non-cooperative target is estimated by a real vision system. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed estimation approach for the target and the incremental control strategy for the robotic manipulator.

  18. Graphlet-based edge clustering reveals pathogen-interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Solava, R. W.; Michaels, R. P.; Milenković, T.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Prediction of protein function from protein interaction networks has received attention in the post-genomic era. A popular strategy has been to cluster the network into functionally coherent groups of proteins and assign the entire cluster with a function based on functions of its annotated members. Traditionally, network research has focused on clustering of nodes. However, clustering of edges may be preferred: nodes belong to multiple functional groups, but clustering of nodes typically cannot capture the group overlap, while clustering of edges can. Clustering of adjacent edges that share many neighbors was proposed recently, outperforming different node clustering methods. However, since some biological processes can have characteristic ‘signatures’ throughout the network, not just locally, it may be of interest to consider edges that are not necessarily adjacent. Results: We design a sensitive measure of the ‘topological similarity’ of edges that can deal with edges that are not necessarily adjacent. We cluster edges that are similar according to our measure in different baker's yeast protein interaction networks, outperforming existing node and edge clustering approaches. We apply our approach to the human network to predict new pathogen-interacting proteins. This is important, since these proteins represent drug target candidates. Availability: Software executables are freely available upon request. Contact: tmilenko@nd.edu Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22962470

  19. Edge-based image restoration.

    PubMed

    Rareş, Andrei; Reinders, Marcel J T; Biemond, Jan

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a new image inpainting algorithm that relies on explicit edge information. The edge information is used both for the reconstruction of a skeleton image structure in the missing areas, as well as for guiding the interpolation that follows. The structure reconstruction part exploits different properties of the edges, such as the colors of the objects they separate, an estimate of how well one edge continues into another one, and the spatial order of the edges with respect to each other. In order to preserve both sharp and smooth edges, the areas delimited by the recovered structure are interpolated independently, and the process is guided by the direction of the nearby edges. The novelty of our approach lies primarily in exploiting explicitly the constraint enforced by the numerical interpretation of the sequential order of edges, as well as in the pixel filling method which takes into account the proximity and direction of edges. Extensive experiments are carried out in order to validate and compare the algorithm both quantitatively and qualitatively. They show the advantages of our algorithm and its readily application to real world cases. PMID:16238052

  20. Edge conduction in vacuum glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, T.M.; Collins, R.E.; Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-03-01

    Vacuum glazing is a form of low-conductance double glazing using in internal vacuum between the two glass sheets to eliminate heat transport by gas conduction and convection. An array of small support pillars separates the sheets; fused solder glass forms the edge seal. Heat transfer through the glazing occurs by radiation across the vacuum gap, conduction through the support pillars, and conduction through the bonded edge seal. Edge conduction is problematic because it affects stresses in the edge region, leading to possible failure of the glazing; in addition, excessive heat transfer because of thermal bridging in the edge region can lower overall window thermal performance and decrease resistance to condensation. Infrared thermography was used to analyze the thermal performance of prototype vacuum glazings, and, for comparison, atmospheric pressure superwindows. Research focused on mitigating the edge effects of vacuum glazings through the use of insulating trim, recessed edges, and framing materials. Experimentally validated finite-element and finite-difference modeling tools were used for thermal analysis of prototype vacuum glazing units and complete windows. Experimental measurements of edge conduction using infrared imaging were found to be in good agreement with finite-element modeling results for a given set of conditions. Finite-element modeling validates an analytic model developed for edge conduction.

  1. Kinematics of the SgrB2(N-LMH) Molecular Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Pedelty, J. A.; Boboltz, D. A.; Liu, S.-Y.; Snyder, L. E.; Palmer, Patrick; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    Ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) emission and absorption have been imaged with the Very Large Array (VLA) toward SgrB2(N-LMH) by means of the 5(sub 15)-4(sub 14) rotational transition at 43.5 GHz (lambda approx. 7 mm). The 1.5" x 1.4" VLA beam shows two principal sources of ethyl cyanide emission: an unresolved source approx. 5" north of the LMH that is kinematically consistent with simple expansion, contraction, or small-scale turbulence, and the resolved LMH core source itself that shows kinematics indicating an edge-on rotating disk that extends 23" (approx. 0.1 pc) in the approximate east-west direction. A search for the 7(sub 07)-6(sub 06) rotational transition of the amino acid glycine (NH2CH2COOH) at 43.7 GHz toward SgrB2(N-LMH) gave negative results.

  2. Kinematic and dynamic analysis of an anatomically based knee joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kok-Meng; Guo, Jiajie

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a knee-joint model to provide a better understanding on the interaction between natural joints and artificial mechanisms for design and control of rehabilitation exoskeletons. The anatomically based knee model relaxes several commonly made assumptions that approximate a human knee as engineering pin-joint in exoskeleton design. Based on published MRI data, we formulate the kinematics of a knee-joint and compare three mathematical approximations; one model bases on two sequential circles rolling a flat plane; and the other two are mathematically differentiable ellipses-based models with and without sliding at the contact. The ellipses-based model taking sliding contact into accounts shows that the rolling-sliding ratio of a knee-joint is not a constant but has an average value consistent with published measurements. This knee-joint kinematics leads to a physically more accurate contact-point trajectory than methods based on multiple circles or lines, and provides a basis to derive a knee-joint kinetic model upon which the effects of a planar exoskeleton mechanism on the internal joint forces and torque during flexion can be numerically investigated. Two different knee-joint kinetic models (pin-joint approximation and anatomically based model) are compared against a condition with no exoskeleton. The leg and exoskeleton form a closed kinematic chain that has a significant effect on the joint forces in the knee. Human knee is more tolerant than pin-joint in negotiating around a singularity but its internal forces increase with the exoskeleton mass-to-length ratio. An oversimplifying pin-joint approximation cannot capture the finite change in the knee forces due to the singularity effect. PMID:20189182

  3. Kinematic Origins of Motor Inconsistency in Expert Pianists.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Kenta; Lee, André; Altenmüller, Eckart; Miyazaki, Fumio; Furuya, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    For top performers, including athletes and musicians, even subtle inconsistencies in rhythm and force during movement production decrease the quality of performance. However, extensive training over many years beginning in childhood is unable to perfect dexterous motor performance so that it is without any error. To gain insight into the biological mechanisms underlying the subtle defects of motor actions, the present study sought to identify the kinematic origins of inconsistency of dexterous finger movements in musical performance. Seven highly-skilled pianists who have won prizes at international piano competitions played a short sequence of tones with the right hand at a predetermined tempo. Time-varying joint angles of the fingers were recorded using a custom-made data glove, and the timing and velocity of the individual keystrokes were recorded from a digital piano. Both ridge and stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated an association of the inter-trial variability of the inter-keystroke interval (i.e., rhythmic inconsistency) with both the rotational velocity of joints of the finger used for a keystroke (i.e., striking finger) and the movement independence between the striking and non-striking fingers. This indicates a relationship between rhythmic inconsistency in musical performance and the dynamic features of movements in not only the striking finger but also the non-striking fingers. In contrast, the inter-trial variability of the key-descending velocity (i.e., loudness inconsistency) was associated mostly with the kinematic features of the striking finger at the moment of the keystroke. Furthermore, there was no correlation between the rhythmic and loudness inconsistencies. The results suggest distinct kinematic origins of inconsistencies in rhythm and loudness in expert musical performance. PMID:27537686

  4. Prey capture kinematics of ant-eating lizards.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Jay J; Herrel, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    While morphological and behavioral feeding specializations are obvious in many vertebrate groups, among lizards there appear to be few dietary specialists. By comparing the prey capture kinematics and overall feeding behavior in two highly specialized ant-eating lizards (Moloch horridus and Phrynosoma platyrhinos) with those of two closely related dietary generalists (Pogona vitticeps and Uma notata), we investigate whether dietary specialization has been accompanied by changes in the function and use of the feeding system. We quantified kinematic variables from high-speed video recordings (200-250 frames s(-1)) of each species feeding on ants. Prey capture was strikingly different in M. horridus to that of other species, being characterized by a suite of unusual behaviors including the lack of a body lunge, faster tongue protrusion, reduced prey processing and, most notably, the ability to modulate the slow open phase of the gape cycle. In concert, these traits make a single feeding event in M. horridus faster than that in any other iguanian lizard studied to date. Prey capture behavior in P. platyrhinos is kinematically more similar to U. notata and P. vitticeps than to M. horridus, but the ant specialists are similar in that both lack distinct prey processing behaviors, resulting in faster overall capture and feeding events. While ant feeding in P. vitticeps is faster than feeding on other prey, the duration of a single feeding event is still four times longer than in either ant specialist, because of extensive prey processing. Additionally, a phylogenetic comparison of ant specialist lizards with dietary generalists revealed that ant-eating lizards require significantly less time to capture and process prey. Thus there are not only significant behavioral modifications in these ant-eating lizards, but also multiple strategies among specialists, suggesting differing selective pressures or phylogenetic constraints in the evolution of ant eating in lizards. PMID

  5. Kinematic Origins of Motor Inconsistency in Expert Pianists

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Kenta; Lee, André; Altenmüller, Eckart; Miyazaki, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    For top performers, including athletes and musicians, even subtle inconsistencies in rhythm and force during movement production decrease the quality of performance. However, extensive training over many years beginning in childhood is unable to perfect dexterous motor performance so that it is without any error. To gain insight into the biological mechanisms underlying the subtle defects of motor actions, the present study sought to identify the kinematic origins of inconsistency of dexterous finger movements in musical performance. Seven highly-skilled pianists who have won prizes at international piano competitions played a short sequence of tones with the right hand at a predetermined tempo. Time-varying joint angles of the fingers were recorded using a custom-made data glove, and the timing and velocity of the individual keystrokes were recorded from a digital piano. Both ridge and stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated an association of the inter-trial variability of the inter-keystroke interval (i.e., rhythmic inconsistency) with both the rotational velocity of joints of the finger used for a keystroke (i.e., striking finger) and the movement independence between the striking and non-striking fingers. This indicates a relationship between rhythmic inconsistency in musical performance and the dynamic features of movements in not only the striking finger but also the non-striking fingers. In contrast, the inter-trial variability of the key-descending velocity (i.e., loudness inconsistency) was associated mostly with the kinematic features of the striking finger at the moment of the keystroke. Furthermore, there was no correlation between the rhythmic and loudness inconsistencies. The results suggest distinct kinematic origins of inconsistencies in rhythm and loudness in expert musical performance. PMID:27537686

  6. Generic robotic kinematic generator for virtual environment interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Piguet, Laurent; Baur, Charles

    1996-12-01

    The expansion of robotic systems' performance, as well as the need for such machines to work in complex environments (hazardous, small, distant, etc.), involves the need for user interfaces which permit efficient teleoperation. Virtual Reality based interfaces provide the user with a new method for robot task planning and control: he or she can define tasks in a very intuitive way by interacting with a 3D computer generated representation of the world, which is continuously updated thanks to multiple sensors fusion and analysis. The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has successfully tested different kinds of teleoperations. In the early 90s, a transatlantic teleoperation of a conventional robot manipulator with a vision feedback system to update the virtual world was achieved. This approach was then extended to perform teleoperation of several mobile robots (Khepera, Koala) as well as to control microrobots used for microsystems' assembly in the micrometer range. One of the problems encountered with such an approach is the necessity to program a specific kinematic algorithm for each kind of manipulator. To provide a more general solution, we started a project aiming at the design of a 'kinematic generator' (CINEGEN) for the simulation of generic serial and parallel mechanical chains. With CINEGEN, each manipulator is defined with an ascii file description and its attached graphics files; inserting a new manipulator simply requires a new description file, and none of the existing tools require modification. To have a real time behavior, we have chosen a numerical method based on the pseudo-Jacobian method to generate the inverse kinematics of the robot. The results obtained with an object-oriented implementation on a graphic workstation are presented in this paper.

  7. Effect of the mandible on mouthguard measurements of head kinematics.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Calvin; Wu, Lyndia C; Hammoor, Brad T; Luck, Jason F; Cutcliffe, Hattie C; Lynall, Robert C; Kait, Jason R; Campbell, Kody R; Mihalik, Jason P; Bass, Cameron R; Camarillo, David B

    2016-06-14

    Wearable sensors are becoming increasingly popular for measuring head motions and detecting head impacts. Many sensors are worn on the skin or in headgear and can suffer from motion artifacts introduced by the compliance of soft tissue or decoupling of headgear from the skull. The instrumented mouthguard is designed to couple directly to the upper dentition, which is made of hard enamel and anchored in a bony socket by stiff ligaments. This gives the mouthguard superior coupling to the skull compared with other systems. However, multiple validation studies have yielded conflicting results with respect to the mouthguard׳s head kinematics measurement accuracy. Here, we demonstrate that imposing different constraints on the mandible (lower jaw) can alter mouthguard kinematic accuracy in dummy headform testing. In addition, post mortem human surrogate tests utilizing the worst-case unconstrained mandible condition yield 40% and 80% normalized root mean square error in angular velocity and angular acceleration respectively. These errors can be modeled using a simple spring-mass system in which the soft mouthguard material near the sensors acts as a spring and the mandible as a mass. However, the mouthguard can be designed to mitigate these disturbances by isolating sensors from mandible loads, improving accuracy to below 15% normalized root mean square error in all kinematic measures. Thus, while current mouthguards would suffer from measurement errors in the worst-case unconstrained mandible condition, future mouthguards should be designed to account for these disturbances and future validation testing should include unconstrained mandibles to ensure proper accuracy. PMID:27155744

  8. A Kinematic Calibration Process for Flight Robotic Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Curtis L.; Robinson, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) robotic arm is ten times more massive than any Mars robotic arm before it, yet with similar accuracy and repeatability positioning requirements. In order to assess and validate these requirements, a higher-fidelity model and calibration processes were needed. Kinematic calibration of robotic arms is a common and necessary process to ensure good positioning performance. Most methodologies assume a rigid arm, high-accuracy data collection, and some kind of optimization of kinematic parameters. A new detailed kinematic and deflection model of the MSL robotic arm was formulated in the design phase and used to update the initial positioning and orientation accuracy and repeatability requirements. This model included a higher-fidelity link stiffness matrix representation, as well as a link level thermal expansion model. In addition, it included an actuator backlash model. Analytical results highlighted the sensitivity of the arm accuracy to its joint initialization methodology. Because of this, a new technique for initializing the arm joint encoders through hardstop calibration was developed. This involved selecting arm configurations to use in Earth-based hardstop calibration that had corresponding configurations on Mars with the same joint torque to ensure repeatability in the different gravity environment. The process used to collect calibration data for the arm included the use of multiple weight stand-in turrets with enough metrology targets to reconstruct the full six-degree-of-freedom location of the rover and tool frames. The follow-on data processing of the metrology data utilized a standard differential formulation and linear parameter optimization technique.

  9. SMACK - SMOOTHING FOR AIRCRAFT KINEMATICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, R.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program SMACK (SMoothing for AirCraft Kinematics) is designed to provide flightpath reconstruction of aircraft forces and motions from measurements that are noisy or incomplete. Additionally, SMACK provides a check on instrument accuracy and data consistency. The program can be used to analyze data from flight-test experiments prior to their use in performance, stability and control, or aerodynamic modeling calculations. It can also be used in the analysis of aircraft accidents, where the actual forces and motions may have to be determined from a very limited data set. Application of a state-estimation method for flightpath reconstruction is possible because aircraft forces and motions are related by well-known equations of motion. The task of postflight state estimation is known as a nonlinear, fixed-interval smoothing problem. SMACK utilizes a backward-filter, forward-smoother algorithm to solve the problem. The equations of motion are used to produce estimates that are compared with their corresponding measurement time histories. The procedure is iterative, providing improved state estimates until a minimum squared-error measure is achieved. In the SMACK program, the state and measurement models together represent a finite-difference approximation for the six-degree-of-freedom dynamics of a rigid body. The models are used to generate time histories which are likely to be found in a flight-test measurement set. These include onboard variables such as Euler angles, angular rates, and linear accelerations as well as tracking variables such as slant range, bearing, and elevation. Any bias or scale-factor errors associated with the state or measurement models are appended to the state vector and treated as constant but unknown parameters. The SMACK documentation covers the derivation of the solution algorithm, describes the state and measurement models, and presents several application examples that should help the analyst recognize the potential

  10. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and Making it…

  11. Hummingbirds control turning velocity using body orientation and turning radius using asymmetrical wingbeat kinematics.

    PubMed

    Read, Tyson J G; Segre, Paolo S; Middleton, Kevin M; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2016-03-01

    Turning in flight requires reorientation of force, which birds, bats and insects accomplish either by shifting body position and total force in concert or by using left-right asymmetries in wingbeat kinematics. Although both mechanisms have been observed in multiple species, it is currently unknown how each is used to control changes in trajectory. We addressed this problem by measuring body and wingbeat kinematics as hummingbirds tracked a revolving feeder, and estimating aerodynamic forces using a quasi-steady model. During arcing turns, hummingbirds symmetrically banked the stroke plane of both wings, and the body, into turns, supporting a body-dependent mechanism. However, several wingbeat asymmetries were present during turning, including a higher and flatter outer wingtip path and a lower more deviated inner wingtip path. A quasi-steady analysis of arcing turns performed with different trajectories revealed that changes in radius were associated with asymmetrical kinematics and forces, and changes in velocity were associated with symmetrical kinematics and forces. Collectively, our results indicate that both body-dependent and -independent force orientation mechanisms are available to hummingbirds, and that these kinematic strategies are used to meet the separate aerodynamic challenges posed by changes in velocity and turning radius. PMID:27030042

  12. Upper extremity kinematic and kinetic adaptations during a fatiguing repetitive task.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jin; Lin, Jia-Hua; Faber, Gert S; Buchholz, Bryan; Xu, Xu

    2014-06-01

    Repetitive low-force contractions are common in the workplace and yet can lead to muscle fatigue and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The current study aimed to investigate potential motion adaptations during a simulated repetitive light assembly work task designed to fatigue the shoulder region, focusing on changes over time and age-related group differences. Ten younger and ten older participants performed four 20-min task sessions separated by short breaks. Mean and variability of joint angles and scapular elevation, joint net moments for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist were calculated from upper extremity kinematics recorded by a motion tracking system. Results showed that joint angle and joint torque decreased across sessions and across multiple joints and segments. Increased kinematic variability over time was observed in the shoulder joint; however, decreased kinematic variability over time was seen in the more distal part of the upper limb. The changes of motion adaptations were sensitive to the task-break schedule. The results suggested that kinematic and kinetic adaptations occurred to reduce the biomechanical loading on the fatigued shoulder region. In addition, the kinematic and kinetic responses at the elbow and wrist joints also changed, possibly to compensate for the increased variability caused by the shoulder joint while still maintaining task requirements. These motion strategies in responses to muscle fatigue were similar between two age groups although the older group showed more effort in adaptation than the younger in terms of magnitude and affected body parts. PMID:24642235

  13. Solution of Inverse Kinematics for 6R Robot Manipulators With Offset Wrist Based on Geometric Algebra.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhongtao; Yang, Wenyu; Yang, Zhen

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present an efficient method based on geometric algebra for computing the solutions to the inverse kinematics problem (IKP) of the 6R robot manipulators with offset wrist. Due to the fact that there exist some difficulties to solve the inverse kinematics problem when the kinematics equations are complex, highly nonlinear, coupled and multiple solutions in terms of these robot manipulators stated mathematically, we apply the theory of Geometric Algebra to the kinematic modeling of 6R robot manipulators simply and generate closed-form kinematics equations, reformulate the problem as a generalized eigenvalue problem with symbolic elimination technique, and then yield 16 solutions. Finally, a spray painting robot, which conforms to the type of robot manipulators, is used as an example of implementation for the effectiveness and real-time of this method. The experimental results show that this method has a large advantage over the classical methods on geometric intuition, computation and real-time, and can be directly extended to all serial robot manipulators and completely automatized, which provides a new tool on the analysis and application of general robot manipulators. PMID:23918347

  14. Estimating feedforward vs. feedback control of speech production through kinematic analyses of unperturbed articulatory movements

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang S.; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the contributions of feedforward vs. feedback control systems in speech articulation, we analyzed the correspondence between initial and final kinematics in unperturbed tongue and jaw movements for consonant-vowel (CV) and vowel-consonant (VC) syllables. If movement extents and endpoints are highly predictable from early kinematic information, then the movements were most likely completed without substantial online corrections (feedforward control); if the correspondence between early kinematics and final amplitude or position is low, online adjustments may have altered the planned trajectory (feedback control) (Messier and Kalaska, 1999). Five adult speakers produced CV and VC syllables with high, mid, or low vowels while movements of the tongue and jaw were tracked electromagnetically. The correspondence between the kinematic parameters peak acceleration or peak velocity and movement extent as well as between the articulators' spatial coordinates at those kinematic landmarks and movement endpoint was examined both for movements across different target distances (i.e., across vowel height) and within target distances (i.e., within vowel height). Taken together, results suggest that jaw and tongue movements for these CV and VC syllables are mostly under feedforward control but with feedback-based contributions. One type of feedback-driven compensatory adjustment appears to regulate movement duration based on variation in peak acceleration. Results from a statistical model based on multiple regression are presented to illustrate how the relative strength of these feedback contributions can be estimated. PMID:25426056

  15. Computer Assisted Mechanical Axis and Kinematic TKA

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Peter; Mahoharan, Varaguna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has traditionally been and largely continues to be aligned mechanically, that being with a neutral coronal plane mechanical tibiofemoral axis and a joint line orientated at 900 to this axis. Femoral component rotation is set by gap balancing or by externally rotating 30 from any of a number femoral reference lines. This produces a rectangular flexion gap and relaxes patellar tracking. Kinematic alignment (KA) is an alternative technique that aims to restore premorbid alignment, joint orientation and ligament tension. The basic premise for this technique is based on evidence that the medial and lateral femoral condyles consistently equate to cylinders of equal or near equal size and that therefore with a fixed radius, cruciate retaining implant, matched distal femoral, posterior femoral and proximal tibial resections, accounting for bone and cartilage already lost will reproduce the premorbid joint line and restore native premorbid kinematics. Femoral rotation is therefore referenced off the prearthritic posterior condylar axis (PCA) that is on average internally rotated to the AP axis. Kinematic alignment therefore has the potential to challenge patellar tracking, increase patellar load and potentially increase patellar complications. Method: Case control study – level of evidence III-2. Between November 2012 and June 2013 the senior author completed 104 consecutive computer assisted (CAS) kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasties (TKA) with a cruciate retaining, fixed bearing, single radius implant. The results of these surgeries were compared with the results of 91 consecutive CAS mechanically aligned TKA done between November 2011 and October 2012 using the same navigation system and implant Implant sizing and positioning as well as gap measurement and ligament balance was done with computer assistance in all cases. Data was collected prospectively and analysed retrospectively. Results: The Oxford Knee Score

  16. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.; Jensen, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  17. Kinematic hardening of a porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheatham, J. B.; Allen, M. B.; Celle, C. C.

    1984-10-01

    A concept for a kinematic hardening yield surface in stress space for Cordova Cream limestone (Austin Chalk) developed by Celle and Cheatham (1981) has been improved using Ziegler's modification of Prager's hardening rule (Ziegler, 1959). Data to date agree with the formulated concepts. It is shown how kinematic hardening can be used to approximate the yield surface for a wide range of stress states past the initial yield surface. The particular difficulty of identifying the yield surface under conditions of unloading or extension is noted. A yield condition and hardening rule which account for the strain induced anisotropy in Cordova Cream Limestone were developed. Although the actual yield surface appears to involve some change of size and shape, it is concluded that true kinematic hardening provides a basis for engineering calculations.

  18. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron-electron interactions in these localized states.

  19. Edge-edge interactions in stacked graphene nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Silva, Eduardo; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Jia, Xiaoting; Sumpter, Bobby G; Dresselhaus, M; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies show the dynamics of small graphene platelets on larger graphene layers. The platelets move nearly freely to eventually lock in at well-defined positions close to the edges of the larger underlying graphene sheet. While such movement is driven by a shallow potential energy surface described by an interplane interaction, the lock-in position occurs by via edge-edge interactions of the platelet and the graphene surface located underneath. Here we quantitatively study this behavior using van der Waals density functional calculations. Local interactions at the open edges are found to dictate stacking configurations that are different from Bernal (AB) stacking. These stacking configurations are known to be otherwise absent in edge-free two-dimensional (2D) graphene. The results explain the experimentally observed platelet dynamics and provide a detailed account of the new electronic properties of these combined systems.

  20. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron–electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  1. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron-electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  2. Kinematics and Control of Robot Manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paden, Bradley Evan

    This dissertation focuses on the kinematics and control of robot manipulators. The contribution to kinematics is a fundamental theorem on the design of manipulators with six revolute joints. The theorem states, roughly speaking, that manipulators which have six revolute joints and are modeled after the human arm are optimal and essentially unique. In developing the mathematical framework to prove this theorem, we define precisely the notions of length of a manipulator, well-connected-workspace, and work-volume. We contribute to control a set of analysis techniques for the design of variable structure (sliding mode) controllers for manipulators. The organization of the dissertation is the following. After introductory remarks in chapter one, the group of proper rigid motions, G, is introduced in chapter two. The tangent bundle of G is introduced and it is shown that the velocity of a rigid body can be represented by an element in the Lie algebra of G (commonly called a twist). Further, rigid motions which are exponentials of twists are used to describe four commonly occurring subproblems in robot kinematics. In chapter three, the exponentials of twists are used to write the forward kinematic map of robot manipulators and the subproblems of chapter two are used to solve the Stanford manipulator and an elbow manipulator. Chapter four focuses on manipulator singularities. Twist coordinates are used to find critical points of the forward kinematic map. The contribution to kinematics is contained in chapter five where a mathematical framework for studying the relationship between the design of 6R manipulators and their performance is developed. Chapter seven contains the contribution to control. The work of A. F. Filippov on differential equations with discontinuous right-hand-side and the work of F. H. Clarke on generalized gradients are combined to obtain a calculus for analyzing nonsmooth gradient systems. The techniques developed are applied to design a simple

  3. The EDGE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Stephan S.; Cheng, Edward S.; Cottingham, David A.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Knox, Lloyd; Silverberg, Robert F.; Timbie, Peter T.; Wilson, Grant

    2003-02-01

    EDGE is a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) borne instrument designed to measure the large-scale anisotropy of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB). The goal is to use this signal as a new observational tool to measure the character of the spatial distribution of galaxies at the largest spatial scales. With a 6\\arcmin\\ beam mapping more than 400 square degrees of sky at 8 frequency bands between 250GHz and 1.5 THz the experiment can determine the variation of galaxy density on spatial scales ranging from >200h-1 Mpc, where dark matter variations are determined directly from Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) anisotropy, to <5h-1 Mpc where the distribution of dark matter and galaxies is determined from galaxy redshift surveys and the underlying dynamics of structure growth is non-linear. The instrument consists of a 1-meter class off-axis telescope and a Frequency Selective Bolometer (FSB) array radiometer. The FSB design provides the compact, multi-chromatic, high sensitivity focal plane needed for this measurement.

  4. Tibial rotation kinematics subsequent to knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Duane J.; Khatib, Yasser H.; Parker, David A.; Jenkin, Deanne E.; Molnar, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of computer assisted joint replacement has facilitated precise intraoperative measurement of knee kinematics. The changes in “screw home mechanism” (SHM) resulting from Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) with different prostheses and constraints has not yet been accurately described. Methods A pilot study was first completed. Intraoperative kinematic data was collected two groups of 15 patients receiving different prostheses. Results On average, patients lost 5.3° of ER (SD = 6.1°). There was no significant difference between the prostheses or different prosthetic constraints. Conclusions There significant loss of SHM after TKA. Further research is required to understand its impact on patient function. PMID:25829754

  5. Hexapod kinematics for secondary mirror aberration control .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.

    This work deals with active correction of the aberrations in a telescope by moving the secondary mirror. A special attention is dedicated to the case of a secondary mirror whose motions are controlled by a 6-6 Stewart Platform (generally called by astronomers simply "hexapod", even if this term is more general). The kinematics of the device is studied. The non trivial forward kinematics problem is solved by an iterative algorithm fitting the necessities of an active optics system and fast enough to be used in a closed loop feedback control.

  6. Controlling chaotic robots with kinematical redundancy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Zhaohui; Zhang, Dengcai; Zhang, H

    2006-03-01

    Robots with kinematical redundancy under the pseudoinverse control exhibit undesirable chaotic joint motion, which leads to erratic behaviors. In this study, we used the delayed feedback method to control chaotic motions of a planar 3R rigid and a planar 3R flexible redundant robot under the pseudoinverse control when the end-effector traces a closed-path repeatedly in the work space. It was demonstrated that chaotic motions of robots with kinematical redundancy can be turned into regular motion when the delayed feedback method was applied with some appropriate parameters. This study provides a new insight helpful to solve the repeatability problem of redundant manipulators. PMID:16599763

  7. Kinematics of AWM and MKW Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koranyi, Daniel M.; Geller, Margaret J.

    2002-01-01

    We have measured 1365 redshifts to a limiting magnitude of R~15.5 in 15 AWM/MKW clusters and have collected another 203 from the literature in MKW 4s, MKW 2, and MKW 2s. In AWM 7 we have extended the redshift sample to R~18 in the cluster center. We have identified 704 cluster members in 17 clusters; 201 are newly identified. We summarize the kinematics and distributions of the cluster galaxies and provide an initial discussion of substructure, mass and luminosity segregation, spectral segregation, velocity-dispersion profiles, and the relation of the central galaxy to global cluster properties. We compute optical mass estimates, which we compare with X-ray mass determinations from the literature. The clusters are in a variety of dynamical states, reflected in the three classes of behavior of the velocity-dispersion profile in the core: rising, falling, or flat/ambiguous. The velocity dispersion of the emission-line galaxy population significantly exceeds that of the absorption-line galaxies in almost all of the clusters, and the presence of emission-line galaxies at small projected radii suggests continuing infall of galaxies onto the clusters. The presence of a cD galaxy does not constrain the global cluster properties; these clusters are similar to other poor clusters that contain no cD. We use the similarity of the velocity-dispersion profiles at small radii and the cD-like galaxies' internal velocity dispersions to argue that cD formation is a local phenomenon. Our sample establishes an empirical observational baseline of poor clusters for comparison with simulations of similar systems. Observations reported in this paper were obtained at the Multiple Mirror Telescope Observatory, a facility operated jointly by the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution; at the Whipple Observatory, a facility operated jointly by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and Harvard University; and at the WIYN Observatory, a joint facility of the University of

  8. Photometric and Kinematic Studies of Extragalactic Globular Cluster Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windschitl-Dowell, Jessica L.

    2015-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are compact, luminous collections of stars created during the early stages of galaxy formation. As a result, the properties of GC systems provide important clues about the formation, merger history, and structure of their host galaxies. In particular, kinematic studies of GCs can be used to investigate the dark matter distribution in galaxy halos and provide observational evidence that can be used to constrain models of galaxy formation. I will present our study of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055, and show how we used wide-field BVR imaging from the WIYN 3.5-m telescope to detect the GC population and measure the global properties of the system. We quantified the radial distribution of the GC system and total number of GCs in these galaxies and compared the results to those of other galaxies.I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). Using spectra taken with AAT/AAOmega, WIYN/HYDRA, and MMT/Hectospec, I measured the radial velocities of GCs, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and V-band mass-to-light (M/LV) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). I compared our results to mass estimates from other kinematic tracers and also considered them in the context of galaxy formation models. For both galaxies, I found that the M/LV profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of our data. I also looked for evidence of rotation within the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. Finally, I examined the velocity dispersion of each GC system as a function of radius and found kinematic differences between the red, metal-rich and blue, metal-poor GC subpopulations.

  9. Graph Theory Roots of Spatial Operators for Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan

    2011-01-01

    bodies, the indexing schemes, etc. The relationship of the underlying structure is intimately connected with efficient, recursive computational algorithms. The results provide the foundational groundwork for a much broader look at the key problems in kinematics and dynamics. The properties of general graphs and trees of nodes and edge were examined, as well as the properties of adjacency matrices that are used to describe graph connectivity. The nilpotency property of such matrices for directed trees was reviewed, and the adjacency matrices were generalized to the notion of block weighted adjacency matrices that support block matrix elements. This leads us to the development of the notion of Spatial Kernel Operator SKO kernels. These kernels provide the basis for the development of SKO resolvent operators.

  10. Calibration of parallel kinematic devices using sequential determination of kinematic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    JOKIEL JR.,BERNHARD; BIEG,LOTHAR F.; ZIEGERT,JOHN C.

    2000-04-06

    In PKM Machines, the Cartesian position and orientation of the tool point carried on the platform is obtained from a kinematic model of the particular machine. Accurate positioning of these machines relies on the accurate knowledge of the parameters of the kinematic model unique to the particular machine. The parameters in the kinematic model include the spatial locations of the joint centers on the machine base and moving platform, the initial strut lengths, and the strut displacements. The strut displacements are readily obtained from sensors on the machine. However, the remaining kinematic parameters (joint center locations, and initial strut lengths) are difficult to determine when these machines are in their fully assembled state. The size and complexity of these machines generally makes it difficult and somewhat undesirable to determine the remaining kinematic parameters by direct inspection such as in a coordinate measuring machine. In order for PKMs to be useful for precision positioning applications, techniques must be developed to quickly calibrate the machine by determining the kinematic parameters without disassembly of the machine. A number of authors have reported techniques for calibration of PKMs (Soons, Masory, Zhuang et. al., Ropponen). In two other papers, the authors have reported on work recently completed by the University of Florida and Sandia National Laboratories on calibration of PKMs, which describes a new technique to sequentially determine the kinematic parameters of an assembled parallel kinematic device. The technique described is intended to be used with a spatial coordinate measuring device such as a portable articulated CMM measuring arm (Romer, Faro, etc.), a Laser Ball Bar (LBB), or a laser tracker (SMX< API, etc.). The material to be presented is as follows: (1) methods to identify the kinematic parameters of 6--6 variant Stewart platform manipulators including joint center locations relative to the workable and spindle nose

  11. Fractal Plate Reconstructions, Incorporating Asymmetric Spreading and Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilger, R.

