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Sample records for multiscale pde solvers

  1. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  2. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  3. Algebraic Multiscale Solver for Elastic Geomechanical Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, N.; Hajibeygi, H.; Tchelepi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting the geomechanical response of geological formations to thermal, pressure, and mechanical loading is important in many engineering applications. The mathematical formulation that describes deformation of a reservoir coupled with flow and transport entails heterogeneous coefficients with a wide range of length scales. Such detailed heterogeneous descriptions of reservoir properties impose severe computational challenges for the study of realistic-scale (km) reservoirs. To deal with these challenges, we developed an Algebraic Multiscale Solver for ELastic geomechanical deformation (EL-AMS). Constructed on finite element fine-scale system, EL-AMS imposes a coarse-scale grid, which is a non-overlapping decomposition of the domain. Then, local (coarse) basis functions for the displacement vector are introduced. These basis functions honor the elastic properties of the local domains subject to the imposed local boundary conditions. The basis form the Restriction and Prolongation operators. These operators allow for the construction of accurate coarse-scale systems for the displacement. While the multiscale system is efficient for resolving low-frequency errors, coupling it with a fine-scale smoother, e.g., ILU(0), leads to an efficient iterative solver. Numerical results for several test cases illustrate that EL-AMS is quite efficient and applicable to simulate elastic deformation of large-scale heterogeneous reservoirs.

  4. Multiscale Universal Interface: A concurrent framework for coupling heterogeneous solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Kudo, Shuhei; Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Concurrently coupled numerical simulations using heterogeneous solvers are powerful tools for modeling multiscale phenomena. However, major modifications to existing codes are often required to enable such simulations, posing significant difficulties in practice. In this paper we present a C++ library, i.e. the Multiscale Universal Interface (MUI), which is capable of facilitating the coupling effort for a wide range of multiscale simulations. The library adopts a header-only form with minimal external dependency and hence can be easily dropped into existing codes. A data sampler concept is introduced, combined with a hybrid dynamic/static typing mechanism, to create an easily customizable framework for solver-independent data interpretation. The library integrates MPI MPMD support and an asynchronous communication protocol to handle inter-solver information exchange irrespective of the solvers' own MPI awareness. Template metaprogramming is heavily employed to simultaneously improve runtime performance and code flexibility. We validated the library by solving three different multiscale problems, which also serve to demonstrate the flexibility of the framework in handling heterogeneous models and solvers. In the first example, a Couette flow was simulated using two concurrently coupled Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of different spatial resolutions. In the second example, we coupled the deterministic SPH method with the stochastic Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method to study the effect of surface grafting on the hydrodynamics properties on the surface. In the third example, we consider conjugate heat transfer between a solid domain and a fluid domain by coupling the particle-based energy-conserving DPD (eDPD) method with the Finite Element Method (FEM)

  5. Multiscale Universal Interface: A concurrent framework for coupling heterogeneous solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Kudo, Shuhei; Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-09-01

    Concurrently coupled numerical simulations using heterogeneous solvers are powerful tools for modeling multiscale phenomena. However, major modifications to existing codes are often required to enable such simulations, posing significant difficulties in practice. In this paper we present a C++ library, i.e. the Multiscale Universal Interface (MUI), which is capable of facilitating the coupling effort for a wide range of multiscale simulations. The library adopts a header-only form with minimal external dependency and hence can be easily dropped into existing codes. A data sampler concept is introduced, combined with a hybrid dynamic/static typing mechanism, to create an easily customizable framework for solver-independent data interpretation. The library integrates MPI MPMD support and an asynchronous communication protocol to handle inter-solver information exchange irrespective of the solvers' own MPI awareness. Template metaprogramming is heavily employed to simultaneously improve runtime performance and code flexibility. We validated the library by solving three different multiscale problems, which also serve to demonstrate the flexibility of the framework in handling heterogeneous models and solvers. In the first example, a Couette flow was simulated using two concurrently coupled Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of different spatial resolutions. In the second example, we coupled the deterministic SPH method with the stochastic Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method to study the effect of surface grafting on the hydrodynamics properties on the surface. In the third example, we consider conjugate heat transfer between a solid domain and a fluid domain by coupling the particle-based energy-conserving DPD (eDPD) method with the Finite Element Method (FEM).

  6. A fast algorithm for parabolic PDE-based inverse problems based on Laplace transforms and flexible Krylov solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhos, Tania; Saibaba, Arvind K.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2015-10-15

    We consider the problem of estimating parameters in large-scale weakly nonlinear inverse problems for which the underlying governing equations is a linear, time-dependent, parabolic partial differential equation. A major challenge in solving these inverse problems using Newton-type methods is the computational cost associated with solving the forward problem and with repeated construction of the Jacobian, which represents the sensitivity of the measurements to the unknown parameters. Forming the Jacobian can be prohibitively expensive because it requires repeated solutions of the forward and adjoint time-dependent parabolic partial differential equations corresponding to multiple sources and receivers. We propose an efficient method based on a Laplace transform-based exponential time integrator combined with a flexible Krylov subspace approach to solve the resulting shifted systems of equations efficiently. Our proposed solver speeds up the computation of the forward and adjoint problems, thus yielding significant speedup in total inversion time. We consider an application from Transient Hydraulic Tomography (THT), which is an imaging technique to estimate hydraulic parameters related to the subsurface from pressure measurements obtained by a series of pumping tests. The algorithms discussed are applied to a synthetic example taken from THT to demonstrate the resulting computational gains of this proposed method.

  7. Blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve: a quantitative computational study using a multiscale suspension flow solver.

    PubMed

    Min Yun, B; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-10-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are among the most popular prostheses to replace defective native valves. However, complex flow phenomena caused by the prosthesis are thought to induce serious thromboembolic complications. This study aims at employing a novel multiscale numerical method that models realistic sized suspended platelets for assessing blood damage potential in flow through BMHVs. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow through a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent™ valve in the aortic position at very high spatiotemporal resolution with the presence of thousands of suspended platelets. Platelet damage is modeled for both the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. No platelets exceed activation thresholds for any of the simulations. Platelet damage is determined to be particularly high for suspended elements trapped in recirculation zones, which suggests a shift of focus in blood damage studies away from instantaneous flow fields and toward high flow mixing regions. In the diastolic phase, leakage flow through the b-datum gap is shown to cause highest damage to platelets. This multiscale numerical method may be used as a generic solver for evaluating blood damage in other cardiovascular flows and devices. PMID:25070372

  8. A preliminary investigation of the growth of an aneurysm with a multiscale monolithic Fluid-Structure interaction solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerroni, D.; Manservisi, S.; Pozzetti, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we investigate the potentialities of multi-scale engineering techniques to approach complex problems related to biomedical and biological fields. In particular we study the interaction between blood and blood vessel focusing on the presence of an aneurysm. The study of each component of the cardiovascular system is very difficult due to the fact that the movement of the fluid and solid is determined by the rest of system through dynamical boundary conditions. The use of multi-scale techniques allows us to investigate the effect of the whole loop on the aneurysm dynamic. A three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model for the aneurysm is developed and coupled to a mono-dimensional one for the remaining part of the cardiovascular system, where a point zero-dimensional model for the heart is provided. In this manner it is possible to achieve rigorous and quantitative investigations of the cardiovascular disease without loosing the system dynamic. In order to study this biomedical problem we use a monolithic fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model where the fluid and solid equations are solved together. The use of a monolithic solver allows us to handle the convergence issues caused by large deformations. By using this monolithic approach different solid and fluid regions are treated as a single continuum and the interface conditions are automatically taken into account. In this way the iterative process characteristic of the commonly used segregated approach, it is not needed any more.

  9. Terascale Optimal PDE Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    David Keyes

    2009-07-28

    The Terascale Optimal PDE Solvers (TOPS) Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (ISIC) was created to develop and implement algorithms and support scientific investigations performed by DOE-sponsored researchers. These simulations often involve the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on terascale computers. The TOPS Center researched, developed and deployed an integrated toolkit of open-source, optimal complexity solvers for the nonlinear partial differential equations that arise in many DOE application areas, including fusion, accelerator design, global climate change and reactive chemistry. The algorithms created as part of this project were also designed to reduce current computational bottlenecks by orders of magnitude on terascale computers, enabling scientific simulation on a scale heretofore impossible.

  10. SpectralPlasmaSolver: a Spectral Code for Multiscale Simulations of Collisionless, Magnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Manzini, Gianmarco; Markidis, Stefano; Peng, Ivy Bo; Roytershteyn, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a spectral code, called SpectralPlasmaSolver (SPS), for the solution of the multi-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The method is based on a Hermite-Fourier decomposition of the particle distribution function. The code is written in Fortran and uses the PETSc library for solving the non-linear equations and preconditioning and the FFTW library for the convolutions. SPS is parallelized for shared- memory machines using OpenMP. As a verification example, we discuss simulations of the two-dimensional Orszag-Tang vortex problem and successfully compare them against a fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell simulation. An assessment of the performance of the code is presented, showing a significant improvement in the code running-time achieved by preconditioning, while strong scaling tests show a factor of 10 speed-up using 16 threads.

  11. Parallel large-scale adaptive mesh PDE solution and applications to multiscale problems in solid earth geophysics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghattas, O.; Burstedde, C.; Stadler, G.; Wilcox, L. C.; Tu, T.; Issac, T.; Gurnis, M.; Alisic, L.; Tan, E.; Zhong, S.

    2009-12-01

    Many problems in solid earth geophysics are characterized by dynamics occurring on a wide range of length and time scales, placing the solution of the governing partial differential equations (PDEs) for such problems among the grand challenges of computational geophysics. One approach to overcoming the tyranny of scales is adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), which locally and dynamically adapts the mesh to resolve spatio-temporal scales and features of interest. For example, we are interested in modeling global mantle convection with nonlinear rheology and kilometer-scale resolution at faulted plate boundaries. Another problem of interest is modeling the dynamics of polar ice sheets with fine resolution in the vicinity of stick-slip transitions. Geophysical inverse problems characterized by a wide range of medium properties can also benefit from AMR as the earth model is updated. While AMR promises to help overcome the challenges inherent in modeling multiscale problems, the benefits are difficult to achieve in practice, particularly on petascale computers that are essential for frontier problems. Due to the complex dynamic data structures and communication patterns, and frequent data exchange and redistribution, scaling dynamic AMR to tens of thousands of processors has long been considered a challenge. Another difficulty is extending parallel AMR techniques to high-order-accurate, complex-geometry-conforming finite element methods that are favored for many classes of solid earth geophysical problems. Here, we present the ALPS (Adaptive Large-scale Parallel Simulations) framework for parallel adaptive solution of PDEs. ALPS includes the octor and p4est libraries for parallel dynamic mesh adaptivity on single-octree-based and forest-of-octree-based geometries, respectively, and the mangll library for arbitrary-order hexahedral continuous and discontinuous finite/spectral element discretizations on general multi-octree geometries. ALPS has been shown to scale well

  12. Multithreaded Model for Dynamic Load Balancing Parallel Adaptive PDE Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisochoides, Nikos

    1995-01-01

    We present a multithreaded model for the dynamic load-balancing of numerical, adaptive computations required for the solution of Partial Differential Equations (PDE's) on multiprocessors. Multithreading is used as a means of exploring concurrency in the processor level in order to tolerate synchronization costs inherent to traditional (non-threaded) parallel adaptive PDE solvers. Our preliminary analysis for parallel, adaptive PDE solvers indicates that multithreading can be used an a mechanism to mask overheads required for the dynamic balancing of processor workloads with computations required for the actual numerical solution of the PDE's. Also, multithreading can simplify the implementation of dynamic load-balancing algorithms, a task that is very difficult for traditional data parallel adaptive PDE computations. Unfortunately, multithreading does not always simplify program complexity, often makes code re-usability not an easy task, and increases software complexity.

  13. HPCCG Solver Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-03-01

    HPCCG is a simple PDE application and preconditioned conjugate gradient solver that solves a linear system on a beam-shaped domain. Although it does not address many performance issues present in real engineering applications, such as load imbalance and preconditioner scalability, it can serve as a first "sanity test" of new processor design choices, inter-connect network design choices and the scalability of a new computer system. Because it is self-contained, easy to compile and easily scaledmore » to 100s or 1000s of porcessors, it can be an attractive study code for computer system designers.« less

  14. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  15. A heterogeneous multiscale method for poroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Paul M.

    In this thesis, we develop and analyze a heterogeneous multiscale model for coupled fluid flow and solid deformation in porous media based on operator splitting and finite volume method. The splitting method results in two elliptic multiscale PDE's in the form of a reaction diffusion equation and a linear elasticity equation. We extend our previous multiscale method from 1D to higher dimensions and develop new approaches for the inclusion of mixed boundary conditions and source terms. We derive an error estimate for our multiscale method and analyze the stability of our splitting method. We also test the effectiveness of our method in the case of steady state linear poroelasticity.

  16. New Multigrid Solver Advances in TOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout, R D; Brannick, J; Brezina, M; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S

    2005-06-27

    In this paper, we highlight new multigrid solver advances in the Terascale Optimal PDE Simulations (TOPS) project in the Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. We discuss two new algebraic multigrid (AMG) developments in TOPS: the adaptive smoothed aggregation method ({alpha}SA) and a coarse-grid selection algorithm based on compatible relaxation (CR). The {alpha}SA method is showing promising results in initial studies for Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) applications. The CR method has the potential to greatly improve the applicability of AMG.

  17. Amesos Solver Package

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Vendall S.; Heroux, Michael A.; Hoekstra, Robert J.; Sala, Marzio

    2004-03-01

    Amesos is the Direct Sparse Solver Package in Trilinos. The goal of Amesos is to make AX=S as easy as it sounds, at least for direct methods. Amesos provides interfaces to a number of third party sparse direct solvers, including SuperLU, SuperLU MPI, DSCPACK, UMFPACK and KLU. Amesos provides a common object oriented interface to the best sparse direct solvers in the world. A sparse direct solver solves for x in Ax = b. where A is a matrix and x and b are vectors (or multi-vectors). A sparse direct solver flrst factors A into trinagular matrices L and U such that A = LU via gaussian elimination and then solves LU x = b. Switching amongst solvers in Amesos roquires a change to a single parameter. Yet, no solver needs to be linked it, unless it is used. All conversions between the matrices provided by the user and the format required by the underlying solver is performed by Amesos. As new sparse direct solvers are created, they will be incorporated into Amesos, allowing the user to simpty link with the new solver, change a single parameter in the calling sequence, and use the new solver. Amesos allows users to specify whether the matrix has changed. Amesos can be used anywhere that any sparse direct solver is needed.

  18. Amesos Solver Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-03-01

    Amesos is the Direct Sparse Solver Package in Trilinos. The goal of Amesos is to make AX=S as easy as it sounds, at least for direct methods. Amesos provides interfaces to a number of third party sparse direct solvers, including SuperLU, SuperLU MPI, DSCPACK, UMFPACK and KLU. Amesos provides a common object oriented interface to the best sparse direct solvers in the world. A sparse direct solver solves for x in Ax = b. wheremore » A is a matrix and x and b are vectors (or multi-vectors). A sparse direct solver flrst factors A into trinagular matrices L and U such that A = LU via gaussian elimination and then solves LU x = b. Switching amongst solvers in Amesos roquires a change to a single parameter. Yet, no solver needs to be linked it, unless it is used. All conversions between the matrices provided by the user and the format required by the underlying solver is performed by Amesos. As new sparse direct solvers are created, they will be incorporated into Amesos, allowing the user to simpty link with the new solver, change a single parameter in the calling sequence, and use the new solver. Amesos allows users to specify whether the matrix has changed. Amesos can be used anywhere that any sparse direct solver is needed.« less

  19. A framework for the construction of preconditioners for systems of PDE

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, S.; Otto, K.

    1994-12-31

    The authors consider the solution of systems of partial differential equations (PDE) in 2D or 3D using preconditioned CG-like iterative methods. The PDE is discretized using a finite difference scheme with arbitrary order of accuracy. The arising sparse and highly structured system of equations is preconditioned using a discretization of a modified PDE, possibly exploiting a different discretization stencil. The preconditioner corresponds to a separable problem, and the discretization in one space direction is constructed so that the corresponding matrix is diagonalized by a unitary transformation. If this transformation is computable using a fast O(n log{sub 2} n) algorithm, the resulting preconditioner solve is of the same complexity. Also, since the preconditioner solves are based on a dimensional splitting, the intrinsic parallelism is good. Different choices of the unitary transformation are considered, e.g., the discrete Fourier transform, sine transform, and modified sine transform. The preconditioners fully exploit the structure of the original problem, and it is shown how to compute the parameters describing them subject to different optimality constraints. Some of these results recover results derived by e.g. R. Chan, T. Chan, and E. Tyrtyshnikov, but here they are stated in a {open_quotes}PDE context{close_quotes}. Numerical experiments where different preconditioners are exploited are presented. Primarily, high-order accurate discretizations for first-order PDE problems are studied, but also second-order derivatives are considered. The results indicate that utilizing preconditioners based on fast solvers for modified PDE problems yields good solution algorithms. These results extend previously derived theoretical and numerical results for second-order approximations for first-order PDE, exploiting preconditioners based on fast Fourier transforms.

  20. On PDE solution in transient optimization of gas networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Marc C.

    2007-06-01

    Operative planning in gas distribution networks leads to large-scale mixed-integer optimization problems involving a hyperbolic PDE defined on a graph. We consider the NLP obtained under prescribed combinatorial decisions--or as relaxation in a branch-and-bound framework, addressing in particular the KKT systems arising in primal-dual interior methods. We propose a custom solution algorithm using sparse projections locally in time, based on the KKT systems' structural properties in space as induced by the discretized gas flow equations in combination with the underlying network topology. The numerical efficiency and accuracy of the algorithm are investigated, and detailed computational comparisons with a previously developed control space method and with the multifrontal solver MA27 are provided.

  1. MGLab3D: An interactive environment for iterative solvers for elliptic PDEs in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bordner, J.; Saied, F.

    1996-12-31

    GLab3D is an enhancement of an interactive environment (MGLab) for experimenting with iterative solvers and multigrid algorithms. It is implemented in MATLAB. The new version has built-in 3D elliptic pde`s and several iterative methods and preconditioners that were not available in the original version. A sparse direct solver option has also been included. The multigrid solvers have also been extended to 3D. The discretization and pde domains are restricted to standard finite differences on the unit square/cube. The power of this software studies in the fact that no programming is needed to solve, for example, the convection-diffusion equation in 3D with TFQMR and a customized V-cycle preconditioner, for a variety of problem sizes and mesh Reynolds, numbers. In addition to the graphical user interface, some sample drivers are included to show how experiments can be composed using the underlying suite of problems and solvers.

  2. A Yeast-Based Chemical Screen Identifies a PDE Inhibitor That Elevates Steroidogenesis in Mouse Leydig Cells via PDE8 and PDE4 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Demirbas, Didem; Wyman, Arlene R.; Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Cakici, Ozgur; Beavo, Joseph A.; Hoffman, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    A cell-based high-throughput screen (HTS) was developed to detect phosphodiesterase 8 (PDE8) and PDE4/8 combination inhibitors. By replacing the Schizosaccharomyces pombe PDE gene with the murine PDE8A1 gene in strains lacking adenylyl cyclase, we generated strains whose protein kinase A (PKA)-stimulated growth in 5-fluoro orotic acid (5FOA) medium reflects PDE8 activity. From our previously-identified PDE4 and PDE7 inhibitors, we identified a PDE4/8 inhibitor that allowed us to optimize screening conditions. Of 222,711 compounds screened, ∼0.2% displayed composite Z scores of >20. Additional yeast-based assays using the most effective 367 compounds identified 30 candidates for further characterization. Among these, compound BC8-15 displayed the lowest IC50 value for both PDE4 and PDE8 inhibition in in vitro enzyme assays. This compound also displays significant activity against PDE10A and PDE11A. BC8-15 elevates steroidogenesis in mouse Leydig cells as a single pharmacological agent. Assays using BC8-15 and two structural derivatives support a model in which PDE8 is a primary regulator of testosterone production by Leydig cells, with an additional role for PDE4 in this process. BC8-15, BC8-15A, and BC8-15C, which are commercially available compounds, display distinct patterns of activity against PDE4, PDE8, PDE10A, and PDE11A, representing a chemical toolkit that could be used to examine the biological roles of these enzymes in cell culture systems. PMID:23967182

  3. Biomolecular surface construction by PDE transform.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiong; Yang, Siyang; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-03-01

    This work proposes a new framework for the surface generation based on the partial differential equation (PDE) transform. The PDE transform has recently been introduced as a general approach for the mode decomposition of images, signals, and data. It relies on the use of arbitrarily high-order PDEs to achieve the time-frequency localization, control the spectral distribution, and regulate the spatial resolution. The present work provides a new variational derivation of high-order PDE transforms. The fast Fourier transform is utilized to accomplish the PDE transform so as to avoid stringent stability constraints in solving high-order PDEs. As a consequence, the time integration of high-order PDEs can be done efficiently with the fast Fourier transform. The present approach is validated with a variety of test examples in two-dimensional and three-dimensional settings. We explore the impact of the PDE transform parameters, such as the PDE order and propagation time, on the quality of resulting surfaces. Additionally, we utilize a set of 10 proteins to compare the computational efficiency of the present surface generation method and a standard approach in Cartesian meshes. Moreover, we analyze the present method by examining some benchmark indicators of biomolecular surface, that is, surface area, surface-enclosed volume, solvation free energy, and surface electrostatic potential. A test set of 13 protein molecules is used in the present investigation. The electrostatic analysis is carried out via the Poisson-Boltzmann equation model. To further demonstrate the utility of the present PDE transform-based surface method, we solve the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations with a PDE transform surface of a protein. Second-order convergence is observed for the electrostatic potential and concentrations. Finally, to test the capability and efficiency of the present PDE transform-based surface generation method, we apply it to the construction of an excessively large biomolecule, a

  4. Inhibitors of phosphodiesterases PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4 do not increase the sinoatrial tachycardia of noradrenaline and prostaglandin PGE₁ in mice.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Tovar, Alejandro; Vargas, María Luisa; Kaumann, Alberto J

    2016-02-01

    Phosphodiesterases PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4 are expressed in murine sinoatrial cells. PDE3 and/or PDE4 reduce heart rate but apparently do not influence the tachycardia mediated through sinoatrial β1- and β2-adrenoceptors despite the high content of sinoatrial cAMP. The function of PDE2 is, however, uncertain. Prostaglandin PGE1 elicits sinoatrial tachycardia through EP receptors, but the control by phosphodiesterases is unknown. We investigated on spontaneously beating right atria of mice the effects of the PDE2 inhibitors Bay 60-7550 and EHNA on basal beating and the tachycardia produced by noradrenaline (3 nM) and PGE1 (1 μM). Bay 60-7550 (1 μM), but not EHNA (10 μM), increased basal sinoatrial beating. EHNA also failed to produce tachycardia in the presence of the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin (10 μM), remaining inconclusive whether PDE2 reduces basal sinoatrial beating. Rolipram (10 μM) and cilostamide (300 nM) caused moderate tachycardia. The tachycardia evoked by Bay 60-7550 was similar in the absence and presence of rolipram. Noradrenaline elicited stable tachycardia that was not increased by Bay 60-7550. A stable tachycardia caused by PGE1 was not increased by the inhibitors of PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4. Unlike PDE3 and PDE4 which reduce murine basal sinoatrial beating, a possible effect of PDE2 needs further research. The stable tachycardia produced by noradrenaline and PGE1, together with the lack potentiation by the inhibitors of PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4, suggests that cAMP generated at the receptor compartments is hardly hydrolyzed by these phophodiesterases. Evidence from human volunteers is consistent with this proposal. PMID:26531832

  5. Multiscale Simulation Framework for Coupled Fluid Flow and Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Tchelepi, Hamdi

    2014-11-14

    A multiscale linear-solver framework for the pressure equation associated with flow in highly heterogeneous porous formations was developed. The multiscale based approach is cast in a general algebraic form, which facilitates integration of the new scalable linear solver in existing flow simulators. The Algebraic Multiscale Solver (AMS) is employed as a preconditioner within a multi-stage strategy. The formulations investigated include the standard MultiScale Finite-Element (MSFE) andMultiScale Finite-Volume (MSFV) methods. The local-stage solvers include incomplete factorization and the so-called Correction Functions (CF) associated with the MSFV approach. Extensive testing of AMS, as an iterative linear solver, indicate excellent convergence rates and computational scalability. AMS compares favorably with advanced Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) solvers for highly detailed three-dimensional heterogeneous models. Moreover, AMS is expected to be especially beneficial in solving time-dependent problems of coupled multiphase flow and transport in large-scale subsurface formations.

  6. Implementing Multiscale Fluid Simulations using Multiscale Universal Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Kudo, Shuhei; Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George; Crunch Team

    2015-11-01

    The power of multiscale fluid simulations lies in its ability to recover a hierarchical levels of details by choreographing multiple solvers, thus extending the length and time scale accessible given a fixed amount of computing power. However, practical difficulties frequently arise when stitching together solvers which were not designed to be coupled, and would often result in tedious and unsustainable coding effort. The Multiscale Universal Interface (MUI) aims to solve this problem by exposing a small set of generalized programming interfaces that can be dropped into existing solvers with minimal intrusion. Three deployment cases will be given for demonstrating real-world applications of MUI. In the first case we used MUI to implement simulations of polymer-grafted surface in flow using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics/Dissipative Particle Dynamics (SPH/DPD) and state variable coupling. In the second case we constructed coupled DPD/Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation of conjugate heat transfer in heterogeneous coolant. In the third case we built hybrid DPD/molecular dynamics (MD) simulations by blending the forces on atoms at interface regions. Supported by the DOE Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) and AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0463. Computer hours at ORNL allocated through INCITE BIP118 and DD102.

  7. Tumour growth inhibition and anti-angiogenic effects using curcumin correspond to combined PDE2 and PDE4 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Abusnina, Abdurazzag; Keravis, Thérèse; Zhou, Qingwei; Justiniano, Hélène; Lobstein, Annelise; Lugnier, Claire

    2015-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a major role in angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cells. Increase in cyclic AMP (cAMP) level inhibits VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), which specifically hydrolyse cyclic nucleotides, are critical in the regulation of this signal transduction. We have previously reported that PDE2 and PDE4 up-regulations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are implicated in VEGF-induced angiogenesis and that inhibition of PDE2 and PDE4 activities prevents the development of the in vitro angiogenesis by increasing cAMP level, as well as the in vivo chicken embryo angiogenesis. We have also shown that polyphenols are able to inhibit PDEs. The curcumin having anti-cancer properties, the present study investigated whether PDE2 and PDE4 inhibitors and curcumin could have similar in vivo anti-tumour properties and whether the anti-angiogenic effects of curcumin are mediated by PDEs. Both PDE2/PDE4 inhibitor association and curcumin significantly inhibited in vivo tumour growth in C57BL/6N mice. In vitro, curcumin inhibited basal and VEGF-stimulated HUVEC proliferation and migration and delayed cell cycle progression at G0/G1, similarly to the combination of selective PDE2 and PDE4 inhibitors. cAMP levels in HUVECs were significantly increased by curcumin, similarly to rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and BAY-60-550 (PDE2 inhibitor) association, indicating cAMP-PDE inhibitions. Moreover, curcumin was able to inhibit VEGF-induced cAMP-PDE activity without acting on cGMP-PDE activity and to modulate PDE2 and PDE4 expressions in HUVECs. The present results suggest that curcumin exerts its in vitro anti-angiogenic and in vivo anti-tumour properties through combined PDE2 and PDE4 inhibition. PMID:25230992

  8. PDE-10A inhibitors as insulin secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Cantin, Louis-David; Magnuson, Steven; Gunn, David; Barucci, Nicole; Breuhaus, Marina; Bullock, William H; Burke, Jennifer; Claus, Thomas H; Daly, Michelle; Decarr, Lynn; Gore-Willse, Ann; Hoover-Litty, Helana; Kumarasinghe, Ellalahewage S; Li, Yaxin; Liang, Sidney X; Livingston, James N; Lowinger, Timothy; Macdougall, Margit; Ogutu, Herbert O; Olague, Alan; Ott-Morgan, Ronda; Schoenleber, Robert W; Tersteegen, Adrian; Wickens, Philip; Zhang, Zhonghua; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Lei; Sweet, Laurel J

    2007-05-15

    Modulation of cAMP levels has been linked to insulin secretion in preclinical animal models and in humans. The high expression of PDE-10A in pancreatic islets suggested that inhibition of this enzyme may provide the necessary modulation to elicit increased insulin secretion. Using an HTS approach, we have identified quinoline-based PDE-10A inhibitors as insulin secretagogues in vitro. Optimized compounds were evaluated in vivo where improvements in glucose tolerance and increases in insulin secretion were measured. PMID:17400452

  9. Parallel Multigrid Equation Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-09-07

    Prometheus is a fully parallel multigrid equation solver for matrices that arise in unstructured grid finite element applications. It includes a geometric and an algebraic multigrid method and has solved problems of up to 76 mullion degrees of feedom, problems in linear elasticity on the ASCI blue pacific and ASCI red machines.

  10. Dual PDE3/4 and PDE4 inhibitors: novel treatments for COPD and other inflammatory airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Abbott-Banner, Katharine H; Page, Clive P

    2014-05-01

    Selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 and dual PDE3/4 inhibitors have attracted considerable interest as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of respiratory diseases, largely by virtue of their anti-inflammatory (PDE4) and bifunctional bronchodilator/anti-inflammatory (PDE3/4) effects. Many of these agents have, however, failed in early development for various reasons, including dose-limiting side effects when administered orally and lack of sufficient activity when inhaled. Indeed, only one selective PDE4 inhibitor, the orally active roflumilast-n-oxide, has to date received marketing authorization. The majority of the compounds that have failed were, however, orally administered and non-selective for either PDE3 (A,B) or PDE4 (A,B,C,D) subtypes. Developing an inhaled dual PDE3/4 inhibitor that is rapidly cleared from the systemic circulation, potentially with subtype specificity, may represent one strategy to improve the therapeutic index and also exhibit enhanced efficacy versus inhibition of either PDE3 or PDE4 alone, given the potential positive interactions with regard to anti-inflammatory and bronchodilator effects that have been observed pre-clinically with dual inhibition of PDE3 and PDE4 compared with inhibition of either isozyme alone. This MiniReview will summarize recent clinical data obtained with PDE inhibitors and the potential for these drugs to treat COPD and other inflammatory airways diseases such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. PMID:24517491

  11. Adaptive kinetic-fluid solvers for heterogeneous computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabelok, Sergey; Arslanbekov, Robert; Kolobov, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    We show feasibility and benefits of porting an adaptive multi-scale kinetic-fluid code to CPU-GPU systems. Challenges are due to the irregular data access for adaptive Cartesian mesh, vast difference of computational cost between kinetic and fluid cells, and desire to evenly load all CPUs and GPUs during grid adaptation and algorithm refinement. Our Unified Flow Solver (UFS) combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with automatic cell-by-cell selection of kinetic or fluid solvers based on continuum breakdown criteria. Using GPUs enables hybrid simulations of mixed rarefied-continuum flows with a million of Boltzmann cells each having a 24 × 24 × 24 velocity mesh. We describe the implementation of CUDA kernels for three modules in UFS: the direct Boltzmann solver using the discrete velocity method (DVM), the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solver, and a mesoscopic solver based on the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), all using adaptive Cartesian mesh. Double digit speedups on single GPU and good scaling for multi-GPUs have been demonstrated.

  12. Pliris Solver Package

    SciTech Connect

    Kotulski, Joseph D.; Womble, David E.; Greenberg, David; Driessen, Brian

    2004-03-01

    PLIRIS is an object-oriented solver built on top of a previous matrix solver used in a number of application codes. Puns solves a linear system directly via LU factorization with partial pivoting. The user provides the linear system in terms of Epetra Objects including a matrix and right-hand-sides. The user can then factor the matrix and perform the forward and back solve at a later time or solve for multiple right-hand-sides at once. This package is used when dense matrices are obtained in the problem formulation. These dense matrices occur whenever boundary element techniques are chosen for the solution procedure. This has been used in electromagnetics for both static and frequency domain problems.

