Science.gov

Sample records for multiple preequilibrium decay

  1. Benchmarking of multiple preequilibrium routines in GNASH

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1994-08-01

    The authors compare two different models for multiple preequilibrium emission (MPE) in GNASH: the older exciton MPE model; and a new generalized MPE model which is parameter-free. They analyze the proton-induced reactions on zirconium and lead, which were the focus of a recent NEA intermediate-energy code intercomparison, using both the MPE models. They find that the new generalized MPE model better describes the measurements.

  2. Entrance and exit channel phenomena in d- and 3He-induced preequilibrium decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissem, H. H.; Georgi, R.; Scobel, W.; Ernst, J.; Kaba, M.; Rao, J. Rama; Strohe, H.

    1980-10-01

    Activation techniques were used to measure more than 30 excitation functions for single and multiple nucleon and/or α particle emission for d+64,66Zn, 89Y with Ed=9-26 MeV and 3He+63,65Cu, 93Nb with E(3He)=10-44 MeV. The excitation functions are generally in agreement with the results of a combined equilibrium and preequilibrium hybrid model calculation applying initial exciton numbers n0=3 for d and n0=4 for 3He reactions. The composite system 66Ga has been produced via d+64Zn and 3He+63Cu at excitation energies between 22 and 36 MeV. An entrance channel dependence shows up in the yields for single p- and n-emission when compared in the double ratio R=[σ(3He, p)σ(3He, n)][σ(d, p)σ(d, n)]. It approaches a value of about 2, indicating enhanced p emission for the 3He-induced reaction. This value disagrees with the equilibrium isospin formalism and is best reproduced by initial particle exciton numbers n0p=n0n=1.5 for d and n0p=2.5, n0n=1.5 for 3He projectiles, indicating conservation of charge asymmetry in the entrance channel. Isomeric ratios have been measured for 89Y(d, 2n)89Zr and 93Nb(3He, xn)96-xTc (x=1, 2, 3). Calculations with a full statistical model fail to reproduce σgσm as well as σg and σm for reasonable values of the spin cutoff parameter. Inclusion of a preequilibrium decay mode improves the fit, in particular if the angular momentum depletion of the composite system due to preequilibrium decay is increased over that of the equilibrium decay at the same channel energy. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 64,66Zn, 89Y(d, xnypzα), Ed=9-26 MeV, 63,65Cu, 93Nb(3He, xnypzα), E3He=10-44 MeV, x<=4, y<=1, z<=2 measured σ(E) by activation, enriched targets. Statistical model analysis including preequilibrium decay, deduced reaction mechanism, charge asymmetry conservation, spin depletion.

  3. Pre-equilibrium decay processes in energetic heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1986-04-15

    The Boltzmann master equation (BME) is defined for application to precompound decay in heavy ion reactions in the 10 100 MeV/nucleon regime. Predicted neutron spectra are compared with measured results for central collisions of /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C with /sup 165/Ho target nuclei. Comparisons are made with subthreshold ..pi../sup 0/ yields in heavy ion reactions between 35 and 84 MeV/nucleon, and with the ..pi../sup 0/ spectra. The BME is found to be an excellent tool for investigating these experimentally observed aspects of non-equilibrium heavy ion reactions. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Model of multiparticle preequilibrium decay

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Yavshits, S. G.

    2011-10-15

    The possibility of calculating the spectra of several sequentially emitted nucleons was implemented on the basis of the exciton model of the preequilibriumdecay of a nucleus bymeans of a Monte Carlo simulation. A method for determining the instant of statistical equilibration in a composite system formed by intermediate- and high-energy nucleons was proposed. Calculations on the basis of the proposed model were combined with the results of calculations based on the statistical model of nuclear reactions and the intranuclear-cascade model. A systematic comparison of the results of these calculations with experimental data on the spectra of nucleons from (p, xn), (p, xp), (n, xn), and (n, xp) reactions in the projectile-energy range between 20 and 160 MeV was performed. The cross sections for the fission of heavy nuclei that was induced by protons and neutrons of energy in the range extending up to 3 GeV were calculated, and the results of those calculations were contrasted against available experimental data.

  5. Pre-Equilibrium Cluster Emission with Pickup and Knockout

    SciTech Connect

    Betak, E.

    2005-05-24

    We present a generalization of the Iwamoto-Harada-Bisplinghoff pre-equilibrium model of light cluster formation and emission, which is enhanced by allowing for possible admixtures of knockout for strongly coupled ejectiles, like {alpha}'s. The model is able to attain the Weisskopf-Ewing formula for compound-nucleus decay at long-time limit; it keeps the philosophy of pre-equilibrium decay during the equilibration stage and it describes the initial phase of a reaction as direct process(es) expressed using the language of the exciton model.

  6. Multiple photon emission in heavy particle decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakimori, K.; Burnett, T. H.; Cherry, M. L.; Christl, M. J.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1994-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions, at energies above 1 TeV/nucleon, in emulsion chambers flown on high altitude balloons have yielded two events showing apparent decays of a heavy particle into one charged particle and four photons. The photons converted into electron pairs very close to the decay vertex. Attempts to explain this decay topology with known particle decays are presented. Unless both events represent a b yields u transition, which is statistically unlikely, then other known decay modes for charmed or bottom particles do not account satisfactorily for these observations. This could indicate, possibly, a new decay channel.

  7. Charged-particle multiplicities in B-meson decay

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.S.; Csorna, S.E.; Fridman, A.; Hicks, R.G.; Panvini, R.S.; Andrews, D.; Avery, P.; Berkelman, K.; Cabenda, R.; Cassel, D.G.; DeWire, J.W.; Ehrlich, R.; Ferguson, T.; Gilchriese, M.G.D.; Gittelman, B.; Hartill, D.L.; Herrup, D.; Herzlinger, M.; Holzner, S.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.L.; Mistry, N.B.; Morrow, F.; Nordberg, E.; Perchonok, R.; Plunkett, R.; Silverman, A.; Stein, P.C.; Stone, S.; Weber, D.; Wilcke, R.; Sadoff, A.J.; Bebek, C.; Haggerty, J.; Hempstead, M.; Izen, J.M.; Loomis, W.A.; MacKay, W.W.; Pipkin, F.M.; Rohlf, J.; Tanenbaum, W.; Wilson, R.; Chadwick, K.; Chauveau, J.; Ganci, P.; Gentile, T.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.L.; Poling, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rucinski, G.; Thorndike, E.H.; Green, J.; Sannes, F.; Skubic, P.; Snyder, A.; Stone, R.; Brody, A.; Chen, A.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Lipari, P.; Kooy, H.; Moneti, G.C.; Pistilli, P.

    1982-08-09

    The charged multiplicity has been measured at the UPSILON(4S) and a value of 5.75 +- 0.1 +- 0.2 has been obtained for the mean charged multiplicity in B-meson decay. Combining this result with the measurement of prompt letpons from B decay, the values 4.1 +- 0.35 +- 0.2 and 6.3 +- 0.2 +- 0.2 are found for the semileptonic and nonleptonic charged multiplicities, respectively. If b..-->..c dominance is assumed for the weak decay of the B meson, then the semileptonic multiplicity is consistent with the recoil mass determined from the lepton momentum spectrum.

  8. Tooth Decay - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Việt) Dental Decay English Sâu Răng - Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) PDF California Dental Association Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  9. The role of pre-equilibrium theory in nuclear data evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1987-08-01

    We illustrate the utility of preequilibrium plus equilibrium decay models in reproducing neutron and ..gamma..-ray spectra for incident nucleons of approx. = 2 to 20 MeV. We discuss models and theories for calculating preequilibrium nucleon angular distributions and the short comings involved. Attention is focussed on special problems in modelling preequliibrium reactions for target nuclei near shell closures, and possible ways to improve the modelling in these regimes by use of shell model levels to generate few quasi-particle state densities. We show preliminary tests of applicability of preequilibrium models to incident nucleon energies up to 1 GeV and for heavy ion induced reactions at energies up to 300 MeV, areas where modern technology is increasingly seeking nuclear data input. 40 refs., 16 figs.

  10. Preequilibrium neutron emission in fusion of WVHo+ SC at 25 MeV per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Holub, E.; Hilscher, D.; Ingold, G.; Jahnke, U.; Orf, H.; Rossner, H.; Zank, W.P.; Schroeder, W.U.; Gemmeke, H.; Keller, K.

    1986-01-01

    Neutrons were measured in coincidence with evaporation residues from the reaction WVHo+(300 MeV) SC. The evaporation residue velocity distribution is indicative of an average transfer of 80% of the full linear momentum in this reaction. The energy spectra of the coincident neutrons exhibit evaporative and preequilibrium components associated with integral multiplicities of M/sub EV/ = (9.5 +- 0.5) and M/sub PE/ = (1.7 +- 0.3), respectively. The experimental neutron energy and angular distributions are analyzed in terms of multiple-source parametrizations, assuming two or three emitters. The results are compared to those obtained from other inclusive and exclusive associated-particle data. It is observed that the emission patterns of the preequilibrium neutrons are in accord with the predictions of a Fermi-jet model, for neutron angles forward of 35, while this model fails to reproduce the data at angles in the vicinity of 90 and beyond. Various different nucleon momentum distributions have been employed in the model comparison. The insufficiency of the Fermi-jet model to reproduce the data is attributed to the neglect of two-body collisions in this one-body theory. In contrast, the shape of the angle-integrated preequilibrium-neutron energy spectrum is well reproduced with the Harp-Miller-Berne preequilibrium model, if an initial exciton number of n0 = 15 is adopted. This value, as well as the preequilibrium neutron multiplicity, is at variance with systematics established previously.

  11. Spin distribution in neutron induced preequilibrium reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Kawano, T; Chadwick, M; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Macri, R; Younes, W

    2005-10-04

    The preequilibrium reaction mechanism makes an important contribution to neutron-induced reactions above E{sub n} {approx} 10 MeV. The preequilibrium process has been studied exclusively via the characteristic high energy neutrons produced at bombarding energies greater than 10 MeV. They are expanding the study of the preequilibrium reaction mechanism through {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Cross-section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 250 MeV) on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). Residual state population was predicted using the GNASH reaction code, enhanced for preequilibrium. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshback, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without preequilibrium effects is significant.

  12. Matching pre-equilibrium dynamics and viscous hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2010-02-15

    We demonstrate how to match pre-equilibrium dynamics of a 0+1-dimensional quark-gluon plasma to second-order viscous hydrodynamical evolution. The matching allows us to specify the initial values of the energy density and shear tensor at the initial time of hydrodynamical evolution as a function of the lifetime of the pre-equilibrium period. We compare two models for pre-equilibrium quark-gluon plasma, longitudinal free streaming and collisionally broadened longitudinal expansion, and present analytic formulas that can be used to fix the necessary components of the energy-momentum tensor. The resulting dynamical models can be used to assess the effect of pre-equilibrium dynamics on quark-gluon plasma observables. Additionally, we investigate the dependence of entropy production on pre-equilibrium dynamics and discuss the limitations of the standard definitions of nonequilibrium entropy.

  13. The Multiple-Beam Two-Plasmon-Decay Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follett, Russell K.

    Recent developments in experimental techniques and simulations have led to an improved understanding of the nonlinear evolution of the two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Experiments on the OMEGA laser used ultraviolet Thomson scattering to observe TPD electron plasma waves driven by multiple laser beams in a variety of experimental configurations. The experiments were modeled in 3-D using a hybrid code (LPSE) that combines a pseudospectral wave solver with a particle tracker to self-consistently calculate Landau damping. Thomson-scattering measurements of several different plasma wavevectors show a highly anisotropic turbulent TPD driven electron-plasma-wave spectrum and are well reproduced by LPSE simulations. Direct comparison between simulated and measured hot-electron spectra indicate that the hybrid-particle model correctly captures the hot-electron generation mechanism associated with the nonlinear evolution of the TPD instability.

  14. PRECO-D2: program for calculating preequilibrium and direct reaction double differential cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbach, C.

    1985-02-01

    The code PRECO-D2 uses the exciton model for preequilibrium nuclear reactions to describe the emission of particles with mass numbers of 1 to 4 from an equilibrating composite nucleus. A distinction is made between open and closed configurations in this system and between the multi-step direct (MSD) and multi-step compound (MSC) components of the preequilibrium cross section. Additional MSD components are calculated semi-empirically to account for direct nucleon transfer reactions and direct knockout processes involving cluster degrees of freedom. Evaporation from the equilibrated composite nucleus is included in the full MSC cross section. Output of energy differential and double differential cross sections is provided for the first particle emitted from the composite system. Multiple particle emission is not considered. This report describes the reaction models used in writing PRECO-D2 and explains the organization and utilization of the code. 21 refs.

  15. Bayesian characterization of multiple-slope sound energy decays in coupled-volume systems.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Goggans, Paul; Jasa, Tomislav; Robinson, Philip

    2011-02-01

    Due to recent developments in concert hall design, there is an increasing interest in the analysis of sound energy decays consisting of multiple exponential decay rates. It has been considered challenging to estimate parameters associated with double-rate (slope) decay characteristics, and even more challenging when the coupled-volume systems contain more than two decay processes. To meet the need of characterizing energy decays of multiple decay processes, this work investigates coupled-volume systems using acoustic scale-models of three coupled rooms. Two Bayesian formulations are compared using the experimentally measured sound energy decay data. A fully parameterized Bayesian formulation has been found to be capable of characterization of multiple-slope decays beyond the single-slope and double-slope energy decays. Within the Bayesian framework using this fully parameterized formulation, an in-depth analysis of likelihood distributions over multiple-dimensional decay parameter space motivates the use of Bayesian information criterion, an efficient approach to solving Bayesian model selection problems that are suitable for estimating the number of exponential decays. The analysis methods are then applied to a geometric-acoustics simulation of a conceptual concert hall. Sound energy decays more complicated than single-slope and double-slope nature, such as triple-slope decays have been identified and characterized. PMID:21361433

  16. Comparison of transition densities in the DDHMS model of pre-equilibrium emission

    SciTech Connect

    Brito, L.; Carlson, B. V.

    2014-11-11

    The DDHMS (double differential hybrid Monte Carlo simulation) model treats nucleon-induced pre-equilibrium reactions as a series of particle-particle and particle-hole interactions in the space of energy and angle. This work compares spectra obtained within the model using diferent approximations to the density of accessible states. The calculations are performed with the EMPIRE reaction model code, a modular system containing several nuclear reaction models that permits a fairly complete descritpion of the reaction, from elastic scattering and absorption through the pre-equilbrium stage to the final decay by statistical emission.

  17. Comparison of transition densities in the DDHMS model of pre-equilibrium emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, L.; Carlson, B. V.

    2014-11-01

    The DDHMS (double differential hybrid Monte Carlo simulation) model treats nucleon-induced pre-equilibrium reactions as a series of particle-particle and particle-hole interactions in the space of energy and angle. This work compares spectra obtained within the model using diferent approximations to the density of accessible states. The calculations are performed with the EMPIRE reaction model code, a modular system containing several nuclear reaction models that permits a fairly complete descritpion of the reaction, from elastic scattering and absorption through the pre-equilbrium stage to the final decay by statistical emission.

  18. Pre-equilibrium studies in monoisotopic praseodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.P.; Mustafa, M.M.; Sankarcharyulu, M.G.V.

    1994-12-31

    Measurement and analysis of excitation functions in {alpha}-induced reactions has become an important tool for studying the pre-equilibrium (PE) phenomenon. As part of the programme of precise measurement and analysis of excitation functions in reactions for a large number of nuclei, the authors report the measurement of excitation functions for the reactions {sup 141}Pr({alpha},n){sup 144}Pm and {sup 141}Pr({alpha},2n){sup 143}Pm in the energy range from threshold to {approx}40 MeV. To the best of their knowledge, these excitation functions have been measured for the first time. Measurements have been performed using stacked foil activation technique. The irradiation has been carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Calcutta, India using the {alpha}-beam of {approx} 40 MeV. The post irradiation analysis has been done using the HPGe detector coupled to the ORTEC`s PC based multichannel analyser. The analysis of the excitation functions has been carried out using the semi-classical computer codes ACT and ALICE-82. These codes use Hauser-Feshbach/ Welsskopf-Ewing formalism for compound nucleus calculations and exciton/hybrid model for simulating PE contributions. The quantum mechanical statistical multistep code EXIFON has also been used for the analysis of these excitation functions. The comparison of results with different codes will be presented.

  19. PHASE-OTI: A pre-equilibrium model code for nuclear reactions calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmaghraby, Elsayed K.

    2009-09-01

    The present work focuses on a pre-equilibrium nuclear reaction code (based on the one, two and infinity hypothesis of pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions). In the PHASE-OTI code, pre-equilibrium decays are assumed to be single nucleon emissions, and the statistical probabilities come from the independence of nuclei decay. The code has proved to be a good tool to provide predictions of energy-differential cross sections. The probability of emission was calculated statistically using bases of hybrid model and exciton model. However, more precise depletion factors were used in the calculations. The present calculations were restricted to nucleon-nucleon interactions and one nucleon emission. Program summaryProgram title: PHASE-OTI Catalogue identifier: AEDN_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5858 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 149 405 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Pentium 4 and Centrino Duo Operating system: MS Windows RAM: 128 MB Classification: 17.12 Nature of problem: Calculation of the differential cross section for nucleon induced nuclear reaction in the framework of pre-equilibrium emission model. Solution method: Single neutron emission was treated by assuming occurrence of the reaction in successive steps. Each step is called phase because of the phase transition nature of the theory. The probability of emission was calculated statistically using bases of hybrid model [1] and exciton model [2]. However, more precise depletion factor was used in the calculations. Exciton configuration used in the code is that described in earlier work [3]. Restrictions: The program is restricted to single nucleon emission and nucleon

  20. Pre-equilibrium approximation in chemical and photophysical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Margaret; Berberan-Santos, Mário N.

    2002-07-01

    For most mechanisms of chemical reactions and molecular photophysical processes the time evolution of the concentration of the intervening species cannot be obtained analytically. The pre-equilibrium approximation is one of several useful approximation methods that allow the derivation of explicit solutions and simplify numerical solutions. In this work, a general view of the pre-equilibrium approximation is presented, along with the respective analytical solution. It is also shown that the kinetic behavior of systems subject to pre-equilibration can be obtained by the application of perturbation theory. Several photophysical systems are discussed, including excimer formation, thermally activated delayed fluorescence, and external-heavy atom quenching of luminescence.

  1. Excitation Functions of α-INDUCED Reactions in Cobalt and Pre-Equilibrium Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. Afzal; Abd. Alslam, Mouner A.; Sathik, N. P. M.; Ismail, M.; Rashid, M. H.

    Excitation functions for the reactions (α,2n), (α,αn), (α,α2n), (α,α3n) and (α,2pn) have been measured using 57Co as a target up to 50 MeV α-particle energy. The stacked foil activation technique and γ-ray spectroscopy method has been employed. Measured excitation functions are compared with the geometry dependent hybrid (GDH) model. A comparison shows that the pure equilibrium (EQ) compound reaction mechanism is incapable of reproducing the experimental data while the pre-equilibrium (PE) reaction mechanism along with equilibrium (EQ) decay, where it is considered that pre-equilibrium emission of particles take place prior to the establishment of the thermodynamical equilibrium of the system, is able to reproduce the experimental data. The GDH model code ALICE-91 has been used for theoretical calculations. A value of initial exciton number n0=4 with configuration (2 neutron + 2 proton + 0 hole) has been found to give the satisfactory reproduction of experimental excitation functions.

  2. Heavy ion collisions and the pre-equilibrium exciton model

    SciTech Connect

    Betak, E.

    2012-10-20

    We present a feasible way to apply the pre-equilibrium exciton model in its masterequation formulation to heavy-ion induced reactions including spin variables. Emission of nucleons, {gamma}'s and also light clusters is included in our model.

  3. Fine and ultrafine particle decay rates in multiple homes.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lance; Kindzierski, Warren; Kearney, Jill; MacNeill, Morgan; Héroux, Marie-Ève; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2013-11-19

    Human exposure to particles depends on particle loss mechanisms such as deposition and filtration. Fine and ultrafine particles (FP and UFP) were measured continuously over seven consecutive days during summer and winter inside 74 homes in Edmonton, Canada. Daily average air exchange rates were also measured. FP were also measured outside each home and both FP and UFP were measured at a central monitoring station. A censoring algorithm was developed to identify indoor-generated concentrations, with the remainder representing particles infiltrating from outdoors. The resulting infiltration factors were employed to determine the continuously changing background of outdoor particles infiltrating the homes. Background-corrected indoor concentrations were then used to determine rates of removal of FP and UFP following peaks due to indoor sources. About 300 FP peaks and 400 UFP peaks had high-quality (median R(2) value >98%) exponential decay rates lasting from 30 min to 10 h. Median (interquartile range (IQR)) decay rates for UFP were 1.26 (0.82-1.83) h(-1); for FP 1.08 (0.62-1.75) h(-1). These total decay rates included, on average, about a 25% contribution from air exchange, suggesting that deposition and filtration accounted for the major portion of particle loss mechanisms in these homes. Models presented here identify and quantify effects of several factors on total decay rates, such as window opening behavior, home age, use of central furnace fans and kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans, use of air cleaners, use of air conditioners, and indoor-outdoor temperature differences. These findings will help identify ways to reduce exposure and risk. PMID:24143863

  4. Spin distribution in preequilibrium reactions for 48Ti + n.

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D

    2005-04-06

    Cross section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for transitions in {sup 45-48}Ti, {sup 44-48}Sc, and {sup 42-45}Ca have been determined. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the LANSCE/WNR facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed germanium array for neutron induced excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). The data are presented for neutron energies E{sub n} between 1 to 200 MeV. These results are compared with model calculations which include compound nuclear and pre-equilibrium emission. The model calculations are performed using the STAPRE reaction code for E{sub n} up to 20 MeV and the GNASH reaction code for E{sub n} up to 120 MeV. Using the GNASH reaction code the effect of the spin distribution in preequilibrium reactions has been investigated. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshbach, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct (MSD) part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The contribution from higher steps is estimated to be small. The spin distribution of the multistep compound (MSC) part of FKK theory is assumed to be the same as in the compound nucleus. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without

  5. Inverse Methods for Organic Matter Decay: From Multiple Pools to a Lognormal Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D.

    2011-12-01

    The decomposition of plant matter is difficult to model because we lack fundamental constitutive relations between decay rates, litter composition and ecosystems. Because decay slows down with time, and organic matter is compositionally heterogeneous, models of decomposition typically consist of multiple components (pools) which decay exponentially at different rates. Yet, it is unclear how the rates, sizes, and number of these pools vary with organic matter type and ecosystem. Here, we assume that degradation is described by a continuous superposition of first order decay rates. We use an inversion technique to identify the best fitting distributions of rates associated with the LIDET litter decay study [1]. This approach directly identifies the best multi-pool solution for each dataset. However, we find that the multi-pool solution is over-parameterized and not robust to the levels of noise in the decay datasets. We therefore implement a method of regularization to identify the distribution of first order decay rates which best fits the data but not the noise. This approach reveals that the distribution is characteristically lognormal on average across all data sets. To evaluate the validity of this result, we compare decays from a lognormal rate distribution to standard multi-pool models via the Akaike Information Criterion (AICc). The AICc indicates the lognormal distribution of rates contains significantly more information about litter decomposition than multi-pool models. These results suggest that the lognormal framework for analyzing and visualizing decay rates is a valuable tool to better understand the constitutive relations between decay dynamics, composition, ecosystems, and climate. [1] Harmon, M. 2007. LTER Intersite Fine Litter Decomposition Experiment (LIDET). Forest Science Data Bank, Corvallis, OR. [Database]. Available: http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/data/abstract.cfm?dbcode=TD023

  6. Pre-equilibrium dilepton production from an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2008-09-15

    We calculate leading-order dilepton yields from a quark-gluon plasma that has a time-dependent anisotropy in momentum space. Such anisotropies can arise during the earliest stages of quark-gluon plasma evolution due to the rapid longitudinal expansion of the created matter. Two phenomenological models for the proper-time dependence of the parton hard momentum scale, p{sub hard}, and the plasma anisotropy parameter, {xi}, are constructed that describe the transition of the plasma from its initial nonequilibrium state to an isotropic thermalized state. The first model constructed interpolates between 1+1 dimensional free streaming at early times and 1+1 dimensional ideal hydrodynamical expansion at late times. In the second model we include the effect of collisional broadening of the parton distribution functions in the early-time pre-equilibrium stage of plasma evolution. We find for both cases that for fixed initial conditions high-energy dilepton production is enhanced by pre-equilibrium emission. When the models are constrained to fixed final pion multiplicity the dependence of the resulting spectra on the assumed plasma isotropization time is reduced. Using our most realistic collisionally broadened model we find that high-transverse-momentum dilepton production would be enhanced by at most 40% at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and 50% at the CERN Large Hadron Collider if one assumes an isotropization/thermalization time of 2 fm/c. Given sufficiently precise experimental data this enhancement could be used to determine the plasma isotropization time experimentally.

  7. Pre-equilibrium, Statistical Nuclear-Model Code System for Calculation Cross Sections and Emission Spectra, Version gn9cp8.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-02-02

    Version 00 GNASH provides a flexible method by which reaction and level cross sections, isomer ratios, and emission spectra (neutron, gamma-ray, and charged-particle) resulting from particle- and photon-induced reactions can be calculated. The September 1991 release of GNASH incorporated an additional option for calculating gamma-ray strength functions and transmission coefficients by including the Kopecky-Uhl model. In addition, improvements were made to the output routines, particularly regarding gamma-ray strength function information. Major improvements in the 1995more » FKK-GNASH release include added capabilities: to read in externally calculated preequilibrium spectrum from, e.g., Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin theory, to do multiple preequilibrium calculations, to calculate appropriate spin distributions for nuclear states formed in preequilibrium reactions, and to do incident-photon calculations. In the 1998 release improvements were made in the accuracy of the exciton model and other calculations, and provision was made for including energy-dependent renormalization of the reaction cross section and energy-dependent exciton model parameterization (for data evaluation purposes). The sample problems provided here are the same as those that were given in the 1998 release; however, the calculations were run using the current version of GNASH (gn9cp8). The major differences between this version and the previous one released in 1998 are as follows: 1. A serious buffering error that affected stored state populations resulting when multiple reactions lead to the same compound nucleus is corrected. This error only affects cases with INPOPT=-1, normally used for high-energy calculations. It is the reason that the present outputs for the p + Zr90 test case (described below) are significantly different from the 1998 results for the same p + Zr90 test case. 2. Minor errors were corrected in estimating preequilibrium contributions to discrete states; interpolating the spin

  8. The GNASH preequilibrium-statistical nuclear model code

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E. D.

    1988-01-01

    The following report is based on materials presented in a series of lectures at the International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, which were designed to describe the GNASH preequilibrium statistical model code and its use. An overview is provided of the code with emphasis upon code's calculational capabilities and the theoretical models that have been implemented in it. Two sample problems are discussed, the first dealing with neutron reactions on /sup 58/Ni. the second illustrates the fission model capabilities implemented in the code and involves n + /sup 235/U reactions. Finally a description is provided of current theoretical model and code development underway. Examples of calculated results using these new capabilities are also given. 19 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Effects of angular-momentum conservation in unified pre-equilibrium and equilibrium reaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiangjun; Gruppelaar, H.; Akkermans, J. M.

    1987-05-01

    The master-equation theory of precompound and compound nuclear decay is generalized to the inclusion of the conservation of angular momentum. It is demonstrated that the constructed model contains the Hauser-Feshbach, Weisskopf-Ewing as well as standard exciton models as limiting cases. This unified pre-equilibrium/Hauser-Feshbach model, which may be considered as a practicable version of the quantum-statistical, so-called AWM theory of Agassi et al., has been computationally optimized, such that the related numerical effort has become comparable to or less than that of a standard Hauser-Feshbach calculation. With this unified model the nature and importance of some spin effects in pre-equilibrium reactions has been investigated. The main conclusion from numerical calculations is that the standard precompound-model results are close to those of the angular-momentum conserving model, implying that the popular semi-classical models are quite reliable in this respect from a practical point of view.

  10. Investigation of the production of (68)Ga using pre-equilibrium models.

    PubMed

    Baldik, Rıdvan; Dombayci, Ayten

    2016-07-01

    In this study, some nuclear reactions for the production of (68)Ga radioisotope are investigated using pre-equilibrium nuclear reaction models. For this aim, by the pre-equilibrium reaction mechanisms, the excitation functions and emission spectra of some nuclear reactions for the production of (68)Ga radioisotope are calculated. These calculations are performed in the ALICE/ASH and the TALYS 1.6 codes. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental results. PMID:27108069

  11. Measurement of the charged multiplicities in b, c and light quark events from Z0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolen, B.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chou, A.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; Crwaford, G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J. S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; Dell'Orso, R.; Dervan, P. J.; Dima, M.; Dong, D. N.; Du, P. Y. C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M. J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hart, E. L.; Harton, J. L.; Hasan, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasuko, K.; Hedges, S. J.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J. A.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kim, Y. D.; King, M. E.; King, R.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Labs, J. F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lia, V.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovan, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Moore, T. B.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Narita, S.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P. E.; Rochester, L. S.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schumm, B. A.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Smy, M. B.; Snyder, J. A.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Torrence, E.; Trandafir, A. I.; Turk, J. D.; Usher, T.; Va'vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Waite, A. P.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, D. A.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zeitlin, C.; Zhou, J.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Average charged multiplicities have been measured separately in b, c and light quark ( u, d, s) events from Z0 decays measured in the SLD experiment. Impact parameters of charged tracks were used to select enriched samples of b and light quark events, and reconstructed charmed mesons were used to select c quark events. We measured the charged multiplicities: overlinenuds = 20.21 ± 0.10( stat.) ± 0.22( syst.) , overlinenc = 21.28 ± 0.46( stat.) -0.36+0.41syst.) and overlinenb = 23.14 ± 0.10( stat.) -0.37+0.38( syst.) , from which we derived the differences between the total average charged multiplicities of c or b quark events and light quark events: Δ overlinenc = 1.07 ± 0.47( stat.) -0.30+0.36( syst.) and Δ overlinenb = 2.93 ± 0.14( stat.) -0.29+0.30( syst.) . We compared these measurements with those at lower center-of-mass energies and with perturbative QCD predictions. These combined results are in agreement with the QCD expectations and disfavor the hypothesis of flavor-independent fragmentation.

  12. Radionuclide migration through fractured rock: Effects of multiple fractures and two-member decay chains

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.

    1985-09-01

    This report presents the results of an analytical study of the hydrological transport of a radioactive contaminant through fractured, porous rock. The purpose is to evaluate the time-, and space-dependent concentration of the contaminant in the ground-water in the fractures and in the rock pores. We propose a simplified analytical method that superposes two single-fracture solutions for the concentration in the rock matrix with a system of parallel fractures. The exact solutions require multiple integrals and summation of an infinite series, which converges slowly because of its oscillating nature. The convergence of the series becomes slower for strongly-sorbing media, large spacing of two fractures, and early times. In summary, we made extension to the theory of radionuclide penetration into multiply fractured rock, and provided solutions for a two-member decay chain. 9 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  13. State densities with linear momentum and their application to preequilibrium and photoabsorption reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B. ); Oblozinsky, P. . Fyzikalny Ustav)

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the concept of state densities with linear momentum and describe their application to preequilibrium reaction theory as well as nuclear photoabsorption via the quasideuteron mechanism. An exciton model is presented for particle emission in nucleon-induced reactions in which linear momentum conversion is included. The nucleon emission contributions from the first two preequilibrium stages are calculated by determining exact particle-hole state densities with a specific energy and linear momentum in a Fermi-gas model of the nucleus. Angular distributions arise naturally from our treatment and do not have to be added in an ad hoc way. The angular distributions that we obtain from the first two preequilibrium stages are identical to those found using the Kikuchi-Kawai quasifree scattering kernel. Since many preequilibrium analyses are based upon an equidistant single-particle model of the nucleus, we also determine the state densities wit linear momentum (and hence angular distributions) in such a model. A no-parameter quasideuteron model of photoabsorption is presented in which the Levinger parameter and Pauli-blocking function are determined theoretically, using state densities with linear momentum. Comparisons with data are shown, and the temperature dependence of the photoabsorption cross section is calculated. 45 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton and electromagnetic calorimeter requirements at Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1989-08-01

    This is a study of the physics sensitivity to the multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton at the Tau-Charm Factory. The sensitivity is compared for a moderate and an ultimate electromagnetic calorimeter. With the high luminosity of the Tau- Charm Factory, a very large sample of the decays /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//2/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// and /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//3/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// can be collected with both detectors. However, with the ultimate detector, 2/pi//sup 0/ and 3/pi//sup 0/ can be unambiguously reconstructed with very little background. For the suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has the sensitivity. The ultimate detector is also sensitive to the more suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ K/sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau// and the moderate detector may have the sensitivity if the hadronic background is not significantly larger than that predicted by Lund. In the case of the highly suppressed second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has sensitivity. The sensitivity can be greatly enhanced with a small-angle photon veto. 16 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. A combined limit on the neutrino mass from neutrinoless double-beta decay searches in multiple isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzowski, P.

    2016-05-01

    We set a combined limit on the effective Majorana neutrino mass mββ from experimental searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay of multiple isotopes. The limits on mββ range between 130-310 meV, depending on the choice of nuclear matrix element calculation. The limits on mββ can also be translated into a limit on the neutrino mass and mixing parameters of a fourth sterile neutrino.

  16. Features of polarization decay in the transition between the low-step and multiple scattering of laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Yuvchenko, S. A.; Taskina, L. A.; Alonova, M. V.; Isaeva, E. A.; Isaeva, A. A.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of increase in the uncertainty of local polarization states of laser light forward scattered by random media was studied in the experiments with phantom scatterers. At macroscopic level this effect is related to decay in the degree of polarization of scattered light in the course of transition from single to multiple scattering. Gelatin layers with embedded titania particles were used as the phantom scatterers. Features of distributions of local polarization states in various polarization coordinates were considered.

  17. Study of High-multiplicity 3-prong and 5-prong Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P

    2012-06-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions of 3-prong and 5-prong {tau} decay modes using a sample of 430 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {eta}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {yields} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){nu}{sub {tau}} branching fractions are presented as well as a new limit on the branching fraction of the isospin-forbidden, second-class current {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {eta}{prime}(958){nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We find no evidence for charged kaons in these decay modes and place the first upper limits on their branching fractions.

  18. Light-heavy-ion collisions: a window into pre-equilibrium QCD dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romatschke, P.

    2015-07-01

    Relativistic collisions of light on heavy ions (p + Au at GeV, p + Au , d + Au ,He + Au at GeV and 200 GeV and p + Pb ,He + Pb at TeV) are simulated using "superSONIC", a model that includes pre-equilibrium flow, viscous hydrodynamics and a hadronic cascade afterburner. Even though these systems have strong gradients and only consist of at most a few tens of charged particles per unit rapidity, one finds evidence that a hydrodynamic description applies to these systems. Based on these simulations, the presence of a triangular flow component in d + Au collisions at GeV is predicted to be similar in magnitude to that found in He + Au collisions. Furthermore, the ratio of He + Au to d + Au is found to be sensitive to the presence of pre-equilibrium flow. This would imply an experimentally accessible window into pre-equilibrium QCD dynamics using light-heavy-ion collisions.

  19. Pre-equilibrium evolution effects on heavy-ion collision observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Shen, Chun; Heinz, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the importance of pre-equilibrium dynamics on relativistic heavy-ion collision observables, we match a highly nonequilibrium early evolution stage, modeled by free-streaming partons generated from the Monte Carlo Kharzeev-Levin-Nardi (MC-KLN) and Monte Carlo Glauber (MC-Glb) models, to a locally approximately thermalized later evolution stage described by viscous hydrodynamics and study the dependence of final hadronic transverse momentum distributions, in particular their underlying radial and anisotropic flows, on the switching time between these stages. Performing a three-parameter fit of the measured values for the average transverse momenta for pions, kaons, and protons, as well as the elliptic and triangular flows of charged hadrons v2,3 ch, with the switching time τs, the specific shear viscosity η /s during the hydrodynamic stage, and the kinetic decoupling temperature Tdec as free parameters, we find that the preferred "thermalization" times τs depend strongly on the model of the initial conditions. MC-KLN initial conditions require an earlier transition to hydrodynamic behavior (at τs≈0.13 fm / c ), followed by hydrodynamic evolution with a larger specific shear viscosity η /s ≈0.2 , than MC-Glb initial conditions, which prefer switching at a later time (τs≈0.6 fm / c ) followed by a less viscous hydrodynamic evolution with η /s ≈0.16 . These new results including pre-equilibrium evolution are compared to fits without a pre-equilibrium stage where all dynamic evolution before the onset of hydrodynamic behavior is ignored. In each case, the quality of the dynamical descriptions for the optimized parameter sets, as well as the observables which show the strongest constraining power for the thermalization time, are discussed.

  20. Measurement of the charged multiplicities of b, c and light quark events from Z{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect

    The SLD Collaboration

    1995-06-01

    Average charged multiplicities have been measured separately for {ital b, c} and light quark ({ital u, d, s}) events from Z{sup 0} decays at SLD. Impact parameters of charged tracks were used to select enriched samples of {ital b} and light quark events. We measured the charged multiplicities: {bar {ital n}}{sub {ital uds}} = 19.80 {+-} 0.09 ({ital stat}) {+-} 0.57 ({ital syst}), {bar {ital n}}{sub {ital c}} = 21.17 {+-} 0.44 ({ital stat}) {+-} 1.01 ({ital syst}) and {bar {ital n}}{sub {ital b}}{+-}23.14 {+-} 0.09 ({ital stat}) {+-} 1.03 ({ital syst}) (PRELIMINARY), from which we derived the differences between the total average charged multiplicities of {ital c} or {ital b} quark events and light quark events: {delta}{bar {ital n}}{sub {ital c}} = 1.37 {+-} 0.45 ({ital stat}) {+-} 0.86 ({ital syst}) and {delta}{bar {ital n}}{sub {ital b}} = 3.34 {+-} 0. 13 ({ital stat}) {+-} 0.77 ({ital syst}) (PRELIMINARY). We compared these measurements with those at lower center-of-mass energies and with QCD predictions.

  1. Preliminary measurement of the charged multiplicities in b, c and light quark events from Z{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Average charged multiplicities have been measured separately in b, c and light quark (u, d, s) events from Z{sup 0} decays measured in the SLD experiment. Impact parameters of charged tracks were used to select enriched samples of b and light quark events, and reconstructed charmed mesons were used to select c quark events. We measured the charged multiplicities: {anti n}{sub uds} = 20.21 {+-} 0.10 (stat.) {+-} 0.17 (syst.), {anti n}{sub c} = 21.28 {+-} 0.46 (stat.){sub -0.33}{sup +0.38} (syst.) and {anti n}{sub b} = 23.14 {+-} 0.10 (stat.){sub -0.34}{sup +0.35} (syst.), from which we derived the differences between the total average charged multiplicities of c or b quark events and light quark events: {Delta}{anti n}{sub c} = 1.07 {+-} 0.47 (stat.){sub -0.30}{sup +0.36} (syst.) and {Delta}{anti n}{sub b} = 2.93 {+-} 0.14 (stat.){sub -0.29}{sup +0.30} (syst.). We compared these measurements with those at lower center-of-mass energies and with perturbative QCD predictions. These combined results are in agreement with the QCD expectations and disfavor the hypothesis of flavor-independent fragmentation.

  2. Size-dependent structural transition from multiple-twinned particles to epitaxial fcc nanocrystals and nanocrystal decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Huang, W. J.; Bohra, F.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Tedjasaputra, A. P.; Zuo, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    The size dependence of structural transition from multiple-twinned particles (MTP) to epitaxial face centered cubic nanocrystals was investigated for Ag nanoparticles formed on Si(001) surfaces by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex situ transmission electron microscopy. The transition from MTP to nanocrystals was promoted by postdeposition annealing. Clear particle size dependence is found in the epitaxial formation temperatures (TE) , which is about 2/3 of the calculated, size-dependent, melting temperature (TM) using the value of surface energy γS=1.2J/m2 for larger particles (>2nm) . Once nanocrystals are formed, they decay and disappear in a narrow temperature range between 795 and 850K . No evidence of nanocrystal melting was detected from the reflection high-energy electron diffraction observations.

  3. EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS POWERED BY THE DECAY OF NON-HIERARCHICAL MULTIPLE SYSTEMS OF MASSIVE STARS: ORION BN/KL

    SciTech Connect

    Bally, John; Cunningham, Nathaniel J.; Moeckel, Nickolas; Burton, Michael G.; Smith, Nathan; Frank, Adam; Nordlund, Ake E-mail: ncunningham2@unl.edu E-mail: mgb@phys.unsw.edu.au E-mail: afrank@pas.rochester.edu

    2011-02-01

    The explosive Becklin-Neugebauer (BN)/Kleinman-Low (KL) outflow emerging from OMC1 behind the Orion Nebula may have been powered by the dynamical decay of a non-hierarchical multiple system {approx}500 years ago that ejected the massive stars I, BN, and source n, with velocities of about 10-30 km s{sup -1}. New proper-motion measurements of H{sub 2} features show that within the errors of measurement, the outflow originated from the site of stellar ejection. Combined with published data, these measurements indicate an outflow age of {approx}500 years, similar to the time since stellar ejection. The total kinetic energy of the ejected stars and the outflow is about 2 to 6 x 10{sup 47} erg. It is proposed that the gravitational potential energy released by the formation of a short-period binary, most likely source I, resulted in stellar ejection and powered the outflow. A scenario is presented for the formation of a compact, non-hierarchical multiple star system, its decay into an ejected binary and two high-velocity stars, and launch of the outflow. Three mechanisms may have contributed to the explosion in the gas: (1) unbinding of the circumcluster envelope following stellar ejection, (2) disruption of circumstellar disks and high-speed expulsion of the resulting debris during the final stellar encounter, and (3) the release of stored magnetic energy. Plausible protostellar disk end envelope properties can produce the observed outflow mass, velocity, and kinetic energy distributions. The ejected stars may have acquired new disks by fall-back or Bondi-Hoyle accretion with axes roughly orthogonal to their velocities. The expulsion of gas and stars from OMC1 may have been driven by stellar interactions.

  4. Pre-equilibrium α-particle emission as a probe to study α-clustering in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotina, O. V.; Goncharov, S. A.; Eremenko, D. O.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Yuminov, O. A.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Baiocco, G.; Morelli, L.; Degerlier, M.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Valdrè, S.; Piantelli, S.; Pasquali, G.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Wieland, O.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Giaz, A.; Corsi, A.; Fabris, D.