    2011-12-01

    Accretionary plate boundaries - spreading centers and associated transform faults - possess fractal structure like coastlines. Their apparent length demonstrates self-similarity over a range of scales, maximizing multiplicity (entropy) in a recursive chaotic process. Further, optimal, combined oceanic plate reconstructions, incorporating asymmetric accretion over a range of ages produce fractal structure. The minimum fractal configuration as a function of the reconstruction parameters approximates the Lagrangian constraint (the information) in the maximum entropy formalism. The optimal fractal spectrum itself represents maximum entropy of the reconstructed data describing the spreading center for the preferred rotation parameters. Because fractals are intrinsically discontinuous (and analytic derivatives are unavailable), conventional non-linear least squares approaches are inapplicable. Instead, derivative-free, iterative conjugate gradient and simplex algorithms are utilized. In order to allow for kinematic calculations and integrated reconstructions of diverse data ages, parameters are spline-interpolated, rate-normalized, pseudo-vectors. The new formalism provides a unique fitting criterion and algorithm for simultaneous plate and spreading-center reconstruction and kinematics. It also provides a fractal template for reconstructions of other tectonic types.

  12. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  13. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  14. Edge-on Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has imaged an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disc and showing how colliding galaxies trigger the birth of new stars.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. During observations of the galaxy, the camera passed a milestone, taking its 100,000th image since shuttle astronauts installed it in Hubble in 1993.

    The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, look flat when seen edge- on. The new image of the galaxy ESO 510-G13 shows an unusual twisted disc structure, first seen in ground-based photographs taken at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, some 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the galaxy's structure are visible because interstellar dust clouds that trace its disc are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge.

    The strong warping of the disc indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently collided with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge over millions of years. When the disturbances die out, ESO 510-G13 will be a single galaxy.

    The galaxy's outer regions, especially on the right side of the image, show dark dust and bright clouds of blue stars. This indicates that hot, young stars are forming in the twisted disc. Astronomers believe star formation may be triggered when galaxies collide and their interstellar clouds are compressed.

    The Hubble Heritage Team used WFPC2 to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty

  15. Diagnosing phenotypes of single-sample individuals by edge biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanwei; Zeng, Tao; Liu, Xiaoping; Chen, Luonan

    2015-06-01

    Network or edge biomarkers are a reliable form to characterize phenotypes or diseases. However, obtaining edges or correlations between molecules for an individual requires measurement of multiple samples of that individual, which are generally unavailable in clinical practice. Thus, it is strongly demanded to diagnose a disease by edge or network biomarkers in one-sample-for-one-individual context. Here, we developed a new computational framework, EdgeBiomarker, to integrate edge and node biomarkers to diagnose phenotype of each single test sample. By applying the method to datasets of lung and breast cancer, it reveals new marker genes/gene-pairs and related sub-networks for distinguishing earlier and advanced cancer stages. Our method shows advantages over traditional methods: (i) edge biomarkers extracted from non-differentially expressed genes achieve better cross-validation accuracy of diagnosis than molecule or node biomarkers from differentially expressed genes, suggesting that certain pathogenic information is only present at the level of network and under-estimated by traditional methods; (ii) edge biomarkers categorize patients into low/high survival rate in a more reliable manner; (iii) edge biomarkers are significantly enriched in relevant biological functions or pathways, implying that the association changes in a network, rather than expression changes in individual molecules, tend to be causally related to cancer development. The new framework of edge biomarkers paves the way for diagnosing diseases and analyzing their molecular mechanisms by edges or networks in one-sample-for-one-individual basis. This also provides a powerful tool for precision medicine or big-data medicine. PMID:25917597

  16. ANALYTIC MODELING OF THE MORETON WAVE KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2009-09-10

    The issue whether Moreton waves are flare-ignited or coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven, or a combination of both, is still a matter of debate. We develop an analytical model describing the evolution of a large-amplitude coronal wave emitted by the expansion of a circular source surface in order to mimic the evolution of a Moreton wave. The model results are confronted with observations of a strong Moreton wave observed in association with the X3.8/3B flare/CME event from 2005 January 17. Using different input parameters for the expansion of the source region, either derived from the real CME observations (assuming that the upward moving CME drives the wave), or synthetically generated scenarios (expanding flare region, lateral expansion of the CME flanks), we calculate the kinematics of the associated Moreton wave signature. Those model input parameters are determined which fit the observed Moreton wave kinematics best. Using the measured kinematics of the upward moving CME as the model input, we are not able to reproduce the observed Moreton wave kinematics. The observations of the Moreton wave can be reproduced only by applying a strong and impulsive acceleration for the source region expansion acting in a piston mechanism scenario. Based on these results we propose that the expansion of the flaring region or the lateral expansion of the CME flanks is more likely the driver of the Moreton wave than the upward moving CME front.

  17. Constrained tri-sphere kinematic positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Viola, Robert J

    2010-12-14

    A scalable and adaptable, six-degree-of-freedom, kinematic positioning system is described. The system can position objects supported on top of, or suspended from, jacks comprising constrained joints. The system is compatible with extreme low temperature or high vacuum environments. When constant adjustment is not required a removable motor unit is available.

  18. Computer Software & Programing Utilization in Kinematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahraee, Mohammad A.; And Others

    This paper discusses two software packages used in kinematics courses at Purdue University, Calumet (Indiana) and some algorithms written by students for cam design. The first software package, 4BAR, requires the user to define the particular four bar linkage in terms of lengths of the individual links and the angle and distance to the coupler…

  19. Kinematics of foldable discrete space cranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Exact kinematic description of a NASA proposed prototype foldable-deployable discrete space crane are presented. A computer program is developed which maps the geometry of the crane once controlling parameters are specified. The program uses a building block type approach in which it calculates the local coordinates of each repeating cell and then combines them with respect to a global coordinates system.

  20. Compound nucleus studies withy reverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1985-06-01

    Reverse kinematics reactions are used to demonstrate the compound nucleus origin of intermediate mass particles at low energies and the extension of the same mechanism at higher energies. No evidence has appeared in our energy range for liquid-vapor equilibrium or cold fragmentation mechanisms. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  1. KINEMATICS OF STELLAR POPULATIONS IN POSTSTARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hiner, Kyle D.; Canalizo, Gabriela E-mail: khiner@astro-udec.cl

    2015-01-20

    Poststarburst galaxies host a population of early-type stars (A or F) but simultaneously lack indicators of ongoing star formation such as [O II] emission. Two distinct stellar populations have been identified in these systems: a young poststarburst population superimposed on an older host population. We present a study of nine poststarburst galaxies with the following objectives: (1) to investigate whether and how kinematical differences between the young and old populations of stars can be measured, and (2) to gain insight into the formation mechanism of the young population in these systems. We fit high signal-to-noise spectra with two independent populations in distinct spectral regions: the Balmer region, the Mg IB region, and the Ca triplet when available. We show that the kinematics of the two populations largely track one another if measured in the Balmer region with high signal-to-noise data. Results from examining the Faber-Jackson relation and the fundamental plane indicate that these objects are not kinematically disturbed relative to more evolved spheroids. A case study of the internal kinematics of one object in our sample shows it to be pressure supported and not rotationally dominated. Overall our results are consistent with merger-induced starburst scenarios where the young population is observed during the later stages of the merger.

  2. Internal kinematics of H II galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. S.; Plana, H.

    2014-10-01

    H II galaxies are dwarf galaxies characterized by high stellar formation rate with spectrum dominated by strong emission lines, superimposed on a weak stellar continuum. The study of internal kinematics of these objects may be realized using the observed emission lines. Based on these lines we obtained monochromatic intensity, velocity dispersion and radial velocity maps. We have studied the internal kinematics of two H II galaxies: UM 461 and CTS 1020, observed with the Gemini South telescope using the GMOS instrument equipped with an IFU. We aim to investigate the origin of the line-broadening observed on emission lines from the use of kinematics diagnostic diagrams: I vs σ, I vs V, eV vs σ. The analysis of these diagrams was based on the Cometary Stirring Model that allows us to identify, for example, the presence of expanding shells and stellar winds. We found that radial velocity and velocity dispersion maps, for each galaxy, show a different kinematical pattern, although both are H II galaxies. CTS 1020 shows a velocity gradient consistent with a rotating disc with a velocity amplitude of ˜ 40 km s^{-1}. On the other hand UM 461 does not exhibit a typical pattern of a rotating system, despite of the observed velocity gradient in both emission nuclei.

  3. Action Experience Changes Attention to Kinematic Cues

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Courtney A.; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    The current study used remote corneal reflection eye-tracking to examine the relationship between motor experience and action anticipation in 13-months-old infants. To measure online anticipation of actions infants watched videos where the actor’s hand provided kinematic information (in its orientation) about the type of object that the actor was going to reach for. The actor’s hand orientation either matched the orientation of a rod (congruent cue) or did not match the orientation of the rod (incongruent cue). To examine relations between motor experience and action anticipation, we used a 2 (reach first vs. observe first) × 2 (congruent kinematic cue vs. incongruent kinematic cue) between-subjects design. We show that 13-months-old infants in the observe first condition spontaneously generate rapid online visual predictions to congruent hand orientation cues and do not visually anticipate when presented incongruent cues. We further demonstrate that the speed that these infants generate predictions to congruent motor cues is correlated with their own ability to pre-shape their hands. Finally, we demonstrate that following reaching experience, infants generate rapid predictions to both congruent and incongruent hand shape cues—suggesting that short-term experience changes attention to kinematics. PMID:26913012

  4. KINEMATIC DISTANCE ASSIGNMENTS WITH H I ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Courtney; Dickey, John M.

    2012-07-01

    Using H I absorption spectra from the International Galactic Plane Survey, a new method is implemented to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity for 75 H II regions with known systemic velocities from radio recombination lines. A further 40 kinematic distance determinations are made for H II region candidates without known systemic velocities through an investigation of the presence of H I absorption around the terminal velocity. New kinematic distance determinations can be used to further constrain spiral arm parameters and the location and extent of other structures in the Milky Way disk. H I absorption toward continuum sources beyond the solar circle is also investigated. Follow-up studies of H I at higher resolution than the 1' to 2' of existing Galactic Plane Surveys will provide kinematic distances to many more H II regions on the far side of the Galactic center. On the basis of the velocity channel summation technique developed in this paper, a much larger sample of H II regions will be analyzed in a future paper to remove the near-far distance ambiguity.

  5. Compton Effect with Non-Relativistic Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2011-01-01

    In deducing the change of wavelength of x-rays scattered by atomic electrons, one normally makes use of relativistic kinematics for electrons. However, recoiling energies of the electrons are of the order of a few keV which is less than 0.2% of their rest energies. Hence the authors may ask whether relativistic formulae are really necessary. In…

  6. Kinematic Measurements from YouTube Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Video analysis of motion has been in use now for some time. However, some teachers may not have video equipment or may be looking for innovative ways to engage students with interesting applications at no cost. The recent advent of YouTube offers opportunities for students to measure kinematic properties of real-life events using their computers.…

  7. The kinematic algebras from the scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Ricardo; O'Connell, Donal

    2014-03-01

    We study kinematic algebras associated to the recently proposed scattering equations, which arise in the description of the scattering of massless particles. In particular, we describe the role that these algebras play in the BCJ duality between colour and kinematics in gauge theory, and its relation to gravity. We find that the scattering equations are a consistency condition for a self-dual-type vertex which is associated to each solution of those equations. We also identify an extension of the anti-self-dual vertex, such that the two vertices are not conjugate in general. Both vertices correspond to the structure constants of Lie algebras. We give a prescription for the use of the generators of these Lie algebras in trivalent graphs that leads to a natural set of BCJ numerators. In particular, we write BCJ numerators for each contribution to the amplitude associated to a solution of the scattering equations. This leads to a decomposition of the determinant of a certain kinematic matrix, which appears naturally in the amplitudes, in terms of trivalent graphs. We also present the kinematic analogues of colour traces, according to these algebras, and the associated decomposition of that determinant.

  8. GAS KINEMATICS IN Ly{alpha} NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yujin; Jahnke, Knud; Zabludoff, Ann; Eisenstein, Daniel; Dave, Romeel; Shectman, Stephen A.; Kelson, Daniel D.

    2011-07-10

    Exploring the origin of Ly{alpha} nebulae ('blobs') at high redshift requires measurements of their gas kinematics that are impossible with only the resonant, optically thick Ly{alpha} line. To define gas motions relative to the systemic velocity of the blob, the Ly{alpha} line must be compared with an optically thin line like H{alpha} {lambda}6563, which is not much altered by radiative transfer effects and is more concentrated about the galaxies embedded in the nebula's core. We obtain optical and near-IR (NIR) spectra of the two brightest Ly{alpha} blobs (CDFS-LAB01 and CDFS-LAB02) from the Yang et al. sample using the Magellan/Magellan Echellette Spectrograph optical and Very Large Telescope/SINFONI NIR spectrographs. Both the Ly{alpha} and H{alpha} lines confirm that these blobs lie at the survey redshift, z {approx} 2.3. Within each blob, we detect several H{alpha} sources, which roughly correspond to galaxies seen in Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame UV images. The H{alpha} detections show that these galaxies have large internal velocity dispersions ({sigma}{sub v} = 130-190 km s{sup -1}) and that, in the one system (LAB01), where we can reliably extract profiles for two H{alpha} sources, their velocity difference is {Delta}v {approx} 440 km s{sup -1}. The presence of multiple galaxies within the blobs, and those galaxies' large velocity dispersions and large relative motion, is consistent with our previous finding that Ly{alpha} blobs inhabit massive dark matter halos that will evolve into those typical of present-day rich clusters and that the embedded galaxies may eventually become brightest cluster galaxies. To determine whether the gas near the embedded galaxies is predominantly infalling or outflowing, we compare the Ly{alpha} and H{alpha} line centers, finding that Ly{alpha} is not offset ({Delta}v{sub Ly{alpha}} = +0 km s{sup -1}) in LAB01 and redshifted by only +230 km s{sup -1} in LAB02. These offsets are small compared to those of Lyman break

  9. A new bound for the 2-edge connected subgraph problem

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.; Ravi, R.

    1998-04-01

    Given a complete undirected graph with non-negative costs on the edges, the 2-Edge Connected Subgraph Problem consists in finding the minimum cost spanning 2-edge connected subgraph (where multi-edges are allowed in the solution). A lower bound for the minimum cost 2-edge connected subgraph is obtained by solving the linear programming relaxation for this problem, which coincides with the subtour relaxation of the traveling salesman problem when the costs satisfy the triangle inequality. The simplest fractional solutions to the subtour relaxation are the 1/2-integral solutions in which every edge variable has a value which is a multiple of 1/2. The authors show that the minimum cost of a 2-edge connected subgraph is at most four-thirds the cost of the minimum cost 1/2-integral solution of the subtour relaxation. This supports the long-standing 4/3 Conjecture for the TSP, which states that there is a Hamilton cycle which is within 4/3 times the cost of the optimal subtour relaxation solution when the costs satisfy the triangle inequality.

  10. Advanced control schemes and kinematic analysis for a kinematically redundant 7 DOF manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Zhou, Zhen-Lei

    1990-01-01

    The kinematic analysis and control of a kinematically redundant manipulator is addressed. The manipulator is the slave arm of a telerobot system recently built at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to serve as a testbed for investigating research issues in telerobotics. A forward kinematic transformation is developed in its most simplified form, suitable for real-time control applications, and the manipulator Jacobian is derived using the vector cross product method. Using the developed forward kinematic transformation and quaternion representation of orientation matrices, we perform computer simulation to evaluate the efficiency of the Jacobian in converting joint velocities into Cartesian velocities and to investigate the accuracy of Jacobian pseudo-inverse for various sampling times. The equivalence between Cartesian velocities and quaternion is also verified using computer simulation. Three control schemes are proposed and discussed for controlling the motion of the slave arm end-effector.

  11. Red edge measurements for remotely sensing plant chlorophyll content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.; Barringer, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using the wavelength of the maximum slope of the red edge of leaf reflectance spectra, Lambda(re), as an indication of plant chlorophyll status was examined in the laboratory for single leaves of several species. Lambda(re) for each sample was determined by derivative reflectance spectroscopy. A high positive correlation was found between Lambda(re) and leaf chlorophyll content for all species, although there were some differences in the quantitative nature of the relationship for plants of different types. The position of the red edge was found to be unaffected by simulated change in ground cover, but multiple leaf layers produced a shift in its position. Appropriate spectral measurements and processing for obtaining useful information from the red edge are discussed, and the potential of the red edge in relation to other spectral measurements is considered.

  12. Attribute-based edge bundling for visualizing social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lin; Zuo, Wanli; Peng, Tao; Adhikari, Binod Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Most nodes in complex networks have multiple attributes, which make them hard to analyze. Because general edge bundling algorithms fail to handle complex networks as a result of their intricate features, network simplification is extremely important. This paper proposes an attribute-based edge bundling algorithm that displays similar edges in nearby locations. Meanwhile, by analyzing complex networks at a community level, the overlapping clustering of nodes is well implemented, and better clustering effects can be achieved by grouping similar edges together. On the basis of datasets with different types and sizes, the experiments illustrate the simplification degree of the intricate graphs created by the algorithm proposed, which outperforms established competitors in correctness and effectiveness.

  13. Real time markerless motion tracking using linked kinematic chains

    DOEpatents

    Luck, Jason P.; Small, Daniel E.

    2007-08-14

    A markerless method is described for tracking the motion of subjects in a three dimensional environment using a model based on linked kinematic chains. The invention is suitable for tracking robotic, animal or human subjects in real-time using a single computer with inexpensive video equipment, and does not require the use of markers or specialized clothing. A simple model of rigid linked segments is constructed of the subject and tracked using three dimensional volumetric data collected by a multiple camera video imaging system. A physics based method is then used to compute forces to align the model with subsequent volumetric data sets in real-time. The method is able to handle occlusion of segments and accommodates joint limits, velocity constraints, and collision constraints and provides for error recovery. The method further provides for elimination of singularities in Jacobian based calculations, which has been problematic in alternative methods.

  14. Time-Dependent Kinematics of Complex Human Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaibani, Saami J.

    2013-03-01

    The human body can be arranged in numerous geometrical configurations, including many interesting scenarios from the sport of gymnastics. One particularly challenging analytical example among these is the forward flip with maximum separation from the ground at the apex of the flight. The temporal aspects of this move involve the evaluation of multiple different positions during the trajectory, which adds significantly to the effort required. When a forward flip was executed during a football game, ready access to the recording of this allowed a detailed kinematic examination to be performed. Careful application of highly intricate protocols produces results which are consistent with similar athletic environments. The emphasis in this research is to transcend standard approaches elsewhere, which are severely limited to generic athletes and/or generic circumstances. Pedagogical benefits of the rigorous methodology adopted here are explored beyond what was introduced in a recent related study.

  15. The Maiden Voyage of a Kinematics Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwolfe, Matthew L.

    2015-04-01

    In a Montessori preschool classroom, students work independently on tasks that absorb their attention in part because the apparatus are carefully designed to make mistakes directly observable and limit exploration to one aspect or dimension. Control of error inheres in the apparatus itself, so that teacher intervention can be minimal.1 Inspired by this example, I created a robotic kinematics apparatus that also shapes the inquiry experience. Students program the robot by drawing kinematic graphs on a computer and then observe its motion. Exploration is at once limited to constant velocity and constant acceleration motion, yet open to complex multi-segment examples difficult to achieve in the lab in other ways. The robot precisely and reliably produces the motion described by the students' graphs, so that the apparatus itself provides immediate visual feedback about whether their understanding is correct as they are free to explore within the hard-coded limits. In particular, the kinematic robot enables hands-on study of multi-segment constant velocity situations, which lays a far stronger foundation for the study of accelerated motion. When correction is anonymous—just between one group of lab partners and their robot—students using the kinematic robot tend to flow right back to work because they view the correction as an integral part of the inquiry learning process. By contrast, when correction occurs by the teacher and/or in public (e.g., returning a graded assignment or pointing out student misconceptions during class), students all too often treat the event as the endpoint to inquiry. Furthermore, quantitative evidence shows a large gain from pre-test to post-test scores using the Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K).

  16. Kinematic and Spatial Substructure in NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Fűrész, Gabor; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Mateo, Mario

    2015-04-01

    We present an expanded kinematic study of the young cluster NGC 2264 based upon optical radial velocities measured using multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 m MMT and Magellan telescopes. We report radial velocities for 695 stars, of which approximately 407 stars are confirmed or very likely members. Our results more than double the number of members with radial velocities from Fűrész et al., resulting in a much better defined kinematic relationship between the stellar population and the associated molecular gas. In particular, we find that there is a significant subset of stars that are systematically blueshifted with respect to the molecular (13CO) gas. The detection of Lithium absorption and/or infrared excesses in this blueshifted population suggests that at least some of these stars are cluster members; we suggest some speculative scenarios to explain their kinematics. Our results also more clearly define the redshifted population of stars in the northern end of the cluster; we suggest that the stellar and gas kinematics of this region are the result of a bubble driven by the wind from O7 star S Mon. Our results emphasize the complexity of the spatial and kinematic structure of NGC 2264, important for eventually building up a comprehensive picture of cluster formation. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  17. Three-dimensional kinematics of hummingbird flight.

    PubMed

    Tobalske, Bret W; Warrick, Douglas R; Clark, Christopher J; Powers, Donald R; Hedrick, Tyson L; Hyder, Gabriel A; Biewener, Andrew A

    2007-07-01

    Hummingbirds are specialized for hovering flight, and substantial research has explored this behavior. Forward flight is also important to hummingbirds, but the manner in which they perform forward flight is not well documented. Previous research suggests that hummingbirds increase flight velocity by simultaneously tilting their body angle and stroke-plane angle of the wings, without varying wingbeat frequency and upstroke: downstroke span ratio. We hypothesized that other wing kinematics besides stroke-plane angle would vary in hummingbirds. To test this, we used synchronized high-speed (500 Hz) video cameras and measured the three-dimensional wing and body kinematics of rufous hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus, 3 g, N=5) as they flew at velocities of 0-12 m s(-1) in a wind tunnel. Consistent with earlier research, the angles of the body and the stroke plane changed with velocity, and the effect of velocity on wingbeat frequency was not significant. However, hummingbirds significantly altered other wing kinematics including chord angle, angle of attack, anatomical stroke-plane angle relative to their body, percent of wingbeat in downstroke, wingbeat amplitude, angular velocity of the wing, wingspan at mid-downstroke, and span ratio of the wingtips and wrists. This variation in bird-centered kinematics led to significant effects of flight velocity on the angle of attack of the wing and the area and angles of the global stroke planes during downstroke and upstroke. We provide new evidence that the paths of the wingtips and wrists change gradually but consistently with velocity, as in other bird species that possess pointed wings. Although hummingbirds flex their wings slightly at the wrist during upstroke, their average wingtip-span ratio of 93% revealed that they have kinematically ;rigid' wings compared with other avian species. PMID:17575042

  18. Kinematic Optimization in Birds, Bats and Ornithopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Todd

    Birds and bats employ a variety of advanced wing motions in the efficient production of thrust. The purpose of this thesis is to quantify the benefit of these advanced wing motions, determine the optimal theoretical wing kinematics for a given flight condition, and to develop a methodology for applying the results in the optimal design of flapping-wing aircraft (ornithopters). To this end, a medium-fidelity, combined aero-structural model has been developed that is capable of simulating the advanced kinematics seen in bird flight, as well as the highly non-linear structural deformations typical of high-aspect ratio wings. Five unique methods of thrust production observed in natural species have been isolated, quantified and thoroughly investigated for their dependence on Reynolds number, airfoil selection, frequency, amplitude and relative phasing. A gradient-based optimization algorithm has been employed to determined the wing kinematics that result in the minimum required power for a generalized aircraft or species in any given flight condition. In addition to the theoretical work, with the help of an extended team, the methodology was applied to the design and construction of the world's first successful human-powered ornithopter. The Snowbird Human-Powered Ornithopter, is used as an example aircraft to show how additional design constraints can pose limits on the optimal kinematics. The results show significant trends that give insight into the kinematic operation of natural species. The general result is that additional complexity, whether it be larger twisting deformations or advanced wing-folding mechanisms, allows for the possibility of more efficient flight. At its theoretical optimum, the efficiency of flapping-wings exceeds that of current rotors and propellers, although these efficiencies are quite difficult to achieve in practice.

  19. Cleaved-edge-overgrowth nanogap electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luber, Sebastian M.; Bichler, Max; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Tornow, Marc

    2011-02-01

    We present a method to fabricate multiple metal nanogap electrodes of tailored width and distance in parallel, on the cleaved plane of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The three-dimensional patterned structures are obtained by a combination of molecular-beam-epitaxial regrowth on a crystal facet, using the cleaved-edge-overgrowth (CEO) method, and subsequent wet selective etching and metallization steps. SEM and AFM studies reveal smooth and co-planar electrodes of width and distance of the order of 10 nm. Preliminary electrical characterization indicates electrical gap insulation in the 100 MΩ range with kΩ lead resistance. We propose our methodology to realize multiple electrode geometries that would allow investigation of the electrical conductivity of complex nanoscale objects such as branched organic molecules.

  20. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  1. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-10-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  2. The fish tail motion forms an attached leading edge vortex

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Daghooghi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    The tail (caudal fin) is one of the most prominent characteristics of fishes, and the analysis of the flow pattern it creates is fundamental to understanding how its motion generates locomotor forces. A mechanism that is known to greatly enhance locomotor forces in insect and bird flight is the leading edge vortex (LEV) reattachment, i.e. a vortex (separation bubble) that stays attached at the leading edge of a wing. However, this mechanism has not been reported in fish-like swimming probably owing to the overemphasis on the trailing wake, and the fact that the flow does not separate along the body of undulating swimmers. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the vortex reattachment at the leading edge of the fish tail using three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of self-propelled virtual swimmers with different tail shapes. We show that at Strouhal numbers (a measure of lateral velocity to the axial velocity) at which most fish swim in nature (approx. 0.25) an attached LEV is formed, whereas at a higher Strouhal number of approximately 0.6 the LEV does not reattach. We show that the evolution of the LEV drastically alters the pressure distribution on the tail and the force it generates. We also show that the tail's delta shape is not necessary for the LEV reattachment and fish-like kinematics is capable of stabilising the LEV. Our results suggest the need for a paradigm shift in fish-like swimming research to turn the focus from the trailing edge to the leading edge of the tail. PMID:23407826

  3. Hand kinematics of piano playing

    PubMed Central

    Flanders, Martha; Soechting, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Dexterous use of the hand represents a sophisticated sensorimotor function. In behaviors such as playing the piano, it can involve strong temporal and spatial constraints. The purpose of this study was to determine fundamental patterns of covariation of motion across joints and digits of the human hand. Joint motion was recorded while 5 expert pianists played 30 excerpts from musical pieces, which featured ∼50 different tone sequences and fingering. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm revealed that joint velocities could be categorized into several patterns, which help to simplify the description of the movements of the multiple degrees of freedom of the hand. For the thumb keystroke, two distinct patterns of joint movement covariation emerged and they depended on the spatiotemporal patterns of the task. For example, the thumb-under maneuver was clearly separated into two clusters based on the direction of hand translation along the keyboard. While the pattern of the thumb joint velocities differed between these clusters, the motions at the metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-phalangeal joints of the four fingers were more consistent. For a keystroke executed with one of the fingers, there were three distinct patterns of joint rotations, across which motion at the striking finger was fairly consistent, but motion of the other fingers was more variable. Furthermore, the amount of movement spillover of the striking finger to the adjacent fingers was small irrespective of the finger used for the keystroke. These findings describe an unparalleled amount of independent motion of the fingers. PMID:21880938

  4. Hand kinematics of piano playing.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Flanders, Martha; Soechting, John F

    2011-12-01

    Dexterous use of the hand represents a sophisticated sensorimotor function. In behaviors such as playing the piano, it can involve strong temporal and spatial constraints. The purpose of this study was to determine fundamental patterns of covariation of motion across joints and digits of the human hand. Joint motion was recorded while 5 expert pianists played 30 excerpts from musical pieces, which featured ∼50 different tone sequences and fingering. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm revealed that joint velocities could be categorized into several patterns, which help to simplify the description of the movements of the multiple degrees of freedom of the hand. For the thumb keystroke, two distinct patterns of joint movement covariation emerged and they depended on the spatiotemporal patterns of the task. For example, the thumb-under maneuver was clearly separated into two clusters based on the direction of hand translation along the keyboard. While the pattern of the thumb joint velocities differed between these clusters, the motions at the metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-phalangeal joints of the four fingers were more consistent. For a keystroke executed with one of the fingers, there were three distinct patterns of joint rotations, across which motion at the striking finger was fairly consistent, but motion of the other fingers was more variable. Furthermore, the amount of movement spillover of the striking finger to the adjacent fingers was small irrespective of the finger used for the keystroke. These findings describe an unparalleled amount of independent motion of the fingers. PMID:21880938

  5. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  6. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  7. The SLUGGS survey: wide-field stellar kinematics of early-type galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Woodley, Kristin A.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S.; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher; Strader, Jay; Spitler, Lee R.; Foster, Caroline

    2014-08-20

    We present stellar kinematics of 22 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs), based on two-dimensional (2D) absorption line stellar spectroscopy out to ∼2-4 R {sub e} (effective radii), as part of the ongoing SLUGGS Survey. The galaxies span a factor of 20 in intrinsic luminosity, as well as a full range of environment and ETG morphology. Our data consist of good velocity resolution (σ{sub inst} ∼ 25 km s{sup –1}) integrated stellar-light spectra extracted from the individual slitlets of custom made Keck/DEIMOS slitmasks. We extract stellar kinematics measurements (V, σ, h {sub 3}, and h {sub 4}) for each galaxy. Combining with literature values from smaller radii, we present 2D spatially resolved maps of the large-scale kinematic structure in each galaxy. We find that the kinematic homogeneity found inside 1 R {sub e} often breaks down at larger radii, where a variety of kinematic behaviors are observed. While central slow rotators remain slowly rotating in their halos, central fast rotators show more diversity, ranging from rapidly increasing to rapidly declining specific angular momentum profiles in the outer regions. There are indications that the outer trends depend on morphological type, raising questions about the proposed unification of the elliptical and lenticular (S0) galaxy families in the ATLAS{sup 3D} survey. Several galaxies in our sample show multiple lines of evidence for distinct disk components embedded in more slowly rotating spheroids, and we suggest a joint photometric-kinematic approach for robust bulge-disk decomposition. Our observational results appear generally consistent with a picture of two-phase (in-situ plus accretion) galaxy formation.

  8. Automated quantification of lumbar vertebral kinematics from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon; Zhao, Kristin; Morel, Etienne; White, Dan; Magnuson, Dixon; Gay, Ralph; An, Kai-Nan; Robb, Richard

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that the vertebra-to-vertebra patterns of spinal flexion and extension motion of persons with lower back pain will differ from those of persons who are pain-free. Thus, it is our goal to measure the motion of individual lumbar vertebrae noninvasively from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences. Two-dimensional normalized mutual information-based image registration was used to track frame-to-frame motion. Software was developed that required the operator to identify each vertebra on the first frame of the sequence using a four-point "caliper" placed at the posterior and anterior edges of the inferior and superior end plates of the target vertebrae. The program then resolved the individual motions of each vertebra independently throughout the entire sequence. To validate the technique, 6 cadaveric lumbar spine specimens were potted in polymethylmethacrylate and instrumented with optoelectric sensors. The specimens were then placed in a custom dynamic spine simulator and moved through flexion-extension cycles while kinematic data and fluoroscopic sequences were simultaneously acquired. We found strong correlation between the absolute flexionextension range of motion of each vertebra as recorded by the optoelectric system and as determined from the fluoroscopic sequence via registration. We conclude that this method is a viable way of noninvasively assessing twodimensional vertebral motion.

  9. Fast tracking using edge histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, Przemyslaw

    1997-04-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm for tracking objects and objects boundaries. This algorithm was developed and applied in a system used for compositing computer generated images and real world video sequences, but can be applied in general in all tracking systems where accuracy and high processing speed are required. The algorithm is based on analysis of histograms obtained by summing along chosen axles pixels of edge segmented images. Edge segmentation is done by spatial convolution using gradient operator. The advantage of such an approach is that it can be performed in real-time using available on the market hardware convolution filters. After edge extraction and histograms computation, respective positions of maximums in edge intensity histograms, in current and previous frame, are compared and matched. Obtained this way information about displacement of histograms maximums, can be directly converted into information about changes of target boundaries positions along chosen axles.

  10. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  11. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  12. Edge of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    On the night of 4 December 2013, a sequence of polar cap patches was captured by an all-sky airglow imager (ASI) in Longyearbyen, Norway (78.1°N, 15.5°E). The 630.0 nm airglow images from the ASI of 4 second exposure time, oversampled the emission of natural lifetime (with quenching) of at least ˜30 sec, introduce no observational blurring effects. By using such high-quality ASI images, we succeeded in visualizing an asymmetry in the gradients between the leading/trailing edges of the patches in a 2-D fashion. The gradient in the leading edge was found to be 2-3 times steeper than that in the trailing edge. We also identified fingerlike structures, appearing only along the trailing edge of the patches, whose horizontal scale size ranged from 55 to 210 km. These fingers are considered to be manifestations of plasma structuring through the gradient-drift instability (GDI), which is known to occur only along the trailing edge of patches. That is, the current 2-D observations visualized, for the first time, how GDI stirs the patch plasma and such a mixing process makes the trailing edge more gradual. This result strongly implies a close connection between the GDI-driven plasma stirring and the asymmetry in the large-scale shape of patches and then suggests that the fingerlike structures can be used as markers to estimate the fine-scale structure in the plasma flow within patches.

  13. Kinematics of ionized gas in the barred Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, M. W.; Mundell, C. G.; Pedlar, A.

    2005-05-01

    We have determined the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the weak oval bar of the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy, NGC 4151, using the TAURUS Fabry-Perot interferometer to simultaneously map the distribution and kinematics of Hβ emission. We also present broad-band ultraviolet imaging of the host galaxy, obtained with XMM-Newton, which shows the detailed distribution of star formation in the bar and in the optically faint outer spiral arms. We compare the distribution and kinematics of ionized gas with that previously determined in neutral hydrogen by Mundell & Shone; we suggest that the distribution of bright, patchy ultraviolet emission close to the HI shocks is consistent with ionization by star clusters that have formed in compressed pre-shock gas. These clusters then travel ballistically through the gaseous shock to ionize gas downstream along the leading edge of the bar. In addition, we detect, for the first time, ionized gas within the shock itself, which is streaming to smaller radii in the same manner as the neutral gas.