  13. Pliris Solver Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-03-01

    PLIRIS is an object-oriented solver built on top of a previous matrix solver used in a number of application codes. Puns solves a linear system directly via LU factorization with partial pivoting. The user provides the linear system in terms of Epetra Objects including a matrix and right-hand-sides. The user can then factor the matrix and perform the forward and back solve at a later time or solve for multiple right-hand-sides at once. This packagemore » is used when dense matrices are obtained in the problem formulation. These dense matrices occur whenever boundary element techniques are chosen for the solution procedure. This has been used in electromagnetics for both static and frequency domain problems.« less

  14. Challenge of human Jurkat T-cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin elicits major changes in cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) expression by up-regulating PDE3 and inducing PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 splice variants as well as down-regulating a novel PDE4A splice variant.

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, S; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    The cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and PDE4 isoforms provide the major cAMP-hydrolysing PDE activities in Jurkat T-cells, with additional contributions from the PDE1 and PDE2 isoforms. Challenge of cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin led to a rapid, albeit transient, increase in PDE3 activity occurring over the first 45 min, followed by a sustained increase in PDE3 activity which began after approximately 3 h and continued for at least 24 h. Only this second phase of increase in PDE3 activity was blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. After approximately 3 h of exposure to forskolin, PDE4 activity had increased, via a process that could be inhibited by actinomycin D, and it remained elevated for at least a 24 h period. Such actions of forskolin were mimicked by cholera toxin and 8-bromo-cAMP. Forskolin increased intracellular cAMP concentrations in a time-dependent fashion and its action was enhanced when PDE induction was blocked with actinomycin D. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis, using generic primers designed to detect transcripts representing enzymically active products of the four PDE4 genes, identified transcripts for PDE4A and PDE4D but not for PDE4B or PDE4C in untreated Jurkat T-cells. Forskolin treatment did not induce transcripts for either PDE4B or PDE4C; however, it reduced the RT-PCR signal for PDE4A transcripts and markedly enhanced that for PDE4D transcripts. Using RT-PCR primers for PDE4 splice variants, a weak signal for PDE4D1 was evident in control cells whereas, in forskolin-treated cells, clear signals for both PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 were detected. RT-PCR analysis of the PDE4A species indicated that it was not the PDE4A isoform PDE-46 (PDE4A4B). Immunoblotting of control cells for PDE4 forms identified a single PDE4A species of approximately 118 kDa, which migrated distinctly from the PDE4A4B isoform PDE-46, with immunoprecipitation analyses showing that it provided all of the PDE4 activity in control

  15. Moment equations for a piecewise deterministic PDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Lawley, Sean D.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze a piecewise deterministic PDE consisting of the diffusion equation on a finite interval Ω with randomly switching boundary conditions and diffusion coefficient. We proceed by spatially discretizing the diffusion equation using finite differences and constructing the Chapman-Kolmogorov (CK) equation for the resulting finite-dimensional stochastic hybrid system. We show how the CK equation can be used to generate a hierarchy of equations for the r-th moments of the stochastic field, which take the form of r-dimensional parabolic PDEs on {{Ω }r} that couple to lower order moments at the boundaries. We explicitly solve the first and second order moment equations (r = 2). We then describe how the r-th moment of the stochastic PDE can be interpreted in terms of the splitting probability that r non-interacting Brownian particles all exit at the same boundary; although the particles are non-interacting, statistical correlations arise due to the fact that they all move in the same randomly switching environment. Hence the stochastic diffusion equation describes two levels of randomness: Brownian motion at the individual particle level and a randomly switching environment. Finally, in the limit of fast switching, we use a quasi-steady state approximation to reduce the piecewise deterministic PDE to an SPDE with multiplicative Gaussian noise in the bulk and a stochastically-driven boundary.

  16. Assessing the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors in rats.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, A; Savoie, C; Stamatiou, P B; Lachance, N; Jolicoeur, P; Rasori, R; Chan, C C

    2002-01-01

    1. Type 4 phosphodiesterase (PDE4) inhibitors mimic the pharmacological actions of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonists. This has been postulated as the mechanism by which PDE4 inhibitors induce emesis and was also demonstrated by their ability to reverse xylazine/ketamine-induced anaesthesia. We further characterized this latter effect since it appears to reflect the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors. 2. Selective inhibitors of PDE 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were studied in rats, on the duration of anaesthesia induced by the combination of xylazine (10 mg kg(-1), i.m.) and ketamine (10 mg kg(-1), i.m.). PMNPQ (i.e. 6-(4-pyridylmethyl)-8-(3-nitrophenyl)quinoline) - PDE4 inhibitor: 0.01 - 3 mg kg(-1)), like MK-912 (alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist: 0.01 - 3 mg kg(-1)), dose-dependently reduced the duration of anaesthesia. In contrast, vinpocetine (PDE1 inhibitor), EHNA (PDE2 inhibitor), milrinone (PDE3 inhibitor) and zaprinast (PDE5 inhibitor) had no significant effect at the doses tested (1 - 10 mg kg(-1)). Analysis of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of treated animals confirmed the absorption and distribution to the brain of the inactive inhibitors. 3. Neither MK-912 (3 mg kg(-1)) nor PMNPQ (0.1 - 1 mg kg(-1)) altered the duration of anaesthesia induced via a non-alpha(2)-adrenoceptor pathway (sodium pentobarbitone 50 mg kg(-1), i.p.). 4. Central NK(1) receptors are involved in PDE4 inhibitor-induced emesis. Consistently, [sar(9), Met(O(2))(11)]-substance P (NK(1) receptor agonist, 6 microg i.c.v.) reduced the duration of anaesthesia induced by xylazine/ketamine. 5. In summary, this model is functionally coupled to PDE4, specific to alpha(2)-adrenoceptors and relevant to PDE4 inhibitor-induced emesis. It therefore provides a novel way of evaluating the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors in rats. PMID:11786486

  17. A PDE Sensitivity Equation Method for Optimal Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Burns, John

    1996-01-01

    The use of gradient based optimization algorithms in inverse design is well established as a practical approach to aerodynamic design. A typical procedure uses a simulation scheme to evaluate the objective function (from the approximate states) and its gradient, then passes this information to an optimization algorithm. Once the simulation scheme (CFD flow solver) has been selected and used to provide approximate function evaluations, there are several possible approaches to the problem of computing gradients. One popular method is to differentiate the simulation scheme and compute design sensitivities that are then used to obtain gradients. Although this black-box approach has many advantages in shape optimization problems, one must compute mesh sensitivities in order to compute the design sensitivity. In this paper, we present an alternative approach using the PDE sensitivity equation to develop algorithms for computing gradients. This approach has the advantage that mesh sensitivities need not be computed. Moreover, when it is possible to use the CFD scheme for both the forward problem and the sensitivity equation, then there are computational advantages. An apparent disadvantage of this approach is that it does not always produce consistent derivatives. However, for a proper combination of discretization schemes, one can show asymptotic consistency under mesh refinement, which is often sufficient to guarantee convergence of the optimal design algorithm. In particular, we show that when asymptotically consistent schemes are combined with a trust-region optimization algorithm, the resulting optimal design method converges. We denote this approach as the sensitivity equation method. The sensitivity equation method is presented, convergence results are given and the approach is illustrated on two optimal design problems involving shocks.

  18. A novel high-order, entropy stable, 3D AMR MHD solver with guaranteed positive pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derigs, Dominik; Winters, Andrew R.; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We describe a high-order numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver built upon a novel non-linear entropy stable numerical flux function that supports eight travelling wave solutions. By construction the solver conserves mass, momentum, and energy and is entropy stable. The method is designed to treat the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field in a similar fashion to a hyperbolic divergence cleaning technique. The solver described herein is especially well-suited for flows involving strong discontinuities. Furthermore, we present a new formulation to guarantee positivity of the pressure. We present the underlying theory and implementation of the new solver into the multi-physics, multi-scale adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation code FLASH (http://flash.uchicago.edu)

  19. A novel high-order, entropy stable, 3D AMR MHD solver with guaranteed positive pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derigs, Dominik; Winters, Andrew R.; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We describe a high-order numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver built upon a novel non-linear entropy stable numerical flux function that supports eight travelling wave solutions. By construction the solver conserves mass, momentum, and energy and is entropy stable. The method is designed to treat the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field in a similar fashion to a hyperbolic divergence cleaning technique. The solver described herein is especially well-suited for flows involving strong discontinuities. Furthermore, we present a new formulation to guarantee positivity of the pressure. We present the underlying theory and implementation of the new solver into the multi-physics, multi-scale adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation code FLASH (http://flash.uchicago.edu).

  20. [Progress in PDE4 targeted therapy for inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Song, Shun-de; Tang, Hui-fang

    2014-05-01

    cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4) is one of the hot targets for treatment of inflammatory diseases. PDE4 inhibitors can suppress inflammation by increasing the concentration of cAMP in inflammatory cells. The efficacy and safety evaluations of several PDE4 inhibitors are currently carried on in clinical trials, for example GSK256066 in asthma, roflumilast and GSK256066 in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tetomilast in inflammatory bowel disease, and apremilast in dermatitis and arthritis etc. This article reviews the recent progress on PDE4-targeted therapy for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24998661

  1. Parallel tridiagonal equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Three parallel algorithms were compared for the direct solution of tridiagonal linear systems of equations. The algorithms are suitable for computers such as ILLIAC 4 and CDC STAR. For array computers similar to ILLIAC 4, cyclic odd-even reduction has the least operation count for highly structured sets of equations, and recursive doubling has the least count for relatively unstructured sets of equations. Since the difference in operation counts for these two algorithms is not substantial, their relative running times may be more related to overhead operations, which are not measured in this paper. The third algorithm, based on Buneman's Poisson solver, has more arithmetic operations than the others, and appears to be the least favorable. For pipeline computers similar to CDC STAR, cyclic odd-even reduction appears to be the most preferable algorithm for all cases.

  2. Differential Expression and Function of PDE8 and PDE4 in Effector T cells: Implications for PDE8 as a Drug Target in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Amanda G.; Basole, Chaitali; Dong, Hongli; Nguyen, Rebecca K.; Housley, William; Guernsey, Linda; Adami, Alexander J.; Thrall, Roger S.; Clark, Robert B.; Epstein, Paul M.; Brocke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abolishing the inhibitory signal of intracellular cAMP is a prerequisite for effector T (Teff) cell function. The regulation of cAMP within leukocytes critically depends on its degradation by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs). We have previously shown that PDE8A, a PDE isoform with 40–100-fold greater affinity for cAMP than PDE4, is selectively expressed in Teff vs. regulatory T (Treg) cells and controls CD4+ Teff cell adhesion and chemotaxis. Here, we determined PDE8A expression and function in CD4+ Teff cell populations in vivo. Using magnetic bead separation to purify leukocyte populations from the lung draining hilar lymph node (HLN) in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway disease (AAD), we found by Western immunoblot and quantitative (q)RT-PCR that PDE8A protein and gene expression are enhanced in the CD4+ T cell fraction over the course of the acute inflammatory disease and recede at the late tolerant non-inflammatory stage. To evaluate PDE8A as a potential drug target, we compared the selective and combined effects of the recently characterized highly potent PDE8-selective inhibitor PF-04957325 with the PDE4-selective inhibitor piclamilast (PICL). As previously shown, PF-04957325 suppresses T cell adhesion to endothelial cells. In contrast, we found that PICL alone increased firm T cell adhesion to endothelial cells by ~20% and significantly abrogated the inhibitory effect of PF-04957325 on T cell adhesion by over 50% when cells were co-exposed to PICL and PF-04957325. Despite its robust effect on T cell adhesion, PF-04957325 was over two orders of magnitude less efficient than PICL in suppressing polyclonal Teff cell proliferation, and showed no effect on cytokine gene expression in these cells. More importantly, PDE8 inhibition did not suppress proliferation and cytokine production of myelin-antigen reactive proinflammatory Teff cells in vivo and in vitro. Thus, targeting PDE8 through PF-04957325 selectively regulates Teff cell

  3. Differential Expression and Function of PDE8 and PDE4 in Effector T cells: Implications for PDE8 as a Drug Target in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Vang, Amanda G; Basole, Chaitali; Dong, Hongli; Nguyen, Rebecca K; Housley, William; Guernsey, Linda; Adami, Alexander J; Thrall, Roger S; Clark, Robert B; Epstein, Paul M; Brocke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abolishing the inhibitory signal of intracellular cAMP is a prerequisite for effector T (Teff) cell function. The regulation of cAMP within leukocytes critically depends on its degradation by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs). We have previously shown that PDE8A, a PDE isoform with 40-100-fold greater affinity for cAMP than PDE4, is selectively expressed in Teff vs. regulatory T (Treg) cells and controls CD4(+) Teff cell adhesion and chemotaxis. Here, we determined PDE8A expression and function in CD4(+) Teff cell populations in vivo. Using magnetic bead separation to purify leukocyte populations from the lung draining hilar lymph node (HLN) in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway disease (AAD), we found by Western immunoblot and quantitative (q)RT-PCR that PDE8A protein and gene expression are enhanced in the CD4(+) T cell fraction over the course of the acute inflammatory disease and recede at the late tolerant non-inflammatory stage. To evaluate PDE8A as a potential drug target, we compared the selective and combined effects of the recently characterized highly potent PDE8-selective inhibitor PF-04957325 with the PDE4-selective inhibitor piclamilast (PICL). As previously shown, PF-04957325 suppresses T cell adhesion to endothelial cells. In contrast, we found that PICL alone increased firm T cell adhesion to endothelial cells by ~20% and significantly abrogated the inhibitory effect of PF-04957325 on T cell adhesion by over 50% when cells were co-exposed to PICL and PF-04957325. Despite its robust effect on T cell adhesion, PF-04957325 was over two orders of magnitude less efficient than PICL in suppressing polyclonal Teff cell proliferation, and showed no effect on cytokine gene expression in these cells. More importantly, PDE8 inhibition did not suppress proliferation and cytokine production of myelin-antigen reactive proinflammatory Teff cells in vivo and in vitro. Thus, targeting PDE8 through PF-04957325 selectively regulates Teff

  4. Amesos2 Templated Direct Sparse Solver Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-05-24

    Amesos2 is a templated direct sparse solver package. Amesos2 provides interfaces to direct sparse solvers, rather than providing native solver capabilities. Amesos2 is a derivative work of the Trilinos package Amesos.

  5. Modulation of VEGF-induced endothelial cell cycle protein expression through cyclic AMP hydrolysis by PDE2 and PDE4.

    PubMed

    Favot, Laure; Keravis, Thérèse; Lugnier, Claire

    2004-09-01

    Endothelial cell proliferation in response to VEGF plays an important role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis. The role of PDE2 and PDE4 in VEGF-induced proliferation in HUVEC was investigated: 1) VEGF increased cAMP-hydrolytic activity by up-regulating the expression of PDE2 and PDE4 isozymes; 2) VEGF increased progression in cell cycle with an increase in p42/p44 MAP kinase, cyclin A and cyclin D1 expressions and with a decrease in p21 waf1/cip1 and p27 kip1 expressions; 3) EHNA (20 micro M), a selective PDE2 inhibitor, RP73401 (10 micro M), a selective PDE4 inhibitor blocked the VEGF-induced increase in p42/p44 MAP kinase expression; 4) RP73401, but not EHNA, blocked the VEGF-induced increase in cyclin A and decrease in p27 kip1 expressions; 5) EHNA, contrary to RP73401, enhanced the VEGF-induced increase of cyclin A and decrease of p27 kip1. 6) EHNA and RP73401 together blocked the VEGF-induced increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in p21 waf1/cip1 expressions; 7) Inhibition of VEGF-upregulated PDE2 and PDE4 reversed the VEGF-induced alterations in cell cycle protein expression, bringing back endothelial cells to a non-proliferating status. Consequently, PDE2 and PDE4 inhibitions were able to inhibit VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation by restoring cell cycle key protein expression, and might thus be useful in excessive angiogenesis. Furthermore, the differences between PDE2 and PDE4 effects may suggest compartmentalized effects. PMID:15351862

  6. Workload Characterization of CFD Applications Using Partial Differential Equation Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Workload characterization is used for modeling and evaluating of computing systems at different levels of detail. We present workload characterization for a class of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications that solve Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). This workload characterization focuses on three high performance computing platforms: SGI Origin2000, EBM SP-2, a cluster of Intel Pentium Pro bases PCs. We execute extensive measurement-based experiments on these platforms to gather statistics of system resource usage, which results in workload characterization. Our workload characterization approach yields a coarse-grain resource utilization behavior that is being applied for performance modeling and evaluation of distributed high performance metacomputing systems. In addition, this study enhances our understanding of interactions between PDE solver workloads and high performance computing platforms and is useful for tuning these applications.

  7. Numerical Stochastic Homogenization Method and Multiscale Stochastic Finite Element Method - A Paradigm for Multiscale Computation of Stochastic PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    X. Frank Xu

    2010-03-30

    Multiscale modeling of stochastic systems, or uncertainty quantization of multiscale modeling is becoming an emerging research frontier, with rapidly growing engineering applications in nanotechnology, biotechnology, advanced materials, and geo-systems, etc. While tremendous efforts have been devoted to either stochastic methods or multiscale methods, little combined work had been done on integration of multiscale and stochastic methods, and there was no method formally available to tackle multiscale problems involving uncertainties. By developing an innovative Multiscale Stochastic Finite Element Method (MSFEM), this research has made a ground-breaking contribution to the emerging field of Multiscale Stochastic Modeling (MSM) (Fig 1). The theory of MSFEM basically decomposes a boundary value problem of random microstructure into a slow scale deterministic problem and a fast scale stochastic one. The slow scale problem corresponds to common engineering modeling practices where fine-scale microstructure is approximated by certain effective constitutive constants, which can be solved by using standard numerical solvers. The fast scale problem evaluates fluctuations of local quantities due to random microstructure, which is important for scale-coupling systems and particularly those involving failure mechanisms. The Green-function-based fast-scale solver developed in this research overcomes the curse-of-dimensionality commonly met in conventional approaches, by proposing a random field-based orthogonal expansion approach. The MSFEM formulated in this project paves the way to deliver the first computational tool/software on uncertainty quantification of multiscale systems. The applications of MSFEM on engineering problems will directly enhance our modeling capability on materials science (composite materials, nanostructures), geophysics (porous media, earthquake), biological systems (biological tissues, bones, protein folding). Continuous development of MSFEM will

  8. PDE4B as a microglia target to reduce neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Damien D; Hughes, Zoë A

    2016-10-01

    The importance of microglia in immune homeostasis within the brain is undisputed. Their role in a diversity of neurological and psychiatric diseases as well as CNS injury is the subject of much investigation. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is a critical regulator of microglia homeostasis; as the predominant negative modulator of cyclic AMP signaling within microglia, phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) represents a promising target for modulating immune function. PDE4 expression is regulated by inflammation, and in turn, PDE4 inhibition can alter microglia reactivity. As the prototypic PDE4 inhibitor, rolipram, was tested clinically in the 1980s, drug discovery and clinical development of PDE4 inhibitors have been severely hampered by tolerability issues involving nausea and emesis. The two PDE4 inhibitors approved for peripheral inflammatory disorders (roflumilast and apremilast) lack brain penetration and are dose-limited by side effects making them unsuitable for modulating microglial function. Subtype selective inhibitors targeting PDE4B are of high interest given the critical role PDE4B plays in immune function versus the association of PDE4D with nausea and emesis. The challenges and requirements for successful development of a novel brain-penetrant PDE4B inhibitor are discussed in the context of early clinical development strategies. Furthermore, the challenges of monitoring the state of microglia in vivo are highlighted, including a description of the currently available tools and their limitations. Continued drug discovery efforts to identify safe and well-tolerated, brain-penetrant PDE4 inhibitors are a reflection of the confidence in the rationale for modulation of this target to produce meaningful therapeutic benefit in a wide range of neurological conditions and injury. GLIA 2016;64:1698-1709. PMID:27038323

  9. A Comparison of PETSC Library and HPF Implementations of an Archetypal PDE Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Keyes, David E.; Mehrotra, Piyush

    1997-01-01

    Two paradigms for distributed-memory parallel computation that free the application programmer from the details of message passing are compared for an archetypal structured scientific computation a nonlinear, structured-grid partial differential equation boundary value problem using the same algorithm on the same hardware. Both paradigms, parallel libraries represented by Argonne's PETSC, and parallel languages represented by the Portland Group's HPF, are found to be easy to use for this problem class, and both are reasonably effective in exploiting concurrency after a short learning curve. The level of involvement required by the application programmer under either paradigm includes specification of the data partitioning (corresponding to a geometrically simple decomposition of the domain of the PDE). Programming in SPAM style for the PETSC library requires writing the routines that discretize the PDE and its Jacobian, managing subdomain-to-processor mappings (affine global- to-local index mappings), and interfacing to library solver routines. Programming for HPF requires a complete sequential implementation of the same algorithm, introducing concurrency through subdomain blocking (an effort similar to the index mapping), and modest experimentation with rewriting loops to elucidate to the compiler the latent concurrency. Correctness and scalability are cross-validated on up to 32 nodes of an IBM SP2.

  10. PDE3 and PDE4 Isozyme-Selective Inhibitors Are Both Required for Synergistic Activation of Brown Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kraynik, Stephen M.; Miyaoka, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a highly thermogenic organ that converts lipids and glucose into heat. Many of the metabolic and gene transcriptional hallmarks of BAT activation, namely increased lipolysis, uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA, and glucose uptake, are regulated by the adrenergic second messenger, cAMP. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyze the breakdown of cAMP, thereby regulating the magnitude and duration of this signaling molecule. In the absence of adrenergic stimulus, we found that it required a combination of a PDE3 and a PDE4 inhibitor to fully induce UCP1 mRNA and lipolysis in brown adipocytes, whereas neither PDE inhibitor alone had any substantial effect under basal conditions. Under submaximal β-adrenoceptor stimulation of brown adipocytes, a PDE3 inhibitor alone could potentiate induction of UCP1 mRNA, whereas a PDE4 inhibitor alone could augment lipolysis, indicating differential roles for each of these two PDEs. Neither induction of UCP1 nor lipolysis was altered by inhibition of PDE1, PDE2, or PDE8A. Finally, when injected into mice, the combination of PDE3 and PDE4 inhibitors stimulated glucose uptake in BAT under thermoneutral and fasted conditions, a response that was further potentiated by the global ablation of PDE8A. Taken together, these data reveal that multiple PDEs work in concert to regulate three of the important pathways leading to BAT activation, a finding that may provide an improved conceptual basis for the development of therapies for obesity-related diseases. PMID:23493317

  11. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  12. Sherlock Holmes, Master Problem Solver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballew, Hunter

    1994-01-01

    Shows the connections between Sherlock Holmes's investigative methods and mathematical problem solving, including observations, characteristics of the problem solver, importance of data, questioning the obvious, learning from experience, learning from errors, and indirect proof. (MKR)

  13. PDE regularization for Bayesian reconstruction of emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Zhang, Li; Xing, Yuxiang; Zhao, Ziran

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate a type of Bayesian reconstruction which utilizes partial differential equations (PDE) image models as regularization. PDE image models are widely used in image restoration and segmentation. In a PDE model, the image can be viewed as the solution of an evolutionary differential equation. The variation of the image can be regard as a descent of an energy function, which entitles us to use PDE models in Bayesian reconstruction. In this paper, two PDE models called anisotropic diffusion are studied. Both of them have the characteristics of edge-preserving and denoising like the popular median root prior (MRP). We use PDE regularization with an Ordered Subsets accelerated Bayesian one step late (OSL) reconstruction algorithm for emission tomography. The OS accelerated OSL algorithm is more practical than a non-accelerated one. The proposed algorithm is called OSEM-PDE. We validated the OSEM-PDE using a Zubal phantom in numerical experiments with attenuation correction and quantum noise considered, and the results are compared with OSEM and an OS version of MRP (OSEM-MRP) reconstruction. OSEM-PDE shows better results both in bias and variance. The reconstruction images are smoother and have sharper edges, thus are more applicable for post processing such as segmentation. We validate this using a k-means segmentation algorithm. The classic OSEM is not convergent especially in noisy condition. However, in our experiment, OSEM-PDE can benefit from OS acceleration and keep stable and convergent while OSEM-MRP failed to converge.

  14. Assessing the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Robichaud, A; Savoie, C; Stamatiou, P B; Lachance, N; Jolicoeur, P; Rasori, R; Chan, C C

    2002-01-01

    Type 4 phosphodiesterase (PDE4) inhibitors mimic the pharmacological actions of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists. This has been postulated as the mechanism by which PDE4 inhibitors induce emesis and was also demonstrated by their ability to reverse xylazine/ketamine-induced anaesthesia. We further characterized this latter effect since it appears to reflect the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors.Selective inhibitors of PDE 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were studied in rats, on the duration of anaesthesia induced by the combination of xylazine (10 mg kg−1, i.m.) and ketamine (10 mg kg−1, i.m.) PMNPQ (i.e. 6-(4-pyridylmethyl)-8-(3-nitrophenyl)quinoline)  –  PDE4 inhibitor: 0.01 – 3 mg kg−1), like MK-912 (alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist: 0.01 – 3 mg kg−1), dose-dependently reduced the duration of anaesthesia. In contrast, vinpocetine (PDE1 inhibitor), EHNA (PDE2 inhibitor), milrinone (PDE3 inhibitor) and zaprinast (PDE5 inhibitor) had no significant effect at the doses tested (1 – 10 mg kg−1). Analysis of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of treated animals confirmed the absorption and distribution to the brain of the inactive inhibitors.Neither MK-912 (3 mg kg−1) nor PMNPQ (0.1 – 1 mg kg−1) altered the duration of anaesthesia induced via a non-alpha2-adrenoceptor pathway (sodium pentobarbitone 50 mg kg−1, i.p.)Central NK1 receptors are involved in PDE4 inhibitor-induced emesis. Consistently, [sar9, Met(O2)11]-substance P (NK1 receptor agonist, 6 μg i.c.v.) reduced the duration of anaesthesia induced by xylazine/ketamine.In summary, this model is functionally coupled to PDE4, specific to alpha2-adrenoceptors and relevant to PDE4 inhibitor-induced emesis. It therefore provides a novel way of evaluating the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors in rats. PMID:11786486

  15. PDE Nozzle Optimization Using a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Dana; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Genetic algorithms, which simulate evolution in natural systems, have been used to find solutions to optimization problems that seem intractable to standard approaches. In this study, the feasibility of using a GA to find an optimum, fixed profile nozzle for a pulse detonation engine (PDE) is demonstrated. The objective was to maximize impulse during the detonation wave passage and blow-down phases of operation. Impulse of each profile variant was obtained by using the CFD code Mozart/2.0 to simulate the transient flow. After 7 generations, the method has identified a nozzle profile that certainly is a candidate for optimum solution. The constraints on the generality of this possible solution remain to be clarified.

  16. Novel mutations in PDE6B causing human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lu-Lu; Han, Ru-Yi; Yang, Fa-Yu; Yu, Xin-Ping; Xu, Jin-Ling; Min, Qing-Jie; Tian, Jie; Ge, Xiang-Lian; Zheng, Si-Si; Lin, Ye-Wen; Zheng, Yi-Han; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify the genetic defects of a Chinese patient with sporadic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). METHODS Ophthalmologic examinations were performed on the sporadic RP patient, 144 genes associated with retinal diseases were scanned with capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) approach. Two heterozygous mutations in PDE6B were confirmed in the pedigree by Sanger sequencing subsequently. The carrier frequency of PDE6B mutations of reported PDE6B mutations based on the available two public exome databases (1000 Genomes Project and ESP6500 Genomes Project) and one in-house exome database was investigated. RESULTS We identified compound heterozygosity of two novel nonsense mutations c.1133G>A (p.W378X) and c.2395C>T (p.R799X) in PDE6B, one reported causative gene for RP. Neither of the two mutations in our study was presented in three exome databases. Two mutations (p.R74C and p.T604I) in PDE6B have relatively high frequencies in the ESP6500 and in-house databases, respectively, while no common dominant mutation in each of the database or across all databases. CONCLUSION We demonstrates that compound heterozygosity of two novel nonsense mutations in PDE6B could lead to RP. These results collectively point to enormous potential of next-generation sequencing in determining the genetic etiology of RP and how various mutations in PDE6B contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of RP. PMID:27588261

  17. Hierarchical Multiscale Adaptive Variable Fidelity Wavelet-based Turbulence Modeling with Lagrangian Spatially Variable Thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejadmalayeri, Alireza

    . The scalability and speedup studies of this powerful parallel PDE solver are performed on various architectures. Furthermore, Reynolds scaling of active spatial modes of both CVS and SCALES of linearly forced homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds numbers is investigated for the first time. This computational complexity study, by demonstrating very promising slope for Reynolds scaling of SCALES even at constant level of fidelity for SGS dissipation, proves the argument that SCALES as a dynamically adaptive turbulence modeling technique, can offer a plethora of flexibilities in hierarchical multiscale space/time adaptive variable fidelity simulations of high Reynolds number turbulent flows.

  18. Multiscale integration schemes for jump-diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Givon, D.; Kevrekidis, I.G.

    2008-12-09

    We study a two-time-scale system of jump-diffusion stochastic differential equations. We analyze a class of multiscale integration methods for these systems, which, in the spirit of [1], consist of a hybridization between a standard solver for the slow components and short runs for the fast dynamics, which are used to estimate the effect that the fast components have on the slow ones. We obtain explicit bounds for the discrepancy between the results of the multiscale integration method and the slow components of the original system.

  19. Domain decomposition solvers for PDEs : some basics, practical tools, and new developments.

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, Clark R.

    2010-11-01

    The first part of this talk provides a basic introduction to the building blocks of domain decomposition solvers. Specific details are given for both the classical overlapping Schwarz (OS) algorithm and a recent iterative substructuring (IS) approach called balancing domain decomposition by constraints (BDDC). A more recent hybrid OS-IS approach is also described. The success of domain decomposition solvers depends critically on the coarse space. Similarities and differences between the coarse spaces for OS and BDDC approaches are discussed, along with how they can be obtained from discrete harmonic extensions. Connections are also made between coarse spaces and multiscale modeling approaches from computational mechanics. As a specific example, details are provided on constructing coarse spaces for incompressible fluid problems. The next part of the talk deals with a variety of implementation details for domain decomposition solvers. These include mesh partitioning options, local and global solver options, reducing the coarse space dimension, dealing with constraint equations, residual weighting to accelerate the convergence of OS methods, and recycling of Krylov spaces to efficiently solve problems with multiple right hand sides. Some potential bottlenecks and remedies for domain decomposition solvers are also discussed. The final part of the talk concerns some recent theoretical advances, new algorithms, and open questions in the analysis of domain decomposition solvers. The focus will be primarily on the work of the speaker and his colleagues on elasticity, fluid mechanics, problems in H(curl), and the analysis of subdomains with irregular boundaries.

  20. MULTISCALE MATHEMATICS FOR BIOMASS CONVERSION TO RENEWABLE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Vlachos, Dionisios; Plechac, Petr; Katsoulakis, Markos

    2013-09-05

    The overall objective of this project is to develop multiscale models for understanding and eventually designing complex processes for renewables. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first attempt at modeling complex reacting systems, whose performance relies on underlying multiscale mathematics. Our specific application lies at the heart of biofuels initiatives of DOE and entails modeling of catalytic systems, to enable economic, environmentally benign, and efficient conversion of biomass into either hydrogen or valuable chemicals. Specific goals include: (i) Development of rigorous spatio-temporal coarse-grained kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) mathematics and simulation for microscopic processes encountered in biomass transformation. (ii) Development of hybrid multiscale simulation that links stochastic simulation to a deterministic partial differential equation (PDE) model for an entire reactor. (iii) Development of hybrid multiscale simulation that links KMC simulation with quantum density functional theory (DFT) calculations. (iv) Development of parallelization of models of (i)-(iii) to take advantage of Petaflop computing and enable real world applications of complex, multiscale models. In this NCE period, we continued addressing these objectives and completed the proposed work. Main initiatives, key results, and activities are outlined.