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical approach was developed to describe secondary particle emission in heavy ion collisions, with special regards to pre-equilibrium α-particle production. The probabilities of neutron, proton and α-particle emission have been evaluated for both the equilibrium and pre-equilibrium stages of the process. Effects due the possible cluster structure of the projectile which has been excited during the collisions have been experimentally evidenced studying the double differential cross sections of p and α-particles emitted in the E=250MeV 16O +116Sn reaction. Calculations within the present model with different clusterization probabilities have been compared to the experimental data.

  5. Measurement of the multiplicity of gluons splitting to bottom quark pairs in hadronic Z0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Ajinenko, I.; Alekseev, G. D.; Alemany, R.; Allport, P. P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amato, S.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Åsman, B.; Augustin, J.-E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbi, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Barring, O.; Bates, M. J.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Baudot, J.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Belous, K.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Berggren, M.; Bertini, D.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bianchi, F.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, M. S.; Billoir, P.; Bizouard, M.-A.; Bloch, D.; Blume, M.; Bonesini, M.; Bonivento, W.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borgland, A. W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzo, M.; Branchini, P.; Brand, K. D.; Brenke, T.; Brenner, R. A.; Bricman, C.; Brown, R. C. A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.-M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burgsmueller, T.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Rozas, A. J. Camacho; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Canepa, M.; Cao, F.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Gimenez, M. V. Castillo; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chaussard, L.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, M.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Cindro, V.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Cowell, J.-H.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Crosetti, G.; Maestro, J. Cuevas; Czellar, S.; Dahm, J.; Dalmagne, B.; Dam, M.; Damgaard, G.; Dauncey, P. D.; Davenport, M.; da Silva, W.; Deghorain, A.; della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Brabandere, S.; de Clercq, C.; de La Vaissiere, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Diodato, A.; Djannati, A.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Drees, K.-A.; Dris, M.; Durand, J.-D.; Edsall, D.; Ehret, R.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.-P.; Erzen, B.; Espirito Santo, M.; Falk, E.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrer, A.; Fichet, S.; Filippas, T. A.; Firestone, A.; Fischer, P.-A.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Formenti, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, J.; Gaspar, C.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E. N.; Gele, D.; Gerber, J.-P.; Gerdyukov, L.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Goncalves, P.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gorski, M.; Gouz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Graziani, E.; Green, C.; Grefrath, A.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Gumenyuk, S.; Gunther, M.; Guy, J.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Harris, F. J.; Hedberg, V.; Henriques, R.; Hernandez, J. J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T. L.; Heuser, J.-M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Holthuizen, D.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huet, K.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, Ch.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, L.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Kaiser, M.; Kapusta, F.; Karafasoulis, K.; Karlsson, M.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Keranen, R.; Khokhlov, Yu.; Khomenko, B. A.; Khovanski, N. N.; King, B.; Kjaer, N. J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, H.; Kluit, P.; Knoblauch, D.; Kokkinias, P.; Konopliannikov, A.; Koratzinos, M.; Korcyl, K.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kreuter, C.; Kronkvist, I.; Krstic, J.; Krumstein, Z.; Krupinski, W.; Kubinec, P.; Kucewicz, W.; Kurvinen, K.; Lacasta, C.; Laktineh, I.; Lamsa, J. W.; Lanceri, L.; Lane, D. W.; Langefeld, P.; Laugier, J.-P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Lefebure, V.; Legan, C. K.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Libby, J.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Loken, J. G.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Maehlum, G.; Mahon, J. R.; Maio, A.; Malmgren, T. G. M.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Garcia, S. Marti I.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Cubbin, M.; Mc Kay, R.; Mc Nulty, R.; Medbo, J.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, S.; Meyer, W. T.; Michelotto, M.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, R.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, H.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L. M.; Murray, W. J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Navarria, F. L.; Navas, S.; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Nemecek, S.; Neumann, W.; Neumeister, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nieuwenhuizen, M.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolenko, M.; Niss, P.; Nomerotski, A.; Normand, A.; Novak, M.; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A. G.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganini, P.; Paganoni, M.; Pain, R.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Passeri, A.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H. T.; Piana, G.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Podobnik, T.; Podobrin, O.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P. N.; Read, A. L.; Reale, M.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, N. G.; Regler, M.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P. B.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Richardson, J.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roos, L.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Rybicki, K.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sahr, O.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sannino, M.; Schneider, H.; Schwickerath, U.; Schyns, M. A. E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Y.; Segar, A. M.; Seitz, A.; Sekulin, R.; Serbelloni, L.; Shellard, R. C.; Siegrist, P.; Silvestre, R.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A. N.; Sitar, B.; Skaali, T. B.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G. R.; Sokolov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Sosnowski, R.; Souza-Santos, D.; Spassov, T.; Spiriti, E.; Sponholz, P.; Squarcia, S.; Stampfer, D.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stapnes, S.; Stavitski, I.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Tavernet, J. P.; Tchikilev, O.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Tilquin, A.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Todorov, T.; Todorova, S.; Toet, D. Z.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trombini, A.; Troncon, C.; Tsirou, A.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyndel, M.; Tzamarias, S.; Ueberschaer, B.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Velde, C. Vander; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; van Dam, P.; van Doninck, W. K.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Vilanova, D.; Vincent, P.; Vitale, L.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Weiser, C.; Wetherell, A. M.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J. H.; Wielers, M.; Wilkinson, G. R.; Williams, W. S. C.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wlodek, T.; Yi, J.; Yip, K.; Yushchenko, O.; Zach, F.; Zaitsev, A.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimin, N. I.; Zucchelli, G. C.; Zumerle, G.

    1997-02-01

    An inclusive measurement of the average multiplicity of bb pairs from gluons, gbb, in hadronic Z0 events collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, is presented. A counting technique, based on jet b-tagging in 4-jet events, has been used. Looking for secondary bottom production in events with production of any primary flavour, by requiring two b-tagged jets in well defined topological configurations, gave gbb = (0.21 +/- 0.11 (stat) +/- 0.09(syst)) %. This result was checked with a different method designed to select events with four b quarks in the final state. Agreement within the errors was found.

  6. Code System for Pre-equilibrium Process with Multiple Nucleon Emission.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-12-10

    Version 00 PREM calculates the energy spectra and distribution of excitons at each stage of a multi-nucleon emission process when the initial exciton distribution is given. The time evolution can also be calculated.

  7. Theory and application of optimal linear resolution to MRI truncation artifacts, multiexponential decays and in vivo multiple sclerosis pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cover, Keith S.

    It is widely believed that one of the best way to proceed when analysing data is to generate estimates which fit the data. However, when the relationship between the unknown model and data is linear for highly underdetermined systems, is it common practice to find estimates with good linear resolution with no regard for fitting the data. For example, windowed Fourier transforms produces estimates that have good linear resolution but do not fit the data. Surprisingly, many researchers do not seem to be explicitly aware of this fact. This thesis presents a theoretical basis for the linear resolution which demonstrates that, for a wide range of problems, algorithms which produce estimates with good linear resolution can be a more powerful and convenient way of presenting the information in the data, than models that fit the data. Linear resolution was also applied to two outstanding problems in linear inverse theory. The first was the problem of truncation artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Truncation artifacts were heavily suppressed or eliminated by the choice of one of two novel Fourier transform windows. Complete elimination of truncation artifacts generally led to unexpectedly blurry images. Heavy suppression seemed to be the best compromise between truncation artifacts and blurriness. The second problem was estimating the relaxation distribution of a multiexponential system from its decay curve. This is an example where hundreds of papers have been written on the subject, yet almost no one has made a substantial effort to apply linear resolution. I found the application to be very successful. As an example, the algorithm was applied to the decay of MRI data from multiple sclerosis patients in an attempt to differentiate between various pathologies.

  8. Exciton Model Code System for Calculating Preequilibrium and Direct Double Differential Cross Sections.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-07-09

    Version 02 PRECO-2006 is a two-component exciton model code for the calculation of double differential cross sections of light particle nuclear reactions. PRECO calculates the emission of light particles (A = 1 to 4) from nuclear reactions induced by light particles on a wide variety of target nuclei. Their distribution in both energy and angle is calculated. Since it currently only considers the emission of up to two particles in any given reaction, it ismore » most useful for incident energies of 14 to 30 MeV when used as a stand-alone code. However, the preequilibrium calculations are valid up to at least around 100 MeV, and these can be used as input for more complete evaporation calculations, such as are performed in a Hauser-Feshbach model code. Finally, the production cross sections for specific product nuclides can be obtained« less

  9. Preequilibrium processes in the fusion of {sup 12}C with {sup 103}Rh up to 20 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.; Cavinato, M.; Fabrici, E.; Gadioli, E.; Gadioli Erba, E.; Groppi, F.; Bello, M.; Bovati, C.; Di Filippo, A. |; Stevens, T.G.; Connell, S.H.; Sellschop, J.P.; Mills, S.J.; Nortier, F.M.; Steyn, G.F.; Marchetta, C. |

    1996-12-01

    We have measured the excitation functions of several reactions occurring in the fusion of {sup 12}C with {sup 103}Rh at incident energies up to about 230 MeV. The data can be satisfactorily reproduced by considering the preequilibrium emission of particles during the thermalization of the composite nucleus. The energy evolution of the mean-field interaction is also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Massive black hole binaries in gas-rich galaxy mergers; multiple regimes of orbital decay and interplay with gas inflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Lucio

    2013-12-01

    We revisit the phases of the pairing and sinking of black holes (BHs) in galaxy mergers and circumnuclear discs in light of the results of recent simulations with massive BHs embedded in predominantly gaseous backgrounds. After a general overview we highlight for the first time the existence of a clear transition, for unequal mass BHs, between the regime in which the orbital decay is dominated by the conventional dynamical friction wake and one in which global disc torques associated with density waves launched by the secondary BH as well as co-orbital torques arising from gas gravitationally captured by the BH dominate and lead to faster decay. The new regime intervenes at BH binary separations of a few tens of parsecs and below, following a phase of orbital circularization driven dynamical friction. It bears some resemblance with planet migration in protoplanetary discs. While the orbital timescale is reasonably matched by the migration rate for the Type-I regime, the dominant negative torque arises near the co-rotation resonance, which is qualitatively similar to what is found in the so-called Type-III migration, the fastest migration regime identified so far for planets. This fast decay rate brings the BHs to separations of order 10-1 pc, the resolution limit of our simulations, in less than ˜107 yr in a smooth disc, while the decay timescale can increase to >108 yr in clumpy discs due to gravitational scattering with molecular clouds. Eventual gap opening at sub-pc scale separations will slow down the orbital decay subsequently. How fast the binary BH can reach the separation at which gravitational waves take over will be determined by the nature of the interaction with the circumbinary disc and the complex torques exerted the gas flowing through the edge of such disc, the subject of many recent studies. We also present a new intriguing connection between the conditions required for rapid orbital decay of massive BH binaries and those required for prominent

  11. Large pre-equilibrium contribution in {alpha}+{sup nat}Ni interactions at {approx_equal}8-40 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Singh, Devendra P.; Unnati,; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Musthafa, M. M.

    2008-10-15

    To investigate pre-equilibrium emission of light nuclear particle(s), an experiment has been performed using {alpha} beams at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Center (VECC), Kolkata, India. In the present work, excitation functions for {sup 58}Ni({alpha},p){sup 61}Cu,{sup 58}Ni({alpha},pn){sup 60}Cu,{sup 60}Ni({alpha},p2n){sup 61}Cu,{sup 60}Ni({alpha},n){sup 63}Zn,{sup 60}Ni({alpha},2n) {sup 62}Zn,{sup 61}Ni({alpha},3n){sup 62}Zn, and {sup 61}Ni({alpha},2n){sup 63}Zn reactions have been measured by using the stacked foil activation technique followed by off-line {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Experimentally measured excitation functions have been compared with the prediction of the theoretical model code ALICE-91 with and/or without the inclusion of pre-equilibrium emission. Analysis of the data suggests that an admixture of both equilibrium and pre-equilibrium emission is needed to reproduce experimental data at energies {approx_equal}8-40 MeV and reveals significant contribution from pre-equilibrium emission. An attempt has also been made to estimate the pre-equilibrium contribution, which has been found to depend on projectile energy and on number of emitted particle(s)

  12. Evidence of pre-equilibrium {gamma}-ray emission in heavy ion collisions at intermediate incident energies

    SciTech Connect

    Tudisco, S.; Di Pietro, A.; Pappalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.; Amorini, F.; Cardella, G.; Papa, M.; Figuera, P.; Musumarra, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Pirrone, S.

    1999-11-16

    The experimental results of {sup 40}Ca+{sup 48}Ca,{sup 40}Ca,{sup 46}Ti reactions are reported. The comparison between {gamma}-ray spectra measured in coincidence with fusion evaporation residues for the three colliding systems shows a clear evidence of pre-equilibrium {gamma}-rays emission in the region around 10 MeV. BNV simulations also predict this emission. The saturation of GDR strength with temperature has been found with some dependence on the colliding system.

  13. Multiple Decay Mechanisms and 2D-UV Spectroscopic Fingerprints of Singlet Excited Solvated Adenine-Uracil Monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Li, Quansong; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Rivalta, Ivan; Voityuk, Alexander A; Mukamel, Shaul; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Garavelli, Marco; Blancafort, Lluís

    2016-05-23

    The decay channels of singlet excited adenine uracil monophosphate (ApU) in water are studied with CASPT2//CASSCF:MM potential energy calculations and simulation of the 2D-UV spectroscopic fingerprints with the aim of elucidating the role of the different electronic states of the stacked conformer in the excited state dynamics. The adenine (1) La state can decay without a barrier to a conical intersection with the ground state. In contrast, the adenine (1) Lb and uracil S(U) states have minima that are separated from the intersections by sizeable barriers. Depending on the backbone conformation, the CT state can undergo inter-base hydrogen transfer and decay to the ground state through a conical intersection, or it can yield a long-lived minimum stabilized by a hydrogen bond between the two ribose rings. This suggests that the (1) Lb , S(U) and CT states of the stacked conformer may all contribute to the experimental lifetimes of 18 and 240 ps. We have also simulated the time evolution of the 2D-UV spectra and provide the specific fingerprint of each species in a recommended probe window between 25 000 and 38 000 cm(-1) in which decongested, clearly distinguishable spectra can be obtained. This is expected to allow the mechanistic scenarios to be discerned in the near future with the help of the corresponding experiments. Our results reveal the complexity of the photophysics of the relatively small ApU system, and the potential of 2D-UV spectroscopy to disentangle the photophysics of multichromophoric systems. PMID:27113273

  14. Equilibrium and pre-equilibrium processes in the Mn55(Li6,xp) and Fe57(α,xp) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Massey, T. N.; Siem, S.; Kalbach, C.

    2011-05-01

    Spectra of outgoing neutrons and protons from the Li6 + Mn55 reaction and protons from the α + Fe57 reaction have been measured with beams of 15-MeV Li6 ions and 30-MeV α particles. These reactions proceed through the same Ni61 nucleus at the same excitation energy, thus allowing the difference in reaction mechanisms to be studied. It is shown that spectra from the first reaction measured at backward angles are due to emission from a traditional compound nucleus reaction, in which the intermediate nucleus has reached statistical equilibrium; the spectra from the second reaction contain a significant fraction of pre-equilibrium emission at all angles. Level density parameters of the residual nucleus Co60 have been obtained from the first reaction. Both emission spectra and angular distributions have been measured for the second reaction. It was found that the pre-equilibrium component exhibits a forward-peaked angular distribution, as expected, but with a steeper slope than predicted and with an unusual slight rise at angles above 120°. The backward-angle rise is explained qualitatively by the dominance of the multistep compound mechanism at backward angles.

  15. Decay of multispin multiple-quantum coherent states in the NMR of a solid and the stabilization of their intensity profile with time

    SciTech Connect

    Zobov, V. E.; Lundin, A. A.

    2011-12-15

    Variations, experimentally observed in [14], in the intensity profiles of multiple-quantum (MQ) coherences in the presence of two special types of perturbations are explained on the basis of the theory, earlier developed by the authors, of the growth of the effective size of correlated clusters (the number of correlated spins) and the relaxation of MQ coherent states [23]. The intensity and the character of perturbation were controlled by the experimenters. It is shown that the observed stabilization of profiles with time is not associated with the stabilization of the cluster size. Quite the contrary, a cluster of correlated spins monotonically grows, while the observed variations in the intensity profile and its stabilization with time are attributed to the dependence of the decay rate of an MQ coherence on its order (its position in the MQ spectrum). The results of the theory are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. The effect of the initial exciton numbers on {sup 54,56}Fe(p, xp) Pre-Equilibrium Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Boeluekdemir, M. H.; Tel, E.; Ayd Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I n, A.; Okuducu, S.; Kaplan, A.

    2011-02-15

    In pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions, the geometry-dependent hybrid model is applied with the use of the neutron and proton densities to investigate the effect of initial exciton numbers on the nucleon emission spectra. The initial exciton numbers calculated with the theoretical neutron and proton densities have been obtained within the Skryme-Hartree-Fock method with SKM* and SLy4 forces on target nuclei in the {sup 54,56}Fe(p, xp) reaction at 61.5-MeV incident proton energy by using a new calculationmethod of Tel et al. Also, the differences between the initial exciton numbers for protons and neutrons as a function of nuclear radius, focusing on systematic discrepancies correlated to differences in the proton and neutron densities have been investigated.

  17. Direct and inverse auger processes in InAs nanocrystals: can the decay signature of a trion be mistaken for carrier multiplication?

    PubMed

    Califano, Marco

    2009-09-22

    A complete and detailed theoretical investigation of the main processes involved in the controversial detection and quantification of carrier multiplication (CM) is presented, providing a coherent and comprehensive picture of excited state relaxation in InAs nanocrystals (NCs). The observed rise and decay times of the 1S transient bleach are reproduced, in the framework of the Auger model, using an atomistic semiempirical pseudopotential method, achieving excellent agreement with experiment. The CM time constants for small core-only and core/shell nanocrystals are obtained as a function of the excitation energy, assuming an impact-ionization-like process. The resulting lifetimes at energies close to the observed CM onset are consistent with the upper limits deduced experimentally from PbSe and CdSe samples. Most interestingly, as the Auger recombination lifetimes calculated for charged excitons are found to be of a similar order of magnitude to those computed for biexcitons, both species are expected to exhibit the fast decay component in NC population dynamics so far attributed exclusively to the presence of biexcitons and therefore identified as the signature of CM occurrence in high-energy low-pump-fluence spectroscopic studies. However, the ratio between trions and biexcitons time constants is found to be larger than the typical experimental accuracy. It is therefore concluded that, in InAs NCs, it should be experimentally possible to discriminate between the two species and that the origin of the observed discrepancies in CM yields is unlikely to lay in the presence of charged excitons. PMID:19689121

  18. Mutations in SMG9, Encoding an Essential Component of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Machinery, Cause a Multiple Congenital Anomaly Syndrome in Humans and Mice.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Anazi, Shams; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Caddle, L Brianna; Palmer, Kristina; Ali, Rehab; Alshidi, Tarfa; Hagos, Samya; Goodwin, Leslie; Hashem, Mais; Wakil, Salma M; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Colak, Dilek; Murray, Stephen A; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-04-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is an important process that is best known for degrading transcripts that contain premature stop codons (PTCs) to mitigate their potentially harmful consequences, although its regulatory role encompasses other classes of transcripts as well. Despite the critical role of NMD at the cellular level, our knowledge about the consequences of deficiency of its components at the organismal level is largely limited to model organisms. In this study, we report two consanguineous families in which a similar pattern of congenital anomalies was found to be most likely caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations in SMG9, encoding an essential component of the SURF complex that generates phospho-UPF1, the single most important step in NMD. By knocking out Smg9 in mice via CRISPR/Cas9, we were able to recapitulate the major features of the SMG9-related multiple congenital anomaly syndrome we observed in humans. Surprisingly, human cells devoid of SMG9 do not appear to have reduction of PTC-containing transcripts but do display global transcriptional dysregulation. We conclude that SMG9 is required for normal human and murine development, most likely through a transcriptional regulatory role, the precise nature of which remains to be determined. PMID:27018474

  19. Modulated curvaton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: firouz@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2013-03-01

    We study primordial density perturbations generated by the late decay of a curvaton field whose decay rate may be modulated by the local value of another isocurvature field, analogous to models of modulated reheating at the end of inflation. We calculate the primordial density perturbation and its local-type non-Gaussianity using the sudden-decay approximation for the curvaton field, recovering standard curvaton and modulated reheating results as limiting cases. We verify the Suyama-Yamaguchi inequality between bispectrum and trispectrum parameters for the primordial density field generated by multiple field fluctuations, and find conditions for the bound to be saturated.

  20. Seismic wave attenuation in Israel region estimated from the multiple lapse time window analysis and S-wave coda decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirova, Tatiana; Pinsky, Vladimir

    2014-04-01

    For the first time, a regional seismic attenuation for the Israel region is quantitatively estimated as a combination of intrinsic and scattering attenuations. We use a multiple lapse time windows analysis (MLTWA) to determinate the relative contributions of intrinsic absorption and scattering processes to the total regional attenuation in the crust. A single isotropic scattering model assuming a uniform half-space lithosphere is used to fit MLTWA predicted and measured energies from the records of 232 regional earthquakes recorded at 17 short-period and 5 broad-band local seismic stations. Analysis is performed for a set of 10 frequencies between 0.5 and 10 Hz. The frequency-dependent quality factor Q obtained by MLTWA ranges between Q = 77f0.96 in the Northern Israel and Q = 132f0.96 in Southern Israel. Independent estimates of regional coda Q value based on S-wave coda decay rate obtained by averaging of five broad-band Israel Seismic Network stations are approximated by the relation Qc = 126f1.05. As a whole, our findings indicate that in the Israel region, intrinsic absorption prevails over scattering attenuation. Separate analysis for three tectonically different regions in Israel region-Galilee-Lebanon, Judea-Samaria and Eastern Sinai-shows a regional dependence of attenuation parameters. The variation of attenuation characteristics implies different physical mechanisms of seismic attenuation in the Israel region and is related to the differences of structure in the Earth's crust beneath Israel. Such variation in the attenuation patterns is in agreement with the assumption that Northern Israel is tectonically more active than Southern Israel and that in the northern and central parts of Israel the upper crust is more heterogeneous than in the southern part.

  1. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without a filling, the decay can get deep into the tooth and its nerves and cause a toothache or abscess. To help prevent cavities Brush your teeth every day with a fluoride toothpaste Clean between ...

  2. Complete and incomplete fusion and emission of preequilibrium nucleons in the interaction of [sup 12]C with [sup 197]Au below 10 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Vergani, P.; Gadioli, E.; Vaciago, E.; Fabrici, E.; Gadioli Erba, E.; Galmarini, M. ); Ciavola, G.; Marchetta, C. )

    1993-10-01

    The excitation functions for production of nineteen isotopes of At, Po, Bi, Pb, and Tl in the interaction of [sup 12]C with [sup 197]Au between 57 and 97 MeV incident energy have been measured with the activation technique. The analysis of these data allows one to estimate the cross sections for complete fusion of [sup 12]C and incomplete fusion of [sup 8]Be and [alpha] fragments with gold, and shows the presence of preequilibrium emissions at incident energies only slightly higher than the Coulomb barrier acting between [sup 12]C and [sup 197]Au.

  3. Equilibrium and pre-equilibrium processes in the {sup 55}Mn({sup 6}Li,xp) and {sup 57}Fe({alpha},xp) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Buerger, A.; Goergen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.; Kalbach, C.

    2011-05-15

    Spectra of outgoing neutrons and protons from the {sup 6}Li + {sup 55}Mn reaction and protons from the {alpha} + {sup 57}Fe reaction have been measured with beams of 15-MeV {sup 6}Li ions and 30-MeV {alpha} particles. These reactions proceed through the same {sup 61}Ni nucleus at the same excitation energy, thus allowing the difference in reaction mechanisms to be studied. It is shown that spectra from the first reaction measured at backward angles are due to emission from a traditional compound nucleus reaction, in which the intermediate nucleus has reached statistical equilibrium; the spectra from the second reaction contain a significant fraction of pre-equilibrium emission at all angles. Level density parameters of the residual nucleus {sup 60}Co have been obtained from the first reaction. Both emission spectra and angular distributions have been measured for the second reaction. It was found that the pre-equilibrium component exhibits a forward-peaked angular distribution, as expected, but with a steeper slope than predicted and with an unusual slight rise at angles above 120 deg. The backward-angle rise is explained qualitatively by the dominance of the multistep compound mechanism at backward angles.

  4. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurement of the spontaneous fission decay of 252Cf in a segmented HPGe/BGO detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D L; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Gibelin, J; Heffner, M D; Mintz, J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D; Sheets, S A; Snyderman, N J; Stoyer, M A; Wiedeking, M

    2008-04-23

    Coincident {gamma} rays from a {sup 252}Cf source were measured using an array of six segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors each enclosed by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The detectors were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1 {micro}Ci {sup 252}Cf source to cover a large solid angle for {gamma}-ray measurement with a reasonable reconstruction of the multiplicity. Neutron multiplicity was determined in certain cases by identifying the prompt {gamma} rays from individual fission fragment pairs. Multiplicity distributions from previous experiments and theoretical models were convolved with the response function of the array and compared to the present results. These results suggest a {gamma}-ray multiplicity spectrum broader than previous measurements and models, and provide no evidence of correlation with neutron multiplicity.

  5. The Equilibrium and Pre-equilibrium Triton Emission Spectra of Some Target Nuclei for ( n, xt) Reactions up to 45 MeV Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Kaplan, A.; Aydın, A.; Özkorucuklu, S.; Büyükuslu, H.; Yıldırım, G.

    2010-08-01

    Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So, working out the systematics of ( n,t) reaction cross sections and triton emission differential data are important for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, ( n,xt) reactions for some target nuclei as 16O, 27Al, 59Co and 209Bi have been investigated up to 45 MeV incident neutron energy. In the calculations of the triton emission spectra, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been used. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  6. Expression of multiple Bacillus subtilis genes is controlled by decay of slrA mRNA from Rho-dependent 3′ ends

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Kearns, Daniel B.; Bechhofer, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Timely turnover of RNA is an important element in the control of bacterial gene expression, but relatively few specific targets of RNA turnover regulation are known. Deletion of the Bacillus subtilis pnpA gene, encoding the major 3′ exonuclease turnover enzyme, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), was shown previously to cause a motility defect correlated with a reduced level of the 32-gene fla/che flagellar biosynthesis operon transcript. fla/che operon transcript abundance has been shown to be inhibited by an excess of the small regulatory protein, SlrA, and here we find that slrA mRNA accumulated in the pnpA-deletion mutant. Mutation of slrA was epistatic to mutation of pnpA for the motility-related phenotype. Further, Rho-dependent termination was required for PNPase turnover of slrA mRNA. When the slrA gene was provided with a Rho-independent transcription terminator, gene regulation was no longer PNPase-dependent. Thus we show that the slrA transcript is a direct target of PNPase and that regulation of RNA turnover is a major determinant of motility gene expression. The interplay of specific transcription termination and mRNA decay mechanisms suggests selection for fine-tuning of gene expression. PMID:26857544

  7. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics > Tooth Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental ... back teeth decay so easily? Who should get seal​ants? Should sealants be put on baby teeth? ...

  8. Semileptonic Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  9. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  10. Dark Decay of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye-Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. The top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6sigma deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t-->bW+Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t-->bW) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. We discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  11. Dark decay of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  12. Proton decay theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay. (WHK)

  13. Nested sampling applied in Bayesian room-acoustics decay analysis.

    PubMed

    Jasa, Tomislav; Xiang, Ning

    2012-11-01

    Room-acoustic energy decays often exhibit single-rate or multiple-rate characteristics in a wide variety of rooms/halls. Both the energy decay order and decay parameter estimation are of practical significance in architectural acoustics applications, representing two different levels of Bayesian probabilistic inference. This paper discusses a model-based sound energy decay analysis within a Bayesian framework utilizing the nested sampling algorithm. The nested sampling algorithm is specifically developed to evaluate the Bayesian evidence required for determining the energy decay order with decay parameter estimates as a secondary result. Taking the energy decay analysis in architectural acoustics as an example, this paper demonstrates that two different levels of inference, decay model-selection and decay parameter estimation, can be cohesively accomplished by the nested sampling algorithm. PMID:23145609

  14. Moduli Decays and Gravitinos

    SciTech Connect

    Dine, Michael; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Morisse, Alexander; Shirman, Yuri

    2006-04-21

    One proposed solution of the moduli problem of string cosmology requires that the moduli are quite heavy, their decays reheating the universe to temperatures above the scale of nucleosynthesis. In many of these scenarios, the moduli are approximately supersymmetric; it is then crucial that the decays to gravitinos are helicity suppressed. In this paper, we discuss situations where these decays are, and are not, suppressed. We also comment on a possible gravitino problem from inaton decay.

  15. Baryonic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this talk the decays of B-mesons into baryons are discussed. Large mass of B-meson makes possible the decays of the type B → baryon (+mesons). Experimental observations and measurements of these decays at B-factories Belle and BaBar have stimulate the development of theoretical models in this field. We briefly review the experimental results together with the current theoretical models which describe baryonic B decays.

  16. Phenomenology of preequilibrium angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbach, C.; Mann, F.M.

    1980-05-01

    The systematics of continuum angular distributions from a wide variety of light ion nuclear reactions have been studied. To first order, the shape of the angular distributions have been found to depend only on the energy of the outgoing particle and on the division of the cross section into multi-step direct and multi-step compound parts. The angular distributions can be described in terms of Legendre polynomials with the reduced polynomial coefficients exhibiting a simple dependence on the outgoing particle energy. Two integer and four continuous parameters with universal values are needed to describe the coefficients for outgoing energies of 2 to 60 MeV in all the reaction types studied. This parameterization combined with a modified Griffin model computer code permits the calculation of double differential cross sections for light ion continuum reactions where no data is available.

  17. Cascade decays of hollow ions

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, G. ); Hahn, Y. )

    1991-05-01

    A multiple-electron-emission process for atoms with one or more inner-shell vacancies is treated using the radiative- and Auger-electron-emission cascade model, in which inner-shell holes are assumed to decay by sequentially emitting radiations and/or Auger electrons. Such hollow ions are produced by synchrotron irradiation of atomic targets and in ion-surface interactions with multiple-electron transfers. The final charge-state distribution is determined by the Auger and radiative branching ratios at each stage of the decay sequence. At intermediate stages of cascade, hollow ions with more than one hole in different ionization stages are created. The Ne, Mg, and Fe{sup 14+} ions with the initial 1{ital s}, 2{ital s}, and 2{ital p} vacancies are considered in detail, and the core charge dependence of the maximum charge state is studied. The hollow Mg ion with double initial 1{ital s} holes is analyzed, and the result compared with that for the case of one 1{ital s} hole. The peak is shifted more than two units to a higher degree of ionization. The correlated shake-off and shake-up multiple-electron processes are not considered, but they are expected to cause further shifts.

  18. Axions from string decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C., LLNL

    1998-07-09

    We have studied numerically the evolution and decay of axion strings. These global defects decay mainly by axion emission and thus contribute to the cosmological axion energy density. The relative importance of this source relative to misalignment production of axions depends on the spectrum. Radiation spectra for various string loop configurations are presented. They support the contention that the string decay contribution is of the same order of magnitude as the contribution from misalignment.

  19. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  20. Hypernuclear Weak Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itonaga, K.; Motoba, T.

    The recent theoretical studies of Lambda-hypernuclear weak decaysof the nonmesonic and pi-mesonic ones are developed with the aim to disclose the link between the experimental decay observables and the underlying basic weak decay interactions and the weak decay mechanisms. The expressions of the nonmesonic decay rates Gamma_{nm} and the decay asymmetry parameter alpha_1 of protons from the polarized hypernuclei are presented in the shell model framework. We then introduce the meson theoretical Lambda N -> NN interactions which include the one-meson exchanges, the correlated-2pi exchanges, and the chiral-pair-meson exchanges. The features of meson exchange potentials and their roles on the nonmesonic decays are discussed. With the adoption of the pi + 2pi/rho + 2pi/sigma + omega + K + rhopi/a_1 + sigmapi/a_1 exchange potentials, we have carried out the systematic calculations of the nonmesonic decay observables for light-to-heavy hypernuclei. The present model can account for the available experimental data of the decay rates, Gamma_n/Gamma_p ratios, and the intrinsic asymmetry parameters alpha_Lambda (alpha_Lambda is related to alpha_1) of emitted protons well and consistently within the error bars. The hypernuclear lifetimes are evaluated by converting the total weak decay rates Gamma_{tot} = Gamma_pi + Gamma_{nm} to tau, which exhibit saturation property for the hypernuclear mass A ≥ 30 and agree grossly well with experimental data for the mass range from light to heavy hypernuclei except for the very light ones. Future extensions of the model and the remaining problems are also mentioned. The pi-mesonic weak processes are briefly surveyed, and the calculations and predictions are compared and confirmed by the recent high precision FINUDA pi-mesonic decay data. This shows that the theoretical basis seems to be firmly grounded.

  1. Dark decay of the top quark

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant topmore » quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.« less

  2. Axions from wall decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S; Hagmann, C; Sikivie, P

    2001-01-08

    The authors discuss the decay of axion walls bounded by strings and present numerical simulations of the decay process. In these simulations, the decay happens immediately, in a time scale of order the light travel time, and the average energy of the radiated axions is {approx_equal} 7m{sub a} for v{sub a}/m{sub a} {approx_equal} 500. is found to increase approximately linearly with ln(v{sub a}/m{sub a}). Extrapolation of this behavior yields {approx_equal} 60 m{sub a} in axion models of interest.

  3. Combinedatomic-nuclear decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyublik, A. Ya.

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed in details the combined decay of the atomic-nuclear state, which consists of the excited 3/2+ level of 63 153 Eu and K hole, formed in the K capture by 153Gd. This decay proceeds in two stages. First, the nucleus transfers its energy to 2 p electron, which flies into the continuum spectrum, and then returns into 1s hole, emitting γ quantum with the energy equal to the sum of energies of the nuclear and atomic transitions. We estimated the decay probability to be 2.2 × 10-13, that is much less than the recent experimental findings.

  4. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  5. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  6. Tooth decay - early childhood

    MedlinePlus

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries (ECC) ... chap 304. Ribeiro NM, Ribeiro MA. Breastfeeding and early childhood caries: a critical review. J Pediatr (Rio J) . ...

  7. Decay of metastable topological defects

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J. ); Vilenkin, A. Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 )

    1993-03-15

    We systematically analyze the decay of metastable topological defects that arise from the spontaneous breakdown of gauge or global symmetries. Quantum-mechanical tunneling rates are estimated for a variety of decay processes. The decay rate for a global string, vortex, domain wall, or kink is typically suppressed compared to the decay rate for its gauged counterpart. We also discuss the decay of global texture, and of semilocal and electroweak strings.

  8. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonesi, Oliviero

    2016-05-01

    After more than 3/4 of century from its proposal, Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (NLDBD) is still missing observation and continues to represent the only practical method for investigating the Dirac/Majorana nature of neutrinos. In case neutrinos would be Majorana particles, NLDBD would provide unique informations on their properties (absolute mass scale and Majorana phases). Boosted by the discovery of neutrino oscillations, a number of experiments with improved sensitivity have been proposed in the past decade. Some of them have recently started operation and others are ready to start. They will push the experimental sensitivity on the decay halflife beyond 1026 year, starting to analyze the region of the inverted mass hierarchy. The status and perspectives of the ongoing experimental effort are reviewed. Uncertainties coming from the calculation othe decay nuclear matrix elements (NME) as well as the recently suggested possibility of a relevant quenching of the axial coupling constant are also discussed.

  9. Decay of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in {sup 194}Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  11. Weak decay of hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Moby Dick spectrometer (at BNL) in coincidence with a range spectrometer and a TOF neutron detector will be used to study the weak decay modes of /sup 12/C. The Moby Dick spectrometer will be used to reconstruct and tag events in which specific hypernuclear states are formed in the reaction K/sup -/ + /sup 12/C ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/ + /sup 12/C. Subsequent emission of decay products (pions, protons and neutrons) in coincidence with the fast forward pion will be detected in a time and range spectrometer, and a neutron detector.

  12. Search for the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for decays is performed using 3 .0 fb1- of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment during 2011 and 2012. The f 0(980) meson is reconstructed through its decay to the π + π - final state in the mass window 900 MeV /c 2 < m( π + π -) < 1080 MeV /c 2. No significant signal is observed. The first upper limits on the branching fraction of are set at 90 % (95 %) confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Decay of relativistic hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Majlingova, Olga

    2008-05-12

    The contribution is focused on the analysis of the hypernuclei decay. Hypernuclei, nuclei composed of nucleons and hyperon, enable us to more precise study baryon-baryon interaction, both weak and strong. Several experiments for study new hypernuclear objects are presently taking data or are planned in several laboratories in Italy, Germany, Russia, Japan and USA. The aim of the contribution is the introduction the catalogue of all possible decays of light hypernuclei (A{<=}12). Created catalogue could be exploited for planning next experiments.

  14. Excitation functions of heavy residues produced in the 14N+103Rh reaction up to 400 MeV: Analysis of the pre-equilibrium mechanism with the hybrid Monte Carlo simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Steyn, G. F.; Singh, N. L.; Chatterjee, A.

    2016-02-01

    The excitation functions of heavy residues, produced in the interaction of 14N with 103Rh, have been measured over the projectile energy region from a threshold up to 400 MeV by means of the activation method in conjunction with γ-ray spectroscopy. Cross sections for 15 reaction residues are presented, namely, 104Cd, Ag-105103, Pd-10199, 97,99,101Rh, Ru,9795, and Tc-9694. The experimental data are compared with theoretical model predictions using the hybrid Monte Carlo simulation model as implemented in the recently released alice2014 code. The theory assumes that the dominant pre-equilibrium mechanism includes multinucleon and cluster emissions in the initial stages of the interaction between the projectile and the target nucleus. Overall, the theoretical predictions provide a satisfactory agreement with the trend of the present experimental results for most of the observed reaction residues. This provides strong evidence that the underlying reaction mechanisms in the code are appropriately described. Overall, the Obninsk level densities give the best results in the present study.

  15. Decay Time of Cathodoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Simple measurements of the decay time of cathodoluminescence are described. Cathodoluminescence is used in many devices, including computer monitors, oscilloscopes, radar displays and television tubes. The experimental setup is simple and easy to build. Two oscilloscopes, a function generator, and a fast photodiode are needed for the experiments.…

  16. Chiral quirkonium decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, R.; Kribs, Graham D.

    2011-08-01

    We calculate the two-body decay rates of quirkonium states formed from quirks that acquire mass solely through electroweak symmetry breaking. We consider SU(N)ic infracolor with two flavors of quirks transforming under the electroweak group (but not QCD) of the standard model. In one case, the quirks are in a chiral representation of the electroweak group, while in the other case, a vectorlike representation. The differences in the dominant decay channels between “chiral quirkonia” versus “vectorlike quirkonia” are striking. Several chiral quirkonia states can decay into the unique two-body resonance channels WH, ZH, tt¯, tb¯/bt¯, and γH, which never dominate for vectorlike quirkonia. Additionally, the channels WW, WZ, ZZ, and Wγ, are shared among both chiral and vectorlike quirkonia. Resonances of dileptons or light quarks (dijets) can dominate for some vectorlike quirkonia states throughout their mass range, while these modes never dominate for chiral quirkonia unless the decays into pairs of gauge or Higgs bosons are kinematically forbidden.

  17. Chiral Quirkonium Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, R.; Kribs, Graham D.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    We calculate the two-body decay rates of quirkonium states formed from quirks that acquire mass solely through electroweak symmetry breaking. We consider SU(N){sub ic} infracolor with two flavors of quirks transforming under the electroweak group (but not QCD) of the standard model. In one case, the quirks are in a chiral representation of the electroweak group, while in the other case, a vectorlike representation. The differences in the dominant decay channels between 'chiral quirkonia' versus 'vectorlike quirkonia' are striking. Several chiral quirkonia states can decay into the unique two-body resonance channels WH, ZH, t{bar t}, t{bar b}/b{bar t}, and {gamma}H, which never dominate for vectorlike quirkonia. Additionally, the channels WW, WZ, ZZ, and W{gamma}, are shared among both chiral and vectorlike quirkonia. Resonances of dileptons or light quarks (dijets) can dominate for some vectorlike quirkonia states throughout their mass range, while these modes never dominate for chiral quirkonia unless the decays into pairs of gauge or Higgs bosons are kinematically forbidden.

  18. Anatomy of decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, Lennaert; De Bruyn, Kristof; Fleischer, Robert; Mulder, Mick; Tuning, Niels

    2015-07-01

    The decays B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +} probe the CP-violating mixing phases ϕ d and ϕ s , respectively. The theoretical uncertainty of the corresponding determinations is limited by contributions from penguin topologies, which can be included with the help of the U-spin symmetry of the strong interaction. We analyse the currently available data for B {/d, s 0} → D {/d, s -} D {/d, s +} decays and those with similar dynamics to constrain the involved non-perturbative parameters. Using further information from semileptonic B {/d 0} → D {/d -} ℓ + ν ℓ decays, we perform a test of the factorisation approximation and take non-factorisable SU(3)-breaking corrections into account. The branching ratios of the B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +}, B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +}, B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/s +} decays show an interesting pattern which can be accommodated through significantly enhanced exchange and penguin annihilation topologies. This feature is also supported by data for the B {/s 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} channel. Moreover, there are indications of potentially enhanced penguin contributions in the B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +} decays, which would make it mandatory to control these effects in the future measurements of ϕ d and ϕ s . We discuss scenarios for high-precision measurements in the era of Belle II and the LHCb upgrade.

  19. Charged kaon and proton production in B-hadron decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegenfeldt, Fredrik Per

    The production of charged kaons and protons in B-hadron decays has been measured in e+e- annihilations at centre-of-mass energies corresponding to the Z0 mass. In total 1.6 million hadronic Z0 decays were analysed, corresponding to about 690000 B-hadron decays. They were collected using the DELPHI detector at the LEP collider at CERN during 1994 and 1995. Events containing B-hadron decays were identified using special characteristics of the B-hadron decay topology. In particular, the long lifetime of the B-hadron leads to decay vertices significantly displaced relative the interaction point. These so called secondary vertices were reconstructed using a powerful micro vertex detector. In order to discriminate B-hadron decay products from fragmentation tracks, a method was used where the impact parameter measured by the vertex detector was employed as a discriminating variable. The tracks were thus divided into two classes, one compatible with the interaction point and the other compatible with a secondary vertex. An unfolding method was used to extract the true B-hadron decay tracks from the two classes. Charged kaons and protons were identified using the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector and corrected for misidentification using an efficiency matrix. The analysis resulted in charged kaon and proton spectra from B-hadron decays, including previously unmeasured momentum regions. Integrating the spectra yielded the following multiplicities n(B- hadron-->K+/- X)=0.683+/-0.021(stat) +/-0.017(syst) n(B- hadron-->p/p X)=0.127+/-0.013(stat) +/-0.019(syst) where the proton multiplicity does not include Λ baryon decay products.