  14. The kinematic advantage of electric cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration of a common car with with a turbocharged diesel engine is compared to the same type with an electric motor in terms of kinematics. Starting from a state of rest, the electric car reaches a distant spot earlier than the diesel car, even though the latter has a better specification for engine power and average acceleration from 0 to 100 km h-1. A three phase model of acceleration as a function of time fits the data of the electric car accurately. The first phase is a quadratic growth of acceleration in time. It is shown that the tenfold higher coefficient for the first phase accounts for most of the kinematic advantage of the electric car.

  15. A classification of finite quantum kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolar, J.

    2014-10-01

    Quantum mechanics in Hilbert spaces of finite dimension N is reviewed from the number theoretic point of view. For composite numbers N possible quantum kinematics are classified on the basis of Mackey's Imprimitivity Theorem for finite Abelian groups. This yields also a classification of finite Weyl-Heisenberg groups and the corresponding finite quantum kinematics. Simple number theory gets involved through the fundamental theorem describing all finite discrete Abelian groups of order N as direct products of cyclic groups, whose orders are powers of not necessarily distinct primes contained in the prime decomposition of N. The representation theoretic approach is further compared with the algebraic approach, where the basic object is the corresponding operator algebra. The consideration of fine gradings of this associative algebra then brings a fresh look on the relation between the mathematical formalism and physical realizations of finite quantum systems.

  16. Kinematic measurements using an infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, F.; Paulucci, L.

    2016-03-01

    The use of an infrared sensor as a new alternative to measure position as a function of time in kinematic experiments was investigated using a microcontroller as the data acquisition and control device. These are versatile sensors that offer advantages over typical ultrasound devices. The setup described in this paper enables students to develop their own experiments, promoting opportunities for learning physical concepts such as the different types of forces that can act on a body (gravitational, elastic, drag, etc) and the resulting types of movements with good sensitivity within the 4-30 cm range. As a proof of concept we also present the application of a prototype designed to record the kinematics of mass-spring systems.

  17. Missing Mass Measurement Using Kinematic Cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ian-Woo

    2010-02-10

    We propose a new method for mass measurement of missing energy particle using cusp structure in the kinematic distribution. We consider a resonance particle decay into a pair of missing energy particles and a pair of visible particles and show invariant mass and angular distribution have non-smooth profiles. The cusp location only depends on mass parameters. Invariant mass and angular distribution are complementary in visibility of the cusp.

  18. Analyzing Robotic Kinematics Via Computed Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    Computing system assists in evaluation of kinematics of conceptual robot. Displays positions and motions of robotic manipulator within work cell. Also displays interactions between robotic manipulator and other objects. Results of simulation displayed on graphical computer workstation. System includes both off-the-shelf software originally developed for automotive industry and specially developed software. Simulation system also used to design human-equivalent hand, to model optical train in infrared system, and to develop graphical interface for teleoperator simulation system.

  19. Kinematics of Phase Boundary Growth. Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radev, Krassimir B.

    2010-01-01

    This report aims to give consideration to the time-space evolution of the phase boundary by making use of the kinematic condition on the interface, representing the balance of the mass fluxes through the movable growing boundary, as well as the Gibbs-Thompson condition of the local phase equilibrium. The analysis has shown the determinative role of a dimensionles parameter—combination of only physical properties of the system—on the evolution of surface fluctuations.

  20. Kinematics of Hooke universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, William S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The singularity problem associated with wrist mechanisms commonly found on industrial manipulators can be alleviated by redesigning the wrist so that it functions as a three-axis gimbal system. This paper discussess the kinematics of gimbal robot wrists made of one and two Hooke universal joints. Derivations of the resolved rate motion control equations for the single and double Hooke universal joint wrists are presented using the three-axis gimbal system as a theoretical wrist model.

  1. Lower extremity kinematics of athletics curve sprinting.

    PubMed

    Alt, Tobias; Heinrich, Kai; Funken, Johannes; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Curve running requires the generation of centripetal force altering the movement pattern in comparison to the straight path run. The question arises which kinematic modulations emerge while bend sprinting at high velocities. It has been suggested that during curve sprints the legs fulfil different functions. A three-dimensional motion analysis (16 high-speed cameras) was conducted to compare the segmental kinematics of the lower extremity during the stance phases of linear and curve sprints (radius: 36.5 m) of six sprinters of national competitive level. Peak joint angles substantially differed in the frontal and transversal plane whereas sagittal plane kinematics remained unchanged. During the prolonged left stance phase (left: 107.5 ms, right: 95.7 ms, straight: 104.4 ms) the maximum values of ankle eversion (left: 12.7°, right: 2.6°, straight: 6.6°), hip adduction (left: 13.8°, right: 5.5°, straight: 8.8°) and hip external rotation (left: 21.6°, right: 12.9°, straight: 16.7°) were significantly higher. The inside leg seemed to stabilise the movement in the frontal plane (eversion-adduction strategy) whereas the outside leg provided and controlled the motion in the horizontal plane (rotation strategy). These results extend the principal understanding of the effects of curve sprinting on lower extremity kinematics. This helps to increase the understanding of nonlinear human bipedal locomotion, which in turn might lead to improvements in athletic performance and injury prevention. PMID:25495196

  2. High precision kinematic surveying with laser scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Gunnar

    2007-12-01

    The kinematic survey of roads and railways is becoming a much more common data acquisition method. The development of the Mobile Road Mapping System (MoSES) has reached a level that allows the use of kinematic survey technology for high precision applications. The system is equipped with cameras and laser scanners. For high accuracy requirements, the scanners become the main sensor group because of their geometric precision and reliability. To guarantee reliable survey results, specific calibration procedures have to be applied, which can be divided into the scanner sensor calibration as step 1, and the geometric transformation parameter estimation with respect to the vehicle coordinate system as step 2. Both calibration steps include new methods for sensor behavior modeling and multisensor system integration. To verify laser scanner quality of the MoSES system, the results are regularly checked along different test routes. It can be proved that a standard deviation of 0.004 m for height of the scanner points will be obtained, if the specific calibrations and data processing methods are applied. This level of accuracy opens new possibilities to serve engineering survey applications using kinematic measurement techniques. The key feature of scanner technology is the full digital coverage of the road area. Three application examples illustrate the capabilities. Digital road surface models generated from MoSES data are used, especially for road surface reconstruction tasks along highways. Compared to static surveys, the method offers comparable accuracy at higher speed, lower costs, much higher grid resolution and with greater safety. The system's capability of gaining 360 profiles leads to other complex applications like kinematic tunnel surveys or the precise analysis of bridge clearances.

  3. Brain dopamine and kinematics of graphomotor functions.

    PubMed

    Lange, Klaus W; Mecklinger, Lara; Walitza, Susanne; Becker, Georg; Gerlach, Manfred; Naumann, Markus; Tucha, Oliver

    2006-10-01

    Three experiments were performed in an attempt to achieve a better understanding of the effect of dopamine on handwriting. In the first experiment, kinematic aspects of handwriting movements were compared between healthy participants and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) on their usual dopaminergic treatment and following withdrawal of dopaminergic medication. In the second experiment, the writing performance of healthy participants with a hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra as detected by transcranial sonography (TCS) was compared with the performance of healthy participants with low echogenicity of the substantia nigra. The third experiment examined the effect of central dopamine reduction on kinematic aspects of handwriting movements in healthy adults using acute phenylalanine and tyrosine depletion (APTD). A digitising tablet was used for the assessment of handwriting movements. Participants were asked to perform a simple writing task. Movement time, distance, velocity, acceleration and measures of fluency of handwriting movements were measured. The kinematic analysis of handwriting movements revealed that alterations of central dopaminergic neurotransmission adversely affect movement execution during handwriting. In comparison to the automatic processing of handwriting movements displayed by control participants, participants with an altered dopaminergic neurotransmission shifted from an automatic to a controlled processing of movement execution. Central dopamine appears to be of particular importance with regard to the automatic execution of well-learned movements. PMID:16859791

  4. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Gretchen; Weimar, Wendi

    2015-01-01

    Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg), with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER) and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR) during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly. PMID:26839605

  5. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen; Weimar, Wendi

    2015-12-22

    Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg), with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER) and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR) during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly. PMID:26839605

  6. Kinematic adaptations to tripedal locomotion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Goldner, B; Fuchs, A; Nolte, I; Schilling, N

    2015-05-01

    Limb amputation often represents the only treatment option for canine patients with certain diseases or injuries of the appendicular system. Previous studies have investigated adaptations to tripedal locomotion in dogs but there is a lack of understanding of biomechanical compensatory mechanisms. This study evaluated the kinematic differences between quadrupedal and tripedal locomotion in nine healthy dogs running on a treadmill. The loss of the right pelvic limb was simulated using an Ehmer sling. Kinematic gait analysis included spatio-temporal comparisons of limb, joint and segment angles of the remaining pelvic and both thoracic limbs. The following key parameters were compared between quadrupedal and tripedal conditions: angles at touch-down and lift-off, minimum and maximum joint angles, plus range of motion. Significant differences in angular excursion were identified in several joints of each limb during both stance and swing phases. The most pronounced differences concerned the remaining pelvic limb, followed by the contralateral thoracic limb and, to a lesser degree, the ipsilateral thoracic limb. The thoracic limbs were, in general, more retracted, consistent with pelvic limb unloading and previous observations of bodyweight re-distribution in amputees. Proximal limb segments showed more distinct changes than distal ones. Particularly, the persistently greater anteversion of the pelvis probably affects the axial system. Overall, tripedal locomotion requires concerted kinematic adjustments of both the appendicular and axial systems, and consequently preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitative care of canine amputees should involve the whole musculoskeletal apparatus. PMID:25862392

  7. New Kinematical Constraints on Cosmic Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steve W.; Amin, Mustafa A.; Blandford, Roger; /-KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-05-25

    We present and employ a new kinematical approach to ''dark energy'' studies. We construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). An elegant feature of this parameterization is that all {Lambda}CDM models have j(t)=1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Applying our model to redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements, we obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk, j(t)=j, we measure q{sub 0}=-0.81 {+-} 0.14 and j=2.16 +0.81 -0.75, results that are consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} confidence level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. The results obtained with this new approach therefore provide important additional information and we argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible.

  8. Decay patterns of edge states at reconstructed armchair graphene edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changwon; Ihm, Jisoon; Kim, Gunn

    Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the electronic structures of localized states at reconstructed armchair graphene edges. We consider graphene nanoribbons with two different edge types and obtain the energy band structures and charge densities of the edge states. By examining the imaginary part of the wave vector in the forbidden energy region, we reveal the decay behavior of the wave functions in graphene. The complex band structures of graphene in the armchair and zigzag directions are presented in the first-principles framework. G.K. acknowledges the support of the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Education (Grant No. 2013R1A1A2009131) and the Priority Research Center Program (Grant No. 2010-0020207).

  9. Computational tool for comparison of kinematic mechanisms and commonly used kinematic models

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Van Vorhis, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    Accurate, reliable, and reproducible methods to measure the movements of human joints have been elusive. Currently, three-dimensional recording methods are used to track the motion of one segment relative to another as the joint moves. Six parameters describe the moving segment`s location and orientation relative to the reference segment: three translations (x, y, and z) and three rotations (yaw, pitch and roll) in the reference frame. The raw data can be difficult to interpret. For this reason, several methods have been developed to measure the motion of human joints and to describe the resulting data. For example, instant helical axes or screw deviation axes (Kinzell et al., 1972), the Joint Coordinate System of Grood and Suntay (1983), and the Euler angle method have been used to describe the movements of bones relative to each other. None of these methods takes into account the physical kinematic mechanism producing the joint motion. More recently, Lupichuk (1995) has developed an algorithm to find, for an arbitrary revolute, the axis` position and orientation in three- dimensional space. Each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages in analyzing joint kinematics. The authors have developed software to provide a means of comparing these methods for arbitrary, single degree of freedom, kinematic mechanisms. Our objective is to demonstrate the software and to show how it can be used to compare the results from the different kinematic models as they are applied to specific kinematic mechanisms.

  10. Three-dimensional trunk kinematics in golf: between-club differences and relationships to clubhead speed.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Cochrane, Jodie; Ball, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to determine whether significant three-dimensional (3D) trunk kinematic differences existed between a driver and a five-iron during a golf swing; and (ii) to determine the anthropometric, physiological, and trunk kinematic variables associated with clubhead speed. Trunk range of motion and golf swing kinematic data were collected from 15 low-handicap male golfers (handicap = 2.5 +/- 1.9). Data were collected using a 10-camera motion capture system operating at 250 Hz. Data on clubhead speed and ball velocity were collected using a real-time launch monitor. Paired t-tests revealed nine significant (p < or = 0.0019) between-club differences for golf swing kinematics, namely trunk and lower trunk flexion/extension and lower trunk axial rotation. Multiple regression analyses explained 33.7-66.7% of the variance in clubhead speed for the driver and five-iron, respectively, with both trunk and lower trunk variables showing associations with clubhead speed. Future studies should consider the role of the upper limbs and modifiable features of the golf club in developing clubhead speed for the driver in particular. PMID:23898684

  11. On the Edge: Haptic Discrimination of Edge Sharpness

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Andy L.; Kent, Christopher; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Benton, Christopher P.; Groen, Martin G. M.; Noyes, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing ubiquity of haptic displays (e.g., smart phones and tablets) necessitates a better understanding of the perceptual capabilities of the human haptic system. Haptic displays will soon be capable of locally deforming to create simple 3D shapes. This study investigated the sensitivity of our haptic system to a fundamental component of shapes: edges. A novel set of eight high quality shape stimuli with test edges that varied in sharpness were fabricated in a 3D printer. In a two alternative, forced choice task, blindfolded participants were presented with two of these shapes side by side (one the reference, the other selected randomly from the remaining set of seven) and after actively exploring the test edge of each shape with the tip of their index finger, reported which shape had the sharper edge. We used a model selection approach to fit optimal psychometric functions to performance data, and from these obtained just noticeable differences and Weber fractions. In Experiment 1, participants performed the task with four different references. With sharpness defined as the angle at which one surface meets the horizontal plane, the four JNDs closely followed Weber’s Law, giving a Weber fraction of 0.11. Comparisons to previously reported Weber fractions from other haptic manipulations (e.g. amplitude of vibration) suggests we are sufficiently sensitive to changes in edge sharpness for this to be of potential utility in the design of future haptic displays. In Experiment 2, two groups of participants performed the task with a single reference but different exploration strategies; one was limited to a single touch, the other unconstrained and free to explore as they wished. As predicted, the JND in the free exploration condition was lower than that in the single touch condition, indicating exploration strategy affects sensitivity to edge sharpness. PMID:24023852

  12. A study of slanted-edge MTF stability and repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Jackson K. M.

    2015-01-01

    The slanted-edge method of measuring the spatial frequency response (SFR) as an approximation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) has become a well known and widely used image quality testing method over the last 10 years. This method has been adopted by multiple international standards including ISO and IEEE. Nearly every commercially available image quality testing software includes the slanted-edge method and there are numerous open-source algorithms available. This method is one of the most important image quality algorithms in use today. This paper explores test conditions and the impacts they have on the stability and precision of the slanted-edge method as well as details of the algorithm itself. Real world and simulated data are used to validate the characteristics of the algorithm. Details of the target such as edge angle and contrast ratio are tested to determine the impact on measurement under various conditions. The original algorithm defines a near vertical edge so that errors introduced are minor but the theory behind the algorithm requires a perfectly vertical edge. A correction factor is introduced as a way to compensate for this problem. Contrast ratio is shown to have no impact on results in an absence of noise.

  13. Rajiform locomotion: three-dimensional kinematics of the pectoral fin surface during swimming in the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon orbignyi.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Erin L; Lauder, George V

    2012-09-15

    Rajiform locomotion in fishes is dominated by distinctive undulations of expanded pectoral fins. Unlike other fishes, which typically interact with the fluid environment via multiple fins, undulating rays modulate a single control surface, the pectoral disc, to perform pelagic locomotion, maneuvering and other behaviors. Complex deformations of the broad, flexible pectoral fins occur as the undulating wave varies in three dimensions; pectoral fin kinematics and changes in waveform with swimming speed cannot be fully quantified by two-dimensional analyses of the fin margin. We present the first three-dimensional analysis of undulatory rajiform locomotion in a batoid, the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon orbignyi. Using three cameras (250 frames s(-1)), we gathered three-dimensional excursion data from 31 points on the pectoral fin during swimming at 1.5 and 2.5 disc lengths s(-1), describing the propulsive wave and contrasting waveforms between swimming speeds. Only a relatively small region of the pectoral fin (~25%) undulates with significant amplitude (>0.5 cm). Stingrays can maintain extreme lateral curvature of the distal fin margin in opposition to induced hydrodynamic loads, 'cupping' the edge of the pectoral fin into the flow, with potential implications for drag reduction. Wave amplitude increases across both anteroposterior and mediolateral fin axes. Along the anteroposterior axis, amplitude increases until the wave reaches mid-disc and then remains constant, in contrast to angulliform patterns of continuous amplitude increase. Increases in swimming speed are driven by both wave frequency and wavespeed, though multivariate analyses reveal a secondary role for amplitude. PMID:22693031

  14. A model-free feature-based bi-planar RSA method for kinematic analysis of total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shahram; Anglin, Carolyn; Agbanlog, Kenard; Masri, Bassam A; Wilson, David R

    2012-03-01

    Fluoroscopic imaging is commonly used for assessing relative motions of orthopaedic implants. One limiting factor to in vivo model-based roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis of total knee arthroplasty is the need for 3D models of the implants.The 3D models of the implant components must be reverse-engineered, if not provided by the company, which makes this method impractical for a clinical study involving many types or sizes of implants. This study introduces a novel feature-based methodology that registers the features at the implant-bone or implant-cement interface of the components that have elementary shapes. These features include pegs with hemispherical heads, and straight, circular or curved edges located on flat faces of the box of the femoral component or the stem geometry of the tibial component. Software was developed to allow easy registration of these features through a graphical user interface. The accuracy and precision of registration for multiple flexion angles from 0 to 120 deg was determined with reference to registered poses of the implants through experiments on bone replica models and also on a cadaver specimen implanted with total knee prostheses. When compared to an equivalent bi-planar model-based registration, the results were comparable: The mean accuracy of this feature-based method was 1.45 deg and 1.03 mm (in comparison to 0.95 deg and 1.32 mm for the model-based approach), and the mean precision was 0.57 deg and 0.26 mm (in comparison to 0.42 deg and 0.44 mm for the model-based approach).The methodology and the developed software can easily accommodate different design of implants with various fixation features. This method can facilitate in vivo kinematic analysis of total knee arthroplasty by eliminating the need for 3D models of the implant components. PMID:22482689

  15. Influence of kinematic redundancy on the singularity-free workspace of parallel kinematic machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlarski, Jens; Heimann, Bodo; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2012-06-01

    In this paper the effect of kinematic redundancy in order to reduce the singularity loci of the direct kinematics and to increase the operational, i.e., singularityfree, workspace is demonstrated. The proposed approach consists of additional prismatic actuators allowing one or more base joints to move linearly. As a result, a selective reconfiguration can be performed in order to avoid singular configurations. Exemplarily, kinematically redundant schemes of four structures, the 3 RRR, the 3R PR, the 6U PS, and the 6 RUS, are considered. The relationship between the redundancy and the operational workspace is studied and several analysis examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed concept. Furthermore, the additional benefit of an increasing number of redundant actuators is discussed.

  16. Continued Growth on Graphene Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhengtang

    Previously, we have shown that the large-size single crystal graphene can be obtained by suppressing the nucleation density during Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) growth. Here we demonstrate that the graphene single crystal can be amplified by a continued growth method. In this process, we used a mild oxidation step after the first-growth, which lead to the observed fromation of oxides at the vicinity of graphene edges, which allows the graphene growth at seed edges due to reduced activation energy. Consequently, we successful grown a secondary single-crystal graphene structures with the same lattice structure, orientation on the graphene edges. This amplification method would enable the production of graphene electronics with controlled properties.

  17. Edges and Corners With Shearlets.

    PubMed

    Duval-Poo, Miguel A; Odone, Francesca; De Vito, Ernesto

    2015-11-01

    Shearlets are a relatively new and very effective multi-scale framework for signal analysis. Contrary to the traditional wavelets, shearlets are capable to efficiently capture the anisotropic information in multivariate problem classes. Therefore, shearlets can be seen as the valid choice for multi-scale analysis and detection of directional sensitive visual features like edges and corners. In this paper, we start by reviewing the main properties of shearlets that are important for edge and corner detection. Then, we study algorithms for multi-scale edge and corner detection based on the shearlet representation. We provide an extensive experimental assessment on benchmark data sets which empirically confirms the potential of shearlets feature detection. PMID:26353351

  18. How realistic are flat-ramp-flat fault kinematic models? Comparing mechanical and kinematic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, L.; Nevitt, J. M.; Hilley, G. E.; Seixas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Rock within the upper crust appears to deform according to elasto-plastic constitutive rules, but structural geologists often employ kinematic descriptions that prescribe particle motions irrespective of these physical properties. In this contribution, we examine the range of constitutive properties that are approximately implied by kinematic models by comparing predicted deformations between mechanical and kinematic models for identical fault geometric configurations. Specifically, we use the ABAQUS finite-element package to model a fault-bend-fold geometry using an elasto-plastic constitutive rule (the elastic component is linear and the plastic failure occurs according to a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion). We varied physical properties in the mechanical model (i.e., Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, cohesion yield strength, internal friction angle, sliding friction angle) to determine the impact of each on the observed deformations, which were then compared to predictions of kinematic models parameterized with identical geometries. We found that a limited sub-set of physical properties were required to produce deformations that were similar to those predicted by the kinematic models. Specifically, mechanical models with low cohesion are required to allow the kink at the bottom of the flat-ramp geometry to remain stationary over time. Additionally, deformations produced by steep ramp geometries (30 degrees) are difficult to reconcile between the two types of models, while lower slope gradients better conform to the geometric assumptions. These physical properties may fall within the range of those observed in laboratory experiments, suggesting that particle motions predicted by kinematic models may provide an approximate representation of those produced by a physically consistent model under some circumstances.

  19. Active edge control in the precessions polishing process for manufacturing large mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Wei; Walker, David; Yu, Gouyo

    2014-09-01

    The segmentation of the primary mirror is the only promising solution for building the next generation of ground telescopes. However, manufacturing segmented mirrors presents its own challenges. The edge mis-figure impacts directly on the telescope's scientific output. The `Edge effect' significantly dominates the polishing precision. Therefore, the edge control is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues in the segment production that needs to be addressed urgently. This paper reports an active edge control technique for the mirror segments fabrication using the Precession's polishing technique. The strategy in this technique requires that the large spot be selected on the bulk area for fast polishing, and the small spot is used for edge figuring. This can be performed by tool lift and optimizing the dell time to compensate for non-uniform material removal at the edge zone. This requires accurate and stable edge tool influence functions. To obtain the full tool influence function at the edge, we have demonstrated in previous work a novel hybrid-measurement method which uses both simultaneous phase interferometry and profilometry. In this paper, the edge effect under `Bonnet tool' polishing is investigated. The pressure distribution is analyzed by means of finite element analysis (FEA). According to the `Preston' equation, the shape of the edge tool influence functions is predicted. With this help, the multiple process parameters at the edge zone are optimized. This is demonstrated on a 200mm crosscorners hexagonal part with a result of PV less than 200nm for entire surface.

  20. Edge shape and comfort of rigid lenses.

    PubMed

    La Hood, D

    1988-08-01

    One of the main factors determining the comfort of a rigid contact lens is the shape of the edge. The comfort of four different contact lens edge shapes was assessed with four unadapted subjects in a randomized masked trial. Lenses with well rounded anterior edge profiles were found to be significantly more comfortable than lenses with square anterior edges. There was no significant difference in subjective comfort between a rounded and square posterior edge profile. The results suggest that the interaction of the edge with the eyelid is more important in determining comfort than edge effects on the cornea, when lenses are fitted according to a corneal alignment philosophy. PMID:3177585

  1. Introduction to Solid Edge(TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John C.

    1997-01-01

    Solid Edge was conceived and developed to provide breakthrough levels of productivity for engineers and designers by providing tools focused on their daily work. This user-oriented approach led to a focus on five key areas: 1) assembly-focused design, 2) ease of use, 3) plug and play software, 4) superior part modeling, and 5) production drafting. Mechanical designers work primarily with assemblies of parts that together perform a useful function. The parts themselves are principally a consequence of the function of the assembly and the interrelationships between parts. Breakthroughs in productivity will come through a focus on making the design of assemblies easier, with enhanced part design a prerequisite to that. Enhancements already in development are part to part interaction, more assembly features applying to multiple parts, exploded assemblies, assembly playback, enhanced BOM, etc.

  2. Gabor wavelets for texture edge extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Juliang; Foerstner, Wolfgang

    1994-08-01

    Textures in images have a natural order, both in orientation and multiple narrow-band frequency, which requires the user to employ multichannel local spatial/frequency filtering and orientation selectivity, and to have a multiscale characteristic. Each channel covers one part of a whole frequency domain, which indicates different information for the different texton. Gabor filter, as a near orthogonal wavelet used in this paper, has orientation selectivity, multiscale property, linear phase, and good localization both in spatial and frequency domains, which are suitable for texture analysis. Gabor filters are employed for clustering the similarity of the same type of textons. Gaussian filters are also used for detection of normal image edges. Then hybrid texture and nontexture gradient measurement is based on fusion of the difference of amplitude of the filter responses between Gabor and Gaussian filters at neighboring pixels by mainly using average squared gradient. Normalization, based on the noise response and based on maximum response, is computed.

  3. Shape-dependent canny edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.; Nercessian, Shahan C.; Almunstashri, Ali A.

    2011-08-01

    Edges characterize the boundaries of objects in images and are informative structural cues for computer vision and target/object detection and recognition systems. The Canny edge detector is widely regarded as the edge detection standard. It is fairly adaptable to different environments, as its parametric nature attempts to tailor the detection of edges based on image-dependent characteristics or the particular requirements of a given implementation. Though it has been used in a myriad of image processing tasks, the Canny edge detector is still vulnerable to edge losses, localization errors, and noise sensitivity. These issues are largely due to the key tradeoff made in the scale and size of the edge detection filters used by the algorithm. Small-scaled filters are sensitive to edges but also to noise, whereas large-scaled filters are robust to noise but could filter out fine details. In this paper, novel edge detection kernel generalizations and a shape-dependent edge detector are introduced to alleviate these shortcomings. While most standard edge detection algorithms are based on convolving the input image with fixed size square kernels, this paper will illustrate the benefits of different filter sizes, and more importantly, different kernel shapes for edge detection. Moreover, new edge fusion methods are introduced to more effectively combine the individual edge responses. Existing edge detectors, including the Canny edge detector, can be obtained from the generalized edge detector by specifying corresponding parameters and kernel shapes. The proposed representations and edge detector have been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on several different types of image data. Computer simulations demonstrate that nonsquare kernel approaches can outperform square kernel approaches such as Canny, Sobel, Prewitt, Roberts, and others, providing better tradeoffs between noise rejection, accurate edge localization, and resolution. Where possible, Pratt's figure of

  4. POTENTIAL MEMBERS OF STELLAR KINEMATIC GROUPS WITHIN 30 pc OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Tadashi; Morino, Jun-Ichi

    2012-01-15

    We analyze the kinematic histories of stars within 30 pc of the Sun, for which three-dimensional spatial coordinates and three-dimensional velocity vectors are available. From this sample, we extract members of stellar kinematic groups (SKGs) in the following manner. First, we consider in the three-dimensional velocity space centered on the local standard of rest, a sphere with a radius of 8 km s{sup -1} centered on the mean velocity vector of a particular SKG. Around each SKG velocity center, we have found a significant excess of stars compared to background field stars. For each candidate, in the three-dimensional spatial coordinate space, its trajectory is traced back in time by the age of the relevant SKG to obtain the estimated distance from the SKG center at the time of the SKG's birth by the epicyclic approximation and harmonic vertical motion. It often happens that a star is a candidate member of multiple SKGs. Then we rank the candidacy to multiple SKGs based on the smallness of distance separations. In this manner, we have kinematically selected 238 candidates. We further impose at least one of the following qualitative criteria for being a member: spectral type A or B, variability, or EUV and X-ray emission. We have finally selected 137 candidate members of SKGs out of a sample of 966 stars.

  5. Kinematical and mechanical aspects of wafer slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, P. G.

    1982-02-01

    Some recently achieved results concerning the technological fundamentals of slurry sawing are presented. The specific material removal process and the related kinematic and geometric contact conditions between workpiece and saw blade are described. The result of a functional description of the slurry sawing process is presented, expressing the main process criteria, such as infeed per stroke, specific removal rate, specific tool wear, and vertical stroke intensity, in terms of the dominating process parameters, such as stroke length, width of workpiece, stroke frequency, specific cutting force and slurry specification.

  6. Kinematic control of robot with degenerate wrist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Moore, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Kinematic resolved rate equations allow an operator with visual feedback to dynamically control a robot hand. When the robot wrist is degenerate, the computed joint angle rates exceed operational limits, and unwanted hand movements can result. The generalized matrix inverse solution can also produce unwanted responses. A method is introduced to control the robot hand in the region of the degenerate robot wrist. The method uses a coordinated movement of the first and third joints of the robot wrist to locate the second wrist joint axis for movement of the robot hand in the commanded direction. The method does not entail infinite joint angle rates.

  7. Automobile Collisions, Kinematics and Related Injury Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    It has been determined clinically that fatalities and injury severity resulting from automobile collisions have decreased during the last five years for low impact speeds. This reduction is a direct result of the application of biomechanics and occupant kinematics, as well as changes in automobile design. The paper defines terminology used in the field of mechanics and develops examples and illustrations of the physical concepts of acceleration, force strength, magnitude duration, rate of onset and others, as they apply to collision phenomena and injury. The mechanism of injury pattern reduction through the use of restraint systems is illustrated. PMID:5059661

  8. Null-strut calculus. I. Kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Kheyfets, A.; LaFave, N.J.; Miller, W.A. )

    1990-06-15

    This paper describes the kinematics of null-strut calculus---a 3+1 Regge calculus approach to general relativity. We show how to model the geometry of spacetime with simplicial spacelike three-geometries (TET's) linked to earlier'' and later'' momentumlike lattice surfaces (TET{sup *}) entirely by light rays or null struts.'' These three-layered lattice spacetime geometries are defined and analyzed using combinatorial formulas for the structure of polytopes. The following paper in this series describes how these three-layered spacetime lattices are used to model spacetimes in full conformity with Einstein's theory of gravity.

  9. Kinematics and Fluid Dynamics of Jellyfish Maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laura; Hoover, Alex

    2014-11-01

    Jellyfish propel themselves through the water through periodic contractions of their elastic bells. Some jellyfish, such as the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita and the upside down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana, can perform turns via asymmetric contractions of the bell. The fluid dynamics of jellyfish forward propulsion and turning is explored here by analyzing the contraction kinematics of several species and using flow visualization to quantify the resulting flow fields. The asymmetric contraction and structure of the jellyfish generates asymmetries in the starting and stopping vortices. This creates a diagonal jet and a net torque acting on the jellyfish. Results are compared to immersed boundary simulations

  10. Quantum simulation of noncausal kinematic transformations.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U; Casanova, J; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2013-08-30

    We propose the implementation of Galileo group symmetry operations or, in general, linear coordinate transformations in a quantum simulator. With an appropriate encoding, unitary gates applied to our quantum system give rise to Galilean boosts or spatial and time parity operations in the simulated dynamics. This framework provides us with a flexible toolbox that enhances the versatility of quantum simulation theory, allowing the direct access to dynamical quantities that would otherwise require full tomography. Furthermore, this method enables the study of noncausal kinematics and phenomena beyond special relativity in a quantum controllable system. PMID:24033011

  11. Failure tolerant operation of kinematically redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Christopher L.; Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    1994-01-01

    Redundant manipulators may compensate for failed joints with their additional degrees of freedom. In this paper such a manipulator is considered fault tolerant if it can guarantee completion of a task after any one of its joints has failed. This fault tolerance of kinematically redundant manipulators is insured here. Methods to analyze the manipulator's work space find regions inherently suitable for critical tasks because of their high level of failure tolerance. Constraints are then placed on the manipulator's range of motion to guarantee completion of a task.

  12. Kinematic Measurements from YouTube Videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2009-04-01

    Video analysis of motion has been in use now for some time.1-3 However, some teachers may not have video equipment or may be looking for innovative ways to engage students with interesting applications at no cost. The recent advent of YouTube offers opportunities for students to measure kinematic properties of real-life events using their computers. This paper provides examples such as measuring the average speed of a winning horse at the Kentucky Derby, plotting speed versus time from watching the speedometer of a high-performance bike, and determining acceleration for circular motion of amusement park rides.

  13. JFKengine: A Jacobian and Forward Kinematics Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, K.N.

    2003-02-13

    During robot path planning and control the equations that describe the robot motions are determined and solved. Historically these expressions were derived analytically off-line. For robots that must adapt to their environment or perform a wide range of tasks, a way is needed to rapidly re-derive these expressions to take into account the robot kinematic changes, such as when a tool is added to the end-effector. The JFKengine software was developed to automatically produce the expressions representing the manipulator arm motion, including the manipulator arm Jacobian and the forward kinematic expressions. Its programming interface can be used in conjunction with robot simulation software or with robot control software. Thus, it helps to automate the process of configuration changes for serial robot manipulators. If the manipulator undergoes a geometric change, such as tool acquisition, then JFKengine can be invoked again from the control or simulation software, passing it parameters for the new arm configuration. This report describes the automated processes that are implemented by JFKengine to derive the kinematic equations and the programming interface by which it is invoked. Then it discusses the tree data structure that was chosen to store the expressions, followed by several examples of portions of expressions as represented in the tree. The C++ classes and their methods that implement the expression differentiation and evaluation operations are described. The algorithms used to construct the Jacobian and forward kinematic equations using these basic building blocks are then illustrated. The activity described in this report is part of a larger project entitled ''Multi-Optimization Criteria-Based Robot Behavioral Adaptability and Motion Planning'' that focuses on the development of a methodology for the generalized resolution of robot motion equations with time-varying configurations, constraints, and task objective criteria. A specific goal of this project is

  14. The Problem of the Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faatz, Judith A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a field study in a local ecosystem which allows high school students to investigate the edge effect, where a meadow and a forest meet. Students measure soil moisture content, soil temperature, air temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity, and illumination level. Teachers can help students apply their findings to understand problems…

  15. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-11-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  16. Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise - the Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, THomas F.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to reduce the noise radiating from a wing-flap side edge is being developed. As an airplane wing with an extended flap is exposed to a subsonic airflow, air is blown outward through thin rectangular chord-wise slots at various locations along the side edges and side surface of the flap to weaken and push away the vortices that originate in that region of the flap and are responsible for important noise emissions. Air is blown through the slots at up to twice the local flow velocity. The blowing is done using one or multiple slots, where a slot is located along the top, bottom or side surface of the flap along the side edge, or also along the intersection of the bottom (or top) and side surfaces.