  1. AQUASOL: An efficient solver for the dipolar Poisson-Boltzmann-Langevin equation.

    PubMed

    Koehl, Patrice; Delarue, Marc

    2010-02-14

    The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) formalism is among the most popular approaches to modeling the solvation of molecules. It assumes a continuum model for water, leading to a dielectric permittivity that only depends on position in space. In contrast, the dipolar Poisson-Boltzmann-Langevin (DPBL) formalism represents the solvent as a collection of orientable dipoles with nonuniform concentration; this leads to a nonlinear permittivity function that depends both on the position and on the local electric field at that position. The differences in the assumptions underlying these two models lead to significant differences in the equations they generate. The PB equation is a second order, elliptic, nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE). Its response coefficients correspond to the dielectric permittivity and are therefore constant within each subdomain of the system considered (i.e., inside and outside of the molecules considered). While the DPBL equation is also a second order, elliptic, nonlinear PDE, its response coefficients are nonlinear functions of the electrostatic potential. Many solvers have been developed for the PB equation; to our knowledge, none of these can be directly applied to the DPBL equation. The methods they use may adapt to the difference; their implementations however are PBE specific. We adapted the PBE solver originally developed by Holst and Saied [J. Comput. Chem. 16, 337 (1995)] to the problem of solving the DPBL equation. This solver uses a truncated Newton method with a multigrid preconditioner. Numerical evidences suggest that it converges for the DPBL equation and that the convergence is superlinear. It is found however to be slow and greedy in memory requirement for problems commonly encountered in computational biology and computational chemistry. To circumvent these problems, we propose two variants, a quasi-Newton solver based on a simplified, inexact Jacobian and an iterative self-consistent solver that is based directly on the PBE

  2. AQUASOL: An efficient solver for the dipolar Poisson–Boltzmann–Langevin equation

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, Patrice; Delarue, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The Poisson–Boltzmann (PB) formalism is among the most popular approaches to modeling the solvation of molecules. It assumes a continuum model for water, leading to a dielectric permittivity that only depends on position in space. In contrast, the dipolar Poisson–Boltzmann–Langevin (DPBL) formalism represents the solvent as a collection of orientable dipoles with nonuniform concentration; this leads to a nonlinear permittivity function that depends both on the position and on the local electric field at that position. The differences in the assumptions underlying these two models lead to significant differences in the equations they generate. The PB equation is a second order, elliptic, nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE). Its response coefficients correspond to the dielectric permittivity and are therefore constant within each subdomain of the system considered (i.e., inside and outside of the molecules considered). While the DPBL equation is also a second order, elliptic, nonlinear PDE, its response coefficients are nonlinear functions of the electrostatic potential. Many solvers have been developed for the PB equation; to our knowledge, none of these can be directly applied to the DPBL equation. The methods they use may adapt to the difference; their implementations however are PBE specific. We adapted the PBE solver originally developed by Holst and Saied [J. Comput. Chem. 16, 337 (1995)] to the problem of solving the DPBL equation. This solver uses a truncated Newton method with a multigrid preconditioner. Numerical evidences suggest that it converges for the DPBL equation and that the convergence is superlinear. It is found however to be slow and greedy in memory requirement for problems commonly encountered in computational biology and computational chemistry. To circumvent these problems, we propose two variants, a quasi-Newton solver based on a simplified, inexact Jacobian and an iterative self-consistent solver that is based directly on

  3. Self-correcting Multigrid Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome L.V. Lewandowski

    2004-06-29

    A new multigrid algorithm based on the method of self-correction for the solution of elliptic problems is described. The method exploits information contained in the residual to dynamically modify the source term (right-hand side) of the elliptic problem. It is shown that the self-correcting solver is more efficient at damping the short wavelength modes of the algebraic error than its standard equivalent. When used in conjunction with a multigrid method, the resulting solver displays an improved convergence rate with no additional computational work.

  4. Scalable Parallel Algebraic Multigrid Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, R; Lu, S; Tong, C; Vassilevski, P

    2005-03-23

    The authors propose a parallel algebraic multilevel algorithm (AMG), which has the novel feature that the subproblem residing in each processor is defined over the entire partition domain, although the vast majority of unknowns for each subproblem are associated with the partition owned by the corresponding processor. This feature ensures that a global coarse description of the problem is contained within each of the subproblems. The advantages of this approach are that interprocessor communication is minimized in the solution process while an optimal order of convergence rate is preserved; and the speed of local subproblem solvers can be maximized using the best existing sequential algebraic solvers.

  5. General complex polynomial root solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Gould, A.

    2012-12-01

    This general complex polynomial root solver, implemented in Fortran and further optimized for binary microlenses, uses a new algorithm to solve polynomial equations and is 1.6-3 times faster than the ZROOTS subroutine that is commercially available from Numerical Recipes, depending on application. The largest improvement, when compared to naive solvers, comes from a fail-safe procedure that permits skipping the majority of the calculations in the great majority of cases, without risking catastrophic failure in the few cases that these are actually required.

  6. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  7. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  8. Terascale Optimal PDE Simulations (TOPS) Center

    SciTech Connect

    Pothen, Alex

    2006-08-23

    This report covers the period from Oct. 2002 to Sep. 2004 when Old Dominion University (ODU) was the lead institution for the TOPS ISIC, until in Oct. 2004 Columbia University replaced ODU as the lead institution. The TOPS members from ODU focused on various aspects of the linear and nonlinear solver infrastructure required by the partial differential equations simulation codes, working directly with SciDAC teams from the Fusion Energy Sciences program: the Center for Extended agnetohydrodynamic Modeling (CEMM) at Princeton, and with the Center for Magnetic Reconnection Studies (CMRS) at University of New Hampshire. With CEMM we worked with their MHD simulation code, called M3D, which is semi-implicit, requiring linear solves but no onlinear solves. We contributed several improvements to their current semi-implicit code. Among these was the use of multilevel reconditioning, which provides optimal scaling. This was done through the multigrid preconditioner available in Hypre, another major solver package available in TOPS. We also provided them direct solver functionality for their linear solves since they may be required for more accurate solutions in some regimes. With the CMRS group, we implemented a fully implicit parallel magnetic reconnection simulation code, built on top of PETSc. Our first attempt was a Krylov linear iteration (GMRES because of the lack of symmetry), within each nonlinear (Newton) iteration, with optimal multilevel preconditioning, using the geometric multigrid preconditioner from PETSc. However, for reasons that we have not yet fully understood, the multigrid preconditioner fails early in the simulation, breaking the outer Newton iteration. Much better results were obtained after switching from optimal multilevel preconditioning to suboptimal one level preconditioning. Our current code, based on the additive Schwartz preconditioner from in PETSc, with ILU on subdomains, scales reasonably well, while matching the output of the original

  9. Dual PDE3/4 inhibitors as therapeutic agents for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Banner, Katharine H; Press, Neil J

    2009-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE)4, and to a lesser extent, PDE3/4 inhibitors have attracted considerable interest as potential therapeutic agents for diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Indeed, ibudilast and theophylline are utilized clinically, and roflumilast is in late-stage clinical development. Unfortunately, however many PDE4 and dual PDE3/4 inhibitors have failed in early development due to low therapeutic ratios. The majority of these compounds are however orally administered and non-selective for either PDE3(A, B) or PDE4(A, B, C, D) subtypes. Developing an inhaled dual PDE3/4 inhibitor with subtype specificity may represent one strategy to improve the therapeutic index. Indeed combined inhibition of PDE3 and PDE4 inhibitor has additive and synergistic anti-inflammatory and bronchodilatory effects versus inhibition of either PDE3 or PDE4 alone. Given that synergy has been seen in terms of efficacy end points, an obvious concern is that synergy may also be observed in side effects. Interestingly, however, no synergy or additive effects with a combination of a PDE3 and PDE4 inhibitor in a cardiomyocyte assay were observed. This review will summarize the rationale for developing an inhaled dual PDE3/4 inhibitor, as a treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease together with recent advances in trying to understand the pathogenesis of PDE inhibitor-induced mesenteric vasculitis (a key potential dose-limiting side effect of these agents), highlighting potential early and sensitive predictive biomarkers. PMID:19508401

  10. RACK1 and β-arrestin2 attenuate dimerization of PDE4 cAMP phosphodiesterase PDE4D5.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Graeme B

    2016-07-01

    PDE4 family cAMP-selective cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases are important in the regulation of cAMP abundance in numerous systems, and thereby play an important role in the regulation of PKA and EPAC activity and the phosphorylation of CREB. We have used the yeast 2-hybrid system to demonstrate recently that long PDE4 isoforms form homodimers, consistent with data obtained recently by structural studies. The long PDE4 isoform PDE4D5 interacts selectively with β-arrestin2, implicated in the regulation of G-protein-coupled receptors and other cell signaling components, and also with the β-propeller protein RACK1. In the present study, we use 2-hybrid approaches to demonstrate that RACK1 and β-arrestin2 inhibit the dimerization of PDE4D5. We also show that serine-to-alanine mutations at PKA and ERK1/2 phosphorylation sites on PDE4D5 detectably ablate dimerization. Conversely, phospho-mimic serine-to-aspartate mutations at the MK2 and oxidative stress kinase sites ablate dimerization. Analysis of PDE4D5 that is locked into the dimeric configuration by the formation of a trans disulfide bond between Ser261 and Ser602 shows that RACK1 interacts strongly with both the monomeric and dimeric forms, but that β-arrestin2 interacts exclusively with the monomeric form. This is consistent with the concept that β-arrestin2 can preferentially recruit the monomeric, or "open," form of PDE4D5 to β2-adrenergic receptors, where it can regulate cAMP signaling. PMID:26257302

  11. Multiscale Methods for Nuclear Reactor Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Benjamin S.

    The ability to accurately predict local pin powers in nuclear reactors is necessary to understand the mechanisms that cause fuel pin failure during steady state and transient operation. In the research presented here, methods are developed to improve the local solution using high order methods with boundary conditions from a low order global solution. Several different core configurations were tested to determine the improvement in the local pin powers compared to the standard techniques, that use diffusion theory and pin power reconstruction (PPR). Two different multiscale methods were developed and analyzed; the post-refinement multiscale method and the embedded multiscale method. The post-refinement multiscale methods use the global solution to determine boundary conditions for the local solution. The local solution is solved using either a fixed boundary source or an albedo boundary condition; this solution is "post-refinement" and thus has no impact on the global solution. The embedded multiscale method allows the local solver to change the global solution to provide an improved global and local solution. The post-refinement multiscale method is assessed using three core designs. When the local solution has more energy groups, the fixed source method has some difficulties near the interface: however the albedo method works well for all cases. In order to remedy the issue with boundary condition errors for the fixed source method, a buffer region is used to act as a filter, which decreases the sensitivity of the solution to the boundary condition. Both the albedo and fixed source methods benefit from the use of a buffer region. Unlike the post-refinement method, the embedded multiscale method alters the global solution. The ability to change the global solution allows for refinement in areas where the errors in the few group nodal diffusion are typically large. The embedded method is shown to improve the global solution when it is applied to a MOX/LEU assembly

  12. PDE5 Exists in Human Neurons and is a Viable Therapeutic Target for Neurologic Disease.

    PubMed

    Teich, Andrew F; Sakurai, Mikako; Patel, Mitesh; Holman, Cameron; Saeed, Faisal; Fiorito, Jole; Arancio, Ottavio

    2016-03-01

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) is a critical component of the cGMP-PKG axis of cellular signaling in neurons, and inhibition of PDE5 has been shown to be therapeutic in a wide range of neurologic conditions in animal models. However, enthusiasm for PDE5 inhibitors in humans is limited by data suggesting that PDE5 may not exist in human neurons. Here, we first show that past attempts to quantify PDE5 mRNA were flawed due to the use of incorrect primers, and that when correct primers are used, PDE5 mRNA is detectable in human brain tissue. We then show that PDE5 protein exists in human brain by western blot and ELISA. Most importantly, we performed immunohistochemistry and demonstrate that PDE5 is present in human neurons. We hope that this work will trigger a renewed interest in the development of PDE5 inhibitors for neurologic disease. PMID:26967220

  13. PDE5 Exists in Human Neurons and is a Viable Therapeutic Target for Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teich, Andrew F.; Sakurai, Mikako; Patel, Mitesh; Holman, Cameron; Saeed, Faisal; Fiorito, Jole; Arancio, Ottavio

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) is a critical component of the cGMP-PKG axis of cellular signaling in neurons, and inhibition of PDE5 has been shown to be therapeutic in a wide range of neurologic conditions in animal models. However, enthusiasm for PDE5 inhibitors in humans is limited by data suggesting that PDE5 may not exist in human neurons. Here, we first show that past attempts to quantify PDE5 mRNA were flawed due to the use of incorrect primers, and that when correct primers are used, PDE5 mRNA is detectable in human brain tissue. We then show that PDE5 protein exists in human brain by western blot and ELISA. Most importantly, we performed immunohistochemistry and demonstrate that PDE5 is present in human neurons. We hope that this work will trigger a renewed interest in the development of PDE5 inhibitors for neurologic disease. PMID:26967220

  14. Three dimensional HLL Riemann solver for conservation laws on structured meshes; Application to Euler and magnetohydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we build on our prior work on multidimensional Riemann solvers by detailing the construction of a three-dimensional HLL Riemann solver. As with the two-dimensional Riemann solver, this is accomplished by introducing a constant resolved state between the states being considered, which introduces sufficient dissipation for systems of conservation laws. Closed form expressions for the resolved fluxes are provided to facilitate numerical implementation. This is accomplished by introducing a novel derivation of the multidimensional Riemann solver. The novelty consists of integrating Lagrangian fluxes across moving surfaces. This makes the problem easier to visualize in three dimensions. (A video introduction to multidimensional Riemann solvers is available on http://www.nd.edu/~dbalsara/Numerical-PDE-Course A robust and efficient second order accurate numerical scheme for three dimensional Euler and MHD flows is presented. The scheme is built on the current three-dimensional Riemann solver and has been implemented in the author's RIEMANN code. We demonstrate that schemes that are based on the three-dimensional Riemann solver permit multidimensional discontinuities to propagate more isotropically on resolution-starved meshes. The number of zones updated per second by this scheme on a modern processor is shown to be cost competitive with schemes that are based on a one-dimensional Riemann solver. However, the present scheme permits larger timesteps in three dimensions because of its inclusion of genuinely three-dimensional effects in the flow. For MHD problems it is not necessary to double the dissipation when evaluating the edge-centered electric fields. Accuracy analysis for three-dimensional Euler and MHD problems shows that the scheme meets its design accuracy. Several stringent test problems involving Euler and MHD flows are also presented and the scheme is shown to perform robustly on all of them. For the very first time, we present the formulation and

  15. Efficacy and selectivity of phosphodiesterase-targeted drugs to inhibit photoreceptor phosphodiesterase (PDE6) in retinal photoreceptors*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujun; Feng, Qing; Cote, Rick H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors are important therapeutic agents, but their effects on photoreceptor PDE (PDE6) and photoreceptor cells are poorly understood. We characterized the potency and selectivity of various classes of PDE inhibitors on purified rod and cone PDE6 and on intact rod outer segments (ROS). Methods: The inhibition constant (KI) of isozyme-selective PDE inhibitors was determined for purified rod and cone PDE6. Perturbations of cGMP levels in isolated ROS suspensions by PDE inhibitors were quantitated by a cGMP enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results: Most PDE5-selective inhibitors are excellent PDE6 inhibitors. Vardenafil, a potent PDE5 inhibitor (KI = 0.2 nM), is the most potent PDE6 inhibitor tested (KI = 0.7 nM). Zaprinast is the only drug that inhibits PDE6 more potently than PDE5. PDE1-selective inhibitors were equally effective in inhibiting PDE6. In intact ROS, PDE inhibitors elevated cGMP levels but none fully inhibited PDE6. Their potency to elevate cGMP levels in ROS was much lower than their ability to inhibit the purified enzyme. Competition between PDE5/6-selective drugs and the inhibitory γ subunit for the active site of PDE6 is proposed to reduce the effectiveness of drugs at the enzyme active site. Conclusions: Several classes of PDE inhibitors equally well inhibit PDE6 as the PDE family to which they are targeted. In intact ROS, high PDE6 concentrations, binding of the γ subunit to the active site, and calcium feedback mechanisms attenuate the effectiveness of PDE inhibitors to inhibit PDE6 and disrupt the cGMP signaling pathway during visual transduction. PMID:16123402

  16. A comparison of solver performance for complex gastric electrophysiology models.

    PubMed

    Sathar, Shameer; Cheng, Leo K; Trew, Mark L

    2015-08-01

    Computational techniques for solving systems of equations arising in gastric electrophysiology have not been studied for efficient solution process. We present a computationally challenging problem of simulating gastric electrophysiology in anatomically realistic stomach geometries with multiple intracellular and extracellular domains. The multiscale nature of the problem and mesh resolution required to capture geometric and functional features necessitates efficient solution methods if the problem is to be tractable. In this study, we investigated and compared several parallel preconditioners for the linear systems arising from tetrahedral discretisation of electrically isotropic and anisotropic problems, with and without stimuli. The results showed that the isotropic problem was computationally less challenging than the anisotropic problem and that the application of extracellular stimuli increased workload considerably. Preconditioning based on block Jacobi and algebraic multigrid solvers were found to have the best overall solution times and least iteration counts, respectively. The algebraic multigrid preconditioner would be expected to perform better on large problems. PMID:26736543

  17. HEAT.PRO - THERMAL IMBALANCE FORCE SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS USING PDE2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Y.

    1994-01-01

    HEAT.PRO calculates the thermal imbalance force resulting from satellite surface heating. The heated body of a satellite re-radiates energy at a rate that is proportional to its temperature, losing the energy in the form of photons. By conservation of momentum, this momentum flux out of the body creates a reaction force against the radiation surface, and the net thermal force can be observed as a small perturbation that affects long term orbital behavior of the satellite. HEAT.PRO calculates this thermal imbalance force and then determines its effects on satellite orbits, especially where the Earth's shadowing of an orbiting satellite causes periodic changes in the spacecraft's thermal environment. HEAT.PRO implements a finite element method routine called PDE2D which incorporates material properties to determine the solar panel surface temperatures. The nodal temperatures are computed at specified time steps and are used to determine the magnitude and direction of the thermal force on the spacecraft. These calculations are based on the solar panel orientation and satellite's position with respect to the earth and sun. It is necessary to have accurate, current knowledge of surface emissivity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and material density. These parameters, which may change due to degradation of materials in the environment of space, influence the nodal temperatures that are computed and thus the thermal force calculations. HEAT.PRO was written in FORTRAN 77 for Cray series computers running UNICOS. The source code contains directives for and is used as input to the required partial differential equation solver, PDE2D. HEAT.PRO is available on a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape in UNIX tar format (standard distribution medium) or a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. An electronic copy of the documentation in Macintosh Microsoft Word format is included on the distribution tape. HEAT.PRO was developed in 1991. Cray and UNICOS are

  18. Time-domain Raman analytical forward solvers.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Binzoni, Tiziano; Sekar, Sanathana Konugolu Venkata; Farina, Andrea; Cavalieri, Stefano; Pifferi, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    A set of time-domain analytical forward solvers for Raman signals detected from homogeneous diffusive media is presented. The time-domain solvers have been developed for two geometries: the parallelepiped and the finite cylinder. The potential presence of a background fluorescence emission, contaminating the Raman signal, has also been taken into account. All the solvers have been obtained as solutions of the time dependent diffusion equation. The validation of the solvers has been performed by means of comparisons with the results of "gold standard" Monte Carlo simulations. These forward solvers provide an accurate tool to explore the information content encoded in the time-resolved Raman measurements. PMID:27607645

  19. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multiscale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier–Stokes solver NεκTαr. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers (NεκTαr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300 K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in

  20. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multi-scale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier-Stokes solver εκ αr . The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers ( εκ αr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in future

  1. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multiscale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier-Stokes solver NɛκTαr. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers (NɛκTαr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300 K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in future

  2. A generalized gyrokinetic Poisson solver

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Lee, W.W.

    1995-03-01

    A generalized gyrokinetic Poisson solver has been developed, which employs local operations in the configuration space to compute the polarization density response. The new technique is based on the actual physical process of gyrophase-averaging. It is useful for nonlocal simulations using general geometry equilibrium. Since it utilizes local operations rather than the global ones such as FFT, the new method is most amenable to massively parallel algorithms.

  3. On unstructured grids and solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals and the state-of-the-art technology for unstructured grids and solvers are highlighted. Algorithms and techniques pertinent to mesh generation are discussed. It is shown that grid generation and grid manipulation schemes rely on fast multidimensional searching. Flow solution techniques for the Euler equations, which can be derived from the integral form of the equations are discussed. Sample calculations are also provided.

  4. Novel PDE4 Inhibitors Derived from Chinese Medicine Forsythia

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Tiffany A.; McKelvey, Alison C.; Weathington, Nate M.; Birru, Rahel L.; Lear, Travis; Leikauf, George D.; Chen, Bill B.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a crucial intracellular second messenger molecule that converts extracellular molecules to intracellular signal transduction pathways generating cell- and stimulus-specific effects. Importantly, specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) subtypes control the amplitude and duration of cAMP-induced physiological processes and are therefore a prominent pharmacological target currently used in a variety of fields. Here we tested the extracts from traditional Chinese medicine, Forsythia suspense seeds, which have been used for more than 2000 years to relieve respiratory symptoms. Using structural-functional analysis we found its major lignin, Forsynthin, acted as an immunosuppressant by inhibiting PDE4 in inflammatory and immune cell. Moreover, several novel, selective small molecule derivatives of Forsythin were tested in vitro and in murine models of viral and bacterial pneumonia, sepsis and cytokine-driven systemic inflammation. Thus, pharmacological targeting of PDE4 may be a promising strategy for immune-related disorders characterized by amplified host inflammatory response. PMID:25549252

  5. Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the orbits of Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, a Solar-Terrestrial Probe mission comprising of four identically instrumented spacecraft that will study the Earth's magn...

  6. A new chemical tool for exploring the physiological function of the PDE2 isozyme.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Robert J; Abrams, Kristin; Garceau, Norman Y; Kamath, Ajith V; Manley, Christopher M; Lilley, Susan C; Otte, Douglas A; Scott, Dennis O; Sheils, Alissa L; Tess, David A; Vellekoop, A Samuel; Zhang, Yan; Lam, Kelvin T

    2006-01-15

    Oxindole (2) is a potent and selective PDE2 inhibitor with a favorable ADME, physiochemical and pharmacokinetic profile to allow for use as a chemical tool in elucidating the physiological role of PDE2. PMID:16275071

  7. Diazepam and rolipram differentially inhibit cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterases PDE4A1 and PDE4B3 in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Cherry, J A; Thompson, B E; Pho, V

    2001-03-19

    Cyclic AMP is hydrolyzed by members of at least eight classes of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Although it has been reported that cyclic AMP PDE activity in mammalian tissues can be inhibited by benzodiazepines, it has not been conclusively demonstrated that members of the class of cyclic AMP-specific, rolipram-inhibitable PDEs (PDE4s) are targets for these drugs. Moreover, no PDE4s expressed in mice have been characterized. To address these issues, we isolated two cDNAs representing homologues of PDE4A1 and PDE4B3 from a mouse brain library. After transient transfection in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, the mouse PDEs hydrolyzed cyclic AMP with a low K(m) and were inhibited by rolipram; both are properties typical of other mammalian PDE4 enzymes. In addition, we found that diazepam inhibited cyclic AMP hydrolysis by the mouse PDE4 subtypes. Interestingly, PDE4B was significantly more sensitive to inhibition by both rolipram and diazepam than the PDE4A subtype. This is the first demonstration that recombinantly expressed PDE4s are inhibited by diazepam, and should facilitate future studies with mouse models of depression and anxiety. PMID:11267656

  8. Pseudo-time methods for constrained optimization problems governed by PDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, Shlomo

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for solving optimization problems governed by partial differential equations. Existing methods are gradient information in marching toward the minimum, where the constrained PDE is solved once (sometimes only approximately) per each optimization step. Such methods can be viewed as a marching techniques on the intersection of the state and costate hypersurfaces while improving the residuals of the design equations per each iteration. In contrast, the method presented here march on the design hypersurface and at each iteration improve the residuals of the state and costate equations. The new method is usually much less expensive per iteration step since, in most problems of practical interest, the design equation involves much less unknowns that that of either the state or costate equations. Convergence is shown using energy estimates for the evolution equations governing the iterative process. Numerical tests show that the new method allows the solution of the optimization problem in a cost of solving the analysis problems just a few times, independent of the number of design parameters. The method can be applied using single grid iterations as well as with multigrid solvers.

  9. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  10. The numerical performance of wavelets and reproducing kernels for PDE`s

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.; Roach, D.W.; Voth, T.E.

    1998-08-01

    The results presented here constitute a brief summary of an on-going multi-year effort to investigate hierarchical/wavelet bases for solving PDE`s and establish a rigorous foundation for these methods. A new, hierarchical, wavelet-Galerkin solution strategy based upon the Donovan-Geronimo-Hardin-Massopust (DGHM) compactly-supported multi-wavelet is presented for elliptic partial differential equations. This multi-scale wavelet-Galerkin method uses a wavelet transform to yield nearly mesh independent condition numbers for elliptic problems as opposed to the multi-scaling functions that yield condition numbers which increase as the square of the mesh size. In addition, the results of von Neumann analyses for the DGHM multi-wavelet element and the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method (RKPM) are presented for model hyperbolic partial differential equations. RKPM exhibits excellent dispersion characteristics using a consistent mass matrix with the proper choice of refinement parameter and mass matrix formulation. In comparison, the wavelet-Galerkin formulation using the DGHM element delivers a frequency response comparable to a Bubnov-Galerkin formulation with a quadratic element.

  11. PDE5 inhibitors enhance celecoxib killing in multiple tumor types.

    PubMed

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Tavallai, Seyedmehrad; Webb, Timothy; Samuel, Peter; Conley, Adam; Binion, Brittany; Young, Harold F; Poklepovic, Andrew; Spiegel, Sarah; Dent, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The present studies determined whether clinically relevant phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors interacted with a clinically relevant NSAID, celecoxib, to kill tumor cells. Celecoxib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to kill multiple tumor cell types. Celecoxib and sildenafil killed ex vivo primary human glioma cells as well as their associated activated microglia. Knock down of PDE5 recapitulated the effects of PDE5 inhibitor treatment; the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME suppressed drug combination toxicity. The effects of celecoxib were COX2 independent. Over-expression of c-FLIP-s or knock down of CD95/FADD significantly reduced killing by the drug combination. CD95 activation was dependent on nitric oxide and ceramide signaling. CD95 signaling activated the JNK pathway and inhibition of JNK suppressed cell killing. The drug combination inactivated mTOR and increased the levels of autophagy and knock down of Beclin1 or ATG5 strongly suppressed killing by the drug combination. The drug combination caused an ER stress response; knock down of IRE1α/XBP1 enhanced killing whereas knock down of eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP suppressed killing. Sildenafil and celecoxib treatment suppressed the growth of mammary tumors in vivo. Collectively our data demonstrate that clinically achievable concentrations of celecoxib and sildenafil have the potential to be a new therapeutic approach for cancer. PMID:25303541

  12. PDE3A mutations cause autosomal dominant hypertension with brachydactyly.

    PubMed

    Maass, Philipp G; Aydin, Atakan; Luft, Friedrich C; Schächterle, Carolin; Weise, Anja; Stricker, Sigmar; Lindschau, Carsten; Vaegler, Martin; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Toka, Hakan R; Schulz, Herbert; Krawitz, Peter M; Parkhomchuk, Dmitri; Hecht, Jochen; Hollfinger, Irene; Wefeld-Neuenfeld, Yvette; Bartels-Klein, Eireen; Mühl, Astrid; Kann, Martin; Schuster, Herbert; Chitayat, David; Bialer, Martin G; Wienker, Thomas F; Ott, Jürg; Rittscher, Katharina; Liehr, Thomas; Jordan, Jens; Plessis, Ghislaine; Tank, Jens; Mai, Knut; Naraghi, Ramin; Hodge, Russell; Hopp, Maxwell; Hattenbach, Lars O; Busjahn, Andreas; Rauch, Anita; Vandeput, Fabrice; Gong, Maolian; Rüschendorf, Franz; Hübner, Norbert; Haller, Hermann; Mundlos, Stefan; Bilginturan, Nihat; Movsesian, Matthew A; Klussmann, Enno; Toka, Okan; Bähring, Sylvia

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death worldwide, and hypertension is the major risk factor. Mendelian hypertension elucidates mechanisms of blood pressure regulation. Here we report six missense mutations in PDE3A (encoding phosphodiesterase 3A) in six unrelated families with mendelian hypertension and brachydactyly type E (HTNB). The syndrome features brachydactyly type E (BDE), severe salt-independent but age-dependent hypertension, an increased fibroblast growth rate, neurovascular contact at the rostral-ventrolateral medulla, altered baroreflex blood pressure regulation and death from stroke before age 50 years when untreated. In vitro analyses of mesenchymal stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and chondrocytes provided insights into molecular pathogenesis. The mutations increased protein kinase A-mediated PDE3A phosphorylation and resulted in gain of function, with increased cAMP-hydrolytic activity and enhanced cell proliferation. Levels of phosphorylated VASP were diminished, and PTHrP levels were dysregulated. We suggest that the identified PDE3A mutations cause the syndrome. VSMC-expressed PDE3A deserves scrutiny as a therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:25961942

  13. Effect of Operating Frequency on PDE Driven Ejector Thrust Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh; Landry, K.; Shehadeh, R.; Bouvet, N.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Results of an on-going study of pulse detonation engine driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE) designed to operate at frequencies up to 50 Hz. The PDE used in these experiments utilizes an equi-molar mixture of oxygen and nitrogen as the oxidizer, and ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel, with the propellant mixture having an equivalence ratio of one. A line of sight laser absorption technique was used to determine the time needed for proper filling of the tube. Thrust measurements were made using an integrated spring damper system coupled with a linear variable displacement transducer. The baseline thrust of the PDE was first measured at each desired frequency and agrees with experimental and modeling results found in the literature. Thrust augmentation measurements were then made for constant diameter ejectors. The ejectors had varying lengths, and two different inlet geometries were tested for each ejector configuration. The parameter space for the study included PDE operation frequency, ejector length, overlap distance and the radius of curvature for the ejector inlets. For the studied experimental matrix, the results showed a maximum thrust augmentation of 106% at an operational frequency of 30 Hz.

  14. Student's Lab Assignments in PDE Course with MAPLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponidi, B. Alhadi

    Computer-aided software has been used intensively in many mathematics courses, especially in computational subjects, to solve initial value and boundary value problems in Partial Differential Equations (PDE). Many software packages were used in student lab assignments such as FORTRAN, PASCAL, MATLAB, MATHEMATICA, and MAPLE in order to accelerate…

  15. PDE5 Inhibitors Enhance Celecoxib Killing in Multiple Tumor Types

    PubMed Central

    BOOTH, LAURENCE; ROBERTS, JANE L.; CRUICKSHANKS, NICHOLA; TAVALLAI, SEYEDMEHRAD; WEBB, TIMOTHY; SAMUEL, PETER; CONLEY, ADAM; BINION, BRITTANY; YOUNG, HAROLD F.; POKLEPOVIC, ANDREW; SPIEGEL, SARAH; DENT, PAUL

    2015-01-01

    The present studies determined whether clinically relevant phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors interacted with a clinically relevant NSAID, celecoxib, to kill tumor cells. Celecoxib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to kill multiple tumor cell types. Celecoxib and sildenafil killed ex vivo primary human glioma cells as well as their associated activated microglia. Knock down of PDE5 recapitulated the effects of PDE5 inhibitor treatment; the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME suppressed drug combination toxicity. The effects of celecoxib were COX2 independent. Over-expression of c-FLIP-s or knock down of CD95/FADD significantly reduced killing by the drug combination. CD95 activation was dependent on nitric oxide and ceramide signaling. CD95 signaling activated the JNK pathway and inhibition of JNK suppressed cell killing. The drug combination inactivated mTOR and increased the levels of autophagy and knock down of Beclin1 or ATG5 strongly suppressed killing by the drug combination. The drug combination caused an ER stress response; knock down of IRE1α/XBP1 enhanced killing whereas knock down of eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP suppressed killing. Sildenafil and celecoxib treatment suppressed the growth of mammary tumors in vivo. Collectively our data demonstrate that clinically achievable concentrations of celecoxib and sildenafil have the potential to be a new therapeutic approach for cancer. PMID:25303541

  16. Analysis Tools for CFD Multigrid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Analysis tools are needed to guide the development and evaluate the performance of multigrid solvers for the fluid flow equations. Classical analysis tools, such as local mode analysis, often fail to accurately predict performance. Two-grid analysis tools, herein referred to as Idealized Coarse Grid and Idealized Relaxation iterations, have been developed and evaluated within a pilot multigrid solver. These new tools are applicable to general systems of equations and/or discretizations and point to problem areas within an existing multigrid solver. Idealized Relaxation and Idealized Coarse Grid are applied in developing textbook-efficient multigrid solvers for incompressible stagnation flow problems.