  20. Rare Down Quark Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Kwong-Kwai Humphrey

    1992-01-01

    The rare decays bto sX are sensitive to strong interaction corrections. The effects can be estimated by a renormalization group technique which requires the evaluation of QCD mixing among effective operators. In the dimensional reduction and the naive dimensional regularization methods, there are discrepancies in evaluating the QCD mixing of the four-quark operators with the bto sgamma and bto s+gluon dipole operators. In this thesis, the problem is investigated by considering the contributions of the epsilon -scalar field and the epsilon -dimensional operators that distinguish between the two methods. The discrepancies are shown to come from the epsilon-dimensional four-quark operators in dimensional reduction and not from the epsilon -scalar field. In the decay bto sl^+l^ -, the intermediate of cc pairs in the charm-penguin diagram can form the resonance states J/psi and psi^'. In the published literature, there is a sign discrepancy in the Breit-Wigner amplitude for the resonance effects. Here, the sign difference is settled by considering the unitarity limit of the amplitude in the Argand diagram. The effects of the resonances are quite substantial on the invariant mass spectrum for this decay. However, they are shown to be negligible on the dilepton energy spectrum below 0.95 GeV. The energy spectrum is, thus, more useful than the invariant mass spectrum for measurements of the top -quark mass. The decays Bto K^*X are well modeled by the quark-level decays bto sX. In the quark model, the hadronization is done using a nonrelativistic wave function. In the decay B to K^*gamma, the large K ^* recoil creates an uncertainty in calculating the branching ratio using the quark model. The problem is explored by considering other meson processes where data exist. The data on the pi form factor and the omegapi^0 transition form factor suggest the necessity to retain relativistic spinor and meson normalizations in the quark -model; however, the data do not resolve the

  1. Fast analysis of radionuclide decay chain migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. S.; Liang, C. P.; Liu, C. W.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    A novel tool for rapidly predicting the long-term plume behavior of an arbitrary length radionuclide decay chain is presented in this study. This fast tool is achieved based on generalized analytical solutions in compact format derived for a set of two-dimensional advection-dispersion equations coupled with sequential first-order decay reactions in groundwater system. The performance of the developed tool is evaluated by a numerical model using a Laplace transform finite difference scheme. The results of performance evaluation indicate that the developed model is robust and accurate. The developed model is then used to fast understand the transport behavior of a four-member radionuclide decay chain. Results show that the plume extents and concentration levels of any target radionuclide are very sensitive to longitudinal, transverse dispersion, decay rate constant and retardation factor. The developed model are useful tools for rapidly assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  2. B Decays Involving Light Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Eschrich, Ivo Gough; /UC, Irvine

    2007-01-09

    Recent BABAR results for decays of B-mesons to combinations of non-charm mesons are presented. This includes B decays to two vector mesons, B {yields} {eta}{prime}({pi}, K, {rho}) modes, and a comprehensive Dalitz Plot analysis of B {yields} KKK decays.

  3. Rate of gravitational inflaton decay via gauge trace anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yuki

    2011-02-15

    We analyze decay processes of the inflaton field, {phi}, during the coherent oscillation phase after inflation in f({phi})R gravity. It is inevitable that the inflaton decays gravitationally into gauge fields in the presence of f({phi})R coupling. We show a concrete calculation of the rate that the inflaton field decays into a pair of gauge fields via the trace anomaly. Comparing this new decay channel via the anomaly with the channels from the tree-level analysis, we find that the branching ratio crucially depends on masses and the internal multiplicities (flavor quantum number) of decay product particles. While the inflaton decays exclusively into light fields, heavy fields still play a role in quantum loops. We argue that this process in principle allows us to constrain the effects of arbitrary heavy particles in the reheating. We also apply our analysis to Higgs inflation, and find that the gravitational decay rate would never exceed gauge interaction decay rates if quantum gravity is unimportant.

  4. MEASUREMENTS OF THE PROPERTIES OF D MESON DECAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, G.; Blocker, C.A.; Blondel, A.; Carithers, W.C.; Chinowsky, W.; Coles, M.W.; Cooper, S.; Dieterle, W.E.; Dillon, J.B.; Eaton, M.W.; Gidal, G.; Goldhaber, G.; Johnson, A.D.; Kadyk, J.A.; Lankford, A.J.; Millikan, R.E.; Nelson, M.E.; Pang, C.Y.; Patrick, J.F.; Strait, J.; Trilling, G.H.; Vella, E.N.; Videau, I.

    1980-05-01

    We present a study of the decay properties of charmed D mesons produced near the peak of the {psi}" (3770) resonance in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. Branching fractions for nine Cabibbo-favored and three Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes are presented along with upper limits on one additional Cabibbo-favored and four additional Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes. A study of K{pi}{pi} decay mode Dalitz plots reveals a large quasi-two-body pseudoscalar-vector component for the D{sup 0} decays and an apparent nonuniform population an the Dalitz plot for the D{sup +} decay into K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. Using tagged events, we measure the charged particle multiplicity and strange particle content of D decays. A measurement of the D{sup +} and D{sup 0} semileptonic decay fractions indicates that the D{sup +} has a significantly longer lifetime than the D{sup 0}.

  5. Decay Dynamics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. We investigate the mathematical function that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic lymphocytes. We do it in the context of enzyme kinetics, using geometrical and analytical arguments. We derive the equations governing the decay of a tumor in the limit in which it is plainly surrounded by immune cells. A cellular automaton is used to test such decay, confirming its validity. Finally, we introduce a modification in the fractional cell kill so that the expected dynamics is attained in the mentioned limit. We also discuss the potential of this new function for non-solid and solid tumors which are infiltrated with lymphocytes. PMID:27310010

  6. RADIATIVE PENGUIN DECAYS FROM BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, Gerald

    2003-08-28

    Electroweak penguin decays provide a promising hunting ground for Physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). The decay B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, which proceeds through an electromagnetic penguin loop, already provides stringent constraints on the supersymmetric (SUSY) parameter space. The present data samples of {approx}1 x 10{sup 8} B{bar B} events allow to explore radiative penguin decays with branching fractions of the order of 10{sup -6} or less. In this brief report they discuss a study of B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decay modes and a search for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma} decays.

  7. Charmless b decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Donega, Mauro; /Geneva U.

    2005-07-01

    The authors report on the charmless B decays measurements performed on 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper describes: the first observation of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and the measurement of the direct Cp asymmetry in the ({bar B}){sub d} {yields} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay; the first evidence of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} and the branching ratio and Cp asymmetry for the B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} decay.

  8. The one charged particle decay modes of the tau

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1987-11-01

    Tables of measurements of the total branching fraction of tau lepton decays to modes with one charged particle are given along with the major individual branching fractions. The reason a combination of measurements and calculations is needed to display the discrepancy is described briefly. It is argued that uncertainties in measurements of the branching fractions for multiple photon decay modes prevent complete reliance on experiment. The multiple photon modes are discussed in more detail. Present research on experimental technique problems relative to the apparent discrepancy is summarized. (LEW)

  9. Enhanced chlorine dioxide decay in the presence of metal oxides: relevance to drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; von Gunten, Urs; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) decay in the presence of typical metal oxides occurring in distribution systems was investigated. Metal oxides generally enhanced ClO2 decay in a second-order process via three pathways: (1) catalytic disproportionation with equimolar formation of chlorite and chlorate, (2) reaction to chlorite and oxygen, and (3) oxidation of a metal in a reduced form (e.g., cuprous oxide) to a higher oxidation state. Cupric oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) showed significantly stronger abilities than goethite (α-FeOOH) to catalyze the ClO2 disproportionation (pathway 1), which predominated at higher initial ClO2 concentrations (56-81 μM). At lower initial ClO2 concentrations (13-31 μM), pathway 2 also contributed. The CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay is a base-assisted reaction with a third-order rate constant of 1.5 × 10(6) M(-2) s(-1) in the presence of 0.1 g L(-1) CuO at 21 ± 1 °C, which is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than in the absence of CuO. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) significantly enhanced the formation of chlorite and decreased the ClO2 disproportionation in the CuO-ClO2 system, probably because of a higher reactivity of CuO-activated ClO2 with NOM. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to simulate CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay at various pH values. Model simulations that agree well with the experimental data include a pre-equilibrium step with the rapid formation of a complex, namely, CuO-activated Cl2O4. The reaction of this complex with OH(-) is the rate-limiting and pH-dependent step for the overall reaction, producing chlorite and an intermediate that further forms chlorate and oxygen in parallel. These novel findings suggest that the possible ClO2 loss and the formation of chlorite/chlorate should be carefully considered in drinking water distribution systems containing copper pipes. PMID:23796229

  10. Measurement of light charged particles in the decay channels of medium-mass excited compound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Carboni, S.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Morelli, L.; Nannini, A.; Nicolini, R.; Poggi, G.; Vannini, G.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Dudek, J.; Fornal, B.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazurek, K.; Męczyński, W. M.; Myalski, S.; Styczeń, J.; Ziębliński, M.

    2014-03-01

    The 48Ti on 40Ca reactions have been studied at 300 and 600 MeV focusing on the fusion-evaporation (FE) and fusion-fission (FF) exit channels. Energy spectra and multiplicities of the emitted light charged particles have been compared to Monte Carlo simulations based on the statistical model. Indeed, in this mass region (A ~ 100) models predict that shape transitions can occur at high spin values and relatively scarce data exist in the literature about coincidence measurements between evaporation residues and light charged particles. Signals of shape transitions can be found in the variations of the lineshape of high energy gamma rays emitted from the de-excitation of GDR states gated on different region of angular momenta. For this purpose it is important to keep under control the FE and FF processes, to regulate the statistical model parameters and to control the onset of possible pre-equilibrium emissions from 300 to 600 MeV bombarding energy.

  11. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating 88Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Morelli, L.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chbihi, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Myalski, S.; Nicolini, R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-03-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the 88Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction 48Ti+40Ca at 300, 450, and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted α particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as deep inelastic collisions or quasifission/quasifusion) different from the compound nucleus formation.

  12. Rare B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  13. E6 Gamma Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. Alex; Rae, W. D. M.

    2011-05-06

    Rare electric hexacontatetrapole (E6) transitions are studied in the full (f{sub 7/2},f{sub 5/2},p{sub 3/2},p{sub 1/2}) shell-model basis. Comparison of theory to the results from the gamma decay in {sup 53}Fe and from inelastic electron scattering on {sup 52}Cr provides unique and interesting tests of the valence wavefunctions, the models used for energy density functionals and into the origin of effective charge.

  14. A model for multiexponential tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins is modeled by multiexponential functions characterized by lifetimes and preexponential factors. Commonly, multiple conformations of the protein are invoked to explain the recovery of two or more lifetimes from the experimental data. However, in many proteins the structure seems to preclude the possibility of multiple conformers sufficiently different from one another to justify such an inference. We present here another plausible multiexponential model based on the assumption that an energetically excited donor surrounded by N acceptor molecules decays by specific radiative and radiationless relaxation processes, and by transferring its energy to acceptors present in or close to the protein matrix. If interactions between the acceptors themselves and back energy transfer are neglected, we show that the intensity decay function contain 2N exponential components characterized by the unperturbed donor lifetime, by energy transfer rates and a probability of occurrence for the corresponding process. We applied this model to the fluorescence decay of holo- and apoazurin, ribonuclease T1, and the reduced single tryptophan mutant (W28F) of thioredoxin. Use of a multiexponential model for the analysis of the fluorescence intensity decay can therefore be justified, without invoking multiple protein conformations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8312471

  15. Wood decay at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, François; Coston-Guarini, Jennifer; Guarini, Jean-Marc; Fanfard, Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    The oceans and seas receive coarse woody debris since the Devonian, but the kinetics of wood degradation remains one of many unanswered questions about the fate of driftwood in the marine environment. A simple gravimetric experiment was carried out at a monitoring station located at the exit of a steep, forested Mediterranean watershed in the Eastern Pyrenees. The objective was to describe and quantify, with standardized logs (in shape, structure and constitution), natural degradation of wood in the sea. Results show that the mass decrease of wood logs over time can be described by a sigmoidal curve. The primary process of wood decay observed at the monitoring station was due to the arrival and installation of wood-boring species that consumed more than half of the total wood mass in six months. Surprisingly, in a region where there is little remaining wood marine infrastructure, "shipworms", i.e. xylophagous bivalves, are responsible for an important part of this wood decay. This suggests that these communities are maintained probably by a frequent supply of a large quantity of riparian wood entering the marine environment adjacent to the watershed. By exploring this direct link between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, our long term objective is to determine how these supplies of terrestrial organic carbon can sustain wood-based marine communities as it is observed in the Mediterranean Sea.

  16. Alpha decay in electron surrounding

    SciTech Connect

    Igashov, S. Yu.; Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M.

    2013-12-15

    The influence of atomic electron shells on the constant of alpha decay of heavy and mediummass nuclei was considered in detail. A method for simultaneously taking into account the change in the potential-barrier shape and the effect of reflection of a diverging Coulomb wave in the classically allowed region was developed. The ratios of decay probabilities per unit time for a bare nucleus and the respective neutral atom were found for some alpha-decaying isotopes.

  17. Search for rare B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reßing, D.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Frankl, C.; Graf, J.; Schmidtler, M.; Schramm, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Barsuk, S.; Belyaev, I.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Gershtein, L.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutyin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e +e - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, we have searched for decays b → sgluon through full reconstruction of a whole event. Two B overlineB decays were found with one of B meson decaying into a final state without charmed particles. We also obtained an upper limit of Br(B + → τ+ντ) of 1.04% at 90% CL.

  18. CP violation in K decays and rare decays

    SciTech Connect

    Buchalla, G.

    1996-12-01

    The present status of CP violation in decays of neutral kaons is reviewed. In addition selected rare decays of both K and B mesons are discussed. The emphasis is in particular on observables that can be reliably calculated and thus offer the possibility of clean tests of standard model flavor physics. 105 refs.

  19. α-decay study of {}^{{182,184}}Tl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Beveren, C.; Andreyev, A. N.; Barzakh, A. E.; Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Fedorov, D.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Ferrer, R.; Ghys, L.; Huyse, M.; Köster, U.; Lane, J.; Liberati, V.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Procter, T. J.; Rapisarda, E.; Sandhu, K.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Veselský, M.

    2016-02-01

    α-decay spectroscopy of {}{182,184}Tl has been performed at the CERN isotope separator on-line (ISOLDE) facility. New fine-structure α decays have been observed for both isotopes. α-decay branching ratios of 0.089(19)%, 0.047(6)% and 1.22(30)% have been deduced for the (10-), (7+) and (2-) states respectively in 184Tl and a lower limit of 0.49% for the α-decay branching ratio of 182Tl. A new half-life of 9.5(2) s for the (2-) state in 184Tl and 1.9(1) s for the low-spin state in 182Tl has been deduced. Using α-γ coincidence analysis, multiple γ rays were observed de-exciting levels in {}{178,180}Au fed by {}{182,184}Tl α decays. The γ transitions connecting these low-lying states in {}{178,180}Au are essential to sort the data and possibly identify bands from in-beam studies in these isotopes. Owing to the complex fine-structure α decays and limited knowledge about the structure of the daughter nuclei, only partial level schemes could be constructed for both gold isotopes in the present work. Reduced α-decay widths have been calculated and are compared with values obtained in neighboring odd-A and even-A thallium isotopes. Except for the allowed α decay of the 184Tl (10-) state, the other fine-structure α decays observed in this study are hindered. This points to strong structural changes between parent thallium and daughter gold isotopes.

  20. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and ``new physics`` searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  1. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and new physics'' searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  2. Theoretical understanding of charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.

    1986-08-01

    A detailed description of charm decays has emerged. The various concepts involved are sketched. Although this description is quite successful in reproducing the data the chapter on heavy flavour decays is far from closed. Relevant questions like on th real strength of weak annihilation, Penguin operators, etc. are still unanswered. Important directions in future work, both on the experimental and theoretical side are identified.

  3. Counterflow driven by swirl decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtern, Vladimir N.; Borissov, Anatoli A.

    2010-06-01

    The global meridional circulation of a viscous fluid, caused by swirl decay in a cylindrical container, is studied. To this end, a new solution to the Navier-Stokes equations is obtained, and simple experiments are performed to verify the predictions of the theory. The swirl decay mechanism explains elongated counterflows in hydrocyclones and vortex tubes sometimes extending over a hundred diameters.

  4. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  5. Logarithmic decays of unstable states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldi, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the survival amplitude of unstable quantum states deviates from exponential relaxations and exhibits decays that depend on the integral and analytic properties of the energy distribution density. In the same scenario, model independent dominant logarithmic decays t -1- α0log t of the survival amplitude are induced over long times by special conditions on the energy distribution density. While the instantaneous decay rate exhibits the dominant long time relaxation 1 / t, the instantaneous energy tends to the minimum value of the energy spectrum with the dominant logarithmic decay 1/( tlog 2 t) over long times. Similar logarithmic relaxations have already been found in the dynamics of short range potential systems with even dimensional space or in the Weisskopf-Wigner model of spontaneous emission from a two-level atom. Here, logarithmic decays are obtained as a pure model independent quantum effect in general unstable states.

  6. Beauty meson decays to charmonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, Alexey Valerievich

    2001-10-01

    We study decays of beauty (B) mesons into the final states containing charmonium mesons. The data were collected by the CLEO experiment at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring from 1990 to 1999. First, we describe a technique that significantly improves the reconstruction efficiency for decays of J/ y and y (2S) mesons into a pair of leptons. This reconstruction method is used in all the analyses presented in this dissertation. Then we present a study of B decays to the χc 1 and χc2 charmonium states and compare our results with the predictions of different theoretical models of charmonium production. After that we report the first observation of the decay B --> J/ y φK, which is the first B meson decay requiring a creation of an additional ss¯ quark pair. Then we measure the B0 and B+ meson masses from B0 --> y (') K0S and B+ --> y (') K+ decays. The method employed eliminates the dominant systematic uncertainty associated with the previous B meson mass measurements at the e+e- colliders and results in a significant improvement in precision. After that we present a study of three B0 decay modes useful for time-dependent CP asymmetry measurements. In this study we reconstruct B0 --> J/ y K0S , B0 --> χc 1 K0S , and B0 --> J/ y π0 decays. The latter two decay modes are observed for the first time. We describe a K0S --> π0π0 detection technique and its application to the reconstruction of the decay B 0 --> J/ y K0S . Then we present a sensitivity study for the measurement of the mixing-induced CP violation in the neutral B meson system (parameter sin 2β) at CLEO using the method that requires a measurement of the decay time of only one meson in a B0overline B0 pair. Finally, we search for direct CP violation in decays B+/- --> J/ y K+/- and B +/- --> y (2S) K+/- . The results of this search are consistent with the Standard Model expectations and provide the first experimental test of the assumption that direct CP violation is negligible in B --> y (') K decays.

  7. Primordial nucleosynthesis with decaying particles. I - Entropy-producing decays. II - Inert decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a nonrelativistic particle X, which decays out of equilibrium, on primordial nucleosynthesis is investigated, including both the energy density of the X particle and the electromagnetic entropy production from its decay. The results are parametrized in terms of the X particle lifetime and the density parameter rm(X), where m(X) is the X particle mass and r is the ratio of X number density to photon number density prior to nucleosynthesis. The results rule out particle lifetimes greater than 1-10 s for large values of rm(X). The question of a decaying particle which produces no electromagnetic entropy in the course of its decay is addressed, and particles which produce both entropy and an inert component in their decay are discussed.

  8. Power-law photoluminescence decay in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    2014-05-15

    Some quantum dot samples show a long-time (power-law) behavior of their luminescence intensity decay. This effect has been recently explained as being due to a cooperation of many tunneling channels transferring electrons from small quantum dots with triplet exciton to quantum dots at which the electrons can recombine with the holes in the valence band states. In this work we show that the long-time character of the sample luminescence decay can also be caused by an intrinsic property of a single dot, namely, by a non-adiabatic effect of the electron occupation up-conversion caused by the electron-phonon multiple scattering mechanism.

  9. Multi-modal fission in collinear ternary cluster decay of 252Cf(sf, fff)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkhodjaev, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the multiple decay modes of collinear fission in 252Cf(sf, fff), with three fragments as suggested by the potential energy surface (PES). Fission as a statistical decay is governed by the phase space of the different decay channels, which are suggested in the PES-landscape. The population of the fission modes is determined by the minima in the PES at the scission points and on the internal potential barriers. The ternary collinear decay proceeds as a sequential process, in two steps. The originally observed ternary decay of 252Cf(sf) into three different masses (e.g. 132-140Sn, 52-48Ca, 68-72Ni), observed by the FOBOS group in the FLNR (Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions) of the JINR (Dubna) the collinear cluster tripartition (CCT), is one of the ternary fission modes. This kind of "true ternary fission" of heavy nuclei has often been predicted in theoretical works during the last decades. In the present note we discuss different ternary fission modes in the same system. The PES shows pronounced minima, which correspond to several modes of ternary fragmentations. These decays have very similar dynamical features as the previously observed CCT-decays. The data obtained in the experiments on CCT allow us to extract the yields for different decay modes using specific gates on the measured parameters, and to establish multiple modes of the ternary fission decay.

  10. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  11. Multiple Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called multiple pregnancy . If more than one egg is released during the menstrual cycle and each ... fraternal twins (or more). When a single fertilized egg splits, it results in multiple identical embryos. This ...

  12. Multiple myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - multiple ... Multiple myeloma most commonly causes: Low red blood cell count ( anemia ), which can lead to fatigue and ...

  13. Charm counting in b decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z → b overlineb decays has been measured from the yield of D0, D+, Ds+ and Λc+ decays in a sample of q overlineq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be nc = 1.230 ± 0.036 ± 0.038 ± 0.053, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  14. Glueball decay in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koji; Tan, C.-I; Terashima, Seiji

    2008-04-15

    Using holographic QCD based on D4-branes and D8-anti-D8-branes, we have computed couplings of glueballs to light mesons. We describe glueball decay by explicitly calculating its decay widths and branching ratios. Interestingly, while glueballs remain less well understood both theoretically and experimentally, our results are found to be consistent with the experimental data for the scalar glueball candidate f{sub 0}(1500). More generally, holographic QCD predicts that decay of any glueball to 4{pi}{sup 0} is suppressed, and that mixing of the lightest glueball with qq mesons is small.

  15. Optimizing VANDLE for Decay Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, N. T.; Taylor, S. Z.; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A.; Vandle Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the decay properties of neutron rich isotopes has well established importance to the path of the r-process and to the total decay heat for reactor physics. Specifically, the half-life, branching ratio and spectra for β-n decay is of particular interest. With that in mind, we have continued attempts to improve upon the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) in terms of efficiency and TOF resolution through the use of new and larger scintillators. Details of the new implementation, design and characterization of the array will be shown and compared to previous results.

  16. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simanihuruk, Mudin

    2011-01-01

    Multiplication facts are difficult to teach. Therefore many researchers have put a great deal of effort into finding multiplication strategies. Sherin and Fuson (2005) provided a good survey paper on the multiplication strategies research area. Kolpas (2002), Rendtorff (1908), Dabell (2001), Musser (1966) and Markarian (2009) proposed the finger…

  17. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple Sclerosis Information Page Condensed from Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Multiple Sclerosis? An unpredictable disease of the central nervous system, ...

  18. Radiative Leptonic B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Edward Tann

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a search for B+ meson decays into γℓ+v, where ℓ = e,μ. We use a sample of 232 million B$\\bar{B}$ meson pairs recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We measure a partial branching fraction Δβ in a restricted region of phase space that reduces the effect of theoretical uncertainties, requiring the lepton energy to be in the range 1.875 and 2.850 GeV, the photon energy to be in the range 0.45 and 2.35 GeV, and the cosine of the angle between the lepton and photon momenta to be less than -0.36, with all quantities computed in the Υ(4S) center-of-mass frame. We find Δβ(B+ → γℓ+v) = (-0.31.5+1.3(statistical) -0.6+0.6(systematic) ± 0.1(theoretical)) x 10-6, under the assumption of lepton universality. Interpreted as a 90% confidence-level Bayesian upper limit, the result corresponds to 1.7 x 10-6 for a prior at in amplitude, and 2.3 x 10-6 for a prior at in branching fraction.

  19. Pre-equilibrium parton dynamics: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: parton production and evolution; QCD transport theory; interference in the medium; QCD and phase transition; and future heavy ion experiments. This papers have been indexed separately elsewhere on the data base.

  20. The decay of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  1. Questions Students Ask: Beta Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Jordan; Hartt, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Answers a student's question about the emission of a positron from a nucleus. Discusses the problem from the aspects of the uncertainty principle, beta decay, the Fermi Theory, and modern physics. (YP)

  2. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  3. Overview of rare K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Littenberg, L.

    1995-05-01

    The status and future prospects of searches for and studies of forbidden and highly suppressed K decays are reviewed. Here the author discusses three areas of recent activity in rare K decay. These are lepton-flavor violating decays, which are entirely forbidden in the Standard Model, K{sub S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0}, which is of interest from the point of view of CP-violation, and `one loop` decays of the form K{sup 0,{+-}} {yields} ({pi}{sup 0,{+-}})l{bar l}, that can throw light on Standard Model CP-violation and determine parameters such as V{sub td}.

  4. CP violation in K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  6. Proton decay and nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alvioli, M.; Strikman, M.; Benhar, O.; Ericson, M.

    2010-04-15

    The kinematics of the decay of a bound proton is governed by the proton spectral function. We evaluate this quantity in {sup 16}O using the information from nuclear physics experiments. It also includes a correlated part. The reliability of this evaluation is sufficient to open the possibility of correlated cuts in the missing mass and momentum variables to identify the decay events from the bound protons with a possible increase of the signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Thermal corrections to Electroweak Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina

    2016-03-01

    We study the electroweak processes at finite temperatures. This includes the decay rates of electroweak gauge bosons and beta decays. Major thermal corrections come from QED type radiative corrections. Heavy mass of the electroweak gauge bosons helps to suppress the radiative corrections due to the electroweak gauge boson loops. Therefore, dominant thermal corrections are due to the photon loops. We also discuss the relevance of our results to astrophysics and cosmology.

  8. Semileptonic B-Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Alexei; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2010-08-26

    The study of the semileptonic B-meson decays is the most accessible and cleanest way to determine the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and V{sub ub}. These decays also provide experimental access to study the QCD form-factors, heavy quark masses, and HQE parameters. The theoretical description of semileptonic B-meson decays at the parton level is very simple because there is no interaction between leptonic and hadronic currents. At the hadron level one needs to introduce corrections due to the strong interaction between quarks. Especially in the description of the inclusive B-meson decays the motion of the b-quark inside the B-meson plays a crucial role. All these effects are described in the frameworks of Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) and Lattice QCD (LQCD). We give an overview about results of studies of semileptonic B-meson decays collected with the BABAR and Belle detectors at the PEP-II and the KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -}-storage rings. We present recent results on hadronic moments measured in inclusive B {yields} X{sub c}lv and B {yields} X{sub u}lv decays and extracted heavy quark masses m{sub b} and m{sub c} and dominant non-perturbative Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE) parameters. We also report the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| in inclusive and in exclusive semileptonic B-meson decays. We describe the studies of the form-factor parameters for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}l{sup +}v and present the measurement of the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}l{sup +}v form-factor shape.

  9. Reionization and dark matter decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldengott, Isabel M.; Boriero, Daniel; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic reionization and dark matter decay can impact observations of the cosmic microwave sky in a similar way. A simultaneous study of both effects is required to constrain unstable dark matter from cosmic microwave background observations. We compare two reionization models with and without dark matter decay. We find that a reionization model that fits also data from quasars and star forming galaxies results in tighter constraints on the reionization optical depth τreio, but weaker constraints on the spectral index ns than the conventional parametrization. We use the Planck 2015 data to constrain the effective decay rate of dark matter to Γeff < 2.9 × 10‑25/s at 95% C.L. This limit is robust and model independent. It holds for any type of decaying dark matter and it depends only weakly on the chosen parametrization of astrophysical reionization. For light dark matter particles that decay exclusively into electromagnetic components this implies a limit of Γ < 5.3 × 10‑26/s at 95% C.L. Specifying the decay channels, we apply our result to the case of keV-mass sterile neutrinos as dark matter candidates and obtain constraints on their mixing angle and mass, which are comparable to the ones from the diffuse X-ray background.

  10. 7 CFR 51.898 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Decay. 51.898 Section 51.898 Agriculture Regulations... Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions § 51.898 Decay. Decay means.... Slight surface development of green mold (Cladosporium) shall not be considered decay....

  11. Decaying Turbulence in the Generalised Burgers Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boritchev, Alexandre

    2014-10-01

    We consider the generalised Burgers equation where f is strongly convex and ν is small and positive. We obtain sharp estimates for Sobolev norms of u (upper and lower bounds differ only by a multiplicative constant). Then, we obtain sharp estimates for the dissipation length scale and the small-scale quantities which characterise the decaying Burgers turbulence, i.e., the structure functions and the energy spectrum. The proof uses a quantitative version of an argument by Aurell et al. (J Fluid Mech 238:467-486, 1992). Note that we are dealing with decaying, as opposed to stationary turbulence. Thus, our estimates are not uniform in time. However, they hold on a time interval [ T 1, T 2], where T 1 and T 2 depend only on f and the initial condition, and do not depend on the viscosity. These results allow us to obtain a rigorous theory of the one-dimensional Burgers turbulence in the spirit of Kolmogorov's 1941 theory. In particular, we obtain two results which hold in the inertial range. On one hand, we explain the bifractal behaviour of the moments of increments, or structure functions. On the other hand, we obtain an energy spectrum of the form k -2. These results remain valid in the inviscid limit.

  12. Unsolved problems in hadronic charm decay

    SciTech Connect

    Browder, T.E.

    1989-08-01

    This paper describes several outstanding problems in the study of hadronic decays of charmed mesons where further experimental work and theoretical understanding is needed. Four topics are stressed: double Cabibbo suppressed decays (DCSD) of D/sup +/ mesons, hadronic D/sub s/ decays, weak hadronic quasi-two-body decays to pairs of vector mesons, and penguin decays of D mesons. 24 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Decay curve study in a standard electron capture decay

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, D.; Fukuda, M.; Kisamori, K.; Kuwada, Y.; Makisaka, K.; Matsumiya, R.; Matsuta, K.; Mihara, M.; Takagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Izumikawa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2010-05-12

    We have searched for a time-modulated decay in a standard electron capture experiment for {sup 140}Pr, in order to confirm a report from GSI, where an oscillatory decay has been observed for hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions in the cooler storage ring. {sup 140}Pr has been produced with the {sup 140}Ce(p, n) reaction by a pulsed proton beam accelerated from the Van de Graaff accelerator at Osaka University. Resultant time dependence of the K{sub a}lpha and K{sub b}eta X-ray intensities from the daughter shows no oscillatory behavior.

  14. The search for proton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; McGrew, C.; Mohapatra, R.; Peterson, E.; Cline, D.B.

    1994-12-31

    The conservation of the quantum number called baryon number, like lepton (or family) number, is an empirical fact even though there are very good reasons to expect otherwise. Experimentalists have been searching for baryon number violating decays of the proton and neutron for decades now without success. Theorists have evolved deep understanding of the relationship between the natural forces in the development of various Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) that nearly universally predict baryon number violating proton decay, or related phenomena like n-{bar n} oscillations. With this in mind, the Proton Decay Working Group reviewed the current experimental and theoretical status of the search for baryon number violation with an eye to the advancement in the next decade.

  15. Tunneling decay of false kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Éric; Gobeil, Yan; MacKenzie, Richard; Marleau, Luc; Paranjape, M. B.; Ung, Yvan

    2015-07-01

    We consider the decay of "false kinks," that is, kinks formed in a scalar field theory with a pair of degenerate symmetry-breaking false vacua in 1 +1 dimensions. The true vacuum is symmetric. A second scalar field and a peculiar potential are added in order for the kink to be classically stable. We find an expression for the decay rate of a false kink. As with any tunneling event, the rate is proportional to exp (-SE) where SE is the Euclidean action of the bounce describing the tunneling event. This factor varies wildly depending on the parameters of the model. Of interest is the fact that for certain parameters SE can get arbitrarily small, implying that the kink is only barely stable. Thus, while the false vacuum itself may be very long-lived, the presence of kinks can give rise to rapid vacuum decay.

  16. Observable signatures of inflaton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, Diana; Battefeld, Thorsten; Giblin, John T. Jr.; Pease, Evan K. E-mail: tbattefe@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de E-mail: peasee@kenyon.edu

    2011-02-01

    We numerically compute features in the power-spectrum that originate from the decay of fields during inflation. Using a simple, phenomenological, multi-field setup, we increase the number of fields from a few to thousands. Whenever a field decays, its associated potential energy is transferred into radiation, causing a jump in the equation of state parameter and mode mixing at the perturbed level. We observe discrete steps in the power-spectrum if the number of fields is low, in agreement with analytic arguments in the literature. These features become increasingly smeared out once many fields decay within a given Hubble time. In this regime we confirm the validity of the analytic approach to staggered inflation, which is based on a coarse-graining procedure. Our numerical approach bridges the aforementioned analytic treatments, and can be used in more complicated scenarios.

  17. Free radical decay in adamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Tegowski, A.T.; Pratt, D.W.

    1984-01-11

    Kinetic electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques have been used to characterize the decay behavior of the ''stable'' free radical 2-cyclohexanonyl in the plastic crystal phase f an adamantane matrix over the temperature range 257-313 K. Typical plots of the EPR signal intensity as a function of time are biexponential in nature, suggesting the existence of at least two channels for free radical decay. The activation parameters for both processes have been measured in both protonated and deuterated samples. A comparison of these results with those in other systems suggests that the host does, as expected, considerably reduce the pre-exponential factors for decay of the radical by bimolecular processes but has relatively little influence on the corresponding activation energies. 3 figures.

  18. EC decay of 244Bk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodaye, Suparna; Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sharma, S. K.; Pujari, P. K.; Palit, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    Berkelium isotopes have been produced in 11B-induced reaction on 238U. The EC decay of 244Bk → 244Cm has been studied by carrying out the single and coincidence measurements of the γ-rays emitted during the de-excitation of the 244Cm levels. Radiochemical separations have been carried out to minimize the contribution from the fission products and target. The new half-life of 244Bk is obtained as 5.02 ± 0.03 h, which is close to the theoretically calculated value. The relative intensities of the decay γ-rays have been re-evaluated. Based on the coincidence measurements, a tentative partial level scheme for 244Bk → 244Cm decay has been proposed.

  19. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  20. The study of rare decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wan-Li; Wang, Guo-Li; Fu, Hui-Feng; Wang, Tian-Hong; Jiang, Yue

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we study rare decays within the Standard Model. The penguin, box, annihilation, color-favored cascade and color-suppressed cascade contributions are included. Based on our calculation, the annihilation and color-favored cascade diagrams play important roles in the differential branching fractions, forward-backward asymmetries, longitudinal polarizations of the final vector mesons and leptonic longitudinal polarization asymmetries. More importantly, color-favored cascade decays largely enhance the resonance cascade contributions. To avoid the resonance cascade contribution pollution, new cutting regions are put forward.

  1. Laser-Assisted Muon Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Aihua; Li Shumin; Berakdar, Jamal

    2007-06-22

    We show theoretically that the muon lifetime can be changed dramatically by embedding the decaying muon in a strong linearly polarized laser field. Evaluating the S-matrix elements taking all electronic multiphoton processes into account we find that a CO{sub 2} laser with an electric field amplitude of 10{sup 6} V cm{sup -1} results in an order of magnitude shorter lifetime of the muon. We also analyze the dependencies of the decay rate on the laser frequency and intensity.

  2. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND CONSTRAINTS OF DECAYING DARK MATTER PARTICLE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, S.; Chan, M. H.; Chu, M.-C.

    2012-08-20

    If a component of cosmological dark matter is made up of massive particles-such as sterile neutrinos-that decay with cosmological lifetime to emit photons, the reionization history of the universe would be affected, and cosmic microwave background anisotropies can be used to constrain such a decaying particle model of dark matter. The optical depth depends rather sensitively on the decaying dark matter particle mass m{sub dm}, lifetime {tau}{sub dm}, and the mass fraction of cold dark matter f that they account for in this model. Assuming that there are no other sources of reionization and using the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-year data, we find that 250 eV {approx}< m{sub dm} {approx}< 1 MeV, whereas 2.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr {approx}< {tau}{sub dm}/f {approx}< 1.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} yr. The best-fit values for m{sub dm} and {tau}{sub dm}/f are 17.3 keV and 2.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} yr, respectively.

  3. Multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Nathan A; Yurs, Lena A; Block, Stephen B; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Kornau, Kathryn M; Wright, John C

    2009-08-20

    Multiple quantum coherences provide a powerful approach for studies of complex systems because increasing the number of quantum states in a quantum mechanical superposition state increases the selectivity of a spectroscopic measurement. We show that frequency domain multiple quantum coherence multidimensional spectroscopy can create these superposition states using different frequency excitation pulses. The superposition state is created using two excitation frequencies to excite the symmetric and asymmetric stretch modes in a rhodium dicarbonyl chelate and the dynamic Stark effect to climb the vibrational ladders involving different overtone and combination band states. A monochromator resolves the free induction decay of different coherences comprising the superposition state. The three spectral dimensions provide the selectivity required to observe 19 different spectral features associated with fully coherent nonlinear processes involving up to 11 interactions with the excitation fields. The different features act as spectroscopic probes of the diagonal and off-diagonal parts of the molecular potential energy hypersurface. This approach can be considered as a coherent pump-probe spectroscopy where the pump is a series of excitation pulses that prepares a multiple quantum coherence and the probe is another series of pulses that creates the output coherence. PMID:19507812

  4. Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP): evaluation of the main 233Pa decay characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chechev, Valery P; Kuzmenko, Nikolay K

    2006-01-01

    The results of a decay data evaluation are presented for 233Pa (beta-) decay to nuclear levels in 233U. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2005. PMID:16574422

  5. Geochemical test for branching decay of 176Lu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelin, Y.; Davis, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    Two different groups of values for the 176Lu decay constant have been determined by recent high-precision experiments. The λ 176Lu values of 1.86-1.87 × 10 -11 a -1 were determined by age comparisons using terrestrial minerals of Proterozoic and late Archean age, whereas values of ˜1.94 × 10 -11 a -1 were determined in age comparison studies of meteorites. A possible branched decay of 176Lu could be the cause of this discrepancy. The β + decay of 176Lu to 176Yb was detected in the early studies of radioactivity of 176Lu, with reported values of λβ +/(λβ + + λβ -) in the total 176Lu ranging from less than 0.03 to 0.67. If the β + decay fraction is close to the upper limit of the reported values, it can explain the 4%-6% difference between the apparent λ 176Lu values. To get a reliable estimate for the β + decay of 176Lu, we have measured Yb isotopic composition in 2.7 Ga zircons with Lu/Yb N (chondrite-normalized) ratios of 1.40 and 1.45, in 1.0 Ga xenotime with Lu/Yb N = 1.23, using Yb from the 28.4 Ma Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) zircon and titanite as the modern reference value. Multiple analyses yielded the following weighted mean values (± 2σ) for the 176Yb/ 174Yb ratio: 0.4022134 ± 0.0000017 for the FCT zircon and titanite, 0.4022134 ± 0.0000019 for the 1.0 Ga xenotime, and 0.4022124 ± 0.0000033 for the 2.7 Ga zircons. These data yield λβ +/(λβ + + λβ -) = -0.005 ± 0.015 (2σ) and establish an upper limit of 0.9% of total decays for the β + decay branch. Branching decay can therefore be eliminated as the cause of the discrepancy in 176Lu decay constant estimates. We discuss other possible causes of the λ 176Lu terrestrial vs. meteorite discrepancy.

  6. Interpretation of fluorescence decays in proteins using continuous lifetime distributions.

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, J R; Gratton, E; Prendergast, F G

    1987-01-01

    dependence of the parameters that describe the single-potential well distribution indicated the inadequacy of this model at lower temperature, suggesting that multiple potential wells can describe better the decay for this protein. Images FIGURE 4 p933-b PMID:3607213

  7. Multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Advances in the imaging and treatment of multiple myeloma have occurred over the past decade. This article summarises the current status and highlights how an understanding of both is necessary for optimum management. PMID:20159661

  8. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the ... and your body, leading to the symptoms of MS. They can include Visual disturbances Muscle weakness Trouble ...

  9. Multiple myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - multiple ... myeloma most commonly causes a low red blood cell count ( anemia ), which can lead to fatigue and ...

  10. Multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Raab, Marc S; Podar, Klaus; Breitkreutz, Iris; Richardson, Paul G; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2009-07-25

    Multiple myeloma is characterised by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells, and mounting evidence indicates that the bone marrow microenvironment of tumour cells has a pivotal role in myeloma pathogenesis. This knowledge has already expanded treatment options for patients with multiple myeloma. Prototypic drugs thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide have each been approved for the treatment of this disease by targeting both multiple myeloma cells and the bone marrow microenvironment. Although benefit was first shown in relapsed and refractory disease, improved overall response, duration of response, and progression-free and overall survival can be achieved when these drugs are part of first-line regimens. This treatment framework promises to improve outcome not only for patients with multiple myeloma, but also with other haematological malignancies and solid tumours. PMID:19541364

  11. Rare B decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, Sinead M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-10-01

    The confidence level limits of the CDF search for the B{sub s}{sup 0} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} rare decays and the branching ratio measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +} D{sub s}{sup -} are presented.

  12. Fermi's β-DECAY Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Throughout his lifetime Enrico Fermi (1901-1954) had considered his 1934 β-decay theory as his most important contribution to theoretical physics. E. Segrè (1905-1989) had vividly written about an episode at the inception of that paper:1...

  13. Review of tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.P.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of the {tau} decay modes are reviewed and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. While the agreement is generally good, the status of the 1-prong puzzle'' remains controversial and a discrepancy between the measured leptonic branching fractions and the {tau} lifetime persists. Prospects for precision measurements at a Tau-Charm Factory are also reviewed. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1990-09-30

    This report discusses the nuclear structure of the following isotopes as a result of radioactive decays: neutron-deficient iridium isotopes; neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; neutron-deficient gold isotopes; neutron-deficient mercury isotopes; neutron-deficient thallium isotopes; neutron-deficient lead isotopes; neutron-deficient promethium isotopes; and neutron-deficient samarium isotopes.

