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Sample records for mungbeans

  1. Genomic resources in mungbean for future breeding programs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sue K.; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Lee, Jayern; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Among the legume family, mungbean (Vigna radiata) has become one of the important crops in Asia, showing a steady increase in global production. It provides a good source of protein and contains most notably folate and iron. Beyond the nutritional value of mungbean, certain features make it a well-suited model organism among legume plants because of its small genome size, short life-cycle, self-pollinating, and close genetic relationship to other legumes. In the past, there have been several efforts to develop molecular markers and linkage maps associated with agronomic traits for the genetic improvement of mungbean and, ultimately, breeding for cultivar development to increase the average yields of mungbean. The recent release of a reference genome of the cultivated mungbean (V. radiata var. radiata VC1973A) and an additional de novo sequencing of a wild relative mungbean (V. radiata var. sublobata) has provided a framework for mungbean genetic and genome research, that can further be used for genome-wide association and functional studies to identify genes related to specific agronomic traits. Moreover, the diverse gene pool of wild mungbean comprises valuable genetic resources of beneficial genes that may be helpful in widening the genetic diversity of cultivated mungbean. This review paper covers the research progress on molecular and genomics approaches and the current status of breeding programs that have developed to move toward the ultimate goal of mungbean improvement. PMID:26322067

  2. Evaluation of Mungbean Genotypes Based on Yield Stability and Reaction to Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alam, AKM Mahbubul; Somta, Prakit; Jompuk, Choosak; Chatwachirawong, Prasert; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    This work was conducted to identify mungbean genotypes showing yield stability and resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) disease. Sixteen genotypes were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with two replications for two years (2011 and 2012) at three locations (Gazipur, Ishurdi and Madaripur) of the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute. An analysis of variance exhibited significant effects of genotype (G), environment (E), and genotype × environment (G×E) on grain yield. Among eight agronomic characters, the principal component 1 (PC1) was always higher than the PC2. Considering G×E interaction, BM6 was the best genotype at all three locations in both years. Based on grain yield and stability performance, BM6 ranked first while the worst performing genotypes were BM1 and G10. Based on discrimination and representation, Gazipur was identified as an ideal environment for these mungbeans. Relationship between soil-plant analysis developments (SPAD) value was positive with yield but negative with MYMV severity. BM6, G1 and G2 were considered as promising sources of resistance for low disease score and stable response across the environments. The environment proved to have an influence on MYMV infection under natural infestation. A positive correlation was observed between disease score and the temperature under natural growing condition. PMID:25289012

  3. Biosynthesis of trigonelline from nicotinate mononucleotide in mungbean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Matsui, Ayu; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    To determine the biosynthetic pathway to trigonelline, the metabolism of [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) and [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinate riboside (NaR) in protein extracts and tissues of embryonic axes from germinating mungbeans (Phaseolus aureus) was investigated. In crude cell-free protein extracts, in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine, radioactivity from [(14)C]NaMN was incorporated into NaR, nicotinate and trigonelline. Activities of NaMN nucleotidase, NaR nucleosidase and trigonelline synthase were also observed in the extracts. Exogenously supplied [(14)C]NaR, taken up by embryonic axes segments, was readily converted to nicotinate and trigonelline. It is concluded that the NaMN-->NaR-->nicotinate-->trigonelline pathway is operative in the embryonic axes of mungbean seedlings. This result suggests that trigonelline is synthesised not only from NAD but also via the de novo biosynthetic pathway of pyridine nucleotides. PMID:17888466

  4. Genome sequence of mungbean and insights into evolution within Vigna species

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yang Jae; Kim, Sue K.; Kim, Moon Young; Lestari, Puji; Kim, Kil Hyun; Ha, Bo-Keun; Jun, Tae Hwan; Hwang, Won Joo; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Shim, Sangrea; Yoon, Min Young; Jang, Young Eun; Han, Kwang Soo; Taeprayoon, Puntaree; Yoon, Na; Somta, Prakit; Tanya, Patcharin; Kim, Kwang Soo; Gwag, Jae-Gyun; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Lee, Yeong-Ho; Park, Beom-Seok; Bombarely, Aureliano; Doyle, Jeffrey J.; Jackson, Scott A.; Schafleitner, Roland; Srinives, Peerasak; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata) is a fast-growing, warm-season legume crop that is primarily cultivated in developing countries of Asia. Here we construct a draft genome sequence of mungbean to facilitate genome research into the subgenus Ceratotropis, which includes several important dietary legumes in Asia, and to enable a better understanding of the evolution of leguminous species. Based on the de novo assembly of additional wild mungbean species, the divergence of what was eventually domesticated and the sampled wild mungbean species appears to have predated domestication. Moreover, the de novo assembly of a tetraploid Vigna species (V. reflexo-pilosa var. glabra) provides genomic evidence of a recent allopolyploid event. The species tree is constructed using de novo RNA-seq assemblies of 22 accessions of 18 Vigna species and protein sets of Glycine max. The present assembly of V. radiata var. radiata will facilitate genome research and accelerate molecular breeding of the subgenus Ceratotropis. PMID:25384727

  5. Salinity and High Temperature Tolerance in Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] from a Physiological Perspective.

    PubMed

    HanumanthaRao, Bindumadhava; Nair, Ramakrishnan M; Nayyar, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic constraints seriously affect the productivity of agriculture worldwide. The broadly recognized benefits of legumes in cropping systems-biological nitrogen fixation, improving soil fertility and broadening cereal-based agro-ecologies, are desirable now more than ever. Legume production is affected by hostile environments, especially soil salinity and high temperatures (HTs). Among legumes, mungbean has acceptable intrinsic tolerance mechanisms, but many agro-physiological characteristics of the Vigna species remain to be explored. Mungbean has a distinct advantage of being short-duration and can grow in wide range of soils and environments (as mono or relay legume). This review focuses on salinity and HT stresses on mungbean grown as a fallow crop (mungbean-rice-wheat to replace fallow-rice-wheat) and/or a relay crop in cereal cropping systems. Salinity tolerance comprises multifaceted responses at the molecular, physiological and plant canopy levels. In HTs, adaptation of physiological and biochemical processes gradually may lead to improvement of heat tolerance in plants. At the field level, managing or manipulating cultural practices can mitigate adverse effects of salinity and HT. Greater understanding of physiological and biochemical mechanisms regulating these two stresses will contribute to an evolving profile of the genes, proteins, and metabolites responsible for mungbean survival. We focus on abiotic stresses in legumes in general and mungbean in particular, and highlight gaps that need to be bridged through future mungbean research. Recent findings largely from physiological and biochemical fronts are examined, along with a few agronomic and farm-based management strategies to mitigate stress under field conditions. PMID:27446183

  6. Salinity and High Temperature Tolerance in Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] from a Physiological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    HanumanthaRao, Bindumadhava; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Nayyar, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic constraints seriously affect the productivity of agriculture worldwide. The broadly recognized benefits of legumes in cropping systems—biological nitrogen fixation, improving soil fertility and broadening cereal-based agro-ecologies, are desirable now more than ever. Legume production is affected by hostile environments, especially soil salinity and high temperatures (HTs). Among legumes, mungbean has acceptable intrinsic tolerance mechanisms, but many agro-physiological characteristics of the Vigna species remain to be explored. Mungbean has a distinct advantage of being short-duration and can grow in wide range of soils and environments (as mono or relay legume). This review focuses on salinity and HT stresses on mungbean grown as a fallow crop (mungbean-rice-wheat to replace fallow-rice-wheat) and/or a relay crop in cereal cropping systems. Salinity tolerance comprises multifaceted responses at the molecular, physiological and plant canopy levels. In HTs, adaptation of physiological and biochemical processes gradually may lead to improvement of heat tolerance in plants. At the field level, managing or manipulating cultural practices can mitigate adverse effects of salinity and HT. Greater understanding of physiological and biochemical mechanisms regulating these two stresses will contribute to an evolving profile of the genes, proteins, and metabolites responsible for mungbean survival. We focus on abiotic stresses in legumes in general and mungbean in particular, and highlight gaps that need to be bridged through future mungbean research. Recent findings largely from physiological and biochemical fronts are examined, along with a few agronomic and farm-based management strategies to mitigate stress under field conditions. PMID:27446183

  7. Detection of quantitative trait loci for mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) resistance in mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) in India and Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kitsanachandee, Ratanakorn; Somta, Prakit; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Akhtar, Khalid P.; Shah, Tariq Mahmud; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Bains, Tejinderjit S.; Sirari, Asmita; Kaur, Livinder; Srinives, Peerasak

    2013-01-01

    Yellow mosaic disease (YMD) is one of the major diseases affecting mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek). In this study, we report the mapping of the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) resistance in mungbean. An F8 recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population was generated in Thailand from a cross between NM10-12-1 (MYMIV resistance) and KPS2 (MYMIV susceptible). One hundred and twenty-two RILs and their parents were evaluated for MYMIV resistance in infested fields in India and Pakistan. A genetic linkage map was developed for the RIL population using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Composite interval mapping identified five QTLs for MYMIV resistance: three QTLs for India (qYMIV1, qYMIV2 and qYMIV3) and two QTLs for Pakistan (qYMIV4 and qYMIV5). qYMIV1, qYMIV2, qYMIV3, qYMIV4 and qYMIV5 explained 9.33%, 10.61%, 12.55%, 21.93% and 6.24% of variation in disease responses, respectively. qYMIV1 and qYMIV4 appeared to be the same locus and were common to a major QTL for MYMIV resistance in India identified previously using a different resistant mungbean. PMID:24399908

  8. Protein digestibility of weaning foods prepared from rice-minced meat and rice-mungbean combination in infants using a short term nitrogen balance method.

    PubMed

    Hussain, T; Tontisirin, K; Chaowanakarnkit, L

    1983-08-01

    Three diets based on rice-dehulled mungbean, rice-minced meat and rice-mungbean with hull were tested with infants 11 to 20 months of age using a short term nitrogen balance technique. The results indicate that with isocaloric and isonitrogenous intake, all the subjects given either of the three diets were in positive nitrogen balance. The protein quality, in terms of nitrogen absorption and true digestibility, of rice-meat diet was superior to that of rice-bean diets. Among the rice-bean diets, it was noted that rice-mungbean with hull had a lower digestibility as compared to rice-dehulled mungbean diet. The poor digestibility of rice-mungbean with hull diet is the first limiting factor in its utilization by infants. Dehulling of mungbean before cooking is recommended for preparing weaning food for infant feeding. PMID:6644389

  9. Rhizodeposition of Nitrogen and Carbon by Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) and Its Contribution to Intercropped Oats (Avena nuda L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Huadong; Yang, Xuechao; Feng, Xiaomin; Qian, Xin; Hu, Yuegao; Ren, Changzhong; Zeng, Zhaohai

    2015-01-01

    Compounds released by mungbean roots potentially represent an enormous source of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in mungbean-oat intercropping systems. In this study, an in situ experiment was conducted using a 15N - 13C double stem-feeding method to measure N and C derived from the rhizodeposition (NdfR and CdfR) of mungbean and their transfer to oats in an intercropping system. Mungbean plants were sole cropped (S) or intercropped (I) with oat. The plants were labeled 5 weeks after planting and were harvested at the beginning of pod setting (Ip and Sp) and at maturity (Im and Sm). More than 60% and 50% of the applied 15N and 13C, respectively, were recovered in each treatment, with 15N and 13C being quite uniformly distributed in the different plant parts. NdfR represented 9.8% (Sp), 9.2% (Ip), 20.1% (Sm), and 21.2% (Im) of total mungbean plant N, whereas CdfR represented 13.3% (Sp), 42.0% (Ip), 15.4% (Sm), and 22.6% (Im) of total mungbean plant C. When considering the part of rhizodeposition transferred to associated oat, intercropping mungbean released more NdfR and CdfR than mungbean alone. About 53.4–83.2% of below-ground plant N (BGP-N) and 58.4–85.9% of BGP-C originated from NdfR and CdfR, respectively. The N in oats derived from mungbean increased from 7.6% at the pod setting stage to 9.7% at maturity, whereas the C in oats increased from 16.2% to 22.0%, respectively. Only a small percentage of rhizodeposition from mungbean was transferred to oats in the intercropping systems, with a large percentage remaining in the soil. This result indicates that mungbean rhizodeposition might contribute to higher N and C availability in the soil for subsequent crops. PMID:25821975

  10. Genetic Confirmation of Mungbean (Vigna radiata) and Mashbean (Vigna mungo) Interspecific Recombinants using Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Ghulam; Hameed, Amjad; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ahsan, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad J.; Iqbal, Nayyer

    2015-01-01

    Molecular confirmation of interspecific recombinants is essential to overcome the issues like self-pollination, environmental influence, and inadequacy of morphological characteristics during interspecific hybridization. The present study was conducted for genetic confirmation of mungbean (female) and mashbean (male) interspecific crosses using molecular markers. Initially, polymorphic random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), universal rice primers (URP), and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers differentiating parent genotypes were identified. Recombination in hybrids was confirmed using these polymorphic DNA markers. The NM 2006 × Mash 88 was most successful interspecific cross. Most of true recombinants confirmed by molecular markers were from this cross combination. SSR markers were efficient in detecting genetic variability and recombination with reference to specific chromosomes and particular loci. SSR (RIS) and RAPD identified variability dispersed throughout the genome. In conclusion, DNA based marker assisted selection (MAS) efficiently confirmed the interspecific recombinants. The results provided evidence that MAS can enhance the authenticity of selection in mungbean improvement program. PMID:26697053

  11. Growth and mitochondrial respiration of mungbeans (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) germinated at low pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, M. E.; Gerth, W. A.; Scheld, H. W.; Strain, B. R.