  17. Superiority of combined phosphodiesterase PDE3/PDE4 inhibition over PDE4 inhibition alone on glucocorticoid- and long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist-induced gene expression in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    BinMahfouz, Hawazen; Borthakur, Bibhusana; Yan, Dong; George, Tresa; Giembycz, Mark A; Newton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, also known as corticosteroids, induce effector gene transcription as a part of their anti-inflammatory mechanisms of action. Such genomic effects can be significantly enhanced by long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs) and may contribute to the clinical superiority of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/LABA combinations in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) over ICSs alone. Using models of cAMP- and glucocorticoid-induced transcription in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, we show that combining inhibitors of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and PDE4 provides greater benefits compared with inhibiting either PDE alone. In respect to cAMP-dependent transcription, inhibitors of PDE3 (siguazodan, cilostazol) and PDE4 (rolipram, GSK256066, roflumilast N-oxide) each sensitized to the LABA, formoterol. This effect was magnified by dual PDE3 and PDE4 inhibition. Siguazodan plus rolipram was also more effective at inducing cAMP-dependent transcription than either inhibitor alone. Conversely, the concentration-response curve describing the enhancement of dexamethasone-induced, glucocorticoid response element-dependent transcription by formoterol was displaced to the left by PDE4, but not PDE3, inhibition. Overall, similar effects were described for bona fide genes, including RGS2, CD200, and CRISPLD2. Importantly, the combination of siguazodan plus rolipram prolonged the duration of gene expression induced by formoterol, dexamethasone, or dexamethasone plus formoterol. This was most apparent for RGS2, a bronchoprotective gene that may also reduce the proinflammatory effects of constrictor mediators. Collectively, these data provide a rationale for the use of PDE3 and PDE4 inhibitors in the treatment of COPD and asthma where they may enhance, sensitize, and prolong the effects of LABA/ICS combination therapies. PMID:25324049

  18. MACSYMA's symbolic ordinary differential equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The MACSYMA's symbolic ordinary differential equation solver ODE2 is described. The code for this routine is delineated, which is of interest because it is written in top-level MACSYMA language, and may serve as a good example of programming in that language. Other symbolic ordinary differential equation solvers are mentioned.

  19. KLU2 Direct Linear Solver Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-01-04

    KLU2 is a direct sparse solver for solving unsymmetric linear systems. It is related to the existing KLU solver, (in Amesos package and also as a stand-alone package from University of Florida) but provides template support for scalar and ordinal types. It uses a left looking LU factorization method.

  20. MUSIC: MUlti-Scale Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Oliver; Abel, Tom

    2013-11-01

    MUSIC generates multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological ‘zoom-in’ simulations. The code uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). MUSIC achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10-4 for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier space-induced interference ringing.

  1. Improving Resource-Unaware SAT Solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölldobler, Steffen; Manthey, Norbert; Saptawijaya, Ari

    The paper discusses cache utilization in state-of-the-art SAT solvers. The aim of the study is to show how a resource-unaware SAT solver can be improved by utilizing the cache sensibly. The analysis is performed on a CDCL-based SAT solver using a subset of the industrial SAT Competition 2009 benchmark. For the analysis, the total cycles, the resource stall cycles, the L2 cache hits and the L2 cache misses are traced using sample based profiling. Based on the analysis, several techniques - some of which have not been used in SAT solvers so far - are proposed resulting in a combined speedup up to 83% without affecting the search path of the solver. The average speedup on the benchmark is 60%. The new techniques are also applied to MiniSAT2.0 improving its runtime by 20% on average.

  2. Belos Block Linear Solvers Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-03-01

    Belos is an extensible and interoperable framework for large-scale, iterative methods for solving systems of linear equations with multiple right-hand sides. The motivation for this framework is to provide a generic interface to a collection of algorithms for solving large-scale linear systems. Belos is interoperable because both the matrix and vectors are considered to be opaque objects--only knowledge of the matrix and vectors via elementary operations is necessary. An implementation of Balos is accomplished viamore » the use of interfaces. One of the goals of Belos is to allow the user flexibility in specifying the data representation for the matrix and vectors and so leverage any existing software investment. The algorithms that will be included in package are Krylov-based linear solvers, like Block GMRES (Generalized Minimal RESidual) and Block CG (Conjugate-Gradient).« less

  3. The human phosphodiesterase PDE10A gene genomic organization and evolutionary relatedness with other PDEs containing GAF domains.

    PubMed

    Fujishige, K; Kotera, J; Yuasa, K; Omori, K

    2000-10-01

    PDE10A is a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) exhibiting properties of a cAMP PDE and a cAMP-inhibited cGMP PDE. The transcripts are specifically expressed in the striatum. The human gene encoding PDE10A was cloned and investigated. The PDE10A gene spanned > 200 kb and contained 24 exons. The exon-intron organization of PDE10A was different from those of PDE5A and PDE6B, although these three PDEs include two GAF domains and have similar amino-acid sequences. The promoter sequence of PDE10A was highly GC-rich and did not contain a TATA motif and a CAAT box, suggesting it is a housekeeping gene. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the C32E12.2 gene encoding a probable PDE that is 48% identical to the human PDE10A protein showed similar exon organization to PDE10A but not PDE5A and PDE6B. This, together with the phylogenic tree analysis, suggested that the ancestral gene for PDE10A existed in a lower organism such as C. elegans. PMID:10998054

  4. Estimating the magnitude of near-membrane PDE4 activity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenkuan; Feinstein, Wei P; Britain, Andrea L; Ochoa, Cristhiaan D; Zhu, Bing; Richter, Wito; Leavesley, Silas J; Rich, Thomas C

    2015-09-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated that functionally discrete pools of phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity regulate distinct cellular functions. While the importance of localized pools of enzyme activity has become apparent, few studies have estimated enzyme activity within discrete subcellular compartments. Here we present an approach to estimate near-membrane PDE activity. First, total PDE activity is measured using traditional PDE activity assays. Second, known cAMP concentrations are dialyzed into single cells and the spatial spread of cAMP is monitored using cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. Third, mathematical models are used to estimate the spatial distribution of PDE activity within cells. Using this three-tiered approach, we observed two pharmacologically distinct pools of PDE activity, a rolipram-sensitive pool and an 8-methoxymethyl IBMX (8MM-IBMX)-sensitive pool. We observed that the rolipram-sensitive PDE (PDE4) was primarily responsible for cAMP hydrolysis near the plasma membrane. Finally, we observed that PDE4 was capable of blunting cAMP levels near the plasma membrane even when 100 μM cAMP were introduced into the cell via a patch pipette. Two compartment models predict that PDE activity near the plasma membrane, near cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, was significantly lower than total cellular PDE activity and that a slow spatial spread of cAMP allowed PDE activity to effectively hydrolyze near-membrane cAMP. These results imply that cAMP levels near the plasma membrane are distinct from those in other subcellular compartments; PDE activity is not uniform within cells; and localized pools of AC and PDE activities are responsible for controlling cAMP levels within distinct subcellular compartments. PMID:26201952

  5. A new model of Pde4d deficiency: genetic knock-down of PDE4D enzyme in rats produces an antidepressant phenotype without spatial cognitive effects.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, T L; Braun, A A; Amos-Kroohs, R M; Williams, M T; Ostertag, E; Vorhees, C V

    2012-07-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a superfamily of intracellular second messenger cyclic nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes composed of 12 families. The Pde4 family has been implicated in depression and cognition, and PDE4 inhibitors have been evaluated as antidepressants and possible cognitive enhancers. Pde4d(-/-) mice show an antidepressant phenotype and learning enhancement on some tests, but not others as do mice treated with PDE4 inhibitors. Here, we report for the first time the behavioral phenotype of a new Pde4d knock-down (KD) rat model of PDE4D deficiency. Consistent with other data on PDE4D deficiency, Pde4d KD rats showed depression resistance in the Porsolt forced swim test and hyperreactivity of the acoustic startle response with no differential response on prepulse inhibition, suggesting no sensorimotor gating defect. Pde4d KD rats also exhibited a small exploratory activity reduction but no difference following habituation, and no enhanced spatial learning or reference memory in the Morris water maze. A selective improvement in route-based learning in the Cincinnati water maze was seen as well as enhanced contextual and cued fear conditioning and a more rapid rate of cued extinction from their higher freezing level that declined to wild-type (WT) levels only after ∼20 extinction trials. The rat model confirms Pde4d's role in depression but not in spatial learning or memory enhancement and shows for the first time higher fear conditioning and altered extinction compared with controls. The new model provides a tool by which to better understand the role of PDE4D in neuropsychiatric disorders and for the development of alternate treatment approaches. PMID:22487514

  6. A two-dimensional Riemann solver with self-similar sub-structure - Alternative formulation based on least squares projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Vides, Jeaniffer; Gurski, Katharine; Nkonga, Boniface; Dumbser, Michael; Garain, Sudip; Audit, Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Just as the quality of a one-dimensional approximate Riemann solver is improved by the inclusion of internal sub-structure, the quality of a multidimensional Riemann solver is also similarly improved. Such multidimensional Riemann problems arise when multiple states come together at the vertex of a mesh. The interaction of the resulting one-dimensional Riemann problems gives rise to a strongly-interacting state. We wish to endow this strongly-interacting state with physically-motivated sub-structure. The self-similar formulation of Balsara [16] proves especially useful for this purpose. While that work is based on a Galerkin projection, in this paper we present an analogous self-similar formulation that is based on a different interpretation. In the present formulation, we interpret the shock jumps at the boundary of the strongly-interacting state quite literally. The enforcement of the shock jump conditions is done with a least squares projection (Vides, Nkonga and Audit [67]). With that interpretation, we again show that the multidimensional Riemann solver can be endowed with sub-structure. However, we find that the most efficient implementation arises when we use a flux vector splitting and a least squares projection. An alternative formulation that is based on the full characteristic matrices is also presented. The multidimensional Riemann solvers that are demonstrated here use one-dimensional HLLC Riemann solvers as building blocks. Several stringent test problems drawn from hydrodynamics and MHD are presented to show that the method works. Results from structured and unstructured meshes demonstrate the versatility of our method. The reader is also invited to watch a video introduction to multidimensional Riemann solvers on http://www.nd.edu/~dbalsara/Numerical-PDE-Course.

  7. A 3-D RBF-FD elliptic solver for irregular boundaries: modeling the atmospheric global electric circuit with topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayona, V.; Flyer, N.; Lucas, G. M.; Baumgaertner, A. J. G.

    2015-04-01

    A numerical model based on Radial Basis Function-generated Finite Differences (RBF-FD) is developed for simulating the Global Electric Circuit (GEC) within the Earth's atmosphere, represented by a 3-D variable coefficient linear elliptic PDE in a spherically-shaped volume with the lower boundary being the Earth's topography and the upper boundary a sphere at 60 km. To our knowledge, this is (1) the first numerical model of the GEC to combine the Earth's topography with directly approximating the differential operators in 3-D space, and related to this (2) the first RBF-FD method to use irregular 3-D stencils for discretization to handle the topography. It benefits from the mesh-free nature of RBF-FD, which is especially suitable for modeling high-dimensional problems with irregular boundaries. The RBF-FD elliptic solver proposed here makes no limiting assumptions on the spatial variability of the coefficients in the PDE (i.e. the conductivity profile), the right hand side forcing term of the PDE (i.e. distribution of current sources) or the geometry of the lower boundary.

  8. Multiscale Cancer Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Macklin, Paul; Cristini, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Simulating cancer behavior across multiple biological scales in space and time, i.e., multiscale cancer modeling, is increasingly being recognized as a powerful tool to refine hypotheses, focus experiments, and enable more accurate predictions. A growing number of examples illustrate the value of this approach in providing quantitative insight on the initiation, progression, and treatment of cancer. In this review, we introduce the most recent and important multiscale cancer modeling works that have successfully established a mechanistic link between different biological scales. Biophysical, biochemical, and biomechanical factors are considered in these models. We also discuss innovative, cutting-edge modeling methods that are moving predictive multiscale cancer modeling toward clinical application. Furthermore, because the development of multiscale cancer models requires a new level of collaboration among scientists from a variety of fields such as biology, medicine, physics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science, an innovative Web-based infrastructure is needed to support this growing community. PMID:21529163

  9. Mean field spin glasses treated with PDE techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Adriano; Del Ferraro, Gino; Tantari, Daniele

    2013-07-01

    Following an original idea of Guerra, in these notes we analyze the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model from different perspectives, all sharing the underlying approach which consists in linking the resolution of the statistical mechanics of the model (e.g. solving for the free energy) to well-known partial differential equation (PDE) problems (in suitable spaces). The plan is then to solve the related PDE using techniques involved in their native field and lastly bringing back the solution in the proper statistical mechanics framework. Within this strand, after a streamlined test-case on the Curie-Weiss model to highlight the methods more than the physics behind, we solve the SK both at the replica symmetric and at the 1-RSB level, obtaining the correct expression for the free energy via an analogy to a Fourier equation and for the self-consistencies with an analogy to a Burger equation, whose shock wave develops exactly at critical noise level (triggering the phase transition). Our approach, beyond acting as a new alternative method (with respect to the standard routes) for tackling the complexity of spin glasses, links symmetries in PDE theory with constraints in statistical mechanics and, as a novel result from the theoretical physics perspective, we obtain a new class of polynomial identities (namely of Aizenman-Contucci type, but merged within the Guerra's broken replica measures), whose interest lies in understanding, via the recent Panchenko breakthroughs, how to force the overlap organization to the ultrametric tree predicted by Parisi.

  10. Universal structure and universal equations (PDE) for unitary ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumanov, Igor

    2010-08-01

    Random matrix ensembles with unitary invariance of measure (UE) are described in a unified way using a combination of Tracy-Widom (TW) and Adler-Shiota-van Moerbeke approaches to the derivation of partial differential equations (PDEs) for spectral gap probabilities. First, general three-term recurrence relations for UE restricted to subsets of real line, or, in other words, for functions in the resolvent kernel, are obtained. Using them, simple universal relations between all TW dependent variables and one-dimensional Toda lattice τ-functions are found. A universal system of PDE for UE is derived from previous relations, which leads also to a single independent PDE for spectral gap probability of various UE. Thus, orthogonal function bases and Toda lattice are seen at the core of correspondence of different approaches. Moreover, Toda-AKNS system provides a common structure of PDE for unitary ensembles. Interestingly, this structure can be seen in two very different forms: one arises from orthogonal function-Toda lattice considerations, while the other comes from Schlesinger equations for isomonodromic deformations and their relation to TW equations. The simple example of Gaussian matrices most neatly exposes this structure.

  11. Biallelic Mutations in PDE10A Lead to Loss of Striatal PDE10A and a Hyperkinetic Movement Disorder with Onset in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Diggle, Christine P; Sukoff Rizzo, Stacey J; Popiolek, Michael; Hinttala, Reetta; Schülke, Jan-Philip; Kurian, Manju A; Carr, Ian M; Markham, Alexander F; Bonthron, David T; Watson, Christopher; Sharif, Saghira Malik; Reinhart, Veronica; James, Larry C; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle A; Charych, Erik; Allen, Melanie; Harms, John; Schmidt, Christopher J; Ng, Joanne; Pysden, Karen; Strick, Christine; Vieira, Päivi; Mankinen, Katariina; Kokkonen, Hannaleena; Kallioinen, Matti; Sormunen, Raija; Rinne, Juha O; Johansson, Jarkko; Alakurtti, Kati; Huilaja, Laura; Hurskainen, Tiina; Tasanen, Kaisa; Anttila, Eija; Marques, Tiago Reis; Howes, Oliver; Politis, Marius; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Nguyen, Khanh Q; Majewski, Jacek; Uusimaa, Johanna; Sheridan, Eamonn; Brandon, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    Deficits in the basal ganglia pathways modulating cortical motor activity underlie both Parkinson disease (PD) and Huntington disease (HD). Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is enriched in the striatum, and animal data suggest that it is a key regulator of this circuitry. Here, we report on germline PDE10A mutations in eight individuals from two families affected by a hyperkinetic movement disorder due to homozygous mutations c.320A>G (p.Tyr107Cys) and c.346G>C (p.Ala116Pro). Both mutations lead to a reduction in PDE10A levels in recombinant cellular systems, and critically, positron-emission-tomography (PET) studies with a specific PDE10A ligand confirmed that the p.Tyr107Cys variant also reduced striatal PDE10A levels in one of the affected individuals. A knock-in mouse model carrying the homologous p.Tyr97Cys variant had decreased striatal PDE10A and also displayed motor abnormalities. Striatal preparations from this animal had an impaired capacity to degrade cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and a blunted pharmacological response to PDE10A inhibitors. These observations highlight the critical role of PDE10A in motor control across species. PMID:27058446

  12. Multiscale Design of Advanced Materials based on Hybrid Ab Initio and Quasicontinuum Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Luskin, Mitchell

    2014-03-12

    This project united researchers from mathematics, chemistry, computer science, and engineering for the development of new multiscale methods for the design of materials. Our approach was highly interdisciplinary, but it had two unifying themes: first, we utilized modern mathematical ideas about change-of-scale and state-of-the-art numerical analysis to develop computational methods and codes to solve real multiscale problems of DOE interest; and, second, we took very seriously the need for quantum mechanics-based atomistic forces, and based our methods on fast solvers of chemically accurate methods.

  13. PDE4D phosphorylation: A coincidence detector integrating multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Mika, Delphine; Conti, Marco

    2016-07-01

    In Eukaryotes, more than 100 different phosphodiesterase (PDE) proteins serve to fine-tune cyclic nucleotide (cAMP and cGMP) signals and contribute to specificity of signaling. In mammals, PDEs are divided into 11 families, of which PDE4 represents the largest family. Four genes (pde4a, pde4b, pde4c and pde4d) encode for this class of enzymes in mammals and give rise to more than 20 variants. Within this family of genes, PDE4D was discovered on the basis of its regulatory properties and its induction by hormones and cAMP. PDE4D has often been used as the prototype PDE4 and large body of work has been generated on the biochemical, pharmacological, and physiological properties of this enzyme. This review covers the regulation of PDE4D by phosphorylation, the impact of this regulation in the context of the structure of this protein, and the functional consequences of this complex pattern of posttranslational modifications. PMID:26562185

  14. Domain Organization and Conformational Plasticity of the G Protein Effector, PDE6*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhixian; He, Feng; Constantine, Ryan; Baker, Matthew L.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Schmid, Michael F.; Wensel, Theodore G.; Agosto, Melina A.

    2015-01-01

    The cGMP phosphodiesterase of rod photoreceptor cells, PDE6, is the key effector enzyme in phototransduction. Two large catalytic subunits, PDE6α and -β, each contain one catalytic domain and two non-catalytic GAF domains, whereas two small inhibitory PDE6γ subunits allow tight regulation by the G protein transducin. The structure of holo-PDE6 in complex with the ROS-1 antibody Fab fragment was determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The ∼11 Å map revealed previously unseen features of PDE6, and each domain was readily fit with high resolution structures. A structure of PDE6 in complex with prenyl-binding protein (PrBP/δ) indicated the location of the PDE6 C-terminal prenylations. Reconstructions of complexes with Fab fragments bound to N or C termini of PDE6γ revealed that PDE6γ stretches from the catalytic domain at one end of the holoenzyme to the GAF-A domain at the other. Removal of PDE6γ caused dramatic structural rearrangements, which were reversed upon its restoration. PMID:25809480

  15. Does phosphodiesterase 11A (PDE11A) hold promise as a future therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michy P

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 11A (PDE11A) is the most recently discovered 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. By breaking down both cAMP and cGMP, PDE11A is a critical regulator of intracellular signaling. To date, PDE11A has been implicated to play a role in tumorigenesis, brain function, and inflammation. Here, we consolidate and, where necessary, reconcile the PDE11A literature to evaluate this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target. We compare the results and methodologies of numerous studies that report conflicting tissue expression profiles for PDE11A. We conclude that PDE11A expression is relatively restricted in the body, with reliable expression reported in tissues such as the brain (particularly the hippocampus), the prostate, and the adrenal gland. Each of the four PDE11A splice variants (PDE11A1-4) appears to exhibit a distinct tissue expression profile and has a unique N-terminal regulatory region, suggesting that each isoform could be individually targeted with a small molecule or biologic. Progress has been made in identifying a tool PDE11A inhibitor as well as an activator; however, the functional effects of these pharmacological tools remain to be determined. Importantly, PDE11A knockout mice do exist and appear healthy into late age, suggesting a potential safety window for targeting this enzyme. Considering the implication of PDE11A in disease-relevant biology, the potential to selectively target specific PDE11A variants, and the possibility of either activating or inhibiting the enzyme, we believe PDE11A holds promise as a potential future therapeutic target. PMID:25159071

  16. Biochemical and behavioral effects of PDE10A inhibitors: Relationship to target site occupancy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Wen; Seager, Matthew A; Wojcik, Trevor; Heman, Karen; Molski, Thaddeus F; Fernandes, Alda; Langdon, Shaun; Pendri, Annapurna; Gerritz, Samuel; Tian, Yuan; Hong, Yang; Gallagher, Lizbeth; Merritt, James R; Zhang, Chongwu; Westphal, Ryan; Zaczek, Robert; Macor, John E; Bronson, Joanne J; Lodge, Nicholas J

    2016-03-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors increase the functionality of striatal medium spiny neurons and produce antipsychotic-like effects in rodents by blocking PDE10A mediated hydrolysis of cAMP and/or cGMP. In the current study, we characterized a radiolabeled PDE10A inhibitor, [(3)H]BMS-843496, and developed an ex vivo PDE10 binding autoradiographic assay to explore the relationship between PDE10 binding site occupancy and the observed biochemical and behavioral effects of PDE10 inhibitors in mice. [(3)H]BMS-843496 is a potent PDE10A inhibitor with a binding affinity (KD) of 0.15 nM and a functional selectivity of >100-fold over other PDE subtypes tested. Specific [(3)H]BMS-843496 binding sites were dominant in the basal ganglia, especially the striatum, with low to moderate binding in the cortical and hippocampal areas, of the mouse and monkey brain. Systemic administration of PDE10 inhibitors produced a dose- and plasma/brain concentration-dependent increase in PDE10A occupancy measured in the striatum. PDE10A occupancy was positively correlated with striatal pCREB expression levels. PDE10A occupancy was also correlated with antipsychotic-like effects measured using the conditioned avoidance response model; a minimum of ∼40% occupancy was typically required to achieve efficacy. In contrast, a clear relationship between PDE10A occupancy and catalepsy scores, a potential extrapyramidal symptom readout in rodent, was not evident. PMID:26522433

  17. ALPS - A LINEAR PROGRAM SOLVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Linear programming is a widely-used engineering and management tool. Scheduling, resource allocation, and production planning are all well-known applications of linear programs (LP's). Most LP's are too large to be solved by hand, so over the decades many computer codes for solving LP's have been developed. ALPS, A Linear Program Solver, is a full-featured LP analysis program. ALPS can solve plain linear programs as well as more complicated mixed integer and pure integer programs. ALPS also contains an efficient solution technique for pure binary (0-1 integer) programs. One of the many weaknesses of LP solvers is the lack of interaction with the user. ALPS is a menu-driven program with no special commands or keywords to learn. In addition, ALPS contains a full-screen editor to enter and maintain the LP formulation. These formulations can be written to and read from plain ASCII files for portability. For those less experienced in LP formulation, ALPS contains a problem "parser" which checks the formulation for errors. ALPS creates fully formatted, readable reports that can be sent to a printer or output file. ALPS is written entirely in IBM's APL2/PC product, Version 1.01. The APL2 workspace containing all the ALPS code can be run on any APL2/PC system (AT or 386). On a 32-bit system, this configuration can take advantage of all extended memory. The user can also examine and modify the ALPS code. The APL2 workspace has also been "packed" to be run on any DOS system (without APL2) as a stand-alone "EXE" file, but has limited memory capacity on a 640K system. A numeric coprocessor (80X87) is optional but recommended. The standard distribution medium for ALPS is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. IBM, IBM PC and IBM APL2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  18. SUDOKU A STORY & A SOLVER

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER, P.R.

    2006-04-01

    Sudoku, also known as Number Place, is a logic-based placement puzzle. The aim of the puzzle is to enter a numerical digit from 1 through 9 in each cell of a 9 x 9 grid made up of 3 x 3 subgrids (called ''regions''), starting with various digits given in some cells (the ''givens''). Each row, column, and region must contain only one instance of each numeral. Completing the puzzle requires patience and logical ability. Although first published in a U.S. puzzle magazine in 1979, Sudoku initially caught on in Japan in 1986 and attained international popularity in 2005. Last fall, after noticing Sudoku puzzles in some newspapers and magazines, I attempted a few just to see how hard they were. Of course, the difficulties varied considerably. ''Obviously'' one could use Trial and Error but all the advice was to ''Use Logic''. Thinking to flex, and strengthen, those powers, I began to tackle the puzzles systematically. That is, when I discovered a new tactical rule, I would write it down, eventually generating a list of ten or so, with some having overlap. They served pretty well except for the more difficult puzzles, but even then I managed to develop an additional three rules that covered all of them until I hit the Oregonian puzzle shown. With all of my rules, I could not seem to solve that puzzle. Initially putting my failure down to rapid mental fatigue (being unable to hold a sufficient quantity of information in my mind at one time), I decided to write a program to implement my rules and see what I had failed to notice earlier. The solver, too, failed. That is, my rules were insufficient to solve that particular puzzle. I happened across a book written by a fellow who constructs such puzzles and who claimed that, sometimes, the only tactic left was trial and error. With a trial and error routine implemented, my solver successfully completed the Oregonian puzzle, and has successfully solved every puzzle submitted to it since.

  19. A multiscale two-point flux-approximation method

    SciTech Connect

    Møyner, Olav Lie, Knut-Andreas

    2014-10-15

    A large number of multiscale finite-volume methods have been developed over the past decade to compute conservative approximations to multiphase flow problems in heterogeneous porous media. In particular, several iterative and algebraic multiscale frameworks that seek to reduce the fine-scale residual towards machine precision have been presented. Common for all such methods is that they rely on a compatible primal–dual coarse partition, which makes it challenging to extend them to stratigraphic and unstructured grids. Herein, we propose a general idea for how one can formulate multiscale finite-volume methods using only a primal coarse partition. To this end, we use two key ingredients that are computed numerically: (i) elementary functions that correspond to flow solutions used in transmissibility upscaling, and (ii) partition-of-unity functions used to combine elementary functions into basis functions. We exemplify the idea by deriving a multiscale two-point flux-approximation (MsTPFA) method, which is robust with regards to strong heterogeneities in the permeability field and can easily handle general grids with unstructured fine- and coarse-scale connections. The method can easily be adapted to arbitrary levels of coarsening, and can be used both as a standalone solver and as a preconditioner. Several numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate that the MsTPFA method can be used to solve elliptic pressure problems on a wide variety of geological models in a robust and efficient manner.

  20. Multiscale modeling and simulation of brain blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdikaris, Paris; Grinberg, Leopold; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work is to present an overview of recent advances in multi-scale modeling of brain blood flow. In particular, we present some approaches that enable the in silico study of multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena in the cerebral vasculature. We discuss the formulation of continuum and atomistic modeling approaches, present a consistent framework for their concurrent coupling, and list some of the challenges that one needs to overcome in achieving a seamless and scalable integration of heterogeneous numerical solvers. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is demonstrated in a realistic case involving modeling the thrombus formation process taking place on the wall of a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm. This highlights the ability of multi-scale algorithms to resolve important biophysical processes that span several spatial and temporal scales, potentially yielding new insight into the key aspects of brain blood flow in health and disease. Finally, we discuss open questions in multi-scale modeling and emerging topics of future research.

  1. SIERRA framework version 4 : solver services.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan B.

    2005-02-01

    Several SIERRA applications make use of third-party libraries to solve systems of linear and nonlinear equations, and to solve eigenproblems. The classes and interfaces in the SIERRA framework that provide linear system assembly services and access to solver libraries are collectively referred to as solver services. This paper provides an overview of SIERRA's solver services including the design goals that drove the development, and relationships and interactions among the various classes. The process of assembling and manipulating linear systems will be described, as well as access to solution methods and other operations.

  2. A scalable 2-D parallel sparse solver

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, S.C.; Mitra, S.

    1995-12-01

    Scalability beyond a small number of processors, typically 32 or less, is known to be a problem for existing parallel general sparse (PGS) direct solvers. This paper presents a parallel general sparse PGS direct solver for general sparse linear systems on distributed memory machines. The algorithm is based on the well-known sequential sparse algorithm Y12M. To achieve efficient parallelization, a 2-D scattered decomposition of the sparse matrix is used. The proposed algorithm is more scalable than existing parallel sparse direct solvers. Its scalability is evaluated on a 256 processor nCUBE2s machine using Boeing/Harwell benchmark matrices.

  3. ALPS: A Linear Program Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferencz, Donald C.; Viterna, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    ALPS is a computer program which can be used to solve general linear program (optimization) problems. ALPS was designed for those who have minimal linear programming (LP) knowledge and features a menu-driven scheme to guide the user through the process of creating and solving LP formulations. Once created, the problems can be edited and stored in standard DOS ASCII files to provide portability to various word processors or even other linear programming packages. Unlike many math-oriented LP solvers, ALPS contains an LP parser that reads through the LP formulation and reports several types of errors to the user. ALPS provides a large amount of solution data which is often useful in problem solving. In addition to pure linear programs, ALPS can solve for integer, mixed integer, and binary type problems. Pure linear programs are solved with the revised simplex method. Integer or mixed integer programs are solved initially with the revised simplex, and the completed using the branch-and-bound technique. Binary programs are solved with the method of implicit enumeration. This manual describes how to use ALPS to create, edit, and solve linear programming problems. Instructions for installing ALPS on a PC compatible computer are included in the appendices along with a general introduction to linear programming. A programmers guide is also included for assistance in modifying and maintaining the program.

  4. Euler solvers for transonic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleer, Bram

    1989-01-01

    The 1980s may well be called the Euler era of applied aerodynamics. Computer codes based on discrete approximations of the Euler equations are now routinely used to obtain solutions of transonic flow problems in which the effects of entropy and vorticity production are significant. Such codes can even predict separation from a sharp edge, owing to the inclusion of artificial dissipation, intended to lend numerical stability to the calculation but at the same time enforcing the Kutta condition. One effect not correctly predictable by Euler codes is the separation from a smooth surface, and neither is viscous drag; for these some form of the Navier-Stokes equation is needed. It, therefore, comes as no surprise to observe that the Navier-Stokes has already begun before Euler solutions were fully exploited. Moreover, most numerical developments for the Euler equations are now constrained by the requirement that the techniques introduced, notably artificial dissipation, must not interfere with the new physics added when going from an Euler to a full Navier-Stokes approximation. In order to appreciate the contributions of Euler solvers to the understanding of transonic aerodynamics, it is useful to review the components of these computational tools. Space discretization, time- or pseudo-time marching and boundary procedures, the essential constituents are discussed. The subject of grid generation and grid adaptation to the solution are touched upon only where relevant. A list of unanswered questions and an outlook for the future are covered.

  5. Rapid regulation of PDE-2 and PDE-4 cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity following ligation of the T cell antigen receptor on thymocytes: analysis using the selective inhibitors erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA) and rolipram.