  15. Entanglement entropy in particle decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lello, Louis; Boyanovsky, Daniel; Holman, Richard

    2013-11-01

    The decay of a parent particle into two or more daughter particles results in an entangled quantum state as a consequence of conservation laws in the decay process. Recent experiments at Belle and BaBar take advantage of quantum entanglement and the correlations in the time evolution of the product particles to study CP and T violations. If one (or more) of the product particles are not observed, their degrees of freedom are traced out of the pure state density matrix resulting from the decay, leading to a mixed state density matrix and an entanglement entropy. This entropy is a measure of the loss of information present in the original quantum correlations of the entangled state. We use the Wigner-Weisskopf method to construct an approximation to this state that evolves in time in a manifestly unitary way. We then obtain the entanglement entropy from the reduced density matrix of one of the daughter particles obtained by tracing out the unobserved states, and follow its time evolution. We find that it grows over a time scale determined by the lifetime of the parent particle to a maximum, which when the width of the parent particle is narrow, describes the phase space distribution of maximally entangled Bell-like states. The method is generalized to the case in which the parent particle is described by a wave packet localized in space. Possible experimental avenues to measure the entanglement entropy in the decay of mesons at rest are discussed.

  16. Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, S.A.; Jiwa, Theresa I.

    1991-01-01

    Successful management of patients with multiple sclerosis depends upon the involvement of the family physician. All contacts with either a multiple sclerosis clinic or a neurologist should be made at the instigation of the family practitioner. Constant contact with the family physician ensures that the individual receives proper care. While specialty care is needed for many of the symptoms, psychosocial problems are dealt with best by the individual's own family physician. PMID:21229090

  17. Decay of Dirac massive hair in the background of a spherical black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Moderski, Rafal; Rogatko, Marek

    2008-06-15

    The intermediate and late-time behavior of massive Dirac hair in the static spherically general black hole spacetime is studied. It is revealed that the intermediate asymptotic pattern of decay of massive Dirac spinor hair is dependent on the mass of the field under consideration as well as the multiple number of the wave mode. The long-lived oscillatory tail observed at timelike infinity in the considered background decays slowly as t{sup -5/6}.

  18. Neutron Beta Decay Studies with Nab

    SciTech Connect

    Baessler, S.; Alarcon, R.; Alonzi, L. P.; Balascuta, S.; Barron-Palos, L.; Bowman, James David; Bychkov, M. A.; Byrne, J.; Calarco, J; Chupp, T.; Cianciolo, T. V.; Crawford, C.; Frlez, E.; Gericke, M. T.; Glück, F.; Greene, G. L.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Gudkov, V.; Harrison, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Ito, T.; Makela, M.; Martin, J.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGovern, S.; Page, S.; Penttila, Seppo I; Pocanic, Dinko; Salas-Bacci, A.; Tompkins, Z.; Wagner, D.; Wilburn, W. S.; Young, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Precision measurements in neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay and allow for several stringent tests of the standard model. This paper discusses the design and the expected performance of the Nab spectrometer.

  19. [Multiple meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Terrier, L-M; François, P

    2016-06-01

    Multiple meningiomas (MMs) or meningiomatosis are defined by the presence of at least 2 lesions that appear simultaneously or not, at different intracranial locations, without the association of neurofibromatosis. They present 1-9 % of meningiomas with a female predominance. The occurrence of multiple meningiomas is not clear. There are 2 main hypotheses for their development, one that supports the independent evolution of these tumors and the other, completely opposite, that suggests the propagation of tumor cells of a unique clone transformation, through cerebrospinal fluid. NF2 gene mutation is an important intrinsic risk factor in the etiology of multiple meningiomas and some exogenous risk factors have been suspected but only ionizing radiation exposure has been proven. These tumors can grow anywhere in the skull but they are more frequently observed in supratentorial locations. Their histologic types are similar to unique meningiomas of psammomatous, fibroblastic, meningothelial or transitional type and in most cases are benign tumors. The prognosis of these tumors is eventually good and does not differ from the unique tumors except for the cases of radiation-induced multiple meningiomas, in the context of NF2 or when diagnosed in children where the outcome is less favorable. Each meningioma lesion should be dealt with individually and their multiple character should not justify their resection at all costs. PMID:27234913

  20. Decay Spectroscopy for Nuclear Astrophysics: {beta}-delayed Proton Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Aysto, J.; Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J.; Pollacco, E.; Kebbiri, M.

    2011-11-30

    Decay spectroscopy is one of the oldest indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics. We have developed at TAMU techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. These allowed us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of {sup 23}Al, {sup 27}P, {sup 31}Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg(crucial for the depletion of {sup 22}Na in novae), {sup 26m}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si and {sup 30}P(p,{gamma}){sup 31}S(bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. More recently we have radically improved the technique using a gas based detector we call AstroBox.

  1. Decays of near BPS heterotic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Gutperle, Michael; Krym, Darya

    2006-10-15

    The decay of highly excited massive string states in compactified heterotic string theories is discussed. We calculate the decay rate and spectrum of states carrying momentum and winding in the compactified direction. The longest lived states in the spectrum are near Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states whose decay is dominated by a single decay channel of massless radiation which brings the state closer to being BPS.

  2. Penguin and rare decays in BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akar, Simon; Babar Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present recent results from the BABAR Collaboration on radiative decays. These include searches for new physics via measurements of several observables such as the time- dependent CP asymmetry in B0 → K0Sπ-π+γ exclusive decays, as well as direct CP asymmetries and branching fractions in B → Xsγ and B → Xsl+l- inclusive decays.

  3. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-11-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B{yields}B{sub 1}B{sub 2}-bar{gamma} are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  4. Review of B and Bs decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzi, Concezio

    2014-05-01

    A review of B and Bs decays is presented. Emphasis is given to processes most sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model, such as radiative, electroweak and "Higgs" penguin decays, and tree-level decays involving tau leptons in the final state. An outlook on future perspectives is also given.

  5. Beauty baryon decays: a theoretical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    I overview the theoretical status and recent progress on the calculations of beauty baryon decays focusing on the QCD aspects of the exclusive semi-leptonic Λb → plμ decay at large recoil and theoretical challenges of radiative and electro-weak penguin decays Λb → Λγ,Λl+l-.

  6. 7 CFR 51.2087 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Decay. 51.2087 Section 51.2087 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Almonds in the Shell Definitions § 51.2087 Decay. Decay means that part or all...

  7. 7 CFR 51.2962 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Decay. 51.2962 Section 51.2962 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2962 Decay. Decay means that any portion...

  8. 7 CFR 51.490 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Decay. 51.490 Section 51.490 Agriculture Regulations... Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.490 Decay. Decay means breakdown, disintegration or fermentation of the flesh or rind of the cantaloup caused by bacteria or fungi; except that dry type...

  9. 7 CFR 51.2962 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Decay. 51.2962 Section 51.2962 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2962 Decay. Decay means that any portion...

  10. 7 CFR 51.2120 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Decay. 51.2120 Section 51.2120 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2120 Decay. Decay means that part or all of...

  11. 7 CFR 51.2120 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Decay. 51.2120 Section 51.2120 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2120 Decay. Decay means that part or all of...

  12. 7 CFR 51.2087 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Decay. 51.2087 Section 51.2087 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Almonds in the Shell Definitions § 51.2087 Decay. Decay means that part or all...

  13. 7 CFR 51.490 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Decay. 51.490 Section 51.490 Agriculture Regulations... Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.490 Decay. Decay means breakdown, disintegration or fermentation of the flesh or rind of the cantaloup caused by bacteria or fungi; except that dry type...

  14. Investigations on sound energy decays and flows in a monumental mosque.

    PubMed

    Sü Gül, Zühre; Xiang, Ning; Çalışkan, Mehmet

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates the sound energy decays and flows in the Süleymaniye Mosque in İstanbul. This is a single-space superstructure having multiple domes. The study searches for the non-exponential sound energy decay characteristics. The effect of different material surfaces and volumetric contributions are investigated using acoustic simulations and in situ acoustical measurements. Sound energy decay rates are estimated by Bayesian decay analysis. The measured data reveal double- or triple-slope energy decay profiles within the superstructure. To shed light on the mechanism of energy exchanges resulting in multi-slope decay, spatial sound energy distributions and energy flow vectors are studied by diffusion equation model (DEM) simulations. The resulting sound energy flow vector maps highlight the contribution of a sound-reflective central dome contrasted with an absorptive carpeted floor in providing delayed energy feedback. In contrast, no multi-slope energy decay pattern is observed in DEM simulations with a bare marble floor, which generates a much more diffuse sound field than in the real situation with a carpeted floor. The results demonstrate that energy fragmentation, in support of the non-exponential energy decay profile, is due to both the sound absorption characteristics of materials and to their distributions, as well as to relations between the subvolumes of the mosque's interior. PMID:27475158

  15. Decay spectroscopy of element 115 daughters:280Rg→276Mt and 276Mt→272Bh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gothe, O. R.; Uribe, E. C.; Pang, G. K.; Bleuel, D. L.; Block, M.; Clark, R. M.; Campbell, C. M.; Crawford, H. L.; Cromaz, M.; Di Nitto, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Esker, N. E.; Fahlander, C.; Fallon, P.; Farjadi, R. M.; Forsberg, U.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Loveland, W.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; May, E. M.; Mudder, P. R.; Olive, D. T.; Rice, A. C.; Rissanen, J.; Rudolph, D.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Shusterman, J. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wiens, A.; Yakushev, A.; Nitsche, H.

    2015-08-01

    Forty-six decay chains, assigned to the decay of 288115 , were produced using the 243Am(48Ca,3 n )288115 reaction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-in. cyclotron. The resulting series of α decays were studied using α -photon and α -x-ray spectroscopies. Multiple α -photon coincidences were observed in the element 115 decay chain members, particularly in the third- and fourth-generation decays (presumed to be 280Rg and 276Mt , respectively). Upon combining these data with those from 22 288115 decay chains observed in a similar experiment, updated level schemes in 276Mt and 272Bh (populated by the α decay of 280Rg and 276Mt , respectively) are proposed. Photons were observed in the energy range expected for K x rays coincident with the α decay of both 280Rg and 276Mt . However, Compton scattering of higher-energy γ rays and discrete transitions are present in the K x-ray region preventing a definitive Z identification to be made based on observation of characteristic K x-ray energies.

  16. Universal Distribution of Litter Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2008-12-01

    Degradation of litter is the result of many physical, chemical and biological processes. The high variability of these processes likely accounts for the progressive slowdown of decay with litter age. This age dependence is commonly thought to result from the superposition of processes with different decay rates k. Here we assume an underlying continuous yet unknown distribution p(k) of decay rates [1]. To seek its form, we analyze the mass-time history of 70 LIDET [2] litter data sets obtained under widely varying conditions. We construct a regularized inversion procedure to find the best fitting distribution p(k) with the least degrees of freedom. We find that the resulting p(k) is universally consistent with a lognormal distribution, i.e.~a Gaussian distribution of log k, characterized by a dataset-dependent mean and variance of log k. This result is supported by a recurring observation that microbial populations on leaves are log-normally distributed [3]. Simple biological processes cause the frequent appearance of the log-normal distribution in ecology [4]. Environmental factors, such as soil nitrate, soil aggregate size, soil hydraulic conductivity, total soil nitrogen, soil denitrification, soil respiration have been all observed to be log-normally distributed [5]. Litter degradation rates depend on many coupled, multiplicative factors, which provides a fundamental basis for the lognormal distribution. Using this insight, we systematically estimated the mean and variance of log k for 512 data sets from the LIDET study. We find the mean strongly correlates with temperature and precipitation, while the variance appears to be uncorrelated with main environmental factors and is thus likely more correlated with chemical composition and/or ecology. Results indicate the possibility that the distribution in rates reflects, at least in part, the distribution of microbial niches. [1] B. P. Boudreau, B.~R. Ruddick, American Journal of Science,291, 507, (1991). [2] M

  17. Lyapunov decay in quantum irreversibility.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, Ignacio; Roncaglia, Augusto J; Wisniacki, Diego A

    2016-06-13

    The Loschmidt echo--also known as fidelity--is a very useful tool to study irreversibility in quantum mechanics due to perturbations or imperfections. Many different regimes, as a function of time and strength of the perturbation, have been identified. For chaotic systems, there is a range of perturbation strengths where the decay of the Loschmidt echo is perturbation independent, and given by the classical Lyapunov exponent. But observation of the Lyapunov decay depends strongly on the type of initial state upon which an average is carried out. This dependence can be removed by averaging the fidelity over the Haar measure, and the Lyapunov regime is recovered, as has been shown for quantum maps. In this work, we introduce an analogous quantity for systems with infinite dimensional Hilbert space, in particular the quantum stadium billiard, and we show clearly the universality of the Lyapunov regime. PMID:27140966

  18. Resolvability of positron decay channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.

    1985-03-07

    Many data analysis treatments of positron experiments attempt to resolve two or more positron decay or exist channels which may be open simultaneously. Examples of the need to employ such treatments of the experimental results can be found in the resolution of the constituents of a defect ensemble, or in the analysis of the complex spectra which arise from the interaction of slow positrons at or near the surfaces of solids. Experimental one- and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experiments in Al single crystals have shown that two defect species (mono- and divacancies) can be resolved under suitable conditions. Recent experiments at LLNL indicate that there are a variety of complex exit channels open to positrons interacting at surfaces, and ultimely these decay channels must also be suitably resolved from one another. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Decay of /sup 150/Er

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D.M.; Toth, K.S.; Ellis-Akovali, Y.A.; Cole, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    A new activity, T/sub 1/2/ = 20 +- 2 sec, was observed in /sup 12/C bombardments of /sup 144/Sm. Only one ..gamma.. ray, 476.0 +- 0.1 keV, was found to be associated with this nuclide. We identify the new isotope as /sup 150/Er and propose that it decays mainly to one level in /sup 150/Ho at an excitation energy of approx.476 keV by an allowed ..beta.. transition which connects states with the following configurations: O/sup +/(..pi..h/sub 11/2/, ..pi..h/sub 11/2/)..-->..1/sup +/(..pi..h/sub 11/2/,..nu..h/sub 9/2/). As part of the investigation, the decay properties of the high- and low-spin /sup 150/Ho isomers were reexamined.

  20. Flavor mixing and quark decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu Wang, Ling-Lie

    1981-01-01

    Since this is an experimental conference I shall begin my talk with that spirit. We can view that the subject of my talk as a result of ''the ORY Collaboration'' with more than fifty theorists involved. The topics covered are the results of four task forces: I. The mixing Matrix Task Force, II.. The D-decay Task Force, III. the Boredom-Escaping Group and IV. the Far-and-Beyond Group.

  1. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  2. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1991-09-30

    This report discusses nuclear structure from radioactive decay of the following: Neutron-Deficient Iridium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Platinum Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Gold Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Mercury Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Thallium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Lead Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Samarium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Promethium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Neodymium Isotopes; and Neutron-Deficient Praseodymium Isotopes. Also discussed are Nuclear Systematics and Models.

  3. MoNA and Two-Neutron Decay Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grovom, Amanda; Aulie, Alegra; Rogers, Warren F.

    2010-11-01

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) is a large, high-efficiency position-sensitive neutron detector array housed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, consisting of 144 2-meter long scintillator bars with a PMT positioned at each end, designed to detect the energy and trajectory of fast neutrons emitted in the breakup of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. Because a single neutron can scatter multiple times within MoNA, (including a large presence of dark-scattering from Carbon), the experimental challenge to distinguish between single and multiple neutron decay events is significant. We've developed special data-sorting routines that selectively filter on a combination of factors such as neutron velocity and scattering angle, hit-pattern distribution, neutron-fragment opening angle, and decay energy in order to reduce the Carbon scattering background and enhance correlations between pairs of neutrons. We've applied this analysis to the 2-neutron decays of ^24O and ^13Li from data sets from previous MoNA experiments. Results will be presented.

  4. Tunneling decay of false vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, M. B.; Yajnik, U. A.; Yeom, Dong-han

    2013-10-01

    We consider the decay of vortices trapped in the false vacuum of a theory of scalar electrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions. The potential is inspired by models with intermediate symmetry breaking to a metastable vacuum that completely breaks a U(1) symmetry, while in the true vacuum, the symmetry is unbroken. The false vacuum is unstable through the formation of true vacuum bubbles; however, the rate of decay can be extremely long. On the other hand, the false vacuum can contain metastable vortex solutions. These vortices contain the true vacuum inside in addition to a unit of magnetic flux and the appropriate topologically nontrivial false vacuum outside. We numerically establish the existence of vortex solutions which are classically stable; however, they can decay via tunneling. In general terms, they tunnel to a configuration which is a large, thin-walled vortex configuration that is now classically unstable to the expansion of its radius. We compute an estimate for the tunneling amplitude in the semiclassical approximation. We believe our analysis would be relevant to superconducting thin films or superfluids.

  5. Spectrometers for Beta Decay Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yong; Hirshfield, Jay

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the neutrino mass direct measurement experiment Project 8, precision spectrometers are proposed to simultaneously measure energy and momentum of beta-decay electrons produced in rare nuclear events with improved energy resolution. For detecting single beta decay electrons near the end-point from a gaseous source such as tritium, one type of spectrometer is proposed to utilize stimulated cyclotron resonance interaction of microwaves with electrons in a waveguide immersed in a magnetic mirror. In the external RF fields, on-resonance electrons will satisfy both the cyclotron resonance condition and waveguide dispersion relationship. By correlating the resonances at two waveguide modes, one can associate the frequencies with both the energy and longitudinal momentum of an on-resonance electron to account for the Doppler shifts. For detecting neutrino-less double-beta decay, another spectrometer is proposed with thin foil of double-beta-allowed material immersed in a magnetic field, and RF antenna array for detection of synchrotron radiation from electrons. It utilizes the correlation between the antenna signals including higher harmonics of radiation to reconstruct the total energy distribution.

  6. Radiative decay of nonstationary system.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sumana; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2004-04-01

    When a finite quantum system, say a fluorescent molecule is attached to a bulk surface and excited by a short laser pulse, the decay dynamics of the system is modulated by the surface and the signal is enhanced due to the bulk surface. We have considered the decay dynamics of a model of displaced distorted molecule whose excited potential surface is coupled to a continuum and then this first continuum is in turn coupled to a second continuum. In the short time scale there is a coherent exchange of energy between the system molecule and the first continuum states. In the long time scale the energy of the whole system plus first continuum drains out to the final continuum states. A dendrimer nanocomposite with the gold surface shows an enhanced light emission. This can be qualitatively understood from the model we proposed here. We have numerically studied the various potential parameters of the molecule which can affect the signal. When the potential surfaces are flat, the band structure of the first continuum states along with its initial excitation has some nontrivial effect on the profile of the radiative decay. PMID:15267501

  7. Nuclear Decay Data: On-going Studies to Address and Improve Radionuclide Decay Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Alan L.

    2005-05-01

    Representative decay data studies are described and reviewed, ranging from various measurement programmes to the maintenance of evaluated decay-data libraries. Gross beta-decay measurements are essential to address the decay-data requirements for short-lived fission products, well-defined half-lives are required in assessments of the storage of long-lived radionuclides in waste depositories, and improved decay data continue to be demanded in safeguards, to improve detector-calibration standards, and for medical and analytical applications. Such needs require the measurement of good quality decay data, along with multinational evaluations of decay schemes by means of agreed procedures.

  8. Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  9. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The author has been prompted to write this article about finger multiplication for a number of reasons. Firstly there are a number of related articles in past issues of "Mathematics Teaching" ("MT") which have connections to this algorithm. Secondly, very few of his primary teaching students and professional colleagues appear to be aware of the…

  10. Adaptive wavelet methods - Matrix-vector multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černá, Dana; Finěk, Václav

    2012-12-01

    The design of most adaptive wavelet methods for elliptic partial differential equations follows a general concept proposed by A. Cohen, W. Dahmen and R. DeVore in [3, 4]. The essential steps are: transformation of the variational formulation into the well-conditioned infinite-dimensional l2 problem, finding of the convergent iteration process for the l2 problem and finally derivation of its finite dimensional version which works with an inexact right hand side and approximate matrix-vector multiplications. In our contribution, we shortly review all these parts and wemainly pay attention to approximate matrix-vector multiplications. Effective approximation of matrix-vector multiplications is enabled by an off-diagonal decay of entries of the wavelet stiffness matrix. We propose here a new approach which better utilize actual decay of matrix entries.

  11. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurements using STEFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitt, A. J.; Smith, A. G.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Dare, J. A.

    2012-09-01

    An ongoing investigation into the angular momentum generated during the fission of 252Cf is currently under way using the SpecTrometer for Exotic Fission Fragments (STEFF). Measurements have been made of the fold distribution (measured multiplicity) with STEFF. These have been compared to a Monte-carlo simulation to determine a value for the average angular momentum Jrms = 6hslash which is comparable to previous measurements [1]. Measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity were performed whilst gating on different fragment mass regions. The result was compared with a sum of the lowest 2+ energies from both fragment and complementary in the mass gate. The results support the view that gamma-ray multiplicity is largely determined by the decay of the nucleus through near yrast transitions that follow the statistical decay.

  12. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David E-mail: alejandro.ibarra@ph.tum.de

    2012-08-01

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons. We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  13. Doubly charmful baryonic B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Tsai, S.-Y.

    2006-04-01

    There are two apparent puzzles connected with the two-body and three-body doubly charmed baryonic B decays. First, earlier calculations based on QCD sum rules or the diquark model predict B(B{sup 0}{yields}{xi}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}){approx_equal}B(B{sup 0}{yields}B{sub c}N), while experimentally the former has a rate 2 orders of magnitude larger than the latter. Second, a naive estimate of the branching ratio O(10{sup -9}) for the color-suppressed three-body decay B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K, which is highly suppressed by phase space, is too small by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared to the experiment. We show that the great suppression for the {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K production can be alleviated provided that there exists a narrow hidden charm bound state with a mass near the {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} threshold. This new state that couples strongly to the charmed baryon pair can be searched for in B decays and in pp collisions by studying the mass spectrum of D{sup (*)}D{sup (*)} or {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}. The doubly charmful decay B{yields}{xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} has a configuration more favorable than the singly charmful one such as B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}p since no hard gluon is needed to produce the energetic {xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} pair in the former decay, while two hard gluons are needed for the latter process. Assuming that a soft qq quark pair is produced through the {sigma} and {pi} meson exchanges in the configuration for B{yields}{xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}, it is found that its branching ratio is of order 10{sup -3}, in agreement with the experiment.

  14. Lifetime constraints for late dark matter decay

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nicole F.; Galea, Ahmad J.; Petraki, Kalliopi

    2010-07-15

    We consider a class of late-decaying dark matter models, in which a dark matter particle decays to a heavy stable daughter of approximately the same mass, together with one or more relativistic particles which carry away only a small fraction of the parent rest mass. Such decays can affect galactic halo structure and evolution, and have been invoked as a remedy to some of the small-scale structure formation problems of cold dark matter. There are existing stringent limits on the dark matter lifetime if the decays produce photons. By considering examples in which the relativistic decay products instead consist of neutrinos or electron-position pairs, we derive stringent limits on these scenarios for a wide range of dark matter masses. We thus eliminate a sizable portion of the parameter space for these late-decay models if the dominant decay channel involves standard model final states.

  15. Numerical simulations of the decay of satellite galaxy orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Tremaine, S.

    1983-01-01

    A multiple three-body technique is used to study the orbital evolution of satellite galaxies which is similar to the N-body method but neglects two-body forces between stars in the halo of the parent galaxy. It is found that, for satellites orbiting within the halo, Chandrasekhar's (1960) dynamical friction formula accurately describes the orbital decay rate, including its variation with satellite mass and size and with the number density and mass of halo stars. Significant frictional forces are present even outside the halo, and the orbital decay rate, instead of depending on the procedure used to place the satellite in its orbit, is determined only by the current orbital parameters. This semirestricted N-body method is sufficiently fast to have permitted the running of 200 simulations to date, many more than would have been possible by means of the conventional N-body technique.

  16. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K. S.; Mas, J. F.; McConnell, J. W.; Yu, C.-H.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R. C.; Woods, P. J.; Ginter, T. N.; Gross, C. J.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S. H.; Weintraub, W.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; MacDonald, B. D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E. F.

    1998-12-21

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu.

  17. Gravitational effects on inflaton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2015-05-22

    We point out that the inflaton inevitably couples to all non-conformally coupled matters gravitationally through an oscillation in the Hubble parameter or the cosmic scale factor. It leads to particle production during the inflaton oscillation regime, which is most efficient just after inflation. Moreover, the analysis is extended to the model with non-minimal inflaton couplings to gravity, in which the Hubble parameter oscillates more violently. We apply our results to the graviton production by the inflaton: gravitons are also produced just after inflation, but the non-minimal coupling does not induce inflaton decay into the graviton pair.

  18. Classical picture of postexponential decay

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Martorell, J.; Sprung, D. W. L.

    2010-04-15

    Postexponential decay of the probability density of a quantum particle leaving a trap can be reproduced accurately, except for interference oscillations at the transition to the postexponential regime, by means of an ensemble of classical particles emitted with constant probability per unit time and the same half-life as the quantum system. The energy distribution of the ensemble is chosen to be identical to the quantum distribution, and the classical point source is located at the scattering length of the corresponding quantum system. A one-dimensional example is provided to illustrate the general argument.

  19. Dissipationless decay of Jovian jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirraglia, J. A.

    1989-05-01

    IRIS data have been taken as the bases of windshear calculations whose results imply a decrease of the Jovian planet's zonal jets with altitude. The simplified dynamical model developed to furnish a mechanism accounting for the decay involves a highly truncated set of dissipationless equations simulating the upper-tropospheric and stratospheric flow. While the model's lower boundary is constrained as a latitudinally periodic set of alternating jets, the upper boundary constraint maintains a constant potential temperature. The small perturbations to which the imposed zonal jets are unstable grow and interact nonlinearly, generating a zonal flow that opposes the imposed one and thereby leading to the apparent decrease of the jets with altitude.

  20. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K.S.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Yu, C.; Bingham, C.R.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S.H.; Weintraub, W.; Rykaczewski, K.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R.C.; Woods, P.J.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; MacDonald, B.D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E.F.; Ressler, J.J.; Walters, W.B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-01

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Bremsstrahlung in {alpha} Decay Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Jentschura, U. D.; Koeck, F.; Lauer, M.; Schwalm, D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.

    2007-07-13

    A high-statistics measurement of bremsstrahlung emitted in the {alpha} decay of {sup 210}Po has been performed, which allows us to follow the photon spectra up to energies of {approx}500 keV. The measured differential emission probability is in good agreement with our theoretical results obtained within the quasiclassical approximation as well as with the exact quantum mechanical calculation. It is shown that, due to the small effective electric dipole charge of the radiating system, a significant interference between the electric dipole and quadrupole contributions occurs, which is altering substantially the angular correlation between the {alpha} particle and the emitted photon.

  2. Tau decays into K* mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Frankl, C.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Schechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Doutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1995-06-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the storage ring DORIS II we have measured τ decays into three charged mesons containing K * mesons. Exploiting the good particle identification capabilities of the detector we have determined the following branching ratios:Brleft( {tau ^ - to overline {K^{*0} } π ^ - v_tau } right) = left( {0.25 ± 0.10 ± 0.05} right)% , B r (τ-→ K *0 K - v τ)= (0.20±0.05±0.04)%, and B r (τ-→ K *- X 0 v τ) =(1.15±0.15-0.18 +0.13)%.

  3. Exploring the simplest purely baryonic decay processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, C. Q.; Hsiao, Y. K.; Rodrigues, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    Though not considered in general, purely baryonic decays could shed light on the puzzle of the baryon number asymmetry in the universe by means of a better understanding of the baryonic nature of our matter world. As such, they constitute a yet unexplored class of decay processes worth investigating. We propose to search for purely baryonic decay processes at the LHCb experiment. No such type of decay has ever been observed. In particular, we concentrate on the decay Λb0→p p ¯n , which is the simplest purely baryonic decay mode, with solely spin-1 /2 baryons involved. We predict its decay branching ratio to be B (Λb0→p p ¯ n )=(2. 0-0.2+0.3)×10-6 , which is sufficiently large to make the decay mode accessible to LHCb. Our study can be extended to other purely baryonic decays such as Λb0→p p ¯ Λ , Λb0→Λ p ¯ Λ , and Λb0→Λ Λ ¯Λ , as well as to similar decays of antitriplet b baryons such as Ξb0 ,-.

  4. Sbottom discovery via mixed decays at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Su, Shufang; Wu, Yongcheng; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Huanian

    2015-12-01

    In the search for the bottom squark (sbottom) in supersymmetry (SUSY) at the LHC, the common practice has been to assume a 100% decay branching fraction for a given search channel. In realistic minimal supersymmetric Standard Model scenarios, there are often more than one significant decay modes to be present, which significantly weaken the current sbottom search limits at the LHC. On the other hand, the combination of the multiple decay modes offers alternative discovery channels for sbottom searches. In this paper, we present the sbottom decays in a few representative mass parameter scenarios. We then analyze the sbottom signal for the pair production in QCD with one sbottom decaying via b ˜ →b χ10 , b χ20 , and the other one decaying via b ˜→t χ1±. With the gaugino subsequent decaying to gauge bosons or a Higgs boson χ20→Z χ10 , h χ10 and χ1±→W±χ10, we study the reach of those signals at the 14 TeV LHC with 300 fb-1 integrated luminosity. For a left-handed bottom squark, we find that a mass up to 920 GeV can be discovered at 5 σ significance for 250 GeV 0 ); similarly, it can be discovered up to 840 GeV, or excluded up to 900 GeV at the 95% confidence level for the Z channel (μ <0 ). The top squark reach is close to that of the bottom squark. The sbottom and stop signals in the same SUSY parameter scenario are combined to obtain the optimal sensitivity, which is about 150 GeV better than the individual reach of the sbottom or stop. For a right-handed bottom squark with the b ˜ b˜ *→b χ10 , t χ1± channel, we find that the sbottom mass up to 880 GeV can be discovered at 5 σ significance, or excluded up to 1060 GeV at the 95% confidence level.

  5. Modeling Radionuclide Decay Chain Migration Using HYDROGEOCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. C.; Tsai, C. H.; Lai, K. H.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear technology has been employed for energy production for several decades. Although people receive many benefits from nuclear energy, there are inevitably environmental pollutions as well as human health threats posed by the radioactive materials releases from nuclear waste disposed in geological repositories or accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities. Theoretical studies have been undertaken to understand the transport of radionuclides in subsurface environments because that the radionuclide transport in groundwater is one of the main pathway in exposure scenarios for the intake of radionuclides. The radionuclide transport in groundwater can be predicted using analytical solution as well as numerical models. In this study, we simulate the transport of the radionuclide decay chain using HYDROGEOCHEM. The simulated results are verified against the analytical solution available in the literature. Excellent agreements between the numerical simulation and the analytical are observed for a wide spectrum of concentration. HYDROGECHEM is a useful tool assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  6. Multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a clonal plasma cell malignancy that accounts for slightly more than 10% of all hematologic cancers. In this paper, we present a historically focused review of the disease, from the description of the first case in 1844 to the present. The evolution of drug therapy and stem-cell transplantation for the treatment of myeloma, as well as the development of new agents, is discussed. We also provide an update on current concepts of diagnosis and therapy, with an emphasis on how treatments have emerged from a historical perspective after certain important discoveries and the results of experimental studies. PMID:18332230

  7. Multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Files, Daniel Kane; Jausurawong, Tani; Katrajian, Ruba; Danoff, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, debilitating disease that can have devastating effects. Presentation varies widely in symptoms, pace, and progression. In addition to a thorough history and physical examination, diagnostic tools required to diagnose MS and exclude other diagnoses include MRI, evoked potential testing, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Although the disease is not curable presently, quality of life can be improved by minimizing the frequency and severity of disease burden. Disease modification, symptom management, preservation of function, and treatment of psychosocial issues are paramount to enhance the quality of life for the patient affected with MS. PMID:25979578

  8. Quantitative Lifetime Unmixing of Multiexponentially Decaying Fluorophores Using Single-Frequency Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; van Munster, Erik B.; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W. J.

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative microscopy technique for imaging nanosecond decay times of fluorophores. In the case of frequency-domain FLIM, several methods have been described to resolve the relative abundance of two fluorescent species with different fluorescence decay times. Thus far, single-frequency FLIM methods generally have been limited to quantifying two species with monoexponential decay. However, multiexponential decays are the norm rather than the exception, especially for fluorescent proteins and biological samples. Here, we describe a novel method for determining the fractional contribution in each pixel of an image of a sample containing two (multiexponentially) decaying species using single-frequency FLIM. We demonstrate that this technique allows the unmixing of binary mixtures of two spectrally identical cyan or green fluorescent proteins, each with multiexponential decay. Furthermore, because of their spectral identity, quantitative images of the relative molecular abundance of these fluorescent proteins can be generated that are independent of the microscope light path. The method is rigorously tested using samples of known composition and applied to live cell microscopy using cells expressing multiple (multiexponentially decaying) fluorescent proteins. PMID:18359789

  9. Shallow Decay of Early X-Ray Afterglows from Inhomogeneous Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Ioka, Kunihito; Yamazaki, Ryo; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-04-01

    Almost all the X-ray afterglows of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite have a shallow decay phase in their first few thousand seconds. We show that in an inhomogeneous-jet model (multiple-subjet or patchy-shell), the superposition of the afterglows of off-axis subjets (patchy shells) can produce the shallow decay phase. The necessary condition for obtaining the shallow decay phase is that γ-ray-bright subjets (patchy shells) have γ-ray efficiencies higher than previously estimated and that they be surrounded by γ-ray-dim subjets (patchy shells) with low γ-ray efficiency. Our model predicts that events with dim prompt emission will have a conventional afterglow light curve without a shallow decay phase, like GRB 050416A.

  10. K-shell internal ionization and excitation in β decay of 35S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Daisuke; Katano, Rintaro; Isozumi, Yasuhito

    1999-10-01

    Using a flat-crystal x-ray spectrometer designed for low-energy photons from radioactive sources, the K-shell internal ionization and excitation (K-IIE) in the β decay of 35S has been investigated by measuring chlorine K x rays from carefully purified 35S sources. We have succeeded for the first time in obtaining a high-resolution spectrum of the Kα x-ray group emitted after the β decay of 35S, which consists of at least six lines, indicating that multiple ionizations and excitations including L and M shells are dominant in the K-IIE process during the β decay of low-Z nuclides. The K-hole creation probability for 35S determined is (2.8+/-0.5)×10-3 per decay, which agrees well with the previous result by Rubinson and Howland within the standard deviation. The comparison with available theoretical calculations is also given.

  11. Bs decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Giurgiu, Gavril; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2010-09-01

    The authors present measurements of the branching ratio and of the polarization amplitudes in charmless B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} decays using data corresponding to 2.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron. The branching ratio in B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} decays is measured relative to the normalization mode B{sub s} {yields} J/{Psi}{phi} be {Beta}(B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi})/{Beta}(B{sub s} {yields} J/{Psi}{phi}) = [1.78 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.20(syst)] x 10{sup -2}. Using the experimental value of {Beta}(B{sub s} {yields} J/{Psi}{phi}) they determine the B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} branching ratio {Beta}(B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi}) = 2.40 {+-} 0.21(stat) {+-} 0.27(syst) {+-} 0.82(BR) x 10{sup -5}. The polarization fractions are measured for the first time in this analysis and found to be: |A{sub 0}|{sup 2} = 0.348 {+-} 0.041(stat) {+-} 0.021(syst); |A{sub {parallel}}|{sup 2} = 0.287 {+-} 0.043(stat) {+-} 0.011(syst); and |A{sub {perpendicular}}|{sup 2} = 0.365 {+-} 0.044(stat) {+-} 0.027(syst).

  12. Statistical interpretation of joint multiplicity distributions of neutrons and charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tõke, J.; Agnihotri, D. K.; Skulski, W.; Schröder, W. U.

    2001-02-01

    Experimental joint multiplicity distributions of neutrons and charged particles provide a striking signal of the characteristic decay processes of nuclear systems following energetic nuclear reactions. They present, therefore, a valuable tool for testing theoretical models for such decay processes. The power of this experimental tool is demonstrated by a comparison of an experimental joint multiplicity distribution to the predictions of different theoretical models of statistical decay of excited nuclear systems. It is shown that, while generally phase-space based models offer a quantitative description of the observed correlation pattern of such an experimental multiplicity distribution, some models of nuclear multifragmentation fail to account for salient features of the observed correlation.

  13. Measurements of Rare B Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Paul C.

    2003-03-05

    We present the results of searches for rare B meson decays. The measurements use all or part of a data sample of about 88 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected between 1999 and 2002 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We study a variety of decays dominated by electromagnetic, electroweak and gluonic penguin transitions, and report measurements of branching fractions.

  14. Rare Z decays and neutrino flavor universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durieux, Gauthier; Grossman, Yuval; König, Matthias; Kuflik, Eric; Ray, Shamayita

    2016-05-01

    We study rare four-body decays of the Z -boson involving at least one neutrino and one charged lepton. Large destructive interferences make these decays very sensitive to the Z couplings to neutrinos. As the identified charged leptons can determine the neutrino flavors, these decays probe the universality of the Z couplings to neutrinos. The rare four-body processes could be accurately measured at future lepton colliders, leading to percent level precision.

  15. Charm nonleptonic decays and final state interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Lusignoli, M.; Pugliese, A.

    1996-02-01

    A global previous analysis of two-body nonleptonic decays of D mesons has been extended to the decays involving light scalar mesons. The allowance for final state interaction also in nonresonant channels provides a fit of much improved quality and with less symmetry breaking in the axial charges. We give predictions for about 50 decay branching ratios yet to be measured. We also discuss long distance contributions to the difference ΔΓ between the DS and DL widths.

  16. Effects of Neutrino Decay on Oscillation Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Kayla; de Gouvêa, André

    2016-01-01

    It is now well accepted that neutrinos oscillate as a quantum mechanical result of a misalignment between their mass-eigenstates and the flavor-eigenstates. We study neutrino decay—the idea that there may be new, light states that the three Standard Model flavors may be able to decay into. We consider what effects this neutrino decay would have on the observed oscillation probabilities.The Hamiltonian governs how the states change with time, so we use it to calculate an oscillation amplitude, and from that, the oscillation probability. We simplify the theoretical probabilities using results from experimental data, such as the neutrino mixing angles and mass differences. By exploring what values of the decay parameters are physically allowable, we can begin to understand just how large the decay parameters can be. We compare the probabilities in the case of no neutrino decay and in the case of maximum neutrino decay to determine how much of an effect neutrino decay could have on observations, and discuss the ability of future experiments to detect these differences.We also examine neutrino decay in the realm of CP invariance, and found that it is a new source of CP violation. Our work indicates that there is a difference in the oscillation probabilities between particle transitions and their corresponding antiparticle transitions. If neutrino decay were proven true, it could be an important factor in understanding leptogenesis and the particle-antiparticle asymmetry present in our Universe.

  17. 7 CFR 51.898 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States.... Slight surface development of green mold (Cladosporium) shall not be considered decay....

  18. 7 CFR 51.898 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States.... Slight surface development of green mold (Cladosporium) shall not be considered decay....

  19. Unique forbidden beta decays and neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-01

    The measurement of the electron energy spectrum in single β decays close to the endpoint provides a direct determination of the neutrino masses. The most sensitive experiments use β decays with low Q value, e.g. KATRIN (tritium) and MARE (rhenium). We present the theoretical spectral shape of electrons emitted in the first, second, and fourth unique forbidden β decays. Our findings show that the Kurie functions for these unique forbidden β transitions are linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie function of the allowed β decay of tritium.

  20. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  1. Unique forbidden beta decays and neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    The measurement of the electron energy spectrum in single β decays close to the endpoint provides a direct determination of the neutrino masses. The most sensitive experiments use β decays with low Q value, e.g. KATRIN (tritium) and MARE (rhenium). We present the theoretical spectral shape of electrons emitted in the first, second, and fourth unique forbidden β decays. Our findings show that the Kurie functions for these unique forbidden β transitions are linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie function of the allowed β decay of tritium.

  2. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Dirk; Forsberg, U.; Golubev, P.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Yakushev, A.; Andersson, L.-L.; Di Nitto, A.; Duehllmann, Ch. E.; Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gross, Carl J; Hessberger, F. P.; Herzberg, R.-D; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kratz, J. V.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Schaedel, M.; Aberg, S.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Brand, H.; Carlsson, B. G.; Cox, D.; Derkx, X.; Eberhardt, K.; Even, J.; Fahlander, C.; Gerl, J.; Jaeger, E.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Mistry, A.; Mokry, C.; Nitsche, H.; Omtvedt, J. P.; Papadakis, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Runke, J.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Thoerle-Pospiech, P.; Torres, T.; Traut, T.; Trautmann, N.; Tuerler, A.; Ward, A.; Ward, D. E.; Wiehl, N.

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution a, X-ray and -ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fu r Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated a-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z = 115. The data includes first candidates of fingerprinting the decay step Mt --> Bh with characteristic X rays. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z > 112. Comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  3. Effects of a decaying cosmological fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Luca; Finelli, Fabio

    2005-06-10

    We present the initial conditions for a decaying cosmological perturbation and study its signatures in the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and matter power spectra. An adiabatic decaying mode in the presence of components that are not described as perfect fluids (such as collisionless matter) decays slower than in a perfect-fluid dominated Universe and displays super-Hubble oscillations. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe first year data constrain the decaying to growing ratio of scale invariant adiabatic fluctuations at the matter-radiation equality to less than 10%. PMID:16090380

  4. [Multiple apheresis].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C

    2007-05-01

    Multiple apheresis makes it possible to obtain at least two labile blood components from a single donor using a cell separator. It can be either multicomponent apheresis leading to the preparation of at least two different blood component types or red blood cell apheresis providing two identical red blood cell concentrates. These techniques available in addition to whole blood donation, are modifying collection strategies in many Etablissements Français du Sang and will contribute to improve stock logistics in the future. In areas with insufficient stock, these procedures will help achieve blood component self-sufficiency. The author first describes the principle underlying different--current or future--techniques as well as their advantages and drawbacks. He finally addresses the potential impact of these processes on the evolution of blood collection and the advantages to be gained. PMID:17521944

  5. Photovoltaic multiplicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queisser, Hans J.

    1997-04-01

    A multicell solar energy converter, produced in 1959/60 at the Shockley Transistor Corporation, is reviewed. The feasibility of this device, one of the first involving principles of Si integrated circuits, was demonstrated in anticipation of large-area Si sheets, to be pulled from Si/Pb binary melts. Secondly, the generation of multiple carrier pairs by absorption of merely one photon is discussed. Experiments on high-quality Si solar cells demonstrated this effect, which relies on inverse Auger generation. In principle, much higher maximal conversion efficiencies would be possible; novel criteria for materials optimization result. The new challenge of the inverse band structure problem arises. Finally, multistage optical transitions via deep centers in solar cells are briefly appraised.