    1988-01-01

    Mungbean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) seedlings were grown hypobarically to assess the effects of low pressure (21-24 kilopascals) on growth and mitochondrial respiration. Control seedlings grown at ambient pressure (101 kilopascals) were provided amounts of O2 equivalent to those provided experimental seedlings at reduced pressure to factor out responses to O2 concentration and to total pressure. Respiration was assayed using washed mitochondria, and was found to respond only to O2 concentration. Regardless of total pressure, seedlings grown at 2 millimoles O2 per liter had higher state 3 respiration rates and decreased percentages of alternative respiration compared to ambient (8.4 millimoles O2 per liter) controls. In contrast, seedling growth responded to total pressure but not to O2 concentration. Seedlings were significantly larger when grown under low pressure. While low O2 (2 millimoles O2 per liter) diminished growth at ambient pressure, growth at low pressure in the same oxygen concentration was enhanced. Respiratory development and growth of mungbean seedlings under low pressure is unimpaired whether oxygen or air is used as the chamber gas, and further, low pressure can improve growth under conditions of poor aeration.

  12. The oligomeric Rep protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a likely replicative helicase

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Malik, Punjab Singh; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Kaliappan, Kosalai; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate by rolling circle mode of replication (RCR) and the viral Rep protein initiates RCR by the site-specific nicking at a conserved nonamer (TAATATT↓ AC) sequence. The mechanism of subsequent steps of the replication process, e.g. helicase activity to drive fork-elongation, etc. has largely remained obscure. Here we show that Rep of a geminivirus, namely, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), acts as a replicative helicase. The Rep-helicase, requiring ≥6 nt space for its efficient activity, translocates in the 3′→5′ direction, and the presence of forked junction in the substrate does not influence the activity to any great extent. Rep forms a large oligomeric complex and the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric conformation (∼24mer). The role of Rep as a replicative helicase has been demonstrated through ex vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in planta analyses in Nicotiana tabacum. We also establish that such helicase activity is not confined to the MYMIV system alone, but is also true with at least two other begomoviruses, viz., Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV). PMID:17142233

  13. Combined effect of aqueous chlorine dioxide and modified atmosphere packaging on inhibiting Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes in mungbean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Jin, H-H; Lee, S-Y

    2007-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) combined with modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on inhibiting total mesophilic microorganisms, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in mungbean sprouts during refrigerated storage. Mungbean sprouts were packaged using 4 different methods (air, vacuum, CO2 gas, and N2 gas) following treatment with water or 100 ppm ClO2 for 5 min and stored at 5 +/- 2 degrees C. The population of total mesophilic microorganisms in mungbean sprouts was about 8.4-log(10) CFU/g and this level was not significantly reduced by treatment with water or ClO2 (P > 0.05). However, when samples were packaged under vacuum, N2 gas, or CO2 gas following treatment with ClO2, the populations of total mesophilic microorganisms were significantly reduced during storage (P < 0.05). Levels of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes in mungbean sprouts following inoculation were 4.6- and 5.6-log(10) CFU/g and treatment with water followed by different packaging conditions (air, vacuum, N2 gas, and CO2 gas) had no significant effect on population reduction (P > 0.05). However, treatment with ClO2 significantly reduced populations of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes by 3.0- and 1.5-log CFU/g, respectively (P < 0.05), and these reduced cell levels were maintained or decreased in samples packaged under vacuum or in N2 or CO2 gas during storage. These results suggest that the combination of ClO2 treatment and MAP such as CO2 gas packaging may be useful for inhibiting microbial contamination and maintaining quality in mungbean sprouts during storage. PMID:18034740

  14. Cloning and functional expression of a mungbean defensin VrD1 in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Jr; Chen, Gan-Hong; Hsu, Hui-Ching; Li, Shin-Shing; Chen, Ching-San

    2004-04-21

    It was shown previously that a bacterially expressed mungbean defensin VrCRP exhibited both antifungal and insecticidal activities. To isolate this protein in a large quantity for its characterization, the defensin cDNA was expressed in Pichia pastoris and the recombinant defensin (rVrD1) was purified. The recombinant VrD1 was shown to inhibit the growth of fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum, Pyricularia oryza, Rhizoctonia solani, and Trichophyton rubrum and development of bruchid larva. The protein also inhibits in vitro protein synthesis. These biological activities are similar to that of the bacterially expressed defensin. Functional expression of VrD1 in Pichia pastoris provides a highly feasible system to study the structure-function relationship of VrD1 using the mutagenesis approach. PMID:15080630

  15. Absence of interaction of genomic components and complementation between Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus isolates in cowpea.

    PubMed

    Surendranath, B; Usharani, K S; Nagma, A; Victoria, A K; Malathi, V G

    2005-09-01

    Agroinoculations were performed with DNA A and DNA B components of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) isolates differing in their infectivity on cowpea. Exchange of genomic components of the MYMIV isolates occurred in all the leguminous species but not in cowpea. Extremely low viral DNA accumulation and atypical leaf curl symptoms produced by reassortants in cowpea suggest barriers both for replication and systemic movement despite genetic similarity. PMID:15931466

  16. Mungbean plants expressing BjNPR1 exhibit enhanced resistance against the seedling rot pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, S; Kirti, P B

    2012-02-01

    Mungbean, Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek is an important pulse crop that is widely cultivated in semi- arid tropics. The crop is attacked by various soil-borne pathogens like Rhizoctonia solani, which causes dry rot disease and seriously affects its productivity. Earlier we characterized the non-expressor of pathogenesis related gene-1(BjNPR1) of mustard, Brassica juncea, the counterpart of AtNPR1 of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we transformed mungbean with BjNPR1 via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Because of the recalcitrant nature of mungbean, the effect of some factors like Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains (GV2260 and LBA4404), pH, L: -cysteine and tobacco leaf extract was tested in transformation. The transgenic status of 15 plants was confirmed by PCR using primers for nptII. The independent integration of T-DNA in transgenic plants was analyzed by Southern hybridization with an nptII probe and the expression of BjNPR1 was confirmed by RT-PCR. Some of the T(0) plants were selected for detached leaf anti-fungal bioassay using the fungus Rhizoctonia solani, which showed moderate to high level of resistance depending on the level of expression of BjNPR1. The seedling bioassay of transgenic T(2) plants indicated resistance against dry rot disease caused by R. solani. PMID:21584838

  17. Kinetics, equilibrium and mechanism of Cd2+ removal from aqueous solution by mungbean husk.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Asma; Iqbal, Muhammad; Höll, Wolfgang H

    2009-09-15

    Mungbean husk (mbh), an agrowaste material, was investigated as a new sorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) from aqueous solution. The maximum removal of Cd(2+) was found to be 35.41 mg g(-1) at pH 5.0, 500 mg l(-1) initial Cd(2+) concentration and 5 g l(-1) sorbent dosage. Sorption kinetics and equilibria followed pseudo-second order and Langmuir isotherm equations. The mechanism of Cd(2+) adsorption on mbh was investigated by DRIFT spectroscopy, SEM-EDX analysis, and by monitoring the release of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+) and Na(+)) during the uptake of Cd(2+). DRIFT spectra of mbh showed the presence of amino, carboxyl, carbonyl and hydroxyl as the major functional groups involved in the sorption of Cd(2+). The sum of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+) and K(+) released from mbh with the quantitatively equivalent uptake of Cd(2+) indicated that the main mechanism of Cd(2+) adsorption was ion exchange. EDX analysis data supported the hypothesis of the involvement of ion exchange, as alkali and alkaline earth metal cations were noted to disappear in EDX spectrum of mbh after the uptake of Cd(2+). No significant loss in Cd(2+) sorption capacity of regenerated mbh was noted during reuse for five successive sorption-desorption cycles. PMID:19386413

  18. Simultaneous determination of five phytohormones in mungbean sprouts of China by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue-Na; Qin, Xin-Ying; Lv, Yun-Kai; Li, Shan-Ze; Wei, Chen

    2014-08-01

    A simple and rapid micellar electrokinetic chromatography method was developed for simultaneous determination of indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, gibberellic acid, abscisic acid and naphthylacetic acid in mungbean sprouts for monitoring plant growth and development. The effects of several parameters related to the separation and determination were investigated in detail. The analysis was carried out using 10 mM borax, 10 mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate, 90 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate and 5% acetonitrile as running buffer (pH 9.0). Under optimum conditions, the method demonstrated good performance concerning linearity (r, 0.9954-0.9991), precision (0.77-4.97%), the method limit of detection (LOD) and the method limit of quantitation (LOQ) (LOD, 0.011-0.177 mg/kg; LOQ, 0.035-0.590 mg/kg) and accuracy (83.62-102.56%). The results confirmed that the method is rapid, convenient and of low cost for the determination of the phytohormones. PMID:23845886

  19. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Research To Explore Bruchid-Resistant Genes in Mungbean Isogenic Lines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wu-Jui; Ko, Chia-Yun; Liu, Mao-Sen; Kuo, Chien-Yen; Wu, Dung-Chi; Chen, Chien-Yu; Schafleitner, Roland; Chen, Long-Fang O; Lo, Hsiao-Feng

    2016-08-31

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) is an important rotation legume crop for human nutrition in Asia. Bruchids (Callosobruchus spp.) currently cause heavy damage as pests of grain legumes during storage. We used omics-related technologies to study the mechanisms of bruchid resistance in seeds of the nearly isogenic lines VC1973A (bruchid-susceptible) and VC6089A (bruchid-resistant). A total of 399 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the two lines by transcriptome sequencing. Among these DEGs, 251 exhibited high expression levels and 148 expressed low expression levels in seeds of VC6089A. Forty-five differential proteins (DPs) were identified by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ); 21 DPs had higher abundances in VC6089A, and 24 DPs had higher abundances in VC1973A. According to transcriptome and proteome data, only three DEGs/DPs, including resistant-specific protein (g39185), gag/pol polyprotein (g34458), and aspartic proteinase (g5551), were identified and located on chromosomes 5, 1, and 7, respectively. Both g39185 and g34458 genes encode a protein containing a BURP domain. In previous research on bruchid molecular markers, the g39185 gene located close to the molecular markers of major bruchid-resistant locus may be a bruchid-resistant gene. PMID:27508985

  20. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV. PMID:26436122

  1. Development of combined dry heat and chlorine dioxide gas treatment with mechanical mixing for inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo on mungbean seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of fresh sprouted beans. The sprouting conditions of mungbean seeds provide optimal conditions of temperature and humidity for any potential pathogenic contaminant on the seeds to grow. The lack of a kill step post-sprouting is a major sa...