    PubMed

    Michie, A M; Lobban, M; Müller, T; Harnett, M M; Houslay, M D

    1996-02-01

    The PDE2, cyclic GMP-stimulated, and the PDE4, cyclic AMP-specific enzymes provide the major, detectable cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activities in murine thymocytes. In the absence of the cyclic GMP, PDE4 activity predominated (approximately 80% total) but in the presence of low (10 microM) cyclic GMP concentrations, PDE2 activity constituted the major PDE activity in thymocytes (approximately 80% total). The PDE4 selective inhibitor rolipram dose-dependently inhibited thymocyte PDE4 activity (IC50 approximately 65 nM). PDE2 was dose-dependently activated (EC50 approximately 1 microM) by cyclic GMP and inhibited by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA) (IC50 approximately 4 microM). EHNA was shown to serve as a selective inhibitor of PDE-2 activity as assessed from studies using separated PDE1, PDE2, PDE3 and PDE4 species from hepatocytes as well as human PDE2 and PDE4 enzymes. EHNA completely ablated the ability of cyclic GMP to activate PDE2 activity, whilst having a much smaller inhibitory effect on the unstimulated PDE2 activity. EHNA exhibited normal Michaelian kinetics of inhibition for the cyclic GMP-stimulated PDE2 activity with Hill plots near unity. Apparent negative co-operative effect were seen in the absence of cyclic GMP with Hill coefficients of approximately 0.3 for inhibition of PDE2 activity. Within 5 min of challenge of thymocytes with the lectin phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) there was a transient decrease (approximately 83%) in PDE-4 activity and in PDE2 activity (approximately 40%). Both anti-TCR antibodies also caused an initial reduction in the PDE4 activity which was followed by a sustained and profound increase in activity. In contrast to that observed with PHA, anti-TCR/CD3 antisera had little effect on PDE2 activity. It is suggested that, dependent upon the intracellular concentrations of cyclic GMP, thymocyte cyclic AMP metabolism can be expected to switch from being under the predominant control of PDE4 activity to that determined

  6. Parallelizing alternating direction implicit solver on GPUs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a parallel Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) solver on GPUs. Our implementation significantly improves existing implementations in two aspects. First, we address the scalability issue of existing Parallel Cyclic Reduction (PCR) implementations by eliminating their hardware resource con...

  7. Optimization of solver for gas flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savichkin, D.; Dodulad, O.; Kloss, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of the work is optimization of the solver for rarefied gas flow modeling based on the Boltzmann equation. Optimization method is based on SIMD extensions for ×86 processors. Computational code is profiled and manually optimized with SSE instructions. Heat flow, shock waves and Knudsen pump are modeled with optimized solver. Dependencies of computational time from mesh sizes and CPU capabilities are provided.

  8. Community Multiscale Air Quality Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA developed the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) system to apply a “one atmosphere” multiscale and multi-pollutant modeling approach based mainly on the “first principles” description of the atmosphere. The multiscale capability is supported by the governing di...

  9. A parallel PCG solver for MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanhui; Li, Guomin

    2009-01-01

    In order to simulate large-scale ground water flow problems more efficiently with MODFLOW, the OpenMP programming paradigm was used to parallelize the preconditioned conjugate-gradient (PCG) solver with in this study. Incremental parallelization, the significant advantage supported by OpenMP on a shared-memory computer, made the solver transit to a parallel program smoothly one block of code at a time. The parallel PCG solver, suitable for both MODFLOW-2000 and MODFLOW-2005, is verified using an 8-processor computer. Both the impact of compilers and different model domain sizes were considered in the numerical experiments. Based on the timing results, execution times using the parallel PCG solver are typically about 1.40 to 5.31 times faster than those using the serial one. In addition, the simulation results are the exact same as the original PCG solver, because the majority of serial codes were not changed. It is worth noting that this parallelizing approach reduces cost in terms of software maintenance because only a single source PCG solver code needs to be maintained in the MODFLOW source tree. PMID:19563427

  10. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on themore » problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  11. Adaptive multiscale model reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric; Efendiev, Yalchin; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss a general multiscale model reduction framework based on multiscale finite element methods. We give a brief overview of related multiscale methods. Due to page limitations, the overview focuses on a few related methods and is not intended to be comprehensive. We present a general adaptive multiscale model reduction framework, the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method. Besides the method's basic outline, we discuss some important ingredients needed for the method's success. We also discuss several applications. The proposed method allows performing local model reduction in the presence of high contrast and no scale separation.

  12. PDE4 in the human heart – major player or little helper?

    PubMed Central

    Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    PDEs restrict the positive inotropic effects of β-adrenoceptor stimulation by degrading cAMP. Hence, PDE inhibitors sensitize the heart to catecholamines and are therefore used as positive inotropes. On the downside, this is accompanied by exaggerated energy expenditure, cell death and arrhythmias. For many years, PDE3 was considered to be the major isoform responsible for the control of cardiac force and rhythm. However, recent work in gene-targeted mice and rodent cells has indicated that PDE4 is also involved. Furthermore, selective PDE4 inhibitors augment catecholamine-stimulated cAMP levels and induce arrhythmias in human atrial preparations, which suggests that PDE4 has a more prominent role in the human heart than anticipated, and that PDE4 inhibitors such as roflumilast may carry an arrhythmogenic risk. In this issue of the journal, a team of researchers from three laboratories report on the effect of PDE3 and PDE4 inhibitors on ventricular trabeculae from explanted human hearts. The key result is that the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram does not affect the positive inotropic effects of β1- or β2-adrenoceptor stimulation. Given that the ventricle rather than the atria is the critical region in terms of arrhythmogenic consequences, this is an important and reassuring finding. Linked Article This article is a commentary on the research paper by Molenaar et al., pp. 528–538 of this issue. To view this paper visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12167 PMID:23489196

  13. PDE3A Regulates Basal Myocardial Contractility through Interacting with SERCA2a-Signaling Complexes in Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Beca, Sanja; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Shen, Weixing; Liu, Jie; Makary, Samy; Polidovitch, Nazari; Sun, Junhui; Hockman, Steven; Chung, Youn Wook; Movesian, Matthew; Murphy, Elizabeth; Manganiello, Vincent; Backx, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale cAMP is an important regulator of myocardial function, and regulation of cAMP hydrolysis by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) is a critical determinant of the amplitude, duration, and compartmentation of cAMP–mediated signaling. The role of different PDE isozymes, particularly PDE3A versus PDE3B, in the regulation of heart function remains unclear. Objective To determine the relative contribution of PDE3A versus PDE3B isozymes in the regulation of heart function and to dissect the molecular basis for this regulation. Methods and Results Compared to wild-type (WT) littermates, cardiac contractility and relaxation were enhanced in isolated hearts from PDE3A−/−, but not PDE3B−/−, mice. Furthermore, PDE3 inhibition had no effect on PDE3A−/− hearts but increased contractility in WT (as expected) and PDE3B−/− hearts to levels indistinguishable from PDE3A−/−. The enhanced contractility in PDE3A−/− hearts was associated with cAMP-dependent elevations in Ca2+ transient amplitudes and increased SR Ca2+ content, without changes in L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa,L) of cardiomyocytes, as well as with increased SR Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) activity, SR Ca2+ uptake rates, and phospholamban (PLN) phosphorylation in SR fractions. Consistent with these observations, PDE3 activity was reduced ~8-fold in SR fractions from PDE3A−/− hearts. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments further revealed that PDE3A associates with both SERCA2a and PLN in a complex which also contains AKAP-18, PKA-RII and PP2A. Conclusion Our data support the conclusion that PDE3A is the primary PDE3 isozyme modulating basal contractility and SR Ca2+ content by regulating cAMP in microdomains containing macromolecular complexes of SERCA2a-PLN-PDE3A. PMID:23168336

  14. PSPIKE: A Parallel Hybrid Sparse Linear System Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguoglu, Murat; Sameh, Ahmed H.; Schenk, Olaf

    The availability of large-scale computing platforms comprised of tens of thousands of multicore processors motivates the need for the next generation of highly scalable sparse linear system solvers. These solvers must optimize parallel performance, processor (serial) performance, as well as memory requirements, while being robust across broad classes of applications and systems. In this paper, we present a new parallel solver that combines the desirable characteristics of direct methods (robustness) and effective iterative solvers (low computational cost), while alleviating their drawbacks (memory requirements, lack of robustness). Our proposed hybrid solver is based on the general sparse solver PARDISO, and the “Spike” family of hybrid solvers. The resulting algorithm, called PSPIKE, is as robust as direct solvers, more reliable than classical preconditioned Krylov subspace methods, and much more scalable than direct sparse solvers. We support our performance and parallel scalability claims using detailed experimental studies and comparison with direct solvers, as well as classical preconditioned Krylov methods.

  15. Domain decomposition in time for PDE-constrained optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Andrew T.; Stoll, Martin

    2015-08-28

    Here, PDE-constrained optimization problems have a wide range of applications, but they lead to very large and ill-conditioned linear systems, especially if the problems are time dependent. In this paper we outline an approach for dealing with such problems by decomposing them in time and applying an additive Schwarz preconditioner in time, so that we can take advantage of parallel computers to deal with the very large linear systems. We then illustrate the performance of our method on a variety of problems.

  16. Pyrazolopyridines as potent PDE4B inhibitors: 5-Heterocycle SAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Charlotte J.; Ballantine, Stuart P.; Coe, Diane M.; Cook, Caroline M.; Delves, Christopher J.; Dowle, Mike D.; Edlin, Chris D.; Hamblin, J. Nicole; Holman, Stuart; Johnson, Martin R.; Jones, Paul S.; Keeling, Sue E.; Kranz, Michael; Lindvall, Mika; Lucas, Fiona S.; Neu, Margarete; Solanke, Yemisi E.; Somers, Don O.; Trivedi, Naimisha A.; Wiseman, Joanne O.

    2012-05-03

    Following the discovery of 4-(substituted amino)-1-alkyl-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-5-carboxamides as potent and selective phosphodiesterase 4B inhibitors, [Hamblin, J. N.; Angell, T.; Ballentine, S., et al. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.2008, 18, 4237] the SAR of the 5-position was investigated further. A range of substituted heterocycles showed good potencies against PDE4. Optimisation using X-ray crystallography and computational modelling led to the discovery of 16, with sub-nM inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} production from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  17. Simulation of Stochastic Processes by Coupled ODE-PDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the emergence of randomness in solutions of coupled, fully deterministic ODE-PDE (ordinary differential equations-partial differential equations) due to failure of the Lipschitz condition as a new phenomenon. It is possible to exploit the special properties of ordinary differential equations (represented by an arbitrarily chosen, dynamical system) coupled with the corresponding Liouville equations (used to describe the evolution of initial uncertainties in terms of joint probability distribution) in order to simulate stochastic processes with the proscribed probability distributions. The important advantage of the proposed approach is that the simulation does not require a random-number generator.

  18. Adaptive Multilevel Second-Generation Wavelet Collocation Elliptic Solver: A Cure for High Viscosity Contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevlahan, N. N.; Vasilyev, O. V.; Yuen, D. A.

    2003-12-01

    An adaptive multilevel wavelet collocation method for solving multi-dimensional elliptic problems with localized structures is developed. The method is based on the general class of multi-dimensional second generation wavelets and is an extension of the dynamically adaptive second generation wavelet collocation method for evolution problems. Wavelet decomposition is used for grid adaptation and interpolation, while O(N) hierarchical finite difference scheme, which takes advantage of wavelet multilevel decomposition, is used for derivative calculations. The multilevel structure of the wavelet approximation provides a natural way to obtain the solution on a near optimal grid. In order to accelerate the convergence of the iterative solver, an iterative procedure analogous to the multigrid algorithm is developed. For the problems with slowly varying viscosity simple diagonal preconditioning works. For problems with large laterally varying viscosity contrasts either direct solver on shared-memory machines or multilevel iterative solver with incomplete LU preconditioner may be used. The method is demonstrated for the solution of a number of two-dimensional elliptic test problems with both constant and spatially varying viscosity with multiscale character.

  19. GPU accelerated solver for nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. Application to the electrophysiology problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Andres; Ferrero, Jose M.; Rodriguez Matas, Jose F.

    2015-11-01

    Solving the electric activity of the heart possess a big challenge, not only because of the structural complexities inherent to the heart tissue, but also because of the complex electric behaviour of the cardiac cells. The multi-scale nature of the electrophysiology problem makes difficult its numerical solution, requiring temporal and spatial resolutions of 0.1 ms and 0.2 mm respectively for accurate simulations, leading to models with millions degrees of freedom that need to be solved for thousand time steps. Solution of this problem requires the use of algorithms with higher level of parallelism in multi-core platforms. In this regard the newer programmable graphic processing units (GPU) has become a valid alternative due to their tremendous computational horsepower. This paper presents results obtained with a novel electrophysiology simulation software entirely developed in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The software implements fully explicit and semi-implicit solvers for the monodomain model, using operator splitting. Performance is compared with classical multi-core MPI based solvers operating on dedicated high-performance computer clusters. Results obtained with the GPU based solver show enormous potential for this technology with accelerations over 50 × for three-dimensional problems.

  20. Molecular cloning and subcellular distribution of the novel PDE4B4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase isoform.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Malcolm; McSorley, Theresa; Olsen, Aileen E; Johnston, Lee Ann; Thomson, Neil C; Baillie, George S; Houslay, Miles D; Bolger, Graeme B

    2003-01-01

    We have isolated cDNAs encoding PDE4B4, a new cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE4) isoform with novel properties. The amino acid sequence of PDE4B4 demonstrates that it is encoded by the PDE4B gene, but that it differs from the previously isolated PDE4B1, PDE4B2 and PDE4B3 isoforms by the presence of a novel N-terminal region of 17 amino acids. PDE4B4 contains both of the upstream conserved region 1 (UCR1) and UCR2 regulatory units that are characteristic of 'long' PDE4 isoforms. RNase protection demonstrated that PDE4B4 mRNA is expressed preferentially in liver, skeletal muscle and various regions of the brain, which differs from the pattern of tissue distribution of the other known PDE4B long forms, PDE4B1 and PDE4B3. Expression of PDE4B4 cDNA in COS7 cells produced a protein of 85 kDa under denaturing conditions. Subcellular fractionation of recombinant, COS7-cell expressed PDE4B4 showed that the protein was localized within the cytosol, which was confirmed by confocal microscopic analysis of living COS7 cells transfected with a green fluorescent protein-PDE4B4 chimaera. PDE4B4 exhibited a K(m) for cAMP of 5.4 microM and a V(max), relative to that of the long PDE4B1 isoform, of 2.1. PDE4B4 was inhibited by the prototypical PDE4 inhibitor rolipram [4-[3-(cyclopentoxyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-pyrrolidinone] with an IC(50) of 83 nM. Treatment of COS7 cells with forskolin, to elevate cAMP levels, produced activation of PDE4B4, which was associated with the phosphorylation of PDE4B4 on Ser-56 within UCR1. The unique tissue distribution and intracellular targeting of PDE4B4 suggests that this isoform may have a distinct functional role in regulating cAMP levels in specific cell types. PMID:12441002

  1. PDE5 inhibitors protect against post-infarction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Shuang; Zeng, Cao; Yu, Wenjun; Shen, Mingzhi; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Congye; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Haichang

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the main causes for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This study was designed to examine the effect of PDE-5 inhibition on cardiac geometry, function and apoptosis in post-infarct HF. Our data revealed that treatment of the PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil, beginning 3 days after left anterior descending coronary artery ligation, attenuated LV remodeling, cardiac dysfunction, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and mitochondrial anomalies including ATP production, mitochondrial respiratory defects, decline of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and compromised mitochondrial ultrastructure. Sildenafil partially ameliorated the downregulation of Sirt3 protein and acetylation of PGC-1alpha in peri-infarct myocardial regions. In cultured neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes subjected to hypoxia for 24 hrs, sildenafil suppressed apoptosis, promoted ATP production and elevated MMP, along with the increased Sirt3 protein expression and decreased PGC-1alpha acetylation. Interestingly, knock down of Sirt3 attenuated or nullified sildenafil-offered beneficial effects. Our findings demonstrated that sildenafil exerts its cardioprotective effect against post-infarction injury by improving mitochondrial ultrastructure and function via the Sirt3/PGC-1alpha pathway. This observation should shed some lights towards application of sildenafil in energy-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27100500

  2. Mesh Algorithms for PDE with Sieve I: Mesh Distribution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knepley, Matthew G.; Karpeev, Dmitry A.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a new programming framework, called Sieve, to support parallel numerical partial differential equation(s) (PDE) algorithms operating over distributed meshes. We have also developed a reference implementation of Sieve in C++ as a library of generic algorithms operating on distributed containers conforming to the Sieve interface. Sieve makes instances of the incidence relation, or arrows, the conceptual first-class objects represented in the containers. Further, generic algorithms acting on this arrow container are systematically used to provide natural geometric operations on the topology and also, through duality, on the data. Finally, coverings and duality are used to encode notmore » only individual meshes, but all types of hierarchies underlying PDE data structures, including multigrid and mesh partitions. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of the framework, we show how the mesh partition data can be represented and manipulated using the same fundamental mechanisms used to represent meshes. We present the complete description of an algorithm to encode a mesh partition and then distribute a mesh, which is independent of the mesh dimension, element shape, or embedding. Moreover, data associated with the mesh can be similarly distributed with exactly the same algorithm. The use of a high level of abstraction within the Sieve leads to several benefits in terms of code reuse, simplicity, and extensibility. We discuss these benefits and compare our approach to other existing mesh libraries.« less

  3. Parallel PDE-Based Simulations Using the Common Component Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    McInnes, Lois C.; Allan, Benjamin A.; Armstrong, Robert; Benson, Steven J.; Bernholdt, David E.; Dahlgren, Tamara L.; Diachin, Lori; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Kohl, James A.; Larson, J. Walter; Lefantzi, Sophia; Nieplocha, Jarek; Norris, Boyana; Parker, Steven G.; Ray, Jaideep; Zhou, Shujia

    2006-03-05

    Summary. The complexity of parallel PDE-based simulations continues to increase as multimodel, multiphysics, and multi-institutional projects become widespread. A goal of componentbased software engineering in such large-scale simulations is to help manage this complexity by enabling better interoperability among various codes that have been independently developed by different groups. The Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum is defining a component architecture specification to address the challenges of high-performance scientific computing. In addition, several execution frameworks, supporting infrastructure, and generalpurpose components are being developed. Furthermore, this group is collaborating with others in the high-performance computing community to design suites of domain-specific component interface specifications and underlying implementations. This chapter discusses recent work on leveraging these CCA efforts in parallel PDE-based simulations involving accelerator design, climate modeling, combustion, and accidental fires and explosions. We explain how component technology helps to address the different challenges posed by each of these applications, and we highlight how component interfaces built on existing parallel toolkits facilitate the reuse of software for parallel mesh manipulation, discretization, linear algebra, integration, optimization, and parallel data redistribution. We also present performance data to demonstrate the suitability of this approach, and we discuss strategies for applying component technologies to both new and existing applications.

  4. A nonlinear manifold-based reduced order model for multiscale analysis of heterogeneous hyperelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Satyaki; Matouš, Karel

    2016-05-01

    A new manifold-based reduced order model for nonlinear problems in multiscale modeling of heterogeneous hyperelastic materials is presented. The model relies on a global geometric framework for nonlinear dimensionality reduction (Isomap), and the macroscopic loading parameters are linked to the reduced space using a Neural Network. The proposed model provides both homogenization and localization of the multiscale solution in the context of computational homogenization. To construct the manifold, we perform a number of large three-dimensional simulations of a statistically representative unit cell using a parallel finite strain finite element solver. The manifold-based reduced order model is verified using common principles from the machine-learning community. Both homogenization and localization of the multiscale solution are demonstrated on a large three-dimensional example and the local microscopic fields as well as the homogenized macroscopic potential are obtained with acceptable engineering accuracy.

  5. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes as targets of the intracellular signalling network: benefits of PDE inhibitors in various diseases and perspectives for future therapeutic developments

    PubMed Central

    Keravis, Thérèse; Lugnier, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that specifically inactivate the intracellular messengers cAMP and cGMP in a compartmentalized manner represent an important enzyme class constituted by 11 gene-related families of isozymes (PDE1 to PDE11). Downstream receptors, PDEs play a major role in controlling the signalosome at various levels of phosphorylations and protein/protein interactions. Due to the multiplicity of isozymes, their various intracellular regulations and their different cellular and subcellular distributions, PDEs represent interesting targets in intracellular pathways. Therefore, the investigation of PDE isozyme alterations related to various pathologies and the design of specific PDE inhibitors might lead to the development of new specific therapeutic strategies in numerous pathologies. This manuscript (i) overviews the different PDEs including their endogenous regulations and their specific inhibitors; (ii) analyses the intracellular implications of PDEs in regulating signalling cascades in pathogenesis, exemplified by two diseases affecting cell cycle and proliferation; and (iii) discusses perspectives for future therapeutic developments. PMID:22014080

  6. How Schools and Students Respond to School Improvement Programs: The Case of Brazil's PDE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnoy, Martin; Gove, Amber K.; Loeb, Susanna; Marshall, Jeffrey H.; Socias, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    This study uses rich empirical data from Brazil to assess how a government program (PDE) that decentralizes school management decisions changes what goes on in schools and how these changes affect student outcomes. It appears that the PDE resulted in some improvements in management and learning materials, but little change in other areas including…

  7. On the Interface of Probabilistic and PDE Methods in a Multifactor Term Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamon, Rogemar S.

    2004-01-01

    Within the general framework of a multifactor term structure model, the fundamental partial differential equation (PDE) satisfied by a default-free zero-coupon bond price is derived via a martingale-oriented approach. Using this PDE, a result characterizing a model belonging to an exponential affine class is established using only a system of…

  8. CELLULAR AND SUBCELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF PDE10A, A STRIATUM-ENRICHED PHOSPHODIESTERASE

    PubMed Central

    XIE, Z.; ADAMOWICZ, W. O.; ELDRED, W. D.; JAKOWSKI, A. B.; KLEIMAN, R. J.; MORTON, D. G.; STEPHENSON, D. T.; STRICK, C. A.; WILLIAMS, R. D.; MENNITI, F. S.

    2006-01-01

    PDE10A is a recently identified phosphodiesterase that is highly expressed by the GABAergic medium spiny projection neurons of the mammalian striatum. Inhibition of PDE10A results in striatal activation and behavioral suppression, suggesting that PDE10A inhibitors represent a novel class of antipsychotic agents. In the present studies we further elucidate the localization of this enzyme in striatum of rat and cynomolgus monkey. We find by confocal microscopy that PDE10A-like immunoreactivity is excluded from each class of striatal interneuron. Thus, the enzyme is restricted to the medium spiny neurons. Subcellular fractionation indicates that PDE10A is primarily membrane bound. The protein is present in the synaptosomal fraction but is separated from the postsynaptic density upon solubilization with 0.4% Triton X-100. Immuno-electron microscopy of striatum confirms that PDE10A is most often associated with membranes in dendrites and spines. Immuno-gold particles are observed on the edge of the postsynaptic density but not within this structure. Our studies indicate that PDE10A is associated with post-synaptic membranes of the medium spiny neurons, suggesting that the specialized compartmentation of PDE10A enables the regulation of intracellular signaling from glutamatergic and dopaminergic inputs to these neurons. PMID:16483723

  9. A novel thermoregulatory role for PDE10A in mouse and human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hankir, Mohammed K; Kranz, Mathias; Gnad, Thorsten; Weiner, Juliane; Wagner, Sally; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Bronisch, Felix; Steinhoff, Karen; Luthardt, Julia; Klöting, Nora; Hesse, Swen; Seibyl, John P; Sabri, Osama; Heiker, John T; Blüher, Matthias; Pfeifer, Alexander; Brust, Peter; Fenske, Wiebke K

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 10A (PDE10A) is highly enriched in striatum and is under evaluation as a drug target for several psychiatric/neurodegenerative diseases. Preclinical studies implicate PDE10A in the regulation of energy homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. By utilizing small-animal PET/MRI and the novel radioligand [(18)F]-AQ28A, we found marked levels of PDE10A in interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) of mice. Pharmacological inactivation of PDE10A with the highly selective inhibitor MP-10 recruited BAT and potentiated thermogenesis in vivo In diet-induced obese mice, chronic administration of MP-10 caused weight loss associated with increased energy expenditure, browning of white adipose tissue, and improved insulin sensitivity. Analysis of human PET data further revealed marked levels of PDE10A in the supraclavicular region where brown/beige adipocytes are clustered in adults. Finally, the inhibition of PDE10A with MP-10 stimulated thermogenic gene expression in human brown adipocytes and induced browning of human white adipocytes. Collectively, our findings highlight a novel thermoregulatory role for PDE10A in mouse and human adipocytes and promote PDE10A inhibitors as promising candidates for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. PMID:27247380

  10. PDE5 inhibitors enhance the lethality of standard of care chemotherapy in pediatric CNS tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jane L; Booth, Laurence; Conley, Adam; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Malkin, Mark; Kukreja, Rakesh C; Grant, Steven; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We determined whether clinically relevant phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors interacted with clinically relevant chemotherapies to kill medulloblastoma cells. In medulloblastoma cells PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion with vincristine/etoposide/cisplatin to cause cell death. Knockdown of PDE5 expression recapitulated the combination effects of PDE5 inhibitor drugs with chemotherapy drugs. Expression of dominant negative caspase 9 did not significantly inhibit chemotherapy lethality but did significantly reduce enhanced killing in combination with the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil. Overexpression of BCL-XL and c-FLIP-s suppressed individual and combination drug toxicities. Knockdown of CD95 or FADD suppressed drug combination toxicity. Treatment with PDE5 inhibitors and chemotherapy drugs promoted autophagy which was maximal at ~12 h post-treatment, and in a cell type-dependent manner knockdown of Beclin1 or ATG5 either suppressed or enhanced drug combination lethality. PDE5 inhibitors enhanced the induction of chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in a nitric oxide synthase-dependent fashion. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the combination of PDE5 inhibitors with standard of care chemotherapy agents for medulloblastoma represents a possible novel modality for future treatment of this disease. PMID:24651037

  11. Design and Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Coumarin Derivatives as PDE Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumbar, Mahadev N; Kamble, Ravindra R; Kamble, Atulkumar A; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kumari, Sandhya; Nair, Ramya; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar; Prasad, D Jagadeesh

    2016-01-01

    Coumarins appended to benzimidazole through pyrazole are designed and synthesized using microwave irradiation. These compounds were analyzed for phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition indirectly by motility pattern in human spermatozoa. Some of the synthesized compounds, namely, 5d, 5e, 5f, 5g, 5h, and 5k, have exhibited potent inhibitory activity on PDE. PMID:26998358

  12. Design and Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Coumarin Derivatives as PDE Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kumbar, Mahadev N.; Kamble, Ravindra R.; Kamble, Atulkumar A.; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kumari, Sandhya; Nair, Ramya; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar; Prasad, D. Jagadeesh

    2016-01-01

    Coumarins appended to benzimidazole through pyrazole are designed and synthesized using microwave irradiation. These compounds were analyzed for phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition indirectly by motility pattern in human spermatozoa. Some of the synthesized compounds, namely, 5d, 5e, 5f, 5g, 5h, and 5k, have exhibited potent inhibitory activity on PDE. PMID:26998358

  13. Brain PET measurement of PDE10A occupancy by TAK-063, a new PDE10A inhibitor, using [(11) C]T-773 in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Takano, Akihiro; Stepanov, Vladimir; Nakao, Ryuji; Amini, Nahid; Gulyás, Balázs; Kimura, Haruhide; Halldin, Christer

    2016-06-01

    Because phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) degrades both cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate and is distributed mainly in the striatum, PDE10A inhibitors have been considered to potentially be useful therapeutic agents for psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases such as schizophrenia and Huntington's disease. We measured striatal PDE10A occupancy by TAK-063, a newly developed compound with high affinity and selectivity for PDE10A, using PET with [(11) C]T-773 in nonhuman primates. Two 123-min dynamic PET measurements were performed on three female rhesus monkeys, once at baseline and again after intravenous administration of different doses of TAK-063 (0.2-1.6 mg/kg). Total distribution volume (VT ) was calculated with a two-tissue compartment model using metabolite-corrected plasma input. Although the in vitro autoradiography did not show high specific binding to [(11) C]T-773 in the cerebellum, VT in the cerebellum decreased after TAK-063 treatment. The specific binding to PDE10A (VS ) was calculated as the difference of the VT between the target regions and the cerebellum. PDE10A occupancy was calculated as the percent change of VS . The average PDE10A occupancy of the caudate nucleus and putamen was 35.2% at 0.2 mg/kg and 83.2% at 1.6 mg/kg. In conclusion, this nonhuman primate PET study demonstrated that [(11) C]T-773 is useful to estimate the PDE10A occupancy by TAK-063 in the striatum although there is in vivo interaction of the uptake between [(11) C]T-773 and TAK-063 in the cerebellum. These results warrant further clinical occupancy study for TAK-063. Synapse 70:253-263, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26878349

  14. Design, Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationship of Functionalized Tetrahydro-β-carboline Derivatives as Novel PDE5 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nermin S.; Gary, Bernard D.; Tinsley, Hethar N.; Piazza, Gary A.; Laufer, Stefan; Abadi, Ashraf H.

    2016-01-01

    Starting from tadalafil as a template, a series of functionalized tetrahydro-b-carboline derivatives have been prepared and identified as novel potent and selective PDE5 inhibitors. Replacing the 3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl at position 6 of tadalafil, together with elongation of the N2-methyl substituent and manipulation of the stereochemical aspects of the two chiral carbons led to the identification of compound XXI, a highly potent PDE5 inhibitor (IC50 = 3 nM). Compound XXI was also highly selective for PDE5 versus PDE3B, PDE4B, and PDE11A, with a selectivity index of 52 and 235 towards PDE5 rather than PDE11 with both cAMP and cGMP as substrate, respectively. PMID:21384413

  15. New iterative solvers for the NAG Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Salvini, S.; Shaw, G.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the work which has been carried out at NAG Ltd to update the iterative solvers for sparse systems of linear equations, both symmetric and unsymmetric, in the NAG Fortran 77 Library. Our current plans to extend this work and include it in our other numerical libraries in our range are also briefly mentioned. We have added to the Library the new Chapter F11, entirely dedicated to sparse linear algebra. At Mark 17, the F11 Chapter includes sparse iterative solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-box routines for sparse symmetric (both positive-definite and indefinite) linear systems. Mark 18 will add solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-boxes for sparse unsymmetric systems: the development of these has already been completed.

  16. Using SPARK as a Solver for Modelica

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael; Wetter, Michael; Haves, Philip; Moshier, Michael A.; Sowell, Edward F.

    2008-06-30

    Modelica is an object-oriented acausal modeling language that is well positioned to become a de-facto standard for expressing models of complex physical systems. To simulate a model expressed in Modelica, it needs to be translated into executable code. For generating run-time efficient code, such a translation needs to employ algebraic formula manipulations. As the SPARK solver has been shown to be competitive for generating such code but currently cannot be used with the Modelica language, we report in this paper how SPARK's symbolic and numerical algorithms can be implemented in OpenModelica, an open-source implementation of a Modelica modeling and simulation environment. We also report benchmark results that show that for our air flow network simulation benchmark, the SPARK solver is competitive with Dymola, which is believed to provide the best solver for Modelica.

  17. PDE4 and PDE5 regulate cyclic nucleotide contents and relaxing effects on carbachol-induced contraction in the bovine abomasum

    PubMed Central

    KANEDA, Takeharu; KIDO, Yuuki; TAJIMA, Tsuyoshi; URAKAWA, Norimoto; SHIMIZU, Kazumasa

    2014-01-01

    The effects of various selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors on carbachol (CCh)-induced contraction in the bovine abomasum were investigated. Various selective PDE inhibitors, vinpocetine (type 1), erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA, type 2), milrinone (type 3), Ro20-1724 (type 4), vardenafil (type 5), BRL-50481 (type 7) and BAY73-6691 (type 9), inhibited CCh-induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. Among the PDE inhibitors, Ro20-1724 and vardenafil induced more relaxation than the other inhibitors based on the data for the IC50 or maximum relaxation. In smooth muscle of the bovine abomasum, we showed the expression of PDE4B, 4C, 4D and 5 by RT-PCR analysis. In the presence of CCh, Ro20-1724 increased the cAMP content, but not the cGMP content. By contrast, vardenafil increased the cGMP content, but not the cAMP content. These results suggest that Ro20-1724-induced relaxation was correlated with cAMP and that vardenafil-induced relaxation was correlated with cGMP in the bovine abomasum. In conclusion, PDE4 and PDE5 are the enzymes involved in regulation of the relaxation associated with cAMP and cGMP, respectively, in the bovine abomasum. PMID:25319411

  18. Analytical solutions to the backward Kolmogorov PDE via an adiabatic approximation to the Schrödinger PDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2005-11-01

    Analytical solutions to the backward Kolmogorov PDE are very dependent on the functional form of b(y,t) and a(y,t). We suggest one solution technique for obtaining analytical solutions via the use of an adiabatic approximation to the Schrödinger PDE. This approximation takes the specific form of a so-called WKB (W D Wentzel [G. Wentzel, Eine Verallgemeinerung der Quantenbedingungen für die Zwecke der Wellenmechanik, Z. Phys. 38 (1926) 518-529], K D Kramers [H. Kramers, Wellenmechanik und halbzahlige Quantisierung, Z. Phys. 39 (1926) 828-840], B D Brillouin [L. Brillouin, La mécanique ondulatoire de Schrödinger: une méthode générale de résolution par approximations successives, C. R. Acad. Sci. 183 (1926) 24-26]) approximation. We provide for two examples, in financial option pricing, where we show how the proposed approximation could be of use.