  17. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  18. Development of edge effects around experimental ecosystem hotspots is affected by edge density and matrix type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecological edge effects are sensitive to landscape context. In particular, edge effects can be altered by matrix type and by the presence of other nearby edges. We experimentally altered patch configurations in an African savanna to determine how edge density and matrix type influence edge effect de...

  19. [Application and development of kinematical alighment during total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Zhang Guo-dong; Yang, Chen; Yang, Guang; Qi, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty is an emerging process, and draws more and more attentions from scholars. Knee joint is close to normal joint after TKA through kinematical alighment, which has good clinical results and functional scores, and not increase failure probility. Thus, it may increase joint stress of patella-femur joint, lead to patellar maltracking and increase abrasion. The paper summarized defination and basical principle, operative method, clinical outcomes and deficiency of kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty, in order to choose a better way for kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26911130

  20. Geometric deviation modeling by kinematic matrix based on Lagrangian coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weidong; Hu, Yueming; Liu, Yu; Dai, Wanyi

    2015-09-01

    Typical representation of dimension and geometric accuracy is limited to the self-representation of dimension and geometric deviation based on geometry variation thinking, yet the interactivity affection of geometric variation and gesture variation of multi-rigid body is not included. In this paper, a kinematic matrix model based on Lagrangian coordinate is introduced, with the purpose of unified model for geometric variation and gesture variation and their interactive and integrated analysis. Kinematic model with joint, local base and movable base is built. The ideal feature of functional geometry is treated as the base body; the fitting feature of functional geometry is treated as the adjacent movable body; the local base of the kinematic model is fixed onto the ideal geometry, and the movable base of the kinematic model is fixed onto the fitting geometry. Furthermore, the geometric deviation is treated as relative location or rotation variation between the movable base and the local base, and it's expressed by the Lagrangian coordinate. Moreover, kinematic matrix based on Lagrangian coordinate for different types of geometry tolerance zones is constructed, and total freedom for each kinematic model is discussed. Finally, the Lagrangian coordinate library, kinematic matrix library for geometric deviation modeling is illustrated, and an example of block and piston fits is introduced. Dimension and geometric tolerances of the shaft and hole fitting feature are constructed by kinematic matrix and Lagrangian coordinate, and the results indicate that the proposed kinematic matrix is capable and robust in dimension and geometric tolerances modeling.

  1. Kinematics Analysis of an Aided Robot for Needle Insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Gao, Dedong; Wang, Shan; Bai, Huiquan; Zheng, Haojun

    The kinematic relationship between the needle base and the robot's joints is analyzed. The analysis process is based on the aided needle-insertion robot built by our group. The thinking of needle-inserting procedure is confirming the needle base's posture before the needle inserted into tissue. The method of Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) parameters is used to establish a link robot body-frames with the structural characteristics of the robot. After analysing kinematics, the kinematics equation is presented. The kinematics inverse solutions are obtained with the analytical method and geometry analysis method.

  2. Architecture and Kinematics of the Taiwan Arc-Continent Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, S.; Suppe, J.; Wu, Y. M.; Kanda, R. V. S.

    2014-12-01

    In Taiwan two subduction zones come together in quasi-orthogonal, kinematically stable configuration. Under Taiwan the upper crust of Eurasia is decoupled from the rest of the lithosphere by a detachment that forms the main subduction interface between Eurasia (EU) and Philippine Sea plate (PSP). This interface is visible in both seismicity and crustal tomography at shallow depths and can be followed into the mantle to depths of 450-500 km using global tomography. The plate interface between EU and PSP in the upper 100 km changes from about 60 degrees in the south to vertical (south-central Taiwan) to overturned (north-central Taiwan). The Eurasian Moho is similarly folded, but it does not overturn. Shortening across the plate boundary is accomplished by a combination of subduction of Eurasian lithosphere, folding and thrusting in the Eurasian upper crust, and a secondary subduction zone within the PSP. We hypothesize that: (1) once arc-continent collision occurs, subduction of Eurasian continental lower crust and upper mantle can continue by lithospheric delamination and by continuity with the much larger Eurasian slab to the south; (2) the upper crust of EU deforms by faulting and folding; (3) the present convergence rate of about 90 mm/yr is limited to the last 2 Ma, whereas the long-term rate is about 30 mm/yr and in Taiwan the difference is being taken up by secondary subduction within the PSP margin; (4) a margin-parallel STEP (Subduction-Transform-Edge-Propagator) fault forms the northern limit of Eurasian subduction, which allows the whole system to propagate self-similarly southwestward.

  3. Mechanics, kinematics and geometry of pebble abrasion from binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    As sediment is transported downstream as bedload, it collides with the bed causing sharp edges to chip and wear away, rounding the rock through the process of abrasion. Previous work has linked abrasion to downstream fining and rounding of grains, however, there has been little attempt to understand the underlying kinematics of abrasion. Furthermore, most studies neglect the fine particle produced during the abrasion process, as the initial grain gets smaller and rounder. In this research, we preform well-controlled laboratory experiments to determine the functional dependence between impact energy and mass lost from abrasion. We use a double-pendulum "Newton's Cradle" set-up to examine the abrasion between two grains and with a high-speed camera, we can quantify the impact energies during collision. Results from experiments verify that mass loss is proportional to kinetic energy. We define a material parameter that incorporates material density, Young's modulus, and tensile stress and show that this parameter is directly related to the proportionality between mass loss and energy. We identify an initial region of the mass loss curves in which abrasion is independent of energy and material properties; results suggest this region is determined by shape. We show that grain size distributions of daughter products are universal and independent of material; they follow a Weibull distribution, which is expected distribution from brittle fracture theory. Finally, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show a thin damage zone near the surface, suggesting that collision energy is attenuated over some small skin depth. Overall, we find that pebble abrasion by collision can be characterized by two universal scaling relations - the mass loss versus energy curves and the size distribution of daughter products. Results will be useful for estimating expected abrasion rates in the field, and additionally demonstrate that low-energy collisions produce large quantities of sand

  4. Study on general theory of kinematics and dynamics of wheeled mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukishima, Takahiro; Sasaki, Ken; Takano, Masaharu; Inoue, Kenji

    1992-03-01

    This paper proposes a general theory of kinematics and dynamics of wheeled mobile robots (WMRs). Unlike robotic manipulators which are modeled as 3-dimensional serial link mechanism, WMRs will be modeled as planar linkage mechanism with multiple links branching out from the base and/or another link. Since this model resembles a tree with branches, it will be called 'tree-structured-link'. The end of each link corresponds to the wheel which is in contact with the floor. In dynamics of WMR, equation of motion of a WMR is derived from joint input torques incorporating wheel dynamics. The wheel dynamics determines forces and moments acting on wheels as a function of slip velocity. This slippage of wheels is essential in dynamics of WMR. It will also be shown that the dynamics of WMR reduces to kinematics when slippage of wheels is neglected. Furthermore, the equation of dynamics is rewritten in velocity input form, since most of industrial motors are velocity controlled.

  5. Planning JWST/NIRSpec Multi-Object Spectroscopy: Galaxy Kinematics at Redshifts 2-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassin, Susan A.; Beck, T. L.; Karakla, D. M.; Soderblom, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    The JWST Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) team at STScI is developing software to plan observations with one of the most important and complex modes on JWST, namely the Micro-Shutter Array (MSA). Here we present an example of planning a complex observing scenario with the MSA: multi-position angle slit spectra of a large sample of galaxies at redshifts 2-3. The science goal is to discern their internal gas kinematics. At high redshift, galaxy morphologies are likely to be disturbed and the merger rate high, ensuring that major axes (if galaxies even have any) will be difficult to ascertain. A multi-position angle strategy is needed to ensure that at least one slit is placed close enough to the galaxies' major axes to detect any rotation. Here we investigate the use of multiple position angles in planning an example survey of galaxy kinematics.

  6. Development of a sensor coordinated kinematic model for neural network controller training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1990-01-01

    A robotic benchmark problem useful for evaluating alternative neural network controllers is presented. Specifically, it derives two camera models and the kinematic equations of a multiple degree of freedom manipulator whose end effector is under observation. The mapping developed include forward and inverse translations from binocular images to 3-D target position and the inverse kinematics of mapping point positions into manipulator commands in joint space. Implementation is detailed for a three degree of freedom manipulator with one revolute joint at the base and two prismatic joints on the arms. The example is restricted to operate within a unit cube with arm links of 0.6 and 0.4 units respectively. The development is presented in the context of more complex simulations and a logical path for extension of the benchmark to higher degree of freedom manipulators is presented.

  7. Photon Counting Using Edge-Detection Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Farr, William H.

    2010-01-01

    New applications such as high-datarate, photon-starved, free-space optical communications require photon counting at flux rates into gigaphoton-per-second regimes coupled with subnanosecond timing accuracy. Current single-photon detectors that are capable of handling such operating conditions are designed in an array format and produce output pulses that span multiple sample times. In order to discern one pulse from another and not to overcount the number of incoming photons, a detection algorithm must be applied to the sampled detector output pulses. As flux rates increase, the ability to implement such a detection algorithm becomes difficult within a digital processor that may reside within a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Systems have been developed and implemented to both characterize gigahertz bandwidth single-photon detectors, as well as process photon count signals at rates into gigaphotons per second in order to implement communications links at SCPPM (serial concatenated pulse position modulation) encoded data rates exceeding 100 megabits per second with efficiencies greater than two bits per detected photon. A hardware edge-detection algorithm and corresponding signal combining and deserialization hardware were developed to meet these requirements at sample rates up to 10 GHz. The photon discriminator deserializer hardware board accepts four inputs, which allows for the ability to take inputs from a quadphoton counting detector, to support requirements for optical tracking with a reduced number of hardware components. The four inputs are hardware leading-edge detected independently. After leading-edge detection, the resultant samples are ORed together prior to deserialization. The deserialization is performed to reduce the rate at which data is passed to a digital signal processor, perhaps residing within an FPGA. The hardware implements four separate analog inputs that are connected through RF connectors. Each analog input is fed to a high-speed 1

  8. Structural Analyses of the Kahiltna Terrane: A Kinematic Record of the Collision of the Talkeetna Superterrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bier, S. E.; Fisher, D.

    2002-12-01

    Macro-, meso-, and microscale structural analyses from several localities across the ~1000 km Kahiltna Terrane provide valuable kinematic insights into the late Cretaceous collision between the Talkeetna superterrane and North America. The Kahiltna Terrane, a Jurassic-Cretaceous flysch basin inboard of the Talkeetna superterrane (Wrangellia, Peninsular, and Alexander terranes), contains incremental strain indicators that record a history of oblique collision and subsequent deformation in a strike-slip regime. A comparison of structural data from localities across the Kahiltna terrane suggests a unique history not yet described in previous work on south-central Alaskan tectonics. Data was collected from the Reindeer Hills area, the northwestern Talkeetna Mountains, Denali National Park, the Peters Hills, and the Tordrillo Mountains. In the Reindeer Hills, a melange zone occurs as a series of exposures dismembered by ongoing strike slip faulting between the flysch of the Kahiltna terrane and the precollisional edge of the North American continent. This melange is characterized by fault-bounded blocks of Paleozoic limestone and sandstone within an argillite matrix with a conspicuous scaly fabric. The blocks range in size from 10 cm to tens of meters; and melange fish indicate a south-directed shear sense. The melange is overlain by a red and green (Triassic-Jurassic?) conglomerate along an unconformity that likely marks the base of a perched slope basin near the toe of an accretionary wedge. The strike of bedding and cleavage in this area trends EW. The fold axes trend NW-SE and folds verge to the south. In the northwest corner of the Talkeetna Mountains, the structure is dominated by north vergent folds and faults. The strike of bedding trends ~025°; whereas the strike of the cleavage is ~060°. Both cleavage and bedding dip to the southeast. The fold axes trend roughly NE-SW. North of the Denali Fault System, in Denali National Park, strike of bedding is ~122° and

  9. Nuclear Rings in Galaxies - A Kinematic Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzuca, Lisa M.; Swaters, Robert A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We combine DensePak integral field unit and TAURUS Fabry-Perot observations of 13 nuclear rings to show an interconnection between the kinematic properties of the rings and their resonant origin. The nuclear rings have regular and symmetric kinematics, and lack strong non-circular motions. This symmetry, coupled with a direct relationship between the position angles and ellipticities of the rings and those of their host galaxies, indicate the rings are in the same plane as the disc and are circular. From the rotation curves derived, we have estimated the compactness (v(sup 2)/r) up to the turnover radius, which is where the nuclear rings reside. We find that there is evidence of a correlation between compactness and ring width and size. Radially wide rings are less compact, and thus have lower mass concentration. The compactness increases as the ring width decreases. We also find that the nuclear ring size is dependent on the bar strength, with weaker bars allowing rings of any size to form.

  10. Kinematics and Aerodynamics of Backward Flying Dragonflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Zeyghami, Samane; Dong, Haibo

    2015-11-01

    Highly maneuverable insects such as dragonflies have a wide range of flight capabilities; precise hovering, fast body reorientations, sideways flight and backward takeoff are only a few to mention. In this research, we closely examined the kinematics as well as aerodynamics of backward takeoff in dragonflies and compared them to those of forward takeoff. High speed videography and accurate 3D surface reconstruction techniques were employed to extract details of the wing and body motions as well as deformations during both flight modes. While the velocities of both forward and backward flights were similar, the body orientation as well as the wing kinematics showed large differences. Our results indicate that by tilting the stroke plane angle of the wings as well as changing the orientation of the body relative to the flight path, dragonflies control the direction of the flight like a helicopter. In addition, our detailed analysis of the flow in these flights shows important differences in the wake capture phenomena among these flight modes. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  11. Kinematically consistent models of viscoelastic stress evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVries, Phoebe M. R.; Meade, Brendan J.

    2016-05-01

    Following large earthquakes, coseismic stresses at the base of the seismogenic zone may induce rapid viscoelastic deformation in the lower crust and upper mantle. As stresses diffuse away from the primary slip surface in these lower layers, the magnitudes of stress at distant locations (>1 fault length away) may slowly increase. This stress relaxation process has been used to explain delayed earthquake triggering sequences like the 1992 Mw = 7.3 Landers and 1999 Mw = 7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes in California. However, a conceptual difficulty associated with these models is that the magnitudes of stresses asymptote to constant values over long time scales. This effect introduces persistent perturbations to the total stress field over many earthquake cycles. Here we present a kinematically consistent viscoelastic stress transfer model where the total perturbation to the stress field at the end of the earthquake cycle is zero everywhere. With kinematically consistent models, hypotheses about the potential likelihood of viscoelastically triggered earthquakes may be based on the timing of stress maxima, rather than on any arbitrary or empirically constrained stress thresholds. Based on these models, we infer that earthquakes triggered by viscoelastic earthquake cycle effects may be most likely to occur during the first 50% of the earthquake cycle regardless of the assumed long-term and transient viscosities.

  12. Gait kinematic analysis evaluates hindlimb revascularization.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Amelia; Delgado, Alexandra; Escalante, Bruno; Santana, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is described as vascular disorders associated with ischemia and may be the result of an obstructive vascular process or a lost revascularization response. We have shown that gait locomotion analysis by video filming represents an integrative model for the evaluation of mechanisms involved in the process of ischemia-induced revascularization. However, analysis by this method can be subjective and perception errors may be occurring. We present the optimization of a quantifiable, noninvasive, reproducible method that analyzes ankle kinematics in rats using a two-dimensional digital video system. Gait dynamics were filmed in hindlimb ischemic rats with a high speed digital video camera. Images were collected and analyzed at 125 frames per second. An algorithm using interactive data language (IDL) was devised to assess different parameters. In ischemic rats, stride time and knee joint angle remained altered 10 days post-surgery compared with sham animals. Gait kinematics were outlined in a highly reliable way by this computational analysis and corroborated the notion of hindlimb movement recovery associated with the revascularization process. PMID:22423574

  13. Friction Stir Welding at MSFC: Kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    In 1991 The Welding Institute of the United Kingdom patented the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process. In FSW a rotating pin-tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the faying surfaces together as it moves up the seam. By April 2000 the American Welding Society International Welding and Fabricating Exposition featured several exhibits of commercial FSW processes and the 81st Annual Convention devoted a technical session to the process. The FSW process is of interest to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as a means of avoiding hot-cracking problems presented by the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy, which is the primary constituent of the Lightweight Space Shuttle External Tank. The process has been under development at MSFC for External Tank applications since the early 1990's. Early development of the FSW process proceeded by cut-and-try empirical methods. A substantial and complex body of data resulted. A theoretical model was wanted to deal with the complexity and reduce the data to concepts serviceable for process diagnostics, optimization, parameter selection, etc. A first step in understanding the FSW process is to determine the kinematics, i.e., the flow field in the metal in the vicinity of the pin-tool. Given the kinematics, the dynamics, i.e., the forces, can be targeted. Given a completed model of the FSW process, attempts at rational design of tools and selection of process parameters can be made.

  14. Flapping flight: effect of asymmetric kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Nakul; Krithivasan, Siddharth; K. R., Sreenivas

    2014-11-01

    Flapping flight has received considerable attention in the past with its relevance in the design of micro-air vehicles. In this regard, asymmetric flapping of wings offers simple kinematics. Nevertheless, it leads to symmetry-breaking in the flow field and generation of sustained lift. It has been observed previously with flow visualization experiments and Discrete Vortex Method (DVM) simulations that if the down-stroke time period is lesser than the up-stroke time, there is a net downward momentum imparted to the fluid. This is seen as a switching the flow field from a four-jet (symmetric) to a two-jet (asymmetric) configuration when the stroke-time ratio is progressively varied. This symmetry breaking has been studied experimentally using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) across a range of Reynolds Numbers and asymmetry ratios. Results are also corroborated with results from 3-D numerical simulations. Study helps in shedding light on the effectiveness of asymmetric kinematics as a lift generation mechanism.

  15. Kinematics of signature writing in healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Michael P; Kim, Chi; Landy, Kelly M

    2014-07-01

    Forensic document examiners (FDE) called upon to distinguish a genuine from a forged signature of an elderly person are often required to consider the question of age-related deterioration and whether the available exemplars reliably capture the natural effects of aging of the original writer. An understanding of the statistical relationship between advanced age and handwriting movements can reduce the uncertainty that may exist in an examiner's approach to questioned signatures formed by elderly writers. The primary purpose of this study was to systematically examine age-related changes in signature kinematics in healthy writers. Forty-two healthy subjects between the ages of 60-91 years participated in this study. Signatures were recorded using a digitizing tablet, and commercial software was used to examine the temporal and spatial stroke kinematics and pen pressure. Results indicated that vertical stroke duration and dysfluency increased with age, whereas vertical stroke amplitude and velocity decreased with age. Pen pressure decreased with age. We found that a linear model characterized the best-fit relationship between advanced age and handwriting movement parameters for signature formation. Male writers exhibited stronger age effects than female writers, especially for pen pressure and stroke dysfluency. The present study contributes to an understanding of how advanced age alters signature formation in otherwise healthy adults. PMID:24673648

  16. THE KINEMATICS OF PRIMATE MIDFOOT FLEXIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Thomas M.; Ball, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a unique assessment of primate intrinsic foot joint kinematics based upon bone pin rigid cluster tracking. It challenges the assumption that human evolution resulted in a reduction of midfoot flexibility, which has been identified in other primates as the “midtarsal break.” Rigid cluster pins were inserted into the foot bones of human, chimpanzee, baboon and macaque cadavers. The positions of these bone pins were monitored during a plantarflexion-dorsiflexion movement cycle. Analysis resolved flexion-extension movement patterns and the associated orientation of rotational axes for the talonavicular, calcaneocuboid and lateral cubometatarsal joints. Results show that midfoot flexibility occurs primarily at the talonavicular and cubometatarsal joints. The rotational magnitudes are roughly similar between humans and chimps. There is also a similarity among evaluated primates in the observed rotations of the lateral cubometatarsal joint, but there was much greater rotation observed for the talonavicular joint, which may serve to differentiate monkeys from the hominines. It appears that the capability for a midtarsal break is present within the human foot. A consideration of the joint axes shows that the medial and lateral joints have opposing orientations, which has been associated with a rigid locking mechanism in the human foot. However, the potential for this same mechanism also appears in the chimpanzee foot. These findings demonstrate a functional similarity within the midfoot of the hominines. Therefore, the kinematic capabilities and restrictions for the skeletal linkages of the human foot may not be as unique as has been previously suggested. PMID:25234343

  17. The Kinematics of Turbulent Boundary Layer Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen Kern

    1991-01-01

    The long history of research into the internal structure of turbulent boundary layers has not provided a unified picture of the physics responsible for turbulence production and dissipation. The goals of the present research are to: (1) define the current state of boundary layer structure knowledge; and (2) utilize direct numerical simulation results to help close the unresolved issues identified in part A and to unify the fragmented knowledge of various coherent motions into a consistent kinematic model of boundary layer structure. The results of the current study show that all classes of coherent motion in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer may be related to vortical structures, but that no single form of vortex is representative of the wide variety of vortical structures observed. In particular, ejection and sweep motions, as well as entrainment from the free-streem are shown to have strong spatial and temporal relationships with vortical structures. Disturbances of vortex size, location, and intensity show that quasi-streamwise vortices dominate the buffer region, while transverse vortices and vortical arches dominate the wake region. Both types of vortical structure are common in the log region. The interrelationships between the various structures and the population distributions of vortices are combined into a conceptual kinematic model for the boundary layer. Aspects of vortical structure dynamics are also postulated, based on time-sequence animations of the numerically simulated flow.

  18. Testing Iberia Kinematics at Jurassic-Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neres, Marta; Miranda, J. Miguel; Font, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Paleogeographic reconstructions of Iberia at Mesozoic are still a matter of debate. A major problem resides in the incompatibility existing between kinematic models and paleomagnetic data older than 120 Ma. Here, we investigate the origin of this misfit by finding and testing euler poles that fit Iberian mean paleomagnetic poles (123, 130 and 151 Ma) with global APWP. At 123 Ma 130 Ma, no geologically plausible solutions were found, questioning the validity of corresponding paleomagnetic data. Contrarily, for 151 Ma mean pole, coherent solutions were simulated, suggesting respective paleomagnetic data as potentially reliable. Based on these results, we propose a new magnetic reconstruction for Iberia and surrounding plates at ~150 Ma, to which corresponds the IB-NAM euler pole -18.08 / 67.54 / -57.72 (long / lat / angle). This is the first pre-drift reconstruction for Iberia to be compatible with paleomagnetic data. A complete and coherent model for the Jurassic-Cretaceous kinematic evolution of Iberia is still dependent on more and better paleomagnetic poles and on a reevaluation of magnetic anomalies, for which several problems remain unsolved.

  19. Constraints on the thermo-kinematic evolution of the Central Nepal Himalaya from modeling detrital thermochronology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C.; van der Beek, P.; Braun, J.; Robert, X.

    2009-12-01

    Detrital thermochronometer data collected within foreland basins record the topographic, fault kinematic and erosional evolution of the source area and are especially useful in constraining the temporal evolution of orogen-scale exhumation rates. We use a modified version of the transient 3-D thermo-kinematic model Pecube (e.g., Braun, 2003) to predict thermal structure, exhumation pathways and detrital age distributions for the low temperature zircon fission track (ZFT) and muscovite Ar/Ar (MAr) thermochronometers. Multiple faults with variable geometry and velocity are constructed within the model, and the effect of fault kinematics on the thermal field through which rock particles cool is tested. Measured ZFT and MAr grain-age distributions from Mio-Pliocene Siwalik foreland basin sediments in central Nepal are compared to those predicted by the numerical model to assess the effect of potential kinematic variations of the central Himalaya between 20 Ma and the present-day. Recent studies suggest a deceleration of the convergence rate of India and Asia between 20 and 10 Ma (e.g., Molnar & Stock, 2009), which may correspond to a distinct decrease in measured exhumation rates in central Nepal around 16 Ma (e.g., Bernet et al, 2006). Inversions are carried out to determine the distribution of fault velocities, convergence rates and thermal parameters that best fit the detrital datasets in an attempt to constrain the thermo-kinematic model for central Nepal Himalaya.

  20. Fabrication of ultra-fine nanostructures using edge transfer printing.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mianqi; Li, Fengwang; Cao, Tingbing

    2012-03-21

    The exploration of new methods and techniques for application in diverse fields, such as photonics, microfluidics, biotechnology and flexible electronics is of increasing scientific and technical interest for multiple uses over distance of 10-100 nm. This article discusses edge transfer printing--a series of unconventional methods derived from soft lithography for nanofabrication. It possesses the advantages of easy fabrication, low-cost and great serviceability. In this paper, we show how to produce exposed edges and use various materials for edge transfer printing, while nanoskiving, nanotransfer edge printing and tunable cracking for nanogaps are introduced. Besides this, different functional materials, such as metals, inorganic semiconductors and polymers, as well as localised heating and charge patterning, are described here as unconventional "inks" for printing. Edge transfer printing, which can effectively produce sub-100 nm scale ultra-fine structures, has broad applications, including metallic nanowires as nanoelectrodes, semiconductor nanowires for chemical sensors, heterostructures of organic semiconductors, plasmonic devices and so forth. PMID:22344574

  1. Conservation of Edge Essentiality Profiles in Metabolic Networks Across Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arodź, Tomasz

    Reactions involved in cellular metabolism form a complex network susceptible to targeted attacks. Recent experiments show that several descriptors of edge essentiality correlate well with lethality of silencing corresponding genes in a model organism, opening path to identifying targets for antimicrobial drugs that would disrupt network functioning in bacteria. However, correlation of high essentiality with experiment is necessary but not sufficient for a descriptor to be useful. Also, the essentialities of corresponding edges have to differ markedly between pathogens and hosts, to yield minimal effect on the latter. Here, we analyse similarity of profiles of several edge essentiality measures across multiple species. We show that local measures, based on degrees of a substrate and a product linked by the edge, or on the alternative paths connecting the two, are evolutionarily conserved within bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, but also differ between these groups, leading to isolated clusters of species. Furthermore, comparison with a global topological measure, the relative decrease in network efficiency upon edge removal, shows that metabolic networks are more conserved locally than globally.

  2. The SLUGGS Survey: A New Mask Design to Reconstruct the Stellar Populations and Kinematics of Both Inner and Outer Galaxy Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Nicola; Forbes, Duncan A.; Poci, Adriano; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; McDermid, Richard; Alabi, Adebusola B.; Brodie, Jean P.; Cappellari, Michele; Pota, Vincenzo; Foster, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Integral field unit spectrographs allow the 2D exploration of the kinematics and stellar populations of galaxies, although they are generally restricted to small fields-of-view. Using the large field-of-view of the DEIMOS multislit spectrograph on Keck and our Stellar Kinematics using Multiple Slits technique, we are able to extract sky-subtracted stellar light spectra to large galactocentric radii. Here, we present a new DEIMOS mask design named SuperSKiMS that explores large spatial scales without sacrificing high spatial sampling. We simulate a set of observations with such a mask design on the nearby galaxy NGC 1023, measuring stellar kinematics and metallicities out to where the galaxy surface brightness is orders of magnitude fainter than the sky. With this technique we also reproduce the results from literature integral field spectroscopy in the innermost galaxy regions. In particular, we use the simulated NGC 1023 kinematics to model its total mass distribution to large radii, obtaining comparable results with those from published integral field unit observation. Finally, from new spectra of NGC 1023, we obtain stellar 2D kinematics and metallicity distributions that show good agreement with integral field spectroscopy results in the overlapping regions. In particular, we do not find a significant offset between our Stellar Kinematics using Multiple Slits and the ATLAS3D stellar velocity dispersion at the same spatial locations.

  3. Oscillations of a Turbulent Jet Incident Upon an Edge

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2000-09-19

    For the case of a jet originating from a fully turbulent channel flow and impinging upon a sharp edge, the possible onset and nature of coherent oscillations has remained unexplored. In this investigation, high-image-density particle image velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are employed to determine the instantaneous, whole-field characteristics of the turbulent jet-edge interaction in relation to the loading of the edge. It is demonstrated that even in absence of acoustic resonant or fluid-elastic effects, highly coherent, self-sustained oscillations rapidly emerge above the turbulent background. Two clearly identifiable modes of instability are evident. These modes involve large-scale vortices that are phase-locked to the gross undulations of the jet and its interaction with the edge, and small-scale vortices, which are not phase-locked. Time-resolved imaging of instantaneous vorticity and velocity reveals the form, orientation, and strength of the large-scale concentrations of vorticity approaching the edge in relation to rapid agglomeration of small-scale vorticity concentrations. Such vorticity field-edge interactions exhibit rich complexity, relative to the simplified pattern of vortex-edge interaction traditionally employed for the quasi-laminar edgetone. Furthermore, these interactions yield highly nonlinear surface pressure signatures. The origin of this nonlinearity, involving coexistence of multiple frequency components, is interpreted in terms of large- and small-scale vortices embedded in distributed vorticity layers at the edge. Eruption of the surface boundary layer on the edge due to passage of the large-scale vortex does not occur; rather apparent secondary vorticity concentrations are simply due to distension of the oppositely-signed vorticity layer at the tip of the edge. The ensemble-averaged turbulent statistics of the jet quickly take on an identity that is distinct from the statistics of the turbulent boundary layer in the channel

  4. Window Spacers and Edge Seals in Insulating Glass Units: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    SINTEF Building and Infrastructure; Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Bergh, Sofie Van Den; Hart, Robert; Jelle, Bjrn Petter; Gustavsen, Arild

    2013-01-31

    Insulating glass (IG) units typically consist of multiple glass panes that are sealed and held together structurally along their perimeters. This report describes a study of edge seals in IG units. First, we summarize the components, requirements, and desired properties of edge construction in IG units, based on a survey of the available literature. Second, we review commercially available window edge seals and describe their properties, to provide an easily accessible reference for research and commercial purposes. Finally, based on the literature survey and review of current commercial edge seal systems, we identify research opportunities for future edge seal improvements and solutions.

  5. Electronic Bandgap and Edge Reconstruction in Phosphorene: An Experimental/Theoretical joint investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liangbo; Wang, Jun; Lin, Wenzhi; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Pan, Minghu; Meunier, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorene, or monolayer black phosphorus, is a new 2D layered material with high hole mobility and direct semiconducting bandgap. However, the direct bandgap of phosphorene has not been directly measured, and the properties of its edges have not been considered in detail. In a joint experimental/theoretical work, we studied the electronic properties of phosphorene and its edges [Liang et al., Nano Letters, 2014, 14, 6400]. A detailed scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) study with first-principles calculations reveals the presence of a semiconducting 2 eV gap, the direct bandgap for phosphorene. More importantly, we were able to identify a sharp mono-step in phosphorene that allowed us to perform the first-ever investigation of edges. STS measurements across the step edge indicate nontrivial multiple edge states located inside the 2 eV gap and below the Fermi level. To understand these edge states, we have modeled a series of 1D phosphorene nanoribbons including armchair- and zigzag-edged PNRs. Extensive density functional theory calculations show that edge reconstructions are responsible for energy positions of these edge states. The reconstructions self-passivate most edge dangling bonds by switching the coordination number of phosphorus from 3 to 4 or 5. NYSTAR Program C080117 and the Office of Naval Research; Oak Ridge National Laboratory by U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Adaptive detection of microvascular edge in microcirculatory images for auto-tracking measurement of spontaneous vasomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xiaoyou; Bao, Yongjian; Xiu, Rui-juan; Karras, Matti

    1994-05-01

    We developed a dynamic microvascular edge detection method which is based on an adaptive thresholding and multijudgmental criteria. To realize the on-line measurement with video rate, we first set changeable measuring lines which are perpendicular to a microvessel axis and cover the possible edge location at a cross- section of the microvessel as a sampling window. A dynamic threshold, which can frame-by-frame automatically adapt to the change of light intensity in the sampling window, will be generated based on the on-line analysis of light intensity distribution along the measuring lines. The judgment of microvascular edges is based on the pattern characteristics of the light intensity distribution curve in the microvascular edge areas and the possible range of the microvascular diameters. Multiple criteria for the edge detection were set for accurately detecting the edges and skipping the non-edge zones to speed the edge recognizing procedure. To further improve reliability of this edge detection, a dynamic graphic indicator can be generated according to the detected vessel edge location, and simultaneously displayed with the original image. This algorithm has been successfully applied for autotracking measurement of spontaneous vasomotion in microcirculation, even when the microcirculatory image had complex background and low contrast.

  7. Saddle-node dynamics for edge detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Y.F.

    1994-09-01

    The author demonstrates how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, this scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  8. On the Connection Between Flap Side-Edge Noise and Tip Vortex Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casalino, D.; Hazir, A.; Fares, E.; Duda, B.; Khorrami, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present work is to investigate how the dynamics of the vortical flow about the flap side edge of an aircraft determine the acoustic radiation. A validated lattice- Boltzmann CFD solution of the unsteady flow about a detailed business jet configuration in approach conditions is used for the present analysis. Evidence of the connection between the noise generated by several segments of the inboard flap tip and the aerodynamic forces acting on the same segments is given, proving that the noise generation mechanism has a spatially coherent and acoustically compact character on the scale of the flap chord, and that the edge-scattering effects are of secondary importance. Subsequently, evidence of the connection between the kinematics of the tip vortex system and the aerodynamic force is provided. The kinematics of the dual vortex system are investigated via a core detection technique. Emphasis is placed on the mutual induction effects between the two main vortices rolling up from the pressure and suction sides of the flap edge. A simple heuristic formula that relates the far-field noise spectrum and the cross-spectrum of the unsteady vortical positions is developed.

  9. Linear array optical edge sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K. (Inventor); Primus, Howard C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A series of independent parallel pairs of light emitting and detecting diodes for a linear pixel array, which is laterally positioned over an edge-like discontinuity in a workpiece to be scanned, is disclosed. These independent pairs of light emitters and detectors sense along intersecting pairs of separate optical axes. A discontinuity, such as an edge in the sensed workpiece, reflects a detectable difference in the amount of light from that discontinuity in comparison to the amount of light that is reflected on either side of the discontinuity. A sequentially sychronized clamping and sampling circuit detects that difference as an electrical signal which is recovered by circuitry that exhibits an improved signal-to-noise capability for the system.