  2. The switching of electron flux from the cyanide-insensitive oxidase to the cytochrome pathway in mung-bean (Phaseolus aureus L.) mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S B

    1988-01-01

    The activities of the mung-bean (Phaseolus aureus L.) mitochondrial cyanide-insensitive oxidase and cytochrome pathways have been measured simultaneously. The results show that electrons can be diverted both from the alternative pathway to the cytochrome pathway and from the cytochrome to the alternative pathway. The competition of the two pathways for the available electron flux is discussed. PMID:3342013

  3. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to inactivate Salmonella enterica on mungbean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Prodduk, Vara; Annous, Bassam A; Liu, Linshu; Yam, Kit L

    2014-11-01

    Although freshly sprouted beans and grains are considered to be a source of nutrients, they have been associated with foodborne outbreaks. Sprouts provide good matrices for microbial localization and growth due to optimal conditions of temperature and humidity while sprouting. Also, the lack of a kill step postsprouting is a major safety concern. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to reduce Salmonella on artificially inoculated mungbean sprouts. The effectiveness of gaseous chlorine dioxide (0.5 mg/liter of air) with or without tumbling (mechanical mixing) was compared with an aqueous chlorine (200 ppm) wash treatment. Tumbling the inoculated sprouts during the chlorine dioxide gas application for 15, 30, and 60 min reduced Salmonella populations by 3.0, 4.0, and 5.5 log CFU/g, respectively, as compared with 3.0, 3.0, and 4.0 log CFU/g reductions obtained without tumbling, respectively. A 2.0 log CFU/g reduction in Salmonella was achieved with an aqueous chlorine wash. The difference in microbial reduction between chlorine dioxide gas versus aqueous chlorine wash points to the important role of surface topography, pore structure, bacterial attachment, and/or biofilm formation on sprouts. These data suggested that chlorine dioxide gas was capable of penetrating and inactivating cells that are attached to inaccessible sites and/or are within biofilms on the sprout surface as compared with an aqueous chlorine wash. Consequently, scanning electron microscopy imaging indicated that chlorine dioxide gas treatment was capable of penetrating and inactivating cells attached to inaccessible sites and within biofilms on the sprout surfaces. PMID:25364920

  4. Morphological and Pathogenic Variability among Macrophomina phaseolina Isolates Associated with Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Wilczek from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Umer

    2014-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is a serious pathogen of many crops. In the present studies, 65 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina from different agroecological regions of Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provinces of Pakistan were analyzed for morphological and pathogenic variability. Regardless of their geographic origins, significant differences were detected among 65 isolates in their radial growth, sclerotial size, and weight as well as in pathogenicity. Sixteen isolates were rated as fast growing, 11 as slow growing, and the rest of the isolates as medium growing. Nine isolates were classified as large sized, 26 as small sized, and the remaining 30 isolates as medium sized. Thirty five isolates were ranked as heavy weight, 12 as low weight, and the rest of isolates were grouped as medium weight. Ten fungal isolates appeared to be least virulent, whereas eight isolates of diverse origin proved to be highly virulent against mungbean cultivars. The remaining isolates were regarded as moderately virulent. No relationship was found among the morphological characters and pathogenicity of the isolates. These morphological and pathogenic variations in various isolates of M. phaseolina may be considered important in disease management systems and will be useful in breeding programmes of mungbean cultivars resistant to charcoal rot. PMID:24558345

  5. Production and purification of antioxidant peptides from a mungbean meal hydrolysate by Virgibacillus sp. SK37 proteinase.

    PubMed

    Lapsongphon, Nawaporn; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2013-11-15

    Antioxidant peptides of mungbean meal hydrolysed by Virgibacillus sp. SK37 proteinases (VH), Alcalase (AH) and Neutrase (NH) were investigated. The antioxidant activities based on 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) radical-scavenging, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and metal chelation of VH were comparable to those of NH. VH was purified using ultrafiltration, ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The purified peptides (F37) from VH, which had the highest specific antioxidant activity, consisted of four peptides containing an arginine residue at their C-termini. In addition, the ABTS radical-scavenging activity of the purified peptides (F42) at 0.148mg/ml was comparable to that of 1mM of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). These two fractions were stable over a wide pH (4-10) and temperature (25-121°C) range. Virgibacillus sp. SK37 proteinase is a potential processing-aid for the production of a mungbean meal hydrolyzate with antioxidant properties. PMID:23790878

  6. Physiochemical Studies of Sodium Chloride on Mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) and Its Possible Recovery with Spermine and Gibberellic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sanglap; Paul, Atreyee

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and biochemical responses to increasing NaCl concentrations, along with low concentrations of gibberellic acid or spermine, either alone or in their combination, were studied in mungbean seedlings. In the test seedlings, the root-shoot elongation, biomass production, and the chlorophyll content were significantly decreased with increasing NaCl concentrations. Salt toxicity severely affected activities of different antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress markers. Activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) increased significantly over water control. Similarly, oxidative stress markers such as proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) contents also increased as a result of progressive increase in salt stress. Combined application of NaCl along with low concentrations of either gibberellic acid (5 µM) or spermine (50 µM) in the test seedlings showed significant alterations, that is, drastic increase in seedling elongation, increased biomass production, increased chlorophyll content, and significant lowering in all the antioxidant enzyme activities as well as oxidative stress marker contents in comparison to salt treated test seedlings, leading to better growth and metabolism. Our study shows that low concentrations of either gibberellic acid or spermine will be able to overcome the toxic effects of NaCl stress in mungbean seedlings. PMID:25734186

  7. Ethylene and adventitious root formation in hypocotyl segments of etiolated mung-bean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Batten, D J; Mullins, M G

    1978-01-01

    Rooting responses and ethylene production by hypocotyl cuttings from etiolated mung-bean seedlings treated with the auxins α-naphthaleneacetic acid, γ-(indole-3)-n-butyric acid (IBA) and 2,4,5-trichloro-phenoxypropionic acid were determined. There was no relationship between the abilities of the auxins to induce root formation and their capacities for inducing ethylene production. Studies with mixtures of 3-indoleacetic acid, a poor stimulator of rooting but an effective inducer of ethylene production, and IBA, an effective rooting stimulator but a poor inducer of ethylene production, exposure of cuttings to ethylene or (2-chloroethyl) phosphonic acid (Ethephon), hypobaric storage (150 mb) of treated cuttings, and exposure of auxin-treated cuttings to 7% CO2 also indicated that ethylene is not directly involved in initiation of adventitious roots in this plant material. PMID:24414045

  8. Establishment of lacZ marked strain of phosphate solubilizing bacterium in the rhizosphere and its effect on plant growth in mungbean.

    PubMed

    Sunita, S; Kapoor, K K; Goyal, S; Sharma, P K

    2010-10-01

    The establishment of lacZ marked strain of P-solubilizing bacterium Pseudomonas in the rhizosphere of mungbean (Vigna radiata) under pothouse conditions was studied. The lacZ marker was transferred to Pseudomonas P-36 on LB medium using donor strain of E. coli. The lacZ marked strain formed blue colonies on selective media and could be identified from soil on the basis of this character. The lacZ marked strain was able to survive in rhizosphere of mungbean under pothouse conditions and maintained a population of about 10(4) g(-1) of rhizosphere soils up to 60 days study period. Positive effect of inoculation with P-solubilizing bacterium on dry matter yield, P and N-uptake was observed using rock phosphate and single super phosphate as P sources with and without farmyard amendment. PMID:22815583

  9. Gene Mapping of a Mutant Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Using New Molecular Markers Suggests a Gene Encoding a YUC4-like Protein Regulates the Chasmogamous Flower Trait.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingbin; Somta, Prakit; Chen, Xin; Cui, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Xingxing; Srinives, Peerasak

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) is a cleistogamous plant in which flowers are pollinated before they open, which prevents yield improvements through heterosis. We previously generated a chasmogamous mutant (CM) mungbean in which open flowers are pollinated. In this study, we developed insertion/deletion (indel) markers based on the transcriptome differences between CM and Sulu-1 (i.e., normal flowering) plants. An F2 population derived from a cross between CM and Sulu-1 was used for gene mapping. Segregation analyses revealed that a single recessive gene regulates the production of chasmogamous flowers. Using newly developed indel and simple sequence repeat markers, the cha gene responsible for the chasmogamous flower trait was mapped to a 277.1-kb segment on chromosome 6. Twelve candidate genes were detected in this segment, including Vradi06g12650, which encodes a YUCCA family protein associated with floral development. A single base pair deletion producing a frame-shift mutation and a premature stop codon in Vradi06g12650 was detected only in CM plants. This suggested that Vradi06g12650 is a cha candidate gene. Our results provide important information for the molecular breeding of chasmogamous mungbean lines, which may serve as new genetic resources for hybrid cultivar development. PMID:27375671

  10. Gene Mapping of a Mutant Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Using New Molecular Markers Suggests a Gene Encoding a YUC4-like Protein Regulates the Chasmogamous Flower Trait

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingbin; Somta, Prakit; Chen, Xin; Cui, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Xingxing; Srinives, Peerasak

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) is a cleistogamous plant in which flowers are pollinated before they open, which prevents yield improvements through heterosis. We previously generated a chasmogamous mutant (CM) mungbean in which open flowers are pollinated. In this study, we developed insertion/deletion (indel) markers based on the transcriptome differences between CM and Sulu-1 (i.e., normal flowering) plants. An F2 population derived from a cross between CM and Sulu-1 was used for gene mapping. Segregation analyses revealed that a single recessive gene regulates the production of chasmogamous flowers. Using newly developed indel and simple sequence repeat markers, the cha gene responsible for the chasmogamous flower trait was mapped to a 277.1-kb segment on chromosome 6. Twelve candidate genes were detected in this segment, including Vradi06g12650, which encodes a YUCCA family protein associated with floral development. A single base pair deletion producing a frame-shift mutation and a premature stop codon in Vradi06g12650 was detected only in CM plants. This suggested that Vradi06g12650 is a cha candidate gene. Our results provide important information for the molecular breeding of chasmogamous mungbean lines, which may serve as new genetic resources for hybrid cultivar development. PMID:27375671

  11. Cloning and Functional Characterization of a Vacuolar Na+/H+ Antiporter Gene from Mungbean (VrNHX1) and Its Ectopic Expression Enhanced Salt Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sagarika; Alavilli, Hemasundar; Lee, Byeong-ha; Panda, Sanjib Kumar; Sahoo, Lingaraj

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuolar NHX exchangers play a significant role in adaption to salt stress by compartmentalizing excess cytosolic Na+ into vacuoles and maintaining cellular homeostasis and ionic equilibrium. We cloned an orthologue of the vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter gene, VrNHX1 from mungbean (Vigna radiata), an important Asiatic grain legume. The VrNHX1 (Genbank Accession number JN656211.1) contains 2095 nucleotides with an open reading frame of 1629 nucleotides encoding a predicted protein of 542 amino acids with a deduced molecular mass of 59.6 kDa. The consensus amiloride binding motif (84LFFIYLLPPI93) was observed in the third putative transmembrane domain of VrNHX1. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis clearly suggested that VrNHX1 had high similarity to those of orthologs belonging to Class-I clade of plant NHX exchangers in leguminous crops. VrNHX1 could be strongly induced by salt stress in mungbean as the expression in roots significantly increased in presence of 200 mM NaCl with concomitant accumulation of total [Na+]. Induction of VrNHX1 was also observed under cold and dehydration stress, indicating a possible cross talk between various abiotic stresses. Heterologous expression in salt sensitive yeast mutant AXT3 complemented for the loss of yeast vacuolar NHX1 under NaCl, KCl and LiCl stress indicating that VrNHX1 was the orthologue of ScNHX1. Further, AXT3 cells expressing VrNHX1 survived under low pH environment and displayed vacuolar alkalinization analyzed using pH sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF-AM. The constitutive and stress inducible expression of VrNHX1 resulted in enhanced salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines. Our work suggested that VrNHX1 was a salt tolerance determinant in mungbean. PMID:25350285

  12. Effect of tillage practices on soil properties and crop productivity in wheat-mungbean-rice cropping system under subtropical climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Khairul; Islam, Md Monirul; Salahin, Nazmus; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to know cropping cycles required to improve OM status in soil and to investigate the effects of medium-term tillage practices on soil properties and crop yields in Grey Terrace soil of Bangladesh under wheat-mungbean-T. aman cropping system. Four different tillage practices, namely, zero tillage (ZT), minimum tillage (MT), conventional tillage (CT), and deep tillage (DT), were studied in a randomized complete block (RCB) design with four replications. Tillage practices showed positive effects on soil properties and crop yields. After four cropping cycles, the highest OM accumulation, the maximum root mass density (0-15 cm soil depth), and the improved physical and chemical properties were recorded in the conservational tillage practices. Bulk and particle densities were decreased due to tillage practices, having the highest reduction of these properties and the highest increase of porosity and field capacity in zero tillage. The highest total N, P, K, and S in their available forms were recorded in zero tillage. All tillage practices showed similar yield after four years of cropping cycles. Therefore, we conclude that zero tillage with 20% residue retention was found to be suitable for soil health and achieving optimum yield under the cropping system in Grey Terrace soil (Aeric Albaquept). PMID:25197702

  13. The AC5 protein encoded by Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus is a pathogenicity determinant that suppresses RNA silencing-based antiviral defenses.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangfang; Xu, Xiongbiao; Huang, Changjun; Gu, Zhouhang; Cao, Linge; Hu, Tao; Ding, Ming; Li, Zhenghe; Zhou, Xueping

    2015-10-01

    It is generally accepted that begomoviruses in the family Geminiviridae encode four proteins (from AC1/C1 to AC4/C4) using the complementary-sense DNA as template. Although AC5/C5 coding sequences are increasingly annotated in databases for many begomoviruses, the evolutionary relationships and functions of this putative protein in viral infection are obscure. Here, we demonstrate several important functions of the AC5 protein of a bipartite begomovirus, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV). Mutational analyses and transgenic expression showed that AC5 plays a critical role in MYMIV infection. Ectopic expression of AC5 from a Potato virus X (PVX) vector resulted in severe mosaic symptoms followed by a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Furthermore, MYMIV AC5 effectively suppressed post-transcriptional gene silencing induced by single-stranded but not double-stranded RNA. AC5 was also able to reverse transcriptional gene silencing of a green fluorescent protein transgene by reducing methylation of promoter sequences, probably through repressing expression of a CHH cytosine methyltransferase (DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE2) in N. benthamiana. Our results demonstrate that MYMIV AC5 is a pathogenicity determinant and a potent RNA silencing suppressor that employs novel mechanisms to suppress antiviral defenses, and suggest that the AC5 function may be conserved among many begomoviruses. PMID:26010321

  14. Effect of Tillage Practices on Soil Properties and Crop Productivity in Wheat-Mungbean-Rice Cropping System under Subtropical Climatic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Monirul; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to know cropping cycles required to improve OM status in soil and to investigate the effects of medium-term tillage practices on soil properties and crop yields in Grey Terrace soil of Bangladesh under wheat-mungbean-T. aman cropping system. Four different tillage practices, namely, zero tillage (ZT), minimum tillage (MT), conventional tillage (CT), and deep tillage (DT), were studied in a randomized complete block (RCB) design with four replications. Tillage practices showed positive effects on soil properties and crop yields. After four cropping cycles, the highest OM accumulation, the maximum root mass density (0–15 cm soil depth), and the improved physical and chemical properties were recorded in the conservational tillage practices. Bulk and particle densities were decreased due to tillage practices, having the highest reduction of these properties and the highest increase of porosity and field capacity in zero tillage. The highest total N, P, K, and S in their available forms were recorded in zero tillage. All tillage practices showed similar yield after four years of cropping cycles. Therefore, we conclude that zero tillage with 20% residue retention was found to be suitable for soil health and achieving optimum yield under the cropping system in Grey Terrace soil (Aeric Albaquept). PMID:25197702

  15. Mungbean yellow mosaic Indian virus encoded AC2 protein suppresses RNA silencing by inhibiting Arabidopsis RDR6 and AGO1 activities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikash; Mishra, Sumona Karjee; Rahman, Jamilur; Taneja, Jyoti; Sundaresan, Geethaa; Mishra, Neeti Sanan; Mukherjee, Sunil K

    2015-12-01

    RNA silencing refers to a conserved RNA-directed gene regulatory mechanism in a wide range of eukaryotes. It plays an important role in many processes including growth, development, genome stability, and antiviral defense in the plants. Geminivirus encoded AC2 is identified as an RNA silencing suppressor protein, however, the mechanism of action has not been characterized. In this paper, we elucidate another mechanism of AC2-mediated suppression activity of Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV). The AC2 protein, unlike many other suppressors, does not bind to siRNA or dsRNA species and its suppression activity is mediated through interaction with key components of the RNA silencing pathway, viz., RDR6 and AGO1. AC2 interaction inhibits the RDR6 activity, an essential component of siRNA and tasi-RNA biogenesis and AGO1, the major slicing factor of RISC. Thus the study identifies dual sites of MYMIV-AC2 interference and probably accounts for its strong RNA silencing suppression activity. PMID:26433748

  16. Proteomics approach combined with biochemical attributes to elucidate compatible and incompatible plant-virus interactions between Vigna mungo and Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vigna mungo, a tropical leguminous plant, highly susceptible to yellow mosaic disease caused by Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV) resulting in high yield penalty. The molecular events occurring during compatible and incompatible interactions between V. mungo and MYMIV pathosystem are yet to be explored. In this study biochemical analyses in conjunction with proteomics of MYMIV-susceptible and -resistant V. mungo genotypes were executed to get an insight in the molecular events during compatible and incompatible plant-virus interactions. Results Biochemical analysis revealed an increase in phenolics, hydrogen peroxide and carbohydrate contents in both compatible and incompatible interactions; but the magnitudes were higher during incompatible interaction. In the resistant genotype the activities of superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase increased significantly, while catalase activity decreased. Comparative proteome analyses using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry identified 109 differentially abundant proteins at 3, 7 and 14 days post MYMIV-inoculation. Proteins of several functional categories were differentially changed in abundance during both compatible and incompatible interactions. Among these, photosynthesis related proteins were mostly affected in the susceptible genotype resulting in reduced photosynthesis rate under MYMIV-stress. Differential intensities of chlorophyll fluorescence and chlorophyll contents are in congruence with proteomics data. It was revealed that Photosystem II electron transports are the primary targets of MYMIV during pathogenesis. Quantitative real time PCR analyses of selected genes corroborates with respective protein abundance during incompatible interaction. The network of various cellular pathways that are involved in inducing defense response contains several conglomerated cores of nodal proteins, of which ascorbate peroxidase, rubisco activase and serine

  17. Effect of plant density and mixing ratio on crop yield in sweet corn/mungbean intercropping.

    PubMed

    Sarlak, S; Aghaalikhani, M; Zand, B

    2008-09-01

    In order to evaluate the ear and forage yield of sweet corn (Zea mays L. var. Saccarata) in pure stand and intercropped with mung bean (Vigna radiata L.), a field experiment was conducted at Varamin region on summer 2006. Experiment was carried out in a split plot design based on randomized complete blocks with 4 replications. Plant density with 3 levels [Low (D1), Mean (D2) and High (D3) respecting 6, 8 and 10 m(-2) for sweet corn, cultivar S.C.403 and 10, 20 and 30 m(-2) for mung bean cultivar, Partow] was arranged in main plots and 5 mixing ratios [(P1) = 0/100, (P2) = 25/75, (P3) = 50/50, (P4) = 75/25, (P5) = 100/0% for sweet corn/mung bean, respectively] were arranged in subplots. Quantitative attributes such as plant height, sucker numbers, LER, dry matter distribution in different plant organs were measured in sweet corn economical maturity. Furthermore the yield of cannable ear corn and yield components of sweet corn and mung bean were investigated. Results showed that plant density has not any significant effect on evaluated traits, while the effect of mixing ratio was significant (p < 0.01). Therefore, the mixing ratio of 75/25 (sweet corn/mung bean) could be introduced as the superior mixing ratio; because of it's maximum rate of total sweet corn's biomass, forage yield, yield and yield components of ear corn in intercropping. Regarding to profitability indices of intercropping, the mixing ratio 75/25 (sweet corn/mung bean) in low density (D1P2) which showed the LER = 1.03 and 1.09 for total crop yield before ear harvesting and total forage yield after ear harvest respectively, was better than corn or mung bean monoculture. PMID:19266927

  18. Appraisal of gene action for indeterminate growth in mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Javed; Ahsan, Muhammad; Saleem, Muhammad; Ali, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the inheritance pattern of indeterminate growth in Vigna radiata, various related traits were studied. The techniques used for the purpose were generation mean and variance analyses. Narrow sense heritability estimates were also computed. Four out of fifty greengram accessions were selected during preliminary screen trial based on DDd2 and DDh2 values. Two cross combinations were made by utilizing four parents. Generation variance analysis demonstrated the engagement of additive and environmental components, with the pre-pondrance of additive gene action. Narrow sense heritability estimates (>67%) also supported the same. In generation mean analysis both cross combinations manifested non-allelic epistatic digenic interactions for the investigated traits except for plant height at first flower initiation and for seed yield per plant in one cross combination, where only additive and dominance components were important. For pyramiding the additive genes favoring determinate plant growth, higher harvest index and simultaneously purging the genes promoting twining growth habit escorted with low seed yield, any modified breeding scheme which could serve the said purpose may be opted. PMID:26388879

  19. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to inactivate Salmonella enterica on mungbean sprouts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although fresh-sprouted beans and grains are considered a good source of nutrients, they have been associated with foodborne outbreaks. Sprouts provide a good matrix for microbial localization and growth due to optimal conditions of temperature and humidity while sprouting. Also, the lack of a kill...

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of mungbean Vigna radiata var. radiata NM92 and a phylogenetic analysis of crops in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ping; Lo, Hsiao-Feng; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chen, Long-Fang Oliver

    2016-09-01

    The entire mitogenome of the Vigna radiata var. radiata NM92 was identified as a circular molecule of 401 262 bp length (DDBJ accession number: AP014716). The contents of A, T, C, and G in the NM92 mitogenome were found to be 27.48%, 27.41%, 22.63%, and 22.48%, respectively. The NM92 mitogenome encoded 3 rRNAs, 16 tRNAs and 33 proteins. Eight protein-coding genes (nad1, nad2, nad4, nad5, nad7, rps3, and rps10) centain introns. Among them, three (nad1, nad2, and nad5) are trans-spliced genes. A phylogenetic tree was reconstructed using the 21 protein-coding genes of 16 crops. A species of gymnosperms, Cycas, was selected as the outgroup. This complete mitogenome sequence provides useful information to understand the cultivation of Vigna radiata and other crops. PMID:26469726

  1. Survival of Aeromonas hydrophila and Listeria monocytogenes on fresh vegetables stored under moderate vacuum.

    PubMed

    Aytac, S A; Gorris, L G

    1994-11-01

    Storage at 6.5°C under moderate vacuum effectively prevented growth of Aeromonas hydrophila on chicory endive, but had only a limited inhibitory effect on the growth of the organism on mung bean sprouts. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes on chicory endive was strongly stimulated under these conditions, whereas it was decreased on mung-bean sprouts. PMID:24421192

  2. Diagnosis of a new variant of soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus with extended host-range in India.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Nagamani; Kumar, Alok; Sharma, Prachi; Kapoor, Reetika; Jain, Rakesh Kumar; Mandal, Bikash

    2015-12-01

    Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV, genus Carmovirus) was previously known to occur in South Korea and USA causing bright yellow mosaic in soybean. In this study, SYMMV (Car-Mb14 isolate) was isolated from mungbean (Vigna radiata) exhibiting mild mottling and puckering symptoms in the experimental field at Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi during 2012. The virus isolate, Car-Mb14 induced veinal mottling, mild mottling, chlorotic blotching, local and systemic necrosis in soybean, mungbean, blackgram, French bean and guar bean, respectively. The symptomatology of the present isolate of SYMMV was different from the previously reported South Korean isolate, as the later did not induce symptoms in any of the above legumes other than soybean. The present isolate was phylogenetically distinct and shared 90-93 % sequence identity in coat protein (CP) of 52 SYMMV isolates reported from Korea and USA. In order to know the serological relationships, the CP gene of the present isolate was over expressed as a 39 kDa protein in E. coli and an antiserum of 1:16,000 titer against the recombinant CP was produced. Serological cross reactivity analysis revealed that SYMMV was serologically related to blackgram mottle virus but not to cowpea mottle virus, the other legume infecting carmoviruses. The antiserum was used to detect prevalence of SYMMV in legume crops by ELISA. Out of 145 field samples of legumes (mungbean, blackgram, French bean and soybean) collected from different places in India, SYMMV was detected only in 16 samples of mungbean and one sample of blackgram. The natural infection of SYMMV in mungbean and blackgram was further confirmed based on CP gene sequence. This study provides evidence of occurrence of a new variant of SYMMV with distinct symptom phenotype and extended host-range in India. PMID:26645042

  3. Transcriptional Slippage and RNA Editing Increase the Diversity of Transcripts in Chloroplasts: Insight from Deep Sequencing of Vigna radiata Genome and Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ping; Ko, Chia-Yun; Kuo, Ching-I; Liu, Mao-Sen; Schafleitner, Roland; Chen, Long-Fang Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We performed deep sequencing of the nuclear and organellar genomes of three mungbean genotypes: Vigna radiata ssp. sublobata TC1966, V. radiata var. radiata NM92 and the recombinant inbred line RIL59 derived from a cross between TC1966 and NM92. Moreover, we performed deep sequencing of the RIL59 transcriptome to investigate transcript variability. The mungbean chloroplast genome has a quadripartite structure including a pair of inverted repeats separated by two single copy regions. A total of 213 simple sequence repeats were identified in the chloroplast genomes of NM92 and RIL59; 78 single nucleotide variants and nine indels were discovered in comparing the chloroplast genomes of TC1966 and NM92. Analysis of the mungbean chloroplast transcriptome revealed mRNAs that were affected by transcriptional slippage and RNA editing. Transcriptional slippage frequency was positively correlated with the length of simple sequence repeats of the mungbean chloroplast genome (R2=0.9911). In total, 41 C-to-U editing sites were found in 23 chloroplast genes and in one intergenic spacer. No editing site that swapped U to C was found. A combination of bioinformatics and experimental methods revealed that the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-transcribed genes psbF and ndhA are affected by transcriptional slippage in mungbean and in main lineages of land plants, including three dicots (Glycine max, Brassica rapa, and Nicotiana tabacum), two monocots (Oryza sativa and Zea mays), two gymnosperms (Pinus taeda and Ginkgo biloba) and one moss (Physcomitrella patens). Transcript analysis of the rps2 gene showed that transcriptional slippage could affect transcripts at single sequence repeat regions with poly-A runs. It showed that transcriptional slippage together with incomplete RNA editing may cause sequence diversity of transcripts in chloroplasts of land plants. PMID:26076132

  4. Crop genotype and a novel symbiotic fungus influences the root endophytic colonization potential of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Geeta; Singh, N; Marwaha, T S

    2009-01-01

    Effect of plant genotype on the root endophytic colonization ability of a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), Pseudomonas striata was undertaken in this study. Use of a lac-Z tagged P. striata strain showed that, it can exist as an endophyte and the plant genotype determines the performance of the inoculated PGPR. The cultivars of Zea mays L. (maize) and Vigna radiata L. (mung bean) tested showed differential affinity to the PGPR (P. striata) as reflected by a significant variation in the root endophytic colonization ability of P. striata. Coinoculation with a novel symbiotic fungus Piriformospora indica was found to stimulate endophytic colonization of P. striata in both maize and mungbean. The root exudates of maize and mungbean cultivars showed variations in the total sugar and amino acid contents. However, no consistent relationship was recorded between the concentrations of these metabolites and endophytic colonization of the added PGPR. PMID:23572916

  5. Effects of autoclaving and charcoal on root-promoting substances present in water extracts made from gelling agents.

    PubMed

    Arthur, G D; Stirk, W A; Van Staden, J

    2006-10-01

    The root-promoting ability of water extracts made from gelling agents (agar and Gelrite) was investigated using the mungbean rooting bioassay. Autoclaving these water extracts decreased the number of roots in mungbean cuttings compared to the controls. The addition of activated charcoal to the water extracts from Agar Bacteriological and Agar Commercial Gel had no effect on their root-promoting ability. Extracts with exogenous indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) which were treated by autoclaving or via a freeze-thaw cycle, significantly increased rooting. However, incorporation of activated charcoal to similar IBA-containing extracts reduced rooting. Our results indicate that more attention should be given to the choice of gelling agent and its interaction with other additives in the media used during tissue culture. PMID:16274988

  6. Characterization of betasatellite associated with the yellow mosaic disease of grain legumes in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Satya, V K; Malathi, V G; Velazhahan, R; Rabindran, R; Jayamani, P; Alice, D

    2013-01-01

    Yellow mosaic disease caused by mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus (the family Geminiviridae) is a major constraint in cultivation of grain legumes in India. The urdbean (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) and mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek) samples affected with yellow mosaic disease exhibits yellow mosaic symptoms along with leaf puckering and leaf distortion in Tamil Nadu. Hence the study was performed to find out if there was any association and influence of betasatellite DNA on the symptom expression of MYMV. Full length viral clones of DNA A and DNA B were obtained through rolling circle amplification from YMD infected samples and identified as mungbean yellow mosaic virus. Interestingly, betasatellite was found to associate with MYMV, and its nucleotide sequence analysis showed its 95% identity with papaya leaf curl betasatellite (DQ118862) from cowpea. The present study represents the first report about the association of papaya leaf curl betasatellite with MYMV and represents a new member of the emerging group of bipartite begomovirus associated with betasatellite DNA. PMID:24294953

  7. Microbial profiles of on-line--procured sprouting seeds and potential hazards associated with enterotoxigenic Bacillus spp. in homegrown sprouts.

    PubMed

    Pao, S; Khalid, M F; Kalantari, A

    2005-08-01

    We examined the microbiological quality of sprouting seeds sold through the Internet. Overall, five types of seeds each from six organic and six conventional sources were evaluated. The growth and toxin production of naturally occurring Bacillus spp. in sprouts produced using home-scale sprouting devices also were investigated. For alfalfa, broccoli, lentil, mungbean, and radish seeds, the average microbial counts were 3.3, 4.0, 2.8, 3.5, and 3.6 log CFU/g, presumptive B. cereus counts were 0.7, 1.0, 0.8, 1.0, and 0.9 log CFU/g, and total coliform counts were -0.3, -0.4, -0.5, 0.0, and -0.4 log of the most probable number per gram, respectively. No Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157, other fecal coliforms, or Staphylococcus aureus was found on seeds. Compared with conventional seeds, the organic seeds had lower or equivalent counts for total microorganisms, presumptive B. cereus, and total coliforms. When seeds were sprouting using a glass jar, the growth of presumptive B. cereus was significant for radish and broccoli but not for alfalfa, lentil, and mungbean sprouts; the counts exceeded 5.0 log CFU/g in radish sprouts. When sprouts were grown using an automatic sprouting device, presumptive B. cereus showed slight growth (< 3.0 log cycles) in radish, broccoli, and mungbean sprouts but no growth in alfalfa and lentil sprouts. Although the presumptive B. cereus isolates were enterotoxigenic, they did not produce or accumulate detectable levels of diarrheal toxins in freshly produced sprouts. PMID:21132973

  8. Analyses of MYMIV-induced transcriptome in Vigna mungo as revealed by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ganguli, Sayak; Dey, Avishek; Banik, Rahul; Kundu, Anirban; Pal, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Virus (MYMIV) is the viral pathogen that causes yellow mosaic disease to a number of legumes including Vigna mungo. VM84 is a recombinant inbred line resistant to MYMIV, developed in our laboratory through introgression of resistance trait from V. mungo line VM-1. Here we present the quality control passed transcriptome data of mock inoculated (control) and MYMIV-infected VM84, those have already been submitted in Sequence Read Archive (SRX1032950, SRX1082731) of NCBI. QC reports of FASTQ files generated by ‘SeqQC V2.2’ bioinformatics tool. PMID:26981413

  9. Genetic diversity of the black gram [Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper] gene pool as revealed by SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Kaewwongwal, Anochar; Kongjaimun, Alisa; Somta, Prakit; Chankaew, Sompong; Yimram, Tarikar; Srinives, Peerasak

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 520 cultivated and 14 wild accessions of black gram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) were assessed for diversity using 22 SSR markers. Totally, 199 alleles were detected with a mean of 9.05 alleles per locus. Wild black gram showed higher gene diversity than cultivated black gram. Gene diversity of cultivated accessions among regions was comparable, while allelic richness of South Asia was higher than that of other regions. 78.67% of the wild gene diversity presented in cultivated accessions, indicating that the domestication bottleneck effect in black gram is relatively low. Genetic distance analysis revealed that cultivated black gram was more closely related to wild black gram from South Asia than that from Southeast Asia. STRUCTURE, principal coordinate and neighbor-joining analyses consistently revealed that 534 black gram accessions were grouped into three major subpopulations. The analyses also revealed that cultivated black gram from South Asia was genetically distinct from that from West Asia. Comparison by SSR analysis with other closely related Vigna species, including mungbean, azuki bean, and rice bean, revealed that level of gene diversity of black gram is comparable to that of mungbean and rice bean but lower than that of azuki bean. PMID:26069442

  10. Salvaging effect of triacontanol on plant growth, thermotolerance, macro-nutrient content, amino acid concentration and modulation of defense hormonal levels under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad; Shahzad, Raheem; Khan, Abdul Latif; Asaf, Sajjad; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Kang, Sang-Mo; Bilal, Saqib; Hamayun, Muhammad; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-02-01

    In this study, it was hypothesized that application of triacontanol, a ubiquitous saturated primary alcohol, at different times-before (TBHS), mid (TMHS), and after (TAHS) heat stress-will extend heat stress (HS) protection in mungbean. The effect of triacontanol on the levels of defense hormones abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) was investigated along with the plant growth promotion, nutrient and amino acid content with and without heat stress. Heat stress caused a prominent reduction in plant growth attributes, nutrient and amino acid content, which were attributed to the decreased level of ABA and JA. However, application of triacontanol, particularly in the TBHS and TMHS treatments, reversed the deleterious effects of HS by showing increased ABA and JA levels that favored the significant increase in plant growth attributes, enhanced nutrient content, and high amount of amino acid. TAHS, a short-term application of triacontanol, also significantly increased ABA and JA levels and thus revealed important information of its association with hormonal modulation. The growth-promoting effect of triacontanol was also confirmed under normal growth conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate the beneficial effects of triacontanol, with or without heat stress, on mungbean and its interaction with or regulation of the levels of defense hormones. PMID:26744997

  11. Regulation of Population Densities of Heterodera cajani and Other Plant-Parasitic Nematodes by Crop Rotations on Vertisols, in Semi-Arid Tropical Production Systems in India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S B; Rego, T J; Mohiuddin, M; Rao, V N

    1996-06-01

    The significance of double crop (intercrop and sequential crop), single crop (rainy season crop fallow from June to September), and rotations on densities of Heterodera cajani, Helicotylenchus retusus, and Rotylenchulus reniformis was studied on Vertisol (Typic Pellusterts) between 1987 and 1993. Cowpea (Vigna sinensis), mungbean (Phaseolus aureus), and pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) greatly increased the population densities of H. cajani and suppressed the population densities of other plant-parasitic nematodes. Mean population densities of H. cajani were about 8 times lower in single crop systems than in double crop systems, with pigeonpea as a component intercrop. Plots planted to sorghum, safflower, and chickpea in the preceding year contained fewer H. cajani eggs and juveniles than did plots previously planted to pigeonpea, cowpea, or mungbean. Continuous cropping of sorghum in the rainy season and safflower in the post-rainy season markedly reduced the population density of H. cajani. Sorghum, safflower, and chickpea favored increased population densities of H. retusus. Adding cowpea to the system resulted in a significant increase in the densities of R. reniformis. Mean densities of total plant-parasitic nematodes were three times greater in double crop systems, with pigeonpea as a component intercrop than in single crop systems with rainy season fallow component. Cropping systems had a regulatory effect on the nematode populations and could be an effective nematode management tactic. Intercropping of sorghum with H. cajani tolerant pigeonpea could be effective in increasing the productivity of traditional production systems in H. cajani infested regions. PMID:19277141

  12. Regulation of Population Densities of Heterodera cajani and Other Plant-Parasitic Nematodes by Crop Rotations on Vertisols, in Semi-Arid Tropical Production Systems in India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S. B.; Rego, T. J.; Mohiuddin, M.; Rao, V. N.

    1996-01-01

    The significance of double crop (intercrop and sequential crop), single crop (rainy season crop fallow from June to September), and rotations on densities of Heterodera cajani, Helicotylenchus retusus, and Rotylenchulus reniformis was studied on Vertisol (Typic Pellusterts) between 1987 and 1993. Cowpea (Vigna sinensis), mungbean (Phaseolus aureus), and pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) greatly increased the population densities of H. cajani and suppressed the population densities of other plant-parasitic nematodes. Mean population densities of H. cajani were about 8 times lower in single crop systems than in double crop systems, with pigeonpea as a component intercrop. Plots planted to sorghum, safflower, and chickpea in the preceding year contained fewer H. cajani eggs and juveniles than did plots previously planted to pigeonpea, cowpea, or mungbean. Continuous cropping of sorghum in the rainy season and safflower in the post-rainy season markedly reduced the population density of H. cajani. Sorghum, safflower, and chickpea favored increased population densities of H. retusus. Adding cowpea to the system resulted in a significant increase in the densities of R. reniformis. Mean densities of total plant-parasitic nematodes were three times greater in double crop systems, with pigeonpea as a component intercrop than in single crop systems with rainy season fallow component. Cropping systems had a regulatory effect on the nematode populations and could be an effective nematode management tactic. Intercropping of sorghum with H. cajani tolerant pigeonpea could be effective in increasing the productivity of traditional production systems in H. cajani infested regions. PMID:19277141

  13. Roles of the plasma membrane and the cell wall in the responses of plant cells to freezing.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoyoshi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Jitsuyama, Yutaka; Takezawa, Daisuke; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2002-09-01

    In an effort to clarify the responses of a wide range of plant cells to freezing, we examined the responses to freezing of the cells of chilling-sensitive and chilling-resistant tropical and subtropical plants. Among the cells of the plants that we examined, those of African violet ( Saintpaulia grotei Engl.) leaves were most chilling-sensitive, those of hypocotyls in mungbean [ Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilcz.] seedlings were moderately chilling-sensitive, and those of orchid [ Paphiopedilum insigne (Wallich ex Lindl.) Pfitz.] leaves were chilling-resistant, when all were chilled at -2 degrees C. By contrast, all these plant cells were freezing-sensitive and suffered extensive damage when they were frozen at -2 degrees C. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) confirmed that, upon chilling at -2 degrees C, both chilling-sensitive and chilling-resistant plant cells were supercooled. Upon freezing at -2 degrees C, by contrast, intracellular freezing occurred in Saintpaulia leaf cells, frost plasmolysis followed by intracellular freezing occurred in mungbean seedling cells, and extracellular freezing (cytorrhysis) occurred in orchid leaf cells. We postulate that chilling-related destabilization of membranes might result in the loss of the ability of the plasma membrane to act as a barrier against the propagation of extracellular ice in chilling-sensitive plant cells. We also examined the role of cell walls in the response to freezing using cells in which the plasma membrane had been disrupted by repeated freezing and thawing. In chilling-sensitive Saintpaulia and mungbean cells, the cells with a disrupted plasma membrane responded to freezing at -2 degrees C by intracellular freezing. By contrast, in chilling-resistant orchid cells, as well as in other cells of chilling-resistant and freezing-resistant plant tissues, including leaves of orchard grass ( Dactylis glomerata L.), leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and cortical tissues of mulberry ( Morus

  14. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  15. Green and brown bridges between weeds and crops reveal novel Diaporthe species in Australia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S M; Tan, Y P; Shivas, R G; Neate, S M; Morin, L; Bissett, A; Aitken, E A B

    2015-12-01

    Diaporthe (syn. Phomopsis) species are well-known saprobes, endophytes or pathogens on a range of plants. Several species have wide host ranges and multiple species may sometimes colonise the same host species. This study describes eight novel Diaporthe species isolated from live and/or dead tissue from the broad acre crops lupin, maize, mungbean, soybean and sunflower, and associated weed species in Queensland and New South Wales, as well as the environmental weed bitou bush (Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. rotundata) in eastern Australia. The new taxa are differentiated on the basis of morphology and DNA sequence analyses based on the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region, and part of the translation elongation factor-1α and ß-tubulin genes. The possible agricultural significance of live weeds and crop residues ('green bridges') as well as dead weeds and crop residues ('brown bridges') in aiding survival of the newly described Diaporthe species is discussed. PMID:26823627

  16. A Homoploid Hybrid Between Wild Vigna Species Found in a Limestone Karst

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yu; Iseki, Kohtaro; Kitazawa, Kumiko; Muto, Chiaki; Somta, Prakit; Irie, Kenji; Naito, Ken; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Genus Vigna comprise several domesticated species including cowpea and mungbean, and diverse wild species. We found an introgressive hybrid population derived from two wild species, Vigna umbellata and Vigna exilis, in Ratchaburi district, Thailand. The hybrid was morphologically similar to V. umbellata but habituated in a limestone rock mountain, which is usually dominated by V. exilis. Analyzing simple sequence repeat loci indicated the hybrid has undergone at least one round of backcross by V. umbellata. We found the hybrid acquired vigorous growth from V. umbellata and drought tolerance plus early flowering from V. exilis, and thus has taken over some habitats of V. exilis in limestone karsts. Given the wide crossability of V. umbellata, the hybrid can be a valuable genetic resource to improve drought tolerance of some domesticated species. PMID:26648953

  17. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls in aqueous solutions after UV-peroxide treatment: focus on toxicity of effluent to primary producers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dennis N; Macawile, Maria Cristina A; Abella, Leonila C; Gallardo, Susan M

    2011-09-01

    The combination of UV irradiation and hydrogen peroxide (UV-H(2)O(2)) was shown to be effective in treating water spiked with 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobipheny (PCB 153), reducing its concentration by as much as 98%. To test the toxicity of the effluent, bioassays involving three species of primary producers were performed. Results showed the effluent exerting an adverse effect on the algae Scenedesmus bijugatus and the duckweed Lemna paucicostata. On the other hand, exposure of the mungbean Vigna radiata to the effluent revealed mostly no statistically significant adverse effect or growth stimulation. This suggested that on an exposure period of 96 h, higher forms of chlorophyll-bearing species such as plants are relatively unaffected by trace concentrations of PCBs and degradation products, while less differentiated species like algae and duckweeds are vulnerable. PMID:21531462

  18. Metal uptake via phosphate fertilizer and city sewage in cereal and legume crops in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, G; Javed, W; Hussain, A; Wahid, A; Murtaza, B; Owens, G

    2015-06-01

    Crop irrigation with heavy metal-contaminated effluents is increasingly common worldwide and necessitates management strategies for safe crop production on contaminated soils. This field study examined the phytoavailability of three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn) in two cereal (wheat, maize) and legume (chickpea, mungbean) crops in response to the application of either phosphatic fertilizer or sewage-derived water irrigation over two successive years. Five fertilizer treatments, i.e. control, recommended nitrogen (N) applied alone and in combination of three levels of phosphorus (P), half, full and 1.5 times of recommended P designated as N0P0, N1P0, N1P0.5, N1P1.0, and N1P1.5, respectively. Tissue concentrations of Cd, Cu, Zn, and P were determined in various plant parts, i.e., root, straw, and grains. On the calcareous soils studied while maximum biomass production was obtained with application of P at half the recommended dose, the concentrations of metals in the crops generally decreased with increasing P levels. Tissue metal concentrations increased with the application of N alone. Translocation and accumulation of Zn and Cu were consistently higher than Cd. And the pattern of Cd accumulation differed among plant species; more Cd being accumulated by dicots than monocots, especially in their grains. The order of Cd accumulation in grains was maize > chickpea > mungbean > wheat. Mungbean and chickpea straws also had higher tissue Cd concentration above permissible limits. The two legume species behaved similarly, while cereal species differed from each other in their Cd accumulation. Metal ion concentrations were markedly higher in roots followed by straw and grains. Increasing soil-applied P also increased the extractable metal and P concentrations in the post-harvest soil. Despite a considerable addition of metals by P fertilizer, all levels of applied P effectively decreased metal phytoavailability in sewage-irrigated soils, and applying half of the

  19. In silico allergenicity prediction of several lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Garino, Cristiano; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are common allergens and they are particularly widespread within the plant kingdom. They have a highly conserved three-dimensional structure that generate a strong cross-reactivity among the members of this family. In the last years several web tools for the prediction of allergenicity of new molecules based on their homology with known allergens have been released, and guidelines to assess potential allergenicity of proteins through bioinformatics have been established. Even if such tools are only partially reliable yet, they can provide important indications when other kinds of molecular characterization are lacking. The potential allergenicity of 28 amino acid sequences of LTPs homologs, either retrieved from the UniProt database or in silico deduced from the corresponding EST coding sequence, was predicted using 7 publicly available web tools. Moreover, their similarity degree to their closest known LTP allergens was calculated, in order to evaluate their potential cross-reactivity. Finally, all sequences were studied for their identity degree with the peach allergen Pru p 3, considering the regions involved in the formation of its known conformational IgE-binding epitope. Most of the analyzed sequences displayed a high probability to be allergenic according to all the software employed. The analyzed LTPs from bell pepper, cassava, mango, mungbean and soybean showed high homology (>70%) with some known allergenic LTPs, suggesting a potential risk of cross-reactivity for sensitized individuals. Other LTPs, like for example those from canola, cassava, mango, mungbean, papaya or persimmon, displayed a high degree of identity with Pru p 3 within the consensus sequence responsible for the formation, at three-dimensional level, of its major conformational epitope. Since recent studies highlighted how in patients mono-sensitized to peach LTP the levels of IgE seem directly proportional to the chance of developing cross

  20. Pyridine metabolism in tea plants: salvage, conjugate formation and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Deng, Wei-Wei

    2012-11-01

    Pyridine compounds, including nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, are key metabolites of both the salvage pathway for NAD and the biosynthesis of related secondary compounds. We examined the in situ metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide, [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid and [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid riboside in tissue segments of tea (Camellia sinensis) plants, and determined the activity of enzymes involved in pyridine metabolism in protein extracts from young tea leaves. Exogenously supplied (14)C-labelled nicotinamide was readily converted to nicotinic acid, and some nicotinic acid was salvaged to nicotinic acid mononucleotide and then utilized for the synthesis of NAD and NADP. The nicotinic acid riboside salvage pathway discovered recently in mungbean cotyledons is also operative in tea leaves. Nicotinic acid was converted to nicotinic acid N-glucoside, but not to trigonelline (N-methylnicotinic acid), in any part of tea seedlings. Active catabolism of nicotinic acid was observed in tea leaves. The fate of [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid indicates that glutaric acid is a major catabolite of nicotinic acid; it was further metabolised, and carbon atoms were finally released as CO(2). The catabolic pathway observed in tea leaves appears to start with the nicotinic acid N-glucoside formation; this pathway differs from catabolic pathways observed in microorganisms. Profiles of pyridine metabolism in tea plants are discussed. PMID:22527843

  1. Methionine salvage pathway in relation to ethylene biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The recycling of methionine during ethylene biosynthesis (the methionine cycle) was studied. During ethylene biosynthesis, the H/sub 3/CS-group of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is released at 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), which is recycled to methionine via 5'-methylthioribose (MTS). In mungbean hypocotyls and cell-free extracts of avocado fruit, (/sup 14/C)MTR was converted to labeled methionine via 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutyric acid (HMB) as intermediates. Radioactive tracer studies showed that KMB was converted readily in vivo and in vitro to methionine, while HMB was converted much more slowly. The conversion of KMB to methionine by dialyzed avocado extract required an amino group donor. Among several potential donors tested, L-glutamine was the most efficient. Incubation of (ribose-U-/sup 14/C)MTR with avocado extract resulted in the production of (/sup 14/C)formate, with little evolution of other /sup 14/C-labeled one-carbon compounds, indicating that the conversion of MTR to KMB involves a loss of formate, presumably from C-1 of MTR.

  2. Metabolism of 5-methylthioribose to methionine

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, J.H.; Yang, S.F.

    1987-06-01

    During ethylene biosynthesis, the H/sub 3/CS-group of S-adenosylmethionine is released as 5'-methylthioadenosine, which is recycled to methionine via 5-methylthioribose (MTR). In mungbean hypocotyls and cell-free extracts of avocado, (/sup 14/C)MTR was converted into labeled methionine via 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutyric acid (HMB), as intermediates. Incubation of (ribose-U-/sup 14/C)MTR with avocado extract resulted in the production of (/sup 14/C)formate, indicating the conversion of MTR to KMB involves a loss of formate, presumably from C-1 of MTR. Tracer studies showed that KMB was converted readily in vivo and in vitro to methionine, while HMB was converted much more slowly. The conversion of KMB to methionine by dialyzed avocado extract requires an amino donor. Among several potential donors examined, L-glutamine was the most efficient. Anaerobiosis inhibited only partially the oxidation of MTR to formate, KMB/HMB, and methionine by avocado extract. The role of O/sub 2/ in the conversion of MTR to methionine is discussed.

  3. Fermentation and quality of yellow pigments from golden brown rice solid culture by a selected Monascus mutant.

    PubMed

    Yongsmith, Busaba; Thongpradis, Panida; Klinsupa, Worawan; Chantrapornchai, Withida; Haruthaithanasan, Vichai

    2013-10-01

    A single peak (λmax 370) yellow pigment-producing mutant derived from Monascus sp. TISTR 3179 was used for the pigment production in solid rice culture. Various factors affecting yellow tones were investigated. Hom-mali rice variety was the best amongst five Thai local varieties used for fungus culture. It was also better than corn, mungbean, soybean, potato, sweet potato, or cassava tubers. The moisture content and temperature were the key environmental factors affecting the color tones of creamy, tangerine, and golden brown rice solid cultures. The golden brown rice culture gave the highest yellow pigment concentration. Under an optimum room temperature of 28-32 °C, an initial moisture content of 42 %, and 7-day-old inoculum size of 2 % (v/w) the maximum yield at 2,224.63 A370U/gdw of yellow pigment was produced. A mellow yellow powder at 550 A370U/gdw could be obtained using spray-drying techniques. The powder had a moisture content of 5.15 %, a water activity value of 0.398, a hue angle of 73.70 ° (yellowish orange), high lightness (L) of 74.63, color saturation (C) of 28.97, a neutral pH of 7.42, 0.12 % acidity and solubility of 0.211 g/10 ml. It was noteworthy that the Chinese fresh noodle with spray-dried yellow powder showed no discoloration during 8-day storage. PMID:23912113

  4. Identification and structure elucidation of a novel antifungal compound produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 against Macrophomina phaseolina.

    PubMed

    Illakkiam, Devaraj; Ponraj, Paramasivan; Shankar, Manoharan; Muthusubramanian, Shanmugam; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 was found to protect mungbean plants from charcoal rot disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina. Secondary metabolites from the culture supernatant of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 were extracted with ethyl acetate and the antifungal compound was purified by preparative HPLC using reverse phase chromatography. The purified compound showed antifungal activity against M. phaseolina and other phytopathogenic fungi (Fusarium sp., Rhizoctonia sp. Alternaria sp., and Aspergillus sp.). The structure of the purified compound was determined using (1)H, (13)C, 2D NMR spectra and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Spectral data suggest that the antifungal compound is 3,4-dihydroxy-N-methyl-4-(4-oxochroman-2-yl)butanamide, with the chemical formula C14H17NO5 and a molecular mass of 279. Though chemically synthesized chromanone derivatives have been shown to have antifungal activity, we report for the first time, the microbial production of a chromanone derivative with antifungal activity. This ability of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 makes it a suitable strain for biocontrol. PMID:24037513

  5. Determination of cyanogenic compounds in edible plants by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye-Jeon; Do, Byung-Kyung; Shim, Soon-Mi; Kwon, Hoonjeong; Lee, Dong-Ha; Nah, Ahn-Hee; Choi, Youn-Ju; Lee, Sook-Yeon

    2013-06-01

    Cyanogenic glycosides are HCN-producing phytotoxins; HCN is a powerful and a rapidly acting poison. It is not difficult to find plants containing these compounds in the food supply and/or in medicinal herb collections. The objective of this study was to investigate the distribution of total cyanide in nine genera (Dolichos, Ginkgo, Hordeum, Linum, Phaseolus, Prunus, Phyllostachys, Phytolacca, and Portulaca) of edible plants and the effect of the processing on cyanide concentration. Total cyanide content was measured by ion chromatography following acid hydrolysis and distillation. Kernels of Prunus genus are used medicinally, but they possess the highest level of total cyanide of up to 2259.81 CN(-)/g dry weight. Trace amounts of cyanogenic compounds were detected in foodstuffs such as mungbeans and bamboo shoots. Currently, except for the WHO guideline for cassava, there is no global standard for the allowed amount of cyanogenic compounds in foodstuffs. However, our data emphasize the need for the guidelines if plants containing cyanogenic glycosidesare to be developed as dietary supplements. PMID:24278641

  6. Instant multigrain porridge: effect of cooking treatment on physicochemical and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Mandge, Harshad M; Sharma, Savita; Dar, Basharat Nabi

    2014-01-01

    Multigrain blends of wheat, mungbean, sorghum, barley, corn (50:20:15:10:5) and flaxseeds @ 1% were processed by instantization (cooking) treatments to produce instant multigrain porridge. Cooking treatment involved three processing steps, Soaking (A: Soaked for 5 h at 50 °C, B: Soaked for 3.5 h at 65 °C), Steaming at 15 psi for 10, 15, 20 min. and drying at 40 °C. Quality evaluation (physical, textural and sensory) of multigrain porridge was used as criteria to select the best processing condition for instantization. Per cent water absorption of grains increased significantly with increase in soaking time/temperature. Complete gelatinization of starch with no stickiness in cooked grains was obtained at 65 °C/3.5 h (soaking) followed by steaming (15 psi/15 min). The results suggest that multigrain blends can be instantized into an acceptable and nutritional, traditional breakfast food (porridge). The multigrain porridge given soaking treatment at 65 °C/3.5 h and steaming treatment for 20 min was having better physical and sensory properties. PMID:24426053

  7. Applications of nuclear and isotopic techniques in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Hilmy, N.; Hendranto, K.

    1994-12-31

    Applications of Nuclear and Isotopic Techniques have been developed by the National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) since early 1970 in Indonesia. The scope of these applications covers various fields such as agriculture, hydrology, sedimentology and industry. Some applications of tracer techniques in industry which have been done such as measurement of homogeneity of mixing process in fertiliser and paper factory, residence time distribution in gold processing plant, mercury inventory in caustic soda plant, enhanced oil recovery in oil production wells, leakage investigation in dust chamber of fertiliser plant and blockage of pipeline, are presented in this paper. In the field of NDT by radiographic technique, BATAN regularly conducts training courses and also issues licences for Level I and II. Some applications of nuclear techniques in agriculture such as mutation breeding, animal production and animal health have shown the potential of radiation in creating variability as a basis for varietal improvements in several food crop species, the potential of using isotopes as tracers in the studies on metabolism, particularly in relation to the efficiency of rumen fermentative digestion and biological evaluation of locally available feedstuffs from agricultural and agro-industrial byproducts. So far, four varieties of nice, two varieties of soybean, and one variety of mungbean have been officially approved for release, and one formulation of feed supplement utilizing locally available agricultural and agro-industrial byproducts has been established and used for cattle and goats. In animal health, a radiovaccine against coccidiosis in poultry has been produced and used routinely.

  8. Tropical food legumes: virus diseases of economic importance and their control.

    PubMed

    Hema, Masarapu; Sreenivasulu, Pothur; Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Kumar, P Lava; Reddy, Dodla V R

    2014-01-01

    Diverse array of food legume crops (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae) have been adopted worldwide for their protein-rich seed. Choice of legumes and their importance vary in different parts of the world. The economically important legumes are severely affected by a range of virus diseases causing significant economic losses due to reduction in grain production, poor quality seed, and costs incurred in phytosanitation and disease control. The majority of the viruses infecting legumes are vectored by insects, and several of them are also seed transmitted, thus assuming importance in the quarantine and in the epidemiology. This review is focused on the economically important viruses of soybean, groundnut, common bean, cowpea, pigeonpea, mungbean, urdbean, chickpea, pea, faba bean, and lentil and begomovirus diseases of three minor tropical food legumes (hyacinth bean, horse gram, and lima bean). Aspects included are geographic distribution, impact on crop growth and yields, virus characteristics, diagnosis of causal viruses, disease epidemiology, and options for control. Effectiveness of selection and planting with virus-free seed, phytosanitation, manipulation of crop cultural and agronomic practices, control of virus vectors and host plant resistance, and potential of transgenic resistance for legume virus disease control are discussed. PMID:25410108

  9. Bean [alpha]-Amylase Inhibitor Confers Resistance to the Pea Weevil (Bruchus pisorum) in Transgenic Peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, H. E.; Gollasch, S.; Moore, A.; Tabe, L. M.; Craig, S.; Hardie, D. C.; Chrispeels, M. J.; Spencer, D.; Higgins, TJV.

    1995-01-01

    Bruchid larvae cause major losses of grain legume crops through-out the world. Some bruchid species, such as the cowpea weevil and the azuki bean weevil, are pests that damage stored seeds. Others, such as the pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum), attack the crop growing in the field. We transferred the cDNA encoding the [alpha]-amylase inhibitor ([alpha]-AI) found in the seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) into pea (Pisum sativum) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Expression was driven by the promoter of phytohemagglutinin, another bean seed protein. The [alpha]-amylase inhibitor gene was stably expressed in the transgenic pea seeds at least to the T5 seed generation, and [alpha]-AI accumulated in the seeds up to 3% of soluble protein. This level is somewhat higher than that normally found in beans, which contain 1 to 2% [alpha]-AI. In the T5 seed generation the development of pea weevil larvae was blocked at an early stage. Seed damage was minimal and seed yield was not significantly reduced in the transgenic plants. These results confirm the feasibility of protecting other grain legumes such as lentils, mungbean, groundnuts, and chickpeas against a variety of bruchids using the same approach. Although [alpha]-AI also inhibits human [alpha]-amylase, cooked peas should not have a negative impact on human energy metabolism. PMID:12228429

  10. Metabolomic Profiling of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens-Induced Root Nodules Reveals Both Host Plant-Specific and Developmental Signatures.

    PubMed

    Lardi, Martina; Murset, Valérie; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Mesa, Socorro; Ahrens, Christian H; Zamboni, Nicola; Pessi, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont, which can grow inside root-nodule cells of the agriculturally important soybean and other host plants. Our previous studies described B. diazoefficiens host-specific global expression changes occurring during legume infection at the transcript and protein level. In order to further characterize nodule metabolism, we here determine by flow injection-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis the metabolome of (i) nodules and roots from four different B. diazoefficiens host plants; (ii) soybean nodules harvested at different time points during nodule development; and (iii) soybean nodules infected by two strains mutated in key genes for nitrogen fixation, respectively. Ribose (soybean), tartaric acid (mungbean), hydroxybutanoyloxybutanoate (siratro) and catechol (cowpea) were among the metabolites found to be specifically elevated in one of the respective host plants. While the level of C4-dicarboxylic acids decreased during soybean nodule development, we observed an accumulation of trehalose-phosphate at 21 days post infection (dpi). Moreover, nodules from non-nitrogen-fixing bacteroids (nifA and nifH mutants) showed specific metabolic alterations; these were also supported by independent transcriptomics data. The alterations included signs of nitrogen limitation in both mutants, and an increased level of a phytoalexin in nodules induced by the nifA mutant, suggesting that the tissue of these nodules exhibits defense and stress reactions. PMID:27240350

  11. Starch behaviors and mechanical properties of starch blend films with different plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Vu, Hoang Phuong; Lumdubwong, Namfone

    2016-12-10

    The main objective of the study was to gain insight into structural and mechanical starch behaviors of the plasticized starch blend films. Mechanical properties and starch behaviors of cassava (CS)/and mungbean (MB) (50/50, w/w) starch blend films containing glycerol (Gly) or sorbitol (Sor) at 33% weight content were investigated. It was found that tensile strength TS and %E of the Gly-CSMB films were similar to those of MB films; but%E of all Sor-films was identical. TS of plasticized films increased when AM content and crystallinity increased. When Sor was substituted for Gly, crystallinity of starch films and their TS increased. The CSMB and MB films had somewhat a similar molecular profile and comparable mechanical properties. Therefore, it was proposed the starch molecular profile containing amylopectin with high M¯w, low M¯w of amylose, and the small size of intermediates may impart the high TS and%E of starch films. PMID:27577902

  12. Characterization and crystallography of recombinant 7S globulins of Adzuki bean and structure-function relationships with 7S globulins of various crops.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takako; Maruyama, Nobuyuki; Salleh, Mohamad Ramlan Mohamed; Mikami, Bunzo; Utsumi, Shigeru

    2008-06-11

    The recombinant proteins Adzuki 7S1, Adzuki 7S2, and Adzuki 7S3 were prepared through the Escherichia coli expression systems of three kinds of adzuki bean cDNAs. The recombinant proteins exhibited intrinsic thermal stabilities, surface hydrophobicities, and solubilities, although the homology of their amino acid sequences ranged from 95-98%. To understand why these individual proteins exhibited different properties, their three-dimensional structures were elucidated. The three proteins were successfully crystallized, and the three-dimensional structures of Adzuki 7S1 and Adzuki 7S3 were determined. The properties and structures of these two proteins were comprehensively compared with those of recombinant 7S globulins (soybean beta-conglycinins beta and alpha'c and mungbean 8Salpha) reported previously. It was likely that cavity sizes, hydrogen bonds, salt bridges, hydrophobic interactions, and lengths of loops determine the thermal stabilities of 7S globulins, and results indicated that cavity sizes strongly contribute to such stability. Surface hydrophobicity was also found to be determined not only by distributions of hydrophobic residues on the molecular surface. Furthermore, solubility at neutral and weak alkaline pH values at mu = 0.08 was found to be dominantly influenced by the electrostatic surface potentials. PMID:18461964

  13. Metabolomic Profiling of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens-Induced Root Nodules Reveals Both Host Plant-Specific and Developmental Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Lardi, Martina; Murset, Valérie; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Mesa, Socorro; Ahrens, Christian H.; Zamboni, Nicola; Pessi, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont, which can grow inside root-nodule cells of the agriculturally important soybean and other host plants. Our previous studies described B. diazoefficiens host-specific global expression changes occurring during legume infection at the transcript and protein level. In order to further characterize nodule metabolism, we here determine by flow injection–time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis the metabolome of (i) nodules and roots from four different B. diazoefficiens host plants; (ii) soybean nodules harvested at different time points during nodule development; and (iii) soybean nodules infected by two strains mutated in key genes for nitrogen fixation, respectively. Ribose (soybean), tartaric acid (mungbean), hydroxybutanoyloxybutanoate (siratro) and catechol (cowpea) were among the metabolites found to be specifically elevated in one of the respective host plants. While the level of C4-dicarboxylic acids decreased during soybean nodule development, we observed an accumulation of trehalose-phosphate at 21 days post infection (dpi). Moreover, nodules from non-nitrogen-fixing bacteroids (nifA and nifH mutants) showed specific metabolic alterations; these were also supported by independent transcriptomics data. The alterations included signs of nitrogen limitation in both mutants, and an increased level of a phytoalexin in nodules induced by the nifA mutant, suggesting that the tissue of these nodules exhibits defense and stress reactions. PMID:27240350

  14. Variability of chloroplast DNA and nuclear ribosomal DNA in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and its wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Fregene, M A; Vargas, J; Ikea, J; Angel, F; Tohme, J; Asiedu, R A; Akoroda, M O; Roca, W M

    1994-11-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cp) and nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) variation was investigated in 45 accessions of cultivated and wild Manihot species. Ten independent mutations, 8 point mutations and 2 length mutations were identified, using eight restriction enzymes and 12 heterologous cpDNA probes from mungbean. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis defined nine distinct chloroplast types, three of which were found among the cultivated accessions and six among the wild species. Cladistic analysis of the cpDNA data using parsimony yielded a hypothetical phylogeny of lineages among the cpDNAs of cassava and its wild relatives that is congruent with morphological evolutionary differentiation in the genus. The results of our survey of cpDNA, together with rDNA restriction site change at the intergenic spacer region and rDNA repeat unit length variation (using rDNA cloned fragments from taro as probe), suggest that cassava might have arisen from the domestication of wild tuberous accessions of some Manihot species, followed by intensive selection. M. esculenta subspp flabellifolia is probably a wild progenitor. Introgressive hybridization with wild forms and pressures to adapt to the widely varying climates and topography in which cassava is found might have enhanced the crop's present day variability. PMID:24178017

  15. Efficacy of application of vegetable seed oils as grain protectant against infestation by Callosobruchus chinensis and its effect on milling fractions and apparent degree of dehusking of legume-pulses.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Dheeraj; Shukla, A K; Tripathi, Kamal K; Singh, A; Dixit, A K; Singh, K

    2006-01-01

    The solvent extracted vegetable seed oils of Cucurbitaceae family viz. Bitter gourd (Momordica charentia), Small bitter gourd (Momordica dioica), Bottle gourd (Lagenaria siscraria) and Ridge gourd (Luffa acutangula) were evaluated as grain protectant against callosobruchus chinensis on the stored legume-pulse grains. All the vegetable seed oils were found effective as legume-pulse grain protectant, which provided, negligible weight loss at the oil-application rate of 6-8 mL/kg in legume-pulse grain after 60 days storage at laboratory conditions. The milling yield and degree of dehusking gets improved after the oil application. The use of solvent extracted Small bitter gourd seed oil at the level of 6-8 mL/kg of legume-pulse grain sample resulted in the improved apparent degree of dehusking from 40.0 to 72.59, 59.88 to 92.44, 63.39 to 87.50 and 57.0 to 79.43 for Pigeonpea (Canjanus cajan), Chickpea (Cicer arietinum), Urdbean (Phaseolus mungo) and Mungbean (Phaseolus radiatus), respectively. PMID:17693691

  16. Transcript dynamics at early stages of molecular interactions of MYMIV with resistant and susceptible genotypes of the leguminous host, Vigna mungo.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Anirban; Patel, Anju; Paul, Sujay; Pal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Initial phases of the MYMIV-Vigna mungo interaction is crucial in determining the infection phenotype upon challenging with the virus. During incompatible interaction, the plant deploys multiple stratagems that include extensive transcriptional alterations defying the virulence factors of the pathogen. Such molecular events are not frequently addressed by genomic tools. In order to obtain a critical insight to unravel how V. mungo respond to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), we have employed the PCR based suppression subtractive hybridization technique to identify genes that exhibit altered expressions. Dynamics of 345 candidate genes are illustrated that differentially expressed either in compatible or incompatible reactions and their possible biological and cellular functions are predicted. The MYMIV-induced physiological aspects of the resistant host include reactive oxygen species generation, induction of Ca2+ mediated signaling, enhanced expression of transcripts involved in phenylpropanoid and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways; all these together confer resistance against the invader. Elicitation of genes implicated in salicylic acid (SA) pathway suggests that immune response is under the regulation of SA signaling. A significant fraction of modulated transcripts are of unknown function indicating participation of novel candidate genes in restricting this viral pathogen. Susceptibility on the other hand, as exhibited by V. mungo Cv. T9 is perhaps due to the poor execution of these transcript modulation exhibiting remarkable repression of photosynthesis related genes resulting in chlorosis of leaves followed by penalty in crop yield. Thus, the present findings revealed an insight on the molecular warfare during host-virus interaction suggesting plausible signaling mechanisms and key biochemical pathways overriding MYMIV invasion in resistant genotype of V. mungo. In addition to inflate the existing knowledge base, the genomic resources identified in

  17. Transcript Dynamics at Early Stages of Molecular Interactions of MYMIV with Resistant and Susceptible Genotypes of the Leguminous Host, Vigna mungo

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anirban; Patel, Anju; Paul, Sujay; Pal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Initial phases of the MYMIV- Vigna mungo interaction is crucial in determining the infection phenotype upon challenging with the virus. During incompatible interaction, the plant deploys multiple stratagems that include extensive transcriptional alterations defying the virulence factors of the pathogen. Such molecular events are not frequently addressed by genomic tools. In order to obtain a critical insight to unravel how V. mungo respond to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), we have employed the PCR based suppression subtractive hybridization technique to identify genes that exhibit altered expressions. Dynamics of 345 candidate genes are illustrated that differentially expressed either in compatible or incompatible reactions and their possible biological and cellular functions are predicted. The MYMIV-induced physiological aspects of the resistant host include reactive oxygen species generation, induction of Ca2+ mediated signaling, enhanced expression of transcripts involved in phenylpropanoid and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways; all these together confer resistance against the invader. Elicitation of genes implicated in salicylic acid (SA) pathway suggests that immune response is under the regulation of SA signaling. A significant fraction of modulated transcripts are of unknown function indicating participation of novel candidate genes in restricting this viral pathogen. Susceptibility on the other hand, as exhibited by V. mungo Cv. T9 is perhaps due to the poor execution of these transcript modulation exhibiting remarkable repression of photosynthesis related genes resulting in chlorosis of leaves followed by penalty in crop yield. Thus, the present findings revealed an insight on the molecular warfare during host-virus interaction suggesting plausible signaling mechanisms and key biochemical pathways overriding MYMIV invasion in resistant genotype of V. mungo. In addition to inflate the existing knowledge base, the genomic resources identified in

  18. Composition of ready cooked foods sampled in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kajadphai-Taungbodhitham, Anocha

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the nutrient composition of ready cooked foods commonly consumed in southern Thailand. Four samples of fourteen types; eight curry dishes, one sweet and sour curry, a soup dish, one stir-fried curry, one stir-fried dish and two single plate dishes were each purchased from 4 different shops around Hat Yai district. The edible part was blended and analysed for its nutrients content per 100 g edible portion. Cassia curry, Thai noodle salad, Ark shell curry and Fermented fish gut dish were a good source of vitamin B1 (145 microg), vitamin C (2.20 mg), calcium (0.23 g) and iron (6.07 mg), respectively. Moisture, ash, fat, protein and carbohydrate were high in Mungbean noodle soup (92.6 g), Fermented fish gut dish (4.1 g), Cassia curry (9.9 g), Stingray stir-fried curry (16.7 g) and Thai noodle salad (24.2 g). Results also showed that the main ingredients and cooking process determined the nutritional values of the foods. A new set of 4 samples of Round noodle in southern curry was purchased, each separated into its edible components and nutrient values estimated using the Thai single ingredient databases. Their nutrient content was also calculated using the data of similar food obtained from this study. Considerable differences amongst the values from the 2 sets of calculation were observed. Problems inherent in using the single ingredient databases were highlighted. This work demonstrates a need to create a food composition database of whole cooked meals ready for serving that reflects real life consumption. PMID:17392077

  19. Loss of adaptation following reversion suggests trade-offs in host use by a seed beetle.

    PubMed

    Messina, F J; Durham, S L

    2015-10-01

    Experimental evolution has provided little support for the hypothesis that the narrow diets of herbivorous insects reflect trade-offs in performance across hosts; selection lines can sometimes adapt to an inferior novel host without a decline in performance on the ancestral host. An alternative approach for detecting trade-offs would be to measure adaptation decay after selection is relaxed, that is, when populations newly adapted to a novel host are reverted to the ancestral one. Lines of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus rapidly adapted to a poor host (lentil); survival in lentil seeds increased from 2% to > 90% in < 30 generations. After the lines had reached a plateau with respect to survival in lentil, sublines were reverted to the ancestral host, mung bean. Twelve generations of reversion had little effect on performance in lentil, but after 25-35 generations, the reverted lines exhibited lower survival, slower development and smaller size. The most divergent pair of lines was then assayed on both lentil and mung bean. Performance on lentil was again much poorer in the reverted line than in the nonreverted one, but the lines performed equally well on mung bean. Moreover, the performance of the nonreverted line on mung bean remained comparable to that of the original mung-bean population. Our results thus present a paradox: loss of adaptation to lentil following reversion implies a trade-off, but the continued strong performance of lentil-adapted lines on mung bean does not. Genomic comparisons of the reverted, nonreverted and ancestral lines may resolve this paradox and determine the importance of selection vs. drift in causing a loss of adaptation following reversion. PMID:26201813

  20. The Vigna Genome Server, 'VigGS': A Genomic Knowledge Base of the Genus Vigna Based on High-Quality, Annotated Genome Sequence of the Azuki Bean, Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroaki; Naito, Ken; Takahashi, Yu; Sato, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Muto, Isamu; Itoh, Takeshi; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    The genus Vigna includes legume crops such as cowpea, mungbean and azuki bean, as well as >100 wild species. A number of the wild species are highly tolerant to severe environmental conditions including high-salinity, acid or alkaline soil; drought; flooding; and pests and diseases. These features of the genus Vigna make it a good target for investigation of genetic diversity in adaptation to stressful environments; however, a lack of genomic information has hindered such research in this genus. Here, we present a genome database of the genus Vigna, Vigna Genome Server ('VigGS', http://viggs.dna.affrc.go.jp), based on the recently sequenced azuki bean genome, which incorporates annotated exon-intron structures, along with evidence for transcripts and proteins, visualized in GBrowse. VigGS also facilitates user construction of multiple alignments between azuki bean genes and those of six related dicot species. In addition, the database displays sequence polymorphisms between azuki bean and its wild relatives and enables users to design primer sequences targeting any variant site. VigGS offers a simple keyword search in addition to sequence similarity searches using BLAST and BLAT. To incorporate up to date genomic information, VigGS automatically receives newly deposited mRNA sequences of pre-set species from the public database once a week. Users can refer to not only gene structures mapped on the azuki bean genome on GBrowse but also relevant literature of the genes. VigGS will contribute to genomic research into plant biotic and abiotic stresses and to the future development of new stress-tolerant crops. PMID:26644460

  1. Potassium contents of northeastern Thai foods.

    PubMed

    Sriboonlue, P; Prasongwatana, V; Suwantrai, S; Bovornpadungkitti, S; Tungsanga, K; Tosukhowong, P

    1998-08-01

    From our previous nutritional assessment, low potassium (K) intake among northeastern Thai males has been clearly demonstrated. This prompted us to undertake a survey of the K content of local foods. Food samples comprised of 57 animal and 142 plant products which were collected from various places in the northeast of Thailand. The dry ashing method was used to prepare the samples for K analysis using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Foods could be divided into 7 groups according to their K levels. Foods containing K > or = 1000 mg per 100 g fresh food were categorized in group 1. These were mainly foods in the legume group, i.e., soybean, cowpea and mungbean. While rice (polished) and rice products, the main staple, were in group 7, the lowest K group of less than 100 mg per 100 g fresh food. Comparison studies of the natural foods between those collected from the northeast and from the central regions of the country, and between the cooked foods purchased from the rural villages and from the urban areas of Khon Kaen municipality, showed that, for most food items, the K content was similar wherever it came from. However, when the K content in various parts or in different stages of growth of the same kind of plants or animals was compared, a great variation was clearly seen, for example, young tamarind leaves contained K in group 6 whereas ripe tamarind fruit contained K in group 1. According to our food consumption data, the analysis of food components of 48 meals taken during the hot season by 13 rural volunteers revealed that food items eaten with the highest frequencies and in the largest amount were those in the low K food groups, i.e., glutinous rice (group 7) and green papaya (group 6). Our results suggest that the low K intake of these northeast rural Thai people is not due to a low K content of foods in this region, but rather that their food habits and low socioeconomic status restricts consumption of those food items with higher K contents. PMID

  2. The studies and legislation on radiation disinfestation, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ying-Kai; Chang, Ming-Shia; Hu, Tsan

    .O.C. in January 1983, not only on sprout inhibition on potatoes, sweat potatoes, shallot, onions, garlic within 150 Gy, radurization on papaya, mango within 1.5 kGy, but also on radiation disinfestation on rice, tobacco with 1 kGy and small red bean, mungbean within 200 Gy. The prospects for the radiation disinfestation are very promising and bright in Taiwan, R.O.C. and all preparation are being made to adopt this technology from research to commercial scale.

  3. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Global Warming Potential of Traditional and Diversified Tropical Rice Rotation Systems including Impacts of Upland Crop Management Practices i.e. Mulching and Inter-crop Cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janz, Baldur; Weller, Sebastian; Kraus, David; Wassmann, Reiner; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    crop rotations indicated a SOC loss for the R-M system, while for the other systems SOC stocks were unaffected. This trend for R-M systems needs to be followed since it has significant consequences not only for the GWP balance but also with regard to soil fertility. New upland crop management practices where first implemented during land-preparation for dry season (July) 2015 where i) 6t/ha rice straw was returned to the field and incorporated into soil as mulch treatment and ii) mungbean was grown as a cover-crop between dry and wet season in addition to the rice straw application. The input of organic material led to higher methanogenic substrate availability during the following wet season. GHG measurements for upland cropping systems (R-M and R-A) indicate increased CH4 and N2O emissions with mulching and inter-crop cultivation when compared to a control treatment. Subsequent measurements will be necessary to further quantify and assess the mitigation potentials or risks of new management practices. Nevertheless, regarding a future increase of water scarcity it can be expected that mixed lowland-upland systems will expand in SE Asia as water requirements were cut by more than half in both rotation systems with upland crops.