  19. The SBML ODE Solver Library: a native API for symbolic and fast numerical analysis of reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Machné, Rainer; Finney, Andrew; Müller, Stefan; Lu, James; Widder, Stefanie; Flamm, Christoph

    2006-06-01

    The SBML ODE Solver Library (SOSlib) is a programming library for symbolic and numerical analysis of chemical reaction network models encoded in the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML). It is written in ISO C and distributed under the open source LGPL license. The package employs libSBML structures for formula representation and associated functions to construct a system of ordinary differential equations, their Jacobian matrix and other derivatives. SUNDIALS' CVODES is incorporated for numerical integration and sensitivity analysis. Preliminary benchmarking results give a rough overview on the behavior of different tools and are discussed in the Supplementary Material. The native application program interface provides fine-grained interfaces to all internal data structures, symbolic operations and numerical routines, enabling the construction of very efficient analytic applications and hybrid or multi-scale solvers with interfaces to SBML and non SBML data sources. Optional modules based on XMGrace and Graphviz allow quick inspection of structure and dynamics. PMID:16527832

  20. Multigrid in energy preconditioner for Krylov solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Slaybaugh, R.N.; Evans, T.M.; Davidson, G.G.; Wilson, P.P.H.

    2013-06-01

    We have added a new multigrid in energy (MGE) preconditioner to the Denovo discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. This preconditioner takes advantage of a new multilevel parallel decomposition. A multigroup Krylov subspace iterative solver that is decomposed in energy as well as space-angle forms the backbone of the transport solves in Denovo. The space-angle-energy decomposition facilitates scaling to hundreds of thousands of cores. The multigrid in energy preconditioner scales well in the energy dimension and significantly reduces the number of Krylov iterations required for convergence. This preconditioner is well-suited for use with advanced eigenvalue solvers such as Rayleigh Quotient Iteration and Arnoldi.

  1. ODE System Solver W. Krylov Iteration & Rootfinding

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Alan C.

    1991-09-09

    LSODKR is a new initial value ODE solver for stiff and nonstiff systems. It is a variant of the LSODPK and LSODE solvers, intended mainly for large stiff systems. The main differences between LSODKR and LSODE are the following: (a) for stiff systems, LSODKR uses a corrector iteration composed of Newton iteration and one of four preconditioned Krylov subspace iteration methods. The user must supply routines for the preconditioning operations, (b) Within the corrector iteration, LSODKR does automatic switching between functional (fixpoint) iteration and modified Newton iteration, (c) LSODKR includes the ability to find roots of given functions of the solution during the integration.

  2. ODE System Solver W. Krylov Iteration & Rootfinding

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-09-09

    LSODKR is a new initial value ODE solver for stiff and nonstiff systems. It is a variant of the LSODPK and LSODE solvers, intended mainly for large stiff systems. The main differences between LSODKR and LSODE are the following: (a) for stiff systems, LSODKR uses a corrector iteration composed of Newton iteration and one of four preconditioned Krylov subspace iteration methods. The user must supply routines for the preconditioning operations, (b) Within the corrector iteration,more » LSODKR does automatic switching between functional (fixpoint) iteration and modified Newton iteration, (c) LSODKR includes the ability to find roots of given functions of the solution during the integration.« less

  3. Steady potential solver for unsteady aerodynamic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, Dan

    1994-01-01

    Development of a steady flow solver for use with LINFLO was the objective of this report. The solver must be compatible with LINFLO, be composed of composite mesh, and have transonic capability. The approaches used were: (1) steady flow potential equations written in nonconservative form; (2) Newton's Method; (3) implicit, least-squares, interpolation method to obtain finite difference equations; and (4) matrix inversion routines from LINFLO. This report was given during the NASA LeRC Workshop on Forced Response in Turbomachinery in August of 1993.

  4. Wave Speeds, Riemann Solvers and Artificial Viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.

    1999-07-18

    A common perspective on the numerical solution of the equation Euler equations for shock physics is examined. The common viewpoint is based upon the selection of nonlinear wavespeeds upon which the dissipation (implicit or explicit) is founded. This perspective shows commonality between Riemann solver based method (i.e. Godunov-type) and artificial viscosity (i.e. von Neumann-Richtmyer). As an example we derive an improved nonlinear viscous stabilization of a Richtmyer-Lax-Wendroff method. Additionally, we will define a form of classical artificial viscosity based upon the HLL Riemann solver.

  5. PHLPP2 Downregulation Contributes to Lung Carcinogenesis Following B[a]P/B[a]PDE Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haishan; Pan, Xiaofu; Jin, Honglei; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Caili; Liu, Pei; Liu, Ya; Chen, Lili; Li, Jingxia; Zhu, Junlan; Zeng, Xingruo; Fu, Kai; Chen, Guorong; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The carcinogenic capacity of B[a]P/B[a]PDE is supported by epidemiologic studies. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for B[a]P/B[a]PDE-caused lung cancer have not been well investigated. We evaluated here the role of novel target PHLPP2 in lung inflammation and carcinogenesis upon B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure. Experimental Design We used the Western blotting, RT-PCR, [35S]methionine pulse and immunohistochemistry staining to determine PHLPP2 downregulation following B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure. Both B[a]PDE-induced Beas-2B cell transformation model and B[a]P-caused mouse lung cancer model were used to elucidate the mechanisms leading to PHLPP2 downregulation and lung carcinogenesis. The important findings were also extended to in vivo human studies. Results We found that B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure downregulated PHLPP2 expression in human lung epithelial cells in vitro and in mouse lung tissues in vivo. The ectopic expression of PHLPP2 dramatically inhibited cell transformation upon B[a]PDE exposure. Mechanistic studies showed that miR-205 induction was crucial for inhibition of PHLPP2 protein translation by targeting PHLPP2-3′-UTR. Interestingly, PHLPP2 expression was inversely associated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) expression, with low PHLPP2 and high TNFα expression in lung cancer tissues compared with the paired adjacent normal lung tissues. Additional studies revealed that PHLPP2 exhibited its antitumorigenic effect of B[a]P/B[a]PDE through the repression of inflammatory TNFα transcription. Conclusions Our studies not only first time identify PHLPP2 downregulation by lung carcinogen B[a]P/B[a]PDE, but also elucidate a novel molecular mechanisms underlying lung inflammation and carcinogenesis upon B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure. PMID:25977341

  6. Constrained pressure residual multiscale (CPR-MS) method for fully implicit simulation of multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusini, Matteo; Lukyanov, Alexander A.; Natvig, Jostein; Hajibeygi, Hadi

    2015-10-01

    We develop the first multiscale method for fully implicit (FIM) simulations of multiphase flow in porous media, namely CPR-MS method. Built on the FIM Jacobian matrix, the pressure system is obtained by employing a Constrained Pressure Residual (CPR) operator. Multiscale Finite Element (MSFE) and Finite Volume (MSFV) methods are then formulated algebraically to obtain efficient and accurate solutions of this pressure equation. The multiscale prediction stage (first-stage) is coupled with a corrector stage (second-stage) employed on the full system residual. The converged solution is enhanced through outer GMRES iterations preconditioned by these first and second stage operators. While the second-stage FIM stage is solved using a classical iterative solver, the multiscale stage is investigated in full detail. Several choices for fine-scale pre- and post-smoothing along with different choices of coarse-scale solvers are considered for a range of heterogeneous three-dimensional cases with capillarity and three-phase systems. The CPR-MS method is the first of its kind, and extends the applicability of the so-far developed multiscale methods (both MSFE and MSFV) to displacements with strong coupling terms.

  7. Compartmentalized PDE4A5 Signaling Impairs Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Long-Term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Park, Alan J.; Tolentino, Rosa E.; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; Tudor, Jennifer C.; Lee, Yool; Hansen, Rolf T.; Guercio, Leonardo A.; Linton, Edward; Neves-Zaph, Susana R.; Meerlo, Peter; Baillie, George S.; Houslay, Miles D.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in cAMP signaling are thought to contribute to neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders. Members of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) family, which contains >25 different isoforms, play a key role in determining spatial cAMP degradation so as to orchestrate compartmentalized cAMP signaling in cells. Each isoform binds to a different set of protein complexes through its unique N-terminal domain, thereby leading to targeted degradation of cAMP in specific intracellular compartments. However, the functional role of specific compartmentalized PDE4 isoforms has not been examined in vivo. Here, we show that increasing protein levels of the PDE4A5 isoform in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons impairs a long-lasting form of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and attenuates hippocampus-dependent long-term memories without affecting anxiety. In contrast, viral expression of a truncated version of PDE4A5, which lacks the unique N-terminal targeting domain, does not affect long-term memory. Further, overexpression of the PDE4A1 isoform, which targets a different subset of signalosomes, leaves memory undisturbed. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor-based cAMP measurements reveal that the full-length PDE4A5, in contrast to the truncated form, hampers forskolin-mediated increases in neuronal cAMP levels. Our study indicates that the unique N-terminal localization domain of PDE4A5 is essential for the targeting of specific cAMP-dependent signaling underlying synaptic plasticity and memory. The development of compounds to disrupt the compartmentalization of individual PDE4 isoforms by targeting their unique N-terminal domains may provide a fruitful approach to prevent cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive disorders that are associated with alterations in cAMP signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons exhibit localized signaling processes that enable biochemical cascades to be activated selectively in specific subcellular

  8. Momentum Diffusivity Estimation via PDE-Constrained Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ou, Y.; Schuster, E.; Humphreys, D. A.; Walker, M. L.; Casper, T. A.; Meyer, W. H.

    2008-11-01

    Several experiments around the world have demonstrated that plasma rotation can improve plasma stability and enhance confinement. It has been shown [1] that the critical rotation speed for stabilization is a function of the rotation profile shape, implying a radially distributed stabilizing mechanism. Modeling of the rotational profile dynamics is limited by poor knowledge of the momentum diffusivity coefficient. In this work we use toroidal angular velocity data from experiments where the torque is modulated using neutral beams, and we employ optimization techniques to estimate the momentum diffusivity coefficient for the angular momentum partial differential equation (PDE) that best fits the experimental data. To further investigate the nonlinear dependence of the momentum diffusivity on other physical variables such as temperatures and densities, we introduce techniques from nonlinear regression and machine learning. 6pt [1] A.C. Sontag, et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1005 (2007).

  9. Parallels between control PDE's and systems of ODE's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Villarreal, Ramiro

    1988-01-01

    System theorists understand that the same mathematical objects which determine controllability for nonlinear control systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) also determine hypoellipticity for linear partial differential equations (PDEs). Moreover, almost any study of ODE systems begins with linear systems. It is remarkable that Hormander's paper on hypoellipticity of second order linear p.d.e.'s starts with equations due to Kolmogorov, which are shown to be analogous to the linear PDEs. Eigenvalue placement by state feedback for a controllable linear system can be paralled for a Kolmogorov equation if an appropriate type of feedback is introduced. Results concerning transformations of nonlinear systems to linear systems are similar to results for transforming a linear PDE to a Kolmogorov equation.

  10. Therapeutic potential of PDE modulation in treating heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Walter; Yan, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Altered cyclic nucleotide-mediated signaling plays a critical role in the development of cardiovascular pathology. By degrading cAMP/cGMP, the action of cyclic nucleotide PDEs is essential for controlling cyclic nucleotide-mediated signaling intensity, duration, and specificity. Altered expression, localization and action of PDEs have all been implicated in causing changes in cyclic nucleotide signaling in cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PDEs has gained interest as a treatment strategy and as an area of drug development. While targeting of certain PDEs has the potential to ameliorate cardiovascular disease, inhibition of others might actually worsen it. This review will highlight recent research on the physiopathological role of cyclic nucleotide signaling, especially with regard to PDEs. While the physiological roles and biochemical properties of cardiovascular PDEs will be summarized, the primary emphasis will be pathological. Research into the potential benefits and hazards of PDE inhibition will also be discussed. PMID:24047267

  11. Exome sequencing identifies PDE4D mutations in acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hane; Graham, John M; Rimoin, David L; Lachman, Ralph S; Krejci, Pavel; Tompson, Stuart W; Nelson, Stanley F; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H

    2012-04-01

    Acrodysostosis is a dominantly-inherited, multisystem disorder characterized by skeletal, endocrine, and neurological abnormalities. To identify the molecular basis of acrodysostosis, we performed exome sequencing on five genetically independent cases. Three different missense mutations in PDE4D, which encodes cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase 4D, were found to be heterozygous in three of the cases. Two of the mutations were demonstrated to have occurred de novo, providing strong genetic evidence of causation. Two additional cases were heterozygous for de novo missense mutations in PRKAR1A, which encodes the cAMP-dependent regulatory subunit of protein kinase A and which has been recently reported to be the cause of a form of acrodysostosis resistant to multiple hormones. These findings demonstrate that acrodysostosis is genetically heterogeneous and underscore the exquisite sensitivity of many tissues to alterations in cAMP homeostasis. PMID:22464252

  12. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace-Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  13. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-15

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace–Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  14. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace-Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  15. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace-Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  16. A 3-D RBF-FD solver for modeling the atmospheric global electric circuit with topography (GEC-RBFFD v1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayona, V.; Flyer, N.; Lucas, G. M.; Baumgaertner, A. J. G.

    2015-10-01

    A numerical model based on radial basis function-generated finite differences (RBF-FD) is developed for simulating the global electric circuit (GEC) within the Earth's atmosphere, represented by a 3-D variable coefficient linear elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) in a spherically shaped volume with the lower boundary being the Earth's topography and the upper boundary a sphere at 60 km. To our knowledge, this is (1) the first numerical model of the GEC to combine the Earth's topography with directly approximating the differential operators in 3-D space and, related to this, (2) the first RBF-FD method to use irregular 3-D stencils for discretization to handle the topography. It benefits from the mesh-free nature of RBF-FD, which is especially suitable for modeling high-dimensional problems with irregular boundaries. The RBF-FD elliptic solver proposed here makes no limiting assumptions on the spatial variability of the coefficients in the PDE (i.e., the conductivity profile), the right hand side forcing term of the PDE (i.e., distribution of current sources) or the geometry of the lower boundary.

  17. Identification of cancer cytotoxic modulators of PDE3A by predictive chemogenomics

    PubMed Central

    de Waal, Luc; Lewis, Timothy A.; Rees, Matthew G.; Tsherniak, Aviad; Wu, Xiaoyun; Choi, Peter S.; Gechijian, Lara; Hartigan, Christina; Faloon, Patrick W.; Hickey, Mark J.; Tolliday, Nicola; Carr, Steven A.; Clemons, Paul A.; Munoz, Benito; Wagner, Bridget K.; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Koehler, Angela N.; Schenone, Monica; Burgin, Alex B.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Greulich, Heidi; Meyerson, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    High cancer death rates indicate the need for new anti-cancer therapeutic agents. Approaches to discover new cancer drugs include target-based drug discovery and phenotypic screening. Here, we identified phosphodiesterase 3A modulators as cell-selective cancer cytotoxic compounds by phenotypic compound library screening and target deconvolution by predictive chemogenomics. We found that sensitivity to 6-(4-(diethylamino)-3-nitrophenyl)-5-methyl-4,5-dihydropyridazin-3(2H)-one, or DNMDP, across 766 cancer cell lines correlates with expression of the phosphodiesterase 3A gene, PDE3A. Like DNMDP, a subset of known PDE3A inhibitors kill selected cancer cells while others do not. Furthermore, PDE3A depletion leads to DNMDP resistance. We demonstrated that DNMDP binding to PDE3A promotes an interaction between PDE3A and Schlafen 12 (SLFN12), suggesting a neomorphic activity. Co-expression of SLFN12 with PDE3A correlates with DNMDP sensitivity, while depletion of SLFN12 results in decreased DNMDP sensitivity. Our results implicate PDE3A modulators as candidate cancer therapeutic agents and demonstrate the power of predictive chemogenomics in small-molecule discovery. PMID:26656089

  18. Three-dimensional reconstruction method on the PDE exhaust plume flow flame temperature field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Wan, Xiong; Luo, Ningning; Li, Shujing

    2010-10-01

    Pulse detonation engine (referred to as PDE) has many advantage about simple structure, high efficiency thermal [1] cycling etc. In the future, it can be widely used in unmanned aircraft, target drone, luring the plane, the imaginary target, target missiles, long-range missiles and other military targets. However, because the exhaust flame of PDE is complicated [2], non-uniform temperature distribution and mutation in real time, its 3-D temperature distribution is difficult to be measured by normal way. As a result, PDE is used in the military project need to face many difficulties and challenges. In order to analyze and improve the working performance of PDE, deep research on the detonation combustion process is necessary. However, its performance characteristic which is in non-steady-state, as well as high temperature, high pressure, transient combustion characteristics put forward high demands about the flow field parameters measurement. In this paper, the PDE exhaust flames temperature field is reconstructed based on the theory of radiation thermometry [3] and Emission Spectral Tomography (referred to as EST) [4~6] which is one branch of Optical CT. It can monitor the detonation wave temperature distribution out of the exhaust flames at different moments, it also provides authentication for the numerical simulation which directs towards PDE work performance, and then it provides the basis for improving the structure of PDE.

  19. DISC1, PDE4B, and NDE1 at the centrosome and synapse

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Nicholas J.; Ogawa, Fumiaki; Antolin-Fontes, Beatriz; Chubb, Jennifer E.; Carlyle, Becky C.; Christie, Sheila; Claessens, Antoine; Porteous, David J.; Millar, J. Kirsty

    2008-12-26

    Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a risk factor for schizophrenia and other major mental illnesses. Its protein binding partners include the Nuclear Distribution Factor E Homologs (NDE1 and NDEL1), LIS1, and phosphodiesterases 4B and 4D (PDE4B and PDE4D). We demonstrate that NDE1, NDEL1 and LIS1, together with their binding partner dynein, associate with DISC1, PDE4B and PDE4D within the cell, and provide evidence that this complex is present at the centrosome. LIS1 and NDEL1 have been previously suggested to be synaptic, and we now demonstrate localisation of DISC1, NDE1, and PDE4B at synapses in cultured neurons. NDE1 is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependant Protein Kinase A (PKA), whose activity is, in turn, regulated by the cAMP hydrolysis activity of phosphodiesterases, including PDE4. We propose that DISC1 acts as an assembly scaffold for all of these proteins and that the NDE1/NDEL1/LIS1/dynein complex is modulated by cAMP levels via PKA and PDE4.

  20. Multiscale Fluctuation Analysis Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Kiyono, Ken; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    Ubiquitous non-Gaussianity of the probability density of (time-series) fluctuations in many real world phenomena has been known and modelled extensively in recent years. Similarly, the analysis of (multi)scaling properties of (fluctuations in) complex systems has become a standard way of addressing unknown complexity. Yet the combined analysis and modelling of multiscale behaviour of probability density — multiscale PDF analysis — has only recently been proposed for the analysis of time series arising in complex systems, such as the cardiac neuro-regulatory system, financial markets or hydrodynamic turbulence. This relatively new technique has helped significantly to expand the previously obtained insights into the phenomena addressed. In particular, it has helped to identify a novel class of scale invariant behaviour of the multiscale PDF in healthy heart rate regulation during daily activity and in a market system undergoing crash dynamics. This kind of invariance reflects invariance of the system under renormalisation and resembles behaviour at criticality of a system undergoing continuous phase transition — indeed in both phenomena, such phase transition behaviour has been revealed. While the precise mechanism underlying invariance of the PDF under system renormalisation of both systems discussed is not to date understood, there is an intimate link between the non-Gaussian PDF characteristics and the persistent invariant correlation structure emerging between fluctuations across scale and time.

  1. Structure-Based Design of a Potent, Selective, and Brain Penetrating PDE2 Inhibitor with Demonstrated Target Engagement.

    PubMed

    Buijnsters, Peter; De Angelis, Meri; Langlois, Xavier; Rombouts, Frederik J R; Sanderson, Wendy; Tresadern, Gary; Ritchie, Alison; Trabanco, Andrés A; VanHoof, Greet; Roosbroeck, Yves Van; Andrés, José-Ignacio

    2014-09-11

    Structure-guided design led to the identification of the novel, potent, and selective phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) inhibitor 12. Compound 12 demonstrated a >210-fold selectivity versus PDE10 and PDE11 and was inactive against all other PDE family members up to 10 μM. In vivo evaluation of 12 provided evidence that it is able to engage the target and to increase cGMP levels in relevant brain regions. Hence, 12 is a valuable tool compound for the better understanding of the role of PDE2 in cognitive impairment and other central nervous system related disorders. PMID:25221665

  2. Structure-Based Design of a Potent, Selective, and Brain Penetrating PDE2 Inhibitor with Demonstrated Target Engagement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Structure-guided design led to the identification of the novel, potent, and selective phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) inhibitor 12. Compound 12 demonstrated a >210-fold selectivity versus PDE10 and PDE11 and was inactive against all other PDE family members up to 10 μM. In vivo evaluation of 12 provided evidence that it is able to engage the target and to increase cGMP levels in relevant brain regions. Hence, 12 is a valuable tool compound for the better understanding of the role of PDE2 in cognitive impairment and other central nervous system related disorders. PMID:25221665

  3. Rare inactivating PDE11A variants associated with testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Anand; Stewart, Douglas R; Faucz, Fabio R; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Bass, Sara; Vogt, Aurelie; Zhang, Xijun; Boland, Joseph; Yeager, Meredith; Loud, Jennifer T; Nathanson, Katherine L; McGlynn, Katherine A; Stratakis, Constantine A; Greene, Mark H; Mirabello, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    Germline inactivating mutations of isoform 4 of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 11A (coded by the PDE11A gene) have been associated with familial adrenocortical tumors and familial testicular cancer. Testicular tissue is unique in expressing all four isoforms of PDE11A. In a prior candidate gene study of 94 familial testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) subjects, we identified a significant association between the presence of functionally abnormal variants in PDE11A and familial TGCT risk. To validate this novel observation, we sequenced the PDE11A coding region in 259 additional TGCT patients (both familial and sporadic) and 363 controls. We identified 55 PDE11A variants: 20 missense, four splice-site, two nonsense, seven synonymous, and 22 intronic. Ten missense variants were novel; nine occurred in transcript variant 4 and one in transcript variant 3. Five rare mutations (p.F258Y, p.G291R, p.V820M, p.R545X, and p.K568R) were present only in cases and were significantly more common in cases vs controls (P=0.0037). The latter two novel variants were functionally characterized and shown to be functionally inactivating, resulting in reduced PDE activity and increased cAMP levels. In further analysis of this cohort, we focused on white participants only to minimize confounding due to population stratification. This study builds upon our prior reports implicating PDE11A variants in familial TGCT, provides the first independent validation of those findings, extends that work to sporadic testicular cancer, demonstrates that these variants are uncommonly but reproducibly associated with TGCT, and refines our understanding regarding which specific inactivating PDE11A variants are most likely to be associated with TGCT risk. PMID:26459559

  4. Altered PDE10A expression detectable early before symptomatic onset in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Niccolini, Flavia; Haider, Salman; Reis Marques, Tiago; Muhlert, Nils; Tziortzi, Andri C; Searle, Graham E; Natesan, Sridhar; Piccini, Paola; Kapur, Shitij; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Gunn, Roger N; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Politis, Marios

    2015-10-01

    There is an urgent need for early biomarkers and novel disease-modifying therapies in Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease pathology involves the toxic effect of mutant huntingtin primarily in striatal medium spiny neurons, which highly express phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A). PDE10A hydrolyses cAMP/cGMP signalling cascades, thus having a key role in the regulation of striatal output, and in promoting neuronal survival. PDE10A could be a key therapeutic target in Huntington's disease. Here, we used combined positron emission tomography (PET) and multimodal magnetic resonance imaging to assess PDE10A expression in vivo in a unique cohort of 12 early premanifest Huntington's disease gene carriers with a mean estimated 90% probability of 25 years before the predicted onset of clinical symptoms. We show bidirectional changes in PDE10A expression in premanifest Huntington's disease gene carriers, which are associated with the probability of symptomatic onset. PDE10A expression in early premanifest Huntington's disease was decreased in striatum and pallidum and increased in motor thalamic nuclei, compared to a group of matched healthy controls. Connectivity-based analysis revealed prominent PDE10A decreases confined in the sensorimotor-striatum and in striatonigral and striatopallidal projecting segments. The ratio between higher PDE10A expression in motor thalamic nuclei and lower PDE10A expression in striatopallidal projecting striatum was the strongest correlate with higher probability of symptomatic conversion in early premanifest Huntington's disease gene carriers. Our findings demonstrate in vivo, a novel and earliest pathophysiological mechanism underlying Huntington's disease with direct implications for the development of new pharmacological treatments, which can promote neuronal survival and improve outcome in Huntington's disease gene carriers. PMID:26198591

  5. Luteinizing Hormone Causes Phosphorylation and Activation of the cGMP Phosphodiesterase PDE5 in Rat Ovarian Follicles, Contributing, Together with PDE1 Activity, to the Resumption of Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Jeremy R; Uliasz, Tracy F; Shuhaibar, Leia C; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Kleiman, Robin J; Humphrey, John M; Lampe, Paul D; Artemyev, Nikolai O; Rybalkin, Sergei D; Beavo, Joseph A; Movsesian, Matthew A; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2016-05-01

    The meiotic cell cycle of mammalian oocytes in preovulatory follicles is held in prophase arrest by diffusion of cGMP from the surrounding granulosa cells into the oocyte. Luteinizing hormone (LH) then releases meiotic arrest by lowering cGMP in the granulosa cells. The LH-induced reduction of cGMP is caused in part by a decrease in guanylyl cyclase activity, but the observation that the cGMP phosphodiesterase PDE5 is phosphorylated during LH signaling suggests that an increase in PDE5 activity could also contribute. To investigate this idea, we measured cGMP-hydrolytic activity in rat ovarian follicles. Basal activity was due primarily to PDE1A and PDE5, and LH increased PDE5 activity. The increase in PDE5 activity was accompanied by phosphorylation of PDE5 at serine 92, a protein kinase A/G consensus site. Both the phosphorylation and the increase in activity were promoted by elevating cAMP and opposed by inhibiting protein kinase A, supporting the hypothesis that LH activates PDE5 by stimulating its phosphorylation by protein kinase A. Inhibition of PDE5 activity partially suppressed LH-induced meiotic resumption as indicated by nuclear envelope breakdown, but inhibition of both PDE5 and PDE1 activities was needed to completely inhibit this response. These results show that activities of both PDE5 and PDE1 contribute to the LH-induced resumption of meiosis in rat oocytes, and that phosphorylation and activation of PDE5 is a regulatory mechanism. PMID:27009040

  6. Convergence acceleration for time-independent first-order PDE using optimal PNB-approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, S.; Branden, H.

    1996-12-31

    We consider solving time-independent (steady-state) flow problems in 2D or 3D governed by hyperbolic or {open_quotes}almost hyperbolic{close_quotes} systems of partial differential equations (PDE). Examples of such PDE are the Euler and the Navier-Stokes equations. The PDE is discretized using a finite difference or finite volume scheme with arbitrary order of accuracy. If the matrix B describes the discretized differential operator and u denotes the approximate solution, the discrete problem is given by a large system of equations.

  7. Repurposing human PDE4 inhibitors for neglected tropical diseases. Evaluation of analogs of the human PDE4 inhibitor GSK-256066 as inhibitors of PDEB1 of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Ochiana, Stefan O.; Bland, Nicholas D.; Settimo, Luca; Campbell, Robert K.; Pollastri, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) have been identified as important enzyme targets for drug development in both humans and in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). With this in mind, we recently reported the profiling of a range of human PDE inhibitors, showing that human PDE4 (hPDE4) inhibitors tend to display the best potency against the trypanosomal phosphodiesterase TbrPDEB1. Among these was GSK-256066, a potent inhibitor of hPDE4 and a weak inhibitor of TbrPDEB1. In this report, we describe the results of a structure-activity relationship study of this chemotype, leading to the discovery of analogs with improved potency against TbrPDEB1 and micromolar inhibition of T. brucei cellular growth. We rationalize the potency trends via molecular docking of the new inhibitors into a recently reported apo structure of TbrPDEB1. The studies in this article will inform future efforts in repurposing human PDE inhibitors as anti-trypanosomal agents. PMID:25283372

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Cavitating Bubbly Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Hsiao, C.-T.; Chahine, G. L.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of cavitating bubbly flows is challenging due to the wide range of characteristic lengths of the physics at play: from micrometers (e.g., bubble nuclei radius) to meters (e.g., propeller diameter or sheet cavity length). To address this, we present here a multiscale approach which integrates a Discrete Bubble Model for dispersed microbubbles and a level set N-S solver for macro cavities, along with a mesoscale transition model to bridge the two. This approach was implemented in 3DYNAFScopyright and used to simulate sheet-to-cloud cavitation over a hydrofoil. The hybrid model captures well the full cavitation process starting from free field nuclei and nucleation from solid surfaces. In low pressure region of the foil small nuclei are seen to grow large and eventually merge to form a large scale sheet cavity. A reentrant jet forms under the cavity, travels upstream, and breaks it, resulting in a bubble cloud of a large amount of microbubbles as the broken pockets shrink and travel downstream. This is in good agreement with experimental observations based of sheet lengths and frequency of lift force oscillation. DOE-SBIR, ONR (monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim)

  9. Expression, intracellular distribution and basis for lack of catalytic activity of the PDE4A7 isoform encoded by the human PDE4A cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Lee Ann; Erdogan, Suat; Cheung, York Fong; Sullivan, Michael; Barber, Rachael; Lynch, Martin J; Baillie, George S; Van Heeke, Gino; Adams, David R; Huston, Elaine; Houslay, Miles D

    2004-01-01

    PDE4A7 is an isoform encoded by the human PDE4A cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase gene that fails to hydrolyse cAMP and whose transcripts are widely expressed. Removal of either the N- or C-terminal unique portions of PDE4A7 did not reconstitute catalytic activity, showing that they did not exert a chronic inhibitory effect. A chimera (Hyb2), formed by swapping the unique N-terminal portion of PDE4A7 with that of the active PDE4A4C form, was not catalytically active. However, one formed (Hyb1) by swapping the unique C-terminal portion of PDE4A7 with that common to all active PDE4 isoforms was catalytically active. Compared with the active PDE4A4B isoform, Hyb1 exhibited a similar K(m) value for cAMP and IC50 value for rolipram inhibition, but was less sensitive to inhibition by Ro-20-1724 and denbufylline, and considerably more sensitive to thermal denaturation. The unique C-terminal region of PDE4A7 was unable to support an active catalytic unit, whereas its unique N-terminal region can. The N-terminal portion of the PDE4 catalytic unit is essential for catalytic activity and can be supplied by either highly conserved sequence found in active PDE4 isoforms from all four PDE4 subfamilies or the unique N-terminal portion of PDE4A7. A discrete portion of the conserved C-terminal region in active PDE4A isoforms underpins their aberrant migration on SDS/PAGE. Unlike active PDE4A isoforms, PDE4A7 is exclusively localized to the P1 particulate fraction in cells. A region located within the C-terminal portion of active PDE4 isoforms prevents such exclusive targeting. Three functional regions in PDE4A isoforms are identified, which influence catalytic activity, subcellular targeting and conformational status. PMID:15025561

  10. Aleph Field Solver Challenge Problem Results Summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Russell; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Aleph models continuum electrostatic and steady and transient thermal fields using a finite-element method. Much work has gone into expanding the core solver capability to support enriched mod- eling consisting of multiple interacting fields, special boundary conditions and two-way interfacial coupling with particles modeled using Aleph's complementary particle-in-cell capability. This report provides quantitative evidence for correct implementation of Aleph's field solver via order- of-convergence assessments on a collection of problems of increasing complexity. It is intended to provide Aleph with a pedigree and to establish a basis for confidence in results for more challeng- ing problems important to Sandia's mission that Aleph was specifically designed to address.

  11. Verifying a Local Generic Solver in Coq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Martin; Karbyshev, Aleksandr; Seidl, Helmut

    Fixpoint engines are the core components of program analysis tools and compilers. If these tools are to be trusted, special attention should be paid also to the correctness of such solvers. In this paper we consider the local generic fixpoint solver RLD which can be applied to constraint systems {x}sqsupseteq fx,{x}in V, over some lattice {D} where the right-hand sides f x are given as arbitrary functions implemented in some specification language. The verification of this algorithm is challenging, because it uses higher-order functions and relies on side effects to track variable dependences as they are encountered dynamically during fixpoint iterations. Here, we present a correctness proof of this algorithm which has been formalized by means of the interactive proof assistant Coq.

  12. Final Report for "Implimentation and Evaluation of Multigrid Linear Solvers into Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Codes for Petascale Computing"

    SciTech Connect

    Srinath Vadlamani; Scott Kruger; Travis Austin

    2008-06-19

    Extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes are used to model the large, slow-growing instabilities that are projected to limit the performance of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The multiscale nature of the extended MHD equations requires an implicit approach. The current linear solvers needed for the implicit algorithm scale poorly because the resultant matrices are so ill-conditioned. A new solver is needed, especially one that scales to the petascale. The most successful scalable parallel processor solvers to date are multigrid solvers. Applying multigrid techniques to a set of equations whose fundamental modes are dispersive waves is a promising solution to CEMM problems. For the Phase 1, we implemented multigrid preconditioners from the HYPRE project of the Center for Applied Scientific Computing at LLNL via PETSc of the DOE SciDAC TOPS for the real matrix systems of the extended MHD code NIMROD which is a one of the primary modeling codes of the OFES-funded Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling (CEMM) SciDAC. We implemented the multigrid solvers on the fusion test problem that allows for real matrix systems with success, and in the process learned about the details of NIMROD data structures and the difficulties of inverting NIMROD operators. The further success of this project will allow for efficient usage of future petascale computers at the National Leadership Facilities: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. The project will be a collaborative effort between computational plasma physicists and applied mathematicians at Tech-X Corporation, applied mathematicians Front Range Scientific Computations, Inc. (who are collaborators on the HYPRE project), and other computational plasma physicists involved with the CEMM project.

  13. Effect of Operating Frequency and Fill Time on PDE-Ejector Thrust Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, K.; Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh; Shehadeh, R.; Bouvet, N.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Thrust measurements for a pulse detonation engine (PDE)-ejector system were determined for a range of operating frequencies. Various length tubular ejectors were utilized. The results were compared to the measurements of the thrust output of the PDE alone to determine the enhancement provided by each ejector configuration at the specified frequencies. Ethylene was chosen as the fuel, with an equi-molar mixture of nitrogen and oxygen acting as the oxidizer. The propellant was kept at an equivalence ratio of one during all the experiments. The system was operated for frequencies between 20 and 50 Hz. The parameter space of the study included PDE operation frequency, ejector length, overlap percentage, the radius of curvature for the ejector inlets, and duration of the time allowed between cycles. The results of the experiments showed a maximum thrust augmentation of 120% for a PDE-ejector configuration at a frequency of 40Hz with a fill time of 10 ms.

  14. Identification of two splice variant forms of type-IVB cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase, DPD (rPDE-IVB1) and PDE-4 (rPDE-IVB2) in brain: selective localization in membrane and cytosolic compartments and differential expression in various brain regions.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M; Shakur, Y; Beattie, J; Houslay, M D

    1994-12-01

    In order to detect the two splice variant forms of type-IVB cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, DPD (type-IVB1) and PDE-4 (type-IVB2), anti-peptide antisera were generated. One set ('DPD/PDE-4-common'), generated against a peptide sequence found at the common C-terminus of these two PDEs, detected both PDEs. A second set was PDE-4 specific, being directed against a peptide sequence found within the unique N-terminal region of PDE-4. In brain, DPD was found exclusively in the cytosol and PDE-4 exclusively associated with membranes. Both brain DPD and PDE-4 activities, isolated by immunoprecipitation, were cyclic AMP-specific (KmcyclicAMP: approximately 5 microM for DPD; approximately 4 microM for PDE-4) and were inhibited by low rolipram concentrations (K1rolipram approximately 1 microM for both). Transient expression of DPD in COS-1 cells allowed identification of an approx. 64 kDa species which co-migrated on SDS/PAGE with the immunoreactive species identified in both brain cytosol and membrane fractions using the DPD/PDE-4-common antisera. The subunit size observed for PDE-4 (approx. 64 kDa) in brain membranes was similar to that predicted from the cDNA sequence, but that observed for DPD was approx. 4 kDa greater. Type-IV, rolipram-inhibited PDE activity was found in all brain regions except the pituitary, where it formed between 30 and 70% of the PDE activity in membrane and cytosolic fractions when assayed with 1 microM cyclic AMP, PDE-4 formed 40-50% of the membrane type-IV activity in all brain regions save the midbrain (approx. 20%). DPD distribution was highly restricted to certain regions, providing approx. 35% of the type-IV cytosolic activity in hippocampus and 13-21% in cortex, hypothalamus and striatum with no presence in brain stem, cerebellum, midbrain and pituitary. The combined type-IVB PDE activities of DPD and PDE-4 contributed approx. 10% of the total PDE activity in most brain regions except for the pituitary (zero) and the mid

  15. Domain decomposition for the SPN solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3 (R) code. (authors)

  16. A perspective on unstructured grid flow solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    This survey paper assesses the status of compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers on unstructured grids. Different spatial and temporal discretization options for steady and unsteady flows are discussed. The integration of these components into an overall framework to solve practical problems is addressed. Issues such as grid adaptation, higher order methods, hybrid discretizations and parallel computing are briefly discussed. Finally, some outstanding issues and future research directions are presented.

  17. Perfectly matched multiscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohu

    In this dissertation, the Perfectly Matched Multiscale Simulations (PMMS), a method of discrete-to-continuum multiscale scale computation is studied, revised and extended. In particular, the role of the Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) in PMMS is carefully studied. We show that instead of following the PML theory of continuum, the PML equations of motion in PMMS can be derived by stretching the inter-atomic equilibrium distance. As a result, the displacement solution in the PML region has the desired spatial damping property. It is also shown that the dispersion relationship in the PML region is different from the one in the original lattice. And a reflection coefficient is computed. We also incorporate the local Quasicontinuum (QC) theory with the cohesive Finite Element (FE) method to form a cohesive QC scheme which can deal with arbitrary discontinuities. This idea is built into the PMMS method to simulate a moving screw dislocation. The second part of the dissertation is to extend PMMS to finite temperature. A multiscale thermodynamics is proposed based on the idea of distributed coarse scale thermostats. Each coarse scale node is viewed as a thermostat and has part of atoms associated with it. The atomic motion at the fine scale level is governed by the Nose-Hoover dynamics. At the coarse scale, the expression of a coarse-grained Helmholtz free energy is derived and coupled thermo-mechanical equations are formulated based on it. With the proposed framework, the finite-temperature PMMS method is capable of simulating problems with drastic temperature change. Several numerical examples are computed to validate the method.

  18. Multiscale methods for nanoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, Kenny

    This project is presented in two sections. Two different multiscale models are developed in order to increase the computational speed of two well known atomistic algorithms, Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). In Section I, the MD method is introduced. Following this, a multiscale method of linking an MD simulation of heat conduction to a finite element (FE) simulation is presented. The method is simple to implement into a conventional MD code and is independent of the atomistic model employed. This bridge between the FE and MD simulations works by ensuring that energy is conserved across the FE/MD boundary. The multiscale simulation allows for the investigation of large systems which are beyond the range of MD. The method is tested extensively in the steady state and transient regimes, and is shown to agree with well with large scale MD and FE simulations. Furthermore, the method removes the artificial boundary effects due to the thermostats and hence allows exact temperatures and temperature gradients to be imposed on to an MD simulation. This allows for better study of temperature gradients on crystal defects etc.. In Section II, the KMC method is introduced. A continuum model for the KMC method is presented and compared to the standard KMC model of surface diffusion. This method replaces the many discrete back and forth atom jumps performed by a standard KMC algorithm with a single flux that can evolve in time. Elastic strain is then incorporated into both algorithms and used to simulate atom deposition upon a substrate by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. Quantum dot formation due to a mismatch in the lattice spacing between a substrate and a deposited film is readily observed in both models. Furthermore, by depositing alternating layers of substrate and deposit, self-organised quantum dot super-lattices are observed in both models..

  19. ADI Finite Difference Discretization of the Heston-Hull-White PDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haentjens, Tinne; Hout, Karel in't.

    2010-09-01

    This paper concerns the efficient numerical solution of the time-dependent, three-dimensional Heston-Hull-White PDE for the fair prices of European call options. The numerical solution method described in this paper consists of a finite difference discretization on non-uniform spatial grids followed by an Alternating Direction Implicit scheme for the time discretization and extends the method recently proved effective by In't Hout & Foulon (2010) for the simpler, two-dimensional Heston PDE.

  20. Phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B) regulates NLRP3 inflammasome in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Faiyaz; Chung, Youn Wook; Tang, Yan; Hockman, Steven C; Liu, Shiwei; Khan, Yusuf; Huo, Kevin; Billings, Eric; Amar, Marcelo J; Remaley, Alan T; Manganiello, Vincent C

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammation in white adipose tissue (WAT), includes infiltration/expansion of WAT macrophages, contributes pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. The inflammasome comprises an intracellular sensor (NLR), caspase-1 and the adaptor ASC. Inflammasome activation leads to maturation of caspase-1 and processing of IL1β, contributing to many metabolic disorders and directing adipocytes to a more insulin-resistant phenotype. Ablation of PDE3B in WAT prevents inflammasome activation by reducing expression of NLRP3, caspase-1, ASC, AIM2, TNFα, IL1β and proinflammatory genes. Following IP injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), serum levels of IL1β and TNFα were reduced in PDE3B(-/-)mice compared to WT. Activation of signaling cascades, which mediate inflammasome responses, were modulated in PDE3B(-/-)mice WAT, including smad, NFAT, NFkB, and MAP kinases. Moreover, expression of chemokine CCL2, MCP-1 and its receptor CCR2, which play an important role in macrophage chemotaxis, were reduced in WAT of PDE3B(-/-)mice. In addition, atherosclerotic plaque formation was significantly reduced in the aorta of apoE(-/-)/PDE3B(-/-)and LDL-R(-/-)/PDE3B(-/-)mice compared to apoE(-/-)and LDL-R(-/-)mice, respectively. Obesity-induced changes in serum-cholesterol were blocked in PDE3B(-/-)mice. Collectively, these data establish a role for PDE3B in modulating inflammatory response, which may contribute to a reduced inflammatory state in adipose tissue. PMID:27321128

  1. Retinitis pigmentosa: impact of different Pde6a point mutations on the disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Jiao, Kangwei; Buena-Atienza, Elena; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Trifunović, Dragana; Balendran, Sukirthini; Koepfli, Tanja; Mühlfriedel, Regine; Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Heckmann, Angelique; Beck, Susanne C; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wissinger, Bernd; Seeliger, Mathias W; Paquet-Durand, François

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the PDE6A gene can cause rod photoreceptors degeneration and the blinding disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP). While a number of pathogenic PDE6A mutations have been described, little is known about their impact on compound heterozygous situations and potential interactions of different disease-causing alleles. Here, we used a novel mouse model for the Pde6a R562W mutation in combination with an existing line carrying the V685M mutation to generate compound heterozygous Pde6a V685M/R562W animals, exactly homologous to a case of human RP. We compared the progression of photoreceptor degeneration in these compound heterozygous mice with the homozygous V685M and R562W mutants, and additionally with the D670G line that is known for a relatively mild phenotype. We investigated PDE6A expression, cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate accumulation, calpain and caspase activity, in vivo retinal function and morphology, as well as photoreceptor cell death and survival. This analysis confirms the severity of different Pde6a mutations and indicates that compound heterozygous mutants behave like intermediates of the respective homozygous situations. Specifically, the severity of the four different Pde6a situations may be categorized by the pace of photoreceptor degeneration: V685M (fastest) > V685M/R562W > R562W > D670G (slowest). While calpain activity was strongly increased in all four mutants, caspase activity was not. This points to the execution of non-apoptotic cell death and may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic interventions. For individual RP patients, our study may help to predict time-courses for Pde6a-related retinal degeneration and thereby facilitate the definition of a window-of-opportunity for clinical interventions. PMID:26188004

  2. Testosterone regulates smooth muscle contractile pathways in the rat prostate: emphasis on PDE5 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinhua; Zang, Ning; Wei, Yu; Yin, Jin; Teng, Ruobing; Seftel, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone (T) plays a permissive role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) have been found to be effective for BPH and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in clinical trials. This study investigated the effect of T on smooth muscle (SM) contractile and regulatory signaling pathways, including PDE5 expression and functional activity in prostate in male rats (sham-operated, surgically castrated, and castrated with T supplementation). In vitro organ bath studies, real-time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry were performed. Castration heavily attenuated contractility, including sensitivity to phenylephrine with SM myosin immunostaining revealing a disrupted SM cell arrangement in the stroma. PDE5 was immunolocalized exclusively in the prostate stroma, and orchiectomy signficantly reduced PDE5 immunopositivity, mRNA, and protein expression, along with nNOS and ROKβ mRNA, whereas it increased eNOS plus α1a and α1b adrenoreceptor expression in castrated animals. The PDE5i zaprinast significantly increased prostate strip relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in control but not castrated rats. But SNP alone was more effective on castrated rats, comparable with sham treated with SNP plus zaprinast. T supplementation prevented or restored all above changes, including SNP and zaprinast in vitro responsiveness. In conclusion, our data show that T positively regulates PDE5 expression and functional activities in prostate, and T ablation not only suppresses prostate size but also reduces prostatic SM contractility, with several potential SM contraction/relaxation pathways implicated. Zaprinast findings strongly suggest a major role for PDE5/cGMP in this signaling cascade. PDE5 inhibition may represent a novel mechanism for treatment of BPH. PMID:22028410

  3. Phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B) regulates NLRP3 inflammasome in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Faiyaz; Chung, Youn Wook; Tang, Yan; Hockman, Steven C.; Liu, Shiwei; Khan, Yusuf; Huo, Kevin; Billings, Eric; Amar, Marcelo J.; Remaley, Alan T.; Manganiello, Vincent C.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammation in white adipose tissue (WAT), includes infiltration/expansion of WAT macrophages, contributes pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. The inflammasome comprises an intracellular sensor (NLR), caspase-1 and the adaptor ASC. Inflammasome activation leads to maturation of caspase-1 and processing of IL1β, contributing to many metabolic disorders and directing adipocytes to a more insulin-resistant phenotype. Ablation of PDE3B in WAT prevents inflammasome activation by reducing expression of NLRP3, caspase-1, ASC, AIM2, TNFα, IL1β and proinflammatory genes. Following IP injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), serum levels of IL1β and TNFα were reduced in PDE3B−/−mice compared to WT. Activation of signaling cascades, which mediate inflammasome responses, were modulated in PDE3B−/−mice WAT, including smad, NFAT, NFkB, and MAP kinases. Moreover, expression of chemokine CCL2, MCP-1 and its receptor CCR2, which play an important role in macrophage chemotaxis, were reduced in WAT of PDE3B−/−mice. In addition, atherosclerotic plaque formation was significantly reduced in the aorta of apoE−/−/PDE3B−/−and LDL-R−/−/PDE3B−/−mice compared to apoE−/−and LDL-R−/−mice, respectively. Obesity-induced changes in serum-cholesterol were blocked in PDE3B−/−mice. Collectively, these data establish a role for PDE3B in modulating inflammatory response, which may contribute to a reduced inflammatory state in adipose tissue. PMID:27321128

  4. PDE3, but not PDE4, reduces β1- and β2-adrenoceptor-mediated inotropic and lusitropic effects in failing ventricle from metoprolol-treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Peter; Christ, Torsten; Hussain, Rizwan I; Engel, Andreas; Berk, Emanuel; Gillette, Katherine T; Chen, Lu; Galindo-Tovar, Alejandro; Krobert, Kurt A; Ravens, Ursula; Levy, Finn Olav; Kaumann, Alberto J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose PDE3 and/or PDE4 control ventricular effects of catecholamines in several species but their relative effects in failing human ventricle are unknown. We investigated whether the PDE3-selective inhibitor cilostamide (0.3–1 μM) or PDE4 inhibitor rolipram (1–10 μM) modified the positive inotropic and lusitropic effects of catecholamines in human failing myocardium. Experimental Approach Right and left ventricular trabeculae from freshly explanted hearts of 5 non-β-blocker-treated and 15 metoprolol-treated patients with terminal heart failure were paced to contract at 1 Hz. The effects of (-)-noradrenaline, mediated through β1 adrenoceptors (β2 adrenoceptors blocked with ICI118551), and (-)-adrenaline, mediated through β2 adrenoceptors (β1 adrenoceptors blocked with CGP20712A), were assessed in the absence and presence of PDE inhibitors. Catecholamine potencies were estimated from –logEC50s. Key Results Cilostamide did not significantly potentiate the inotropic effects of the catecholamines in non-β-blocker-treated patients. Cilostamide caused greater potentiation (P = 0.037) of the positive inotropic effects of (-)-adrenaline (0.78 ± 0.12 log units) than (-)-noradrenaline (0.47 ± 0.12 log units) in metoprolol-treated patients. Lusitropic effects of the catecholamines were also potentiated by cilostamide. Rolipram did not affect the inotropic and lusitropic potencies of (-)-noradrenaline or (-)-adrenaline on right and left ventricular trabeculae from metoprolol-treated patients. Conclusions and Implications Metoprolol induces a control by PDE3 of ventricular effects mediated through both β1 and β2 adrenoceptors, thereby further reducing sympathetic cardiostimulation in patients with terminal heart failure. Concurrent therapy with a PDE3 blocker and metoprolol could conceivably facilitate cardiostimulation evoked by adrenaline through β2 adrenoceptors. PDE4 does not appear to reduce inotropic and lusitropic effects of

  5. Zaprinast impairs spatial memory by increasing PDE5 expression in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Mauro; Pompili, Assunta; Cardarelli, Silvia; Castelli, Valentina; Biagioni, Stefano; Sancesario, Giuseppe; Gasbarri, Antonella

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we report the effect of post-training intraperitoneal administration of zaprinast on rat memory retention in the Morris water maze task that revealed a significant memory impairment at the intermediate dose of 10mg/kg. Zaprinast is capable of inhibiting both striatal and hippocampal PDE activity but to a different extent which is probably due to the different PDE isoforms expressed in these areas. To assess the possible involvement of cyclic nucleotides in rat memory impairment, we compared the effects obtained 30 min after the zaprinast injection with respect to 24h after injection by measuring both cyclic nucleotide levels and PDE activity. As expected, 30 min after the zaprinast administration, we observed an increase of cyclic nucleotides, which returned to a basal level within 24h, with the exception of the hippocampal cGMP which was significantly decreased at the dose of 10mg/kg of zaprinast. This increase in the hippocampal region is the result of a cGMP-specific PDE5 induction, confirmed by sildenafil inhibition, in agreement with literature data that demonstrate transcriptional regulation of PDE5 by cAMP/cGMP intracellular levels. Our results highlight the possible rebound effect of PDE inhibitors. PMID:25281278

  6. Engineered stabilization and structural analysis of the autoinhibited conformation of PDE4

    PubMed Central

    Cedervall, Peder; Aulabaugh, Ann; Geoghegan, Kieran F.; McLellan, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) is an essential contributor to intracellular signaling and an important drug target. The four members of this enzyme family (PDE4A to -D) are functional dimers in which each subunit contains two upstream conserved regions (UCR), UCR1 and -2, which precede the C-terminal catalytic domain. Alternative promoters, transcriptional start sites, and mRNA splicing lead to the existence of over 25 variants of PDE4, broadly classified as long, short, and supershort forms. We report the X-ray crystal structure of long form PDE4B containing UCR1, UCR2, and the catalytic domain, crystallized as a dimer in which a disulfide bond cross-links cysteines engineered into UCR2 and the catalytic domain. Biochemical and mass spectrometric analyses showed that the UCR2-catalytic domain interaction occurs in trans, and established that this interaction regulates the catalytic activity of PDE4. By elucidating the key structural determinants of dimerization, we show that only long forms of PDE4 can be regulated by this mechanism. The results also provide a structural basis for the long-standing observation of high- and low-affinity binding sites for the prototypic inhibitor rolipram. PMID:25775568

  7. Gain-scheduled controller synthesis for a nonlinear PDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi Hashemi, Seyed; Werner, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Linear parameter-varying (LPV) modelling and control of a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) is considered in this article. The one-dimensional viscous Burgers' equation is discretised using a finite difference scheme; the boundary conditions are taken as control inputs and the velocities at two grid points are assumed to be measurable. A nonlinear high-order state space model is generated and proper orthogonal decomposition is used for model order reduction. After assessing the accuracy of the reduced model, a low-order functional observer is designed to estimate the reduced states which are linear combinations of the velocities at all grid points. A discrete-time quasi-LPV model that is affine in scheduling parameters is derived based on the reduced model. A polytopic LPV controller is synthesised based on a generalised plant containing the LPV model and the functional observer. More generally, the proposed method can be used to design an LPV controller for a quasi-LPV system with non-measurable scheduling parameters. Simulation results demonstrate the high tracking performance and disturbance and measurement noise rejection capabilities of the designed LPV controller compared with a linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller based on a linearised model.

  8. Continuous Medial Representation of Brain Structures Using the Biharmonic PDE

    PubMed Central

    Yushkevich, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for constructing deformable continuous medial models for anatomical structures is presented. Medial models describe geometrical objects by first specifying the skeleton of the object and then deriving the boundary surface corresponding to the skeleton. However, an arbitrary specification of a skeleton will not be “Valid” unless a certain set of sufficient conditions is satisfied. The most challenging of these is the non-linear equality constraint that must hold along the boundaries of the manifolds forming the skeleton. The main contribution of this paper is to leverage the biharmonic partial differential equation as a mapping from a codimension-0 subset of Euclidean space to the space of skeletons that satisfy the equality constraint. The PDE supports robust numerical solution on freeform triangular meshes, providing additional flexibility for shape modeling. The approach is evaluated by generating continuous medial models for a large dataset of hippocampus shapes. Generalizations to modeling more complex shapes and to representing branching skeletons are demonstrated. PMID:19059348

  9. Data on the utilization of treatment modalities for ED in Taiwan in the era of PDE5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W-K; Jiann, B-P

    2014-01-01

    Oral PDE5 inhibitors, intracavernosal injection and penile implants are mainstay treatments for ED. Data on their utilization reflect economic aspects of ED, but are underreported. We report utilization data and user characteristics for these modalities in Taiwan between 1999 and 2011. Sales data on PDE5 inhibitors-sildenafil citrate, tadalafil and vardenafil and on alprostadil were retrieved from International Market Services Health, and on penile implants from the local importing company for them. Users' clinical characteristics were derived from one institution. Between 1999 and 2011, sales of PDE5 inhibitors increased 5.9-fold, whereas those of alprostadil and penile implants remained stable. Over 90% of PDE5 inhibitors were purchased in pharmacies without a prescription. Between 1999 and 2011, the number of patients who received PDE5 inhibitors (n=4715) exceeded those who underwent penile injection (n=333) and penile implantation (n=108). The mean age of patients with ED who first received PDE5 inhibitors tended to decrease over consecutive years. Discontinuation of treatment with PDE5 inhibitors or intracavernosal injection reached 90% within 3 years of treatment initiation. Our data on the increasing market for PDE5 inhibitors and the trend for first use of PDE5 inhibitors at younger ages highlight the growing burden of ED and the acceptance of PDE5 inhibitors as the primary treatment for ED. PMID:24451166

  10. MILAMIN 2 - Fast MATLAB FEM solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin; Krotkiewski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2013-04-01

    MILAMIN is a free and efficient MATLAB-based two-dimensional FEM solver utilizing unstructured meshes [Dabrowski et al., G-cubed (2008)]. The code consists of steady-state thermal diffusion and incompressible Stokes flow solvers implemented in approximately 200 lines of native MATLAB code. The brevity makes the code easily customizable. An important quality of MILAMIN is speed - it can handle millions of nodes within minutes on one CPU core of a standard desktop computer, and is faster than many commercial solutions. The new MILAMIN 2 allows three-dimensional modeling. It is designed as a set of functional modules that can be used as building blocks for efficient FEM simulations using MATLAB. The utilities are largely implemented as native MATLAB functions. For performance critical parts we use MUTILS - a suite of compiled MEX functions optimized for shared memory multi-core computers. The most important features of MILAMIN 2 are: 1. Modular approach to defining, tracking, and discretizing the geometry of the model 2. Interfaces to external mesh generators (e.g., Triangle, Fade2d, T3D) and mesh utilities (e.g., element type conversion, fast point location, boundary extraction) 3. Efficient computation of the stiffness matrix for a wide range of element types, anisotropic materials and three-dimensional problems 4. Fast global matrix assembly using a dedicated MEX function 5. Automatic integration rules 6. Flexible prescription (spatial, temporal, and field functions) and efficient application of Dirichlet, Neuman, and periodic boundary conditions 7. Treatment of transient and non-linear problems 8. Various iterative and multi-level solution strategies 9. Post-processing tools (e.g., numerical integration) 10. Visualization primitives using MATLAB, and VTK export functions We provide a large number of examples that show how to implement a custom FEM solver using the MILAMIN 2 framework. The examples are MATLAB scripts of increasing complexity that address a given

  11. Spectral solver for multi-scale plasma physics simulations with dynamically adaptive number of moments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Johnson, Alec; Peng, Ivy Bo; Laure, Erwin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    A spectral method for kinetic plasma simulations based on the expansion of the velocity distribution function in a variable number of Hermite polynomials is presented. The method is based on a set of non-linear equations that is solved to determine the coefficients of the Hermite expansion satisfying the Vlasov and Poisson equations. In this paper, we first show that this technique combines the fluid and kinetic approaches into one framework. Second, we present an adaptive strategy to increase and decrease the number of Hermite functions dynamically during the simulation. The technique is applied to the Landau damping and two-stream instabilitymore » test problems. Performance results show 21% and 47% saving of total simulation time in the Landau and two-stream instability test cases, respectively.« less

  12. Spectral solver for multi-scale plasma physics simulations with dynamically adaptive number of moments

    SciTech Connect

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Johnson, Alec; Peng, Ivy Bo; Laure, Erwin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    A spectral method for kinetic plasma simulations based on the expansion of the velocity distribution function in a variable number of Hermite polynomials is presented. The method is based on a set of non-linear equations that is solved to determine the coefficients of the Hermite expansion satisfying the Vlasov and Poisson equations. In this paper, we first show that this technique combines the fluid and kinetic approaches into one framework. Second, we present an adaptive strategy to increase and decrease the number of Hermite functions dynamically during the simulation. The technique is applied to the Landau damping and two-stream instability test problems. Performance results show 21% and 47% saving of total simulation time in the Landau and two-stream instability test cases, respectively.

  13. Multiscale modeling of chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, John C.

    Chalcogenide glasses exhibit unique properties applicable to a wide range of fields, including electrical and optical switching and the transmission of infrared radiation. In this thesis, we adopt a hierarchical multiscale modeling approach to investigate the fundamental physics of chalcogenide systems. Our multiscale modeling begins in Part I at the quantum mechanical level, where we use the highly accurate Moller-Plesset perturbation technique to derive interaction potentials for elemental and heterogeneous chalcogenide systems. The resulting potentials consist of two-, three-, and effective four-body terms. In Part II, we use these ab initio potentials in classical Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the structure of chalcogenide glasses. We discuss our simulation results in relation to the Phillips model of topological constraints, which predicts critical behavior in chalcogenide systems as a function of average coordination number. Finally, in Part III we address the issue of glass transition range behavior. After reviewing previous models of the glass transition, we derive a new model based on nonequilibrium statistical mechanics and an energy landscape formalism. The new model requires as input a description of inherent structure energies and the transition energies between these structures. To address this issue, we derive an eigenvector-following technique for mapping a multidimensional potential energy landscape. This technique is then extended for application to enthalpy landscapes. Our model will enable the first-ever calculation of glass transition behavior based on only ab initio physics.

  14. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  15. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  16. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  17. Multiscale Cloud System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Moncrieff, Mitchell W.

    2009-01-01

    The central theme of this paper is to describe how cloud system resolving models (CRMs) of grid spacing approximately 1 km have been applied to various important problems in atmospheric science across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales and how these applications relate to other modeling approaches. A long-standing problem concerns the representation of organized precipitating convective cloud systems in weather and climate models. Since CRMs resolve the mesoscale to large scales of motion (i.e., 10 km to global) they explicitly address the cloud system problem. By explicitly representing organized convection, CRMs bypass restrictive assumptions associated with convective parameterization such as the scale gap between cumulus and large-scale motion. Dynamical models provide insight into the physical mechanisms involved with scale interaction and convective organization. Multiscale CRMs simulate convective cloud systems in computational domains up to global and have been applied in place of contemporary convective parameterizations in global models. Multiscale CRMs pose a new challenge for model validation, which is met in an integrated approach involving CRMs, operational prediction systems, observational measurements, and dynamical models in a new international project: the Year of Tropical Convection, which has an emphasis on organized tropical convection and its global effects.

  18. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Petsev, Nikolai D; Leal, L Gary; Shell, M Scott

    2016-02-28

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales. PMID:26931689

  19. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-02-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales.

  20. Approximate Riemann solvers for the Godunov SPH (GSPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Kunal; Ramachandran, Prabhu

    2014-08-01

    The Godunov Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (GSPH) method is coupled with non-iterative, approximate Riemann solvers for solutions to the compressible Euler equations. The use of approximate solvers avoids the expensive solution of the non-linear Riemann problem for every interacting particle pair, as required by GSPH. In addition, we establish an equivalence between the dissipative terms of GSPH and the signal based SPH artificial viscosity, under the restriction of a class of approximate Riemann solvers. This equivalence is used to explain the anomalous “wall heating” experienced by GSPH and we provide some suggestions to overcome it. Numerical tests in one and two dimensions are used to validate the proposed Riemann solvers. A general SPH pairing instability is observed for two-dimensional problems when using unequal mass particles. In general, Ducowicz Roe's and HLLC approximate Riemann solvers are found to be suitable replacements for the iterative Riemann solver in the original GSPH scheme.

  1. Development of a series of novel carbon-11 labeled PDE10A inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Vladimir; Miura, Shotaro; Takano, Akihiro; Amini, Nahid; Nakao, Ryuji; Hasui, Tomoaki; Nakashima, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Takahiko; Kimura, Haruhide; Kuroita, Takanobu; Halldin, Christer

    2015-05-15

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is a member of the PDE family of enzymes that degrades cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Our aim was to label a series of structurally related PDE10A inhibitors with carbon-11 and evaluate them as potential positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for PDE10A using nonhuman primates. The series consisted of seven compounds based on the 3-(1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridazin-4(1H)-one backbone. These compounds were selected from the initial larger library based on a number of parameters such as affinity, selectivity for hPDE10A in in vitro tests, lipophilicity, and on the results of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1)-LLCPK1 and the parallel artificial membrane permeability assays. Seven radioligands (KIT-1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 12) were radiolabeled with carbon-11 employing O-methylation on the hydroxyl moiety using [(11)C]methyl triflate. In vivo examination of each radioligand was performed using PET in rhesus monkeys; analysis of radiometabolites in plasma also was conducted using HPLC. All seven radioligands were labeled with high (>90%) incorporation of [(11)C]methyl triflate into their appropriate precursors and with high specific radioactivity. Carbon-11 labeled KIT-5 and KIT-6 showed high accumulation in the striatum, consistent with the known anatomical distribution of PDE10A in brain, accompanied by fast washout and high specific binding ratio. In particular [(11)C]KIT-6, named [(11)C]T-773, is a promising PET tool for further examination of PDE10A in human brain. PMID:25891816

  2. PDE5 inhibitors as therapeutics for heart disease, diabetes and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anindita; Durrant, David; Salloum, Fadi N; Xi, Lei; Kukreja, Rakesh C

    2015-01-01

    The phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, including sildenafil (Viagra™), vardenafil (Levitra™), and tadalafil (Cialis™) have been developed for treatment of erectile dysfunction. Moreover, sildenafil and tadalafil are used for the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients. Since our first report showing the cardioprotective effect of sildenafil in 2002, there has been tremendous growth of preclinical and clinical studies on the use of PDE5 inhibitors for cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Numerous animal studies have demonstrated that PDE5 inhibitors have powerful protective effect against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, doxorubicin cardiotoxicity, ischemic and diabetic cardiomyopathy, cardiac hypertrophy, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the improvement stem cell efficacy for myocardial repair. Mechanistically, PDE5 inhibitors protect the heart against I/R injury through increased expression of nitric oxide synthases, activation of protein kinase G (PKG), PKG-dependent hydrogen sulfide generation, and phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β - a master switch immediately proximal to mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the end effector of cardioprotection. In addition, PDE5 inhibitors enhance the sensitivity of certain types of cancer to standard chemotherapeutic drugs, including doxorubicin. Many clinical trials with PDE5 inhibitors have focused on the potential cardiovascular and cancer benefits. Despite mixed results of these clinical trials, there is continuing strong interest by basic scientists and clinical investigators in exploring their new clinical uses. It is our hope that future new mechanistic investigations and carefully designed clinical trials would help in reaping additional benefits of PDE5 inhibitors for cardiovascular disease and cancer in patients. PMID:25444755

  3. Performance of distributed multiscale simulations

    PubMed Central

    Borgdorff, J.; Ben Belgacem, M.; Bona-Casas, C.; Fazendeiro, L.; Groen, D.; Hoenen, O.; Mizeranschi, A.; Suter, J. L.; Coster, D.; Coveney, P. V.; Dubitzky, W.; Hoekstra, A. G.; Strand, P.; Chopard, B.

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale simulations model phenomena across natural scales using monolithic or component-based code, running on local or distributed resources. In this work, we investigate the performance of distributed multiscale computing of component-based models, guided by six multiscale applications with different characteristics and from several disciplines. Three modes of distributed multiscale computing are identified: supplementing local dependencies with large-scale resources, load distribution over multiple resources, and load balancing of small- and large-scale resources. We find that the first mode has the apparent benefit of increasing simulation speed, and the second mode can increase simulation speed if local resources are limited. Depending on resource reservation and model coupling topology, the third mode may result in a reduction of resource consumption. PMID:24982258

  4. Robust parallel iterative solvers for linear and least-squares problems, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, Yousef

    2014-01-16

    The primary goal of this project is to study and develop robust iterative methods for solving linear systems of equations and least squares systems. The focus of the Minnesota team is on algorithms development, robustness issues, and on tests and validation of the methods on realistic problems. 1. The project begun with an investigation on how to practically update a preconditioner obtained from an ILU-type factorization, when the coefficient matrix changes. 2. We investigated strategies to improve robustness in parallel preconditioners in a specific case of a PDE with discontinuous coefficients. 3. We explored ways to adapt standard preconditioners for solving linear systems arising from the Helmholtz equation. These are often difficult linear systems to solve by iterative methods. 4. We have also worked on purely theoretical issues related to the analysis of Krylov subspace methods for linear systems. 5. We developed an effective strategy for performing ILU factorizations for the case when the matrix is highly indefinite. The strategy uses shifting in some optimal way. The method was extended to the solution of Helmholtz equations by using complex shifts, yielding very good results in many cases. 6. We addressed the difficult problem of preconditioning sparse systems of equations on GPUs. 7. A by-product of the above work is a software package consisting of an iterative solver library for GPUs based on CUDA. This was made publicly available. It was the first such library that offers complete iterative solvers for GPUs. 8. We considered another form of ILU which blends coarsening techniques from Multigrid with algebraic multilevel methods. 9. We have released a new version on our parallel solver - called pARMS [new version is version 3]. As part of this we have tested the code in complex settings - including the solution of Maxwell and Helmholtz equations and for a problem of crystal growth.10. As an application of polynomial preconditioning we considered the

  5. DPS--a computerised diagnostic problem solver.

    PubMed

    Bartos, P; Gyárfas, F; Popper, M

    1982-01-01

    The paper contains a short description of the DPS system which is a computerized diagnostic problem solver. The system is under development of the Research Institute of Medical Bionics in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia. Its underlying philosophy yields from viewing the diagnostic process as process of cognitive problem solving. The implementation of the system is based on the methods of Artificial Intelligence and utilisation of production systems and frame theory should be noted in this context. Finally a list of program modules and their characterisation is presented. PMID:6811229

  6. Updates to the NEQAIR Radiation Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    The NEQAIR code is one of the original heritage solvers for radiative heating prediction in aerothermal environments, and is still used today for mission design purposes. This paper discusses the implementation of the first major revision to the NEQAIR code in the last five years, NEQAIR v14.0. The most notable features of NEQAIR v14.0 are the parallelization of the radiation computation, reducing runtimes by about 30×, and the inclusion of mid-wave CO2 infrared radiation.

  7. Input-output-controlled nonlinear equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    To upgrade the efficiency and stability of the successive substitution (SS) and Newton-Raphson (NR) schemes, the concept of input-output-controlled solvers (IOCS) is introduced. By employing the formal properties of the constrained version of the SS and NR schemes, the IOCS algorithm can handle indefiniteness of the system Jacobian, can maintain iterate monotonicity, and provide for separate control of load incrementation and iterate excursions, as well as having other features. To illustrate the algorithmic properties, the results for several benchmark examples are presented. These define the associated numerical efficiency and stability of the IOCS.

  8. A new efficient formulation of the HLLEM Riemann solver for general conservative and non-conservative hyperbolic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbser, Michael; Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a new, simple and universal formulation of the HLLEM Riemann solver (RS) is proposed that works for general conservative and non-conservative systems of hyperbolic equations. For non-conservative PDE, a path-conservative formulation of the HLLEM RS is presented for the first time in this paper. The HLLEM Riemann solver is built on top of a novel and very robust path-conservative HLL method. It thus naturally inherits the positivity properties and the entropy enforcement of the underlying HLL scheme. However, with just the slight additional cost of evaluating eigenvectors and eigenvalues of intermediate characteristic fields, we can represent linearly degenerate intermediate waves with a minimum of smearing. For conservative systems, our paper provides the easiest and most seamless path for taking a pre-existing HLL RS and quickly and effortlessly converting it to a RS that provides improved results, comparable with those of an HLLC, HLLD, Osher or Roe-type RS. This is done with minimal additional computational complexity, making our variant of the HLLEM RS also a very fast RS that can accurately represent linearly degenerate discontinuities. Our present HLLEM RS also transparently extends these advantages to non-conservative systems. For shallow water-type systems, the resulting method is proven to be well-balanced. Several test problems are presented for shallow water-type equations and two-phase flow models, as well as for gas dynamics with real equation of state, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD & RMHD), and nonlinear elasticity. Since our new formulation accommodates multiple intermediate waves and has a broader applicability than the original HLLEM method, it could alternatively be called the HLLI Riemann solver, where the "I" stands for the intermediate characteristic fields that can be accounted for.

  9. The Magnetospheric Multiscale Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooley, C. R.; Black, R. K.; Robertson, B. P.; Stone, J. M.; Pope, S. E.; Davis, G. T.

    2016-03-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is the fourth mission of the Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The MMS mission was launched on March 12, 2015. The MMS mission consists of four identically instrumented spin-stabilized observatories which are flown in formation to perform the first definitive study of magnetic reconnection in space. The MMS mission was presented with numerous technical challenges, including the simultaneous construction and launch of four identical large spacecraft with 100 instruments total, stringent electromagnetic cleanliness requirements, closed-loop precision maneuvering and pointing of spinning flexible spacecraft, on-board GPS based orbit determination far above the GPS constellation, and a flight dynamics design that enables formation flying with separation distances as small as 10 km. This paper describes the overall mission design and presents an overview of the design, testing, and early on-orbit operation of the spacecraft systems and instrument suite.

  10. MULTISCALE THERMOHYDROLOGIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    T.A. Buscheck

    2001-12-21

    The purpose of the Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model (MSTHM) is to describe the thermohydrologic evolution of the near-field environment (NFE) and engineered barrier system (EBS) throughout the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain for a particular engineering design (CRWMS M&O 2000c). The process-level model will provide thermohydrologic (TH) information and data (such as in-drift temperature, relative humidity, liquid saturation, etc.) for use in other technical products. This data is provided throughout the entire repository area as a function of time. The MSTHM couples the Smeared-heat-source Drift-scale Thermal-conduction (SDT), Line-average-heat-source Drift-scale Thermohydrologic (LDTH), Discrete-heat-source Drift-scale Thermal-conduction (DDT), and Smeared-heat-source Mountain-scale Thermal-conduction (SMT) submodels such that the flow of water and water vapor through partially-saturated fractured rock is considered. The MSTHM accounts for 3-D drift-scale and mountain-scale heat flow, repository-scale variability of stratigraphy and infiltration flux, and waste package (WP)-to-WP variability in heat output from WPs. All submodels use the nonisothermal unsaturated-saturated flow and transport (NUFT) simulation code. The MSTHM is implemented in several data-processing steps. The four major steps are: (1) submodel input-file preparation, (2) execution of the four submodel families with the use of the NUFT code, (3) execution of the multiscale thermohydrologic abstraction code (MSTHAC), and (4) binning and post-processing (i.e., graphics preparation) of the output from MSTHAC. Section 6 describes the MSTHM in detail. The objectives of this Analyses and Model Report (AMR) are to investigate near field (NF) and EBS thermohydrologic environments throughout the repository area at various evolution periods, and to provide TH data that may be used in other process model reports.

  11. On the relationship between ODE solvers and iterative solvers for linear equations

    SciTech Connect

    Lorber, A.; Joubert, W.; Carey, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    The connection between the solution of linear systems of equations by both iterative methods and explicit time stepping techniques is investigated. Based on the similarities, a suite of Runge-Kutta time integration schemes with extended stability domains are developed using Chebyshev iteration polynomials. These Runge-Kutta schemes are applied to linear and non-linear systems arising from the numerical solution of PDE`s containing either physical or artificial transient terms. Specifically, the solutions of model linear convection and convection-diffusion equations are presented, as well as the solution of a representative non-linear Navier-Stokes fluid flow problem. Included are results of parallel computations.

  12. Inactivation of Pde8b enhances memory, motor performance, and protects against age-induced motor coordination decay

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Li-Chun Lisa; Chan, Guy Chiu-Kai; Nangle, Shannon N.; Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Jones, Graham; Storm, Daniel R.; Beavo, Joseph A.; Zweifel, Larry S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are critical regulatory enzymes in cyclic nucleotide signaling. PDEs have diverse expression patterns within the central nervous system (CNS), show differing affinities for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and regulate a vast array of behaviors. Here, we investigated the expression profile of the PDE8 gene family members Pde8a and Pde8b in the mouse brain. We find that Pde8a expression is largely absent in the CNS; by contrast, Pde8b is expressed in select regions of the hippocampus, ventral striatum, and cerebellum. Behavioral analysis of mice with Pde8b gene inactivation (PDE8B KO) demonstrate an enhancement in contextual fear, spatial memory, performance in an appetitive instrumental conditioning task, motor-coordination, and have an attenuation of age-induced motor coordination decline. In addition to improvements observed in select behaviors, we find basal anxiety levels to be increased in PDE8B KO mice. These findings indicate that selective antagonism of PDE8B may be an attractive target for enhancement of cognitive and motor functions; however, possible alterations in affective state will need to be weighed against potential therapeutic value. PMID:22925203

  13. Comparison of electromagnetic solvers for antennas mounted on vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocker, M. S. L.; Hipp, S.; Spinnler, F.; Tazi, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2015-11-01

    An electromagnetic solver comparison for various use cases of antennas mounted on vehicles is presented. For this purpose, several modeling approaches, called transient, frequency and integral solver, including the features fast resonant method and autoregressive filter, offered by CST MWS, are investigated. The solvers and methods are compared for a roof antenna itself, a simplified vehicle, a roof including a panorama window and a combination of antenna and vehicle. With these examples, the influence of different materials, data formats and parameters such as size and complexity are investigated. Also, the necessary configurations for the mesh and the solvers are described.

  14. Frequency-domain elastic full-waveform multiscale inversion method based on dual-level parallelism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Zhen-Chun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-12-01

    The complexity of an elastic wavefield increases the nonlinearity of inversion. To some extent, multiscale inversion decreases the nonlinearity of inversion and prevents it from falling into local extremes. A multiscale strategy based on the simultaneous use of frequency groups and layer stripping method based on damped wave field improves the stability of inversion. A dual-level parallel algorithm is then used to decrease the computational cost and improve practicability. The seismic wave modeling of a single frequency and inversion in a frequency group are computed in parallel by multiple nodes based on multifrontal massively parallel sparse direct solver and MPI. Numerical tests using an overthrust model show that the proposed inversion algorithm can effectively improve the stability and accuracy of inversion by selecting the appropriate inversion frequency and damping factor in lowfrequency seismic data.

  15. Evaluation of convergence behavior of metamodeling techniques for bridging scales in multi-scale multimaterial simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Oishik; Davis, Sean; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Udaykumar, H.S.

    2015-08-01

    The effectiveness of several metamodeling techniques, viz. the Polynomial Stochastic Collocation method, Adaptive Stochastic Collocation method, a Radial Basis Function Neural Network, a Kriging Method and a Dynamic Kriging Method is evaluated. This is done with the express purpose of using metamodels to bridge scales between micro- and macro-scale models in a multi-scale multimaterial simulation. The rate of convergence of the error when used to reconstruct hypersurfaces of known functions is studied. For sufficiently large number of training points, Stochastic Collocation methods generally converge faster than the other metamodeling techniques, while the DKG method converges faster when the number of input points is less than 100 in a two-dimensional parameter space. Because the input points correspond to computationally expensive micro/meso-scale computations, the DKG is favored for bridging scales in a multi-scale solver.

  16. A multiphysics and multiscale software environment for modeling astrophysical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portegies Zwart, Simon; McMillan, Steve; Harfst, Stefan; Groen, Derek; Fujii, Michiko; Nualláin, Breanndán Ó.; Glebbeek, Evert; Heggie, Douglas; Lombardi, James; Hut, Piet; Angelou, Vangelis; Banerjee, Sambaran; Belkus, Houria; Fragos, Tassos; Fregeau, John; Gaburov, Evghenii; Izzard, Rob; Jurić, Mario; Justham, Stephen; Sottoriva, Andrea; Teuben, Peter; van Bever, Joris; Yaron, Ofer; Zemp, Marcel

    2009-05-01

    We present MUSE, a software framework for combining existing computational tools for different astrophysical domains into a single multiphysics, multiscale application. MUSE facilitates the coupling of existing codes written in different languages by providing inter-language tools and by specifying an interface between each module and the framework that represents a balance between generality and computational efficiency. This approach allows scientists to use combinations of codes to solve highly coupled problems without the need to write new codes for other domains or significantly alter their existing codes. MUSE currently incorporates the domains of stellar dynamics, stellar evolution and stellar hydrodynamics for studying generalized stellar systems. We have now reached a "Noah's Ark" milestone, with (at least) two available numerical solvers for each domain. MUSE can treat multiscale and multiphysics systems in which the time- and size-scales are well separated, like simulating the evolution of planetary systems, small stellar associations, dense stellar clusters, galaxies and galactic nuclei. In this paper we describe three examples calculated using MUSE: the merger of two galaxies, the merger of two evolving stars, and a hybrid N-body simulation. In addition, we demonstrate an implementation of MUSE on a distributed computer which may also include special-purpose hardware, such as GRAPEs or GPUs, to accelerate computations. The current MUSE code base is publicly available as open source at http://muse.li.

  17. Atomistic hybrid DSMC/NEMD method for nonequilibrium multiscale simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Kai; Watkins, Charles B. Koplik, Joel

    2010-03-01

    A multiscale hybrid method for coupling the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) method is introduced. The method addresses Knudsen layer type gas flows within a few mean free paths of an interface or about an object with dimensions of the order of a few mean free paths. It employs the NEMD method to resolve nanoscale phenomena closest to the interface along with coupled DSMC simulation of the remainder of the Knudsen layer. The hybrid DSMC/NEMD method is a particle based algorithm without a buffer zone. It incorporates a new, modified generalized soft sphere (MGSS) molecular collision model to improve the poor computational efficiency of the traditional generalized soft sphere GSS model and to achieve DSMC compatibility with Lennard-Jones NEMD molecular interactions. An equilibrium gas, a Fourier thermal flow, and an oscillatory Couette flow, are simulated to validate the method. The method shows good agreement with Maxwell-Boltzmann theory for the equilibrium system, Chapman-Enskog theory for Fourier flow, and pure DSMC simulations for oscillatory Couette flow. Speedup in CPU time of the hybrid solver is benchmarked against a pure NEMD solver baseline for different system sizes and solver domain partitions. Finally, the hybrid method is applied to investigate interaction of argon gas with solid surface molecules in a parametric study of the influence of wetting effects and solid molecular mass on energy transfer and thermal accommodation coefficients. It is determined that wetting effect strength and solid molecular mass have a significant impact on the energy transfer between gas and solid phases and thermal accommodation coefficient.

  18. Using the scalable nonlinear equations solvers package

    SciTech Connect

    Gropp, W.D.; McInnes, L.C.; Smith, B.F.

    1995-02-01

    SNES (Scalable Nonlinear Equations Solvers) is a software package for the numerical solution of large-scale systems of nonlinear equations on both uniprocessors and parallel architectures. SNES also contains a component for the solution of unconstrained minimization problems, called SUMS (Scalable Unconstrained Minimization Solvers). Newton-like methods, which are known for their efficiency and robustness, constitute the core of the package. As part of the multilevel PETSc library, SNES incorporates many features and options from other parts of PETSc. In keeping with the spirit of the PETSc library, the nonlinear solution routines are data-structure-neutral, making them flexible and easily extensible. This users guide contains a detailed description of uniprocessor usage of SNES, with some added comments regarding multiprocessor usage. At this time the parallel version is undergoing refinement and extension, as we work toward a common interface for the uniprocessor and parallel cases. Thus, forthcoming versions of the software will contain additional features, and changes to parallel interface may result at any time. The new parallel version will employ the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard for interprocessor communication. Since most of these details will be hidden, users will need to perform only minimal message-passing programming.

  19. On code verification of RANS solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eça, L.; Klaij, C. M.; Vaz, G.; Hoekstra, M.; Pereira, F. S.

    2016-04-01

    This article discusses Code Verification of Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers that rely on face based finite volume discretizations for volumes of arbitrary shape. The study includes test cases with known analytical solutions (generated with the method of manufactured solutions) corresponding to laminar and turbulent flow, with the latter using eddy-viscosity turbulence models. The procedure to perform Code Verification based on grid refinement studies is discussed and the requirements for its correct application are illustrated in a simple one-dimensional problem. It is shown that geometrically similar grids are recommended for proper Code Verification and so the data should not have scatter making the use of least square fits unnecessary. Results show that it may be advantageous to determine the extrapolated error to cell size/time step zero instead of assuming that it is zero, especially when it is hard to determine the asymptotic order of grid convergence. In the RANS examples, several of the features of the ReFRESCO solver are checked including the effects of the available turbulence models in the convergence properties of the code. It is shown that it is required to account for non-orthogonality effects in the discretization of the diffusion terms and that the turbulence quantities transport equations can deteriorate the order of grid convergence of mean flow quantities.

  20. Identification of novel mutations confirms PDE4D as a major gene causing acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Danielle C; Dyment, David A; Huang, Lijia; Nikkel, Sarah M; Lacombe, Didier; Campeau, Philippe M; Lee, Brendan; Bacino, Carlos A; Michaud, Jacques L; Bernier, Francois P; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Innes, A Micheil

    2013-01-01

    Acrodysostosis is characterized by nasal hypoplasia, peripheral dysostosis, variable short stature, and intellectual impairment. Recently, mutations in PRKAR1A were reported in patients with acrodysostosis and hormone resistance. Subsequently, mutations in a phosphodiesterase gene (PDE4D) were identified in seven sporadic cases. We sequenced PDE4D in seven acrodysostosis patients from five families. Missense mutations were identified in all cases. Families showed de novo inheritance except one family with three affected children whose father was subsequently found to have subtle features of acrodysostosis. There were no recurrent mutations. Short stature and endocrine resistance are rare in this series; however, cognitive involvement and obesity were frequent. This last finding is relevant given PDE4D is insulin responsive and potentially involved in lipolysis. PDE4D encodes a cyclic AMP regulator and places PDE4D-related acrodysostosis within the same family of diseases as pseudohypoparathyroidism, pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism, PRKAR1A-related acrodysostosis and brachydactyly-mental retardation syndrome; all characterized by cognitive impairment and short distal extremities. PMID:23033274

  1. Protein-protein interactions of PDE4 family members - Functions, interactions and therapeutic value.

    PubMed

    Klussmann, Enno

    2016-07-01

    The second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is ubiquitous and directs a plethora of functions in all cells. Although theoretically freely diffusible through the cell from the site of its synthesis it is not evenly distributed. It rather is shaped into gradients and these gradients are established by phospodiesterases (PDEs), the only enzymes that hydrolyse cAMP and thereby terminate cAMP signalling upstream of cAMP's effector systems. Miles D. Houslay has devoted most of his scientific life highly successfully to a particular family of PDEs, the PDE4 family. The family is encoded by four genes and gives rise to around 20 enzymes, all with different functions. M. Houslay has discovered many of these functions and realised early on that PDE4 family enzymes are attractive drug targets in a variety of human diseases, but not their catalytic activity as that is encoded in conserved domains in all family members. He postulated that targeting the intracellular location would provide the specificity that modern innovative drugs require to improve disease conditions with fewer side effects than conventional drugs. Due to the wealth of M. Houslay's work, this article can only summarize some of his discoveries and, therefore, focuses on protein-protein interactions of PDE4. The aim is to discuss functions of selected protein-protein interactions and peptide spot technology, which M. Houslay introduced into the PDE4 field for identifying interacting domains. The therapeutic potential of PDE4 interactions will also be discussed. PMID:26498857

  2. Molecular mechanisms that could contribute to prolonged effectiveness of PDE5 inhibitors to improve erectile function.

    PubMed

    Francis, S H; Morris, G Z; Corbin, J D

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in penile vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) plays a key role in promoting penile erection. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) in VSMC breaks down cGMP to counter this effect. Sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra) and tadalafil (Cialis), treatments for erectile dysfunction, inhibit PDE5 action. Many men with erectile dysfunction have improved erectile function after plasma inhibitor concentration falls below therapeutic levels. Maximum effect plus onset and duration of action of inhibitor determines its efficacy. The rate and extent of cellular drug accumulation and efflux of drug from smooth muscle cells plus persistence of drug effects in these cell impact these parameters. We propose possible molecular mechanisms that could account for prolonged action of PDE5 inhibitors including (1) persistence of biochemical effects after inhibitor is cleared from cells, and (2) retention of drug in VSMC beyond plasma clearance. PMID:18418391

  3. A PDE Pricing Framework for Cross-Currency Interest Rate Derivatives with Target Redemption Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christara, Christina C.; Minh Dang, Duy; Jackson, Kenneth R.; Lakhany, Asif

    2010-09-01

    We propose a general framework for efficient pricing via a partial differential equation (PDE) approach for exotic cross-currency interest rate (IR) derivatives, with strong emphasis on long-dated foreign exchange (FX) IR hybrids, namely Power Reverse Dual Currency (PRDC) swaps with a FX Target Redemption (FX-TARN) provision. The FX-TARN provision provides a cap on the FX-linked PRDC coupon amounts, and once the accumulated coupon amount reaches this cap, the underlying PRDC swap terminates. Our PDE pricing framework is based on an auxiliary state variable to keep track of the total accumulated PRDC coupon amount. Finite differences on uniform grids and the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) method are used for the spatial and time discretizations, respectively, of the model-dependent PDE corresponding to each discretized value of the auxiliary variable. Numerical examples illustrating the convergence properties of the numerical methods are provided.

  4. Regulation of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2 (SERCA2) Activity by Phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A) in Human Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Faiyaz; Shen, Weixing; Vandeput, Fabrice; Szabo-Fresnais, Nicolas; Krall, Judith; Degerman, Eva; Goetz, Frank; Klussmann, Enno; Movsesian, Matthew; Manganiello, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3) regulates cAMP-mediated signaling in the heart, and PDE3 inhibitors augment contractility in patients with heart failure. Studies in mice showed that PDE3A, not PDE3B, is the subfamily responsible for these inotropic effects and that murine PDE3A1 associates with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2 (SERCA2), phospholamban (PLB), and AKAP18 in a multiprotein signalosome in human sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that PDE3A co-localizes in Z-bands of human cardiac myocytes with desmin, SERCA2, PLB, and AKAP18. In human SR fractions, cAMP increased PLB phosphorylation and SERCA2 activity; this was potentiated by PDE3 inhibition but not by PDE4 inhibition. During gel filtration chromatography of solubilized SR membranes, PDE3 activity was recovered in distinct high molecular weight (HMW) and low molecular weight (LMW) peaks. HMW peaks contained PDE3A1 and PDE3A2, whereas LMW peaks contained PDE3A1, PDE3A2, and PDE3A3. Western blotting showed that endogenous HMW PDE3A1 was the principal PKA-phosphorylated isoform. Phosphorylation of endogenous PDE3A by rPKAc increased cAMP-hydrolytic activity, correlated with shift of PDE3A from LMW to HMW peaks, and increased co-immunoprecipitation of SERCA2, cav3, PKA regulatory subunit (PKARII), PP2A, and AKAP18 with PDE3A. In experiments with recombinant proteins, phosphorylation of recombinant human PDE3A isoforms by recombinant PKA catalytic subunit increased co-immunoprecipitation with rSERCA2 and rat rAKAP18 (recombinant AKAP18). Deletion of the recombinant human PDE3A1/PDE3A2 N terminus blocked interactions with recombinant SERCA2. Serine-to-alanine substitutions identified Ser-292/Ser-293, a site unique to human PDE3A1, as the principal site regulating its interaction with SERCA2. These results indicate that phosphorylation of human PDE3A1 at a PKA site in its unique N-terminal extension promotes its incorporation into SERCA2/AKAP18

  5. Multiscale full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Trampert, Jeannot; Cupillard, Paul; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay; Capdeville, Yann; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We develop and apply a full waveform inversion method that incorporates seismic data on a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, thereby constraining the details of both crustal and upper-mantle structure. This is intended to further our understanding of crust-mantle interactions that shape the nature of plate tectonics, and to be a step towards improved tomographic models of strongly scale-dependent earth properties, such as attenuation and anisotropy. The inversion for detailed regional earth structure consistently embedded within a large-scale model requires locally refined numerical meshes that allow us to (1) model regional wave propagation at high frequencies, and (2) capture the inferred fine-scale heterogeneities. The smallest local grid spacing sets the upper bound of the largest possible time step used to iteratively advance the seismic wave field. This limitation leads to extreme computational costs in the presence of fine-scale structure, and it inhibits the construction of full waveform tomographic models that describe earth structure on multiple scales. To reduce computational requirements to a feasible level, we design a multigrid approach based on the decomposition of a multiscale earth model with widely varying grid spacings into a family of single-scale models where the grid spacing is approximately uniform. Each of the single-scale models contains a tractable number of grid points, which ensures computational efficiency. The multi-to-single-scale decomposition is the foundation of iterative, gradient-based optimization schemes that simultaneously and consistently invert data on all scales for one multi-scale model. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in a full waveform inversion for Eurasia, with a special focus on Anatolia where coverage is particularly dense. Continental-scale structure is constrained by complete seismic waveforms in the 30-200 s period range. In addition to the well-known structural elements of the Eurasian mantle

  6. Functional Analysis of a c-di-AMP-specific Phosphodiesterase MsPDE from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing; Luo, Yunchao; Zheng, Cao; Yin, Kang; Ali, Maria Kanwal; Li, Xinfeng; He, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di‑AMP (c-di-AMP) is a second signaling molecule involved in the regulation of bacterial physiological processes and interaction between pathogen and host. However, the regulatory network mediated by c-di-AMP in Mycobacterium remains obscure. In M. smegmatis, a diadenylate cyclase (DAC) was reported recently, but there is still no investigation on c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase (PDE). Here, we provide a systematic study on signaling mechanism of c-di-AMP PDE in M. smegmatis. Based on our enzymatic analysis, MsPDE (MSMEG_2630), which contained a DHH-DHHA1 domain, displayed a 200-fold higher hydrolytic efficiency (kcat/Km) to c-di-AMP than to c-di-GMP. MsPDE was capable of converting c-di-AMP to pApA and AMP, and hydrolyzing pApA to AMP. Site-directed mutations in DHH and DHHA1 revealed that DHH domain was critical for the phosphodiesterase activity. To explore the regulatory role of c-di-AMP in vivo, we constructed the mspde mutant (Δmspde) and found that deficiency of MsPDE significantly enhanced intracellular C12-C20 fatty acid accumulation. Deficiency of DAC in many bacteria results in cell death. However, we acquired the M. smegmatis strain with DAC gene disrupted (ΔmsdisA) by homologous recombination approach. Deletion of msdisA reduced bacterial C12-C20 fatty acids production but scarcely affected bacterial survival. We also provided evidences that superfluous c-di-AMP in M. smegmatis could lead to abnormal colonial morphology. Collectively, our results indicate that MsPDE is a functional c-di-AMP-specific phosphodiesterase both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also expands the regulatory network mediated by c-di-AMP in M. smegmatis. PMID:26078723

  7. jShyLU Scalable Hybrid Preconditioner and Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-11

    ShyLU is numerical software to solve sparse linear systems of equations. ShyLU uses a hybrid direct-iterative Schur complement method, and may be used either as a preconditioner or as a solver. ShyLU is parallel and optimized for a single compute Solver node. ShyLU will be a package in the Trilinos software framework.

  8. Experiences with linear solvers for oil reservoir simulation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, W.; Janardhan, R.; Biswas, D.; Carey, G.

    1996-12-31

    This talk will focus on practical experiences with iterative linear solver algorithms used in conjunction with Amoco Production Company`s Falcon oil reservoir simulation code. The goal of this study is to determine the best linear solver algorithms for these types of problems. The results of numerical experiments will be presented.

  9. Coupling vs decoupling approaches for PDE/ODE systems modeling intercellular signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Thomas; Friedmann, Elfriede; Gerecht, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We consider PDE/ODE systems for the simulation of intercellular signaling in multicellular environments. The intracellular processes for each cell described here by ODEs determine the long-time dynamics, but the PDE part dominates the solving effort. Thus, it is not clear if commonly used decoupling methods can outperform a coupling approach. Based on a sensitivity analysis, we present a systematic comparison between coupling and decoupling approaches for this class of problems and show numerical results. For biologically relevant configurations of the model, our quantitative study shows that a coupling approach performs much better than a decoupling one.

  10. Adaptive wavelet collocation methods for initial value boundary problems of nonlinear PDE's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Wei; Wang, Jian-Zhong

    1993-01-01

    We have designed a cubic spline wavelet decomposition for the Sobolev space H(sup 2)(sub 0)(I) where I is a bounded interval. Based on a special 'point-wise orthogonality' of the wavelet basis functions, a fast Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) is constructed. This DWT transform will map discrete samples of a function to its wavelet expansion coefficients in O(N log N) operations. Using this transform, we propose a collocation method for the initial value boundary problem of nonlinear PDE's. Then, we test the efficiency of the DWT transform and apply the collocation method to solve linear and nonlinear PDE's.