  6. "Radio-Active" Learning: Visual Representation of Radioactive Decay Using Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Lynda; Kagan, David

    2010-01-01

    The idea of using a dice game to simulate radioactive decay is not new. However, modern pedagogy encourages, if not requires, us to provide multiple representations and visualizations for our students. The advantage of interactive engagement methods also has been made clear. Here we describe a highly visual and interactive use of dice to develop…

  7. Cosmology with decaying vacuum energy

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, K.; Adams, F.; Frieman, J.; Mottola, E.

    1987-09-01

    Motivated by recent attempts to solve the cosmological constant problem, we examine the observational consequences of a vacuum energy density which decays in time. For all times later than t approx. 1 sec, the ratio of the vacuum to the total energy density of the universe must be small. Although the vacuum cannot provide the ''missing mass'' required to close the universe today, its presence earlier in the history of the universe could have important consequences. We discuss restrictions on the vacuum energy arising from primordial nucleosynthesis, the microwave and gamma ray background spectra, and galaxy formation. A small vacuum component at the era of nucleosynthesis, 0.01 < rho/sub vac//rho/sup rad/ < 0.1, increase the number of allowed neutino species to N/sup nu/ > 5, but in some cases would severely distort the microwave spectrum. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Testing Supersymmetry with Neutron Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilburn, W. S.; Cirigliano, V.; Klein, A.; McGaughey, P. L.; Makela, M. F.; Morris, C. L.; Ramsey, J.; Salas-Bacci, A.; Saunders, A.; Broussard, L. J.; Young, A. R.

    2009-10-01

    It has been recently realized that the neutrino correlation parameter B in neutron decay is sensitive to Minimal Supersymmetric Models for the case of maximal mixing. B is currently known to a precision of 3x10-3, but a precision of better than 1x10-3 is required to test these models. Improvements in experimental techniques developed for the ongoing UCNA experiment and the planned abBA experiment may allow an improved measurement of B with a precision approaching 1x10-4. An emerging concept for combining these techniques into an experiment to measure B using ultracold neutrons and large-area silicon detectors will be discussed.

  9. Decaying neutrinos in galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Splinter, Randall J.; Persic, Massimo; Salucci, Paolo

    1994-01-01

    Davidsen et al. (1991) have argued that the failure to detect UV photons from the dark matter (DM) in cluster A665 excludes the decaying neutrino hypothesis. Sciama et al. (1993) argued that because of high central concentration the DM in that cluster must be baryonic. We study the DM profile in clusters of galaxies simulated using the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of density fluctuations, and an amplitude previously derived from numerical simulations (Melott 1984b; Anninos et al. 1991) and in agreement with microwave background fluctuations (Smoot et al. 1992). We find that with this amplitude normalization cluster neutrino DM densities are comparable to observed cluster DM values. We conclude that given this normalization, the cluster DM should be at least largely composed of neutrinos. The constraint of Davidsen et al. can be somewhat weakened by the presence of baryonic DM; but it cannot be eliminated given our assumptions.

  10. Decaying neutrinos in galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Splinter, Randall J.; Persic, Massimo; Salucci, Paolo

    1993-01-01

    The DM profile in clusters of galaxies was studied and simulated using the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of density fluctuations, and an amplitude previously derived from numerical simulations and in agreement with microwave background fluctuations. Neutrino DM densities, with this amplitude normalization cluster, are comparable to observed cluster DM values. It was concluded that given this normalization, the cluster DM should be al least largely composed of neutrinos. The constraint of Davidson et al., who argued that the failure to detect uv photons from the dark matter (DM) in cluster A665 excludes the decaying neutrino hypothesis, could be somewhat weakened by the presence of baryonic DM; but it cannot be eliminated given our assumptions.

  11. Properties of a Decaying Sunspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balthasar, H.; Beck, C.; Gömöry, P.; Muglach, K.; Puschmann, K. G.; Shimizu, T.; Verma, M.

    A small decaying sunspot was observed with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife and the Japanese Hinode satellite. We obtained full Stokes scans in several wavelengths covering different heights in the solar atmosphere. Imaging time series from Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) complete our data sets. The spot is surrounded by a moat flow, which persists also on that side of the spot where the penumbra already had disappeared. Close to the spot, we find a chromospheric location with downflows of more than 10 km s^{-1} without photospheric counterpart. The height dependence of the vertical component of the magnetic field strength is determined in two different ways that yielded different results in previous investigations. Such a difference still exists in our present data, but it is not as pronounced as in the past.

  12. Predicting neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, M.; Villanova del Moral, A.; Valle, J.W.F.

    2005-11-01

    We give predictions for the neutrinoless double beta decay rate in a simple variant of the A{sub 4} family symmetry model. We show that there is a lower bound for the {beta}{beta}{sub 0{nu}} amplitude even in the case of normal hierarchical neutrino masses, corresponding to an effective mass parameter vertical bar m{sub ee} vertical bar {>=}0.17{radical}({delta}m{sub ATM}{sup 2}). This result holds both for the CP conserving and CP violating cases. In the latter case we show explicitly that the lower bound on vertical bar m{sub ee} vertical bar is sensitive to the value of the Majorana phase. We conclude therefore that in our scheme, {beta}{beta}{sub 0{nu}} may be accessible to the next generation of high sensitivity experiments.

  13. New Physics in B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivellin, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    While the LHC did not observe direct evidence for physics beyond the standard model, indirect hints for new physics were uncovered in the flavour sector in the decays B → K*µ+ µ-, B → Kµ+ µ-/B → Ke+e-, Bs → øµ+µ-, B → D(*) τv and h → τ±µ∓. Each observable deviates from the SM predictions at the 2 - 3σ level only, but combining all b → sµ+µ- data via a global fit, one finds 4 - 5 σ difference for NP compared to the SM and combining B → D* τv with B → Dτv one obtains 3:9 σ. While B → D(*) τv and h → τv can be naturally explained by an extended Higgs sector, the b → sµ+µ- anomalies point at a Z' gauge boson. However, it is also possible to explain B → D(*) τv and b → sµ+ µ- simultaneously with leptoquarks while their effect in h → τ±µ∓ is far too small to account for current data. Combining a 2HDM with a gauged Lµ - Lτ symmetry allows for explaining the b → sµ+ µ- anomalies in combination with h → τ±µ∓, predicting interesting correlations with τ → 3µ. In the light of these deviations from the SM we also discuss the possibilities of observing lepton flavour violating B decays (e.g. B → K(*) τ±µ∓ and Bs → τ±µ∓).

  14. A search for narrow states in radiative upsilon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.T.

    1986-12-01

    A search for new states produced in radiative UPSILON(1S) decays is accomplished by observing the inclusive photon energy spectrum. A narrow resonance in the energy spectrum indicates the existence of a new state X produced by the process UPSILON ..-->.. ..gamma..X. The analysis is based on approximately 0.44 x 10/sup 6/ UPSILON(1S) events produced at the DORIS II e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. These data were collected with the Crystal Ball detector between April 1983 and May 1986. This analysis finds no evidence for a new state, so upper limits on the branching ratio BR(UPSILON ..-->.. ..gamma..X) are derived, assuming the state X decays primarily to high-multiplicity hadronic final states. In particular, if the state X were a minimal Higgs particle, its primary decay mode would be to the heaviest fermion-antifermion pair energetically available. For the radiative UPSILON(1S) decays studied here, the heavy fermions would be c anti c or s anti s quark states, over most of the relevant Higgs' mass range. The resulting upper limit for BR(UPSILON(1S) ..-->.. ..gamma..X) is highly energy dependent but for X mass between 1.5 GeV and 8.0 GeV, the 90% confidence level upper limit is better than 8.0 x 10/sup -4/. For a Higgs' mass near 5.0 GeV, the upper limit is about 2.0 x 10/sup -4/ which is approximately equal to the lowest order calculation for the Wilczek mechanism. The Wilczek calculation with QCD radiative corrections predict branching ratios below the limits set here for all Higgs' masses.

  15. Semileptonic B Decays at the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzi, Concezio; /INFN, Ferrara

    2006-09-25

    Recent results on inclusive and exclusive semileptonic B decays from B Factories are presented. The status and perspectives of the determination of the CKM matrix elements V{sub ub} and V{sub cb} with semileptonic B decays is discussed.

  16. Strawberry breeding selections for postharvest fruit decay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit from the annual replicated yield assessments for the USDA-ARS strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duchesne ex Rozier) breeding program at Beltsville, MD in 2010 were evaluated for postharvest decay development after storage at 5 °C. A statistically significant correlation between percentage decay o...

  17. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  18. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  19. QCD in heavy quark production and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wiss, J.

    1997-06-01

    The author discusses how QCD is used to understand the physics of heavy quark production and decay dynamics. His discussion of production dynamics primarily concentrates on charm photoproduction data which are compared to perturbative QCD calculations which incorporate fragmentation effects. He begins his discussion of heavy quark decay by reviewing data on charm and beauty lifetimes. Present data on fully leptonic and semileptonic charm decay are then reviewed. Measurements of the hadronic weak current form factors are compared to the nonperturbative QCD-based predictions of Lattice Gauge Theories. He next discusses polarization phenomena present in charmed baryon decay. Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicts that the daughter baryon will recoil from the charmed parent with nearly 100% left-handed polarization, which is in excellent agreement with present data. He concludes by discussing nonleptonic charm decay which is traditionally analyzed in a factorization framework applicable to two-body and quasi-two-body nonleptonic decays. This discussion emphasizes the important role of final state interactions in influencing both the observed decay width of various two-body final states as well as modifying the interference between interfering resonance channels which contribute to specific multibody decays. 50 refs., 77 figs.

  20. a Selection Rule for Multiquark Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.

    By assuming SU(6)CS symmetry for pentaquark decays one finds a selection rule, which strongly reduces the number of states able to decay into a baryon and a meson final state and allows an intriguing identification for the Θ+ particle recently discovered with the prediction of a narrow width.

  1. Search for proton decay: status report 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.

    1984-01-01

    From the various ongoing searches for proton decay (Kolar Goldfields, Nusex, IMB, Kamiokande and HPW experiments) about twenty candidate events for proton decay have so far been reported. Nevertheless, definite evidence for proton decay has not been claimed. There are two main reasons: (1) for any particular candidate event we cannot exclude the possibility that it is due to the interaction of an atmospheric neutrino, and (2) because of the limited resolution of existing detectors each candidate event can usually not be interpreted as a definite candidate decay branch. If we consider only decay branches in which no neutrino is emitted, the ambiguities in interpretation lead to nearly as many candidate decay branches as there are candidate events. We can already say that for most two-body branches the partial lifetime is > 10/sup 31/y. Since the present detectors, including improvements in progress, as well as new detectors under construction, are sensitive only to partial decay times < 10/sup 33/y, one can hope to decide in the next few years whether or not proton decay takes place within this window of opportunity (10/sup 31/-10/sup 33/y). Results for 204 live days of observation with no neutrino background subtracted in the calculation of lifetime limits are tabulated.

  2. Recent applications of the Boltzmann master equation to heavy ion precompound decay phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1988-06-01

    The Boltzmann master equation (BME) is described and used as a tool to interpret preequilibrium neutron emission from heavy ion collisions gated on evaporation residue or fission fragments. The same approach is used to interpret neutron spectra gated on deep inelastic and quasi-elastic heavy ion collisions. Less successful applications of BME to proton inclusive data with 40 MeV/u incident /sup 12/C ions are presented, and improvements required in the exciton injection term are discussed.

  3. Multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Röllig, Christoph; Knop, Stefan; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2015-05-30

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant disease characterised by proliferation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow and typically accompanied by the secretion of monoclonal immunoglobulins that are detectable in the serum or urine. Increased understanding of the microenvironmental interactions between malignant plasma cells and the bone marrow niche, and their role in disease progression and acquisition of therapy resistance, has helped the development of novel therapeutic drugs for use in combination with cytostatic therapy. Together with autologous stem cell transplantation and advances in supportive care, the use of novel drugs such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs has increased response rates and survival substantially in the past several years. Present clinical research focuses on the balance between treatment efficacy and quality of life, the optimum sequencing of treatment options, the question of long-term remission and potential cure by multimodal treatment, the pre-emptive treatment of high-risk smouldering myeloma, and the role of maintenance. Upcoming results of ongoing clinical trials, together with a pipeline of promising new treatments, raise the hope for continuous improvements in the prognosis of patients with myeloma in the future. PMID:25540889

  4. Multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Massimo; Preziosa, Paolo; Rocca, Maria A

    2016-01-01

    Due to its sensitivity to the different multiple sclerosis (MS)-related abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established tool to diagnose MS and to monitor its evolution. MRI has been included in the diagnostic workup of patients with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of MS, and ad hoc criteria have been proposed and are regularly updated. In patients with definite MS, the ability of conventional MRI techniques to explain patients' clinical status and progression of disability is still suboptimal. Several advanced MRI-based technologies have been applied to estimate overall MS burden in the different phases of the disease. Their use has allowed the heterogeneity of MS pathology in focal lesions, normal-appearing white matter and gray matter to be graded in vivo. Recently, additional features of MS pathology, including macrophage infiltration and abnormal iron deposition, have become quantifiable. All of this, combined with functional imaging techniques, is improving our understanding of the mechanisms associated with MS evolution. In the near future, the use of ultrahigh-field systems is likely to provide additional insight into disease pathophysiology. However, the utility of advanced MRI techniques in clinical trial monitoring and in assessing individual patients' response to treatment still needs to be assessed. PMID:27432676

  5. Neutron Decay with PERC: a Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, G.; Abele, H.; Beck, M.; Drescher, C.; Dubbers, D.; Erhart, J.; Fillunger, H.; Gösselsberger, C.; Heil, W.; Horvath, M.; Jericha, E.; Klauser, C.; Klenke, J.; Märkisch, B.; Maix, R. K.; Mest, H.; Nowak, S.; Rebrova, N.; Roick, C.; Sauerzopf, C.; Schmidt, U.; Soldner, T.; Wang, X.; Zimmer, O.; Perc Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    The PERC collaboration will perform high-precision measurements of angular correlations in neutron beta decay at the beam facility MEPHISTO of the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz in Munich, Germany. The new beam station PERC, a clean, bright, and versatile source of neutron decay products, is designed to improve the sensitivity of neutron decay studies by one order of magnitude. The charged decay products are collected by a strong longitudinal magnetic field directly from inside a neutron guide. This combination provides the highest phase space density of decay products. A magnetic mirror serves to perform precise cuts in phase space, reducing related systematic errors. The new instrument PERC is under development by an international collaboration. The physics motivation, sensitivity, and applications of PERC as well as the status of the design and preliminary results on uncertainties in proton spectroscopy are presented in this paper.

  6. Search for CP violation in hyperon decays.

    SciTech Connect

    Zyla, Piotr; Chan, A.; Chen, Y.C.; Ho, C.; Teng, P.K.; Choong, W.S.; Gidal, G.; Fu, Y.; Gu, P.; Jones, T.D.; Luk, K.B.; Turko, B.; James, C.; Volk, J.; Felix, J.; Burnstein, R.A.; Chakrovorty, A.; Kaplan, D.M.; Lederman, L.M.; Luebke, W.; Rajaram, D.; Rubin, H.A.; Solomey, N.; Torun, Y.; White, C.G.; White, S.L.; Leros, N.; Perroud, J.P.; Gustafson, H.R.; Longo, M.J.; Lopez, F.; Park H.K.; Clark, K.; Jenkins, M.; Dukes, E.C.; Durandet, C.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Lu, L.; Nelson, K.S.

    2002-10-25

    Direct CP violation in nonleptonic hyperon decays can be established by comparing the decays of hyperons and anti-hyperons. For {Xi} decay to {Lambda} {pi} followed by {Lambda} to p{pi}, the proton distribution in the rest frame of Lambda is governed by the product of the decay parameters {alpha}{sub {Xi}} {alpha}{sub {Lambda}}. The asymmetry A{sub {Xi}{Lambda}}, proportional to the difference of {alpha}{sub {Xi}}{alpha}{sub {Lambda}} of the hyperon and anti-hyperon decays, vanishes if CP is conserved. We report on an analysis of a fraction of 1997 and 1999 data collected by the Hyper CP (E871) collaboration during the fixed-target runs at Fermilab. The preliminary measurement of the asymmetry is {Alpha}{sub {Xi}{Lambda}} = [-7 {+-} 12(stat) {+-} 6.2(sys)] x 10{sup -4}, an order of magnitude better than the present limit.

  7. Searching for displaced Higgs boson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Csaba; Kuflik, Eric; Lombardo, Salvator; Slone, Oren

    2015-10-01

    We study a simplified model of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson decaying to a degenerate pair of scalars which travel a macroscopic distance before decaying to SM particles. This is the leading signal for many well-motivated solutions to the hierarchy problem that do not propose additional light colored particles. Bounds for displaced Higgs boson decays below 10 cm are found by recasting existing tracker searches from Run I. New tracker search strategies, sensitive to the characteristics of these models and similar decays, are proposed with sensitivities projected for Run II at √{s }=13 TeV . With 20 fb-1 of data, we find that Higgs branching ratios down to 2 ×1 0-4 can be probed for centimeter decay lengths.

  8. Magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    We have observed that some of our model SSC dipoles have long time constant decays of the magnetic field harmonics with amplitudes large enough to result in significant beam loss, if they are not corrected. The magnets were run at constant current at the SSC injection field level of 0.3 tesla for one to three hours and changes in the magnetic field were observed. One explanation for the observed field decay is time dependent superconductor magnetization. Another explanation involves flux creep or flux flow. Data are presented on how the decay changes with previous flux history. Similar magnets with different Nb-Ti filament spacings and matrix materials have different long time field decay. A theoretical model using proximity coupling and flux creep for the observed field decay is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Stick slip, charge separation and decay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.; Kuksenko, V.S.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of charge separation in rock during stable and unstable deformation give unexpectedly large decay times of 50 sec. Time-domain induced polarization experiments on wet and dry rocks give similar decay times and suggest that the same decay mechanisms operate in the induced polarization response as in the relaxation of charge generated by mechanical deformation. These large decay times are attributed to electrochemical processes in the rocks, and they require low-frequency relative permittivity to be very large, in excess of 105. One consequence of large permittivity, and therefore long decay times, is that a significant portion of any electrical charge generated during an earthquake can persist for tens or hundreds of seconds. As a result, electrical disturbances associated with earthquakes should be observable for these lengths of time rather than for the milliseconds previously suggested. ?? 1986 Birka??user Verlag.

  10. Constraining weak annihilation using semileptonic D decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ligeti, Zoltan; Luke, Michael; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2010-08-01

    The recently measured semileptonic D{sub s} decay rate can be used to constrain weak annihilation (WA) effects in semileptonic D and B decays. We revisit the theoretical predictions for inclusive semileptonic D{sub (s)} decays using a variety of quark mass schemes. The most reliable results are obtained if the fits to B decay distributions are used to eliminate the charm quark mass dependence, without using any specific charm mass scheme. Our fit to the available data shows that WA is smaller than commonly assumed. There is no indication that the WA octet contribution (which is better constrained than the singlet contribution) dominates. The results constrain an important source of uncertainty in the extraction of |V{sub ub}| from inclusive semileptonic B decays.

  11. Radioactive decays of highly-charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B. S.; Najafi, M. A.; Atanasov, D. R.; Blaum, K.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Chen, X. C.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, Ch.; Faestermann, Th.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Kovalenko, O.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Maier, L.; Nolden, F.; Piotrowski, J.; Sanjari, M. S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Spillmann, U.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th.; Trageser, Ch.; Tu, X. L.; Weick, H.; Winckler, N.; Xu, H. S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yan, X. L.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.

    2015-05-01

    Access to stored and cooled highly-charged radionuclides offers unprecedented opportunities to perform high-precision investigations of their decays. Since the few-electron ions, e.g. hydrogen- or helium-like ions, are quantum mechanical systems with clear electronic ground state configurations, the decay studies of such ions are performed under well-defined conditions and allow for addressing fundamental aspects of the decay process. Presented here is a compact review of the relevant experiments conducted at the Experimental Storage Ring ESR of GSI. A particular emphasis is given to the investigations of the two-body beta decay, namely the bound-state β-decay and its time-mirrored counterpart, orbital electron-capture.

  12. Multiple direct and sequential Auger effect in the rare gases

    SciTech Connect

    Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Andric, L.; Aoto, T.; Ito, K.; Hikosaka, Y.; Feifel, R.; Eland, J. H. D.

    2006-01-09

    The use of a magnetic bottle spectrometer with synchrotron radiation allows multi dimensional electron spectroscopy to be performed by detecting in coincidence all electrons (2, 3, 4) ejected in multiple ionization events. Multiple Auger effect following inner-shell ionization can be investigated in this way. Application of the technique to rare gases (Xe 4d and Kr 3d) double Auger decay reveals all the energy pathways involved. The dominant decay path proceeds by Auger cascade through autoionizing states of the doubly charged ion. Processes where 3 electrons are involved are also observed as direct double Auger and as involving precursor Rydberg series.

  13. Multiple osteochondromas

    PubMed Central

    Bovée, Judith VMG

    2008-01-01

    Multiple osteochondromas (MO) is characterised by development of two or more cartilage capped bony outgrowths (osteochondromas) of the long bones. The prevalence is estimated at 1:50,000, and it seems to be higher in males (male-to-female ratio 1.5:1). Osteochondromas develop and increase in size in the first decade of life, ceasing to grow when the growth plates close at puberty. They are pedunculated or sessile (broad base) and can vary widely in size. The number of osteochondromas may vary significantly within and between families, the mean number of locations is 15–18. The majority are asymptomatic and located in bones that develop from cartilage, especially the long bones of the extremities, predominantly around the knee. The facial bones are not affected. Osteochondromas may cause pain, functional problems and deformities, especially of the forearm, that may be reason for surgical removal. The most important complication is malignant transformation of osteochondroma towards secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma, which is estimated to occur in 0.5–5%. MO is an autosomal dominant disorder and is genetically heterogeneous. In almost 90% of MO patients germline mutations in the tumour suppressor genes EXT1 or EXT2 are found. The EXT genes encode glycosyltransferases, catalyzing heparan sulphate polymerization. The diagnosis is based on radiological and clinical documentation, supplemented with, if available, histological evaluation of osteochondromas. If the exact mutation is known antenatal diagnosis is technically possible. MO should be distinguished from metachondromatosis, dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica and Ollier disease. Osteochondromas are benign lesions and do not affect life expectancy. Management includes removal of osteochondromas when they give complaints. Removed osteochondromas should be examined for malignant transformation towards secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma. Patients should be well instructed and regular follow-up for early detection

  14. B, D and K Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Artuso, M.; Asner, D.M.; Ball, P.; Baracchini, E.; Bell, G.; Beneke, M.; Berryhill, J.; Bevan, A.; Bigi, I.I.; Blanke, M.; Bobeth, Ch.; Bona, M.; Borzumati, F.; Browder, T.; Buanes, T.; Buchalla, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Buras, A.J.; Burdin, S.; Cassel, D.G.; Cavanaugh, R.; /Syracuse U. /Carleton U. /Durham U., IPPP /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Karlsruhe U. /RWTH Aachen U. /Fermilab /Queen Mary, U. of London /Notre Dame U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Dortmund U. /Annecy, LAPP /ICTP, Trieste /Taiwan, Natl. Central U. /Hawaii U. /Bergen U. /Munich U. /CERN /Liverpool U.

    2008-03-07

    The present report documents the results of Working Group 2: B, D and K decays, of the workshop on Flavor in the Era of the LHC, held at CERN from November 2005 through March 2007. With the advent of the LHC, we will be able to probe New Physics (NP) up to energy scales almost one order of magnitude larger than it has been possible with present accelerator facilities. While direct detection of new particles will be the main avenue to establish the presence of NP at the LHC, indirect searches will provide precious complementary information, since most probably it will not be possible to measure the full spectrum of new particles and their couplings through direct production. In particular, precision measurements and computations in the realm of flavor physics are expected to play a key role in constraining the unknown parameters of the Lagrangian of any NP model emerging from direct searches at the LHC. The aim of Working Group 2 was twofold: on one hand, to provide a coherent, up-to-date picture of the status of flavor physics before the start of the LHC; on the other hand, to initiate activities on the path towards integrating information on NP from high-p{sub T} and flavor data. This report is organized as follows. In Sec. 1, we give an overview of NP models, focusing on a few examples that have been discussed in some detail during the workshop, with a short description of the available computational tools for flavor observables in NP models. Sec. 2 contains a concise discussion of the main theoretical problem in flavor physics: the evaluation of the relevant hadronic matrix elements for weak decays. Sec. 3 contains a detailed discussion of NP effects in a set of flavor observables that we identified as 'benchmark channels' for NP searches. The experimental prospects for flavor physics at future facilities are discussed in Sec. 4. Finally, Sec. 5 contains some assessments on the work done at the workshop and the prospects for future developments.

  15. B, D and K decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchalla, G.; Komatsubara, T. K.; Muheim, F.; Silvestrini, L.; Artuso, M.; Asner, D. M.; Ball, P.; Baracchini, E.; Bell, G.; Beneke, M.; Berryhill, J.; Bevan, A.; Bigi, I. I.; Blanke, M.; Bobeth, Ch.; Bona, M.; Borzumati, F.; Browder, T.; Buanes, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Buras, A. J.; Burdin, S.; Cassel, D. G.; Cavanaugh, R.; Ciuchini, M.; Colangelo, P.; Crosetti, G.; Dedes, A.; de Fazio, F.; Descotes-Genon, S.; Dickens, J.; Doležal, Z.; Dürr, S.; Egede, U.; Eggel, C.; Eigen, G.; Fajfer, S.; Feldmann, Th.; Ferrandes, R.; Gambino, P.; Gershon, T.; Gibson, V.; Giorgi, M.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golob, B.; Golutvin, A.; Grossman, Y.; Guadagnoli, D.; Haisch, U.; Hazumi, M.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hiller, G.; Hitlin, D.; Huber, T.; Hurth, T.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Isidori, G.; Jäger, S.; Khodjamirian, A.; Koppenburg, P.; Lagouri, T.; Langenegger, U.; Lazzeroni, C.; Lenz, A.; Lubicz, V.; Lucha, W.; Mahlke, H.; Melikhov, D.; Mescia, F.; Misiak, M.; Nakao, M.; Napolitano, J.; Nikitin, N.; Nierste, U.; Oide, K.; Okada, Y.; Paradisi, P.; Parodi, F.; Patel, M.; Petrov, A. A.; Pham, T. N.; Pierini, M.; Playfer, S.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Poschenrieder, A.; Raimondi, P.; Recksiegel, S.; Řezníček, P.; Robert, A.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruggiero, G.; Sarti, A.; Schneider, O.; Schwab, F.; Simula, S.; Sivoklokov, S.; Slavich, P.; Smith, C.; Smizanska, M.; Soni, A.; Speer, T.; Spradlin, P.; Spranger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Stech, B.; Stocchi, A.; Stone, S.; Tarantino, C.; Teubert, F.; T'jampens, S.; Toms, K.; Trabelsi, K.; Trine, S.; Uhlig, S.; Vagnoni, V.; van Hunen, J. J.; Weiglein, G.; Weiler, A.; Wilkinson, G.; Xie, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Zhu, G.; Zupan, J.; Zwicky, R.

    2008-09-01

    The present report documents the results of Working Group 2: B, D and K decays, of the workshop on Flavor in the Era of the LHC, held at CERN from November 2005 through March 2007. With the advent of the LHC, we will be able to probe New Physics (NP) up to energy scales almost one order of magnitude larger than it has been possible with present accelerator facilities. While direct detection of new particles will be the main avenue to establish the presence of NP at the LHC, indirect searches will provide precious complementary information, since most probably it will not be possible to measure the full spectrum of new particles and their couplings through direct production. In particular, precision measurements and computations in the realm of flavor physics are expected to play a key role in constraining the unknown parameters of the Lagrangian of any NP model emerging from direct searches at the LHC. The aim of Working Group 2 was twofold: on the one hand, to provide a coherent up-to-date picture of the status of flavor physics before the start of the LHC; on the other hand, to initiate activities on the path towards integrating information on NP from high- p T and flavor data. This report is organized as follows: in Sect. 1, we give an overview of NP models, focusing on a few examples that have been discussed in some detail during the workshop, with a short description of the available computational tools for flavor observables in NP models. Section 2 contains a concise discussion of the main theoretical problem in flavor physics: the evaluation of the relevant hadronic matrix elements for weak decays. Section 3 contains a detailed discussion of NP effects in a set of flavor observables that we identified as “benchmark channels” for NP searches. The experimental prospects for flavor physics at future facilities are discussed in Sect. 4. Finally, Sect. 5 contains some assessments on the work done at the workshop and the prospects for future developments.

  16. Multiple System Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple System Atrophy Information Page Condensed from Multiple System Atrophy ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Multiple System Atrophy? Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive ...

  17. Penguin diagram dominance in radiative weak decays of bottom baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2005-05-01

    Radiative weak decays of antitriplet bottom baryons are studied under the assumption of penguin diagram dominance and flavor-SU(3) (or SU(2)) symmetry. Relations among decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  18. In-flight decay spectroscopy of exotic light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Charity, R. J.

    2012-11-20

    In-flight-decay spectroscopy is discussed, including its advantages and disadvantages. In particular the use of in-flight-decay spectroscopy for the study of two-proton decay along isobaric multiplets in highlighted.

  19. Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Carsten; /SLAC

    2009-01-22

    Recent results of tau lepton decay studies based on luminosities between 350 fb{sup -1} and 469 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. The analyses reported here are Charged Current Lepton Universality and measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}, and K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied. decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  20. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 45 measurements during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic storm have confirmed that the charge exchange decay mechanism can account for the decay of the storm-time proton ring current. Data from the moderate magnetic storm of 24 February 1972 was selected for study since a symmetrical ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5 to 30 keV decayed throughout the L-value range of 3.5 to 5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn. After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange can entirely account for the storm-time proton ring current decay, and that this mechanism must be considered in all studies involving the loss of proton ring current particles.

  1. Beta decay of 187Re and cosmochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashktorab, K.; Jänecke, J. W.; Becchetti, F. D.

    1993-06-01

    Uncertainties which limit the use of the 187-187Os isobaric pair as a cosmochronometer for the age of the galaxy and the universe include those of the partial half-lives of the continuum and bound-state decays of 187Re. While the total half-life of the decay is well established, the partial half-life for the continuum decay is uncertain, and several previous measurements are not compatible with each other. A high-temperature quartz proportional counter has been used in this work to remeasure the continuum decay of 187Re by introducing a metallo-organic rhenium compound into the counting gas. The measured beta end-point energy for the continuum decay of neutral 187Re to singly ionized 187Os of 2.70+/-0.09 keV agrees with earlier results. However, the present half-life measurement of (45+/-3) Gyr agrees within the quoted uncertainties only with the earlier measurement of Payne [Ph.D. thesis, University of Glasgow, 1965 (unpublished)] and Drever (private communication). The new half-life for the continuum decay and the total half-life of (43.5+/-1.3) Gyr, as reported by Linder et al. [Nature (London) 320, 246 (1986)] yield a branching ratio for the bound-state decay into discrete atomic states of (3+/-6)%. This is in agreement with the most recent calculated theoretical branching ratio of approximately 1%.

  2. Phasor plots of luminescence decay functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberan-Santos, Mário N.

    2015-03-01

    Luminescence decay functions describe the time dependence of the intensity of radiation emitted by electronically excited species. Decay phasor plots (plots of the Fourier sine transform vs. the Fourier cosine transform, for one or several angular frequencies) are being increasingly used in fluorescence, namely in lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this work, a detailed study of the sum of two exponentials decay function is carried out revealing that sub-exponential, super-exponential and unimodal decays have different phasor signatures. A generalization of the lever rule is obtained, and the existence of an outermost phasor curve corresponding to intermediate-like decays is demonstrated. A study of the behavior of more complex decay functions (sum of three exponentials, stretched and compressed exponentials, phosphorescence with reabsorption and triplet-triplet annihilation, fluorescence with quantum beats) allows concluding that a rich diversity of phasor plot patterns exists. In particular, super-exponential decays can present complex shapes, spiraling at high frequencies. The concept of virtual phasor is also introduced.

  3. Particle physics: CP violation in hyperon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Michael J.

    2000-10-31

    The primary research activities under this grant were in E871 (HyperCP) at Fermilab, a search for CP violation in hyperon decays which completed data taking in January, 2000. HyperCP is an experiment designed to perform a sensitive search for direct CP violation in the decays of cascade ({Xi}) and {Lambda} hyperons by looking for an asymmetry between particle and antiparticle decay parameters. The experiment is expected to achieve a sensitivity {approx}10{sup -4} in the decay parameters. Standard model predictions for this CP-violating asymmetry range from 0.3 to 5 x 10{sup -4}. A difference between the decay parameters for particle and antiparticle is direct evidence that CP symmetry is violated. A non-zero asymmetry would be the first evidence for CP violation outside of the K{sup o} system. Recent results from KTeV indicate a direct CP violation in K{sup o} decays, which suggests that CP violation will appear in other decays. In addition, we will look at a number of rare hyperon decays involving muons. These probe important new physics topics such as Majorana neutrinos and lepton number violating processes. The latter are of great current interest because new evidence for neutrino oscillations indicate lepton flavor violation does occur. Our data will lead to an improvement in the limits on branching ratios for these processes typically by three to four orders-of-magnitude. The muon detector construction and data resulting from it have been the responsibility of the Michigan group. We are now leading the analysis of the rare muon-related decay modes, and were responsible for the muon system and beam monitor upgrades for the 1999 run.

  4. Novel method to deal with off-shell particles in cascade decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabortty, Joydeep; Kundu, Anirban; Srivastava, Tripurari

    2016-03-01

    We propose a novel algorithm to compute the width of any generic n -body decay involving multiple off-shell particles having zero and nonzero spins. Starting from a toy example, we show the computations for three different processes that contain spin-0, -1/2 , and -1 off-shell particles. We check that our results match with the existing results at the analytical level. This proposal can be automatized and should be useful to compute the phase space for long cascade decays, without any Monte Carlo sampling.

  5. Linear Transformation Method for Multinuclide Decay Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Yuan

    2010-12-29

    A linear transformation method for generic multinuclide decay calculations is presented together with its properties and implications. The method takes advantage of the linear form of the decay solution N(t) = F(t)N{sub 0}, where N(t) is a column vector that represents the numbers of atoms of the radioactive nuclides in the decay chain, N{sub 0} is the initial value vector of N(t), and F(t) is a lower triangular matrix whose time-dependent elements are independent of the initial values of the system.

  6. Charmless and Penguin Decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco; Collaboration, for the CDF

    2010-12-01

    Penguin transitions play a key role in the search of New Physics hints in the heavy flavor sector. During the last decade CDF has been exploring this opportunity with a rich study of two-body charmless decays of neutral B mesons into charged final-state particles. After briefly introducing the aspects of this physics peculiar to the hadron collision environment, I report on two interesting results: the first polarization measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi} decay and the update of the B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} decays analysis.

  7. Radiative Penguin Decays at the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Koneke, Karsten; /MIT, LNS

    2007-11-16

    In this article, I review the most recent results in radiative penguin decays from the B factories Belle and BABAR. Most notably, I will talk about the recent new observations in the decays B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}) {gamma}, a new analysis technique in b {yields} s{gamma}, and first measurements of radiative penguin decays in the B{sup 0}{sub s} meson system. Finally, I will summarize the current status and future prospects of radiative penguin B physics at the B factories.

  8. Suppressed $B_s$ decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco

    2011-05-01

    We review three recent results of the CDF collaboration on B{sub s}{sup 0} suppressed decays: the first search for CP-violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi} decay, where two CP-violating asymmetries expected to be zero in the Standard Model are measured, and the observation and the branching ratio measurements of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi} f{sub 0}(980) and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi} K{sup (*)} decays.

  9. Neutrino signals from dark matter decay

    SciTech Connect

    Covi, Laura; Grefe, Michael; Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David E-mail: michael.grefe@desy.de E-mail: david.tran@ph.tum.de

    2010-04-01

    We investigate different neutrino signals from the decay of dark matter particles to determine the prospects for their detection, and more specifically if any spectral signature can be disentangled from the background in present and future neutrino observatories. If detected, such a signal could bring an independent confirmation of the dark matter interpretation of the dramatic rise in the positron fraction above 10 GeV recently observed by the PAMELA satellite experiment and offer the possibility of distinguishing between astrophysical sources and dark matter decay or annihilation. In combination with other signals, it may also be possible to distinguish among different dark matter decay channels.

  10. Question of Lorentz violation in muon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, J. P.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Wilschut, H. W.; Timmermans, R. G. E.

    2016-06-01

    Possibilities to test the Lorentz invariance of the weak interaction in muon decay are considered. We derive the direction-dependent muon-decay rate with a general Lorentz-violating addition to the W -boson propagator. We discuss measurements of the directional and boost dependence of the Michel parameters and of the muon lifetime as a function of absolute velocity. The total muon-decay rate in the Lorentz-violating standard model extension is addressed. Suggestions are made for dedicated (re)analyses of the pertinent data and for future experiments.

  11. Rare kaon, muon, and pion decay

    SciTech Connect

    Littenberg, L.

    1998-12-01

    The author discusses the status of and prospects for the study of rare decays of kaons, muons, and pions. Studies of rare kaon decays are entering an interesting new phase wherein they can deliver important short-distance information. It should be possible to construct an alternative unitarity triangle to that determined in the B sector, and thus perform a critical check of the Standard Model by comparing the two. Rare muon decays are beginning to constrain supersymmetric models in a significant way, and future experiments should reach sensitivities which this kind of model must show effects, or become far less appealing.

  12. Outdoor measurements of spherical acoustic shock decay.

    PubMed

    Young, Sarah M; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Leete, Kevin M

    2015-09-01

    Prior anechoic measurements of a small acetylene-oxygen balloon explosion were used to study spherical weak-shock decay over short ranges [Muhlestein et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131, 2422-2430 (2012)]. Here, longer-range measurements conducted at the Bonneville Salt Flats with a larger balloon are described. Waveform and spectral characteristics and comparisons of the peak pressure decay with an analytical weak-shock model are presented. Weak shocks persist to at least 305 m, with an amplitude decay that is predicted reasonably well using the model. Deviations are discussed in the context of atmospheric effects and nonlinear ground reflections. PMID:26428831

  13. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, D; Forsberg, U; Golubev, P; Sarmiento, L G; Yakushev, A; Andersson, L-L; Di Nitto, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Gates, J M; Gregorich, K E; Gross, C J; Heßberger, F P; Herzberg, R-D; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kratz, J V; Rykaczewski, K; Schädel, M; Åberg, S; Ackermann, D; Block, M; Brand, H; Carlsson, B G; Cox, D; Derkx, X; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Fahlander, C; Gerl, J; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Krier, J; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Papadakis, P; Ragnarsson, I; Runke, J; Schaffner, H; Schausten, B; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Torres, T; Traut, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Ward, A; Ward, D E; Wiehl, N

    2013-09-13

    A high-resolution α, x-ray, and γ-ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated α-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z=115. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z>112. Comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation. PMID:24074079

  14. {psi}'' Decays to charmless final states

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, Jonathan L. . E-mail: rosner@hep.uchicago.edu

    2005-09-01

    The importance of measuring the non-DD-bar decays of the {psi}''={psi}(3770) resonance is discussed. These decays can shed light on a possible discrepancy between the total and DD-bar cross-sections at the {psi}'', and on a proposed mechanism for enhancement of penguin amplitudes in B meson decays through charm-anticharm annihilation. Measurements (including the {psi}'' line shape) in states of definite G-parity and in inclusive charmless final states such as {eta}'+X are found to be particularly important.

  15. β -decay study of 94Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, K.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Grzywacz, R.; Gross, C. J.; Madurga, M.; Miller, D.; Stracener, D. W.; Batchelder, J. C.; Brewer, N. T.; Cartegni, L.; Fijałkowska, A.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Królas, W.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mendez, A. J., II; Padgett, S. W.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Winger, J. A.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    β decay of neutron-rich nuclide 94Kr was reinvestigated by means of a high resolution on-line mass separator and β -γ spectroscopy. In total 22 γ -ray transitions were assigned to the decay of 94Kr, and a new isomeric state was identified. The new information allows us to build detailed levels systematics in a chain of odd-odd rubidium isotopes and draw conclusions on nuclear structure for some of the observed states. The discussed level structure affects the evolution of β -decay half-lives for neutron-rich selenium, krypton, and strontium isotopes.

  16. Photoproduction and Decay of Light Mesons in CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Amaryan, Moskov Jamalovich

    2013-08-01

    We present preliminary experimental results on photoproduction and decay of light mesons measured with CLAS setup at JLAB . This include Dalitz decay of pseudoscalar and vector mesons, radiative decay of pseudoscalar mesons as well hadronic decays of pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The collected high statistics in some of decay channels exceeds the world data by an order of magnitude and some other decay modes are observed for the first time. It is shown how the CLAS data will improve the world data on transition form factors of light mesons, Dalitz plot analyses, branching ratios of rare decay modes and other fundamental properties potentially accessible through the light meson decays.

  17. RNA decay machines: the exosome.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, Aleksander; Lubas, Michał; Jensen, Torben Heick; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The multisubunit RNA exosome complex is a major ribonuclease of eukaryotic cells that participates in the processing, quality control and degradation of virtually all classes of RNA in Eukaryota. All this is achieved by about a dozen proteins with only three ribonuclease activities between them. At first glance, the versatility of the pathways involving the exosome and the sheer multitude of its substrates are astounding. However, after fifteen years of research we have some understanding of how exosome activity is controlled and applied inside the cell. The catalytic properties of the eukaryotic exosome are fairly well described and attention is now drawn to how the interplay between these activities impacts cell physiology. Also, it has become evident that exosome function relies on many auxiliary factors, which are intensely studied themselves. In this way, the focus of exosome research is slowly leaving the test tube and moving back into the cell. The exosome also has an interesting evolutionary history, which is evident within the eukaryotic lineage but only fully appreciated when considering similar protein complexes found in Bacteria and Archaea. Thus, while we keep this review focused on the most comprehensively described yeast and human exosomes, we shall point out similarities or dissimilarities to prokaryotic complexes and proteins where appropriate. The article is divided into three parts. In Part One we describe how the exosome is built and how it manifests in cells of different organisms. In Part Two we detail the enzymatic properties of the exosome, especially recent data obtained for holocomplexes. Finally, Part Three presents an overview of the RNA metabolism pathways that involve the exosome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Decay mechanisms. PMID:23352926

  18. Radiative And Electroweak Penguin Decays of B

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, Jeffrey D.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-11-09

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are flavor-changing-neutral-current processes that provide powerful ways to test the Standard Model at the one-loop level, to search for the effects of new physics, and to extract Standard Model parameters such as CKM matrix elements and quark masses. The large data samples obtained by the B-factory experiments BaBar and Belle, together with an intensive theoretical effort, have led to significant progress towards understanding these rare decays. Recent experimental results include the measurements of the b {yields} d{gamma} decays B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, the observation of B {yields} K(*){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decays (together with studies of the associated kinematic distributions), and improved measurements of the inclusive B {yields} Xs{gamma} rate and photon energy spectrum.