  10. Edge-on thick discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, A.; Katkov, I.; Chilingarian, I.; Silchenko, O.; Moiseev, A.; Borisov, S.

    2016-06-01

    Although thick stellar discs are detected in nearly all edge-on disc galaxies, their formation scenarios still remain a matter of debate. Due to observational difficulties, there is a lack of information about their stellar populations. Using the Russian 6-m telescope BTA we collected deep spectra of thick discs in three edge-on early-type disc galaxies located in different environments: NGC4111 in a dense group, NGC4710 in the Virgo cluster, and NGC5422 in a sparse group. We see intermediate age (4 ‑ 5 Gyr) metal rich ([Fe/H] ~ ‑0.2 ‑ 0.0 dex) stellar populations in NGC4111 and NGC4710. On the other hand, NGC5422 does not harbour young stars, its only disc is thick and old (10 Gyr) and its α-element abundance suggests a long formation epoch implying its formation at high redshift. Our results prove the diversity of thick disc formation scenarios.

  11. Teaching and Evaluation Materials Utilizing Multiple Representations in Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savinainen, A.; Nieminen, P.; Makynen, A.; Viiri, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present materials and teaching ideas utilizing multiple representations in the contexts of kinematics and the force concept. These ideas and materials are substantiated by evidence and can be readily used in teaching with no special training. In addition, we briefly discuss two multiple-choice tests based on physics education…

  12. Gyrosheath near the tokamak edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Xiao, H.; Valanju, P.M.

    1993-03-01

    A new model for the structure of the radial electric field profile in the edge during the H-mode is proposed. Charge separation caused by the difference between electron and ion gyromotion, or more importantly in a tokamak, the banana motion (halo effect) can self-consistently produce an electric dipole moment that causes the sheared radial electric field. The calculated results based on the model are consistent with D-III D and TEXTOR experimental results.

  13. Topological edge states in pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Cody; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Kargarian, Mehdi

    In some members of the ferro-pnictides, non-trivial topology in the bulk band-structure is related to potentially observable gapless edge states. We study these states numerically and analytically for a range of parameters, with and without superconductivity and antiferromagnetic SDW ordering, and their relation to the symmetries and topologically non-trivial aspects of our model Hamiltonian. Support was provided by the Doctoral Student Research Grant program at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

  14. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  15. Edge effects and delamination failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    The fundamental relationship between the morphology of a composite laminate and the resulting free edge effects is explored and related to delamination failures. Cross-ply, angle-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates are discussed in detail. It is shown that the local mismatch in elastic properties of adjacent layers and the global stacking sequence of a laminate both have a significant influence on the interlaminar stresses and delamination failures.

  16. Aluminium K-Edge XANES Study of Mica Preiswerkite

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.; Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Mottana, A.; Della Ventura, G.; /SLAC, SSRl

    2006-10-27

    We present the Al K-edge XANES spectrum of synthetic mica with mixed fourfold coordinated and sixfold coordinated Al (preiswerkite). Experimental analysis and multiple scattering simulations of XANES spectra demonstrate that octahedral contributions may overlap the tetrahedral ones so that the lower energy structures in mixed coordination compounds may be associated to Al octahedral site. This unexpected behavior can be explained as due to a large local distortion of the Al octahedral site.

  17. Flap--edge flowfield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, John D.; Cantwell, Brian J.

    1997-11-01

    Recent studies of airframe noise suggest that the wing and flap trailing--edges as well as the flap side--edge are areas of significant noise generation. To identify the fluid dynamic processes associated with these noise sources, we are examining the flow--field around a NACA 63--215 Mod B main element airfoil configured with a half--span Fowler flap. The tests are performed in a low--speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of ~ 6.0×10^5. A hot wire traverse system is used to map the mean velocities and turbulence intensities in the near wake region of the flow. Measurements of the pressure fluctuations along the flap side--edge and in the cove of the airfoil configuration are made with pressure transducers mounted inside the airfoil. The experimental data are in good qualitative agreement with the numerical simulation of a slightly higher Reynolds number flow ( ~ 1.5×10^6) around a geometrically similar airfoil configuration.

  18. Smectic Edge Dislocations under Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peilong; Lu, Chun-Yi David

    2011-09-01

    Layer structures around an edge dislocation in a smectic phase under shear are studied with both phase field and order parameter models. It is shown that, contrast to a crystal solid, the conventional picture of the Peach--Koehler force experienced by dislocations when the sample is under a shear stress cannot be readily applied to the smectic phases. Under a uniform shear flow, we obtain the phase field and order parameter solutions around an edge dislocation. The solutions elucidate properties such as the layer distortion range around the dislocation and scaling of inter-dislocation interaction on dislocation separation. Calculations on energy dissipation indicate the extreme shear-thinning behavior that an edge dislocation induces a shear stress independent of the shear rate. Finally in a bulk sample with dislocation forming loops and networks, we argue that the uniform flow component around the dislocation is important to the energy dissipation and we show that its scaling exponent with the shear rate is very close to results from many previous rheology measurements.

  19. Kinematic analysis of reaching in the cat.

    PubMed

    Martin, J H; Cooper, S E; Ghez, C

    1995-01-01

    The present study examines the kinematic features of forelimb movements made by cats reaching for food in horizontal target wells located at different heights and distances. Wrist paths consisted of two relatively straight segments joined at a "via-point" in front of the aperture of the food well. In the initial lift phase, the paw was raised to the via-point in front of the target. In the second, or thrust phase, the paw was directed forward into the food well. During the lift, the paw was moved toward the target primarily by elbow flexion, accompanied by a sequence of biphasic shoulder and wrist movements. Thrust was accomplished primarily by shoulder flexion while the wrist and the paw were maintained at near-constant angles. The animals varied the height of the reach primarily by varying elbow flexion with proportional changes in elbow angular velocity and angular acceleration and with corresponding variations in wrist speed. Thus, cats reached for targets at different heights by scaling a common kinematic profile. Over a relatively large range of target heights, animals maintained movement duration constant, according to a simple "pulse-height" control strategy (isochronous scaling). For reaches to a given target height, animals compensated for variability in peak acceleration by variations in movement time. We examined the coordination between the shoulder and the wrist with the elbow. Early during the lift, peak shoulder extensor and peak elbow flexor accelerations were synchronized. Late during the lift phase, wrist extensor acceleration was found to occur during the period of elbow flexor deceleration. We hypothesize that these linkages could, in part, be due to passive mechanical interactions. To determine how the angular trajectories of the different joints were organized in relation to target location, we plotted joint kinematic changes directly on the wrist and MCP joint paths. These plots revealed that for all target heights and movement speeds, wrist

  20. A School Experiment in Kinematics: Shooting from a Ballistic Cart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranjc, T.; Razpet, N.

    2011-01-01

    Many physics textbooks start with kinematics. In the lab, students observe the motions, describe and make predictions, and get acquainted with basic kinematics quantities and their meaning. Then they can perform calculations and compare the results with experimental findings. In this paper we describe an experiment that is not often done, but is…

  1. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  2. Zero-Inertial Recession for a Kinematic Wave Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kinematic-wave models of surface irrigation assume a fixed relationship between depth and discharge (typically, normal depth). When surface irrigation inflow is cut off, the calculated upstream flow depth goes to zero, since the discharge is zero. For short time steps, use of the Kinematic Wave mode...

  3. Kinematic Signatures of Telic and Atelic Events in ASL Predicates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an experimental investigation of kinematics of verb sign production in American Sign Language (ASL) using motion capture data. The results confirm that event structure differences in the meaning of the verbs are reflected in the kinematic formation: for example, in the telic verbs (throw, hit), the end-point of the event is…

  4. Kinematic modeling and path planning for MIRADAS arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, Josep; Gómez, José María.; López, Manuel; Torra, Jordi; Raines, Steven N.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Mid-resolution InfRAreD Astronomical Spectrograph (MIRADAS) is a near-infrared (NIR) multi-object spectrograph for the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). It can simultaneously observe multiple targets selected by 20 identical deployable probe arms with pickoff mirror optics. The bases of the arms are fixed to the multiplexing system (MXS) plate, a circular platform, and arranged in a circular layout with minimum separation between elements of the arms. This document presents the MXS prototype P2a, a full-scale, fully operational prototype of a MIRADAS probe arm. This planar closed-loop mechanism compared to other previous designs offers some advantages specially in terms of stability and from the point of view of optics. Unfortunately, these benefits come at the expense of a more complicated kinematics and an unintuitive arm motion. Furthermore, the cryogenic motor controllers used in prototyping impose severe restrictions in path planing. They negatively impact in the slice of pie approach, a collision-avoidance patrolling strategy that can gives good results in other scenarios. This study is a starting point to define collision-free trajectory algorithms for the 20 probe arms of MIRADAS.

  5. Adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems

    DOEpatents

    Hale, L.C.

    1997-07-01

    An adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems is disclosed. The adjustable link is a low-cost, passive device that provides backlash-free adjustment along its single constraint direction and flexural freedom in all other directions. The adjustable link comprises two spheres, two sockets in which the spheres are adjustable retain, and a connection link threadly connected at each end to the spheres, to provide a single direction of restraint and to adjust the length or distance between the sockets. Six such adjustable links provide for six degrees of freedom for mounting an instrument on a support. The adjustable link has applications in any machine or instrument requiring precision adjustment in six degrees of freedom, isolation from deformations of the supporting platform, and/or additional structural damping. The damping is accomplished by using a hollow connection link that contains an inner rod and a viscoelastic separation layer between the two. 3 figs.

  6. Adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.

    1997-01-01

    An adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems. The adjustable link is a low-cost, passive device that provides backlash-free adjustment along its single constraint direction and flexural freedom in all other directions. The adjustable link comprises two spheres, two sockets in which the spheres are adjustable retain, and a connection link threadly connected at each end to the spheres, to provide a single direction of restraint and to adjust the length or distance between the sockets. Six such adjustable links provide for six degrees of freedom for mounting an instrument on a support. The adjustable link has applications in any machine or instrument requiring precision adjustment in six degrees of freedom, isolation from deformations of the supporting platform, and/or additional structural damping. The damping is accomplished by using a hollow connection link that contains an inner rod and a viscoelastic separation layer between the two.

  7. Uncertainty quantification in kinematic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a probabilistic approach to quantify parametric uncertainty in first-order hyperbolic conservation laws (kinematic wave equations). The approach relies on the derivation of a deterministic equation for the cumulative density function (CDF) of the system state, in which probabilistic descriptions (probability density functions or PDFs) of the system parameters and/or initial and boundary conditions serve as inputs. In contrast to PDF equations, which are often used in other contexts, CDF equations allow for straightforward and unambiguous determination of boundary conditions with respect to sample variables.The accuracy and robustness of solutions of the CDF equation for one such system, the Saint-Venant equations of river flows, were investigated via comparison with Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Beating kinematics of magnetically actuated cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downton, M. T.; Stark, H.

    2009-02-01

    We study the beating kinematics and pumping performance of a magnetically actuated artificial cilium attached to a surface using a bead spring model. Several different beating patterns for the external field are considered along with the possiblity of defects in the filament at isolated points. Hydrodynamic interactions between the beads are included by a modified Rotne-Prage tensor such that the no-slip boundary condition at the surface is satisfied. We find that the correct positioning of defects along the filament length can lead to significant increases in the pumping performance of a planar beating pattern. Even more efficient for pumping fluid are three-dimensional beating strokes which bring the filament close to the surface during the return part of the stroke.

  9. Relativistic kinematics for motion faster than light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The use of conformal coordinates in relativistic kinematics is illustrated and a simple extension of the theory of motions faster than light is provided. An object traveling at a speed greater than light discloses its presence by appearing suddenly at a point, splitting into two apparent objects which then recede from each other at sublight velocities. According to the present theory motion at speeds faster than light would not benefit a space traveler, since the twin paradox becomes inverted at such speeds. In Einstein's theory travel at the velocity of light in an intertial system is equivalent to infinite velocity for the traveler. In the present theory the converse is also true; travel at infinite velocity is equivalent to the velocity of light for the traveler.

  10. Effective kinematic viscosity of turbulent He II

    SciTech Connect

    Chagovets, T. V.; Gordeev, A. V.; Skrbek, L.

    2007-08-15

    The temperature dependence of the effective kinematic viscosity of turbulent He II, {nu}{sub eff}(T), is deduced from second sound attenuation data using the late stage of decay of thermally induced counterflow He II turbulence in two channels of square cross section. It is shown to qualitatively agree with the published data for {nu}{sub eff}(T) calculated based on experiments on decaying-grid-generated He II turbulence [Niemela et al., J. Low Temp. Phys. 138, 537 (2005)]. Corrections to these data due to the 'sine squared' law that describes attenuation of the second sound wave propagating along an arbitrary direction with respect to the direction of the core of a quantized vortex in turbulent He II are discussed and applied.

  11. Kinematic Solar Dynamo with Spot Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Miesch, Mark S.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently developed a kinematic dynamo model by including the observed differential rotation and the meridional flow. This model includes the emergence of sunspots from the deep-seated toroidal field and their subsequent decay at the surface, i.e., the Babcock-Leighton process for the generation of poloidal field.We shall show that this model reproduces most of the basic features of the solar magnetic cycle including the polarity reversals, 11 years periodicity, equatorward migration of sunspots at low latitudes and the poleward migration of the radial field at the surface. This model also produces the observed cycle variations when the fluctuations in the active-region tilt are included. North-south asymmetries of cycles from this model will also be demonstrated.

  12. Kinematics of chiropteran shoulder girdle in flight.

    PubMed

    Panyutina, A A; Kuznetsov, A N; Korzun, L P

    2013-03-01

    New data on the mechanisms of movements of the shoulder girdle and humerus of bats are described; potential mobility is compared to the movements actually used in flight. The study was performed on the basis of morphological and functional analysis of anatomical specimens of 15 species, high speed and high definition filming of two species and X-ray survey of Rousettus aegyptiacus flight. Our observations indicate that any excursions of the shoulder girdle in bats have relatively small input in the wing amplitude. Shoulder girdle movements resemble kinematics of a crank mechanism: clavicle plays the role of crank, and scapula-the role of connecting rod. Previously described osseous "locking mechanisms" in shoulder joint of advanced bats do not affect the movements, actually used in flight. The wing beats in bats are performed predominantly by movements of humerus relative to shoulder girdle, although these movements occupy the caudal-most sector of available shoulder mobility. PMID:23381941

  13. A kinematic model of southern California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weldon, R.; Humphreys, E.

    1986-01-01

    We propose a kinematic model for southern California based on late Quaternary slip rates and orientations of major faults in the region. Internally consistent motions are determined assuming that these faults bound rigid blocks. The velocities of the blocks are calculated along several paths that begin in the Mojave Desert and end off the California coast. A path that crosses the western Transverse Ranges accumulates the accepted relative North America-Pacific plate velocity, whereas paths to the north and south result in a significant missing component of motion. This implies the existence of a zone of active deformation in southern California that is interpreted to include the western Transverse Ranges and northwest trending, predominately strike-slip faults close to the coast both north and south of the Transverse Ranges. Strain on this system accounts for about a third of the total North America- Pacific plate motion. -from Authors

  14. SPACEBAR: Kinematic design by computer graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The interactive graphics computer program SPACEBAR, conceived to reduce the time and complexity associated with the development of kinematic mechanisms on the design board, was described. This program allows the direct design and analysis of mechanisms right at the terminal screen. All input variables, including linkage geometry, stiffness, and applied loading conditions, can be fed into or changed at the terminal and may be displayed in three dimensions. All mechanism configurations can be cycled through their range of travel and viewed in their various geometric positions. Output data includes geometric positioning in orthogonal coordinates of each node point in the mechanism, velocity and acceleration of the node points, and internal loads and displacements of the node points and linkages. All analysis calculations take at most a few seconds to complete. Output data can be viewed at the scope and also printed at the discretion of the user.

  15. Differential Kinematics Of Contemporary Industrial Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkodny, T.

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents a simple method of avoiding singular configurations of contemporary industrial robot manipulators of such renowned companies as ABB, Fanuc, Mitsubishi, Adept, Kawasaki, COMAU and KUKA. To determine the singular configurations of these manipulators a global form of description of the end-effector kinematics was prepared, relative to the other links. On the basis of this description , the formula for the Jacobian was defined in the end-effector coordinates. Next, a closed form of the determinant of the Jacobian was derived. From the formula, singular configurations, where the determinant's value equals zero, were determined. Additionally, geometric interpretations of these configurations were given and they were illustrated. For the exemplary manipulator, small corrections of joint variables preventing the reduction of the Jacobian order were suggested. An analysis of positional errors, caused by these corrections, was presented

  16. Elbow joint instability: A kinematic model.

    PubMed

    Olsen, B S; Henriksen, M G; Søjbjerg, J O; Helmig, P; Sneppen, O

    1994-05-01

    The effect of simultaneous ulnar and radial collateral ligament division on the kinematics of the elbow joint is studied in a cadaveric model. Severance of the anterior part of the ulnar collateral ligament and the annular ligament led to significant elbow joint instability in valgus and varus stress and in forced external and internal rotation. The mean maximum laxity in valgus stress and forced external rotation were 5.7° and 13.2°. The forearms of the elbow joint specimens were transfixed in maximum pronation. During valgus and varus stress the corresponding spontaneous ulnar rotation of the specimens was recorded. The reproducibility of the instability pattern suggests that this model is suitable for evaluating stabilizing procedures aimed at correction of elbow joint instability before these procedures are introduced into patient care. PMID:22959690

  17. Global and regional kinematics from SLR stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Peter J.

    1994-01-01

    The stations of the Global Laser Tracking Network have significantly contributed to the measurement of plate kinematics. The expanding network of progressively improved instruments clearly demonstrates the systems' centimeter positioning accuracy. Several satellite laser ranging (SLR) analysis groups have adopted techniques to distill geodynamic information from the Lageos-1 satellite observations using orbital arc lengths from an hour to a decade. SLR observations now provide the scale for the International Terrestrial Reference System and help to define the Earth's polar motion in this system. Agreement between positions separately determined with SLR, VLBI and GPS systems has been established at the level of a few centimeters in position and a few millimeters per year in horizontal velocity.

  18. Unraveling L_{n,k}: Grassmannian Kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC

    2010-02-15

    It was recently proposed that the leading singularities of the S-Matrix of N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory arise as the residues of a contour integral over a Grassmannian manifold, with space-time locality encoded through residue theorems generalizing Cauchy's theorem to more than one variable. We provide a method to identify the residue corresponding to any leading singularity, and we carry this out explicitly for all leading singularities at tree level and one-loop. We also give several examples at higher loops, including all generic two-loop leading singularities and an interesting four-loop object. As an example we consider a 12-pt N{sup 4}MHV leading singularity at two loops that has a kinematic structure involving double square roots. Our analysis results in a simple picture for how the topological structure of loop graphs is reflected in various substructures within the Grassmannian.

  19. Kinematic tests of exotic flat cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, J.C.; Turner, M.S.

    1986-05-01

    Theoretical prejudice and inflationary models of the very early Universe strongly favor the flat, Einstein-deSitter model of the Universe. At present the observational data conflict with this prejudice. This conflict can be resolved by considering flat models of the Universe which possess a smooth component by energy density. We study in detail the kinematics of such models, where the smooth component is relativistic particles, a cosmological term, a network of light strings, or fast-moving, light strings. We also discuss the observational tests which can be used to discriminate between these models. These tests include the magnitude-redshift, lookback time-redshift, angular size-redshift, and comoving volume-redshift diagrams and the growth of density fluctuations.

  20. Chemistry at the Edge of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Bellunato, Amedeo; Arjmandi Tash, Hadi; Cesa, Yanina; Schneider, Grégory F

    2016-03-16

    The selective functionalization of graphene edges is driven by the chemical reactivity of its carbon atoms. The chemical reactivity of an edge, as an interruption of the honeycomb lattice of graphene, differs from the relative inertness of the basal plane. In fact, the unsaturation of the pz orbitals and the break of the π conjugation on an edge increase the energy of the electrons at the edge sites, leading to specific chemical reactivity and electronic properties. Given the relevance of the chemistry at the edges in many aspects of graphene, the present Review investigates the processes and mechanisms that drive the chemical functionalization of graphene at the edges. Emphasis is given to the selective chemical functionalization of graphene edges from theoretical and experimental perspectives, with a particular focus on the characterization tools available to investigate the chemistry of graphene at the edge. PMID:26693841

  1. Kinematics of Visually-Guided Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Bernhard J. M.; Thomassen, Jakob S.

    2014-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of an eye movement that follows Listing’s law is the half-angle rule that says that the angular velocity of the eye tilts by half the angle of eccentricity of the line of sight relative to primary eye position. Since all visually-guided eye movements in the regime of far viewing follow Listing’s law (with the head still and upright), the question about its origin is of considerable importance. Here, we provide theoretical and experimental evidence that Listing’s law results from a unique motor strategy that allows minimizing ocular torsion while smoothly tracking objects of interest along any path in visual space. The strategy consists in compounding conventional ocular rotations in meridian planes, that is in horizontal, vertical and oblique directions (which are all torsion-free) with small linear displacements of the eye in the frontal plane. Such compound rotation-displacements of the eye can explain the kinematic paradox that the fixation point may rotate in one plane while the eye rotates in other planes. Its unique signature is the half-angle law in the position domain, which means that the rotation plane of the eye tilts by half-the angle of gaze eccentricity. We show that this law does not readily generalize to the velocity domain of visually-guided eye movements because the angular eye velocity is the sum of two terms, one associated with rotations in meridian planes and one associated with displacements of the eye in the frontal plane. While the first term does not depend on eye position the second term does depend on eye position. We show that compounded rotation - displacements perfectly predict the average smooth kinematics of the eye during steady- state pursuit in both the position and velocity domain. PMID:24751602

  2. Kinematics of visually-guided eye movements.

    PubMed

    Hess, Bernhard J M; Thomassen, Jakob S

    2014-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of an eye movement that follows Listing's law is the half-angle rule that says that the angular velocity of the eye tilts by half the angle of eccentricity of the line of sight relative to primary eye position. Since all visually-guided eye movements in the regime of far viewing follow Listing's law (with the head still and upright), the question about its origin is of considerable importance. Here, we provide theoretical and experimental evidence that Listing's law results from a unique motor strategy that allows minimizing ocular torsion while smoothly tracking objects of interest along any path in visual space. The strategy consists in compounding conventional ocular rotations in meridian planes, that is in horizontal, vertical and oblique directions (which are all torsion-free) with small linear displacements of the eye in the frontal plane. Such compound rotation-displacements of the eye can explain the kinematic paradox that the fixation point may rotate in one plane while the eye rotates in other planes. Its unique signature is the half-angle law in the position domain, which means that the rotation plane of the eye tilts by half-the angle of gaze eccentricity. We show that this law does not readily generalize to the velocity domain of visually-guided eye movements because the angular eye velocity is the sum of two terms, one associated with rotations in meridian planes and one associated with displacements of the eye in the frontal plane. While the first term does not depend on eye position the second term does depend on eye position. We show that compounded rotation - displacements perfectly predict the average smooth kinematics of the eye during steady- state pursuit in both the position and velocity domain. PMID:24751602

  3. A Kinematic Study of Finswimming at Surface

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Jimmy; Baly, Laurent; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Watier, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Finswimming is a sport of speed practiced on the surface or underwater, in which performance is based on whole-body oscillations. The present study investigated the undulatory motion performed by finswimmers at the surface. This study aiming to analyze the influence of the interaction of gender, practice level, and race distance on selected kinematic parameters. Six elite and six novices finswimmers equipped with joints markers (wrist, elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, and ankle) were recorded in the sagittal plane. The position of these anatomical marks was digitized at 50 Hz. An automated motion analysis software yielded velocity, vertical amplitude, frequency, and angular position. Results showed that stroke frequency decreased whereas the mean amplitude of all joints increased with increasing race distance (p < 0.01). Mean joint amplitude for the upper limbs (wrist, elbow and shoulder) was smaller for experts than for novices. Whereas that of the ankle was larger, so that the oscillation amplitude increased from shoulder to ankle. Elite male finswimmers were pitching more acutely than female. Moreover, elite male finswimmers showed a smaller knee bending than novices and than elite females (p < 0.01). This indicated that elite male finswimmers attempt to reduce drag forces thanks to a weak knee bending and a low upper limbs pitch. To sum up, gender, expertise, and race distance affect the performance and its kinematics in terms frontal drag. Expertise in finswimming requires taking advantage of the mechanical constraints pertaining to hydrodynamic constraints in order to optimize performance. Key Points Finswimmers are at one and the same time a propelling and a propelled body. This study investigates the undulatory motion performed by finswimmers at the surface. Elite male finswimmers were pitching more acutely than female swimmers and showed a smaller knee bending than both novices and elite female swimmers. Finswimmers tended to perform a dolphin-like motion

  4. Kinematics of Baryons Cycling Through Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Nikole M.

    2015-01-01

    In a modern view of galaxy evolution, the baryon cycle is key to understanding the observed global properties of galaxies. Red galaxies passively evolve due to quenching of their star formation, whereas blue galaxies actively evolve, presumably due to a replenishing gas supply. Signatures of the baryon cycle such as IGM accretion, minor mergers, and stellar-driven outflows and fountains are best probed in gaseous halos, i.e., the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We study the spatial and kinematic distribution of the low-ionization metal-enriched CGM with QSO absorption lines for a population of 182 galaxies in the MgII Absorber-Galaxy Catalog (MAGIICAT). We present our findings detailing how the extent and patchiness of the CGM depends on MgII absorption strength, and galaxy luminosity and color. For the first time, we placed the kinematics of 39 MgII absorbers with high-resolution spectra in the context of their host galaxy color, redshift, and orientation. By examining the velocity dispersions of absorbers, we find possible effects of quenching on red galaxies where the velocity dispersions decrease over 2 Gyrs time and are smaller at larger radii. The velocity dispersions for blue galaxies remain constant over time and radius and possibly indicate a sustained flow of baryons feeding star formation. Blue, face-on galaxies probed along the minor axis show the largest velocity dispersions to very high significance. This result provides the strongest direct evidence to date for galactic-scale outflows which, for this orientation, are pointing nearly towards the observer. We discuss how our results place observational constraints on simulations which are just now beginning to accurately model the baryon cycle and its role in galaxy evolution.

  5. Feeding kinematics of juvenile swellsharks, Cephaloscyllium ventriosum

    PubMed

    Ferry-Graham

    1997-01-01

    To investigate how feeding behaviors change with prey size, high-speed video recording was used to examine the kinematics of prey capture and transport in 1-year-old swellsharks Cephaloscyllium ventriosum (Scyliorhinidae: Carchariniformes) feeding on two differently sized prey items. Prey capture in these sharks generally consisted of an initially ram-dominated capture bite, one or more manipulation bites, a holding phase during which the food was held in the teeth of the shark, and then suction-dominated prey transport. During initial capture and transport, most of the water taken in is forced back out of the mouth anteriorly rather than continuing posteriorly out through the gill openings. Dye experiments in which dye-perfused prey items were ingested by the sharks confirm this observation; distinct jets of colored water were video-taped as they were ejected from the mouth. Very late in prey transport, a bolus of water is ejected through the gill slits; however, by this time, the majority of water appears already to have exited the buccal cavity through the mouth. Such patterns were observed for sharks feeding on both small and large prey items. Although a basic pattern of prey capture and transport was regularly repeated among strikes, kinematic patterns during prey capture and transport were variable both within and among individuals, indicating that prey acquisition is not tightly controlled. However, the amount of variability was similar among prey sizes. In addition, there were no detectable changes in behavior due to prey item size. Ram-suction index values confirmed that similar capture modes were being utilized for both prey sizes. PMID:9319118

  6. Numerical analysis of kinematic soil-pile interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Castelli, Francesco; Maugeri, Michele; Mylonakis, George

    2008-07-08

    In the present study, the response of singles pile to kinematic seismic loading is investigated using the computer program SAP2000. The objectives of the study are: (1) to develop a numerical model that can realistically simulate kinematic soil-structure interaction for piles accounting for discontinuity conditions at the pile-soil interface, energy dissipation and wave propagation; (2) to use the model for evaluating kinematic interaction effects on pile response as function of input ground motion; and (3) to present a case study in which theoretical predictions are compared with results obtained from other formulations. To evaluate the effects of kinematic loading, the responses of both the free-field soil (with no piles) and the pile were compared. Time history and static pushover analyses were conducted to estimate the displacement and kinematic pile bending under seismic loadings.

  7. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  8. Numerical analysis of kinematic soil—pile interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Francesco; Maugeri, Michele; Mylonakis, George

    2008-07-01

    In the present study, the response of singles pile to kinematic seismic loading is investigated using the computer program SAP2000@. The objectives of the study are: (1) to develop a numerical model that can realistically simulate kinematic soil-structure interaction for piles accounting for discontinuity conditions at the pile-soil interface, energy dissipation and wave propagation; (2) to use the model for evaluating kinematic interaction effects on pile response as function of input ground motion; and (3) to present a case study in which theoretical predictions are compared with results obtained from other formulations. To evaluate the effects of kinematic loading, the responses of both the free-field soil (with no piles) and the pile were compared. Time history and static pushover analyses were conducted to estimate the displacement and kinematic pile bending under seismic loadings.

  9. Color-kinematics duality in multi-Regge kinematics and dimensional reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Henrik; Vera, Agustín Sabio; Campillo, Eduardo Serna; Vázquez-Mozo, Miguel Á.

    2013-10-01

    In this note we study the applicability of the color-kinematics duality to the scattering of two distinguishable scalar matter particles with gluon emission in QCD, or graviton emission in Einstein gravity. Previous analysis suggested that direct use of the Bern-Carrasco-Johansson double-copy prescription to matter amplitudes does not reproduce the gravitational amplitude in multi-Regge kinematics. This situation, however, can be avoided by extensions to the gauge theory, while maintaning the same Regge limit. Here we present two examples of these extensions: the introduction of a scalar contact interaction and the relaxation of the distinguishability of the scalars. In both cases new diagrams allow for a full reconstruction of the correct Regge limit on the gravitational side. Both modifications correspond to theories obtained by dimensional reduction from higher-dimensional gauge theories.

  10. A study on estimation of planar gait kinematics using minimal inertial measurement units and inverse kinematics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyao; Soh, Gim Song

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study of using four inertial measurement units (IMUs) attached to the heel and pelvis to estimate the joint angles of normal subjects during walking. The IMU, consisting of a 3-D accelerometer and gyroscope, is used to estimate the planar displacement of the heel and pelvis and the angular change of heel in one gait cycle. We then model the gait as a planar 3R serial chain and solve its inverse kinematics by using such information. The results are validated by comparing the estimated joint angles of lower limbs (i.e. hip, knee and ankle angles) with an optical motion capture system. This study can benefit the future research on conducting complete lower limbs kinematics analysis with minimal and unobtrusive wearable sensors. PMID:25571585

  11. Edge localized mode control with an edge resonant magnetic perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R.A.; Boedo, J.A.; Rudakov, D.L.; Evans, T.E.; Osborne, T.H.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; Jackson, G.L.; La Haye, R.J.; Leonard, A.W.; Schaffer, M.J.; Snyder, P.B.; West, W.P.; Thomas, P.R.; Becoulet, M.; Harris, J.; Finken, K.-H.; Doyle, E.J.; Rhodes, T.L.; Wang, G.

    2005-05-15

    A low amplitude ({delta}b{sub r}/B{sub T}=1 part in 5000) edge resonant magnetic field perturbation with toroidal mode number n=3 and poloidal mode numbers between 8 and 15 has been used to suppress most large type I edge localized modes (ELMs) without degrading core plasma confinement. ELMs have been suppressed for periods of up to 8.6 energy confinement times when the edge safety factor q{sub 95} is between 3.5 and 4. The large ELMs are replaced by packets of events (possibly type II ELMs) with small amplitude, narrow radial extent, and a higher level of magnetic field and density fluctuations, creating a duty cycle with long 'active' intervals of high transport and short 'quiet' intervals of low transport. The increased transport associated with these events is less impulsive and slows the recovery of the pedestal profiles to the values reached just before the large ELMs without the n=3 perturbation. Changing the toroidal phase of the perturbation by 60 deg. with respect to the best ELM suppression case reduces the ELM amplitude and frequency by factors of 2-3 in the divertor, produces a more stochastic response in the H-mode pedestal profiles, and displays similar increases in small scale events, although significant numbers of large ELMs survive. In contrast to the best ELM suppression case where the type I ELMs are also suppressed on the outboard midplane, the midplane recycling increases until individual ELMs are no longer discernable. The ELM response depends on the toroidal phase of the applied perturbation because intrinsic error fields make the target plasma nonaxisymmetric, and suggests that at least some of the variation in ELM behavior in a single device or among different devices is due to differences in the intrinsic error fields in these devices. These results indicate that ELMs can be suppressed by small edge resonant magnetic field perturbations. Extrapolation to next-step burning plasma devices will require extending the regime of operation to

  12. INVESTIGATING DISK-HALO FLOWS AND ACCRETION: A KINEMATIC AND MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF EXTRAPLANAR H I IN NGC 3044 AND NGC 4302

    SciTech Connect

    Zschaechner, Laura K.; Rand, Richard J.; Walterbos, Rene E-mail: rjr@phys.unm.edu

    2015-01-20

    To further understand the origins of and physical processes operating in extra-planar gas, we present observations and kinematic models of H I in the two nearby, edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 3044 and NGC 4302. We model NGC 3044 as a single, thick disk. Substantial amounts of extra-planar H I are also detected. We detect a decrease in rotation speed with height (a lag) that shallows radially, reaching zero at approximately R {sub 25}. The large-scale kinematic asymmetry of the approaching and receding halves suggests a recent disturbance. The kinematics and morphology of NGC 4302, a Virgo Cluster member, are greatly disturbed. We model NGC 4302 as a combination of a thin disk and a second, thicker disk, the latter having a hole near the center. We detect lagging extra-planar gas, with indications of shallowing in the receding half, although its characteristics are difficult to constrain. A bridge is detected between NGC 4302 and its companion, NGC 4298. We explore trends involving the extra-planar H I kinematics of these galaxies, as well as galaxies throughout the literature, as well as possible connections between lag properties with star formation and environment. Measured lags are found to be significantly steeper than those modeled by purely ballistic effects, indicating additional factors. Radial shallowing of extra-planar lags is typical and occurs between 0.5R {sub 25} and R {sub 25}, suggesting internal processes are important in dictating extra-planar kinematics.