  19. Rare charm and B decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2003-12-15

    We present results on rare charm and B decays using 65pb{sup -1} of data taken with the CDF detector in Run II. Three results are discussed, a measurement of the relative branching ratios {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi}) and {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi}) and the direct CP-violating decay rate asymmetry, and a limit on the branching ratio of the FCNC decay D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. We also discuss the prospects for the search for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays.

  20. Rare Decays at the LHCb Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescatore, L.

    2015-06-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons offer a rich playground to make precise tests of the Standard Model and look for New Physics at the level of quantum corrections. A review of recent LHCb results will be presented.

  1. Review of modern double beta decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, A. S.

    2015-10-01

    The review of modern experiments on search and studying of double beta decay processes is done. Results of the most sensitive current experiments are discussed. The main attention is paid to EXO-200, KamLAND-Zen, GERDA-I and CUORE-0 experiments. Modern values of T1/2(2ν) and best present limits on neutrinoless double beta decay and double beta decay with Majoron emission are presented. Conservative limits on effective mass of a Majorana neutrino ( < 0.46 eV) and a coupling constant of Majoron to neutrino ( < 1.3 . 10-5) are obtained. Prospects of search for neutrinoless double beta decay in new experiments with sensitivity to at the level of ˜ 0.01-0.1 eV are discussed.

  2. Semileptonic B-Meson Decays at Babar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigamani, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Presented are selected results from semileptonic B-meson decays at BABAR. Two measurements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vcb| are reported, using moments of the hadronic-mass spectrum in inclusive bar B -> Xc l ^ - bar v decays, and also exclusive bar B -> Dl ^ - bar vl decays. These results are based on data samples of 232 (inclusive bar B -> Xc l ^ - bar v) and 460 (exclusive bar B -> Dl ^ - bar vl ) million Υ (4S) -> Bbar B decays recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e-storage rings. Semileptonic events are identified by requiring a lepton (e or μ) in events tagged by a full reconstruction of one of the B mesons in the Bbar B pair.

  3. Decay of turbulence at high reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Sinhuber, Michael; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Bewley, Gregory P

    2015-01-23

    Turbulent motions in a fluid decay at a certain rate once stirring has stopped. The role of the most basic parameter in fluid mechanics, the Reynolds number, in setting the decay rate is not generally known. This Letter concerns the high-Reynolds-number limit of the process. In a classical grid-turbulence wind-tunnel experiment that both reaches higher Reynolds numbers than ever before and covers a wide range of them (10^{4}decay rate with the unprecedented precision of about 2%. Here U is the mean speed of the flow, M is the forcing scale, and ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid. We observe that the decay rate is Reynolds-number independent, which contradicts some models and supports others. PMID:25659002

  4. The BNL rare kaon decay program

    SciTech Connect

    Littenberg, L.

    1996-12-31

    The rare kaon decay program at Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. Results from the last round of experiments are briefly discussed. The three experiments currently collecting data are described. Prospects for future experiments are discussed.

  5. Decay of Turbulence at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinhuber, Michael; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Bewley, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent motions in a fluid decay at a certain rate once stirring has stopped. The role of the most basic parameter in fluid mechanics, the Reynolds number, in setting the decay rate is not generally known. This Letter concerns the high-Reynolds-number limit of the process. In a classical grid-turbulence wind-tunnel experiment that both reaches higher Reynolds numbers than ever before and covers a wide range of them (1 04decay rate with the unprecedented precision of about 2%. Here U is the mean speed of the flow, M is the forcing scale, and ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid. We observe that the decay rate is Reynolds-number independent, which contradicts some models and supports others.

  6. Future Challenges for Double Beta Decay Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have shown that at least one neutrino has a mass greater than 50 meV. In the inverted hierarchy pattern of neutrino masses, one would expect an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 15 meV or greater. This fact has led to a strong resurgence of interest in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments that can reach this mass target. If this rare nuclear decay process exists it would demonstrate that Lepton number conservation is violated, that neutrinos are their own anti-particles and the decay rate would give an indication of the neutrino mass. This presentation will summarize the double beta decay experimental program with a focus on the technical challenges that will be faced.

  7. LHC prospects for minimal decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Covi, Laura; Dradi, Federico E-mail: laura.covi@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de

    2014-10-01

    We study the possible signals at LHC of the minimal models of decaying dark matter. Those models are characterized by the fact that DM interacts with SM particles through renormalizable coupling with an additional heavier charged state. Such interaction allows to produce a substantial abundance of DM in the early Universe via the decay of the charged heavy state, either in- or out-of-equilibrium. Moreover additional couplings of the charged particle open up decay channels for the DM, which can nevertheless be sufficiently long-lived to be a good DM candidate and within reach of future Indirect Detection observations. We compare the cosmologically favored parameter regions to the LHC discovery reach and discuss the possibility of simultaneous detection of DM decay in Indirect Detection.

  8. Review of modern double beta decay experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, A. S.

    2015-10-28

    The review of modern experiments on search and studying of double beta decay processes is done. Results of the most sensitive current experiments are discussed. The main attention is paid to EXO-200, KamLAND-Zen, GERDA-I and CUORE-0 experiments. Modern values of T{sub 1/2}(2ν) and best present limits on neutrinoless double beta decay and double beta decay with Majoron emission are presented. Conservative limits on effective mass of a Majorana neutrino (〈m{sub ν}〉 < 0.46 eV) and a coupling constant of Majoron to neutrino (〈g{sub ee}〉 < 1.3 · 10{sup −5}) are obtained. Prospects of search for neutrinoless double beta decay in new experiments with sensitivity to 〈m{sub ν}〉 at the level of ∼ 0.01-0.1 eV are discussed.

  9. The decay of highly excited open strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D.; Turok, N.; Wilkinson, R.; Jetzer, P.

    1988-01-01

    The decay rates of leading edge Regge trajectory states are calculated for very high level number in open bosonic string theories, ignoring tachyon final states. The optical theorem simplifies the analysis while enabling identification of the different mass level decay channels. The main result is that (in four dimensions) the greatest single channel is the emission of a single photon and a state of the next mass level down. A simple asymptotic formula for arbitrarily high level number is given for this process. Also calculated is the total decay rate exactly up to N=100. It shows little variation over this range but appears to decrease for larger N. The formalism is checked in examples and the decay rate of the first excited level calculated for open superstring theories. The calculation may also have implications for high spin meson resonances.

  10. Probing the Planck Scale with Proton Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Larson, Daniel T.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Thormeier, Marc

    2004-04-28

    We advocate the idea that proton decay may probe physics at the Planck scale instead of the GUT scale. This is possible because supersymmetric theories have dimension-5 operators that can induce proton decay at dangerous rates, even with R-parity conservation. These operators are expected to be suppressed by the same physics that explains the fermion masses and mixings. We present a thorough analysis of nucleon partial lifetimes in models with a string-inspired anomalous U(1)_X family symmetry which is responsible for the fermionic mass spectrum as well as forbidding R-parity violating interactions. Protons and neutrons can decay via R-parity conserving non-renormalizable superpotential terms that are suppressed by the Planck scale and powers of the Cabibbo angle. Many of the models naturally lead to nucleon decay near present limits without any reference to grand unification.

  11. Proton Decay and the Planck Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Daniel T.

    2004-10-02

    Even without grand unification, proton decay can be a powerful probe of physics at the highest energy scales. Supersymmetric theories with conserved R-parity contain Planck-suppressed dimension 5 operators that give important contributions tonucleon decay. These operators are likely controlled by flavor physics, which means current and near future proton decay experiments might yield clues about the fermion mass spectrum. I present a thorough analysis of nucleon partial lifetimes in supersymmetric one-flavon Froggatt-Nielsen models with a single U(1)_X family symmetry which is responsible for the fermionic mass spectrum as well as forbidding R-parity violating interactions. Many of the models naturally lead to nucleon decay near present limits without any reference to grand unification.

  12. Decay heat studies for nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algora, A.; Jordan, D.; Taín, J. L.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Caballero, L.; Nácher, E.; Perez-Cerdan, A. B.; Molina, F.; Estevez, E.; Valencia, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Hunyadi, M. D.; Gulyás, J.; Vitéz, A.; Csatlós, M.; Csige, L.; Eronen, T.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Burkard, K.; Hüller, W.; Batist, L.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.; Yoshida, T.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Peräjärvi, K.

    2014-01-01

    The energy associated with the decay of fission products plays an important role in the estimation of the amount of heat released by nuclear fuel in reactors. In this article we present results of the study of the beta decay of some refractory isotopes that were considered important contributors to the decay heat in reactors. The measurements were performed at the IGISOL facility of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. In these studies we have combined for the first time a Penning trap (JYFLTRAP), which was used as a high resolution isobaric separator, with a total absorption spectrometer. The results of the measurements as well as their consequences for decay heat summation calculations are discussed.

  13. Decaying neutrinos: The long way to isotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Basboell, Anders; Bjaelde, Ole Eggers

    2010-06-15

    We investigate a scenario in which neutrinos are coupled to a pseudoscalar degree of freedom {phi} and where decays {nu}{sub 1{yields}{nu}2}+{phi} and inverse decays are the responsible mechanism for obtaining equilibrium. In this context we discuss the implication of the invisible neutrino decay on the neutrino-pseudoscalar coupling constant and the neutrino lifetime. Assuming the realistic scenario of a thermal background of neutrinos and pseudoscalar we update the bound on the (off-diagonal) neutrino-pseudoscalar coupling constant to g<2.6x10{sup -13} and the bound on the neutrino lifetime to {tau}>1x10{sup 13} s. Furthermore we confirm analytically that kinetic equilibrium is delayed by two Lorentz {gamma} factors--one for time dilation of the (decaying) neutrino lifetime and one from the opening angle. We have also confirmed this behavior numerically.

  14. Nonleptonic weak decays of charmed mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Lusignoli, M.; Miele, G.; Pugliese, A.; Santorelli, P.

    1995-04-01

    A previous analysis of two-body Cabibbo-allowed nonleptonic decays of D0 mesons and of Cabibbo-allowed and first-forbidden decays of D+ and D+s has been adjourned using more recent experimental data and extended to the Cabibbo-forbidden decays of D0. Annihilation and W-exchange contributions as well as final state interaction effects (assumed to be dominated by nearby resonances) have been included and are in fact crucial to obtain a reasonable agreement with the experimental data, which show large flavor SU(3) violations. New fitting parameters are necessary to describe rescattering effects for Cabibbo-forbidden D0 decays, given the lack of experimental information on isoscalar resonances. We keep their number to a minimum, three, using phenomenologically based considerations. We also discuss CP-violating asymmetries.

  15. Three-Phased Wake Vortex Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.; Switzer, George S.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed parametric study is conducted that examines vortex decay within turbulent and stratified atmospheres. The study uses a large eddy simulation model to simulate the out-of-ground effect behavior of wake vortices due to their interaction with atmospheric turbulence and thermal stratification. This paper presents results from a parametric investigation and suggests improvements for existing fast-time wake prediction models. This paper also describes a three-phased decay for wake vortices. The third phase is characterized by a relatively slow rate of circulation decay, and is associated with the ringvortex stage that occurs following vortex linking. The three-phased decay is most prevalent for wakes imbedded within environments having low-turbulence and near-neutral stratification.

  16. Probing supersymmetry in rare B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    We determine the ability of future experiments to observe supersymmetric contributions to the rare decays B {r_arrow} X{sub s}{gamma} and B {r_arrow} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -}. A global fit to the Wilson coefficients which contribute to these decays is performed from Monte Carlo generated data. This fit is then compared to supersymmetric predictions for several different patterns of the superpartner spectrum.

  17. Single-Majoron emission in. mu. decay

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, A.; Pich, A.; Bernabeu, J.

    1985-11-01

    The ..mu -->..etheta and ..mu -->..erho/sub L/ decays, where theta is a Nambu-Goldstone boson associated with the B-L breakdown and rho/sub L/ is a very light neutral Higgs boson, are evaluated in the framework of the triplet model of Gelmini and Roncadelli. It is shown that the widths of these decay modes may be comparable to the ..mu -->..e..gamma.. one.

  18. Cosmic string catalysis of skyrmion decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Davis, Anne-Christine; Brandenberger, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The Callan-Witten picture is developed for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay in order to analyze the corresponding cosmic string scenario. It is discovered that cosmic strings (both ordinary and superconducting) can catalyze proton decay, but that this catalysis only occurs on the scale of the core of the string. In order to do this we have to develop a vortex model for the superconducting string. An argument is also given for the difference in the enhancement factors for monopoles and strings.

  19. Radiative decays of dynamically generated charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Gamermann, D.; Jimenez-Tejero, C. E.; Ramos, A.

    2011-04-01

    In this work we study the radiative decay of dynamically generated J{sup P}=(1{sup -}/2) charm baryons into the ground state J{sup P}=(1{sup +}/2) baryons. Since different theoretical interpretations of these baryonic resonances and, in particular, of the {Lambda}{sub c}(2595), give different predictions, a precise experimental measurement of these decays would be an important step for understanding their nature.

  20. Searches for neutrinoless double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenheuer, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a lepton number violating process whose observation would also establish that neutrinos are their own anti-particles. There are many experimental efforts with a variety of techniques. Some (EXO, Kamland-Zen, GERDA phase I and CANDLES) started take data in 2011 and EXO has reported the first measurement of the half life for the double beta decay with two neutrinos of 136Xe. The sensitivities of the different proposals are reviewed.

  1. Decay properties of double heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-08-05

    We study the semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  2. Rare meson decays into very light neutralinos

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, Ben

    2010-02-10

    Results are presented for the two-body decays of mesons into light neutralinos and from the first complete calculation of the loop-induced decays of kaons to pions plus light neutralinos and of B mesons to kaons plus light neutralinos. The branching ratios are shown to be strongly suppressed within the MSSM with minimal flavor violation, and no bounds on the neutralino mass can be inferred from experimental data, i.e. a massless neutralino is allowed.

  3. An electroweak enigma: Hyperon radiative decays

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyov, A.,; Jastrzembski, E.; Lach, J.; Marriner, J.; Golovtsov, V.; Krivshich, A.; Schegelsky, V.; Smirnov, N.; Terentiev, N.K.; Uvarov, L.; McCliment, E.; Newsom, C.; Norbeck, E.; Cooper, P.S.; /Yale U.

    1985-04-03

    The main thrust of this experiment will be to measure the asymmetry parameter for the electroweak decay {Sigma}{sup +} {yields} p{gamma} and verify its branching ratio. As a secondary goal they will measure, or set new upper limits for, the branching ratio of the electroweak decay {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{gamma}. Since the {Xi}{sup -} are expected to be polarized, information on the asymmetry parameter may also be available.

  4. Rare top quark decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2006-09-25

    Flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decays t {yields} H0 + c, t {yields} Z + c, and H0 {yields} t + c-bar are discussed in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions where FCNC decays may take place at tree-level and are only suppressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks, which is poorly constraint by current experimental values. The non-manifest case is also briefly discussed.

  5. Cosmic strings and baryon decay catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Perkins, W. B.; Davis, A.-C.; Brandenberger, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Cosmic strings, like monopoles, can catalyze proton decay. For integer charged fermions, the cross section for catalysis is not amplified, unlike in the case of monopoles. The catalysis processes are reviewed both in the free quark and skyrmion pictures and the implications for baryogenesis are discussed. A computation of the cross section for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay is presented using classical physics. Also discussed are some effects which can screen catalysis processes.

  6. Electron capture decay in Jovian planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, R. R.; Schiferl, D.

    1987-12-01

    Following the commonly acknowledged fact that the decay of K-40 substantially contributes to the heating of planetary interiors, an examination is made of the possibility that interior heat in the Jovian planets and stars, where interior pressures may exceed 45 Mbar, may be generated by the pressure-accelerated electron capture decay of a variety of isotopes. The isotopes considered encompass K-40, V-50, Te-123, La-138, Al-26, and Cl-36.

  7. Rare B Meson Decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Rare B meson decays are an excellent probe for beyond the Standard Model physics. Two very sensitive processes are the b {yields} s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub s,d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays. We report recent results at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from CDF II using 7 fb{sup -1} at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

  8. Exact relativistic {beta} decay endpoint spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, S. S.; Nasri, S.; Schechter, J.; Tortola, M. A.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2007-10-15

    The exact relativistic form for the {beta} decay endpoint spectrum is derived and presented in a simple factorized form. We show that our exact formula can be well approximated to yield the endpoint form used in the fit method of the KATRIN Collaboration. We also discuss the three-neutrino case and how information from neutrino oscillation experiments may be useful in analyzing future {beta} decay endpoint experiments.

  9. The weak decay of helium hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Athanas, M.J.

    1992-08-01

    A {Lambda} hyperon replaces a neutron in a nucleus to form a hypernucleus via the {sup A}X(K{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}) {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}X reaction at 750 MeV/c (Brookhaven Experiment 788). The free {Lambda} decay rates {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup {minus}}) and {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} n{pi}{sup 0}) are diminished due to Pauli blocking; but a non-mesonic decay mode, nucleon stimulated decay N{Lambda} {yields} Nn, is present and is detected via the energetic decay nucleon(s) ({approx} 400MeV/c). Measurements of the various hypernuclear decay rates {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup {minus}}), {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} n{pi}{sup 0}) and {Gamma}({Lambda}n {yields} nn) provides insight into the strong modification of the weak interaction such as the baryon-baryon {Delta}I ={1/2} rule. The hypernuclear state is isolated by momentum analysis of (K{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}) target reaction. Out-of-beam large volume scintillation detectors and tracking chambers axe used to make particle identification of the hypernuclear decay products by time-of-flight, dE/dx, and range. The kinetic energy of the decay neutrons are measured by time of flight using the large volume 100 element neutron detector system. The hypernuclear lifetime is directly measured using precision scintillator counters and tracking chambers. Measurements of the various decay rates as well as the total lifetime are discussed for {sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}He.

  10. Vacuum decay in a soluble model

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraz de Camargo F, A.; Shellard, R.C.; Marques, G.C.

    1984-03-15

    We study a field-theoretical model where the decay rate of the false vacuum can be computed up to the first quantum corrections in both the high-temperature and zero-temperature limits. We find that the dependence of the decay rate on the height and width of the potential barrier does not follow the same simple area rule as in the quantum-mechanical case. Furthermore, its behavior is strongly model dependent.

  11. Recent Results on Semileptonic Decays at Babar

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Justine; /Orsay, LAL

    2011-11-07

    Some recent BABAR results on semileptonic decays are presented. They focus on the determination of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub ub}| and |V{sub cb}| in inclusive and exclusive b {yields} u{ell}v and b {yields} c{ell}v decays, and on form factors measurement in exclusive c {yields} s{ell}v decays. Semileptonic decays play a crucial role in the determination of the unitarity triangle parameters: decays of the b quark give access to the CKM matrix elements |V{sub ub}| and |V{sub cb}|, while charm decays provide a way to validate lattice QCD computations through form factors measurements. Such calculations provide theoretical inputs that are used, especially, in the b sector. A lot of new results have been obtained by the BABAR collaboration during the last years, thanks to the large b{bar b} and c{bar c} production cross-sections and to the large recorded statistics. Some of these measurements are presented here.

  12. Power spectrum analyses of nuclear decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P. A.; Lasenby, R. N.; Lasenby, A. N.; Buncher, J. B.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Hoft, A. W.; Horan, T. J.; Jenkins, J. H.; Kerford, J. L.; Lee, R. H.; Longman, A.; Mattes, J. J.; Morreale, B. L.; Morris, D. B.; Mudry, R. N.; Newport, J. R.; O'Keefe, D.; Petrelli, M. A.; Silver, M. A.; Stewart, C. A.; Terry, B.

    2010-10-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are not a direct synchronous modulation. We conclude that the annual periodicity in these data sets is a real effect, but that further study involving additional carefully controlled experiments will be needed to establish its origin.

  13. Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2011-02-01

    Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for D{sub s} semileptonic decay is known to be (17.0{+-}5.3)% lower than those for D{sup 0} or D{sup +}, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing b quarks, this method implies that the B{sub s} semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for B semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For {Lambda}{sub b} semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy-quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub b})/{Gamma}(B)=1.13{+-}0.03 of total decay rates.

  14. Enhanced tau neutrino appearance through invisible decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliaroli, Giulia; Di Marco, Natalia; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The decay of neutrino mass eigenstates leads to a change of the conversion and survival probability of neutrino flavor eigenstates. Exploiting the recent results released by the long-baseline OPERA experiment we perform the statistical investigation of the neutrino invisible decay hypothesis in the νμ→ντ appearance channel. We find that the neutrino decay provides an enhancement of the expected tau appearance signal with respect to the standard oscillation scenario for the long-baseline OPERA experiment. The increase of the νμ→ντ conversion probability by the decay of one of the mass eigenstates is due to a reduction of the "destructive interference" among the different massive neutrino components. Despite data showing a very mild preference for invisible decays with respect to the oscillations only hypothesis, we provide an upper limit for the neutrino decay lifetime in this channel of τ3/m3≳1.3 ×10-13 s /eV at the 90% confidence level.

  15. Decays of the heavy lepton, tau (1785)

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    The structure of the weak hadronic current coupled to the tau is investigated via some of the hadronic decays of the tau. The vector current coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. rho ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The axial-vector coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The Cabibbo structure of the hadronic current is established by observing the decay tau ..-->.. K*(890)..nu../sub tau/ and measuring its branching ratio. The branching ratios for the decays tau ..-->.. e anti ..nu../sub e/..nu../sub tau/ and tau ..-->.. ..mu.. anti ..nu../sub ..mu../..nu../sub tau/ are measured as a normalization for the hadronic decays and as a check on the validity of the measurements. The leptonic branching ratios agree well with previous experiments. From a kinematic fit to the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, an upper limit (95% confidence level) of 245 MeV is placed on the tau neutrino mass. From a simultaneous fit of the center of mass energy dependence of the tau production cross section and the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, the tau mass is determined to be 1.787 +- .010 GeV/c. All properties of the tau measured here are consistent with it being a sequential lepton coupled to the ordinary weak hadronic current.

  16. Decay Data Evaluation Project: Evaluation of (52)Fe nuclear decay data.

    PubMed

    Luca, Aurelian

    2016-03-01

    Within the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP) and the IAEA Coordinated Research Project no. F41029, the evaluation of the nuclear decay data of (52)Fe, a radionuclide of interest in nuclear medicine, was performed. The main nuclear decay data evaluated are: the half-life, decay energy, energies and probabilities of the electron capture and β(+) transitions, internal conversion coefficients and gamma-ray energies and emission intensities. This new evaluation, made using the DDEP methodology and tools, was included in the DDEP database NUCLEIDE. PMID:26688358

  17. Multiple Assessments for Multiple Intelligences. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellanca, James; Chapman, Carolyn; Swartz, Elizabeth

    This book is designed to align assessment with instructional practices that promote the development of the multiple intelligences outlined by Howard Gardner. To facilitate the use of multiple assessments for the multiple intelligences, the information in this book is transferable to the classroom. The book explains how a teacher can design…

  18. Improved cosmological constraints on neutrino-producing decaying particles

    SciTech Connect

    de Laix, A.A.; Scherrer, R.J. )

    1993-07-15

    We derive improved cosmological constraints on decaying particles which produce neutrinos but no electromagnetically or strongly interacting particles in their decay. The neutrinos produced in these decays can annihilate with cosmic background antineutrinos or antineutrinos produced in the decay to yield [ital e][sup +][ital e[minus

  19. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. 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M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-11-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at √{s}=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at √{s}=8 TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the γγ, ZZ, W W , Zγ, bb, τ τ , and μμ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. Limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the γγ and ZZ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of m A > 370 GeV in the "hMSSM" simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with W/Z ( Z → ℓℓ, W/Z → jj) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. The use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-11-30

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at √s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at √s=8 TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the γγ, ZZ, W W , Zγ, bb, τ τ , and μμ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. The limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the γγ and ZZ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of mA > 370 GeV in the “hMSSM” simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Finally, direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with W/Z (Z → ℓℓ, W/Z → jj) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. As a result, the use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.

  1. Evidence for correlations between fluctuations in 54Mn decay rates and solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsinally, T.; Fancher, S.; Czerny, M.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Heim, J.; Jenkins, J. H.; Nistor, J.; O'Keefe, D.

    2016-02-01

    Following recent indications that several radioactive isotopes show fluctuating decay rates which may be influenced by solar activity, we present findings from a 2 year period of data collection on 54Mn. Measurements were recorded hourly from a 1 μCi sample of 54Mn monitored from January 2010-December 2011. A series of signal-detection algorithms determine regions of statistically significant fluctuations in decay behaviour from the expected exponential form. The 239 decay flags identified during this interval were compared to daily distributions of multiple solar indices, generated by NOAA, which are associated with heightened solar activity. The indices were filtered to provide a list of the 413 strongest events during a coincident period. We find that 49% of the strongest solar events are preceded by at least 1 decay flag within a 48 h interval, and 37% of decay flags are followed by a reported solar event within 48 h. These results are significant at the 0.9σ and 2.8σ levels respectively, based on a comparison to results obtained from a shuffle test, in which the decay measurements were randomly shuffled in time 10,000 times. We also present results from a simulation combining constructed data reflecting 10 sites which compared and filtered decay flags generated from all sites. The results indicate a potential 35% reduction in the false positive rate in going from 1 to 10 sites. By implication, the improved statistics attest to the benefit of analysing data from a larger number of geographically distributed sites in parallel.

  2. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2015-11-30

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at √s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at √s=8 TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the γγ, ZZ, W W , Zγ, bb, τ τ , and μμ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplingsmore » with mass. The limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the γγ and ZZ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of mA > 370 GeV in the “hMSSM” simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Finally, direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with W/Z (Z → ℓℓ, W/Z → jj) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. As a result, the use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.« less

  3. RAPID ORBITAL DECAY IN THE 12.75-MINUTE BINARY WHITE DWARF J0651+2844

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, J. J.; Winget, D. E.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Mukadam, Anjum S.

    2012-10-01

    We report the detection of orbital decay in the 12.75-minute, detached binary white dwarf (WD) SDSS J065133.338+284423.37 (hereafter J0651). Our photometric observations over a 13 month baseline constrain the orbital period to 765.206543(55) s and indicate that the orbit is decreasing at a rate of (- 9.8 {+-} 2.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} s s{sup -1} (or -0.31 {+-} 0.09 ms yr{sup -1}). We revise the system parameters based on our new photometric and spectroscopic observations: J0651 contains two WDs with M{sub 1} = 0.26 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun} and M{sub 2} = 0.50 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }. General relativity predicts orbital decay due to gravitational wave radiation of (- 8.2 {+-} 1.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} s s{sup -1} (or -0.26 {+-} 0.05 ms yr{sup -1}). Our observed rate of orbital decay is consistent with this expectation. J0651 is currently the second-loudest gravitational wave source known in the milli-Hertz range and the loudest non-interacting binary, which makes it an excellent verification source for future missions aimed at directly detecting gravitational waves. Our work establishes the feasibility of monitoring this system's orbital period decay at optical wavelengths.

  4. Vortex stretching as a mechanism for quantum kinetic energy decay.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Robert M

    2011-06-01

    A pair of perturbed antiparallel quantum vortices, simulated using the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equations, is shown to be unstable to vortex stretching. This results in kinetic energy K(∇ψ) being converted into interaction energy E(I) and eventually local kinetic energy depletion that is similar to energy decay in a classical fluid, even though the governing equations are Hamiltonian and energy conserving. The intermediate stages include the generation of vortex waves, their deepening, multiple reconnections, the emission of vortex rings and phonons, and the creation of an approximately -5/3 kinetic energy spectrum at high wave numbers. All of the wave generation and reconnection steps follow from interactions between the two original vortices. A four vortex example is given to demonstrate that some of these steps might be general. PMID:21702604

  5. Heavy Higgs decay to t t ¯ Z and constraints on a 750 GeV pseudoscalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdom, Bob; Ratzlaff, Melissa

    2016-07-01

    In models with multiple nondegenerate Higgs bosons, the decay chain H /A →A /H Z →t t ¯ Z may have a partial width comparable to the t t ¯ decay mode. We recast the ATLAS standard model t t ¯Z measurement to put limits on the rate for this process. Limits are also set on the two Higgs doublet model at low tan β that are sensitive to a heavy Higgs mass as high as ˜750 GeV . We then discuss the 750 GeV diphoton excess in terms of a pseudoscalar that also has the decays A →H Z and A →H±W∓. These decays strongly constrain the partial widths for A →γ γ and A →g g when combined with the t t ¯ resonance search limits. In a benchmark model the mass of H should be close to 650 GeV.

  6. Bound-state beta decay of highly ionized atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Boyd, R.N.; Mathews, G.J.; Yokoi, K.

    1987-10-01

    Nuclear ..beta.. decays of highly ionized atoms under laboratory conditions are studied. Theoretical predictions of ..beta..-decay rates are given for a few cases in which bound-state ..beta.. decay produces particularly interesting effects. A possible storage-ring experiment is proposed for measuring bound-state ..beta..-decay rates, which will be most easily applied to the decay of /sup 3/H/sup +/. .AE

  7. Quantile regression applied to spectral distance decay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocchini, D.; Cade, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Remotely sensed imagery has long been recognized as a powerful support for characterizing and estimating biodiversity. Spectral distance among sites has proven to be a powerful approach for detecting species composition variability. Regression analysis of species similarity versus spectral distance allows us to quantitatively estimate the amount of turnover in species composition with respect to spectral and ecological variability. In classical regression analysis, the residual sum of squares is minimized for the mean of the dependent variable distribution. However, many ecological data sets are characterized by a high number of zeroes that add noise to the regression model. Quantile regressions can be used to evaluate trend in the upper quantiles rather than a mean trend across the whole distribution of the dependent variable. In this letter, we used ordinary least squares (OLS) and quantile regressions to estimate the decay of species similarity versus spectral distance. The achieved decay rates were statistically nonzero (p < 0.01), considering both OLS and quantile regressions. Nonetheless, the OLS regression estimate of the mean decay rate was only half the decay rate indicated by the upper quantiles. Moreover, the intercept value, representing the similarity reached when the spectral distance approaches zero, was very low compared with the intercepts of the upper quantiles, which detected high species similarity when habitats are more similar. In this letter, we demonstrated the power of using quantile regressions applied to spectral distance decay to reveal species diversity patterns otherwise lost or underestimated by OLS regression. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  8. Parametric Decay During HHFW on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Bernabei, S.; Biewer, T.; Diem, S.; Hosea, J.; LeBlanc, B.; Phillips, C.K.; Ryan, P.; Swain, D.W.

    2005-09-26

    High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating experiments on NSTX have been observed to be accompanied by significant edge ion heating (Ti >> Te). This heating is found to be anisotropic with T perpendicular > T parallel. Simultaneously, coherent oscillations have been detected with an edge Langmuir probe. The oscillations are consistent with parametric decay of the incident fast wave ({omega} > 13{omega}c) into ion Bernstein waves and an unobserved ion-cyclotron quasi-mode. The observation of anisotropic heating is consistent with Bernstein wave damping and the Bernstein waves should completely damp in the plasma periphery as they propagate toward a cyclotron harmonic resonance. The number of daughter waves is found to increase with rf power and to increase as the incident wave's toroidal wavelength increases. The frequencies of the daughter wave are separated by the edge ion cyclotron frequency. Theoretical calculations of the threshold for this decay in uniform plasma indicate an extremely small value of incident power should be required to drive the instability. While such decays are commonly observed at lower harmonics in conventional ICRF heating scenarios they usually do not involve the loss of significant wave power from the pump wave. On NSTX an estimate of the power loss can be found by calculating the minimum power required to support the edge ion heating (presumed to come from the decay Bernstein wave). This calculation indicates at least 20-30% of the incident rf power ends up as decay waves.

  9. Bc production in Higgs boson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Qiao, Cong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    The Bc production rate in Higgs boson decays is evaluated in the nonrelativistic QCD framework. Given that the Higgs total decay width is about 4.20 MeV and the vector Bc* meson decays completely to the ground state, we find that the branching fraction of Bc meson production in Higgs decays is 8.50 ×10-4, where both leading QCD and QED contributions are included. This process is hence detectable in the high-luminosity/-energy LHC. It is found that the coupling of H b b ¯ dominates the processes, and contributions from the triangle top-quark loop and other couplings (H c c ¯, H W W and H Z Z ) are small. In confronting the quarkonia production, we find that the fraction rate of Bc production is more than an order of magnitude bigger than those of charmonium and bottomonium production in Higgs decays. Moreover, various uncertainties and differential distributions of the concerned processes are analyzed carefully.

  10. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  11. Parametric Decay during HHFW on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Wilson; S. Bernabei; T. Biewer; S. Diem; J. Hosea; B. LeBlanc; C.K. Phillips; P. Ryan; D.W. Swain

    2005-05-13

    High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating experiments on NSTX have been observed to be accompanied by significant edge ion heating (T{sub i} >> T{sub e}). This heating is found to be anisotropic with T{sub perp} > T{sub par}. Simultaneously, coherent oscillations have been detected with an edge Langmuir probe. The oscillations are consistent with parametric decay of the incident fast wave ({omega} > 13{omega}{sub ci}) into ion Bernstein waves and an unobserved ion-cyclotron quasi-mode. The observation of anisotropic heating is consistent with Bernstein wave damping, and the Bernstein waves should completely damp in the plasma periphery as they propagate toward a cyclotron harmonic resonance. The number of daughter waves is found to increase with rf power, and to increase as the incident wave's toroidal wavelength increases. The frequencies of the daughter wave are separated by the edge ion cyclotron frequency. Theoretical calculations of the threshold for this decay in uniform plasma indicate an extremely small value of incident power should be required to drive the instability. While such decays are commonly observed at lower harmonics in conventional ICRF heating scenarios, they usually do not involve the loss of significant wave power from the pump wave. On NSTX an estimate of the power loss can be found by calculating the minimum power required to support the edge ion heating (presumed to come from the decay Bernstein wave). This calculation indicates at least 20-30% of the incident rf power ends up as decay waves.

  12. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  13. Exotic muon decays and the KARMEN anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gninenko, S. N.; Krasnikov, N. V.

    1998-08-01

    An anomaly in time distribution of neutrinos from the ISIS pulsed beam stop source observed by the KARMEN collaboration is discussed. We show that the anomaly can be interpreted as a superposition of two exponentials, both having time constants consistent with the μ+ lifetime of 2.2 μs. It is assumed that they both originate from muon decays at rest. One of them describes the time distribution of the prompt neutrino events, while the other describes the time distribution of events from delayed decays of slowly moving (β~=0.02) particles in the KARMEN calorimeter. We propose here that these particles are produced in exotic decays of positive muons μ+-->e++X, resulting in the second exponential time distribution shifted by the time of flight with respect to the time distribution of neutrino events. This model gives an acceptable fit to the KARMEN data if X has a mass of 103.9 MeV. The possible decay modes of this new massive neutral particle are discussed. This hypothesis can be experimentally tested in the near future by studying the low energy part of the e+ spectrum in the μ+ decays.

  14. Positronium Decay and C-Odd Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalsey, M.; Conti, R. S.

    1996-05-01

    Triplet-state orthopositronium (o-Ps) decay rate measurements are in marked disagreement by 0.17% with QED theoretical calculations done up to, but not including order α ^2 radiative and relativistic corrections. The existence of a rare exotic decay branch o-Ps arrow 2γ + X^0 (where X^0 is a neutral, massive C-odd boson) could resolve the discrepancy. We have searched for, but have not found evidence of the X^0 in two recent experiments.(M. Skalsey and R.S. Conti, Phys. Rev. D51), 6292 (1995) and submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. Stringent limits are placed on the exotic decay branching ratio e^+ +e^- arrow X^0 +γ as a function of the X^0 mass and lifetime. The results are interpreted for two distinct models of X^0 interactions and related to o-Ps decay as well as other experiments, including singlet-state parapositronium decay rate measurements. *Supported by NSF grant PHY-9417854 and the University of Michigan.

  15. Experimental puzzles in heavy flavor decays anomalously high {eta}' appearance in charmless strange B decays - flavor SU(3) breaking in charm decays.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; High Energy Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Sciences; Tel Aviv Univ.

    2000-11-30

    Simple experimental tests are proposed which can clarify the origin for the anomalously high {eta}' appearance in charmless strange final states in B decays and can investigate the nature of SU(3) symmetry-breaking in weak heavy flavor decays.

  16. Decay of massive Dirac hair on a brane-world black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Rogatko, Marek; Szyplowska, Agnieszka

    2008-03-15

    We investigate the intermediate and late-time behavior of the massive Dirac spinor field in the background of static spherically symmetric brane-world black hole solutions. The intermediate asymptotic behavior of the massive spinor field exhibits a dependence on the field's parameter mass as well as the multiple number of the wave mode. On the other hand, the late-time behavior power-law decay has a rate which is independent of those factors.

  17. Power Law Decay in High Intensity Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, Timothy; Puga, Alejandro; Nguyen, Baolong; Larue, John

    2015-11-01

    In the study reported herein, the region where the power decay law is applicable for active grid generated turbulence is found by an iterative approach which determines the largest range where the ratio of the dissipation from the power law and the dissipation from the temporal velocity derivative are unity. The square of the Taylor microscale, as noted by Batchelor (1953), is linearly related to downstream distance relative to the virtual origin and can be used in a straightforward manner to find the virtual origin. The fact that the decay of downstream velocity variance is described by a power law is shown to imply power law behavior for various other parameters such as the dissipation, the integral length scale, the Taylor microscale, the Kolmogorov microscale and the Taylor Reynolds number and that there is an algebraic relationship between the various power law exponents. Results are presented for various mean velocities to show the decay exponent as a function of the Taylor Reynolds number.

  18. Correlations and the neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, J.; Poves, A.; Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.

    2009-11-09

    We explore the influence of the deformation on the nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double beta decay (NME), concluding that the difference in deformation -or more generally on the amount of quadrupole correlations- between parent and grand daughter nuclei quenchs strongly the decay. We discuss how varies the nuclear matrix element of {sup 76}Ge decay when the wave functions of the two nuclei involved in the transition are constrained to reproduce the experimental occupancies. In the Interacting Shell Model description the value of the NME is enhanced about 15% compared to previous calculations, whereas in the QRPA the NME's are reduced by 20%-30%, thus, the discrepancies between both approaches diminish.

  19. Microscopic description of superallowed α -decay transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patial, Monika; Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R.

    2016-05-01

    It was recently found that the formation probabilities of α particles in Te isotopes are larger than the corresponding probabilities in Po isotopes. We have done a full microscopic calculation within the framework of the multistep shell model to analyze in detail the formation probabilities and subsequent decays of α particles from 212Po and 104Te. We have also calculated the spectra of these two decaying nuclei and found that the tentatively assigned spin (18+) at 2.922 MeV in 212Po (National Nuclear Data Center, www.nndc.bnl.gov) is predicted to be a state 16+. We also present for the first time the full energy spectrum of 104Te. The evaluated formation amplitudes in both nuclei show that in 104Te there is indeed a superallowed α -decay transition.

  20. Rare decays experimental summary and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Littenberg, L.

    1996-12-31

    I review the status and future prospects of searches for forbidden and highly kaon suppressed decays. This workshop comes as we are poised at the threshold of a new generation of rare K decay experiments. There are new experiments running or about to run at KEK, BNL, FNAL, and CERN. In another year or so these will be joined by the KLOE experiment at DA{Phi}NE. The good news is that it`s a very exciting time. The bad news, at least for a reviewer, is that there aren`t too many new results. Thus I`ll be giving a little more attention than usual to what the experimenters expect to do. My discussion of rare K decays covers processes that are forbidden in the Standard Model, those that highly suppressed and to a smaller extent, those that are merely discouraged.

  1. Decays of doubly charmed meson molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, R.; Nagahiro, H.; Hosaka, A.

    2016-01-01

    If the X(3872), Y(3940) and X(4160) are D*D ¯+c .c ., D*D ¯* and DS*D¯S* molecules, respectively, there should be doubly charmed mesons (D(*)D(*)). In this talk we predict two states with JP = 1+ in the charm = 2 sector, one DD* state around 3850 MeV, other D*D* state with mass around 3970 MeV, and other two similar states in the (charm = 2; strangeness = sector. Besides that, we evaluate the decay widths of doubly charm mesons D*D*(1+), into DDπ and DDγ. These decays are mediated by anomalous couplings D*D* - DD*, with the subsequent decay of D* into Dπ or Dγ.

  2. Factorization in B ---> V gamma decays

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas; Hill, Richard J.; Neubert, Matthias; /Cornell U., LEPP

    2005-03-01

    The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/m{sub b} using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resum perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

  3. Proton decay in the super-world

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, S.

    1986-01-01

    Predictions are elaborated for nucleon decay in supersymmetric grand unified theories (SUSY GUT's). A minimal SU/sub 5/ SUSY GUT is described, as well as SU/sub 5/ breaking. The low energy theory and breaking of supersymmetry are discussed. It is concluded that nucleon decay in SUSY GUT's would be dominated by p ..-->.. K/sup +/anti nu/sub ..mu../ and n ..-->.. K/sup 0/anti nu/sub ..mu../. There are ranges in parameter space for which other decay modes may be significant or may even dominate, it is found. It is noted that minimal SUSY GUT's typically predict a value of sin/sup 2/theta/sub w/ of order .233. 20 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  4. Rare B decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Masato; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    Studying flavor changing neutral current transitions provides important information that helps searches for physics beyond the standard model. In this paper we report on recent measurements of these transitions using data collected by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider, including world-leading limits on the branching fraction of the decay B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, a forward-backward asymmetry measurement in B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays which is consistent and competitive with best B-factories results, and the first observation of the decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}.

  5. Magnetorotational decay instability in Keplerian disks.

    PubMed

    Shtemler, Yuri; Liverts, Edward; Mond, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The saturation of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in thin Keplerian disks through three-wave resonant interactions is introduced and discussed. That mechanism is a natural generalization of the fundamental decay instability discovered five decades ago for infinite, homogeneous, and immovable plasmas. The decay instability relies on the energy transfer from the MRI to stable slow Alfvén-Coriolis as well as magnetosonic waves. A second-order forced Duffing amplitude equation for the initially unstable MRI as well as two first-order equations for the other two waves are derived. The solutions of those equations exhibit bounded bursty nonlinear oscillations for the MRI as well as unbounded growth for the linearly stable slow Alfvén-Coriolis and magnetosonic perturbations, thus giving rise to the magnetorotational decay instability. PMID:24476249

  6. Weak Decays of Excited B Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, B.; Martin Camalich, J.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the decays of the excited (b q ¯) mesons as probes of the short-distance structure of the weak Δ B =1 transitions. These states are unstable under the electromagnetic or strong interactions, although their widths are typically suppressed by phase space. Compared to the pseudoscalar B meson, the purely leptonic decays of the vector B* are not chirally suppressed and are sensitive to different combinations of the underlying weak effective operators. An interesting example is Bs*→ℓ+ℓ-, which has a rate that can be accurately predicted in the standard model. The branching fraction is B ˜10-11, irrespective of the lepton flavor and where the main uncertainty stems from the unmeasured and theoretically not well known Bs* width. We discuss the prospects for producing this decay mode at the LHC and explore the possibility of measuring the Bs*→ℓℓ amplitude, instead, through scattering experiments at the Bs* resonance peak.

  7. Nucleon decay into a dark sector.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman

    2015-02-01

    A sub-GeV dark sector fermion X can have baryon-number-violating interactions induced by high-scale physics, leading to nucleon decay into X+meson and neutron→X+photon. Such processes can mimic standard search modes containing a neutrino, but have different kinematics and may have escaped detection. If a dark force mediated by a light vector Z(d) acts on X, depending on parameters, neutron→X+Z(d) can be important. In typical scenarios, Z(d) decays into ℓ(+)ℓ(-), where ℓ=e,μ, with an order unity branching fraction. Nucleon decay searches can potentially uncover new dark states that are otherwise inaccessible, due to their negligible coupling to ordinary matter or cosmological abundance. PMID:25699434

  8. CP Violation in B Mixing and Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesterinen, Mika

    2013-05-01

    Recent LHCb results on CP violation in B mixing and decays are reported. The analyses are based on 1 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV recorded in 2011. First evidence is presented for CP violation in B± decays to the K±K+K-, π±K+K-, and π±π+π- final states. The CP violating flavour specific asymmetry, asls, is measured to be (-0.24 ± 0.54stat ± 0.33syst) × 10-2, in good agreement with Standard Model expectations. A flavour tagged and time dependent analysis of the decays, Bs → J/ψϕ and Bs → J/ψπ+π-, measures ϕs = -0.002 ± 0.083stat ± 0.027syst rad, in good agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  9. CP violation in hadronic τ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Alakabha; Kiers, Ken; London, David; O'Donnell, Patrick J.; Szynkman, Alejandro

    2007-04-01

    We reexamine CP violation in the ΔS=0 decays τ→Nπντ (N=2,3,4). We assume that the new physics (NP) is a charged Higgs boson. We show that there is no NP contribution to τ→ππντ, which means that no CP violation is expected in this decay. On the other hand, NP can contribute to τ→Nπντ (N=3,4). These are dominated by the intermediate resonant decays τ→ωπντ, τ→ρπντ, and τ→a1πντ. We show that the only sizeable CP-violating effects which are possible are in τ→a1πντ→4πντ (polarization-dependent rate asymmetry) and τ→ωπντ (triple-product asymmetry).

  10. CP violation in B meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, S.; Belle Group

    2003-06-01

    CP violation in neutral B meson decays has been observed confirming the prediction of the Kobayashi-Maskawa model where introduction of six quaks naturally induces CP violation in the weak interaction. The measurements of CP asymmetryc in B meson decays were made at the newly constructed Asymmetric B factories, which consist of high luminosity, ebergy-asymmetric e+e- colliders (KEKB and PEP-II) and detectors (Belle and BaBar). The results are in good agreement and are consistent with other experimental results within the framework of the Standard Model.

  11. Brane decay and an initial spacelike singularity.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shinsuke; Keski-Vakkuri, Esko; Leigh, Robert G; Nowling, Sean

    2006-01-27

    We present a novel string theory scenario where matter in a spacetime originates from a decaying brane at the origin of time. The decay could be considered as a big-bang-like event at X0=0. The closed string interpretation is a time-dependent spacetime with a semi-infinite time direction, with the initial energy of the brane converted into energy flux from the origin. The open string interpretation can be viewed as a string theoretic nonsingular initial condition. PMID:16486680

  12. Laser-induced caesium-137 decay

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Simakin, A V; Shafeev, G A

    2014-08-31

    Experimental data are presented on the laser-induced beta decay of caesium-137. We demonstrate that the exposure of a gold target to a copper vapour laser beam (wavelengths of 510.6 and 578.2 nm, pulse duration of 15 ns) for 2 h in an aqueous solution of a caesium-137 salt reduces the caesium-137 activity by 70%, as assessed from the gamma activity of the daughter nucleus {sup 137m}Ba, and discuss potential applications of laser-induced caesium-137 decay in radioactive waste disposal. (letters)

  13. Search for neutrinoless double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskiy, Igor; O’Sullivan, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    We review current experimental efforts to search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ). A description of the selected leading experiments is given and the strongest recent results are compared in terms of achieved background indexes (BI) and limits on effective Majorana mass. A combined limit is also shown. The second part of the review covers next generation experiments, highlighting the challenges and new technologies that may be necessary to achieve a justifiable discovery potential. A potential synergy with direct dark matter searches, which could be an especially prudent strategy in case the axial vector coupling constant is quenched in 0νββ decay, is emphasized.

  14. DBI analog of a decaying vacuum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessada, Dennis

    2013-07-01

    In this work I discuss the dynamical and thermodynamical equivalence between a general k-essence scalar field cosmology and an arbitrary cosmological model with a decaying vacuum, thus generalizing the approach proposed by Maia and Lima [Phys. Rev. D 65, 083513 (2002)]. The formalism obtained is quite general and holds for any noncanonical scalar field model. As a special case I derive a Dirac-Born-Infeld model with an exponential potential and constant speed of sound, and show that it is equivalent to a cosmological model with decay law Λ(H)=3βH2.

  15. Search for the decay B0-->gammagamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; Laplace, S; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; De Silva, A; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weidemann, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-12-10

    We present a limit on the branching fraction for the decay B0-->gammagamma using data collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e+e- collider. Based on the observation of one event in the signal region, out of a sample of 21.3x10(6) e+e--->Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays, we establish an upper limit on the branching fraction of B(B0-->gammagamma)<1.7x10(-6) at the 90% confidence level. This result substantially improves upon existing limits. PMID:11736494

  16. Double-Beta Decay at TUNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Mary

    2007-10-01

    Studying double-beta decay at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is perhaps one of the most promising ways to pinpoint the neutrino mass. What they do not mention is that to study double-beta decay, you probably have to become a certified miner, and if you have a fear of goats, you should stay away. In this talk, I will tell you some of my experiences as a TUNL graduate student, and how I am now nearly qualified for a job in the mining industry.

  17. Rare B meson decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Walter; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-01

    Rare B meson decays are an excellent probe for beyond the Standard Model physics. Two very sensitive processes are the B{sub s,d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and b {yields} s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays. We report recent results at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from the CDF II and D0 collaborations using between 3.7 fb{sup -1} and 6.9 fb{sup -1} taken during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

  18. Sterile neutrinos in neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Benes, P.; Faessler, Amand; Simkovic, F.; Kovalenko, S.

    2005-04-01

    We study possible contribution of the Majorana neutrino mass eigenstate {nu}{sub h}, dominated by a sterile neutrino component, to neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay. A special emphasis is made on accurate calculation of the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. From the current experimental lower bound on the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay half-life of 76 Ge we derive stringent constraints on the {nu}{sub h}-{nu}{sub e} mixing in a wide region of the values of {nu}{sub h} mass. We discuss cosmological and astrophysical status of {nu}{sub h} in this mass region.

  19. Re-ionization and decaying dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Jubas, Jay M.

    1991-01-01

    Gunn-Peterson tests suggest that the Universe was reionized after the standard recombination epoch. A systematic treatment is presented of the ionization process by deriving the Boltzmann equations appropriate to this regime. A compact solution for the photon spectrum is found in terms of the ionization ratio. These equations are then solved numerically for the Decaying Dark Matter scenario, wherein neutrinos with mass of order 30 eV radiatively decay producing photons which ionize the intergalactic medium. It was found that the neutrino mass and lifetime are severely constrained by Gunn-Peterson tests, observations of the diffuse photon spectrum in the ultraviolet regime, and the Hubble parameter.

  20. Production and decay of Omegac0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-08-10

    We present an analysis of inclusive Omega(c)(0) baryon production and decays in 230.5 fb(-1) of data recorded with the BABAR detector. Omega(c)(0) baryons are reconstructed in four final states (Omega(-)pi(+), Omega(-)pi(+)pi(0), Omega(-)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-), Xi(-)K(-)pi(+)pi(+)) and the corresponding ratios of branching fractions are measured. We also measure the momentum spectrum in the e(+)e(-) center-of-mass frame. From the spectrum, we observe Omega(c)(0) production from B decays and in cc events, and extract the two rates of production. PMID:17930815

  1. Cold positrons from decaying dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Dodelson, Scott; Vives, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often, heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here, we explore the possibilities which arise if one of the products in a (heavyparticle)→(darkmatter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models, but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  2. Study of the radiative pion decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lih, Chong-Chung

    2011-04-01

    We study the radiative pion decay of {pi}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{gamma} in the light-front quark model. We also summarize the result in the chiral perturbation theory. The vector and axial-vector hadronic form factors (F{sub V,A}) for the {pi}{yields}{gamma} transition are evaluated in the whole allowed momentum transfer. In terms of these momentum dependent form factors, we calculate the decay branching ratio and compare our results with the experimental data and other theoretical predictions in the literature. We also constrain the possible size of the tensor interaction in the light-front quark model.

  3. Charmless b-hadrons decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael Joseph; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2008-10-01

    We present CDF results on the branching fractions and time-integrated direct CP asymmetries for Bd, Bs and Lb decay modes into pairs of charmless charged hadrons (pions, kaons and protons). The data-set for these measurements amounts to 1fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy 1.96TeV. We report on the first observation of the Bs->Kpi, Lb-ppi and Lb->pK decay modes and on the measurement of their branching fractions and direct CP asymmetries.

  4. {alpha} Decay of Deformed Actinide Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, T.L.; Kermode, M.W.; Beachey, D.J.; Rowley, N.; Grant, I.S.; Kruppa, A.T.

    1996-07-01

    {alpha} decay through a deformed potential barrier produces significant mixing of angular momenta when mapped from the nuclear interior to the outside. Using experimental branching ratios and either semiclassical or coupled-channels transmission matrices, we have found that there is a set of internal amplitudes which is essentially constant for all even-even actinide nuclei. These same amplitudes also give good results for the known anisotropic {alpha}-particle emission of the favored decays of odd nuclei in the same mass region. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Attractor Explosions and Catalyzed Vacuum Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Daniel; Silverstein, Eva; Starr, David

    2006-05-05

    We present a mechanism for catalyzed vacuum bubble production obtained by combining moduli stabilization with a generalized attractor phenomenon in which moduli are sourced by compact objects. This leads straightforwardly to a class of examples in which the Hawking decay process for black holes unveils a bubble of a different vacuum from the ambient one, generalizing the new endpoint for Hawking evaporation discovered recently by Horowitz. Catalyzed vacuum bubble production can occur for both charged and uncharged bodies, including Schwarzschild black holes for which massive particles produced in the Hawking process can trigger vacuum decay. We briefly discuss applications of this process to the population and stability of metastable vacua.

  6. Halley's comet - Its size and decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, M. K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    1985-09-01

    The outgassing rates inferred from the 1910 apparition and the brightness decay over the previous two millenia are compatible with the minimum nuclear brightness currently observed if the comet nucleus is small, 1.8 - 2.7 km radius with an albedo of 0.1 - 0.2. Outgassing is faster than from a bare nucleus of dirty H2O-ice, which is attributed either to a hot microdust coma or to an organic polymer composition. Halley's comet will decay away within another 45 - 65 apparitions.

  7. Decaying hidden dark matter in warped compactification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang

    2009-09-01

    The recent PAMELA and ATIC/Fermi/HESS experiments have observed an excess of electrons and positrons, but not anti-protons, in the high energy cosmic rays. To explain this result, we construct a decaying hidden dark matter model in string theory compactification that incorporates the following two ingredients, the hidden dark matter scenario in warped compactification and the phenomenological proposal of hidden light particles that decay to the Standard Model. In this model, on higher dimensional warped branes, various warped Kaluza-Klein particles and the zero-mode of gauge field play roles of the hidden dark matter or mediators to the Standard Model.

  8. Attractor explosions and catalyzed vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Daniel; Silverstein, Eva; Starr, David

    2006-07-01

    We present a mechanism for catalyzed vacuum bubble production obtained by combining moduli stabilization with a generalized attractor phenomenon in which moduli are sourced by compact objects. This leads straightforwardly to a class of examples in which the Hawking decay process for black holes unveils a bubble of a different vacuum from the ambient one, generalizing the new end point for Hawking evaporation discovered recently by Horowitz. Catalyzed vacuum bubble production can occur for both charged and uncharged bodies, including Schwarzschild black holes for which massive particles produced in the Hawking process can trigger vacuum decay. We briefly discuss applications of this process to the population and stability of metastable vacua.

  9. Analytical Solution for Multi-Species Contaminant Transport Subject to Sequential First-Order Decay Reactions in Finite Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transport equations governing the movement of multiple solutes undergoing sequential first-order decay reactions have relevance in analyzing a variety of subsurface contaminant transport problems. In this study, a one-dimensional analytical solution for multi-species transport is obtained for finite...

  10. High Multiplicity Searches at the LHC Using Jet Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2012-04-24

    This article introduces a new class of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model that improves the sensitivity to signals with high jet multiplicity. The proposed searches gain access to high multiplicity signals by reclustering events into large-radius, or 'fat', jets and by requiring that each event has multiple massive jets. This technique is applied to supersymmetric scenarios in which gluinos are pair-produced and then subsequently decay to final states with either moderate quantities of missing energy or final states without missing energy. In each of these scenarios, the use of jet mass improves the estimated reach in gluino mass by 20% to 50% over current LHC searches.

  11. Multiple Dynamic Transitions in Nonequilibrium Work Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Jae Dong; Kwon, Chulan; Park, Hyunggyu

    2013-09-01

    The time-dependent work probability distribution function P(W) is investigated analytically for a diffusing particle trapped by an anisotropic harmonic potential and driven by a nonconservative drift force in two dimensions. We find that the exponential tail shape of P(W) characterizing rare-event probabilities undergoes a sequence of dynamic transitions in time. These remarkable locking-unlocking type transitions result from an intricate interplay between a rotational mode induced by the nonconservative force and an anisotropic decaying mode due to the conservative attractive force. We expect that most of the high-dimensional dynamical systems should exhibit similar multiple dynamic transitions.

  12. Multiple acquisition/multiple observation separated local field/chemical shift correlation solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Das, Bibhuti B; Opella, Stanley J

    2014-08-01

    Multiple acquisition spectroscopy (MACSY) experiments that enable multiple free induction decays to be recorded during individual experiments are demonstrated. In particular, the experiments incorporate separated local field spectroscopy into homonuclear and heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. The measured heteronuclear dipolar couplings are valuable in structure determination as well as in enhancing resolution by providing an additional frequency axis. In one example four different three-dimensional spectra are obtained in a single experiment, demonstrating that substantial potential saving in experimental time is available when multiple multi-dimensional spectra are required as part of solid-state NMR studies. PMID:25023566

  13. Multiple Acquisition/Multiple Observation Separated Local Field/Chemical Shift Correlation Solid-state Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple acquisition spectroscopy (MACSY) experiments that enable multiple free induction decays to be recorded during individual experiments are demonstrated. In particular, the experiments incorporate separated local field spectroscopy into homonuclear and heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. The measured heteronuclear dipolar couplings are valuable in structure determination as well as in enhancing resolution by providing an additional frequency axis. In one example four different three-dimensional spectra are obtained in a single experiment, demonstrating that substantial potential saving in experimental time is available when multiple multi-dimensional spectra are required as part of solid-state NMR studies. PMID:25023566

  14. In Australia: Multiple Intelligences in Multiple Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vialle, Wilma

    1997-01-01

    In Australia, Gardner's multiple-intelligences theory has strongly influenced primary, preschool, and special education. A survey of 30 schools revealed that teachers use two basic approaches: teaching to, and teaching through, multiple intelligences. The first approach might develop children's music skills via playing an instrument. The second…

  15. Modes of decay in neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B.; Biswal, S. K.; Singh, S. K.; Lahiri, C.; Patra, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the ground, first intrinsic excited states and density distribution for neutron-rich thorium and uranium isotopes, within the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) approach using axially deformed basis. The total nucleon densities are calculated, from which the cluster-structures inside the parent nuclei are determined. The possible modes of decay, like α-decay and β-decay are analyzed. We find the neutron-rich isotopes are stable against α-decay, however they are very much unstable against β-decay. The life time of these nuclei predicted to be tens of second against β-decay.

  16. Evidence against decay in verbal working memory.

    PubMed

    Oberauer, Klaus; Lewandowsky, Stephan

    2013-05-01

    The article tests the assumption that forgetting in working memory for verbal materials is caused by time-based decay, using the complex-span paradigm. Participants encoded 6 letters for serial recall; each letter was preceded and followed by a processing period comprising 4 trials of difficult visual search. Processing duration, during which memory could decay, was manipulated via search set size. This manipulation increased retention interval by up to 100% without having any effect on recall accuracy. This result held with and without articulatory suppression. Two experiments using a dual-task paradigm showed that the visual search process required central attention. Thus, even when memory maintenance by central attention and by articulatory rehearsal was prevented, a large delay had no effect on memory performance, contrary to the decay notion. Most previous experiments that manipulated the retention interval and the opportunity for maintenance processes in complex span have confounded these variables with time pressure during processing periods. Three further experiments identified time pressure as the variable that affected recall. We conclude that time-based decay does not contribute to the capacity limit of verbal working memory. PMID:22866686

  17. The COBRA Double Beta Decay Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, J. V.

    2007-03-01

    The progress of the COBRA neutrinoless double beta decay experiment is discussed. Potential backgrounds are described. Estimates on the contamination levels of 214Bi in the detectors have been made using previously acquired low background data. New crystals with a different passivation material show an improved background count rate of approximately one order of magnitude.

  18. The COBRA Double Beta Decay Search Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Y.

    2006-11-01

    The COBRA experiment aims to use a large quantity of CdZnTe semiconductor detectors to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The current status of the experiment is discussed, and new limits on several double beta modes are presented. Future plans for a large scale experiment are also described.

  19. The COBRA double beta decay experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldorf, C.; Cobra Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The COBRA experiment is searching for double beta decay using CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. The main focus is on the isotope 116Cd. In addition to pure energy measurements, pixelisation allows also for tracking capabilities. This kind of semiconductor tracker is unique in the field. The current status of the experiment is shown including the latest half-life limits.

  20. The COBRA double-beta decay experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Y.; COBRA Collaboration

    2007-09-01

    The COBRA experiment aims to use a large quantity of Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) semiconductor detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0 υββ). The current status of the experiment is discussed, and new limits on several double-beta modes are presented. Future plans for a large-scale experiment are also described.

  1. Stabilizing oscillating universes against quantum decay

    SciTech Connect

    Mithani, Audrey T.; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2015-07-07

    We investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. However, stability may be achieved for some specially fine-tuned non-vacuum states.

  2. High energy polarized beams from hyperon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    The use of various ways to utilize lambda decays to obtain polarized beams of protons and antiprotons is emphasized. Examples described are the Fermilab polarized beam, now under construction, and the use of similar techniques at other energies. Beam transport, spin precession and reversal systems, and polarimeters are also discussed. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  3. STUDIES OF RADIATIVE PENGUIN DECAYS AT BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, C

    2003-10-27

    The electromagnetic radiative ''penguin'' decays b {yields} s{gamma}, b {yields} d{gamma} are sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model. The authors present recent studies made with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring.

  4. Isospin violation and tensor-glueball decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, A.; Bagchi, B.

    1983-02-01

    We consider the possibility of an isospin-violating decay theta(1640)..-->..E(1440)..pi../sup 0/. We estimate its branching ratio and find GAMMA(theta..-->..E..pi../sup 0/)roughly-equal0.1 keV corresponding to B(theta..-->..etaeta) = 0.5

  5. Scalar Mesons in B-decays

    SciTech Connect

    Minkowski, Peter; Ochs, Wolfgang

    2006-02-11

    We summarize some persistent problems in scalar spectroscopy and discuss what could be learned here from charmless B-decays. Recent experimental results are discussed in comparison with theoretical expectations: a simple model based on penguin dominance leads to various symmetry relations in good agreement with recent data; a factorisation approach yields absolute predictions of rates.

  6. Neutrino masses, Majorons, and muon decay

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, A.; Bernabeu, J.; Pich, A.

    1987-09-01

    The contributions to the parameters xi, delta, rho, and eta in muon decay coming from double Majoron emission, Majorana neutrino masses, and effects of charged scalars are evaluated in the scalar-triplet model. The relevance of these effects for planned experiments is discussed.

  7. Duality and decay of macroscopic F strings.

    PubMed

    Skliros, Dimitri P; Copeland, Edmund J; Saffin, Paul M

    2013-07-26

    We study the decay of fundamental string loops of arbitrary size L/min(n,m)≫sqrt[α'], labeled by (n, m; λn, λ[over ¯]m), where n, m correspond to left- and right-mover harmonics and λn, λ[over ¯]m to polarization tensors, and find that a description in terms of the recent coherent vertex operator construction of Hindmarsh and Skliros is computationally very efficient. We primarily show that the decay rates and mass shifts of vertex operators (n, m; λn, λ[over ¯]m) and their "duals" (n, m; λn, λ[over ¯]m*) are equal to leading order in the string coupling, implying, for instance, that decay rates of epicycloids equal those of hypocycloids. We then compute the power and decay rates associated with massless IR radiation for the trajectory (1, 1; λ1, λ[over ¯]1), and find that it is precisely reproduced by the low energy effective theory of Dabholkar and Harvey. Guided by this correspondence, we conjecture the result for arbitrary trajectories (n, m; λn, λ[over ¯]m) and discover a curious relation between gravitational and axion plus dilaton radiation. It is now possible to start exploring string evolution in regimes where a low energy effective description is less useful, such as in the vicinity of cusps. PMID:23931354

  8. Simplifying the Mathematical Treatment of Radioactive Decay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Derivation of the law of radioactive decay is considered without prior knowledge of calculus or the exponential series. Calculus notation and exponential functions are used because ultimately they cannot be avoided, but they are introduced in a simple way and explained as needed. (Contains 10 figures, 1 box, and 1 table.)

  9. Higgs bosons from top quark decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Ruiz, Richard

    2014-04-01

    In light of the discovery of a standard model (SM)-like Higgs boson (h) at the LHC, we investigate the top quark to Higgs boson transition t→W*bh, which is the leading t→h decay mode in the SM. We find the decay branching fraction to be 1.80×10-9. In comparison, the two-body, loop-induced t→ch transition occurs at ˜10-14 in the SM. We consider the consequences of gauge-invariant dimension-six operators affecting the tt ¯h interaction and find that the decay branching fraction may be increased by a factor of 2 within current constraints on the coupling parameters from collider experiments. We also extend the calculation to the CP-conserving Type I and Type II two-Higgs-doublet models, including both CP-even and CP-odd Higgs bosons. For neutral scalar masses at about 100 GeV, the decay rates can be several times larger than the SM result in the allowed range of model parameters. Observation prospects at present and future colliders are briefly addressed.

  10. Observation of charmless hadronic B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Four candidates for charmless hadronic B decay are observed in a data sample of four million hadronic Z decays recorded by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The probability that these events come from background sources is estimated to be less than 10 -6. The average branching ratio of weakly decaying B hadrons (a mixture of B d0, B s0 and Λb weighted by their production cross sections and lifetimes, here denoted B) into two long-lived charged hadrons (pions, kaons or protons) is measured to be Br(B → h +h -) = (1.7 -0.7+1.0 ± 0.2) × 10 -5. The relative branching fraction {Br( B d(s)0 → π +π -(K -)) }/{Br( B d(s)0 → h +h -) } is measured to be 1.0 -0.3 -0.1+0.0 +0.0. In addition, branching ratio upper limits are obtained for a variety of exclusive charmless hadronic two-body decays of B hadrons.

  11. Nucleon-decay-like signatures of hylogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    We consider nucleon-decay-like signatures of hylogenesis, a variant of the antibaryonic dark matter model. For the interaction between visible and dark matter sectors through the neutron portal, we calculate the rates of dark matter scatterings off a neutron which mimic neutron-decay processes n →ν γ and n →ν e+e- with richer kinematics. We obtain bounds on the model parameters from nonobservation of the neutron decays by applying the kinematical cuts adopted in the experimental analyses. The bounds are generally (much) weaker than those coming from the recently performed study of events with a single jet of high transverse momentum and missing energy observed at the LHC. Then we suggest several new nucleon-decay-like processes with two mesons in the final state and estimate (accounting for the LHC constraints) the lower limits on the nucleon lifetime with respect to these channels. The obtained values appear to be promising for probing the antibaryonic dark matter at future underground experiments like HyperK and DUNE.

  12. Rare Decays of the ɛ Meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papandreou, Zisis

    2006-02-01

    A study of several rare η decays near threshold was carried out at the C-6 (π-) beamline of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory with the Crystal Ball detector, an electromagnetic calorimeter with nearly 4π geometric acceptance that is comprised of 672 optically isolated NaI(Tl) crystals with a thickness of 15.7 radiation lengths. Results from the search for the CP forbidden decay η → 4π0 and the investigation of the quadratic slope parameter in η → 3π0 decay will be profiled, among others. The focus of the talk will be on the η → π0γγ rare decay: its relative branching ratio was extracted to be B1 = (8.3 ± 2.8 ± 1.2) × 10-4, based on the analysis of 3 × 107 detected η mesons. This leads to a partial width for the eta meson of Γ(η → π0γγ) = (0.32 ± 0.15) eV/c2, a value much lower than past measurements and in line with Chiral Perturbation Theory calculations.

  13. Identification and decay of182Tl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouldjedri, A.; Astier, A.; Beraud, R.; Duffait, R.; Emsallem, A.; Haas, H.

    1991-06-01

    A new activity with a 3s half-life at mass 182 was produced via proton spoliation reaction on thorium carbide target and mass separation. From the observation of known γ rays observed in182Hg, it was assigned to the (β++ EC) decay of182Tl, the spin and parity of which is very likely 7+.

  14. Amplitude analyses of charmless B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We present recent results from the LHCb experiment of Amplitude Analyses of charmless decays of B0 and BS0 mesons to two vector mesons. Measurements obtained include the branching fractions and polarization fractions, as well as CP asymmetries. The analyses use the data recorded by the LHCb experiment during Run 1 of the LHC.

  15. Searches for Leptonic B decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, Guglielmo

    2010-02-10

    We present the most recent results on the leptonic B decays B->lnu, B->lnugamma, based on the data collected by the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the UPSILON(4S) resonance.

  16. Hadronization Effects in Inclusive τ Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, A. V.

    2013-11-01

    It is shown that the nonperturbative effects due to hadronization play a crucial role in low-energy strong interaction processes. Specifically, such effects impose a stringent constraint on the infrared behavior of the Adler function and play an essential role in the theoretical analysis of inclusive τ lepton decay.

  17. Hunting for the Xb via radiative decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Wei

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we study radiative decays of Xb, the counterpart of the famous X (3872) in the bottomonium-sector as a candidate for meson-meson molecule, into the γϒ (nS) (n = 1 , 2 , 3). Since it is likely that the Xb is below the BBbar* threshold and the mass difference between the neutral and charged bottom meson is small compared to the binding energy of the Xb, the isospin violating decay mode Xb → ϒ (nS)π+π- would be greatly suppressed. This will promote the importance of the radiative decays. We use the effective Lagrangian based on the heavy quark symmetry to explore the rescattering mechanism and calculate the partial widths. Our results show that the partial widths into γϒ (nS) are about 1 keV, and thus the branching fractions may be sizeable, considering the fact the total width may also be smaller than a few MeV like the X (3872). These radiative decay modes are of great importance in the experimental search for the Xb particularly at hadron collider. An observation of the Xb will provide a deeper insight into the exotic hadron spectroscopy and is helpful to unravel the nature of the states connected by the heavy quark symmetry.

  18. Constraining decaying dark matter with neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The amount of decaying dark matter, accumulated in the central regions in neutron stars together with the energy deposition rate from decays, may set a limit on the neutron star survival rate against transitions to more compact objects provided nuclear matter is not the ultimate stable state of matter and that dark matter indeed is unstable. More generally, this limit sets constraints on the dark matter particle decay time, τχ. We find that in the range of uncertainties intrinsic to such a scenario, masses (mχ /TeV) ≳ 9 ×10-4 or (mχ /TeV) ≳ 5 ×10-2 and lifetimes τχ ≲1055 s and τχ ≲1053 s can be excluded in the bosonic or fermionic decay cases, respectively, in an optimistic estimate, while more conservatively, it decreases τχ by a factor ≳1020. We discuss the validity under which these results may improve with other current constraints.

  19. Semileptonic B decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, D.; /Montreal U.

    2007-05-23

    This paper summarizes the content of a talk given by the author at the Lake Louise Winter Institute, on February 21st 2007. It presents recent measurements of the rates for semileptonic B decays using data collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  20. Evidence against Decay in Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberauer, Klaus; Lewandowsky, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The article tests the assumption that forgetting in working memory for verbal materials is caused by time-based decay, using the complex-span paradigm. Participants encoded 6 letters for serial recall; each letter was preceded and followed by a processing period comprising 4 trials of difficult visual search. Processing duration, during which…

  1. Exotic decays of heavy B quarks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fox, Patrick J.; Tucker-Smith, David

    2016-01-08

    Heavy vector-like quarks of charge –1/3, B, have been searched for at the LHC through the decays B → bZ, bh, tW. In models where the B quark also carries charge under a new gauge group, new decay channels may dominate. We focus on the case where the B is charged under a U(1)' and describe simple models where the dominant decay mode is B → bZ' → b(bb¯¯). With the inclusion of dark matter such models can explain the excess of gamma rays from the Galactic center. We develop a search strategy for this decay chain and estimate thatmore » with integrated luminosity of 300 fb–1 the LHC will have the potential to discover both the B and the Z' for B quarks with mass below ~ 1.6 TeV, for a broad range of Z' masses. Furthermore, a high-luminosity run can extend this reach to 2 TeV.« less

  2. Resistance to Phomopsis Seed Decay in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) of soybean is caused primarily by the fungal pathogen, Phomopsis longicolla T.W. Hobbs along with other Phomopsis and Diaporthe spp. This disease causes poor seed quality and suppresses yield in most soybean-growing countries. Infected soybean seeds can be symptomless, but...

  3. On the decay of Burgers turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbatov, S. N.; Simdyankin, S. I.; Aurell, E.; Frisch, U.; Tóth, G.

    1997-08-01

    This work is devoted to the decay of random solutions of the unforced Burgers equation in one dimension in the limit of vanishing viscosity. The initial velocity is homogeneous and Gaussian with a spectrum proportional to kn at small wavenumbers k and falling off quickly at large wavenumbers.

  4. Kaon Decays from AdS/QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Schvellinger, Martin

    2008-07-28

    We briefly review one of the current applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence known as AdS/QCD and discuss about the calculation of four-point quark-flavour current correlation functions and their applications to the calculation of observables related to neutral kaon decays and neutral kaon mixing processes.

  5. UVC LIGHT TREATMENT REDUCES DECAY OF BLUEBERRIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultraviolet light treatment has been used successfully to reduce postharvest fungal decay in tomatoes, strawberries, peaches, and citrus, presumably through elevated spore death and/or increased phytoalexins. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effectiveness of UV-C light as a posth...

  6. Slowly rotating pulsars and magnetic field decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.

    1997-02-01

    Two dozen long period pulsars are separated from the swarm of ordinary pulsars by an obvious gap in the P versus Sd diagram (where Sd=log˙(P)+21.0), with a plausible upper boundary for ordinary pulsars. Possible pulsar evolutionary tracks are discussed to explain the diagram in terms of previously suggested scenarios of magnetic field decay. The (P-Sd) diagram is difficult to understand if there is no magnetic field decay during the active life of pulsars. However, if the magnetic fields of neutron stars decay exponentially, almost all slowly rotating pulsars must have been injected with a very long initial spin period of about 2 seconds, which seems impossible. Based on qualitative analyses, it is concluded that magnetic fields of neutron stars decay as a power-law, with a time scale related to the initial field strengths. The plausible boundary and the gap are suggested to naturally divide pulsars with distinct magnetic "genes", ie. pulsars which were born from strongly magnetized progenitors -- such as Bp stars, and pulsars born from normal massive stars. The possibility remains open that a fraction of slowly rotating pulsars were injected with long initial spin periods, while others would have a classical pulsar evolution history. It is suggested that PSR B1849+00 was born in the supernova remnant Kes-79 with an initial period of about 2 seconds.

  7. The COBRA Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J. V.

    2007-03-28

    The progress of the COBRA neutrinoless double beta decay experiment is discussed. Potential backgrounds are described. Estimates on the contamination levels of 214Bi in the detectors have been made using previously acquired low background data. New crystals with a different passivation material show an improved background count rate of approximately one order of magnitude.

  8. The COBRA Double Beta Decay Search Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D. Y.

    2006-11-17

    The COBRA experiment aims to use a large quantity of CdZnTe semiconductor detectors to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The current status of the experiment is discussed, and new limits on several double beta modes are presented. Future plans for a large scale experiment are also described.

  9. Analysis of fluorescence decay kinetics from variable-frequency phase shift and modulation data.

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, J R; Laczko, G; Cherek, H; Gratton, E; Limkeman, M

    1984-01-01

    Recently it has become possible to measure fluorescence phase-shift and modulation data over a wide range of modulation frequencies. In this paper we describe the analysis of these data by the method of nonlinear least squares to determine the values of the lifetimes and fractional intensities for a mixture of exponentially decaying fluorophores. Analyzing simulated data allowed us to determine those experimental factors that are most critical for successfully resolving the emissions from mixtures of fluorophores. The most critical factors are the accuracy of the experimental data, the relative difference of the individual decay times, and the inclusion of data measured at multiple emission wavelengths. After measuring at eight widely spaced modulation frequencies, additional measurements yielded only a modest increase in resolution. In particular, the uncertainty in the parameters decreased approximately as the reciprocal of the square root of the number of modulation frequencies. Our simulations showed that with presently available precision and data for one emission bandpass, two decay times could be accurately determined if their ratio were greater than or equal to 1.4. Three exponential decays could also be resolved, but only if the range of the lifetimes were fivefold or greater. To reliably determine closely-spaced decay times, the data were measured at multiple emission wavelengths so that the fractional intensities of the components could be varied. Also, independent knowledge of any of the parameters substantially increased the accuracy with which the remaining parameters could be determined. In the subsequent paper we present experimental results that broadly confirm the predicted resolving potential of variable-frequency phase-modulation fluorometry. PMID:6498264

  10. Discovering uncolored naturalness in exotic Higgs decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2015-12-01

    Solutions to the hierarchy problem usually require top partners. In standard SUSY or composite Higgs theories, the partners carry SM color and are becoming increasingly constrained by LHC searches. However, theories like Folded SUSY (FS), Twin Higgs (TH) and Quirky Little Higgs (QLH) introduce uncolored top partners, which can be SM singlets or carry electroweak charge. Their small production cross section left doubt as to whether the LHC can effectively probe such scenarios. Typically, these partners are charged under their own mirror color gauge group. In FS and QLH, the absence of light mirror matter allows glueballs to form at the bottom of the mirror spectrum. This is also the case in some TH realizations. The Higgs can decay to these mirror glueballs, with the glueballs decaying into SM particles with potentially observable lifetimes. We undertake the first detailed study of this glueball signature and quantitatively demonstrate the discovery potential of uncolored naturalness via exotic Higgs decays at the LHC and a potential future 100TeV collider. Our findings indicate that mirror glueballs are the smoking gun signature of natural FS and QLH type theories, in analogy to tree-level Higgs coupling shifts for the TH. We show that glueball masses in the ˜ 10-60 GeV mass range are theoretically preferred. Careful treatment of lifetime, mirror-hadronization and non-perturbative uncertainties is required to perform meaningful collider studies. We outline several new search strategies for exotic Higgs decays of the form h → XX → 4 f at the LHC, with X having lifetimes in the 10 μm to km range. We find that FS stops can be probed with masses up to 600 (1100) GeV at the LHC with 300 (3000) fb-1 of data, and TH top partners could be accessible with masses up to 900 (1500) GeV. This makes exotic Higgs decays the prime discovery channel for uncolored naturalness at the LHC.

  11. Non-exponential T2* decay in White Matter

    PubMed Central

    van Gelderen, Peter; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Lee, Jongho; Sati, Pascal; Reich, Daniel S.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2011-01-01

    Visualizing myelin in human brain may help the study of diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Previous studies based on T1 and T2 relaxation contrast have suggested the presence of a distinct water pool that may report directly on local myelin content. Recent work indicates that T2* contrast may offer particular advantages over T1 and T2 contrast, especially at high field. However, the complex mechanism underlying T2* relaxation may render interpretation difficult. To address this issue, T2* relaxation behavior in human brain was studied at 3 and 7 tesla. Multiple gradient echoes covering most of the decay curve were analyzed for deviations from mono-exponential behavior. The data confirm the previous finding of a distinct rapidly relaxing signal component (T2* ~ 6 ms), tentatively attributed to myelin water. However, in extension to previous findings, this rapidly relaxing component displayed a substantial resonance frequency shift, reaching 36 Hz in the corpus callosum at 7 T. The component’s fractional amplitude and frequency shift appeared to depend on both field strength and fiber orientation, consistent with a mechanism originating from magnetic susceptibility effects. The findings suggest that T2* contrast at high field may be uniquely sensitive to tissue myelin content, and that proper interpretation will require modeling of susceptibility-induced resonance frequency shifts. PMID:21630352

  12. Evaluation of decay curves of a chemical species undergoing simultaneous first- and second-order decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, K. H.

    1970-01-01

    IBM 1620 computer prepares tables to enable fast calculation of the first- and second-order rate constants from two half-lives and the corresponding initial concentrations, obtained from either one or two decay curves.

  13. Impact of leptonic τ decays on the distribution of B→ Pμ bar{ν } decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordone, Marzia; Isidori, Gino; Dyk, Danny van

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the fully-differential rate of the decays B→ Pτ (→ μ bar{ν }ν )bar{ν } where P = D,π , background to the semimuonic decays B→ Pμ bar{ν }. The decays with a 3ν final state can have a sizable impact on the experimental analyses of the ratios R_D and R_π , depending on the event selection in the analysis. We outline a strategy which permits the extraction of R_P B(τ → μ bar{ν }ν ) from the neutrino-inclusive rate. Our analytic results can also be used to test both existing and upcoming experimental analyses. We further provide Monte Carlo samples of the 5D rate of the neutrino-inclusive decays B→ Pμ X_{bar{ν }}.

  14. Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata parameters from neutrino oscillations, single beta decay, and double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, K.; Takeda, N.; Fukuyama, T.; Nishiura, H.

    2001-07-01

    We examine the constraints on the Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata lepton mixing matrix from the present and future experimental data of neutrino oscillation, tritium beta decay, and neutrinoless double beta decay for the Majorana neutrinos. We show that the small mixing angle solutions for solar neutrino problem are disfavored for small averaged mass ({l_angle}m{sub {nu}}{r_angle}) of neutrinoless double beta decay ({le}0.01 eV) in the inverse neutrino mass hierarchy scenario. This is the case even in the normal mass hierarchy scenario except for a very restrictive value of the averaged neutrino mass ({ovr m{sub {nu}}}) of single beta decay. The lower mass bound for {ovr m{sub {nu}}} is given from the present neutrino oscillation data. We obtain some relations between {l_angle}m{sub {nu}}{r_angle} and {ovr m{sub {nu}}}. The constraints on the Majorana CP violating phases are also given.

  15. Gamow-Teller decay population of 64Ni levels in the decay of 1+ 64Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, D.; Radulov, D.; Walters, W. B.; Darby, I. G.; De Witte, H.; Diriken, J.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Huyse, M.; Köster, U.; Marsh, B. A.; Popescu, L.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van de Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Wimmer, K.

    2012-12-01

    The 64Co β-decay feeding levels in the well-studied 64Ni nucleus were investigated. Whereas the previously known 64Co decay scheme merely contained 2 γ rays, the decay scheme established in this work contains 18, of which 5 are observed in this work and 6 were previously observed in an (n,γ) study but not placed in the 64Ni level scheme. Surprisingly, one additional level—placed at an excitation energy of 3578.7 keV—could be determined. The observed β-decay paths involve allowed νf5/2→πf7/2 and νp1/2→πp3/2 transitions. Three strongly fed levels around 4 MeV are interpreted to possess possible proton-intruder character.

  16. Multiple-Ring Digital Communication Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    1992-01-01

    Optical-fiber digital communication network to support data-acquisition and control functions of electric-power-distribution networks. Optical-fiber links of communication network follow power-distribution routes. Since fiber crosses open power switches, communication network includes multiple interconnected loops with occasional spurs. At each intersection node is needed. Nodes of communication network include power-distribution substations and power-controlling units. In addition to serving data acquisition and control functions, each node acts as repeater, passing on messages to next node(s). Multiple-ring communication network operates on new AbNET protocol and features fiber-optic communication.

  17. PyDecay/GraphPhys: A Unified Language and Storage System for Particle Decay Process Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, Jesse N.; /MIT /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    To ease the tasks of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and event reconstruction (i.e. inferring particle-decay events from experimental data) for long-term BaBar data preservation and analysis, the following software components have been designed: a language ('GraphPhys') for specifying decay processes, common to both simulation and data analysis, allowing arbitrary parameters on particles, decays, and entire processes; an automated visualization tool to show graphically what decays have been specified; and a searchable database storage mechanism for decay specifications. Unlike HepML, a proposed XML standard for HEP metadata, the specification language is designed not for data interchange between computer systems, but rather for direct manipulation by human beings as well as computers. The components are interoperable: the information parsed from files in the specification language can easily be rendered as an image by the visualization package, and conversion between decay representations was implemented. Several proof-of-concept command-line tools were built based on this framework. Applications include building easier and more efficient interfaces to existing analysis tools for current projects (e.g. BaBar/BESII), providing a framework for analyses in future experimental settings (e.g. LHC/SuperB), and outreach programs that involve giving students access to BaBar data and analysis tools to give them a hands-on feel for scientific analysis.