  13. Investigating Disk-halo Flows and Accretion: A Kinematic and Morphological Analysis of Extraplanar H I in NGC 3044 and NGC 4302

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschaechner, Laura K.; Rand, Richard J.; Walterbos, Rene

    2015-01-01

    To further understand the origins of and physical processes operating in extra-planar gas, we present observations and kinematic models of H I in the two nearby, edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 3044 and NGC 4302. We model NGC 3044 as a single, thick disk. Substantial amounts of extra-planar H I are also detected. We detect a decrease in rotation speed with height (a lag) that shallows radially, reaching zero at approximately R 25. The large-scale kinematic asymmetry of the approaching and receding halves suggests a recent disturbance. The kinematics and morphology of NGC 4302, a Virgo Cluster member, are greatly disturbed. We model NGC 4302 as a combination of a thin disk and a second, thicker disk, the latter having a hole near the center. We detect lagging extra-planar gas, with indications of shallowing in the receding half, although its characteristics are difficult to constrain. A bridge is detected between NGC 4302 and its companion, NGC 4298. We explore trends involving the extra-planar H I kinematics of these galaxies, as well as galaxies throughout the literature, as well as possible connections between lag properties with star formation and environment. Measured lags are found to be significantly steeper than those modeled by purely ballistic effects, indicating additional factors. Radial shallowing of extra-planar lags is typical and occurs between 0.5R 25 and R 25, suggesting internal processes are important in dictating extra-planar kinematics.

  14. APPROXIMATION ALGORITHMS FOR DISTANCE-2 EDGE COLORING.

    SciTech Connect

    BARRETT, CHRISTOPHER L; ISTRATE, GABRIEL; VILIKANTI, ANIL KUMAR; MARATHE, MADHAV; THITE, SHRIPAD V

    2002-07-17

    The authors consider the link scheduling problem for packet radio networks which is assigning channels to the connecting links so that transmission may proceed on all links assigned the same channel simultaneously without collisions. This problem can be cast as the distance-2 edge coloring problem, a variant of proper edge coloring, on the graph with transceivers as vertices and links as edges. They present efficient approximation algorithms for the distance-2 edge coloring problem for various classes of graphs.

  15. Densified edge seals for fuel cell components

    DOEpatents

    DeCasperis, Anthony J.; Roethlein, Richard J.; Breault, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A porous fuel cell component, such as an electrode substrate, has a densified edge which forms an improved gas seal during operation when soaked with electrolyte. The edges are made from the same composition as the rest of the component and are made by compressing an increased thickness of this material along the edges during the fabrication process.

  16. RECENT EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF EDGE AND INTERNAL TRANSPORT BARRIERS IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    P. GOHIL; L.R. BAYLOR; K.H. BURRELL; T.A. CASPER; E.J. DOYLE; C.M. GREENFIELD; T.C. JERNIGAN; J.E. KINSEY; C.J LASNIER; R.A. MOYER; M. MURAKAMI; T.L. RHODES; D.L. RUDAKOV; G.M. STAEBLER; G. WANG; J.G. WATKINS; W.P. WEST; L.ZENG

    2002-08-01

    Results from recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have revealed many important details on transport barriers at the plasma edge and in the plasma core. These experiments include: (a) the formation of the H-mode edge barrier directly by pellet injection; (b) the formation of a quiescent H-mode edge barrier (QH-mode) which is free from edge localized modes (ELMs), but which still exhibits good density and radiative power control; (c) the formation of multiple transport barriers, such as the quiescent double barrier (QDB) which combines a internal transport barrier with the quiescent H-mode edge barrier. Results from the pellet-induced H-mode experiments indicate that: (a) the edge temperature (electron or ion) is not a critical parameter for the formation of the H-mode barrier, (b) pellet injection leads to an increased gradient in the radial electric field, E{sub r}, at the plasma edge; (c) the experimentally determined edge parameters at barrier transition are well below the predictions of several theories on the formation of the H-mode barrier, (d) pellet injection can lower the threshold power required to form the H-mode barrier. The quiescent H-mode barrier exhibits good density control as the result of continuous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity at the plasma edge called the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO). The EHO enhances the edge particle transport while maintaining a good energy transport barrier. The ability to produce multiple barriers in the QDB regime has led to long duration, high performance plasmas with {beta}{sub NH{sub 89}} values of 7 for up to 10 times the confinement time. Density profile control in the plasma core of QDB plasmas has been demonstrated using on-axis ECH.

  17. Modern Design of Resonant Edge-Slot Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Resonant edge-slot (slotted-waveguide) array antennas can now be designed very accurately following a modern computational approach like that followed for some other microwave components. This modern approach makes it possible to design superior antennas at lower cost than was previously possible. Heretofore, the physical and engineering knowledge of resonant edge-slot array antennas had remained immature since they were introduced during World War II. This is because despite their mechanical simplicity, high reliability, and potential for operation with high efficiency, the electromagnetic behavior of resonant edge-slot antennas is very complex. Because engineering design formulas and curves for such antennas are not available in the open literature, designers have been forced to implement iterative processes of fabricating and testing multiple prototypes to derive design databases, each unique for a specific combination of operating frequency and set of waveguide tube dimensions. The expensive, time-consuming nature of these processes has inhibited the use of resonant edge-slot antennas. The present modern approach reduces costs by making it unnecessary to build and test multiple prototypes. As an additional benefit, this approach affords a capability to design an array of slots having different dimensions to taper the antenna illumination to reduce the amplitudes of unwanted side lobes. The heart of the modern approach is the use of the latest commercially available microwave-design software, which implements finite-element models of electromagnetic fields in and around waveguides, antenna elements, and similar components. Instead of building and testing prototypes, one builds a database and constructs design curves from the results of computational simulations for sets of design parameters. The figure shows a resonant edge-slot antenna designed following this approach. Intended for use as part of a radiometer operating at a frequency of 10.7 GHz, this antenna

  18. Differences in Lower Extremity and Trunk Kinematics between Single Leg Squat and Step Down Tasks.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Foch, Eric; Luko, Marc M; Loverro, Kari L; Khuu, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The single leg squat and single leg step down are two commonly used functional tasks to assess movement patterns. It is unknown how kinematics compare between these tasks. The purpose of this study was to identify kinematic differences in the lower extremity, pelvis and trunk between the single leg squat and the step down. Fourteen healthy individuals participated in this research and performed the functional tasks while kinematic data were collected for the trunk, pelvis, and lower extremities using a motion capture system. For the single leg squat task, the participant was instructed to squat as low as possible. For the step down task, the participant was instructed to stand on top of a box, slowly lower him/herself until the non-stance heel touched the ground, and return to standing. This was done from two different heights (16 cm and 24 cm). The kinematics were evaluated at peak knee flexion as well as at 60° of knee flexion. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) between the angles at those two time points were also calculated to better understand the relationship between each task. The tasks resulted in kinematics differences at the knee, hip, pelvis, and trunk at both time points. The single leg squat was performed with less hip adduction (p ≤ 0.003), but more hip external rotation and knee abduction (p ≤ 0.030), than the step down tasks at 60° of knee flexion. These differences were maintained at peak knee flexion except hip external rotation was only significant in the 24 cm step down task (p ≤ 0.029). While there were multiple differences between the two step heights at peak knee flexion, the only difference at 60° of knee flexion was in trunk flexion (p < 0.001). Angles at the knee and hip had a moderate to excellent correlation (r = 0.51-0.98), but less consistently so at the pelvis and trunk (r = 0.21-0.96). The differences in movement patterns between the single leg squat and the step down should be considered when selecting a single leg task

  19. Differences in Lower Extremity and Trunk Kinematics between Single Leg Squat and Step Down Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Foch, Eric; Luko, Marc M.; Loverro, Kari L.; Khuu, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The single leg squat and single leg step down are two commonly used functional tasks to assess movement patterns. It is unknown how kinematics compare between these tasks. The purpose of this study was to identify kinematic differences in the lower extremity, pelvis and trunk between the single leg squat and the step down. Fourteen healthy individuals participated in this research and performed the functional tasks while kinematic data were collected for the trunk, pelvis, and lower extremities using a motion capture system. For the single leg squat task, the participant was instructed to squat as low as possible. For the step down task, the participant was instructed to stand on top of a box, slowly lower him/herself until the non-stance heel touched the ground, and return to standing. This was done from two different heights (16cm and 24cm). The kinematics were evaluated at peak knee flexion as well as at 60° of knee flexion. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) between the angles at those two time points were also calculated to better understand the relationship between each task. The tasks resulted in kinematics differences at the knee, hip, pelvis, and trunk at both time points. The single leg squat was performed with less hip adduction (p ≤ 0.003), but more hip external rotation and knee abduction (p ≤ 0.030), than the step down tasks at 60° of knee flexion. These differences were maintained at peak knee flexion except hip external rotation was only significant in the 24cm step down task (p ≤ 0.029). While there were multiple differences between the two step heights at peak knee flexion, the only difference at 60° of knee flexion was in trunk flexion (p < 0.001). Angles at the knee and hip had a moderate to excellent correlation (r = 0.51–0.98), but less consistently so at the pelvis and trunk (r = 0.21–0.96). The differences in movement patterns between the single leg squat and the step down should be considered when selecting a single leg task

  20. Ionized gas kinematics of galaxies in the CALIFA survey. I. Velocity fields, kinematic parameters of the dominant component, and presence of kinematically distinct gaseous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lorenzo, B.; Márquez, I.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Masegosa, J.; Husemann, B.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, J.; Mast, D.; García-Benito, R.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; van de Ven, G.; Spekkens, K.; Holmes, L.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; del Olmo, A.; Ziegler, B.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Papaderos, P.; Gomes, J. M.; Marino, R. A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Bekeraitė, S.; Wisotzki, L.; Bomans, D.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Ionized gas kinematics provide important clues to the dynamical structure of galaxies and hold constraints to the processes driving their evolution. Aims: The motivation of this work is to provide an overall characterization of the kinematic behavior of the ionized gas of the galaxies included in the Calar Alto Legacy Integral field Area (CALIFA), offering kinematic clues to potential users of the CALIFA survey for including kinematical criteria in their selection of targets for specific studies. From the first 200 galaxies observed by CALIFA survey in its two configurations, we present the two-dimensional kinematic view of the 177 galaxies satisfaying a gas content/detection threshold. Methods: After removing the stellar contribution, we used the cross-correlation technique to obtain the radial velocity of the dominant gaseous component for each spectrum in the CALIFA data cubes for different emission lines (namely, [O ii] λλ3726,3729, [O iii] λλ4959,5007, Hα+[N ii] λλ6548,6584, and [SII]λλ6716,6730). The main kinematic parameters measured on the plane of the sky were directly derived from the radial velocities with no assumptions on the internal prevailing motions. Evidence of the presence of several gaseous components with different kinematics were detected by using [O iii] λλ4959,5007 emission line profiles. Results: At the velocity resolution of CALIFA, most objects in the sample show regular velocity fields, although the ionized-gas kinematics are rarely consistent with simple coplanar circular motions. Thirty-five percent of the objects present evidence of a displacement between the photometric and kinematic centers larger than the original spaxel radii. Only 17% of the objects in the sample exhibit kinematic lopsidedness when comparing receding and approaching sides of the velocity fields, but most of them are interacting galaxies exhibiting nuclear activity (AGN or LINER). Early-type (E+S0) galaxies in the sample present clear

  1. The Three-Dimensional Morphology of VY Canis Majoris. I. The Kinematics of the Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Helton, L. Andrew; Jones, Terry J.

    2007-06-01

    Images of the complex circumstellar nebula associated with the famous red supergiant VY CMa show evidence for multiple and asymmetric mass-loss events over the past 1000 yr. Doppler velocities of the arcs and knots in the ejecta show that they are not only spatially distinct but also kinematically separate from the surrounding diffuse material. In this paper we describe second-epoch HST WFPC2 images to measure the transverse motions, which when combined with the radial motions provide a complete picture of the kinematics of the ejecta, including the total space motions and directions of the outflows. Our results show that the arcs and clumps of knots are moving at different velocities, in different directions, and at different angles relative to the plane of the sky and to the star, confirming their origin from eruptions at different times and from physically separate regions on the star. We conclude that the morphology and kinematics of the arcs and knots are consistent with a history of mass ejections not aligned with any presumed axis of symmetry. The arcs and clumps represent relatively massive outflows and ejections of gas very likely associated with large-scale convective activity and magnetic fields. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  2. Effects of dynamical evolution on the internal kinematical properties of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiongco, Maria; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2016-05-01

    The observational characterization of the internal kinematics of Galactic globular clusters will soon reach an unprecedented level of richness, thanks to the synergy between the astrometric data provided by Gaia and HST, and a number of ESO/VLT spectroscopic programs. Such a wealth of information on the three-dimensional velocity space of star clusters, offers the unique opportunity to address a number of open questions on the phase space evolution of collisional stellar systems.Driven by these motivations, I will present some highlighted results of a large survey of N-body simulations aimed at exploring the long-term dynamical evolution of the kinematical properties of tidally limited star clusters. First, I will discuss of the evolution of the anisotropy in velocity space, with particular attention to the dependence on the cluster initial structural properties and dynamical history. I will then focus on the implications of cluster dynamical evolution and loss of stars on its internal rotation. Such an enriched picture of the kinematical properties of star clusters offers a solid bedrock for addressing a range of exciting new questions related to the dynamics of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. In this context, I will illustrate some results on the internal rotational velocity profiles and the evolution of the differences in the rotation of different stellar populations.

  3. Whole-body predictors of wrist shot accuracy in ice hockey: a kinematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Michaud-Paquette, Yannick; Magee, Patrick; Pearsall, David; Turcotte, René

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify joint angular kinematics that corresponds to shooting accuracy in the stationary ice hockey wrist shot. Twenty-four subjects participated in this study, each performing 10 successful shots on four shooting targets. An eight-camera infra-red motion capture system (240 Hz), along with passive reflective markers, was used to record motion of the joints, hockey stick, and puck throughout the performance of the wrist shot. A multiple regression analysis was carried out to examine whole-body kinematic variables with accuracy scores as the dependent variable. Significant accuracy predictors were identified in the lower limbs, torso and upper limbs. Interpretation of the kinematics suggests that characteristics such as a better stability of the base of support, momentum cancellation, proper trunk orientation and a more dynamic control of the lead arm throughout the wrist shot movement are presented as predictors for the accuracy outcome. These findings are substantial as they not only provide a framework for further analysis of motor control strategies using tools for accurate projection of objects, but more tangibly they may provide a comprehensive evidence-based guide to coaches and athletes for planned training to improve performance. PMID:21560748

  4. On powercounting in perturbative quantum gravity theories through color-kinematic duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boels, Rutger H.; Isermann, Reinke Sven

    2013-06-01

    The standard argument why gravity is not renormalisable relies on direct powercounting of Feynman graphs to estimate the degree of UV divergence. In several (highly) supersymmetric examples the actual divergences have been shown to be considerably better. In these examples the improvement follows from a conjectured duality between color and kinematics. In this paper we initiate the systematic study of quite general powercounting under the assumption that color-kinematic duality exists. The main technical tool is a reformulation of the duality in terms of linear maps, modulo subtleties at loop level mostly inherent to the duality. This tool may have wider applications in both gauge and gravity theories, up to resolution of the subtleties. Here it is first applied to the large Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten (BCFW) shift behavior of gravity integrands constructed through the duality. Assuming color-kinematic duality and reasonable technical requirements hold these shifts are shown to be independent of loop order. This is a new quantitative measure for massive cancellations with respect to the Feynman graph expression. More speculatively, the same approach is then applied to provide estimates of the overall degree of UV divergence in quite general gravity theories, assuming the duality exists. The manifest cancellations obtained in these estimates depends on the exact implementation of the duality at loop level, especially on graph topology. The developed arguments apply to all multiplicity. Finally, some evidence for the duality to all loop orders is provided from an analysis of BCFW shifts of gauge theory integrands through Feynman graphs.

  5. Storm fronts over galaxy discs: models of how waves generate extraplanar gas and its anomalous kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, Curtis; Smith, Daniel C.

    2009-09-01

    The existence of partially ionized, diffuse gas and dust clouds at kiloparsec scale distances above the central planes of edge-on, galaxy discs was an unexpected discovery about 20 years ago. Subsequent observations showed that this extended or extraplanar diffuse interstellar gas (EDIG) has rotation velocities approximately 10-20 per cent lower than those in the central plane, and has been hard to account for. Here, we present results of hydrodynamic models, with radiative cooling and heating from star formation. We find that in models with star formation generated stochastically across the disc, an extraplanar gas layer is generated as long as the star formation is sufficiently strong. However, this gas rotates at nearly the same speed as the midplane gas. We then studied a range of models with imposed spiral or bar waves in the disc. EDIG layers were also generated in these models, but primarily over the wave regions, not over the entire disc. Because of this partial coverage, the EDIG clouds move radially, as well as vertically, with the result that observed kinematic anomalies are reproduced. The implication is that the kinematic anomalies are the result of three-dimensional motions when the cylindrical symmetry of the disc is broken. Thus, the kinematic anomalies are the result of bars or strong waves, and more face-on galaxies with such waves should have an asymmetric EDIG component. The models also indicate that the EDIG can contain a significant fraction of cool gas, and that some star formation can be triggered at considerable heights above the disc mid-plane. We expect all of these effects to be more prominent in young, forming discs, to play a role in rapidly smoothing disc asymmetries and in working to self-regulate disc structure.

  6. Baryonic Distributions in Galaxy Dark Matter Haloes I: New Observations of Neutral and Ionized Gas Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (HI) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for sixteen galaxies in the statistically representative EDGES kinematic sample. HI rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The HI rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in twelve galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6μm images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixed stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and maximum disc/bulge assumptions in the rotation curve decomposition.

  7. K-edge densitometer (KED)

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, J.K.; Hansen, W.J.

    1993-02-11

    In 1979, a K-edge densitometer (KED) was installed by the Safeguards Assay group from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the PNC reprocessing plant at Tokai-mura, Japan. It uses an active nondestructive assay technique, KED, to measure the plutonium concentration of the product solution. The measurement uncertainty of an assay depends on the count time chosen, but can be 0.5% or better. The computer hardware and software were upgraded in 1992. This manual describes the operation of the instrument, with an emphasis on the user interface to the software.

  8. Edge Sharpness Assessment by Parametric Modeling: Application to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, R; Ding, Y; Simonetti, OP

    2015-01-01

    In biomedical imaging, edge sharpness is an important yet often overlooked image quality metric. In this work, a semi-automatic method to quantify edge sharpness in the presence of significant noise is presented with application to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The method is based on parametric modeling of image edges. First, an edge map is automatically generated and one or more edges-of-interest (EOI) are manually selected using graphical user interface. Multiple exclusion criteria are then enforced to eliminate edge pixels that are potentially not suitable for sharpness assessment. Second, at each pixel of the EOI, an image intensity profile is read along a small line segment that runs locally normal to the EOI. Third, the profiles corresponding to all EOI pixels are individually fitted with a sigmoid function characterized by four parameters, including one that represents edge sharpness. Last, the distribution of the sharpness parameter is used to quantify edge sharpness. For validation, the method is applied to simulated data as well as MRI data from both phantom imaging and cine imaging experiments. This method allows for fast, quantitative evaluation of edge sharpness even in images with poor signal-to-noise ratio. Although the utility of this method is demonstrated for MRI, it can be adapted for other medical imaging applications. PMID:26755895

  9. Bosonic edge states in gapped honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huaiming; Niu, Yuekun; Chen, Shu; Feng, Shiping

    2016-03-01

    By quantum Monte Carlo simulations of bosons in gapped honeycomb lattices, we show the existence of bosonic edge states. For a single layer honeycomb lattice, bosonic edge states can be controlled to appear, cross the gap, and merge into bulk states by an on-site potential applied on the outermost sites of the boundary. On a bilayer honeycomb lattice, A bosonic edge state traversing the gap at half filling is demonstrated. The topological origin of the bosonic edge states is discussed with pseudo Berry curvature. The results will simulate experimental studies of these exotic bosonic edge states with ultracold bosons trapped in honeycomb optical lattices.

  10. Extraction of edge feature in cardiovascular image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianrong; Chen, Dongqing; Yu, Daoyin; Liu, Xiaojun

    2001-09-01

    Extraction of edge feature and accurate measurement of vascular diameter in cardiovascular image are the bases for labeling the coronary hierarchy, 3D refined reconstruction of the coronary arterial tree and accurate fusion between the calculated 3D vascular trees and other views. In order to extract vessels from the image, the grayscale minimization of the circle template and differential edge detection are put forward. Edge pixels of the coronary artery are set according to maximization of the differential value. The edge lines are determined after the edge pixels are smoothed by B-Spline function. The assessment of feature extraction is demonstrated by the excellent performance in computer simulation and actual application.

  11. An Efficient Ant-Based Edge Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Doğan

    An efficient ant-based edge detector is presented. It is based on the distribution of ants on an image, ants try to find possible edges by using a state transition function based on 5x5 edge structures. Visual comparisons show that the proposed method gives finer details and thinner edges at lesser computational times when compared to earlier ant-based approaches. When compared to standard edge detectors, it shows robustness to Gaussian and Salt & Pepper noise and provides finer details than others with same parameter set in both clear and noisy images.

  12. Tunable skewed edges in puckered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujić, Marko M.; Ezawa, Motohiko; Tadić, Milan Ž.; Peeters, François M.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a type of edges arising due to the anisotropy inherent in the puckered structure of a honeycomb system such as in phosphorene. Skewed-zigzag and skewed-armchair nanoribbons are semiconducting and metallic, respectively, in contrast to their normal edge counterparts. Their band structures are tunable, and a metal-insulator transition is induced by an electric field. We predict a field-effect transistor based on the edge states in skewed-armchair nanoribbons, where the edge state is gapped by applying arbitrary small electric field Ez. A topological argument is presented, revealing the condition for the emergence of such edge states.

  13. Rotational kinematics of a particle in rectilinear motion: Perceptions and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, Vijay A.

    2012-08-01

    Rectilinear motion of a particle with constant velocity is one of the simplest situations one can envisage in mechanics. We discuss the rotational kinematics associated with this motion and find that they are of pedagogical relevance. We have constructed a small inventory consisting of conceptual multiple-choice questions after consultation with content experts and feedback from students. This inventory was administered to a group of physics teachers and the responses reveal interesting misconceptions harbored even by teachers. A brief discussion of the pitfalls and instructional implications is carried out.

  14. Kinematic and dynamic modeling and approximate analysis of a roller chain drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuglede, Niels; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2016-03-01

    A simple roller chain drive consisting of two sprockets connected by tight chain spans is investigated. First, a kinematic model is presented which include both spans and sprockets. An approach for calculating the chain wrapping length is presented, which also allows for the exact calculation of sprocket center positions for a given chain length. The kinematic analysis demonstrates that the total length of the chain wrapped around the sprockets generally varies during one tooth period. Analytical predictions for the wrapping length are compared to multibody simulation results and show very good agreement. It is thereby demonstrated that chain drives with tight chain spans must include compliant components to function. Second, a dynamic model is presented which includes the two spans and the driven sprocket. Assuming the presence of a stationary operating state, the presented dynamic model allows for analytical studies of the coupled motion of the chain spans and driven sprocket. Parametric excitation of the spans come from sprocket angular displacements, and the driven sprocket acts as a boundary which can be compliant in the axial direction. External transverse excitation of the spans comes from polygonal action, and is treated through kinematic forcing at the moving string boundaries. Perturbation analysis of the model is carried out using the method of multiple scales. Results show a multitude of internal and external resonance conditions, and some examples are presented of both decoupled and coupled motion. Together, the kinematic and dynamic model are aimed toward providing a framework for conducting and understanding both numerical, and experimental investigations of roller chain drive dynamics.

  15. The high-ion content and kinematics of low-redshift Lyman limit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Andrew J.; Tumlinson, Jason; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J. Christopher; Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Davé, Romeel

    2013-12-01

    We study the high-ion content and kinematics of the circumgalactic medium around low-redshift galaxies using a sample of 23 Lyman limit systems (LLSs) at 0.08 < z < 0.93 observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. In Lehner et al., we recently showed that low-z LLSs have a bimodal metallicity distribution. Here we extend that analysis to search for differences between the high-ion and kinematic properties of the metal-poor and metal-rich branches. We find that metal-rich LLSs tend to show higher O VI columns and broader O VI profiles than metal-poor LLSs. The total H I line width (Δv {sub 90} statistic) in LLSs is not correlated with metallicity, indicating that the H I kinematics alone cannot be used to distinguish inflow from outflow and gas recycling. Among the 17 LLSs with O VI detections, all but two show evidence of kinematic sub-structure, in the form of O VI-H I centroid offsets, multiple components, or both. Using various scenarios for how the metallicities in the high-ion and low-ion phases of each LLS compare, we constrain the ionized hydrogen column in the O VI phase to lie in the range log N(H II) ∼ 17.6-20. The O VI phase of LLSs is a substantial baryon reservoir, with M(high-ion) ∼ 10{sup 8.5-10.9} (r/150 kpc){sup 2} M {sub ☉}, similar to the mass in the low-ion phase. Accounting for the O VI phase approximately doubles the contribution of low-z LLSs to the cosmic baryon budget.

  16. The High-Ion Content and Kinematics of Low-Redshift Lyman Limit Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew; Lehner, N.; Tumlinson, J.; Howk, J. C.; Tripp, T. M.; Prochaska, J. X.; O'Meara, J.; Werk, J.; Bordoloi, R.; Katz, N.; Oppenheimer, B.; Dave, R.

    2014-01-01

    We study the high-ionization phase and kinematics of the circumgalactic medium around low-redshift galaxies in a sample of 23 low-z (0.08kinematic properties of the metal-poor and metal-rich branches. We find that metal-rich LLSs tend to show higher O VI columns and broader O VI profiles than metal-poor LLSs. The total H I line width (dv90 statistic) in LLSs is not correlated with metallicity, indicating that the H I kinematics alone cannot be used to distinguish inflow and outflow in LLSs. Among the 17 LLSs with O VI detections, all but two show evidence of kinematic sub-structure, in the form of O VI-H I centroid offsets, multiple components, or both. Using various scenarios for how the metallicity in the high-ion and low-ion phases of each LLS compare, we constrain the ionized hydrogen column in the O VI phase to lie in the range log N(H II 17.6-20. Therefore, the O VI phase of LLSs traces a substantial baryon reservoir, with M(high-ion 10^{8.9-10.9}(r/150 kpc)^2 solar masses, similar to the mass in the low-ion phase. Accounting for the O VI phase approximately doubles the contribution of low-z LLSs to the cosmic baryon budget.

  17. Optimal edge filters explain human blur detection.

    PubMed

    McIlhagga, William H; May, Keith A

    2012-01-01

    Edges are important visual features, providing many cues to the three-dimensional structure of the world. One of these cues is edge blur. Sharp edges tend to be caused by object boundaries, while blurred edges indicate shadows, surface curvature, or defocus due to relative depth. Edge blur also drives accommodation and may be implicated in the correct development of the eye's optical power. Here we use classification image techniques to reveal the mechanisms underlying blur detection in human vision. Observers were shown a sharp and a blurred edge in white noise and had to identify the blurred edge. The resultant smoothed classification image derived from these experiments was similar to a derivative of a Gaussian filter. We also fitted a number of edge detection models (MIRAGE, N(1), and N(3)(+)) and the ideal observer to observer responses, but none performed as well as the classification image. However, observer responses were well fitted by a recently developed optimal edge detector model, coupled with a Bayesian prior on the expected blurs in the stimulus. This model outperformed the classification image when performance was measured by the Akaike Information Criterion. This result strongly suggests that humans use optimal edge detection filters to detect edges and encode their blur. PMID:22984222

  18. Kinematic GPS solutions for aircraft trajectories: Identifying and minimizing systematic height errors associated with atmospheric propagation delays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shan, S.; Bevis, M.; Kendrick, E.; Mader, G.L.; Raleigh, D.; Hudnut, K.; Sartori, M.; Phillips, D.

    2007-01-01

    When kinematic GPS processing software is used to estimate the trajectory of an aircraft, unless the delays imposed on the GPS signals by the atmosphere are either estimated or calibrated via external observations, then vertical height errors of decimeters can occur. This problem is clearly manifested when the aircraft is positioned against multiple base stations in areas of pronounced topography because the aircraft height solutions obtained using different base stations will tend to be mutually offset, or biased, in proportion to the elevation differences between the base stations. When performing kinematic surveys in areas with significant topography it should be standard procedure to use multiple base stations, and to separate them vertically to the maximum extent possible, since it will then be much easier to detect mis-modeling of the atmosphere. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Measuring edge importance to improve immunization performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He; Yan, Zhijun; Pan, Yaohui

    2014-12-01

    The edge heterogeneity has a remarkable influence on disease spreading, but it has seldom been considered in the disease-controlling policies. Based on the gravity model, we propose the edge importance index to describe the influence of edge heterogeneity on immunization strategies. Then the edge importance and contact weight are combined to calculate the infection rates on the I-S (Infected-Susceptible) edges in the complex network, and the difference of the infection rates on strong and weak ties is analyzed. Simulation results show that edge heterogeneity has a significant influence on the performance of immunization strategies, and better immunization efficiency is derived when the vaccination rate of the nodes in the weak I-S edges is increased.

  20. Atomic processes in edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, David; Krstic, Predrag; Pindzola, Mitch; Griffin, Donald; Loch, Stuart; Ballance, Conner; Minami, Tatsuya; Reinhold, Carlos; Stuart, Steve

    2006-10-01

    Atomic processes play a number of key roles in both the physics of edge plasmas and in their diagnostics. We will provide a brief overview of a number of electron-impact and heavy-particle atomic collision calculations and the associated evaluated databases that are pertinent to edge modeling. Examples will include a large, well tested set of elastic and related transport cross sections as well as generalized collisional-radiative coefficients for all ion stages of Li and Be. We will also report on recent work that has re-evaluated widely assumed scaling relations for electron-impact ionization of excited states of hydrogen-like ions and how this affects the effective ionization rate coefficient used in a wide range of models. Finally, novel calculations of chemical sputtering, sticking, and reflection of D and D2 incident upon deuterated carbons surfaces (amorphous and graphite), in the energy range from about one eV to hundreds of eV, will be described. New and unique features of these simulations in comparison to the previous ones include the surface preparation, enhanced statistics enabled by ultrascale computer resources, and use of the most recent, improved hydrocarbon potentials.

  1. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals.

  2. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear

    PubMed Central

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals. PMID:27009331

  3. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  4. Power regulation of kinematic control inputs for forward flying Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Kenneth; Faruque, Imraan; Sean Humbert, J.

    2014-12-01

    The choices of insect wing kinematic programs is not well understood, particularly the mechanism by which an insect selects a distortion to achieve flight control. A methodology to evaluate prospective kinematic control inputs is presented based on the reachable states when control actuation was constrained to a unit of power. The method implements a computationally-derived reduced order model of the insect's flight dynamics combined with calculation of power requirement. Four kinematic inputs are evaluated based on this criterion for a Drosophila size insect in forward flight. Stroke bias is shown to be the dominant control input using this power normalized evaluation measure.

  5. Computational neural learning formalisms for manipulator inverse kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulati, Sandeep; Barhen, Jacob; Iyengar, S. Sitharama

    1989-01-01

    An efficient, adaptive neural learning paradigm for addressing the inverse kinematics of redundant manipulators is presented. The proposed methodology exploits the infinite local stability of terminal attractors - a new class of mathematical constructs which provide unique information processing capabilities to artificial neural systems. For robotic applications, synaptic elements of such networks can rapidly acquire the kinematic invariances embedded within the presented samples. Subsequently, joint-space configurations, required to follow arbitrary end-effector trajectories, can readily be computed. In a significant departure from prior neuromorphic learning algorithms, this methodology provides mechanisms for incorporating an in-training skew to handle kinematics and environmental constraints.

  6. Fault tolerant kinematic control of hyper-redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedrossian, Nazareth S.

    1994-01-01

    Hyper-redundant spatial manipulators possess fault-tolerant features because of their redundant structure. The kinematic control of these manipulators is investigated with special emphasis on fault-tolerant control. The manipulator tasks are viewed in the end-effector space while actuator commands are in joint-space, requiring an inverse kinematic algorithm to generate joint-angle commands from the end-effector ones. The rate-inverse kinematic control algorithm presented in this paper utilizes the pseudoinverse to accommodate for joint motor failures. An optimal scale factor for the robust inverse is derived.

  7. An adaptive inverse kinematics algorithm for robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbaugh, R.; Glass, K.; Seraji, H.

    1990-01-01

    An adaptive algorithm for solving the inverse kinematics problem for robot manipulators is presented. The algorithm is derived using model reference adaptive control (MRAC) theory and is computationally efficient for online applications. The scheme requires no a priori knowledge of the kinematics of the robot if Cartesian end-effector sensing is available, and it requires knowledge of only the forward kinematics if joint position sensing is used. Computer simulation results are given for the redundant seven-DOF robotics research arm, demonstrating that the proposed algorithm yields accurate joint angle trajectories for a given end-effector position/orientation trajectory.

  8. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect.

    PubMed

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff

  9. Kinematic mental simulations in abduction and deduction.

    PubMed

    Khemlani, Sangeet Suresh; Mackiewicz, Robert; Bucciarelli, Monica; Johnson-Laird, Philip N

    2013-10-15

    We present a theory, and its computer implementation, of how mental simulations underlie the abductions of informal algorithms and deductions from these algorithms. Three experiments tested the theory's predictions, using an environment of a single railway track and a siding. This environment is akin to a universal Turing machine, but it is simple enough for nonprogrammers to use. Participants solved problems that required use of the siding to rearrange the order of cars in a train (experiment 1). Participants abduced and described in their own words algorithms that solved such problems for trains of any length, and, as the use of simulation predicts, they favored "while-loops" over "for-loops" in their descriptions (experiment 2). Given descriptions of loops of procedures, participants deduced the consequences for given trains of six cars, doing so without access to the railway environment (experiment 3). As the theory predicts, difficulty in rearranging trains depends on the numbers of moves and cars to be moved, whereas in formulating an algorithm and deducing its consequences, it depends on the Kolmogorov complexity of the algorithm. Overall, the results corroborated the use of a kinematic mental model in creating and testing informal algorithms and showed that individuals differ reliably in the ability to carry out these tasks. PMID:24082090

  10. On the Kinematics of Undulator Girder Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    The theory of rigid body kinematics is used to derive equations that govern the control and measurement of the position and orientation of undulator girders. The equations form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system. The equations are linear for small motion and easily inverted as desired. For reference, some relevant girder geometrical data is also given. Equations 6-8 relate the linear potentiometer readings to the motion of the girder. Equations 9-11 relate the cam shaft angles to the motion of the girder. Both sets are easily inverted to either obtain the girder motion from the angles or readings, or, to find the angles and readings that would give a desired motion. The motion of any point on the girder can be calculated by applying either sets of equations to the two cam-planes and extrapolating in the z coordinate using equation 19. The formulation of the equations is quite general and easily coded via matrix and vector methods. They form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system.

  11. The [N II] Kinematics of R Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Vogel, S. N.; VanBuren, D.; Strong, J. P.; Lyon, R. G.; Dorband, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    We report a kinematic study of the symbiotic star system R Aqr derived from [N H]lambda 6584 emission observations with a Fabry-Perot imaging spectrometer. The [N II] spatial structure of the R Aqr jet, first observed circa 1977, and surrounding hourglass-shaped nebulosity, due to an explosion approximately 660 years ago, are derived from 41 velocity planes spaced at approximately 12 km/s intervals. Fabry-Perot imagery shows the elliptical nebulosity comprising the waist of the hourglass shell is consistent with a circular ring expanding radially at 55 km/s as seen at an inclination angle, i approximately 70 deg. Fabry-Perot imagery shows the two-sided R Aqr jet is collimated flow in opposite directions. The intensity-velocity structure of the strong NE jet component is shown in contrast to the amorphous SW jet component. We offer a idealized schematic model for the R Aqr jet motion which results in a small-scale helical structure forming around a larger-scale helical path. The implications of such a jet model are discussed. We present a movie showing a side-by-side comparison of the spatial structure of the model and the data as a function of the 41 velocity planes.

  12. Growth rate degeneracies in kinematic dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, B.; Proctor, M. R. E.

    2013-09-01

    We consider the classical problem of kinematic dynamo action in simple steady flows. Due to the adjointness of the induction operator, we show that the growth rate of the dynamo will be exactly the same for two types of magnetic boundary conditions: the magnetic field can be normal (infinite magnetic permeability, also called pseudovacuum) or tangent (perfect electrical conductor) to the boundaries of the domain. These boundary conditions correspond to well-defined physical limits often used in numerical models and relevant to laboratory experiments. The only constraint is for the velocity field u to be reversible, meaning there exists a transformation changing u into -u. We illustrate this surprising property using S2T2 type of flows in spherical geometry inspired by [Dudley and James, Proc. R. Soc. London A1364-502110.1098/rspa.1989.0112 425, 407 (1989)]. Using both types of boundary conditions, it is shown that the growth rates of the dynamos are identical, although the corresponding magnetic eigenmodes are drastically different.

  13. Kinematic mental simulations in abduction and deduction

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet Suresh; Mackiewicz, Robert; Bucciarelli, Monica; Johnson-Laird, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theory, and its computer implementation, of how mental simulations underlie the abductions of informal algorithms and deductions from these algorithms. Three experiments tested the theory’s predictions, using an environment of a single railway track and a siding. This environment is akin to a universal Turing machine, but it is simple enough for nonprogrammers to use. Participants solved problems that required use of the siding to rearrange the order of cars in a train (experiment 1). Participants abduced and described in their own words algorithms that solved such problems for trains of any length, and, as the use of simulation predicts, they favored “while-loops” over “for-loops” in their descriptions (experiment 2). Given descriptions of loops of procedures, participants deduced the consequences for given trains of six cars, doing so without access to the railway environment (experiment 3). As the theory predicts, difficulty in rearranging trains depends on the numbers of moves and cars to be moved, whereas in formulating an algorithm and deducing its consequences, it depends on the Kolmogorov complexity of the algorithm. Overall, the results corroborated the use of a kinematic mental model in creating and testing informal algorithms and showed that individuals differ reliably in the ability to carry out these tasks. PMID:24082090

  14. Kinematic analysis of rope skipper's stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab Ghani, Nor Atikah; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    There are various kinds of jumping that can be done while performing rope skipping activity. This activity was always associated with injury. But, if the rope skipper can perform the activity in a right way, it is believed that the injury might be reduced. The main purpose of this paper is to observe the stability of rope skipper from a biomechanics perspective, which are the centre of mass, angle at the ankle, knee and hip joints and also the trajectory for the ipsilateral leg between the two types of skip which is one leg and two legs. Six healthy, physically active subject, two males and four females (age: 8.00±1.25 years, weight: 17.90±6.85 kg and height: 1.22±0.08 m) participated in this study. Kinematic data of repeated five cycles of rope skipping activity was captured by using Vicon Nexus system. Based on the data collected, skipping with two legs shows more stable behavior during preparation, flight and landing phases. It is concluded that landing on the balls of the feet, lowering the trajectory positions of the feet from the ground as well as flexion of each joint which would reduce the injury while landing.

  15. Learning Kinematic Constraints in Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Felix C.; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.; Pugh, Carla M.; Patton, James L.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand how kinematic variables impact learning in surgical training, we devised an interactive environment for simulated laparoscopic maneuvers, using either 1) mechanical constraints typical of a surgical “box-trainer” or 2) virtual constraints in which free hand movements control virtual tool motion. During training, the virtual tool responded to the absolute position in space (Position-Based) or the orientation (Orientation-Based) of a hand-held sensor. Volunteers were further assigned to different sequences of target distances (Near-Far-Near or Far-Near-Far). Training with the Orientation-Based constraint enabled much lower path error and shorter movement times during training, which suggests that tool motion that simply mirrors joint motion is easier to learn. When evaluated in physically constrained (physical box-trainer) conditions, each group exhibited improved performance from training. However, Position-Based training enabled greater reductions in movement error relative to Orientation-Based (mean difference: 14.0 percent; CI: 0.7, 28.6). Furthermore, the Near-Far-Near schedule allowed a greater decrease in task time relative to the Far-Near-Far sequence (mean −13:5 percent, CI: −19:5, −7:5). Training that focused on shallow tool insertion (near targets) might promote more efficient movement strategies by emphasizing the curvature of tool motion. In addition, our findings suggest that an understanding of absolute tool position is critical to coping with mechanical interactions between the tool and trocar. PMID:23293709

  16. Virtual sine arm kinematic mount system

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Randall, K.J.

    1997-09-01

    A novel kinematic mount system for a vertical focusing mirror of the soft x-ray spectroscopy beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is described. The system contains three points in a horizontal plane. Each point consists of two horizontal linear precision stages, a spherical ball bearing, and a vertical precision stage. The horizontal linear stages are aligned orthogonally and are conjoined by a spherical ball bearing, supported by the vertical linear stage at each point. The position of each confined horizontal stage is controlled by a motorized micrometer head by spring-loading the flat tip of the micrometer head onto a tooling ball fixing on the carriage of the stage. A virtual sine arm is formed by tilting the upstream horizontal stage down and the two downstream horizontal stages up by a small angle. The fine pitch motion is achieved by adjusting the upstream stage. This supporting structure is extremely steady due to a relatively large span across the supporting points and yields extremely high resolution on the pitch motion. With a one degree tilt and a microstepping motor, the authors achieved a 0.4 nanoradian resolution on the mirror pitch motion.

  17. GLOBAL H I KINEMATICS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Warren, Steven R.; Skillman, Evan; Ott, Juergen; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2013-03-10

    H I line widths are typically interpreted as a measure of interstellar medium turbulence, which is potentially driven by star formation (SF). In an effort to better understand the possible connections between line widths and SF, we have characterized H I kinematics in a sample of nearby dwarf galaxies by co-adding line-of-sight spectra after removing the rotational velocity to produce average global H I line profiles. These ''superprofiles'' are composed of a central narrow peak ({approx}6-10 km s{sup -1}) with higher-velocity wings to either side that contain {approx}10%-15% of the total flux. The superprofiles are all very similar, indicating a universal global H I profile for dwarf galaxies. We compare characteristics of the superprofiles to various galaxy properties, such as mass and measures of SF, with the assumption that the superprofile represents a turbulent peak with energetic wings to either side. We use these quantities to derive average scale heights for the sample galaxies. When comparing to physical properties, we find that the velocity dispersion of the central peak is correlated with ({Sigma}{sub HI}). The fraction of mass and characteristic velocity of the high-velocity wings are correlated with measures of SF, consistent with the picture that SF drives surrounding H I to higher velocities. While gravitational instabilities provide too little energy, the SF in the sample galaxies does provide enough energy through supernovae, with realistic estimates of the coupling efficiency, to produce the observed superprofiles.

  18. Turbulent Particle Pair Diffusion Using Kinematic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nadeem

    2015-11-01

    Sweeping errors in Kinematic Simulations (KS) have been shown to be negligible in turbulent flows with extended inertial subranges up to at least 1 in KS may therefore be a genuine effect, challenging previous assumptions that in turbulence with generalized power-law energy spectra, E (k) ~k-p for 1 <= 3, locality would lead to, K ~σΔγ , where σΔ = [ <Δ2 > ]1/2 , Δ is the pair separation, v is the pair relative velocity, < > is the ensemble average, and γ = (1 + p) / 2 . For Kolmogorov turbulence this gives, K ~σΔ4 / 3 . A new analysis, supported by KS confirms that both local and non-local effects govern the pair diffusion process, leading to, K ~σΔγp , where now γp > γ for Kolmogorov turbulence, K ~σΔ1 . 53 . Thus non-local diffusional processes cannot be neglected, and this may have important consequences for the general theory of turbulence. The author acknowledge financial support from SABIC, #SB101011.

  19. Kinematics and trajectory generation for MIRADAS arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Gómez, J. M.; Torra, J.; López, M.; Raines, S. N.; Eikenberry, S. S.

    2015-05-01

    The Mid-resolution InfRAreD Astronomical Spectrograph (MIRADAS) is a NIR multi-object spectrograph for the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The instrument has a multiplexing system (MXS) that enables the simultaneous observation of twenty objects located within its field of view. These user selected targets are acquired by twenty deployable robotic probe arms with pickoff mirror optics operating at cryogenic temperatures. The MIRADAS probe arm is a close-loop mechanism designed with optics simplicity in mind, presenting good stability when it is operated upside down. Calculating optimum collision-free trajectories requires a good knowledge of the MIRADAS arm behavior based on its geometry and its mechanical constraints. This study introduces a geometric model for the two degree-of-freedom (DoF) mechanism, including solutions for the forward and inverse kinematics problem. The concepts of zone-of-avoidance (ZoA), workspace and envelope of MIRADAS arm are presented and studied. Finally, the paper proposes two different patrolling approaches that can be exploited when planning trajectories.

  20. Kinematic dynamo, supersymmetry breaking, and chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V.; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-04-01

    The kinematic dynamo (KD) describes the growth of magnetic fields generated by the flow of a conducting medium in the limit of vanishing backaction of the fields onto the flow. The KD is therefore an important model system for understanding astrophysical magnetism. Here, the mathematical correspondence between the KD and a specific stochastic differential equation (SDE) viewed from the perspective of the supersymmetric theory of stochastics (STS) is discussed. The STS is a novel, approximation-free framework to investigate SDEs. The correspondence reported here permits insights from the STS to be applied to the theory of KD and vice versa. It was previously known that the fast KD in the idealistic limit of no magnetic diffusion requires chaotic flows. The KD-STS correspondence shows that this is also true for the diffusive KD. From the STS perspective, the KD possesses a topological supersymmetry, and the dynamo effect can be viewed as its spontaneous breakdown. This supersymmetry breaking can be regarded as the stochastic generalization of the concept of dynamical chaos. As this supersymmetry breaking happens in both the diffusive and the nondiffusive cases, the necessity of the underlying SDE being chaotic is given in either case. The observed exponentially growing and oscillating KD modes prove physically that dynamical spectra of the STS evolution operator that break the topological supersymmetry exist with both real and complex ground state eigenvalues. Finally, we comment on the nonexistence of dynamos for scalar quantities.

  1. The kinematics of halo red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, B. W.; Latham, D. W.

    1986-07-01

    The authors have obtained 337 radial velocities with typical accuracies of ± 0.7 km s-1 for 85 metal-poor field red giants, selected from the kinematically unbiased samples of Bond (1980) and Bidelman and MacConnell (1973). The multiply observed stars suggest the field halo giant binary fraction exceeds 10%. Using their own velocities and those published by others, the authors have a sample of 174 red giants with [Fe/H] ≤ -1.5. Their mean motion with respect to the local standard of rest is >V< = -206±23 km s-1, and the velocity dispersions are σR = 154±18 km s-1, σθ = 102±27 km s-1, and σφ = 107±15 km s-1. Using photometrically derived absolute magnitudes and published proper motions, the authors compute orbital eccentricities for 72 stars not already considered in a similar study of southern stars by Norris, Bessell, and Pickles (1985). They find a few (5% - 8%) stars with e < 0.4.

  2. Kinematics of the scaphoid shift test.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, S W; Gupta, A; Crisco, J J

    1997-09-01

    Twenty-five uninjured subjects (50 wrists) were examined clinically and fluoroscopically during performance of the scaphoid shift test. Wrists were placed into 3 groups on the basis of the degree of palpable carpal motion that occurred during the clinical examination. Kinematic parameters of rotation and displacement were calculated from digitized images of the carpals at rest and at maximum displacement. On clinical exam, 36% of normal individuals had positive findings on scaphoid shift test. Dorsal displacement of the scaphoid was not significantly associated with positive scaphoid shift test results in these subjects, while total displacement of the scaphoid (the sum of axial and dorsal displacement) was significantly associated with positive test results. The principle confounding factor appeared to be a high degree of displacement that occurred at the capitolunate joint in some individuals, termed a "midcarpal shift." The data demonstrate that despite a high prevalence of positive scaphoid shifts among uninjured individuals, the ability to accurately detect dorsal displacement of the scaphoid using the scaphoid shift test is limited. On the basis of their findings, the authors recommend that positive test results be confirmed fluoroscopically. PMID:9330136

  3. Thermally Insulating, Kinematic Tensioned-Fiber Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.

    2004-01-01

    A salt pill and some parts of a thermally insulating, kinematic suspension system that holds the salt pill rigidly in an adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is presented. "Salt pill" in this context denotes a unit comprising a cylindrical container, a matrix of gold wires in the container, and a cylinder of ferric ammonium alum (a paramagnetic salt) that has been deposited on the wires. The structural members used in this system for both thermal insulation and positioning are aromatic polyamide fibers (Kevlar(R) or equivalent) under tension. This suspension system is designed to satisfy several special requirements to ensure the proper operation of the ADR. These requirements are to (1) maintain the salt pill at a specified position within the cylindrical bore of an electromagnet; (2) prevent vibrations, which would cause dissipation of heat in the salt pill; and (3) minimize the conduction of heat from the electromagnet bore and other neighboring objects to the salt pill; all while (4) protecting the salt pill (which is fragile) against all tensile and bending loads other than those attributable to its own weight. In addition, the system is required to consist of two subsystems -- one for the top end and one for the bottom end of the salt pill -- that can be assembled and tensioned separately from each other and from the salt pill, then later attached to the salt pill.

  4. Feeding underground: kinematics of feeding in caecilians.

    PubMed

    Herrel, Anthony; Measey, G John

    2012-11-01

    Caecilians are limbless amphibians that have evolved distinct cranial and postcranial specializations associated with a burrowing lifestyle. Observations on feeding behavior are rare and restricted to above-ground feeding in laboratory conditions. Here we report data on feeding in tunnels using both external video and X-ray recordings of caecilians feeding on invertebrate prey. Our data show feeding kinematics similar to those previously reported, including the pronounced neck bending observed during above-ground feeding. Our data illustrate, however, that caecilians may be much faster than previously suspected, with lunge speeds of up to 7 cm sec(-1). Although gape cycles are often slow (0.67 ± 0.29 sec), rapid jaw closure is observed during prey capture, with cycle times and jaw movement velocities similar to those observed in other terrestrial tetrapods. Finally, our data suggest that gape angles may be large (64.8 ± 18°) and that gape profiles are variable, often lacking distinct slow and fast opening and closing phases. These data illustrate the importance of recording naturalistic feeding behavior and shed light on how these animals are capable of capturing and processing prey in constrained underground environments. Additional data on species with divergent cranial morphologies would be needed to better understand the co-evolution between feeding, burrowing, and cranial design in caecilians. PMID:22927194

  5. Kinematical and Chemical Vertical Structure of the Galactic Thick Disk. I. Thick Disk Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Méndez, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    The variation of the kinematical properties of the Galactic thick disk with Galactic height Z is studied by means of 412 red giants observed in the direction of the south Galactic pole up to 4.5 kpc from the plane. We confirm the non-null mean radial motion toward the Galactic anticenter found by other authors, but we find that it changes sign at |Z| = 3 kpc, and the proposed inward motion of the local standard of rest alone cannot explain these observations. The rotational velocity decreases with |Z| by -30 km s-1 kpc-1, but the data are better represented by a power law with index 1.25, similar to that proposed from the analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. All the velocity dispersions increase with |Z|, but the vertical gradients are small. The dispersions grow proportionally, with no significant variation of the anisotropy. The ratio σU/σW = 2 suggests that the thick disk could have formed from a low-latitude merging event. The vertex deviation increases with Galactic height, reaching ~20° at |Z| = 3.5 kpc. The tilt angle also increases, and the orientation of the ellipsoid in the radial-vertical plane is constantly intermediate between the alignment with the cylindrical and the spherical coordinate systems. The tilt angle at |Z| = 2 kpc coincides with the expectations of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics, but an extension of the calculations to higher |Z| is required to perform a conclusive test. Finally, between 2.5 and 3.5 kpc we detect deviations from the linear trend of many kinematical quantities, suggesting that some kinematical substructure could be present. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (proposal IDs 075.B-0459(A), 077.B-0348(A)). This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan and the duPont Telescopes, located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  6. Coordination of multiple robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Soloway, D.

    1987-01-01

    Kinematic resolved-rate control from one robot arm is extended to the coordinated control of multiple robot arms in the movement of an object. The structure supports the general movement of one axis system (moving reference frame) with respect to another axis system (control reference frame) by one or more robot arms. The grippers of the robot arms do not have to be parallel or at any pre-disposed positions on the object. For multiarm control, the operator chooses the same moving and control reference frames for each of the robot arms. Consequently, each arm then moves as though it were carrying out the commanded motions by itself.

  7. Edge detection in microscopy images using curvelets

    PubMed Central

    Gebäck, Tobias; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite significant progress in imaging technologies, the efficient detection of edges and elongated features in images of intracellular and multicellular structures acquired using light or electron microscopy is a challenging and time consuming task in many laboratories. Results We present a novel method, based on the discrete curvelet transform, to extract a directional field from the image that indicates the location and direction of the edges. This directional field is then processed using the non-maximal suppression and thresholding steps of the Canny algorithm to trace along the edges and mark them. Optionally, the edges may then be extended along the directions given by the curvelets to provide a more connected edge map. We compare our scheme to the Canny edge detector and an edge detector based on Gabor filters, and show that our scheme performs better in detecting larger, elongated structures possibly composed of several step or ridge edges. Conclusion The proposed curvelet based edge detection is a novel and competitive approach for imaging problems. We expect that the methodology and the accompanying software will facilitate and improve edge detection in images available using light or electron microscopy. PMID:19257905

  8. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Leading Edge Stagnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2004-01-01

    A multigrid solver is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in evaluating the discrete residuals. TME in solving the incompressible inviscid fluid equations is demonstrated for leading-edge stagnation flows. The contributions of this paper include (1) a special formulation of the boundary conditions near stagnation allowing convergence of the Newton iterations on coarse grids, (2) the boundary relaxation technique to facilitate relaxation and residual restriction near the boundaries, (3) a modified relaxation scheme to prevent initial error amplification, and (4) new general analysis techniques for multigrid solvers. Convergence of algebraic errors below the level of discretization errors is attained by a full multigrid (FMG) solver with one full approximation scheme (FAS) cycle per grid. Asymptotic convergence rates of the FAS cycles for the full system of flow equations are very fast, approaching those for scalar elliptic equations.

  9. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Leading Edge Stagnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2004-01-01

    A multigrid solver is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in evaluating the discrete residuals. TME in solving the incompressible inviscid fluid equations is demonstrated for leading- edge stagnation flows. The contributions of this paper include (1) a special formulation of the boundary conditions near stagnation allowing convergence of the Newton iterations on coarse grids, (2) the boundary relaxation technique to facilitate relaxation and residual restriction near the boundaries, (3) a modified relaxation scheme to prevent initial error amplification, and (4) new general analysis techniques for multigrid solvers. Convergence of algebraic errors below the level of discretization errors is attained by a full multigrid (FMG) solver with one full approximation scheme (F.4S) cycle per grid. Asymptotic convergence rates of the F.4S cycles for the full system of flow equations are very fast, approaching those for scalar elliptic equations.

  10. Potential magnetic properties of nanotubes ( n, 0) with Klein and Fujita edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhavaya, H. M.; Pavlov, M. V.; Ermilov, A. Yu.; Stepanov, N. F.

    2012-08-01

    Analytical solutions for localized states of zigzag-type nanotube (NT) fragments with various combinations of Klein and Fujita borders are considered using the Hückel approach. It is shown that the equations for determining molecular orbitals (MOs) in systems with two Klein edges are similar to equations for systems with two Fujita edges. An analytical formula for the energies of all π MOs is obtained for systems that have a Klein edge on one side and a Fujita edge on the other. It is established that these systems have n orbitals with energy α that are localized on the Fujita and Klein edges in dependence on the MO symmetry. The degeneracy of edge orbitals indicates that there is a tendency toward single occupancy of them and to the appearance of spin (magnetic) properties. In addition, the energies of the states of different multiplicity for NT fragments (8, 0) are calculated using the CASSCF approach. It is shown that the ground state has a multiplicity of 9, as was also indicated by estimates obtained using the density functional method (B3LYP). It is concluded that zigzag-type NTs with asymmetric edges have a tendency to exhibit spin properties. It is noted that the construction of nanoscale magnetic materials based on them is very promising.

  11. The relationships between spatial ability, logical thinking, mathematics performance and kinematics graph interpretation skills of 12th grade physics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bektasli, Behzat

    Graphs have a broad use in science classrooms, especially in physics. In physics, kinematics is probably the topic for which graphs are most widely used. The participants in this study were from two different grade-12 physics classrooms, advanced placement and calculus-based physics. The main purpose of this study was to search for the relationships between student spatial ability, logical thinking, mathematical achievement, and kinematics graphs interpretation skills. The Purdue Spatial Visualization Test, the Middle Grades Integrated Process Skills Test (MIPT), and the Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K) were used for quantitative data collection. Classroom observations were made to acquire ideas about classroom environment and instructional techniques. Factor analysis, simple linear correlation, multiple linear regression, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the quantitative data. Each instrument has two principal components. The selection and calculation of the slope and of the area were the two principal components of TUG-K. MIPT was composed of a component based upon processing text and a second component based upon processing symbolic information. The Purdue Spatial Visualization Test was composed of a component based upon one-step processing and a second component based upon two-step processing of information. Student ability to determine the slope in a kinematics graph was significantly correlated with spatial ability, logical thinking, and mathematics aptitude and achievement. However, student ability to determine the area in a kinematics graph was only significantly correlated with student pre-calculus semester 2 grades. Male students performed significantly better than female students on the slope items of TUG-K. Also, male students performed significantly better than female students on the PSAT mathematics assessment and spatial ability. This study found that students have different levels of spatial ability, logical thinking

  12. Rover Tracks at Crater's Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tracks left by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity as it traveled along the rim of Victoria Crater can be seen clearly in this image taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft.

    This is a subframe of a larger image that the camera acquired on June 26, 2007. The larger image will be released as HiRISE catalogue number PSP_004289_1780 after geometric processing.

    Opportunity first approached Victoria Crater at an alcove informally named 'Duck Bay' (see tracks at left). It then drove along the crater's sinuous edge in a clockwise direction before heading back to Duck Bay, where it is expected to enter the crater in early July 2007.

  13. Compact K-edge densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Cowder, L.R.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Augustson, R.H.; Esmailpour, A.; Hawkins, R.; Kuhn, E.

    1984-05-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed, built, and is currently testing a compact K-edge densitometer for use by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. The unit, which can easily be moved from one location to another within a facility, is positioned outside a glovebox with the body of the instrument inserted into the glove. A fixture inside the glovebox fits around the body and positions a sample holder. A hand-held high-purity germanium detector powered by a battery pack and a Davidson portable multichannel analyzer (MCA) is used to measure the transmission through plutonium nitrate solutions at E/sub Y/ = 121.1 and 122.2 keV. The Davidson MCA is programmed to lead the user through the measurement procedure and perform all the data analyses. The instrument is currently installed at the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, where IAEA personnel are evaluating its accuracy, ease of operation, and safety. 5 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  14. THE STELLAR AND GAS KINEMATICS OF THE LITTLE THINGS DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY NGC 1569

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Megan; Hunter, Deidre A.; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Herrmann, Kimberly; Oh, Se-Heon; Elmegreen, Bruce; Brinks, Elias; Tollerud, Erik E-mail: dah@lowell.edu E-mail: herrmann@lowell.edu E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com E-mail: etolleru@uci.edu

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand the formation and evolution of Magellanic-type dwarf irregular (dIm) galaxies, one needs to understand their three-dimensional structure. We present measurements of the stellar velocity dispersion in NGC 1569, a nearby post-starburst dIm galaxy. The stellar vertical velocity dispersion, {sigma}{sub z}, coupled with the maximum rotational velocity derived from H I observations, V{sub max}, gives a measure of how kinematically hot the galaxy is, and, therefore, indicates its structure. We conclude that the stars in NGC 1569 are in a thick disk with a V{sub max}/{sigma}{sub z} = 2.4 {+-} 0.7. In addition to the structure, we analyze the ionized gas kinematics from O III observations along the morphological major axis. These data show evidence for outflow from the inner starburst region and a potential expanding shell near supermassive star cluster (SSC) A. When compared to the stellar kinematics, the velocity dispersion of the stars increases in the region of SSC A supporting the hypothesis of an expanding shell. The stellar kinematics closely follow the motion of the gas. Analysis of high-resolution H I data clearly reveals the presence of an H I cloud that appears to be impacting the eastern edge of NGC 1569. Also, an ultra-dense H I cloud can be seen extending to the west of the impacting H I cloud. This dense cloud is likely the remains of a dense H I bridge that extended through what is now the central starburst area. The impacting H I cloud was the catalyst for the starburst, thus turning the dense gas into stars over a short timescale, {approx}1 Gyr. We performed a careful study of the spectral energy distribution using infrared, optical, and ultraviolet photometry, producing a state-of-the-art mass model for the stellar disk. This mass modeling shows that stars dominate the gravitational potential in the inner 1 kpc. The dynamical mass of NGC 1569, derived from V{sub max}, shows that the disk may be dark matter deficient in the inner

  15. Deformable wing kinematics in the desert locust: how and why do camber, twist and topography vary through the stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Simon M.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.; Taylor, Graham K.

    2009-01-01

    Here, we present a detailed analysis of the wing kinematics and wing deformations of desert locusts (Schistocerca gregaria, Forskål) flying tethered in a wind tunnel. We filmed them using four high-speed digital video cameras, and used photogrammetry to reconstruct the motion of more than 100 identified points. Whereas the hindwing motions were highly stereotyped, the forewing motions showed considerable variation, consistent with a role in flight control. Both wings were positively cambered on the downstroke. The hindwing was cambered through an ‘umbrella effect’ whereby the trailing edge tension compressed the radial veins during the downstroke. Hindwing camber was reversed on the upstroke as the wing fan corrugated, reducing the projected area by 30 per cent, and releasing the tension in the trailing edge. Both the wings were strongly twisted from the root to the tip. The linear decrease in incidence along the hindwing on the downstroke precisely counteracts the linear increase in the angle of attack that would otherwise occur in root flapping for an untwisted wing. The consequent near-constant angle of attack is reminiscent of the optimum for a propeller of constant aerofoil section, wherein a linear twist distribution allows each section to operate at the unique angle of attack maximizing the lift to drag ratio. This implies tuning of the structural, morphological and kinematic parameters of the hindwing for efficient aerodynamic force production. PMID:19091683

  16. The Kinematics of the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Salmonson, J D

    2004-03-17

    Herein I review the argument that kinematics, i.e. relativistic motions of the emitting source in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are the cause of the lag-luminosity relationship observed in bursts with known redshifts.

  17. The Case for Including Eulerian Kinematics in Undergraduate Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uram, Earl M.

    A Eulerian framework is proposed as an alternative to the Lagrangian framework usually used in undergraduate dynamics courses. An attempt to introduce Eulerian kinematics into a dynamics course is discussed. (LMH)

  18. Kinematic distributions for electron pair production by muons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsker, R.

    1972-01-01

    Cross sections and kinematic distributions for the trident production process plus or negative muon plus charge yields plus or minus muon plus electron plus positron plus charge (with charge = dipion moment and Fe) are given for beam energies of 100 to 300 GeV at fixed (electron positron) masses from 5 to 15 GeV. This process is interesting as a test of quantum electrodynamics at high energies, and in particular as a test of the form of the photon propagator at large timelike (four-momentum) squared. For this purpose, it is desirable to impose kinematic cuts that favor those Bethe-Heitler graphs which contain a timelike photon propagator. It is found that there are substantial differences between the kinematic distributions for the full Bethe-Heitler matrix element and the distributions for the two timelike-photon graphs alone; these differences can be exploited in the selection of appropriate kinematic cuts.

  19. STAR CLUSTERS IN M31: OLD CLUSTERS WITH BAR KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Heather; Harding, Paul; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Athanassoula, E.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze our accurate kinematical data for the old clusters in the inner regions of M31. These velocities are based on high signal-to-noise Hectospec data. The data are well suited for analysis of M31's inner regions because we took particular care to correct for contamination by unresolved field stars from the disk and bulge in the fibers. The metal-poor clusters show kinematics that are compatible with a pressure-supported spheroid. The kinematics of metal-rich clusters, however, argue for a disk population. In particular the innermost region (inside 2 kpc) shows the kinematics of the x{sub 2} family of bar periodic orbits, arguing for the existence of an inner Lindblad resonance in M31.

  20. In situ observation of graphene sublimation and multi-layer edge reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian Yu; Ding, Feng; Yakobson, Boris I.; Lu, Ping; Qi, Liang; Li, Ju

    2009-01-01

    We induced sublimation of suspended few-layer graphene by in situ Joule-heating inside a transmission electron microscope. The graphene sublimation fronts consisted of mostly {1100} zigzag edges. Under appropriate conditions, a fractal-like “coastline” morphology was observed. Extensive multiple-layer reconstructions at the graphene edges led to the formation of unique carbon nanostructures, such as sp2-bonded bilayer edges (BLEs) and nanotubes connected to BLEs. Flat fullerenes/nanopods and nanotubes tunneling multiple layers of graphene sheets were also observed. Remarkably, >99% of the graphene edges observed during sublimation are BLEs rather than monolayer edges (MLEs), indicating that BLEs are the stable edges in graphene at high temperatures. We reproduced the “coastline” sublimation morphologies by kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulations. The simulation revealed geometrical and topological features unique to quasi-2-dimensional (2D) graphene sublimation and reconstructions. These reconstructions were enabled by bending, which cannot occur in first-order phase transformations of 3D bulk materials. These results indicate that substrate of multiple-layer graphene can offer unique opportunities for tailoring carbon-based nanostructures and engineering novel nano-devices with complex topologies. PMID:19515820

  1. Kinematic analysis of platform-type robotic manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaolun

    New methods are developed for the kinematic analysis of serial and platform-type parallel robotic manipulators, including forward and inverse kinematic solutions, singularity identifications and workspace evaluation. Differences between serial and platform-type parallel manipulators, which can provide substantially improved end-point rigidity compared with the conventional serial robotic arms, are addressed. The problem of determining the screw parameters of rigid body motion from initial and final position data is discussed, as a basis to search for a general and efficient procedure to solve the complex forward kinematics problem of platform-type manipulators. Several Screw-Theory based approaches for solving the inverse instantaneous problem of 6 DOF serial manipulators are studied and compared in terms of their computational efficiency, accuracy, sensitivity to data error and capability of dealing with singularities. A modified Vector Decomposition method is then proposed for solving the IIK problem and for singularity analysis of serial kinematic chains, the method is especially effective when applied to the wrist partitioned serial manipulators, which are essential components to any platform-type parallel manipulators. By using the data of three point positions, velocities, and accelerations of the end effector a general method is developed for solving the forward kinematics problem, including position, velocity and acceleration kinematics, of platform-type manipulators. The solution procedure can be applied to a wide variety of platform-type manipulators such as the 6 DOF Steward Platform manipulator and other models. It is found that while the solution for the forward position kinematics of a platform-type manipulator can be obtained by solving a non-linear system of equations, the closed-form solutions for forward rate and acceleration kinematics can be found by solving a system of linear equations. Based on the proposed kinematic formulations, an algorithm

  2. An instance-based algorithm with auxiliary similarity information for the estimation of gait kinematics from wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Goulermas, John Y; Findlow, Andrew H; Nester, Christopher J; Liatsis, Panos; Zeng, Xiao-Jun; Kenney, Laurence P J; Tresadern, Phil; Thies, Sibylle B; Howard, David

    2008-09-01

    Wearable human movement measurement systems are increasingly popular as a means of capturing human movement data in real-world situations. Previous work has attempted to estimate segment kinematics during walking from foot acceleration and angular velocity data. In this paper, we propose a novel neural network [GRNN with Auxiliary Similarity Information (GASI)] that estimates joint kinematics by taking account of proximity and gait trajectory slope information through adaptive weighting. Furthermore, multiple kernel bandwidth parameters are used that can adapt to the local data density. To demonstrate the value of the GASI algorithm, hip, knee, and ankle joint motions are estimated from acceleration and angular velocity data for the foot and shank, collected using commercially available wearable sensors. Reference hip, knee, and ankle kinematic data were obtained using externally mounted reflective markers and infrared cameras for subjects while they walked at different speeds. The results provide further evidence that a neural net approach to the estimation of joint kinematics is feasible and shows promise, but other practical issues must be addressed before this approach is mature enough for clinical implementation. Furthermore, they demonstrate the utility of the new GASI algorithm for making estimates from continuous periodic data that include noise and a significant level of variability. PMID:18779089

  3. High-resolution encoding using redundant edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saddlemyer, Leslie K.; McLean, Gerard F.

    1995-06-01

    Encoding the angular position of large telescopes is typically achieved through the use of friction driven rotary encoders, tape style encoders mounted on the circumference of each telescope axis or co-axially mounted high precision rotary encoders. These forms of encoding have very stringent mounting requirements, are expensive, adversely affected by contaminating particles and often difficult to retrofit to existing telescopes. The advent of long CCDs presents the opportunity to develop accurate position encoding for telescope control using digital image metrology. In this paper we present the design of a high precision non- contact encoding system which uses the detection of multiple redundant visual edge features to develop sub-pixel edge position measurements to a precision of 1/50th pixel. The method is described in detail and is validated with both simulation trials and experimental results from a testbed setup.

  4. Noncollinear exchange interaction in transition metal dichalcogenide edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávalos-Ovando, Oscar; Mastrogiuseppe, Diego; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2016-04-01

    We study the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida effective exchange interaction between magnetic impurities embedded on the edges of transition metal dichalcogenide flakes, using a three-orbital tight-binding model. Electronic states lying midgap of the bulk structure have a strong one-dimensional (1D) character, localized on the edges of the crystallite. This results in exchange interactions with 1 /r (or slower) decay with distance r , similar to other 1D systems. Most interestingly, however, the strong spin-orbit interaction in these materials results in sizable noncollinear Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions between impurities, comparable in size to the usual Ising and in-plane components. Varying the relevant Fermi energy by doping or gating may allow one to modulate the effective interactions, controlling the possible helical ground state configurations of multiple impurities.

  5. Elucidation of kinematical and dynamical structure of the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, T.; Gouda, N.; Ueda, H.; Koyama, H.; Kan-ya, Y.; Taruya, A.

    2008-07-01

    Future space mission of astrometric satellite, GAIA and JASMINE (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for Infrared Exploration), will produce astrometric parameter, such as positions, parallaxes, and proper motions of stars in the Galactic bulge. Then kinematical information will be obtained in the future. Accordingly it is expected that our understanding of the dynamical structure will be greatly improved. Therefore it is important to make a method to construct a kinematical and dynamical structure of the Galactic bulge immediately.

  6. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  7. Stewart platform kinematics and secondary mirror aberration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Marty, L.

    2006-06-01

    This work deals with active correction of the aberrations in a telescope by moving the secondary mirror. A special attention is here dedicated to the case of a secondary mirror whose motions are controlled by a 6-6 Stewart Platform (generally called by astronomers simply "hexapod", even if this term is more general). The kinematics of the device is studied; an iterative algorithm to solve the non trivial forward kinematics problem is described.

  8. Inverse kinematics problem in robotics using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Lawrence, Charles

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, Multilayer Feedforward Networks are applied to the robot inverse kinematic problem. The networks are trained with endeffector position and joint angles. After training, performance is measured by having the network generate joint angles for arbitrary endeffector trajectories. A 3-degree-of-freedom (DOF) spatial manipulator is used for the study. It is found that neural networks provide a simple and effective way to both model the manipulator inverse kinematics and circumvent the problems associated with algorithmic solution methods.

  9. A survey of the Saturnian ring edges: Results from double star occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) has recorded more than 150 stellar occultations of Saturn's rings. About one third are observations involving double stars, where each star contributes its own, independent light curve. For each light curve, its footprint, as projected into the ring plane and depending on observation geometry, samples a different region in the ring. Here, we focus on ring edges. Each occultation then yields two independent edge measurements at two different times and longitudes. We infer relative changes in optical depth and radial position over an azimuthal distance as short as 20 meters. These relative measurements require neither photometric nor geometric calibration and inform on the small-scale variability of structure/features with relative resolutions an order of magnitude higher than typically achieved.The Encke and Keeler gap edges as well as the outer B and A ring edges show radial excursions on the order of tens of meters. These radial variations are, in comparison to the common multi-mode analysis of edge kinematics, high-frequency components with corresponding m numbers of m>5000000. We note that spatial dimensions inferred here are 10-100 times smaller than those of features Region A and B at the B ring edge or "Peggy"-type objects at the A ring edge, and are comparable to individual self-gravity wakes or clumps/particles. The Titan and Huygens ringlets inner and outer edges, on the other hand, are, in comparison, highly regular and smooth with radial variations of only a few meters. Nevertheless they show changes in normal optical depth on the order of 0.4, well above the expected margin due to intrinsic stellar variability. We also identified three features in the C ring that show little radial variability and can thus be considered smooth. Interestingly, this irregularity or raggedness of the edges - manifestation of intrinsic small-scale structure of the ring - is stronger with

  10. The multiform motor cortical output: Kinematic, predictive and response coding.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia; Chinellato, Eris; Castiello, Umberto

    2015-09-01

    Observing actions performed by others entails a subliminal activation of primary motor cortex reflecting the components encoded in the observed action. One of the most debated issues concerns the role of this output: Is it a mere replica of the incoming flow of information (kinematic coding), is it oriented to anticipate the forthcoming events (predictive coding) or is it aimed at responding in a suitable fashion to the actions of others (response coding)? The aim of the present study was to disentangle the relative contribution of these three levels and unify them into an integrated view of cortical motor coding. We combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electromyography recordings at different timings to probe the excitability of corticospinal projections to upper and lower limb muscles of participants observing a soccer player performing: (i) a penalty kick straight in their direction and then coming to a full stop, (ii) a penalty kick straight in their direction and then continuing to run, (iii) a penalty kick to the side and then continuing to run. The results show a modulation of the observer's corticospinal excitability in different effectors at different times reflecting a multiplicity of motor coding. The internal replica of the observed action, the predictive activation, and the adaptive integration of congruent and non-congruent responses to the actions of others can coexist in a not mutually exclusive way. Such a view offers reconciliation among different (and apparently divergent) frameworks in action observation literature, and will promote a more complete and integrated understanding of recent findings on motor simulation, motor resonance and automatic imitation. PMID:25727547

  11. Kinematic analysis of the instep kick in youth soccer players.

    PubMed

    Kapidžić, Alen; Huremović, Tarik; Biberovic, Alija

    2014-09-29

    We attempted to establish which applied kinematic variables significantly contributed to the efficiency of the instep kick motion in soccer. The study sample comprised 13 boys (age: 13 ± 0.5 yrs; body mass: 41.50 ± 8.40 kg; body height: 151.46 ± 5.93 cm) from the FC Sloboda school of soccer. Each participant performed three kicks with maximum strength that were video recorded with two synchronized cameras (Casio Ex-F1) positioned 12 m away from the place of the kick. Data were collected by analyzing the video recordings of each kick. Data processing was performed using the APAS motion analysis system (Ariel Dynamics Inc., San Diego, CA). On the basis of the forward selection method of multiple regression analysis, we determined the correlations between the prediction variables and the selected criteria (speed of the ball; p = 0.01). On the basis of the regression coefficients, it was concluded that two variables significantly contributed to the speed of the ball: speed of the foot of the kicking leg at the time of contact with the ball (p = 0.01) and the distance between the angle support leg and center of the ball ("foot posterior displacement") (p = 0.01). In order to achieve the best possible technical performance and, therefore, a higher speed of the ball, soccer players must pay attention to two important elements during training. First, it is necessary to position the support leg as close to the ball as possible and, second, maximize the force used in the initial phases of the kick to achieve a high speed of the kicking foot. PMID:25414742

  12. Fresnel diffraction of aperture with rough edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yuwei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Meina; Teng, Shuyun

    2015-06-01

    The Fresnel diffraction of an aperture with a rough edge is studied in this paper. Circular and elliptical apertures with sinusoidal and random edges are chosen as examples to investigate the influence of the aperture edge on the diffraction. The numerical calculation results indicate intuitively the variations of the transverse and longitude diffraction intensity distributions with the edge parameters of the aperture. The data files of aperture models are obtained through the numerical calculations, and the aperture samples are obtained with the help of a liquid crystal light modulator (LCLM). Thus, the practical experiments of the diffractions of apertures with rough edges are carried out. The measured results are consistent with the calculated ones. The approximate analytic expressions of the diffraction by the modified aperture are deduced on the basis of the Fresnel diffraction theory and the statistic optics, and the reasonable explanations for the influence of edge parameters on the diffraction are given through the theoretical analysis.

  13. Edge detection based on gradient ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xu-Ri; Lan, Ruo-Ming; Wang, Chao; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2015-12-28

    We present an experimental demonstration of edge detection based on ghost imaging (GI) in the gradient domain. Through modification of a random light field, gradient GI (GGI) can directly give the edge of an object without needing the original image. As edges of real objects are usually sparser than the original objects, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the edge detection result will be dramatically enhanced, especially for large-area, high-transmittance objects. In this study, we experimentally perform one- and two-dimensional edge detection with a double-slit based on GI and GGI. The use of GGI improves the SNR significantly in both cases. Gray-scale objects are also studied by the use of simulation. The special advantages of GI will make the edge detection based on GGI be valuable in real applications. PMID:26832041

  14. Improving Network Transport Efficiency by Edge Rewiring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhong-Yuan; Liang, Man-Gui; Guo, Dong-Chao

    2013-03-01

    Considering the heterogeneous structure of scale-free networks causing low traffic capacity of network, we propose to improve the network transport efficiency by rewiring a fraction of edges for the network. In this paper, six edge rewiring strategies are discussed and extensive simulations on Barabási-Albert (BA) scale-free networks confirm the effectiveness of these strategies. From another perspective, rewiring edges for scale-free networks directly reuse the removed edges under some edge-removal strategies [Z. Liu, M. B. Hu, R. Jiang, W. X. Wang and Q. S. Wu, Phys. Rev. E76 (2007) 037101; G. Q. Zhang, D. Wang and G. J. Li, Phys. Rev. E76 (2007) 017101], and can significantly enhance the traffic capacity of the network at the expense of increasing a little average path length. After the edge rewiring process, the network structure becomes significantly homogeneous. This work is helpful for network design and network performance optimization.

  15. A Magnified View of the Kinematics and Morphology of RCSGA 032727-132609: Zooming in on a Merger at z = 1.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuyts, Eva; Rigby, Jane R.; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging and Keck/OSIRIS near-infrared adaptive optics-assisted integral field spectroscopy for a highly magnified lensed galaxy at z = 1.70. This young starburst is representative of ultraviolet-selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z approx. 2 and contains multiple individual star-forming regions. Due to the lensing magnification, we can resolve spatial scales down to 100 pc in the source plane of the galaxy. The velocity field shows disturbed kinematics suggestive of an ongoing interaction and there is a clear signature of a tidal tail. We constrain the age, reddening, star formation rate, and stellar mass of the star-forming clumps from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling of the WFC3 photometry and measure their H(alpha) luminosity, metallicity, and outflow properties from the OSIRIS data.With strong star-formation-driven outflows in four clumps, RCSGA0327 is the first high-redshift SFG at stellar mass <10(exp 10) Stellar Mass with spatially resolved stellar winds. We compare the H(alpha) luminosities, sizes, and dispersions of the star-forming regions with other high-z clumps as well as local giant H(II) regions and find no evidence for increased clump star formation surface densities in interacting systems, unlike in the local universe. Spatially resolved SED modeling unveils an established stellar population at the location of the largest clump and a second mass concentration near the edge of the system that is not detected in H(alpha) emission. This suggests a picture of an equal-mass mixed major merger, which has not triggered a new burst of star formation or caused a tidal tail in the gas-poor component.

  16. A Magnified View of the Kinematics and Morphology of RCSGA 032727-132609: Zooming in on a Merger at z = 1.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuyts, Eva; Rigby, Jane R.; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren

    2014-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging and Keck/OSIRIS near-infrared adaptive optics-assisted integral field spectroscopy for a highly magnified lensed galaxy at z = 1.70. This young starburst is representative of ultraviolet-selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z ~ 2 and contains multiple individual star-forming regions. Due to the lensing magnification, we can resolve spatial scales down to 100 pc in the source plane of the galaxy. The velocity field shows disturbed kinematics suggestive of an ongoing interaction and there is a clear signature of a tidal tail. We constrain the age, reddening, star formation rate, and stellar mass of the star-forming clumps from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling of the WFC3 photometry and measure their Hα luminosity, metallicity, and outflow properties from the OSIRIS data. With strong star-formation-driven outflows in four clumps, RCSGA0327 is the first high-redshift SFG at stellar mass <1010 M ⊙ with spatially resolved stellar winds. We compare the Hα luminosities, sizes, and dispersions of the star-forming regions with other high-z clumps as well as local giant H II regions and find no evidence for increased clump star formation surface densities in interacting systems, unlike in the local universe. Spatially resolved SED modeling unveils an established stellar population at the location of the largest clump and a second mass concentration near the edge of the system that is not detected in Hα emission. This suggests a picture of an equal-mass mixed major merger, which has not triggered a new burst of star formation or caused a tidal tail in the gas-poor component.

  17. A magnified view of the kinematics and morphology of RCSGA 032727-132609: Zooming in on a merger at z = 1.7

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Eva; Rigby, Jane R.; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren

    2014-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging and Keck/OSIRIS near-infrared adaptive optics-assisted integral field spectroscopy for a highly magnified lensed galaxy at z = 1.70. This young starburst is representative of ultraviolet-selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z ∼ 2 and contains multiple individual star-forming regions. Due to the lensing magnification, we can resolve spatial scales down to 100 pc in the source plane of the galaxy. The velocity field shows disturbed kinematics suggestive of an ongoing interaction and there is a clear signature of a tidal tail. We constrain the age, reddening, star formation rate, and stellar mass of the star-forming clumps from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling of the WFC3 photometry and measure their Hα luminosity, metallicity, and outflow properties from the OSIRIS data. With strong star-formation-driven outflows in four clumps, RCSGA0327 is the first high-redshift SFG at stellar mass <10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} with spatially resolved stellar winds. We compare the Hα luminosities, sizes, and dispersions of the star-forming regions with other high-z clumps as well as local giant H II regions and find no evidence for increased clump star formation surface densities in interacting systems, unlike in the local universe. Spatially resolved SED modeling unveils an established stellar population at the location of the largest clump and a second mass concentration near the edge of the system that is not detected in Hα emission. This suggests a picture of an equal-mass mixed major merger, which has not triggered a new burst of star formation or caused a tidal tail in the gas-poor component.

  18. The Association of Scapular Kinematics and Glenohumeral Joint Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    LUDEWIG, PAULA M.; REYNOLDS, JONATHAN F.

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS There is a growing body of literature associating abnormal scapular positions and motions, and, to a lesser degree, clavicular kinematics with a variety of shoulder pathologies. The purpose of this manuscript is to (1) review the normal kinematics of the scapula and clavicle during arm elevation, (2) review the evidence for abnormal scapular and clavicular kinematics in glenohumeral joint pathologies, (3) review potential biomechanical implications and mechanisms of these kinematic alterations, and (4) relate these biomechanical factors to considerations in the patient management process for these disorders. There is evidence of scapular kinematic alterations associated with shoulder impingement, rotator cuff tendinopathy, rotator cuff tears, glenohumeral instability, adhesive capsulitis, and stiff shoulders. There is also evidence for altered muscle activation in these patient populations, particularly, reduced serratus anterior and increased upper trapezius activation. Scapular kinematic alterations similar to those found in patient populations have been identified in subjects with a short rest length of the pectoralis minor, tight soft-tissue structures in the posterior shoulder region, excessive thoracic kyphosis, or with flexed thoracic postures. This suggests that attention to these factors is warranted in the clinical evaluation and treatment of these patients. The available evidence in clinical trials supports the use of therapeutic exercise in rehabilitating these patients, while further gains in effectiveness should continue to be pursued. PMID:19194022

  19. The complexity of South China Sea kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, Jean-Claude; Gao, Jinyao; Zhao, Minghui; Wu, Jonny; Ding, Weiwei; Yeh, Yi-Ching; Lee, Chao-Shing

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic modeling shows that the age of the youngest South China Sea (SCS) oceanic crust is controversial (e.g. 15.5 Ma, Briais et al., JGR 1993 and 20.5 Ma, Barckhausen et al., MPG 2014). Close to the rift axis of the East sub-basin, Ar-Ar age dating of oceanic crustal rocks collected during IODP Leg 349 gives ages of 15 and 15.2 +/- 0.2 Ma (Koppers, Fall AGU meeting, 2014), which seems to favor the 15.5 Ma age given by Briais et al. modeling. However, basaltic samples might belong to a sill and not to the typical oceanic crust. As post-spreading magmatic activity (~8-13 Ma) largely masks the spreading fabric, in particular near the previously identified E-W portion of the extinct ridge axis of the East sub-basin, the published locations of the axial magnetic anomaly and spreading rates are incorrect. The compilation of available swath bathymetric data shows that if post-spreading volcanics hide the seafloor spreading magnetic fabric mostly along and near the extinct spreading axis, the whole SCS is globally characterized by rift directions following three directions: N055°in the youngest portion of the SCS, N065° and N085° in the oldest portions of the SCS (Sibuet et al., Tectonophysics 2016) suggesting the extinct ridge axis is N055° trending instead of E-W. We present an updated version of the whole SCS structural sketch based on previously published swath bathymetric trends and new detailed magnetic lineations trends compiled from an extremely dense set of magnetic data. The new structural sketch shows: - The distribution of conjugate kinematic domains, - The early opening of the NW and East sub-basins, before a jump of the rift axis, - A second ridge jump in the East basin, - The different expressions of the post-spreading magmatism in the East and SW sub-basins. In the East sub-basin, crustal magmatic intrusions led to the formation of extrusive basalts associated with the presence of numerous volcanoes (Wang et al., Geological Journal 2016). In the SW

  20. The Relationships between Logical Thinking, Gender, and Kinematics Graph Interpretation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bektasli, Behzat; White, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: Kinematics is one of the topics in physics where graphs are used broadly. Kinematics includes many abstract formulas, and students usually try to solve problems with those formulas. However, using a kinematics graph instead of formulas might be a better option for problem solving in kinematics. Graphs are abstract…

  1. Shearlet-based edge detection: flame fronts and tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Emily J.; Reisenhofer, Rafael; Kiefer, Johannes; Lim, Wang-Q.; Li, Zhen; Heygster, Georg

    2015-09-01

    Shearlets are wavelet-like systems which are better suited for handling geometric features in multi-dimensional data than traditional wavelets. A novel method for edge and line detection which is in the spirit of phase congruency but is based on a complex shearlet transform will be presented. This approach to detection yields an approximate tangent direction of detected discontinuities as a byproduct of the computation, which then yields local curvature estimates. Two applications of the edge detection method will be discussed. First, the tracking and classification of flame fronts is a critical component of research in technical thermodynamics. Quite often, the flame fronts are transient or weak and the images are noisy. The standard methods used in the field for the detection of flame fronts do not handle such data well. Fortunately, using the shearlet-based edge measure yields good results as well as an accurate approximation of local curvature. Furthermore, a modification of the method will yield line detection, which is important for certain imaging modalities. Second, the Wadden tidal flats are a biodiverse region along the North Sea coast. One approach to surveying the delicate region and tracking the topographical changes is to use pre-existing Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. Unfortunately, SAR data suffers from multiplicative noise as well as sensitivity to environmental factors. The first large-scale mapping project of that type showed good results but only with a tremendous amount of manual interaction because there are many edges in the data which are not boundaries of the tidal flats but are edges of features like fields or islands. Preliminary results will be presented.

  2. Global and regional kinematics with GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    The inherent precision of the doubly differenced phase measurement and the low cost of instrumentation made GPS the space geodetic technique of choice for regional surveys as soon as the constellation reached acceptable geometry in the area of interest: 1985 in western North America, the early 1990's in most of the world. Instrument and site-related errors for horizontal positioning are usually less than 3 mm, so that the dominant source of error is uncertainty in the reference frame defined by the satellites orbits and the tracking stations used to determine them. Prior to about 1992, when the tracking network for most experiments was globally sparse, the number of fiducial sites or the level at which they could be tied to an SLR or VLBI reference frame usually, set the accuracy limit. Recently, with a global network of over 30 stations, the limit is set more often by deficiencies in models for non-gravitational forces acting on the satellites. For regional networks in the northern hemisphere, reference frame errors are currently about 3 parts per billion (ppb) in horizontal position, allowing centimeter-level accuracies over intercontinental distances and less than 1 mm for a 100 km baseline. The accuracy of GPS measurements for monitoring height variations is generally 2-3 times worse than for horizontal motions. As for VLBI, the primary source of error is unmodeled fluctuations in atmospheric water vapor, but both reference frame uncertainties and some instrument errors are more serious for vertical than horizontal measurements. Under good conditions, daily repeatabilities at the level of 10 mm rms were achieved. This paper will summarize the current accuracy of GPS measurements and their implication for the use of SLR to study regional kinematics.

  3. Stellar kinematics of elliptical galaxies in pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madejsky, Rainer; Bender, Ralf

    1990-01-01

    In both galaxy pairs Arp 166 and 3C 278 the authors find radially increasing velocity dispersions indicating a perturbed, non-equilibrium state of the galaxies after the tidal interaction. In all galaxies, the increase is most pronounced in the regions which correspond to the centers of the outer isophotes. The authors suggest a scenario in which the galaxies are strongly decelerated on their orbits during the encounter. The deceleration depends on the radial position in the perturbed galaxy and vanishes in the center of the perturbed galaxy (Spitzer, 1958). In addition, the crossing time of the stars near the center is very short, implying that the tidal perturbations can be averaged over several orbital periods (e.g., Binney and Tremaine, 1987). In consequence, the central parts are not affected by the tidal interaction while the outer parts are strongly decelerated. This leads to a displacement of the central parts of the galaxies with respect to their envelopes in an anti-symmetrical way for the two components of each galaxy pair. The motions of the central parts subsequently are opposed by dynamical friction with the surrounding envelopes. Due to dynamical friction, the density of the stars increases in the wakes of the moving central parts (Mulder, 1983). The overdensity of stars in the wakes of the moving central parts efficiently decelerates the motions of the central parts. The reaction of the stars in the overdensity regions leads to an increase of the velocity dispersion mainly along the orbits of the moving central parts. The presented observations, especially the asymmetrical luminosity profiles and the radially increasing velocity dispersions support consistently the above scenario of tidal interaction between galaxies. Further spectroscopic observations are necessary in order to investigate the degree of anisotropy in the kinematically perturbed regions.

  4. Growth Kinematics of Opening-Mode Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Alzayer, Y.; Laubach, S.; Fall, A.

    2014-12-01

    Fracture aperture is a primary control on flow in fractured reservoirs of low matrix permeability including unconventional oil and gas reservoirs and most geothermal systems. Guided by principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, fracture aperture is generally assumed to be a linear function of fracture length and elastic material properties. Natural opening-mode fractures with significant preserved aperture are observed in core and outcrop indicative of fracture opening strain accommodated by permanent solution-precipitation creep. Fracture opening may thus be decoupled from length growth if the material effectively weakens after initial elastic fracture growth by either non-elastic deformation processes or changes in elastic properties. To investigate the kinematics of fracture length and aperture growth, we reconstructed the opening history of three opening-mode fractures that are bridged by crack-seal quartz cement in Travis Peak Sandstone of the SFOT-1 well, East Texas. Similar crack-seal cement bridges had been interpreted to form by repeated incremental fracture opening and subsequent precipitation of quartz cement. We imaged crack-seal cement textures for bridges sampled at varying distance from the tips using scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence, and determined the number and thickness of crack-seal cement increments as a function of position along the fracture length and height. Observed trends in increment number and thickness are consistent with an initial stage of fast fracture propagation relative to aperture growth, followed by a stage of slow propagation and pronounced aperture growth. Consistent with fluid inclusion observations indicative of fracture opening and propagation occurring over 30-40 m.y., we interpret the second phase of pronounced aperture growth to result from fracture opening strain accommodated by solution-precipitation creep and concurrent slow, possibly subcritical, fracture propagation. Similar deformation

  5. Fundamental Principles of Proper Space Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Sean

    It is desirable to understand the movement of both matter and energy in the universe based upon fundamental principles of space and time. Time dilation and length contraction are features of Special Relativity derived from the observed constancy of the speed of light. Quantum Mechanics asserts that motion in the universe is probabilistic and not deterministic. While the practicality of these dissimilar theories is well established through widespread application inconsistencies in their marriage persist, marring their utility, and preventing their full expression. After identifying an error in perspective the current theories are tested by modifying logical assumptions to eliminate paradoxical contradictions. Analysis of simultaneous frames of reference leads to a new formulation of space and time that predicts the motion of both kinds of particles. Proper Space is a real, three-dimensional space clocked by proper time that is undergoing a densification at the rate of c. Coordinate transformations to a familiar object space and a mathematical stationary space clarify the counterintuitive aspects of Special Relativity. These symmetries demonstrate that within the local universe stationary observers are a forbidden frame of reference; all is in motion. In lieu of Quantum Mechanics and Uncertainty the use of the imaginary number i is restricted for application to the labeling of mass as either material or immaterial. This material phase difference accounts for both the perceived constant velocity of light and its apparent statistical nature. The application of Proper Space Kinematics will advance more accurate representations of microscopic, oscopic, and cosmological processes and serve as a foundation for further study and reflection thereafter leading to greater insight.

  6. Geometry and kinematic evolution of inversion structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S. )

    1993-07-01

    Positive inversion structures form by the compressional reactivation of preexisting extensional structures. Experimental models and observations of natural structures are used to develop quantitative models for the geometry and kinematic evolution of inversion structures. In this paper, I analyze two main formation mechanisms of inversion structures: (1) fault-propagation folding on planar faults, and (2) fault-bend folding on listric faults. Inversion structures formed by fault-propagation folding occur in the southern North Sea, the Central Montana platform, and the Kangean Basin. During extension, a broad fault-propagation (or drape) fold develops above the master fault, with the fault subsequently breaking through the fold. Synextensional growth units deposited in the hanging wall typically thicken into the basin. Compressional reactivation results in slip reversal on the master and secondary faults, their rotation to shallower dips, and the development of a compressional fault-propagation fold. Inversion structures formed by fault-bend folding on listric faults occur in the Taranaki Basin, and possibly in the southern North Sea. Rollover folding in the hanging wall occurs during extension, possibly accompanied by a small component of fault-propagation folding in the vicinity of the fault tip. Deformation is primarily along a system of antithetic faults. Synextensional growth sediments typically thicken into the fault, but also show thinning in the immediate vicinity of the fault. During compression, the extensional fold is first unfolded and then folded into a compressional fault-bend fold. The characteristic variations in bed geometry and thickness provide predictive models for interpreting the subsurface geometries of these two classes of inversion structures in areas with poor seismic data. These models are particularly useful in exploring for structural traps in the complex and relatively unexplored synextensional growth units. 31 refs., 29 figs.

  7. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Silva, J. V. Sales

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, alpha-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of alpha-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anti-correlated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90% of the barium stars belong to the thin disk population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an AGB star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  8. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Sales Silva, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scaleheight, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, α-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars cannot be represented by a single Gaussian distribution. The abundances of α-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anticorrelated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90 per cent of the barium stars belong to the thin disc population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an asymptotic giant branch star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  9. Visible imaging of edge turbulence in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zweben; R. Maqueda; K. Hill; D. Johnson; et al

    2000-06-13

    Edge plasma turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators is believed to cause the radical heat and particle flux across the separatrix and into the scrape-off-layers of these devices. This paper describes initial measurements of 2-D space-time structure of the edge density turbulence made using a visible imaging diagnostic in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The structure of the edge turbulence is most clearly visible using a method of gas puff imaging to locally illuminate the edge density turbulence.

  10. An edge index for topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodan, Emil

    2009-03-01

    Topological insulators display dissipationless currents flowing at the edges of the samples. These currents are associated to chiral edge modes, whose existence is intrinsically linked to the topology of the electronic states of the bulk. The edge modes can be easily investigated when the edges are smooth and have a periodicity, but as soon as the periodicity is absent, the problem becomes un-traceable by purely theoretical means. In my talk I will exemplify the use of non-commutative calculus to explore the properties, especially the stability of the edge modes. For example, using such techniques one can give a fairly elementary proof that the edge modes in Chern insulators survive even for a rough (random) edge. Similarly, for the Spin-Hall effect, one can define an observable and its associated current whose conductance remains quantized during various deformations of the Hamiltonian system. It turns out that in all cases, the edge conductance is given by the index of a Fredholm operator, which provides a new topological invariant linked directly to the edge rather than the bulk.

  11. Moveable Leading Edge Device for a Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitt, Dale M. (Inventor); Eckstein, Nicholas Stephen (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for managing a flight control surface system. A leading edge section on a wing of an aircraft is extended into a deployed position. A deformable section connects the leading edge section to a trailing section. The deformable section changes from a deformed shape to an original shape when the leading edge section is moved into the deployed position. The leading edge section on the wing is moved from the deployed position to an undeployed position. The deformable section changes to the deformed shape inside of the wing.

  12. Design and structural/optical analysis of a kinematic mount for the testing of silicon carbide mirrors at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Christopher; Frohlich, Charles; Shirgur, Badri; Mink, Ronald G.

    2004-10-01

    A kinematic mount has been designed to support two Silicon Carbide-based spherical mirrors during cryogenic testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The mirrors are flight representative test mirrors for the NIRSpec Instrument of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), provided by Galileo Avionica of Florence, Italy. One is cold-pressed Silicon Carbide (SiC) and one is Carbon reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC); both are coated in a SiC-based chemical vapor deposit. Each is lightweighted and has an integral mount on the rear surface. The integral mount is used as an interface to the kinematic mount, which is designed to support the mirrors during cryogenic testing while minimizing distortions induced by CTE mismatch among the materials. Additionally, an alternative "simply supported" mount is used to hold the mirrors around the outer edge of the optical surface. This eliminates the bending of the integral mount under the weight of the mirror and evaluates the effectiveness of the kinematic mount. The mirrors were analyzed for optical performance during testing from room temperature to 20K using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) with MSC/NASTRAN 2001. Predicted surface figure error (SFE) based on the removal of bias, tilt, and power was calculated using an in-house Matlab script for spherical mirrors. SFE was verified using the SigFit optical post-processing program to provide Zernike polynomial input for analysis with the Zemax optical software. The results show that the kinematic mount induces minimal figure error on the optical surface.

  13. The Impact of Fatigue on the Kinematics of Collegiate Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, W. Jeffrey; Byram, Ian R.; Meadows, Molly C.; Ahmad, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many factors are believed to contribute to throwing injuries in baseball pitchers, in particular overuse and poor throwing mechanics. The impact of fatigue on pitching biomechanics in live-game situations is not well understood. Hypothesis: Pitchers will demonstrate significant deviation in their pitching motions with increasing levels of fatigue. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Eleven National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I collegiate baseball pitchers were filmed in multiple live-game situations throughout a single season using 2 orthogonal high-speed cameras at 120 Hz. The first fastball of each inning and, when available, the fastball subsequent to the 15th and 30th pitch of each inning were recorded and analyzed for 26 kinematic parameters. Pitch count and velocity were recorded. Kinematic differences were assessed for association with pitch count and subjective fatigue measures over the course of each inning and game through the season. Results: Twenty-six games were recorded. Pitchers had a mean of 97.2 ± 16.1 pitches per start and 1079 ± 251 pitches per collegiate season. Increased hip lean at hand separation, elbow height at foot contact, and hip flexion and shoulder tilt at maximum external rotation were seen in innings lasting longer than 15 pitches. Maximum external rotation of the shoulder and elbow height at foot contact decreased over the course of a game. Hip lean at hand separation and elbow height at foot contact increased over the course of the season. Season pitch count was weakly correlated with increased shoulder external rotation and shoulder alignment at maximum external rotation and with shoulder abduction at ball release. Elbow flexion decreased with greater season pitch counts. Conclusion: Hip lean, elbow height, and shoulder external rotation were the most sensitive kinematic parameters to inning, game, and season fatigue. Pitch count and fatigue have a significant impact on live

  14. Edge mode spectroscopy and imaging for film edge properties in magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Lithography is an act of violence. Often, films are almost entirely obliterated by patterning, leaving only nanostructures behind with film edges that have borne the brunt of the damage, edges that carry with them the scars of energetic ion bombardment, reactive ions, liftoff and exposure to ambient conditions. In this talk, I will present a variation on ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy that can provide insight into the magnetic properties of film edges in magnetic nanostructures. The method relies on the non-uniformity of the magnetic field in patterned-film nanostructures that are magnetized in-plane, specifically, the low-field regions that form near where the magnetization is directed normal to the edge. In these regions, localized precession forms as trapped spin wave modes, and the resonance condition of these modes serves as an indicator of the edge properties. I will present modeling and measurements on a 500 nm diameter, 25 nm thick Permalloy disk to illustrate the method. Micromagnetic modeling of this disk predicts a main mode that is nearly uniform across the sample and three localized edge modes with higher resonance fields. The spectra measured with various tip positions and mode imaging are consistent with the modeling results. In addition to a strong center mode, three distinct edge modes are observed when the tip is near the disk edge. For a symmetric disk, the modeling predicts that the edge mode resonances are identical on the two opposite edges. However, the measured edge mode resonances on opposite edges of the disk are detected at different resonance fields, suggesting inhomogeneity of the edge properties. By rotating the applied field, we control the position of the localized edge mode along the edge of the disk and confirm that the edge mode resonance field has a strong angular dependence, showing that edge mode properties can vary significantly in a nominally circular disk.

  15. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.

    For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.

    The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.

    This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).

    Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science

  16. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  17. Multiple Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called multiple pregnancy . If more than one egg is released during the menstrual cycle and each ... fraternal twins (or more). When a single fertilized egg splits, it results in multiple identical embryos. This ...

  18. Multiple myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - multiple ... Multiple myeloma most commonly causes: Low red blood cell count ( anemia ), which can lead to fatigue and ...

  19. Estimation of kinematic parameters in CALIFA galaxies: no-assumption on internal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lorenzo, B.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Califa Team

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple approach to homogeneously estimate kinematic parameters of a broad variety of galaxies (elliptical, spirals, irregulars or interacting systems). This methodology avoids the use of any kinematical model or any assumption on internal dynamics. This simple but novel approach allows us to determine: the frequency of kinematic distortions, systemic velocity, kinematic center, and kinematic position angles which are directly measured from the two dimensional-distributions of radial velocities. We test our analysis tools using the CALIFA Survey

  20. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simanihuruk, Mudin

    2011-01-01

    Multiplication facts are difficult to teach. Therefore many researchers have put a great deal of effort into finding multiplication strategies. Sherin and Fuson (2005) provided a good survey paper on the multiplication strategies research area. Kolpas (2002), Rendtorff (1908), Dabell (2001), Musser (1966) and Markarian (2009) proposed the finger…