  18. Majorana neutrino masses from neutrinoless double-beta decays and lepton-number-violating meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun-Hao; Zhang, Jue; Zhou, Shun

    2016-09-01

    The Schechter-Valle theorem states that a positive observation of neutrinoless double-beta (0 νββ) decays implies a finite Majorana mass term for neutrinos when any unlikely fine-tuning or cancellation is absent. In this note, we reexamine the quantitative impact of the Schechter-Valle theorem, and find that current experimental lower limits on the half-lives of 0 νββ-decaying nuclei have placed a restrictive upper bound on the Majorana neutrino mass | δ mνee | < 7.43 ×10-29 eV radiatively generated at the four-loop level. Furthermore, we generalize this quantitative analysis of 0 νββ decays to that of the lepton-number-violating (LNV) meson decays M- →M‧+ + ℓα- + ℓβ- (for α , β = e or μ). Given the present upper limits on these rare LNV decays, we have derived the loop-induced Majorana neutrino masses | δ mνee | < 9.7 ×10-18 eV, | δ mνeμ | < 1.6 ×10-15 eV and | δ mνμμ | < 1.0 ×10-12 eV from K- →π+ +e- +e-, K- →π+ +e- +μ- and K- →π+ +μ- +μ-, respectively. A partial list of radiative neutrino masses from the LNV decays of D, Ds and B mesons is also given.

  19. [Tooth decay and associated factors among adolescents in the north of the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil: a hierarchical analysis].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Freire, Rafael Silveira; Nepomuceno, Marcela Oliveira; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Marcopito, Luiz Francisco

    2015-11-01

    This is a cross-sectional population-based study (n = 763) conducted in the north of the State of Minas Gerais, which aimed to investigate the prevalence of tooth decay among adolescents and to identify the potential determinants of same. Probability sampling by conglomerates in multiple stages was used. Trained and calibrated professionals performed the data collection by means of intraoral examination and interviews in the previously selected households. In the analysis of the determinant factor for the presence of tooth decay, hierarchical binary logistic regression models were used. The prevalence of tooth decay, decayed, missing and filled teeth were 71.3%, 36.5%, 55.6% and 16%, respectively. The following averages were observed: DMFT (3.4 teeth), number of decayed (0.8 teeth), restored (2.4 teeth) and missing (0.2 teeth). The incidence of tooth decay was higher among adolescents who stated they were black/indigenous/brown (OR = 1.76), lived in crowded households (OR = 2.4), did not regularly visit or had never been to a dentist (OR = 1.9), used public or philanthropic services (OR = 1,8), had smoking habits (OR = 4.1), consumed alcohol (OR = 1.8), perceived their oral health negatively (OR = 5.9 and OR = 1.9) and had toothac in the last six months (OR = 2.0). PMID:26602713

  20. An Experiment on the Decay of 58-Co.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledingham, K. W. D.; Callaghan, A. H. C.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment which uses a radioactive source, a Sodium Iodide detector, and a simple counting apparatus possessed by most universities and colleges. The decay scheme and the theory of nuclear beta decay are presented. (Author/SA)

  1. The file of evaluated decay data in ENDF/B

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, C.W. ); England, T.R. )

    1991-01-01

    One important application of nuclear decay data is the Evaluated Nuclear Data File/B, the base of evaluated nuclear data used in reactor research and technology activities within the US. This report discusses the decay data file.

  2. Method of predicting mechanical properties of decayed wood

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-07-15

    A method for determining the mechanical properties of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms, comprising: a) illuminating a surface of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms with wavelengths from visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR) spectra; b) analyzing the surface of the decayed wood using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra region; and c) using a multivariate analysis to predict mechanical properties of decayed wood by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra obtained from a reference decay wood, the second spectral data being correlated with a known mechanical property analytical result obtained from the reference decayed wood.

  3. Development of JENDL Decay and Fission Yield Data Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakura, J.

    2014-04-01

    Decay and fission yield data of fission products have been developed for decay heat calculations to constitute one of the special purpose files of JENDL (Japanese Nuclear Data Library). The decay data in the previous JENDL decay data file have been updated based on the data extracted from ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) and those by Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (TAGS) measurements reported recently. Fission yield data have also been updated in order to maintain consistency between the decay and yield data files. Decay heat calculations were performed using the updated decay and yield data, and the results were compared with measured decay heat data to demonstrate their applicability. The uncertainties of the calculated results were obtained by sensitivity analyses. The resulting JENDL calculations and their uncertainty were compared with those from the ENDF and JEFF evaluated files.

  4. Preequilibrium Emission of Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, L. M.; Mashnik, S. G.; Sierk, A. J.

    2014-04-01

    The ability to describe production of light fragments (LF) is important for many applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets (SEUs), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams. The cascade-exciton model (CEM) and the Los Alamos version of the quark-gluon string model (LAQGSM) event generators in the LANL transport code MCNP6, describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to 4He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies (up to ∼ 5 GeV for CEM and up to ∼ 1 TeV/A for LAQGSM). However, they do not predict the high-energy tails of LF spectra heavier than 4He well. Most LF with energies above several tens of MeV are emitted during the precompound stage of a reaction. The current versions of our event generators do not account for precompound emission of LF larger than 4He. The aim of our work is to generalize the precompound model to include such processes, leading to increased predictive power of LF production. Extending the model in this way provides preliminary results that have much better agreement with experimental data.

  5. Pre-equilibrium Emission and α-clustering in Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramegna, F.; Fabris, D.; Marchi, T.; Degerlier, M.; Fotina, O. V.; Kravchuk, V. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Morelli, L.; Appannababu, S.; Baiocco, G.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Brondi, A.; Bruno, M.; Casini, G.; Cinausero, M.; Gelli, N.; Moro, R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Poggi, G.; Valdrè, S.; Vardaci, E.

    2015-02-01

    The study of nuclear states built on clusters bound by valence neutrons in their molecular configurations is a field of large interest, which is being renewed by the availability of exotic beams: clustering is, in fact, predicted to become very important at the drip-line, where weakly bound systems will prevail. Although for light nuclei at an excitation energy close to the particle separation value there are experimental evidences of such structure effects, this is still not the case for heavier nuclear systems. Many attempts have been done using preformation alpha clustering models, but there is still a lack of experimental data capable to give a direct feedback. In particular, searching for alpha clustering effects in medium mass systems is still a challenge, which can give new hints in this subject. In the past we have studied the reactions 250, 192 and 130 MeV 16O + 116Sn, observing a significant increase in the fast emitted α-particle yield. This effect was ascribed to the presence of preformed a-clusters in the 16O projectile nucleus. In order to investigate these aspects, in a model independent way, a new experimental campaign has been performed with the GARFIELD + RCo set up, to compare results from two different reactions: a double magic a-cluster (16O) and a non-magic α-cluster projectile (19F) at the same beam velocity (16AMeV) have been chosen, impinging respectively on 65Cu and 62Ni targets, thus leading to the same 81Rb* compound nucleus. The angular distributions and the light charged particles emission spectra in coincidence with evaporation residues have been measured and analyzed. The preliminary results of the data analysis and the main features of the theoretical model used for their interpretation are presented.

  6. Weak decay studies from an effective theory standpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yechan Gunja, Aditya

    In this doctoral dissertation I discuss the phenomenology of some weak interaction decays using a model independent approach by employing effective field theories. I discuss the soft photon contribution and background effect to the rare dimuonic decay of the neutral B meson. I also study some radiative exclusive W boson decays in the standard model in the context of pQCD and SCET. Additionally I invoke leptonic decays of charged mesons to constrain two general models of light dark matter.

  7. Factorization Tests with Cabibbo-Favored Hadronic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, Richard; Honscheid, K.; Pedlar, T.; von Toerne, E.; Wilksen, T.

    2002-04-01

    Based on a data sample of 9.7 million Υ(4s)arrow B barB decays recorded with CLEO II and II.V we present new measurements of cabibbo-favored, hadronic B meson decays. Precise measurements of these decays provide tests of the factorization hypothesis and allow us to examine the theoretical models which are used to constrain the unitarity triangle. Isospin relations in B arrow D(*) π decays permit the investigation of final state interactions.

  8. Twins, Triplets, Multiple Births

    MedlinePlus

    ... alone. Multiple births are up in the United States. More women are having babies after age 30 ... support groups for parents of multiples can help. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's ...

  9. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cancerous (malignant) tumors or grow excessively without forming tumors. Multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes are caused by ... This Article Generic Name Select Brand Names corticotropin H.P. ACTHAR GEL epinephrine ADRENALIN Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia ...

  10. What Is Multiple Myeloma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... other tissues. If someone has only a single plasma cell tumor, the disease is called an isolated (or solitary ) plasmacytoma . If someone has more than one plasmacytoma, they have multiple myeloma . Multiple myeloma is ...

  11. Challenges of Parenting Multiples

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parenting Multiples There are many psychological, social, and economic issues associated with multiple pregnancies. These issues should ... births can also be helpful during difficult times. ECONOMIC ISSUES • The health care cost for delivery and ...

  12. Multiple system atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000757.htm Multiple system atrophy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare condition that causes ...

  13. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    MedlinePlus

    Home - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area ... DIAGNOSED IN 2009 You Can Live Well with MS A healthy diet, regular exercise, stress management and ...

  14. Fatigue and Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Fatigue - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area ... help* daily life for: positive-mom* The National MS Society is Here to Help Need More Information? ...

  15. MultipleColposcopyJCO

    Cancer.gov

    Performing multiple biopsies during a procedure known as colposcopy—visual inspection of the cervix—is more effective than performing only a single biopsy of the worst-appearing area for detecting cervical cancer precursors. This multiple biopsy approach

  16. Multiple sclerosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Your doctor has told you that you have multiple sclerosis. This disease affects the brain and spinal cord ( ... your doctor may prescribe medicine. Some people with multiple sclerosis need to use a urinary catheter . This is ...

  17. The decay of debris disks around solar-type stars

    SciTech Connect

    Sierchio, J. M.; Rieke, G. H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Gáspár, Andras

    2014-04-10

    We present a Spitzer MIPS study of the decay of debris disk excesses at 24 and 70 μm for 255 stars of types F4-K2. We have used multiple tests, including consistency between chromospheric and X-ray activity and placement on the H-R diagram, to assign accurate stellar ages. Within this spectral type range, at 24 μm, 13.6% ± 2.8% of the stars younger than 1 Gyr have excesses at the 3σ level or more, whereas none of the older stars do, confirming previous work. At 70 μm, 22.5% ± 3.6% of the younger stars have excesses at ≥3σ significance, whereas only 4.7{sub −2.2}{sup +3.7}% of the older stars do. To characterize the far-infrared behavior of debris disks more robustly, we doubled the sample by including stars from the DEBRIS and DUNES surveys. For the F4-K4 stars in this combined sample, there is only a weak (statistically not significant) trend in the incidence of far-infrared excess with spectral type (detected fractions of 21.9{sub −4.3}{sup +4.8}%, late F; 16.5{sub −3.3}{sup +3.9}%, G; and 16.9{sub −5.0}{sup +6.3}%, early K). Taking this spectral type range together, there is a significant decline between 3 and 4.5 Gyr in the incidence of excesses, with fractional luminosities just under 10{sup –5}. There is an indication that the timescale for decay of infrared excesses varies roughly inversely with the fractional luminosity. This behavior is consistent with theoretical expectations for passive evolution. However, more excesses are detected around the oldest stars than are expected from passive evolution, suggesting that there is late-phase dynamical activity around these stars.

  18. Formation and decay of rudimentary penumbra around a pore

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Hiroko; Kitai, Reizaburo; Otsuji, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the evolution of a pore in the active region NOAA 10940 using the data obtained by the Hinode satellite on 2007 February 3. The pore we analyzed showed the formation of a rudimentary penumbra structure, succeeded by an abrupt disappearance after about 5 hr. The pore had an approximate radius of 3.5 Mm and a total magnetic flux of 3.0 × 10{sup 19} Mx, which is a little smaller than the necessary magnetic flux for penumbral formation supposed by Rucklidge et al. (1-1.5 × 10{sup 20} Mx). Our observation describes a rare phenomenon which was in the unstable phase between a pore and a sunspot. The area of the dark umbra gradually decreased when the rudimentary penumbral filaments formed the penumbral structure, meaning that the penumbra develops at the expense of the umbral magnetic flux. This statement was confirmed by a rough estimation of the magnetic flux variation observed by the Hinode Fe I magnetogram. Five hours after the formation phase, the decay phase began. In this decaying phase, multiple opposite polarity patches are found to appear in the exterior of the pore (a different location from the penumbra formation site). We interpret these opposite polarities as signatures of the horizontal magnetic field, which preferably appears in the course of the unstable reconfiguration of the magnetic field structure. During the course of the disappearance of the penumbra, the horizontal penumbral field seems to become vertical because of the dark umbral area that recovered by about 10%.

  19. Quasi-periodic Pulsations during the Impulsive and Decay phases of an X-class Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, L. A.; Gallagher, P. T.; Dennis, B. R.; Ireland, J.; Inglis, A. R.; Ryan, D. F.

    2016-08-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) are often observed in X-ray emission from solar flares. To date, it is unclear what their physical origins are. Here, we present a multi-instrument investigation of the nature of QPP during the impulsive and decay phases of the X1.0 flare of 2013 October 28. We focus on the character of the fine structure pulsations evident in the soft X-ray (SXR) time derivatives and compare this variability with structure across multiple wavelengths including hard X-ray and microwave emission. We find that during the impulsive phase of the flare, high correlations between pulsations in the thermal and non-thermal emissions are seen. A characteristic timescale of ∼20 s is observed in all channels and a second timescale of ∼55 s is observed in the non-thermal emissions. SXR pulsations are seen to persist into the decay phase of this flare, up to 20 minutes after the non-thermal emission has ceased. We find that these decay phase thermal pulsations have very small amplitude and show an increase in characteristic timescale from ∼40 s up to ∼70 s. We interpret the bursty nature of the co-existing multi-wavelength QPPs during the impulsive phase in terms of episodic particle acceleration and plasma heating. The persistent thermal decay phase QPPs are most likely connected with compressive magnetohydrodynamic processes in the post-flare loops such as the fast sausage mode or the vertical kink mode.

  20. Nonexponential decay of room-temperature phosphorescence: evidence for several slowly interconverting or static protein conformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlyer, Bruce D.; Schauerte, Joseph A.; Steel, Duncan G.; Gafni, Ari

    1994-08-01

    The phosphorescence decays of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) Trp314, E. coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) Trp109, and B. stearothermophilus phosphofructokinase (PFK) Trp179 are decidedly nonexponential at room temperature. When the data is analyzed using the maximum entropy method (MEM) the AP phosphorescence decay is dominated by a single gaussian distribution while for LADH and PFK the data reveals at least two amplitude packets. The MEM lifetime-normalized widths for these proteins are significantly larger than obtained for the model monoexponential chromophore terbium suggesting that the complex kinetics is intrinsic to the protein. Since the phosphorescence lifetime of a tryptophan residue is related to its microviscosity, the nonexponential decay behavior may imply that the phosphorescing tryptophan residue in each of these samples is best described as existing in at least two states of different local rigidity which interconvert more slowly than the time scale of the phosphorescence decay (0.1 to 1.0 sec). The existence of multiple, long-lived, conformers is further supported by the observation that the phosphorescence lifetime in the LADH sample is excitation wavelength dependent.

  1. Direct observation of the two-plasmon-decay common plasma wave using ultraviolet Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Follett, R K; Edgell, D H; Henchen, R J; Hu, S X; Katz, J; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Shaw, J; Froula, D H

    2015-03-01

    A 263-nm Thomson-scattering beam was used to directly probe two-plasmon-decay (TPD) excited electron plasma waves (EPWs) driven by between two and five 351-nm beams on the OMEGA Laser System. The amplitude of these waves was nearly independent of the number of drive beams at constant overlapped intensity, showing that the observed EPWs are common to the multiple beams. In an experimental configuration where the Thomson-scattering diagnostic was not wave matched to the common TPD EPWs, a broad spectrum of TPD-driven EPWs was observed, indicative of nonlinear effects associated with TPD saturation. Electron plasma waves corresponding to Langmuir decay of TPD EPWs were observed in both Thomson-scattering spectra, suggesting the Langmuir decay instability as a TPD saturation mechanism. Simulated Thomson-scattering spectra from three-dimensional numerical solutions of the extended Zakharov equations of TPD are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra and verify the presence of the Langmuir decay instability. PMID:25871046

  2. Direct observation of the two-plasmon-decay common plasma wave using ultraviolet Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, R. K.; Edgell, D. H.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Katz, J.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-03-26

    A 263-nm Thomson-scattering beam was used to directly probe two-plasmon-decay (TPD) excited electron plasma waves (EPWs) driven by between two and five 351-nm beams on the OMEGA Laser System. The amplitude of these waves was nearly independent of the number of drive beams at constant overlapped intensity, showing that the observed EPWs are common to the multiple beams. In an experimental configuration where the Thomson-scattering diagnostic was not wave matched to the common TPD EPWs, a broad spectrum of TPD-driven EPWs was observed, indicative of nonlinear effects associated with TPD saturation. Electron plasma waves corresponding to Langmuir decay of TPD EPWs were observed in both Thomson-scattering spectra, suggesting the Langmuir decay instability as a TPD saturation mechanism. Simulated Thomson-scattering spectra from three-dimensional numerical solutions of the extended Zakharov equations of TPD are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra and verify the presence of the Langmuir decay instability.

  3. Quasi-periodic Pulsations during the Impulsive and Decay phases of an X-class Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, L. A.; Gallagher, P. T.; Dennis, B. R.; Ireland, J.; Inglis, A. R.; Ryan, D. F.

    2016-08-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) are often observed in X-ray emission from solar flares. To date, it is unclear what their physical origins are. Here, we present a multi-instrument investigation of the nature of QPP during the impulsive and decay phases of the X1.0 flare of 2013 October 28. We focus on the character of the fine structure pulsations evident in the soft X-ray (SXR) time derivatives and compare this variability with structure across multiple wavelengths including hard X-ray and microwave emission. We find that during the impulsive phase of the flare, high correlations between pulsations in the thermal and non-thermal emissions are seen. A characteristic timescale of ˜20 s is observed in all channels and a second timescale of ˜55 s is observed in the non-thermal emissions. SXR pulsations are seen to persist into the decay phase of this flare, up to 20 minutes after the non-thermal emission has ceased. We find that these decay phase thermal pulsations have very small amplitude and show an increase in characteristic timescale from ˜40 s up to ˜70 s. We interpret the bursty nature of the co-existing multi-wavelength QPPs during the impulsive phase in terms of episodic particle acceleration and plasma heating. The persistent thermal decay phase QPPs are most likely connected with compressive magnetohydrodynamic processes in the post-flare loops such as the fast sausage mode or the vertical kink mode.

  4. New Decay Data Sub-library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactors Antineutrino Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonzogni, Alejandro; McCutchan, Elizabeth; Johnson, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 decay data sub-library contains up-to-date decay properties for all known nuclides and can be used in a wide variety of applications such as decay heat, delayed nu-bar and astrophysics. We have recently completed an upgrade to the ENDF/B-VII.1 decay data sub-library in order to better calculate antineutrino spectra from fission of actinide nuclides. This sub-library has been used to identify the main contributors to the antineutrino spectra as well as to derive a systematic behavior of the energy integrated spectra similar to that of the beta-delayed neutron multiplicities. The main improvements have been the use of the TAGS data from Algora et al and Greenwood et al, as well as some of the single beta spectrum data from Rudstam et al to obtain beta minus level feedings. Additionally, we have calculated the antineutrino spectra for neutron energies higher than thermal, needed for highly-enriched uranium cores, such as the HFIR in ORNL that will be used in the PROSPECT experiment. These calculations are relevant since the high precision beta spectra which are used in many antineutrino calculations were measured at thermal energies. The impact of the fission yield data on these calculations will be discussed. This work was sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  5. Skeletal sup 210 Pb from inhalation of sup 222 Rn and its decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, A.T.; Schlenker, R.A.; Stebbings, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    Concern about health effects of radon and its decay products has recently broadened to include the potential role of radon in the causation of myeloid leukemia, multiple myeloma, and melanoma, kidney cancer, and certain childhood cancers. Description of the distribution of radon and its daughters in the skeleton and the marrow, and the dose delivered to red marrow, are of particular relevance. Our interest in a metabolic model for inhaled radon and radon decay products originated with an interest in the use of radioactivity measurement techniques in vivo to quantify the {sup 210}Pb activity of bone. In this paper we estimate the rates of transfer to body fluids of {sup 210}Pb originating from inhaled radon and radon decay products and the quantity of {sup 210}Pb deposited in compact and in cancellous bone for the ideal case of continuous exposure to a constant level of radon and its daughters. We review the contributions of ambient airborne {sup 210}Pb, diet, and active and passive smoking to skeletal levels of {sup 210}Pb, and finally, from the magnitude and the variability of the natural {sup 210}Pb content of the skeleton, we estimate the minimal rate of exposure to airborne radon and its decay products that is required to elevate the skeletal {sup 210}Pb content of an individual to a statistically significant level above the population mean skeletal {sup 210}Pb content derived from all the other environmental sources combined. 55 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Beauty vector meson decay constants from QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity.

  7. In Search of Decay in Verbal Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Marc G.; Jonides, John; Lewis, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Is forgetting in the short term due to decay with the mere passage of time, interference from other memoranda, or both? Past research on short-term memory has revealed some evidence for decay and a plethora of evidence showing that short-term memory is worsened by interference. However, none of these studies has directly contrasted decay and…

  8. COBRA - Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidrich, Nadine

    2012-08-01

    The COBRA experiment is searching for neutrinoless double beta decay using CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. The main focus is on Cd-116, with a decay energy of 2814keV well above the highest naturally occurring gamma lines. Furthermore, Te-130, with a high natural abundance, and Cd-106, a double β+ emitter, are under investigation. Advantageous is the possibility to operate the detectors at room temperature. Besides coplanar grid detectors, pixelised detectors are considered. The latter ones would allow for particle discrimination, therefore providing efficient background reduction. The current status of the experiment is described, including the upgrade of the R&D set-up in spring 2011 at the LNGS underground laboratory, the different detector concepts and the latest half -life limits. Furthermore, studies on the use of liquid scintillator for background suppression and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented.

  9. Antimatter signatures of gravitino dark matter decay

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David E-mail: david.tran@desy.de

    2008-07-15

    The scenario of gravitino dark matter with broken R-parity naturally reconciles three paradigms that, albeit very well motivated separately, seem to be in mutual conflict: supersymmetric dark matter, thermal leptogenesis and standard big bang nucleosynthesis. Interestingly, the products of the gravitino decay could be observed, opening the possibility of indirect detection of gravitino dark matter. In this paper, we compute the positron and the antiproton fluxes from gravitino decay. We find that a gravitino with a mass of m{sub 3/2}{approx}150 GeV and a lifetime of {tau}{sub 3/2}{approx}10{sup 26} s could simultaneously explain the EGRET anomaly in the extragalactic diffuse gamma ray background and the HEAT excess in the positron fraction. However, the predicted antiproton flux tends to be too large, although the prediction suffers from large uncertainties and might be compatible with present observations for certain choices of propagation parameters.

  10. Cold Positrons from Decaying Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Dodelson, Scott; Vives, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here we explore the possibilities that arise if one of the products in a (Heavy Particle) $\\rightarrow$ (Dark Matter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  11. Measurement of psi2S radiative decays.

    PubMed

    Ablikim, M; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Cai, X; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y B; Chu, Y P; Dai, Y S; Diao, L Y; Deng, Z Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gu, S D; Gu, Y T; Guo, Y N; Guo, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hou, J; Hu, H M; Hu, J H; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Lai, Y F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Liu, Fang; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, Jian Liu Q; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Lou, Y C; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Ping, R G; Qi, N D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, C P; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, L; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Zheng; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Weng, Y; Wu, N; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xu, G F; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Yan, M L; Yang, H X; Yang, Y X; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Q; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Yiyun; Zhang, Z X; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Z P; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2007-07-01

    Using 14 x 10(6) psi(2S) events accumulated at the BESII detector, we report first measurements of branching fractions or upper limits for psi(2S) decays into gammapp, gamma2(pi+pi-), gammaKS0K+pi-+c.c., gammaK+K-pi+pi-, gammaK*0K-pi++c.c., gammaK*0K*0, gammapi+pi-pp, gamma2(K+K-), gamma3(pi+pi-), and gamma2(pi+pi-)K+K- with the invariant mass of hadrons below 2.9 GeV/c2. We also report branching fractions of psi(2S) decays into 2(pi+pi-)pi0, omegapi+pi-, omegaf2(1270), b1+/-pi-/+, and pi02(pi+pi-)K+K-. PMID:17678148

  12. Decay of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Beacom, John F; Bell, Nicole F; Hooper, Dan; Pakvasa, Sandip; Weiler, Thomas J

    2003-05-01

    Existing limits on the nonradiative decay of one neutrino to another plus a massless particle (e.g., a singlet Majoron) are very weak. The best limits on the lifetime to mass ratio come from solar neutrino observations and are tau/m greater, similar 10(-4) s/eV for the relevant mass eigenstate(s). For lifetimes even several orders of magnitude longer, high-energy neutrinos from distant astrophysical sources would decay. This would strongly alter the flavor ratios from the phi(nu(e)):phi(nu(mu)):phi(nu(tau))=1:1:1 expected from oscillations alone and should be readily visible in the near future in detectors such as IceCube. PMID:12785996

  13. First Observation of a Baryonic Bc+ Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    A baryonic decay of the Bc+ meson, Bc+→J/ψpp ¯π+, is observed for the first time, with a significance of 7.3 standard deviations, in pp collision data collected with the LHCb detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 taken at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. With the Bc+→J/ψπ+ decay as the normalization channel, the ratio of branching fractions is measured to be B(Bc+→J/ψpp ¯π+)/B(Bc+→J/ψπ+)=0.143-0.034+0.039(stat)±0.013(syst). The mass of the Bc+ meson is determined as M(Bc+)=6274.0±1.8(stat)±0.4(syst) MeV/c2, using the Bc+→J/ψpp ¯π+ channel.

  14. Unraveling duality violations in hadronic tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cata, Oscar; Cata, Oscar; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago

    2008-03-03

    There are some indications from recent determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s and the gluon condensate that the Operator Product Expansion may not be accurate enough to describe non-perturbative effects in hadronic tau decays. This breakdown of the Operator Product Expansion is usually referred to as being due to"Duality Violations." With the help of a physically motivated model, we investigate these duality violations. Based on this model, we argue how they may introduce a non-negligible systematic error in the current analysis, which employs finite-energy sum rules with pinched weights. In particular, this systematic effect might affect the precision determination of alpha_s from tau decays. With a view to a possible future application to real data, we present an alternative method for determining the OPE coefficients that might help estimating, and possibly even reducing, this systematic error.

  15. JUNO and neutrinoless double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shao-Feng; Rodejohann, Werner

    2015-11-01

    We study the impact of the precision determination of oscillation parameters in the JUNO experiment on half-life predictions for neutrinoless double beta decay. We show that the solar neutrino mixing angle can be measured by JUNO with below 1% uncertainty. This implies in particular that the minimal value of the effective mass in the inverted mass ordering will be known essentially without uncertainty. We demonstrate that this reduces the range of half-life predictions in order to test this value by a factor of 2. The remaining uncertainty is caused by nuclear matrix elements. This has important consequences for future double beta decay experiments that aim at ruling out the inverted mass ordering or the Majorana nature of neutrinos.

  16. Searches for very rare decays of kaons

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, K.

    1997-01-01

    The physics motivation for searches for very rare kaon decays, either forbidden or suppressed within the Standard Model, is briefly discussed. Simple arguments conclude that such searches probe possible new forces at a 200 TeV mass scale or constitute a precision test of the electroweak model. The examples of such process are decays of K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu} {sup {+-}}e{sup -+}, K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {mu}{sup +} e{sup -}, K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, and K{sup +} {yields} {pi} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. We present the current experimental status and describe the new efforts to reach sensitivities down to one part in 10{sup 12}. The discussion is focused on the experimental program at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where intense beams make such studies possible.

  17. Theoretical challenges in Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Sabin

    2016-05-01

    The study of the double beta decay (DBD), particularly the neutrino less decay mode, is of great interest for testing the lepton number conservation (LNC) and getting information about neutrino properties, as the neutrinos character (Dirac or Majorana particles?), their absolute mass and hierarchy, etc. [1]-[2]. To make predictions of the DBD lifetimes and put constraints on the neutrino parameters, one needs accurate calculations of the nuclear matrix elements (NME) and phase space factors (PSF) entering the DBD lifetime expressions. In this paper I present recent calculations of these quantities, performed with approaches developed by our group. Then, I compare the theoretical predictions for the two-neutrino (2v) DBD lifetimes, for the most experimentally interesting nuclei, with the experimental ones, and comment on the reliability of the neutrinoless (0v) DBD calculations.

  18. Feeding and decay of superdeformed states

    SciTech Connect

    Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fernandez, P.B.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Moore, E.F.; Wolfs, F.L.H.; Benet, Ph.; Daly, P.J.; Beard, K.B.; Garg, U.; Ye, D.; Drigert, M.W.

    1992-12-31

    The mechanisms for feeding and decay of superdeformed (SD) bands are examined. Data connected with both processes in {sup 192}Hg are compared with model calculations. The calculations successfully reproduce the data, suggesting that the mechanisms for both processes are understood. Constraints on the energy of the SD band energies and on the well-depths at low and high spins have been obtained. At the point of decay around spin 10, we suggest that the SD band is 3.3--4.3 MeV above the normal yrast line and that the well depths at spin 10 and 40 are 0.5--1.3 and 3.5--4.5 MeV, respectively.

  19. Feeding and decay of superdeformed states

    SciTech Connect

    Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fernandez, P.B.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Moore, E.F.; Wolfs, F.L.H. ); Benet, Ph.; Daly, P.J. ); Beard, K.B.; Garg, U.; Ye, D. ); Drigert, M.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The mechanisms for feeding and decay of superdeformed (SD) bands are examined. Data connected with both processes in [sup 192]Hg are compared with model calculations. The calculations successfully reproduce the data, suggesting that the mechanisms for both processes are understood. Constraints on the energy of the SD band energies and on the well-depths at low and high spins have been obtained. At the point of decay around spin 10, we suggest that the SD band is 3.3--4.3 MeV above the normal yrast line and that the well depths at spin 10 and 40 are 0.5--1.3 and 3.5--4.5 MeV, respectively.

  20. Lepton flavor violating decays of vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Helo, Juan C.; Kovalenko, Sergey

    2010-02-01

    We estimate the rates of lepton flavor violating decays of the vector mesons {rho}, {omega}, and {phi}{yields}e{mu}. The theoretical tools are based on an effective Lagrangian approach without referring to any specific realization of the physics beyond the standard model responsible for lepton flavor violation (Le{sub f}). The effective lepton-vector meson couplings are extracted from the existing experimental bounds on the nuclear {mu}{sup -}-e{sup -} conversion. In particular, we derive an upper limit for the Le{sub f} branching ratio Br({phi}{yields}e{mu}){<=}1.3x10{sup -21} which is much more stringent than the recent experimental result Br({phi}{yields}e{mu})<2x10{sup -6} presented by the SND Collaboration. Very tiny limits on Le{sub f} decays of vector mesons derived in this paper make direct experimental observation of these processes unrealistic.

  1. The production and decay of hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanski, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    Hypernuclei have been studied for the last 35 years using several techniques. Since 1970, the {sup A}Z (K{sup {minus}},{pi}{sup {minus}}) {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z strangeness-exchange reaction has been used at CERN, BNL, and KEK to produce hypernuclei and study their spectroscopic properties. These studies also include experiments where decay gamma rays and hypernuclear weak decay products are detected in coincidence with hypernuclear production. Recent experiments at BNL and KEK have proven the utility of the {sup A}Z ({pi}{sup +},K{sup +}) {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z reaction to study hypernuclear spectroscopy. Although I have no hope of covering this field in much detail, I write this paper as an introduction to the subject and highlights some of the recent experimental developments. 37 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Axions from cosmic string and wall decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, Chris

    2010-08-30

    If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall{approx}}1-100(f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

  3. Axions from cosmic string and wall decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C A

    2010-03-10

    If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall} {approx} 1-100 (f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

  4. Fitting the luminosity decay in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, E.; Shiltsev, V.; Slaughter, A.J.; Xiao, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    This paper explores how to fit the decay of the luminosity in the Tevatron. The standard assumptions of a fixed-lifetime exponential decay are only appropriate for very short time intervals. A ''1/time'' functional form fits well, and is supported by analytical derivations. A more complex form, assuming a time-varying lifetime-like term, also produces good results. Changes in the luminosity can be factored into two phenomena: The luminosity burn-off rate, and the burn-off rate from non-luminosity effects. This is particularly relevant for the antiprotons in the Tevatron. The luminous and the non-luminous burn rate of the antiprotons are shown for Tevatron stores.

  5. Double Beta Decay Measurement with COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeanne R.

    2011-12-01

    The COBRA experiment aims to use a large array of CdZnTe semiconductor detectors to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Extensive simulation studies and data collected with a small proto-type experiment have been used to address the major design specifications for a large scale experiment sensitive to 116Cd half-lives in excess of 1026 years. The current and future prospects of the COBRA experiment are presented.

  6. Preferred Modes of Decay in Nuclear Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, Alfredo; López, Jorge A.; Wu, Zehua

    1997-04-01

    Recent experiments show a characteristic energy dependence of the different fragmentation modes in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies. In this work we study this effect and find that, in nuclear fragmentation, like in binary fission, some modes of decay are more probable than the rest. We argue that these high probability mass partitions are ultimately responsible for the observed energy dependence. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation grant PHY-9600038 and Artemio de la Vega Foundation.

  7. Gravitational corrections to standard model vacuum decay

    SciTech Connect

    Isidori, Gino; Rychkov, Vyacheslav S.; Strumia, Alessandro; Tetradis, Nikolaos

    2008-01-15

    We refine and update the metastability constraint on the standard model (SM) top and Higgs masses by analytically including gravitational corrections to the vacuum decay rate. Present best-fit ranges of the top and Higgs masses mostly lie in the narrow metastable region. Furthermore, we show that the SM potential can be fine-tuned in order to be made suitable for inflation. However, SM inflation results in a power spectrum of cosmological perturbations not consistent with observations.

  8. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, E.G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n {yields} p + e + {bar v}{sub e}) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta ({sigma}{sub n} {center_dot} p{sub p} {times} p{sub e}). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  9. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Yasumichi; Shintani, Eigo; Collaboration: RBC Collaboration; UKQCD Collaboration

    2012-07-27

    We report on the calculation of the matrix elements of nucleon to pseudoscalar decay through a three quark operator, a part of the low-energy, four-fermion, baryon-number-violating operator originating from grand unified theories. The direct calculation of the form factors using domain-wall fermions on the lattice, incorporating the u, d and s sea-quarks effects yields the results with all the relevant systematic uncertainties controlled for the first time.

  10. Kaon decay interferometry as meson dynamics probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'ambrosio, G.; Paver, N.

    1994-05-01

    We discuss the time-dependent interferences between KL and KS in the decays in 3π and ππγ, to be studied at interferometry machines such as the φ factory and CERN LEAR. We emphasize the possibilities and the advantages of using interferences, in comparision with width measurements, to obtain information both on CP-conserving and CP-violating amplitudes. Comparision with present data and suggestions for future experiments are made.

  11. Exponential Decay of Correlations Implies Area Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Horodecki, Michał

    2015-01-01

    We prove that a finite correlation length, i.e., exponential decay of correlations, implies an area law for the entanglement entropy of quantum states defined on a line. The entropy bound is exponential in the correlation length of the state, thus reproducing as a particular case Hastings's proof of an area law for groundstates of 1D gapped Hamiltonians. As a consequence, we show that 1D quantum states with exponential decay of correlations have an efficient classical approximate description as a matrix product state of polynomial bond dimension, thus giving an equivalence between injective matrix product states and states with a finite correlation length. The result can be seen as a rigorous justification, in one dimension, of the intuition that states with exponential decay of correlations, usually associated with non-critical phases of matter, are simple to describe. It also has implications for quantum computing: it shows that unless a pure state quantum computation involves states with long-range correlations, decaying at most algebraically with the distance, it can be efficiently simulated classically. The proof relies on several previous tools from quantum information theory—including entanglement distillation protocols achieving the hashing bound, properties of single-shot smooth entropies, and the quantum substate theorem—and also on some newly developed ones. In particular we derive a new bound on correlations established by local random measurements, and we give a generalization to the max-entropy of a result of Hastings concerning the saturation of mutual information in multiparticle systems. The proof can also be interpreted as providing a limitation on the phenomenon of data hiding in quantum states.

  12. Dynamic alignment and selective decay in MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.

    1983-01-01

    Under some circumstances, incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence will evolve toward a state in which the velocity fields and magnetic fields are aligned or anti-aligned. We propose a mechanism for this effect and illustrate with numerical computations. Under some other circumstances, the energy appears to decay selectively toward a minimum energy state in which the kinetic energy has disappeared. It has not been possible so far to identify a boundary in the phase space which divides the two regimes.

  13. Measurements of Rare B Decays at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Masato

    2009-06-01

    Both CDF and D0 experiments have been searching for evidence of physics beyond the standard model (SM) using the Tevatron p{bar p} collider at Fermilab. We report on recent searches in the B flavor sector, especially decays via flavor changing neutral current processes (FCNC), B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, at the Tevatron.

  14. Decay of neutron pulses in graphite assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, U.; Kothari, L.S.

    1982-09-01

    A new neutron scattering kernel for graphite has been developed with the frequency distribution function generated by the authors using the unfolding technique. This has been used to study the decay of neutron pulses in different graphite assemblies. This kernel (with theta /SUB D/ = 2000 K) can give a slightly better explanation of the experimental results than those based on the Krumhansl and Brooks model or the Young and Koppel model of lattice vibrations.

  15. Preferred modes of decay in nuclear fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, A.; Lopez, J.A.; Wu, Z.

    1997-02-01

    Recent experimental studies show a characteristic energy dependence of the different fragmentation modes in heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies. In this work we study this dependence and find that, in multifragmentation, just like in low-energy fission, some modes of decay are more probable than the rest. We argue that these high-probability mass partitions are ultimately responsible for the observed energy dependence. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Population and Decay of Superdeformed ^198Po

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Cizewski, J. A.; Smith, M. B.; Thomas, J. S.; Becker, J. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; McNabb, D. P.; Schiller, A.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Ward, D.

    2002-10-01

    The population and decay of superdeformed (SD) nuclei remains an area of current interest. Little is known about the entry distribution associated with the population of SD excitations, especially in more fissile systems where fission dominates at high angular momentum. The study of the quasicontinuous (QC) spectrum associated with SD excitations provides a probe of the feeding and decay of the SD band as well as information on the excitation energy and spin of SD states. To study the population and decay of SD states, the ^174Yb(^29Si,5n) reaction was used to populate excitations in ^198Po, the most fissile nucleus for which an SD band has been identified at high spin (D.P. McNabb et al.), Phys. Rev. C 53 R541 (1996). The measurements were performed at the 88-Inch Cyclotron facility at LBNL using the Gammasphere array with 101 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors. The present results for the entry distribution and QC spectrum for the SD band in ^198Po will be contrasted to the spectra associated with the ND excitations in ^198Po, as well as the results for ^195Pb and ^192,194Pb footnote D.P. McNabb et al., Phys. Rev. C 61, 031304(R) (2000) for which similar analyses have been reported.

  17. Glueball production via gluonic penguin decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2015-03-01

    We study glueball production in gluonic penguin decay , using the next-to-leading order gluonic penguin interaction and effective couplings of a glueball to two perturbative gluons. Subsequent decays of a scalar glueball are described by using techniques of effective chiral Lagrangians to incorporate the interaction between a glueball and pseudoscalar mesons. Mixing effects between the pure glueball with other mesons are considered. Identifying the as a scalar glueball, we find that both the top and the charm penguin are important and obtain a sizable branching ratio for of order , where the effective coupling strength is estimated to be GeV using experimental data for the branching ratio of based on a chiral Lagrangian estimate. An alternative perturbative QCD based estimation of is a factor of 20 larger, which would imply a much enhanced branching ratio. Glueball production from this rare semi-inclusive decay can be probed at the LHCb and Belle II to narrow down the allowed parameter space. A similar branching ratio is expected for the pseudoscalar glueball. We also briefly comment on the case of vector and tensor glueballs.

  18. Weak Decays of Excited B Mesons.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, B; Martin Camalich, J

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the decays of the excited (bq[over ¯]) mesons as probes of the short-distance structure of the weak ΔB=1 transitions. These states are unstable under the electromagnetic or strong interactions, although their widths are typically suppressed by phase space. Compared to the pseudoscalar B meson, the purely leptonic decays of the vector B^{*} are not chirally suppressed and are sensitive to different combinations of the underlying weak effective operators. An interesting example is B_{s}^{*}→ℓ^{+}ℓ^{-}, which has a rate that can be accurately predicted in the standard model. The branching fraction is B∼10^{-11}, irrespective of the lepton flavor and where the main uncertainty stems from the unmeasured and theoretically not well known B_{s}^{*} width. We discuss the prospects for producing this decay mode at the LHC and explore the possibility of measuring the B_{s}^{*}→ℓℓ amplitude, instead, through scattering experiments at the B_{s}^{*} resonance peak. PMID:27104698

  19. Invisible KL decays in the SM extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gninenko, S. N.; Krasnikov, N. V.

    2016-07-01

    In the Standard Model (SM), the branching ratio for the decay KL → νν¯ is helicity suppressed and predicted to be very small ≤ O(10‑17). We consider two natural extensions of the SM as the two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) and the neutrino minimal Standard Model (νMSM) with additional singlet scalar, whose main feature is that they can lead to an enhanced Br(KL → invisible). In the 2HDM, the smallness of the neutrino mass is explained due to the smallness of the second Higgs doublet vacuum expectation value. Moreover, the νMSM extension with additional singlet field can explain the (g ‑ 2)μ anomaly. The considered models demonstrate that the KL → invisible decay is a clean probe of new physics scale well above 100 TeV, that is complementary to rare K → π + invisible decay, and provide a strong motivation for its sensitive search in a near future low-energy experiment.

  20. Nuclear Data Compilation for Beta Decay Isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmsted, Susan; Kelley, John; Sheu, Grace

    2015-10-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory nuclear data group works with the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data network to compile and evaluate data for use in nuclear physics research and applied technologies. Teams of data evaluators search through the literature and examine the experimental values for various nuclear structure parameters. The present activity focused on reviewing all available literature to determine the most accurate half-life values for beta unstable isotopes in the A = 3-20 range. This analysis will eventually be folded into the ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File). By surveying an accumulated compilation of reference articles, we gathered all of the experimental half-life values for the beta decay nuclides. We then used the Visual Averaging Library, a data evaluation software package, to find half-life values using several different averaging techniques. Ultimately, we found recommended half-life values for most of the mentioned beta decay isotopes, and updated web pages on the TUNL webpage to reflect these evaluations. To summarize, we compiled and evaluated literature reports on experimentally determined half-lives. Our findings have been used to update information given on the TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation group website. This was an REU project with Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory.