Science.gov

Sample records for muon chamber quality

  1. Cosmic muon detector using proportional chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Dezső; Gál, Zoltán; Hamar, Gergő; Sára Molnár, Janka; Oláh, Éva; Pázmándi, Péter

    2015-11-01

    A set of classical multi-wire proportional chambers was designed and constructed with the main purpose of efficient cosmic muon detection. These detectors are relatively simple to construct, and at the same time are low cost, making them ideal for educational purposes. The detector layers have efficiencies above 99% for minimum ionizing cosmic muons, and their position resolution is about 1 cm, that is, particle trajectories are clearly observable. Visualization of straight tracks is possible using an LED array, with the discriminated and latched signal driving the display. Due to the exceptional operating stability of the chambers, the design can also be used for cosmic muon telescopes.

  2. A drift chamber tracking system for muon scattering tomography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J.; Quillin, S.; Stapleton, M.; Steer, C.; Snow, S.

    2015-10-01

    Muon scattering tomography (MST) allows the identification of shielded high atomic number (high-Z) materials by measuring the scattering angle of cosmic ray muons passing through an inspection region. Cosmic ray muons scatter to a greater degree due to multiple Coulomb scattering in high-Z materials than low-Z materials, which can be measured as the angular difference between the incoming and outgoing trajectories of each muon. Measurements of trajectory are achieved by placing position sensitive particle tracking detectors above and below the inspection volume. By localising scattering information, the point at which a series of muons scatter can be used to reconstruct an image, differentiating high, medium and low density objects. MST is particularly useful for differentiating between materials of varying density in volumes that are difficult to inspect visually or by other means. This paper will outline the experimental work undertaken to develop a prototype MST system based on drift chamber technology. The planar drift chambers used in this prototype measure the longitudinal interaction position of an ionising particle from the time taken for elections, liberated in the argon (92.5%), carbon dioxide (5%), methane (2.5%) gas mixture, to reach a central anode wire. Such a system could be used to enhance the detection of shielded radiological material hidden within regular shipping cargo.

  3. Gas gain uniformity tests performed on multiwire proportional chambers for the LHCb muon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, A.; de Andrade Filho, L. M.; Barbosa, A. F.; Graulich, J. S.; Guerrer, G.; Lima, H. P.; Mair, K.; Polycarpo, E.; Reis, A.; Rodrigues, F.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Schoch Vianna, C.

    2008-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and the results of the gas gain uniformity tests performed as part of the quality control of the multiwire proportional chambers produced at CERN for the LHCb muon system. The test provides a relative gas gain measurement over the whole chamber sensitive area. It is based on the analysis of the pulse height spectrum obtained when the chamber is exposed to a 241Am radioactive source. Since the measurement is normalized to the peak of a precise pulse generator, the gain uniformity can also be evaluated among different gas gaps and different chambers. In order to cope with the specific requirements related to the relatively high number of chambers and to their varying geometry, a standalone and compact data acquisition system has been developed which is programmable at the hardware level and may be applied to many other applications requiring precise time-to-digital and analog-to-digital conversion, in correlated or non-correlated mode.

  4. Data Quality Monitoring for the CMS Resistive Plate Chamber Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimmino, A.; CMS Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), with their excellent time resolution (˜ 2 ns), were chosen as dedicated muon trigger detectors for the CMS experiment. RPCs fulfill the job of muon identification, estimate the momentum and unambiguously assign bunch crossing. The critical tasks of monitoring detector performances, debugging hardware, and certifying recorded data are carried out by the RPC Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) system. We here describe the structure, functionalities, and performances of the DQM applications for the CMS RPC detector.

  5. Development of the read-out ASIC for muon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, E.; Bulbakov, I.; Gusev, A.; Malankin, E.; Normanov, D.; Sagdiev, I.; Shumikhin, V.; Shumkin, O.; Ivanov, P.; Vinogradov, S.; Voronin, A.; Samsonov, V.; Ivanov, V.

    2016-02-01

    A front-end prototype ASIC for muon chambers is presented. ASIC was designed and prototyped in the CMOS UMC MMRF 180 nm process via Europractice. The chip includes 8 analog processing channels, each consisting of a preamplifier, two shapers (fast and slow), differential comparator and an area efficient 6 bit SAR ADC with 1.2 mW power consumption at 50 Msps. The chip also includes the threshold DAC and digital serializer. The design has the following features: dynamic range of 100 fC, channel hit rate of 2 MHz, ENC of 1000 e- at 50 pF, power consumption of 10 mW per channel, 6 bit SAR ADC.

  6. Drift time spectrum and gas monitoring in the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer precision chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Daniel S.; Amram, Nir; Ball, Robert; ben Moshe, Meny; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, John W.; Dai, Tiesheng; Diehl, Edward B.; Etzion, Erez; Ferretti, Claudio; Goldfarb, Steven; Gregory, Jeffery; Kiesel, Mike; McKee, Shawn; Thun, Rudi; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wilson, Alan; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhou, Bing

    2008-04-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer incorporates 354 000 drift tubes assembled into 1200 Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) precision chambers, with a total gas volume of 723 m3. This MDT gas, Ar 93% and CO2 7% at 3 bar, is cycled through the spectrometer at a rate of one total detector volume per day. Achieving the 80 μm drift tube design resolution requires stringent gas quality control as a fundamental component of the MDT calibration program. We report on the design, deployment and performance of a dedicated MDT mini-chamber conceived for continuous monitoring and drift time calibration of the ATLAS MDT operating gas. This chamber enables measurement of the drift spectra from which gas properties relevant to MDT calibrations and stable operating conditions are determined. Located in the ATLAS gas facility at CERN, the mini-chamber produces hourly drift spectra which are automatically analyzed. Results are published online and disseminated to the ATLAS muon system conditions and calibration databases in real time.

  7. Performance of a Drift Chamber Candidate for a Cosmic Muon Tomography System

    SciTech Connect

    Anghel, V.; Jewett, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Thompson, M.; Armitage, J.; Botte, J.; Boudjemline, K.; Erlandson, A.; Oakham, G.; Bueno, J.; Bryman, D.; Liu, Z.; Charles, E.; Gallant, G.; Cousins, T.; Noel, S.; Drouin, P.-L.; Waller, D.; Stocki, T. J.

    2011-12-13

    In the last decade, many groups around the world have been exploring different ways to probe transport containers which may contain illicit Special Nuclear Materials such as uranium. The muon tomography technique has been proposed as a cost effective system with an acceptable accuracy. A group of Canadian institutions (see above), funded by Defence Research and Development Canada, is testing different technologies to track the cosmic muons. One candidate is the single wire Drift Chamber. With the capability of a 2D impact position measurement, two detectors will be placed above and two below the object to be probed. In order to achieve a good 3D image quality of the cargo content, a good angular resolution is required. The simulation showed that 1mrad was required implying the spatial resolution of the trackers must be in the range of 1 to 2 mm for 1 m separation. A tracking system using three prototypes has been built and tested. The spatial resolution obtained is 1.7 mm perpendicular to the wire and 3 mm along the wire.

  8. Aging tests of full scale CMS muon cathode strip chambers

    SciTech Connect

    D. Acosta et al.

    2003-10-15

    Two CMS production Cathode Strip Chambers were tested for aging effects in the high radiation environment at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The chambers were irradiated over a large area: in total, about 2.1 m{sup 2} or 700 m of wire in each chamber. The 40% Ar+50%CO{sub 2}+10%CF{sub 4} gas mixture was provided by an open-loop gas system for one of the chambers and by closed-loop recirculating gas system for the other. After accumulating 0.3-0.4 C per centimeter of a wire, which is equivalent to operation during about 30-50 years at the peak LHC luminosity, no significant changes in gas gain, chamber efficiency, and wire signal noise were observed for either of the two chambers. The only consistent signs of aging were a small increase in dark current from {approx}2 nA to {approx}10 nA per plane of 600 wires and a decrease of strip-to-strip resistance from 1000 G{Omega} to 10-100 G{Omega}. Disassembly of the chambers revealed deposits on the cathode planes, while the anode wires remained fairly clean.

  9. A Diffusion Cloud Chamber Study of Very Slow Mesons. II. Beta Decay of the Muon

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lederman, L. M.; Sargent, C. P.; Rinehart, M.; Rogers, K.

    1955-03-01

    The spectrum of electrons arising from the decay of the negative mu meson has been determined. The muons are arrested in the gas of a high pressure hydrogen filled diffusion cloud chamber. The momenta of the decay electrons are determined from their curvature in a magnetic field of 7750 gauss. The spectrum of 415 electrons has been analyzed according to the theory of Michel.

  10. Upgrades of the ATLAS muon spectrometer with sMDT chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, C.; Kroha, H.

    2016-07-01

    With half the drift-tube diameter of the Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS muon spectrometer and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers provide an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit. The chamber assembly time has been reduced by a factor of seven to one working day and the sense wire positioning accuracy improved by a factor of two to better than ten microns. Two sMDT chambers have been installed in ATLAS in 2014 to improve the momentum resolution in the barrel part of the spectrometer. The construction of an additional twelve chambers covering the feet regions of the ATLAS detector has started. It will be followed by the replacement of the MDT chambers at the ends of the barrel inner layer by sMDTs improving the performance at the high expected background rates and providing space for additional RPC trigger chambers.

  11. Construction and Test of a Prototype Chamber for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, B.; Dubbert, J.; Kroha, H.; Loeben, J. v.; Schwegler, P.

    Monitored drift tube chambers are used as precision tracking detectors in the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC at CERN. These chambers provide a spatial resolution of 35 μm and a tracking efficiency of close to 100% up to background rates of 0.5 kHz/cm2, the former being limited at higher rates mainly due to space-charge effects and the latter due to the maximum drift time of 700 ns. For LHC upgrades, a faster drift tube chamber has been developed, using drift tubes with a diameter of 15 mm instead of 30 mm. The increased channel density and shorter drift time of about 200 ns raise the rate capability to about 10 kHz/cm2, while retaining the spatial resolution. A prototype chamber with trapezoidal shape consisting of 2 x 8 layers of 15 mm diameter drift tubes with an active surface of 0.8 m2 has been constructed. The prototype chamber has been tested at CERN with a 180 GeV muon beam at a SPS beam line and with cosmic ray muons at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at high γ radiation rates.

  12. A facility for the test of large-area muon chambers at high rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Altieri, S.; Belli, G.; Bonifas, A.; Carabelli, V.; Gatignon, L.; Hessey, N.; Maggi, M.; Peigneux, J.-P.; Reithler, H.; Silari, M.; Vitulo, P.; Wegner, M.

    2000-09-01

    Operation of large-area muon detectors at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be characterized by large sustained hit rates over the whole area, reaching the range of kHz cm -2. We describe a dedicated test zone built at CERN to test the performance and the aging of the muon chambers currently under development. A radioactive source delivers photons causing the sustained rate of random hits, while a narrow beam of high-energy muons is used to directly calibrate the detector performance. A system of remotely controlled lead filters serves to vary the rate of photons over four orders of magnitude, to allow the study of performance as a function of rate.

  13. Experimental Analysis of Gaseous Chambers for the ATLAS Muon sub-detector Upgrade R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Emmanuel

    2012-11-01

    CERN, the world's largest particle accelerator facility, has begun its ambitious Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program which is and will remain as the world energy frontier until at least 2030. ATLAS, one of the LHC experiments designed to search for new physics, has been taking data for two years. ATLAS has been investigating the necessary changes to its sub-detectors to withstand much higher instantaneous luminosity and to operate after 3000 fb-1 of integrated data. The goal is to achieve the same or better performance (spatial resolution, etc.) despite the large increase in event rate and final integrated dose. The current ATLAS Muon sub-detector will not be able to handle the increased luminosity of a factor of ten. This makes it necessary to replace the current muon sub-detector by possible new gaseous chambers that push their performance to limits never tested before. This talk will focus on the different lab experiments performed at CERN during the summers of 2011 and 2012, including functional uniformity results of a new ``T-series'' chamber design developed by the ATLAS Muon detector upgrade R&D team. As a result, a new visual mapping design was developed by the author that enabled an easier way to find anomalies in the chambers. This work has been presented to ATLAS Weekly Micromegas Meeting's 6 times during the summers of 2011 and 2012.

  14. Experimental Analysis of Gaseous Chambers for the ATLAS Muon sub-detector Upgrade R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Emmanuel; Wotschack, Joerg

    2011-11-01

    CERN, the world's largest particle accelerator facility, has begun its ambitious Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program which is and will remain as the world energy frontier until at least 2030. ATLAS, one of the LHC experiments designed to search for new physics, has been taking data for two years. ATLAS has been investigating the necessary changes to its sub-detectors to withstand much higher instantaneous luminosity and to operate after 3000 fb-1 of integrated data. The goal is to achieve the same or better performance (spatial resolution, etc.) despite the large increase in event rate and final integrated dose. The current ATLAS Muon sub-detector will not be able to handle the increased luminosity of a factor of ten. This makes it necessary to replace the current muon sub-detector by possible new gaseous chambers that push their performance to limits never tested before. This talk will focus on the different lab experiments performed at CERN, including a test beam run, and the exciting results on two of the latest chamber prototypes (R19M and R19G) developed by the ATLAS Muon detector upgrade R&D team. This is the research project the author did at CERN during summer 2011.

  15. Results of investigation of muon fluxes of superhigh energy cosmic rays with X-ray emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanenko, I. P.; Ivanova, M. A.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Ilyina, N. P.; Mandritskaya, K. V.; Osipova, E. A.; Rakobolskaya, I. V.; Zatsepin, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    The overall data from the investigation of the cosmic ray muon flux in the range of zenith angles (0-90) deg within the energy range (3.5 to 5.0) TeV is presented. The exposure of large X-ray emulsion chambers underground was 1200 tons. year. The data were processe using the method which was applied in the experiment Pamir and differred from the earlier applied one. The obtained value of a slope power index of the differential energy spectrum of the global muon flux is =3.7 that corresponds to the slope of the pion generation differential spectrum, gamma sub PI = 2.75 + or - .04. The analysis of the muon zenith-angular distribution showed that the contribution of rapid generation muons in the total muon flux agree the best with the value .2% and less with .7% at a 90% reliability level.

  16. Method to perform in-situ tests on the PHENIX cathodes in the muon tracking chambers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isenhower, Larry

    2003-10-01

    The PHENIX detector has recently completed the third year of running at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Run 3 was the first RHIC run for the complete muon detector system to be in place in PHENIX. Various repairs were needed during the summer to improve the detectors' performance for Run 4. During Run 3 experts noticed that there were broken cathode strips in some of PHENIX's second muon-north tracking chambers. It was necessary to find a method that could find which strips had these breaks. The calibration system had been used before installation to perform these tests, so it was decided to try this method again. With the chambers installed, it was necessary to send the calibration pulse through the high voltage distribution system. Since the anode cards cover regions running from the inner to outer radia, the approximate location of the break can be found by looking for where a missing or attenuated signal returns to its expected pulse height. By removing the broken strips from the analysis the reconstructed tracks will be more accurate, resulting in better mass resolution for detected J/ψ mesons.

  17. Small-strip Thin Gap Chambers for the muon spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Codina, E.

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS muon system upgrade to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19, the so-called New Small Wheel (NSW), is designed to cope with the increased instantaneous luminosity in LHC Run 3. The small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) will provide the NSW with a fast trigger and high precision tracking. The construction protocol has been validated by test beam experiments on a full-size prototype sTGC detector, showing the performance requirements are met. The intrinsic spatial resolution for a single layer has been found to be about 45 μm for a perpendicular incident angle, and the transition region between pads has been measured to be about 4 mm.

  18. Balancing particle absorption with structural support of the muon beam stop in muons-to-electrons experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is seeking a full conversion from muon to electron. The design for Mu2e is based off MECO, another proposed experiment that sought a full conversion from muon to electron at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the 1990s. Mu2e will provide sensitivity that is four times the sensitivity of the previous experiment, SINDRUM II. Discovering muon to electron conversions could help explain physics beyond the standard model of the particle physics.

  19. Front-end readout electronics considerations for Silicon Tracking System and Muon Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasinski, K.; Kleczek, R.; Szczygiel, R.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon Tracking System (STS) and Muon Chamber (MUCH) are components of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR, Germany. STS will be built from 8 detector stations located in the aperture of the magnet. Each station will be built from double-sided silicon strip detectors and connected via kapton microcables to the readout electronics at the perimeter of each station. The challenging physics program of the CBM experiment requires from the detector systems very high performance. Design of the readout ASIC requires finding an optimal solution for interaction time and input charge measurements in the presence of: tight area (channel pitch: 58 μ m), noise (< 1000 e- rms), power (< 10 mW/channel), radiation hardness and speed requirements (average hit rate: 250 khit/s/channel). This paper presents the front-end electronics' analysis towards prototype STS and MUCH readout ASIC implementation in the UMC 180 nm CMOS process and in-system performance with the emphasis on preferable detector and kapton microcable parameters and input amplifiers' architecture and design.

  20. A highly selective first-level muon trigger with MDT chamber data for ATLAS at HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, S.; Kroha, H.

    2016-07-01

    Highly selective triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC where the instantaneous luminosity will be about an order of magnitude larger than the LHC instantaneous luminosity in Run 1. The first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons below the nominal trigger threshold due to the moderate momentum resolution of the Resistive Plate and Thin Gap trigger chambers. The resulting high trigger rates at HL-LHC can be sufficiently reduced by using the data of the precision Muon Drift Tube chambers for the trigger decision. This requires the implementation of a fast MDT read-out chain and of a fast MDT track reconstruction algorithm with a latency of at most 6 μs. A hardware demonstrator of the fast read-out chain has been successfully tested at the HL-LHC operating conditions at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. The fast track reconstruction algorithm has been implemented on a fast trigger processor.

  1. Measuring Muon-Neutrino Charged-Current Differential Cross Sections with a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, Joshua B.

    2011-01-01

    More than 80 years after its proposed existence, the neutrino remains largely mysterious and elusive. Precision measurements of the neutrino's properties are just now beginning to take place. Such measurements are required in order to determine the mass of the neutrino, how many neutrinos there are, if neutrinos are different than anti-neutrinos, and more. Muon-neutrino charged-current differential cross sections on an argon target in terms of the outgoing muon momentum and angle are presented. The measurements have been taken with the ArgoNeuT Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiment. ArgoNeuT is the first LArTPC to ever take data in a low energy neutrino beam, having collected thousands of neutrino and anti-neutrino events in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The results are relevant for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments searching for non-zero $\\theta_{13}$, CP-violation in the lepton sector, and the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy, among other things. Furthermore, the differential cross sections are important for understanding the nature of the neutrino-nucleus interaction in general. These measurements represent a significant step forward for LArTPC technology as they are among the first neutrino physics results with such a device.

  2. Measurement of the spark probability of a GEM detector for the CBM muon chamber (MuCh)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S.; Abuhoza, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Garabatos, C.; Hehner, J.; Kleipa, V.; Morhardt, T.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, H. R.; Wiechula, J.

    2015-11-01

    The triple GEM detectors for the CBM muon chamber (MuCh) will be operated in a high rate environment of heavily ionizing particles due to the presence of thick iron absorber in the system. Therefore, the stability of the detectors needs to be tested. In a dedicated beam time double mask triple GEM detectors have been tested at CERN SPS/H4. In this study pion beam of ~ 150 GeV/c has been used. Different methods to determine the spark has been described in this paper. The stability of the triple GEM detector setup in an environment of high energetic showers is studied. To this end the spark probability in a shower environment is compared to the spark probability in a pion beam. The spark probability was found to be ~10-7 in a high momentum pion beam and in an induced particle shower.

  3. Performance of the new small-strip Thin Gap Chamber for the ATLAS Muon System at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellerive, Alain; Atlas Nsw Stgc Group Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program. The largest phase-1 upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward region with the so-called New Small Wheel (NSW). The NSW consists of layers of Micromegas and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), both providing trigger and tracking capabilities. The precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 microns, and the trigger track segments have to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of approximately 1 mrad. The sTGC structure consists of a grid of gold-plated tungsten wires sandwiched between two resistive cathode planes. The precision cathode plane has strips with a 3.2mm pitch for precision readout and the cathode plane on the other side has pads for triggering. The pads are used to produce a 3-out-of-4 coincidence to identify muon tracks in an sTGC quadruplet. A full size sTGC quadruplet has been constructed and equipped with the first prototype of dedicated front-end electronics. The design of the sTGC will be described. The performance of the sTGC quadruplet has been characterized with data collected at the Fermilab and CERN test beam facilities. Spatial resolution and trigger efficiency results will be presented. An overview of the simulation and digitization model of the sTGC will also be summarized.

  4. The diamond shaped cathode pads of the OPAL muon barrel drift chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J.; Ashton, P.; Baines, J. T. M.; Barlow, R. J.; Chrin, J. T. M.; Davies, O. W.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Hinde, P. S.; Banks, J. N.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Lafferty, G. D.; Loebinger, F. K.; Macbeth, A. A.; Moss, M. W.; Murphy, P. G.; Dowd, A. O.; Pawley, S. J.; Stephens, K.

    1991-12-01

    A total of 110 drift chambers, each containing two 60 cm wide drift cells with anode wires up to 10.4 m long, have been installed on the OPAL detector at the LEP electron-positron collider in CERN, Geneva. The chambers allow measurement of space points on the trajectory of a charged particle: coordinates transverse to the wire direction are reconstructed to an accuracy of 2 mm using conventional drift-time measurements, while a novel arrangement of diamond shaped cathode pads allows location of the track along the wire to an accuracy of 1.5 mm. This is achieved by three measurements of increasing ambiguity but also increasing accuracy. The techniques developed to analyse the signals from the cathode pads are described in some detail.

  5. High speed fault tolerant secure communication for muon chamber using FPGA based GBTx emulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Suman; Mandal, Swagata; Saini, Jogender; Chakrabarti, Amlan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-12-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a part of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt at the GSI. The CBM experiment will investigate the highly compressed nuclear matter using nucleus-nucleus collisions. This experiment will examine lieavy-ion collisions in fixed target geometry and will be able to measure hadrons, electrons and muons. CBM requires precise time synchronization, compact hardware, radiation tolerance, self-triggered front-end electronics, efficient data aggregation schemes and capability to handle high data rate (up to several TB/s). As a part of the implementation of read out chain of Muon Cliamber(MUCH) [1] in India, we have tried to implement FPGA based emulator of GBTx in India. GBTx is a radiation tolerant ASIC that can be used to implement multipurpose high speed bidirectional optical links for high-energy physics (HEP) experiments and is developed by CERN. GBTx will be used in highly irradiated area and more prone to be affected by multi bit error. To mitigate this effect instead of single bit error correcting RS code we have used two bit error correcting (15, 7) BCH code. It will increase the redundancy which in turn increases the reliability of the coded data. So the coded data will be less prone to be affected by noise due to radiation. The data will go from detector to PC through multiple nodes through the communication channel. The computing resources are connected to a network which can be accessed by authorized person to prevent unauthorized data access which might happen by compromising the network security. Thus data encryption is essential. In order to make the data communication secure, advanced encryption standard [2] (AES - a symmetric key cryptography) and RSA [3], [4] (asymmetric key cryptography) are used after the channel coding. We have implemented GBTx emulator on two Xilinx Kintex-7 boards (KC705). One will act as transmitter and other will act as receiver and they are connected

  6. The CMS muon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, P.

    2002-02-01

    The muon detection system of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment is described. It consists of three different detector technologies: drift tubes in the barrel region, cathode strip chambers in the endcap region and resistive plate chambers in both barrel and endcap regions. The CMS muon detection system ensures excellent muon detection and efficient triggering in the pseudorapidity range 0< η<2.4. The most recent developments and some results from the R&D program will also be discussed.

  7. Reanalysis of bubble chamber measurements of muon-neutrino induced single pion production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Callum; Rodrigues, Philip; Cartwright, Susan; Thompson, Lee; McFarland, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    There exists a long-standing disagreement between bubble chamber measurements of the single pion production channel νμp →μ-p π+ from the Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories. We digitize and reanalyze data from both experiments to produce cross-section ratios for various interaction channels, for which the flux uncertainties cancel, and find good agreement between the experiments. By multiplying the cross-section ratio by the well-understood charged-current quasielastic cross section on free nucleons, we extract single-pion production cross sections which do not depend on the flux normalization predictions. The νμp →μ-p π+ cross sections we extract show good agreement between the ANL and BNL data sets.

  8. In situ measurement of ceramic vacuum chamber conductive coating quality

    SciTech Connect

    Doose, C.; Harkay, K.; Kim, S.; Milton, S.

    1997-08-01

    A method for measuring the relative surface resistivity and quality of conductive coatings on ceramic vacuum chambers was developed. This method is unique in that it allows one to test the coating even after the ceramic chamber is installed in the accelerator and under vacuum; furthermore, the measurement provides a localized surface reading of the coating conductance. The method uses a magnetic probe is calibrated using the measured DC end-to-end resistance of the tube under test and by comparison to a high quality test surface. The measurement method has also been verified by comparison to high frequency impedance measurements. A detailed description, results, and sensitivity of the technique are given here.

  9. Performance of a full-size small-strip thin gap chamber prototype for the ATLAS new small wheel muon upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abusleme, A.; Bélanger-Champagne, C.; Bellerive, A.; Benhammou, Y.; Botte, J.; Cohen, H.; Davies, M.; Du, Y.; Gauthier, L.; Koffas, T.; Kuleshov, S.; Lefebvre, B.; Li, C.; Lupu, N.; Mikenberg, G.; Mori, D.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Codina, E. Perez; Rettie, S.; Robichaud-Véronneau, A.; Rojas, R.; Shoa, M.; Smakhtin, V.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Toro, A.; Torres, H.; Ulloa, P.; Vachon, B.; Vasquez, G.; Vdovin, A.; Viel, S.; Walker, P.; Weber, S.; Zhu, C.

    2016-05-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the present design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The most important upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs). The NSWs will be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2019/2020. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC) detectors are designed to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. To validate the design, a full-size prototype sTGC detector of approximately 1.2 × 1.0m2 consisting of four gaps has been constructed. Each gap provides pad, strip and wire readouts. The sTGC intrinsic spatial resolution has been measured in a 32 GeV pion beam test at Fermilab. At perpendicular incidence angle, single gap position resolutions of about 50 μm have been obtained, uniform along the sTGC strip and perpendicular wire directions, well within design requirements. Pad readout measurements have been performed in a 130 GeV muon beam test at CERN. The transition region between readout pads has been found to be 4 mm, and the pads have been found to be fully efficient.

  10. Joint measurement of the atmospheric muon flux through the Puy de Dôme volcano with plastic scintillators and Resistive Plate Chambers detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.; Anastasio, A.; Bross, A.; Béné, S.; Boivin, P.; Bonechi, L.; Cârloganu, C.; Ciaranfi, R.; Cimmino, L.; Combaret, Ch.; D'Alessandro, R.; Durand, S.; Fehr, F.; Français, V.; Garufi, F.; Gailler, L.; Labazuy, Ph.; Laktineh, I.; Lénat, J.-F.; Masone, V.; Miallier, D.; Mirabito, L.; Morel, L.; Mori, N.; Niess, V.; Noli, P.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Portal, A.; Rubinov, P.; Saracino, G.; Scarlini, E.; Strolin, P.; Vulpescu, B.

    2015-11-01

    The muographic imaging of volcanoes relies on the measured transmittance of the atmospheric muon flux through the target. An important bias affecting the result comes from background contamination mimicking a higher transmittance. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations measured independently in 2013 the atmospheric muon flux transmitted through the Puy de Dôme volcano using their early prototype detectors, based on plastic scintillators and on Glass Resistive Plate Chambers, respectively. These detectors had three (MU-RAY) or four (TOMUVOL) detection layers of 1 m2 each, tens (MU-RAY) or hundreds (TOMUVOL) of nanosecond time resolution, a few millimeter position resolution, an energy threshold of few hundreds MeV, and no particle identification capabilities. The prototypes were deployed about 1.3 km away from the summit, where they measured, behind rock depths larger than 1000 m, remnant fluxes of 1.83±0.50(syst)±0.07(stat) m-2 d-1 deg-2 (MU-RAY) and 1.95±0.16(syst)±0.05(stat) m-2 d-1 deg-2 (TOMUVOL), that roughly correspond to the expected flux of high-energy atmospheric muons crossing 600 meters water equivalent (mwe) at 18° elevation. This implies that imaging depths larger than 500 mwe from 1 km away using such prototype detectors suffer from an overwhelming background. These measurements confirm that a new generation of detectors with higher momentum threshold, time-of-flight measurement, and/or particle identification is needed. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations expect shortly to operate improved detectors, suitable for a robust muographic imaging of kilometer-scale volcanoes.

  11. Monte Carlo calculations of electron beam quality conversion factors for several ion chamber types

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive investigation of electron beam reference dosimetry using Monte Carlo simulations of the response of 10 plane-parallel and 18 cylindrical ion chamber types. Specific emphasis is placed on the determination of the optimal shift of the chambers’ effective point of measurement (EPOM) and beam quality conversion factors. Methods: The EGSnrc system is used for calculations of the absorbed dose to gas in ion chamber models and the absorbed dose to water as a function of depth in a water phantom on which cobalt-60 and several electron beam source models are incident. The optimal EPOM shifts of the ion chambers are determined by comparing calculations of R{sub 50} converted from I{sub 50} (calculated using ion chamber simulations in phantom) to R{sub 50} calculated using simulations of the absorbed dose to water vs depth in water. Beam quality conversion factors are determined as the calculated ratio of the absorbed dose to water to the absorbed dose to air in the ion chamber at the reference depth in a cobalt-60 beam to that in electron beams. Results: For most plane-parallel chambers, the optimal EPOM shift is inside of the active cavity but different from the shift determined with water-equivalent scaling of the front window of the chamber. These optimal shifts for plane-parallel chambers also reduce the scatter of beam quality conversion factors, k{sub Q}, as a function of R{sub 50}. The optimal shift of cylindrical chambers is found to be less than the 0.5 r{sub cav} recommended by current dosimetry protocols. In most cases, the values of the optimal shift are close to 0.3 r{sub cav}. Values of k{sub ecal} are calculated and compared to those from the TG-51 protocol and differences are explained using accurate individual correction factors for a subset of ion chambers investigated. High-precision fits to beam quality conversion factors normalized to unity in a beam with R{sub 50} = 7.5 cm (k{sub Q}{sup ′}) are provided. These

  12. Muon-Pair Production by Atmospheric Muons in CosmoALEPH

    SciTech Connect

    Maciuc, F.; Grupen, C.; Hashim, N.O.; Luitz, S.; Mailov, A.; Muller, A.S.; Putzer, A.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Schmelling, M.; Tcaciuc, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Ziegler, T.; Zuber, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Siegen U. /SLAC /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Heidelberg U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /CERN /Princeton U. /Oxford U.

    2006-03-06

    Data from a dedicated cosmic ray run of the ALEPH detector were used in a study of muon trident production, i.e., muon pairs produced by muons. Here the overburden and the calorimeters are the target materials while the ALEPH time projection chamber provides the momentum measurements. A theoretical estimate of the muon trident cross section is obtained by developing a Monte Carlo simulation for muon propagation in the overburden and the detector. Two muon trident candidates were found to match the expected theoretical pattern. The observed production rate implies that the nuclear form factor cannot be neglected for muon tridents.

  13. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L.

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  14. The LHCb Muon System

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, W.

    2005-10-12

    In this paper is described the design, the construction and the performances of several Multi Wire Proportional Chamber prototypes built for the LHCb Muon system. In particular we report results for detection efficiency, time resolution, high rate performances and ageing effect measured at the CERN T11 test beam area and at the high irradiation ENEA Casaccia Calliope Facility.

  15. Flow Quality Surveys in the Settling Chamber of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2011 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Laura E.; VanZante, Judith Foss; Broeren, Andy P.; Kubiak, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the heat exchanger and refrigeration plant for NASA Glenn Research Centers Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were upgraded. Flow quality surveys were performed in the settling chamber of the IRT in order to understand the effect that the new heat exchanger had on the flow quality upstream of the spray bars. Measurements were made of the total pressure, static pressure, total temperature, airspeed, and flow angle (pitch and yaw). These measurements were directly compared to measurements taken in 2000, after the previous heat exchanger was installed. In general, the flow quality appears to have improved with the new heat exchanger.

  16. Flow Quality Surveys in the Settling Chamber of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2011 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Laura E.; VanZante, Judith Foss; Broeren, Andy P.; Kubiak, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the heat exchanger and refrigeration plant for NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were upgraded. Flow quality surveys were performed in the settling chamber of the IRT in order to understand the effect that the new heat exchanger had on the flow quality upstream of the spray bars. Measurements were made of the total pressure, static pressure, total temperature, airspeed, and flow angle (pitch and yaw). These measurements were directly compared to measurements taken in 2000, after the previous heat exchanger was installed. In general, the flow quality appears to have improved with the new heat exchanger.

  17. Flow Quality Surveys in the Settling Chamber of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2011 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Laura E.; Van Zante, Judith Foss; Broeren, Andy P.; Kubiak, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the heat exchanger and refrigeration plant for NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were upgraded. Flow quality surveys were performed in the settling chamber of the IRT in order to understand the effect that the new heat exchanger had on the flow quality upstream of the spray bars. Measurements were made of the total pressure, static pressure, total temperature, airspeed, and ow angle (pitch and yaw). These measurements were directly compared to measurements taken in 2000, after the previous heat exchanger was installed. In general, the flow quality appears to have improved with the new heat exchanger.

  18. Evaluation of the applicability of pinpoint ion chambers for SRS dosimetric quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jong Geun; Jang, Hyun Soo; Kim, Eng Chan; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the applicability of a Pinpoint ion chamber for the measurement of the absolute dose for dosimetric quality assurance (QA) under the same conditions as are used for actual stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). A PTW 31014 Pinpoint chamber with a active volume of 0.015 cm3 was used to measure the absolute doses of small beams. The PTW 60003 natural diamond detector was used as a reference dosimeter. A custom-made cylindrical acrylic phantom (15 cm diameter, 15 cm long) was produced to obtain measurements, and a noncoplanar arc plan was devised to deliver a prescription dose (15-25 Gy) to 80% of the maximum dose to the target in a single fraction by using the BrainLAB planning system. All irradiations were performed by using a Varian Clinac IX 6 MV equipped with a micro-multileaf-collimators (m3) designed by BrainLAB. The acceptability criterion used was a dose difference of less than 3%. The diameter of the target volume was considered the standard parameter in the present study and was used to divide the cases into two groups, that is, a ≤ 10 mm target diameter group (10 cases) and a > 10 mm target diameter group (13 cases). For the Pinpoint chamber and target diameters of ≤ 10 mm, dosimetric uncertainties of > 3% were seen in 4 of the 10 cases, and differences ranged widely from 0.7% to 4.85%. On the other hand, for the Pinpoint chamber and target diameters of > 10 mm all dose differences were less than 1.6%, and the mean discrepancy was 0.81%. A highly significant, but moderate, correlation between dosimetric uncertainties and all target diameters was observed for the Pinpoint chamber (R2 = 0.483, p 0.001). This result indicates that Pinpoint chambers exhibit a field-size dependency when used for SRS dosimetric QA. Based on the results of the present study, we conclude that the use of a Pinpoint chamber for verification of SRS dosimetric QA is unsuitable for all field sizes, but that it can be used to verify the

  19. Quality control results of the drift tubes for the ATLAS MDT-BIS chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Avramidou, R.; Dris, M.; Filippas, T. A.; Gazis, E. N.; Katsoufis, E.; Maltezos, S.; Savva, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tzamariudaki, E.

    2006-05-01

    ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is a general purpose experiment, which will start its operation at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in 2007. The ATLAS detector is designed to study the products of proton-proton collisions at c.m.s. energies of up to 14 TeV. Three Greek Universities have taken the responsibility to construct 112 BIS-MDT (Barrel Inner Small) chambers using 29 000 drift tubes of 170 cm length and 3 cm diameter that have been quality tested before assembly. This work describes the Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA_QC) procedures for the drift tubes, followed at the High Energy Physics Laboratory of the National Technical University of Athens, while emphasis is given on the obtained results for the above mentioned number of tubes.

  20. Muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  1. Photon beam quality correction factors for the NE2571A and NE2581A thimble ionization chambers using PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Erazo, Fabián; Lallena, Antonio M

    2016-01-01

    The beam quality correction factor kQ,Q0 and the perturbation factor pQ for photon beams were calculated for the NE2571A and NE2581A ionization chambers, using the Monte Carlo simulation code PENELOPE. Results are compared to those quoted for the NE2571 and NE2581 chambers in previous works. Both kQ,Q0 and pQ obtained for NE2571A and NE2581A chambers agree with those of their predecessors NE2571 and NE2581 ones. PMID:26602965

  2. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Fellow

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Gail G.; Snopak, Pavel; Bao, Yu

    2015-03-20

    Muons are fundamental particles like electrons but much more massive. Muon accelerators can provide physics opportunities similar to those of electron accelerators, but because of the larger mass muons lose less energy to radiation, allowing more compact facilities with lower operating costs. The way muon beams are produced makes them too large to fit into the vacuum chamber of a cost-effective accelerator, and the short muon lifetime means that the beams must be reduced in size rather quickly, without losing too many of the muons. This reduction in size is called "cooling." Ionization cooling is a new technique that can accomplish such cooling. Intense muon beams can then be accelerated and injected into a storage ring, where they can be used to produce neutrino beams through their decays or collided with muons of the opposite charge to produce a muon collider, similar to an electron-positron collider. We report on the research carried out at the University of California, Riverside, towards producing such muon accelerators, as part of the Muon Accelerator Program based at Fermilab. Since this research was carried out in a university environment, we were able to involve both undergraduate and graduate students.

  3. Quality assurance of proton beams using a multilayer ionization chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanesar, Sandeep; Sahoo, Narayan; Kerr, Matthew; Taylor, M. Brad; Summers, Paige; Zhu, X. Ronald; Poenisch, Falk; Gillin, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The measurement of percentage depth-dose (PDD) distributions for the quality assurance of clinical proton beams is most commonly performed with a computerized water tank dosimetry system with ionization chamber, commonly referred to as water tank. Although the accuracy and reproducibility of this method is well established, it can be time-consuming if a large number of measurements are required. In this work the authors evaluate the linearity, reproducibility, sensitivity to field size, accuracy, and time-savings of another system: the Zebra, a multilayer ionization chamber system.Methods: The Zebra, consisting of 180 parallel-plate ionization chambers with 2 mm resolution, was used to measure depth-dose distributions. The measurements were performed for scattered and scanned proton pencil beams of multiple energies delivered by the Hitachi PROBEAT synchrotron-based delivery system. For scattered beams, the Zebra-measured depth-dose distributions were compared with those measured with the water tank. The principal descriptors extracted for comparisons were: range, the depth of the distal 90% dose; spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) length, the region between the proximal 95% and distal 90% dose; and distal-dose fall off (DDF), the region between the distal 80% and 20% dose. For scanned beams, the Zebra-measured ranges were compared with those acquired using a Bragg peak chamber during commissioning.Results: The Zebra demonstrated better than 1% reproducibility and monitor unit linearity. The response of the Zebra was found to be sensitive to radiation field sizes greater than 12.5 × 12.5 cm; hence, the measurements used to determine accuracy were performed using a field size of 10 × 10 cm. For the scattered proton beams, PDD distributions showed 1.5% agreement within the SOBP, and 3.8% outside. Range values agreed within −0.1 ± 0.4 mm, with a maximum deviation of 1.2 mm. SOBP length values agreed within 0 ± 2 mm, with a maximum deviation of 6 mm. DDF

  4. Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.

    2009-10-19

    Parameters are given of muon colliders with center of mass energies of 1.5 and 3 TeV. Pion production is from protons on a mercury target. Capture, decay, and phase rotation yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling reduces the emittances until the trains are merged into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in 6 dimensions is then applied, followed by final transverse cooling in 50 T solenoids. After acceleration the muons enter the collider ring. Ongoing R&D is discussed.

  5. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  6. IMPACT OF AN OZONE GENERATOR AIR CLEANER ON STYRENE CONCENTRATIONS IN AN INDOOR AIR QUALITY RESEARCH CHAMBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation of the impact of an ozone generator air cleaner on vapor-phase styrene concentrations in a full-scale indoor air quality test chamber. The time history of the concentrations of styrene and ozone is well predicted by a simulation model u...

  7. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Sessler, A.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  8. COMPENSATING FOR WALL EFFECTS IN IAQ (INDOOR AIR QUALITY) CHAMBER TESTS BY MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents mechanistic mathematical models that account for two phenomena: interior surfaces of a state-of-the-art emissions test chamber acting as a transient sink for organic emissions; the effect of increasing chamber concentration on the emission rate of the source. A...

  9. Time-resolved dosimetry using a pinpoint ionization chamber as quality assurance for IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Louwe, Robert J. W. Satherley, Thomas; Day, Rebecca A.; Greig, Lynne; Wendling, Markus; Monshouwer, René

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a method to verify the dose delivery in relation to the individual control points of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an ionization chamber. In addition to more effective problem solving during patient-specific quality assurance (QA), the aim is to eventually map out the limitations in the treatment chain and enable a targeted improvement of the treatment technique in an efficient way. Methods: Pretreatment verification was carried out for 255 treatment plans that included a broad range of treatment indications in two departments using the equipment of different vendors. In-house developed software was used to enable calculation of the dose delivery for the individual beamlets in the treatment planning system (TPS), for data acquisition, and for analysis of the data. The observed deviations were related to various delivery and measurement parameters such as gantry angle, field size, and the position of the detector with respect to the field edge to distinguish between error sources. Results: The average deviation of the integral fraction dose during pretreatment verification of the planning target volume dose was −2.1% ± 2.2% (1 SD), −1.7% ± 1.7% (1 SD), and 0.0% ± 1.3% (1 SD) for IMRT at the Radboud University Medical Center (RUMC), VMAT (RUMC), and VMAT at the Wellington Blood and Cancer Centre, respectively. Verification of the dose to organs at risk gave very similar results but was generally subject to a larger measurement uncertainty due to the position of the detector at a high dose gradient. The observed deviations could be related to limitations of the TPS beam models, attenuation of the treatment couch, as well as measurement errors. The apparent systematic error of about −2% in the average deviation of the integral fraction dose in the RUMC results could be explained by the limitations of the TPS beam model in the calculation of the beam penumbra. Conclusions: This

  10. Design Concepts for Muon-Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R. D.; Berg, J. S.; Kirk, H. G.; Palmer, R. B.; Stratkis, D.; Alexahin, Y.; Bross, A.; Gollwitzer, K.; Mokhov, N. V.; Neuffer, D.; Palmer, M. A.; Yonehara, K.; Snopok, P.; Bogacz, A.; Roberts, T. J.; Delahaye, J. -P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon-based accelerators have the potential to enable facilities at both the Intensity and the Energy Frontiers. Muon storage rings can serve as high precision neutrino sources, and a muon collider is an ideal technology for a TeV or multi-TeV collider. Progress in muon accelerator designs has advanced steadily in recent years. In regard to 6D muon cooling, detailed and realistic designs now exist that provide more than 5 order-of-magnitude emittance reduction. Furthermore, detector performance studies indicate that with suitable pixelation and timing resolution, backgrounds in the collider detectors can be significantly reduced, thus enabling high-quality physics results. Thanks to these and other advances in design & simulation of muon systems, technology development, and systems demonstrations, muon storage-ring-based neutrino sources and a muon collider appear more feasible than ever before. A muon collider is now arguably among the most compelling approaches to a multi-TeV lepton collider. This paper summarizes the current status of design concepts for muon-based accelerators for neutrino factories and a muon collider.

  11. Polarized muon beams for muon collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrinsky, A. N.

    1996-11-01

    An option for the production of intense and highly polarized muon beams, suitable for a high-luminosity muon collider, is described briefly. It is based on a multi-channel pion-collection system, narrow-band pion-to-muon decay channels, proper muon spin gymnastics, and ionization cooling to combine all of the muon beams into a single bunch of ultimately low emittance.

  12. Use of a novel two-dimensional ionization chamber array for pencil beam scanning proton therapy beam quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Mertens, Thierry; Baeumer, Christian; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2015-01-01

    The need to accurately and efficiently verify both output and dose profiles creates significant challenges in quality assurance of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton delivery. A system for PBS QA has been developed that combines a new two-dimensional ionization chamber array in a waterproof housing that is scanned in a water phantom. The MatriXX PT has the same detector array arrangement as the standard MatriXX(Evolution) but utilizes a smaller 2 mm plate spacing instead of 5mm. Because the bias voltage of the MatriXX PT and Evolution cannot be changed, PPC40 and FC65-G ionization chambers were used to assess recombination effects. The PPC40 is a parallel plate chamber with an electrode spacing of 2mm, while the FC65-G is a Farmer chamber FC65-G with an electrode spacing of 2.8 mm. Three bias voltages (500, 200, and 100 V) were used for both detectors to determine which radiation type (continuous, pulse or pulse-scanned beam) could closely estimate Pion from the ratios of charges collected. In comparison with the MatriXX(Evolution), a significant improvement in measurement of absolute dose with the MatriXX PT was observed. While dose uncertainty of the MatriXX(Evolution) can be up to 4%, it is < 1% for the MatriXX PT. Therefore the MatriXX(Evolution) should not be used for QA of PBS for conditions in which ion recombination is not negligible. Farmer chambers should be used with caution for measuring the absolute dose of PBS beams, as the uncertainty of Pion can be > 1%; chambers with an electrode spacing of 2 mm or smaller are recommended. PMID:26103492

  13. Outdoor smog chamber experiments: reactivity of methanol exhaust. Part 2. Quality assurance and data processing system description

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, H.E.; Sexton, K.G.; Kamens, R.M.; Holleman, M.S.

    1985-09-01

    The report describes the Quality Assurance and Data Processing procedures and systems used at the UNC Outdoor Smog Chamber Facility. The primary product of research conducted at this facility is information in the form of measurements of reactants and products in photochemical systems and measurements of the critical parameters that influence the chemical transformations system. Generating useful data begins with understanding the goals of the project and the special needs and concerns of conducting a successful smog-chamber operation. The system components are designed to collect, transfer, process, and report accurate, high-resolution data without loss or distortion. The system components in the Quality Assurance and Data Processing system are: people, hardware, software, checklists, and data bases. Quality-assurance checks are made at every level of the program. Pressurized gas-tank and liquid mixtures were used to establish experimental conditions of HC assuring consistency throughout the program. Several NBS traceable standards and liquid injections into the chamber used for calibration have been intercompared and show good agreement.

  14. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R. J.; Allison, J.; Ashton, P.; Bahan, G. A.; Baines, J. T. M.; Banks, J. N.; Barlow, R. J.; Barnett, S.; Beeston, C.; Chrin, J. T. M.; Clowes, S. G.; Davies, O. W.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Hinde, P. S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Lafferty, G. D.; Loebinger, F. K.; Macbeth, A. A.; McGowan, R. F.; Moss, M. W.; Murphy, P. G.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Dowd, A. J. P.; Pawley, S. J.; Phillips, P. D.; Richards, G. E.; Skillman, A.; Stephens, K.; Tresillian, N. J.; Wood, N. C.; Wyatt, T. R.

    1995-02-01

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989.

  15. A patient-specific quality assurance study on absolute dose verification using ionization chambers of different volumes in RapidArc treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Syam Kumar, S.A.; Sukumar, Prabakar; Sriram, Padmanaban; Rajasekaran, Dhanabalan; Aketi, Srinu; Vivekanandan, Nagarajan

    2012-01-01

    The recalculation of 1 fraction from a patient treatment plan on a phantom and subsequent measurements have become the norms for measurement-based verification, which combines the quality assurance recommendations that deal with the treatment planning system and the beam delivery system. This type of evaluation has prompted attention to measurement equipment and techniques. Ionization chambers are considered the gold standard because of their precision, availability, and relative ease of use. This study evaluates and compares 5 different ionization chambers: phantom combinations for verification in routine patient-specific quality assurance of RapidArc treatments. Fifteen different RapidArc plans conforming to the clinical standards were selected for the study. Verification plans were then created for each treatment plan with different chamber-phantom combinations scanned by computed tomography. This includes Medtec intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) phantom with micro-ionization chamber (0.007 cm{sup 3}) and pinpoint chamber (0.015 cm{sup 3}), PTW-Octavius phantom with semiflex chamber (0.125 cm{sup 3}) and 2D array (0.125 cm{sup 3}), and indigenously made Circular wax phantom with 0.6 cm{sup 3} chamber. The measured isocenter absolute dose was compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) plan. The micro-ionization chamber shows more deviations when compared with semiflex and 0.6 cm{sup 3} with a maximum variation of -4.76%, -1.49%, and 2.23% for micro-ionization, semiflex, and farmer chambers, respectively. The positive variations indicate that the chamber with larger volume overestimates. Farmer chamber shows higher deviation when compared with 0.125 cm{sup 3}. In general the deviation was found to be <1% with the semiflex and farmer chambers. A maximum variation of 2% was observed for the 0.007 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber, except in a few cases. Pinpoint chamber underestimates the calculated isocenter dose by a maximum of 4.8%. Absolute dose

  16. The Muon Detector at the HERA-B experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiges, V.; Fominykh, B.; Khasanov, F.; Kvaratscheliia, T.; Laptin, L.; Tchoudakov, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Buchler, M.; Harr, R. F.; Karchin, P. E.; Nam, S.; Shiu, J. G.; Gilitsky, Yu.; Takach, S. F.

    2001-04-01

    The HERA-B experiment is designed to study beauty particle production and decay using the HERA 920 GeV proton beam interactions with an internal target. The Muon detector provides identification for muons having momenta greater than 5 GeV/c and triggering on the muon pair from J/ ψ decay. Three different chamber types are employed for operation in a high-rate environment. The overall design, performance and current status are discussed.

  17. Energy loss measurement of cosmic ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Joseph

    1993-02-01

    Measurements of energy losses of high energy cosmic ray muons in an ionization chamber are presented. The chamber consists of 16 single gap layers, and the liquid tetra methyl silane (TMS) was used as active medium. The absolute energy loss and the relativistic rise were measured and compared with theoretical calculations. The importance of the measurements within the framework of the cosmic ray experiment KASCADE (German acronym for Karlsruhe Shower Core and Array Detector) are discussed, especially with respect to energy calibration of hadrons and high energy muons above 1 TeV.

  18. Quality control and beam test of GEM detectors for future upgrades of the CMS muon high rate region at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaneo, D.; Abbas, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abi Akl, M.; Ahmed, W.; Ahmed, W.; Altieri, P.; Aly, R.; Armaingaud, C.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ashfaq, A.; Aspell, P.; Assran, Y.; Awan, I.; Bally, S.; Ban, Y.; Banerjee, S.; Barria, P.; Benussi, L.; Bhopatkar, V.; Bianco, S.; Bos, J.; Bouhali, O.; Braibant, S.; Buontempo, S.; Cai, J.; Calabria, C.; Caponero, M.; Caputo, C.; Cassese, F.; Castaneda, A.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Cavallo, F. R.; Celik, A.; Choi, M.; Choi, K.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, J.; Cimmino, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Colaleo, A.; Conde Garcia, A.; Dabrowski, M. M.; De Lentdecker, G.; De Oliveira, R.; De Robertis, G.; Dildick, S.; Dildick, S.; Dorney, B.; Elmetenawee, W.; Fabrice, G.; Ferrini, M.; Ferry, S.; Flanagan, W.; Giacomelli, P.; Gilmore, J.; Guiducci, L.; Gutierrez, A.; Hadjiiska, R. M.; Hassan, A.; Hauser, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Hohlmann, M.; Hoorani, H.; Jeng, Y. G.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kim, H. S.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, S.; Kumar, A.; Lee, J.; Lenzi, T.; Litov, L.; Loddo, F.; Maerschalk, T.; Magazzu, G.; Maggi, M.; Maghrbi, Y.; Magnani, A.; Majumdar, N.; Mal, P. K.; Mandal, K.; Marchioro, A.; Marinov, A.; Merlin, J. A.; Mohammed, N.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, A.; Muhammad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Oliveri, E.; Pant, L. M.; Paolucci, P.; Park, I.; Passeggio, G.; Pavlov, B.; Philipps, B.; Phipps, M.; Piccolo, D.; Postema, H.; Pugliese, G.; Baranac, A. Puig; Radi, A.; Radogna, R.; Raffone, G.; Ramkrishna, S.; Ranieri, A.; Riccardi, C.; Rodrigues, A.; Ropelewski, L.; RoyChowdhury, S.; Ryu, M. S.; Ryu, G.; Safonov, A.; Sakharov, A.; Salva, S.; Saviano, G.; Sharma, A.; Swain, S. K.; Talvitie, J. P.; Talvitie, J. P.; Tamma, C.; Tatarinov, A.; Teng, H.; Turini, N.; Tuuva, T.; Twigger, J.; Tytgat, M.; Vai, I.; Van Stenis, M.; Venditi, R.; Verhagen, E.; Verwilligen, P.; Vitulo, P.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Yang, U.; Yang, Y.; Yonamine, R.; Zaganidis, N.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, A.

    2015-03-01

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) are a proven position sensitive gas detector technology which nowadays is becoming more widely used in High Energy Physics. GEMs offer an excellent spatial resolution and a high particle rate capability, with a close to 100% detection efficiency. In view of the high luminosity phase of the CERN Large Hadron Collider, these aforementioned features make GEMs suitable candidates for the future upgrades of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. In particular, the CMS GEM Collaboration proposes to cover the high-eta region of the muon system with large-area triple-GEM detectors, which have the ability to provide robust and redundant tracking and triggering functions. In this contribution, after a general introduction and overview of the project, the construction of full-size trapezoidal triple-GEM prototypes will be described in more detail. The procedures for the quality control of the GEM foils, including gain uniformity measurements with an x-ray source will be presented. In the past few years, several CMS triple-GEM prototype detectors were operated with test beams at the CERN SPS. The results of these test beam campaigns will be summarised.

  19. Ion Chambers for Monitoring the NuMI Neutrino Beam at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Indurthy, Dharmaraj; Keisler, Ryan; Kopp, Sacha; Mendoza, Steven; Proga, Marek; Pavlovich, Zarko; Zwaska, Robert; Harris, Deborah; Marchionni, Alberto; Morfin, Jorge; Erwin, Albert; Ping Huicana; Velissaris, Christos; Naples, Donna; Northacker, Dave; McDonald, Jeff; Diwan, Milind; Viren, Brett

    2004-11-10

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. The beam must be steered with 1-mRad angular accuracy toward the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays. We review how the monitors will be used to make beam quality measurements, and as well review chamber construction details, radiation damage testing, calibration, and test beam results.

  20. Characterization and use of a 2D-array of ion chambers for brachytherapy dosimetric quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Yewondwossen, Mammo

    2012-10-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array MatriXX Evolution is one of the 2D ionization chamber arrays developed by IBA Dosimetry (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) for megavoltage real-time absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the performance of ion chamber array for submegavoltage range brachytherapy beam dose verification and quality assurance (QA) and (2) use the end-to-end dosimetric evaluation that mimics a patient treatment procedure and confirm the primary source strength calibration agrees in both the treatment planning system (TPS) and treatment delivery console computers. The dose linearity and energy dependence of the 2D ion chamber array was studied using kilovoltage X-ray beams (100, 180 and 300 kVp). The detector calibration factor was determined using 300 kVp X-ray beams so that we can use the same calibration factor for dosimetric verification of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The phantom used for this measurement consists of multiple catheters, the IBA MatriXX detector, and water-equivalent slab of RW3 to provide full scattering conditions. The treatment planning system (TPS) (Oncentra brachy version 3.3, Nucletron BV, Veenendaal, the Netherlands) dose distribution was calculated on the computed tomography (CT) scan of this phantom. The measured and TPS calculated distributions were compared in IBA Dosimetry OmniPro-I'mRT software. The quality of agreement was quantified by the gamma ({gamma}) index (with 3% delta dose and distance criterion of 2 mm) for 9 sets of plans. Using a dedicated phantom capable of receiving 5 brachytherapy intralumenal catheters a QA procedure was developed for end-to-end dosimetric evaluation for routine QA checks. The 2D ion chamber array dose dependence was found to be linear for 100-300 kVp and the detector response (k{sub user}) showed strong energy dependence for 100-300 kVp energy range. For the Ir-192 brachytherapy

  1. Muons in gamma showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.; Vankov, C. P.; Halzen, F.

    1985-01-01

    Muon production in gamma-induced air showers, accounting for all major processes. For muon energies in the GeV region the photoproduction is by far the most important process, while the contribution of micron + micron pair creation is not negligible for TeV muons. The total rate of muons in gamma showers is, however, very low.

  2. Muon energy loss at high energy and implications for detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J.J.; Loken, S.C.

    1987-11-01

    We study the effects of energy loss and associated electromagnetic showers on muon tracking and momentum measurement in muon detectors operating in the energy range 100 GeV-5 TeV. A detailed Monte Carlo simulation tracks muons and shower particles through a detector structure and evaluates the charged-particle environment in chambers. We find that catastrophic energy loss events accompanied by energetic showers can pose serious problems to designers of muon spectrometers. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Flow chamber

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  4. Production of muons for fusion catalysis using a migma configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, George F.; Moir, Ralph W.

    1988-08-01

    Muon-catalyzed fusion requires a very efficient means of producing muons. We describe a muon-producing magnetic-mirror scheme with triton migma that may be more energy efficient than any heretofore proposed. If one could catalyze 200 fusions per muon and employ a uranium blanket that would multiply the neutron energy by a factor of 10, one might produce electricity with an overall plant efficiency (ratio of electric energy produced to nuclear energy released) approaching 30%. The self-colliding arrangement of triton orbits will result in many π-'s being produced near the axis of the magnetic mirror. The pions quickly decay into muons, which are transported into a small (few cm diameter) reactor chamber producing approximately 1 MW/m2 neutron flux on the chamber walls.

  5. Electron beam quality kQ,Q0 factors for various ionization chambers: a Monte Carlo investigation with penelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erazo, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we calculate the beam quality correction factor {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} for various plane-parallel ionization chambers. A set of Monte Carlo calculations using the code penelope/penEasy have been carried out to calculate the overall correction factor fc,Q for eight electron beams corresponding to a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D, with nominal energies ranging between 6 MeV and 22 MeV, for a 60Co beam, that has been used as the reference quality Q0 and also for eight monoenergetic electron beams reproducing the quality index R50 of the Clinac beams. Two field sizes, 10 × 10 cm2 and 20 × 20 cm2 have been considered. The {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} factors have been calculated as the ratio between fc,Q and {{f}\\text{c,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} . Values for the Exradin A10, A11, A11TW, P11, P11TW, T11 and T11TW ionization chambers, manufactured by Standard Imaging, as well as for the NACP-02 have been obtained. The results found with the Clinac beams for the two field sizes analyzed show differences below 0.6%, even in the case of the higher energy electron beams. The {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} values obtained with the Clinac beams are 1% larger than those found with the monoenergetic beams for the higher energies, above 12 MeV. This difference can be ascribed to secondary photons produced in the linac head and the air path towards the phantom. Contrary to what was quoted in a previous work (Sempau et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4427-44), the beam quality correction factors obtained with the complete Clinac geometries and with the monoenergetic beams differ significantly for energies above 12 MeV. Material differences existing between chambers that have the same geometry produce non-negligible modifications in the value of these correction factors.

  6. Electron beam quality k(Q,Q0) factors for various ionization chambers: a Monte Carlo investigation with PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Erazo, F; Brualla, L; Lallena, A M

    2014-11-01

    In this work we calculate the beam quality correction factor k(Q,Q0) for various plane-parallel ionization chambers. A set of Monte Carlo calculations using the code PENELOPE/PENEASY have been carried out to calculate the overall correction factor f(c,Q) for eight electron beams corresponding to a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D, with nominal energies ranging between 6 MeV and 22 MeV, for a (60)Co beam, that has been used as the reference quality Q0 and also for eight monoenergetic electron beams reproducing the quality index R50 of the Clinac beams. Two field sizes, 10 × 10 cm(2) and 20 × 20 cm(2) have been considered. The k(Q,Q0) factors have been calculated as the ratio between f(c,Q) and f(c,Q0). Values for the Exradin A10, A11, A11TW, P11, P11TW, T11 and T11TW ionization chambers, manufactured by Standard Imaging, as well as for the NACP-02 have been obtained. The results found with the Clinac beams for the two field sizes analyzed show differences below 0.6%, even in the case of the higher energy electron beams. The k(Q,Q0) values obtained with the Clinac beams are 1% larger than those found with the monoenergetic beams for the higher energies, above 12 MeV. This difference can be ascribed to secondary photons produced in the linac head and the air path towards the phantom. Contrary to what was quoted in a previous work (Sempau et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4427-44), the beam quality correction factors obtained with the complete Clinac geometries and with the monoenergetic beams differ significantly for energies above 12 MeV. Material differences existing between chambers that have the same geometry produce non-negligible modifications in the value of these correction factors. PMID:25325343

  7. Effect of pretreatment methods and chamber pressure on morphology, quality and adhesion of HFCVD diamond coating on cemented carbide inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, S. K.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Chattopadhyay, A. K.

    2008-04-01

    In the present investigation, diamond coating was deposited on cemented carbide substrate by hot filament chemical vapour deposition. The effect of substrate pretreatment methods and chamber pressure on morphology, quality, and adhesion of the diamond film were studied. The carbide inserts were pretreated with acid, Murakami's solution, and Murakami's solution followed by acid, respectively. The chamber pressure was set at 6.6, 13.2, 26.4, 39.6 and 66 mbar. Deposition carried out at pressure of 26.4 and 39.6 mbar on inserts pretreated with acid exhibited uniform crystal habit and provided coating-substrate adhesion adequate for machining application. Good coating morphology was obtained when deposition was done at 6.6 mbar on carbide inserts treated with Murakami's solution. Pretreatment with Murakami's solution followed by acid and deposition at 6.6 mbar also resulted in good morphology of diamond film. Indentation (Rockwell C scale) was done on diamond-coated inserts to assess coating-substrate adhesion under three loads of 294, 588 and 980 N. The diameter of the indentation crack at the coating-substrate interface was observed under SEM. The results suggested that diamond coating deposited at medium pressure of 26.4 mbar on carbide substrate treated with acid not only exhibited best morphology but also highest coating-substrate adhesion and improved machining performance.

  8. Evaluation of the Multi-Chambered Treatment Train, a retrofit water-quality management device

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, Steven R.; Greb, Steven R.; Bannerman, Roger T.; Pitt, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the benefits and efficiencies of a device called the Multi-Chambered Treatment Train (MCTT), which was installed below the pavement surface at a municipal maintenance garage and parking facility in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Flow-weighted water samples were collected at the inlet and outlet of the device during 15 storms, and the efficiency of the device was based on reductions in the loads of 68 chemical constituents and organic compounds. High reduction efficiencies were achieved for all particulate-associated constituents, including total suspended solids (98 percent), total phosphorus (88 percent), and total recoverable zinc (91 percent). Reduction rates for dissolved fractions of the constituents were substantial, but somewhat lower (dissolved solids, 13 percent; dissolved phosphorus, 78 percent; dissolved zinc, 68 percent). The total dissolved solids load, which originated from road salt storage, was more than four times the total suspended solids load. No appreciable difference was detected between particle-size distributions in inflow and outflow samples.

  9. Muon Bunch Coalescing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Bhat, Chandra; Popovic, Milorad; Bogacz, Alex; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2007-06-25

    The idea of coalescing multiple muon bunches at high energy to enhance the luminosity of a muon collider provides many advantages. It circumvents space-charge, beam loading, and wakefield problems of intense low energy bunches while restoring the synergy between muon colliders and neutrino factories based on muon storage rings. A sampling of initial conceptual design work for a coalescing ring is presented here.

  10. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  11. Muon beamline at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, G. H.; Clarke-Gayther, M. A.; Scott, C. A.; Cox, S. F. J.; Kilcoyne, S. H.

    1994-07-01

    The original pulsed surface muon facility was established at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory's ISIS in 1987. The facility was then upgraded in 1993 from a single beam line and spectrometer to a triple beam facility with three spectrometers working independently. The layout of ISIS is shown. A plan of the ISIS experimental hall is shown, indicating the respective locations of the neutron beams, the KARMEN neutrino facility and the muon beam line complex. Other topics shown in the report include the following: (1) Muon production; (2) Transport of muons to the experimental areas; (3) Positron elimination from the ISIS muon beam; (4) Creation of three independent beam lines.

  12. Triple-GEM Detectors for the Innermost Region of the LHCb Muon Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Poli Lener, M

    2005-10-12

    We present in this paper the mechanical construction procedures, the tools and the relative quality check of a triple-GEM detector. This kind of detector is the result of R and D activity performed for the study of detectors for the hard radiation environment of the innermost region, around the beam pipe, of the first muon station of the LHCb experiment. We also present the performances of the chamber final design, operated with Ar/CO2/CF4 (45/15/40) gas mixture, obtained at PS beam facility at CERN.

  13. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  14. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; et al

    2014-10-05

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  15. Prototype performance of novel muon telescope detector at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan,L.; Ames, V.

    2008-02-04

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design [l]. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRF'C. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution.

  16. Prototype Performance of Novel Muon Telescope Detector at STAR.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan,L.

    2008-04-05

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRPC. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution.

  17. The muon system of the Daya Bay Reactor antineutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Beriguete, W.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Brown, R. E.; Butorov, I.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Carr, R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L.; Chang, Y.; Chasman, C.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, X. C.; Chen, X. H.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. X.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; Dale, E.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Draeger, E.; Du, X. F.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Fu, J. Y.; Ge, L. Q.; Gill, R.; Goett, J.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, G. H.; Hans, S.; He, M.; He, Q.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Hinrichs, P.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. L.; Ji, X. P.; Jiang, H. J.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Kang, L.; Kebwaro, J. M.; Kettell, S. H.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lai, W. C.; Lai, W. H.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, A.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. K.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, S. S.; Liu, Y. B.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Luk, K. B.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. Q.; McDonald, K. T.; McFarlane, M. C.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Mohapatra, D.; Morgan, J. E.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Nemchenok, I.; Newsom, C.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngai, W. K.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevski, A.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Pearson, C. E.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Shao, B. B.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tam, Y. H.; Tang, X.; Themann, H.; Tsang, K. V.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viren, B.; Virostek, S.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Y.; Wang, L. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webber, D. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wei, Y. D.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xia, X.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, G. H.; Xu, J.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y. S.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, J. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zang, S. L.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described.

  18. Multiple muons in MACRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinz, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the multiple muon events in the Monopole Astrophysics and Cosmic Ray Observatory detector was conducted to determine the cosmic ray composition. Particular emphasis is placed on the interesting primary cosmic ray energy region above 2000 TeV/nucleus. An extensive study of muon production in cosmic ray showers has been done. Results were used to parameterize the characteristics of muon penetration into the Earth to the location of a detector.

  19. The forward muon detector of L3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alarcon, J.; Alberdi, J.; Alexandrov, V.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Anderhub, H.; Ariza, M.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakker, F.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barcala, J.; Becker, U.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Betev, B. L.; Biland, A.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borissov, V.; Bosseler, K.; Bouvier, Ph.; Brambilla, E.; Burger, J. D.; Burgos, C.; Buskens, J.; Carlier, J. C.; Carlino, G.; Casaus, J.; Cavallo, N.; Cerjak, I.; Cerrada, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, H. S.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Chvatchkine, V.; Daniel, M.; de Asmundis, R.; Decreuse, G.; Deiters, K.; Djambazov, L.; Duraffourg, P.; Erné, F. C.; Esser, H.; Ezekiev, S.; Faber, G.; Fabre, M.; Fernandez, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Fritschi, M.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Haller, Ch.; Herold, W. D.; Herrmann, J.; Hervé, A.; Hofer, H.; Hofer, H.; Hofer, M.; Hofer, T.; Homma, J.; Horisberger, U.; Horvath, I.; Ingenito, P.; Innocente, V.; Ioudine, I.; Jaspers, M.; de Jong, P.; Kaestli, W.; Kaspar, H.; Kitov, V.; König, A. C.; Koutsenko, V.; Lanzano, S.; Lapoint, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lecomte, P.; Lista, L.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, J. M.; Milesi, M.; Molinero, A.; Montero, A.; Moore, R.; Nahn, S.; Navarrete, J.; Okle, M.; Orlinov, I.; Ostojic, D.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Parascandolo, P.; Passeggio, G.; Patricelli, S.; Peach, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pigni, L.; Postema, H.; Puras, C.; Ren, D.; Rewiersma, P.; Rietmeyer, A.; Riles, K.; Risco, J.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Roeser, U.; Romero, L.; van Rossum, W.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sassowsky, M.; Schegelsky, V.; Scholz, N.; Schultze, K.; Schuylenburg, H.; Sciacca, C.; Seiler, P. G.; Siedenburg, T.; Siedling, R.; Smith, B.; Soulimov, V.; Sudhakar, K.; Syben, O.; Tonutti, M.; Udovcic, A.; Ulbricht, J.; Veillet, L.; Vergain, M.; Viertel, G.; von Gunten, H. P.; Vorobyov, An. A.; Vrankovic, V.; de Waard, A.; Waldmeier-Wicki, S.; Wallraff, W.; Walter, H. C.; Wang, J. C.; Wei, Z. L.; Wetter, R.; Weverling, I.; Willmott, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wu, R. J.; Yang, K. S.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Y.; Zuang, H. L.

    1996-02-01

    The forward-backward muon detector of the L3 experiment is presented. Intended to be used for LEP 200 physics, it consists of 96 self-calibrating drift chambers of a new design enclosing the magnet pole pieces of the L3 solenoid. The pole pieces are toroidally magnetized to form two independent analyzing spectrometers. A novel trigger is provided by resistive plate counters attached to the drift chambers. Details about the design, construction and performance of the whole system are given together with results obtained during the 1995 running at LEP.

  20. Experimental determination of beam quality factors, kQ, for two types of Farmer chamber in a 10 MV photon and a 175 MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medin, Joakim; Ross, Carl K.; Klassen, Norman V.; Palmans, Hugo; Grusell, Erik; Grindborg, Jan-Erik

    2006-03-01

    Absorbed doses determined with a sealed water calorimeter operated at 4 °C are compared with the results obtained using ionization chambers and the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice in a 10 MV photon beam (TPR20,10 = 0.734) and a 175 MeV proton beam (at a depth corresponding to the residual range, Rres = 14.7 cm). Three NE 2571 and two FC65-G ionization chambers were calibrated in terms of absorbed-dose-to-water in 60Co at the Swedish secondary standard dosimetry laboratory, directly traceable to the BIPM. In the photon beam quality, calorimetry was found to agree with ionometry within 0.3%, confirming the kQ values tabulated in TRS-398. In contrast, a 1.8% deviation was found in the proton beam at 6 g cm-2 depth, suggesting that the TRS-398 tabulated kQ values for these two ionization chamber types are too high. Assuming no perturbation effect in the proton beam for the ionization chambers, a value for (wair/e)Q of 33.6 J C-1 ± 1.7% (k = 1) can be derived from these measurements. An analytical evaluation of the effect from non-elastic nuclear interactions in the ionization chamber wall indicates a perturbation effect of 0.6%. Including this estimated result in the proton beam would increase the determined (wair/e)Q value by the same amount.

  1. Experimental determination of beam quality factors, kQ, for two types of Farmer chamber in a 10 MV photon and a 175 MeV proton beam.

    PubMed

    Medin, Joakim; Ross, Carl K; Klassen, Norman V; Palmans, Hugo; Grusell, Erik; Grindborg, Jan-Erik

    2006-03-21

    Absorbed doses determined with a sealed water calorimeter operated at 4 degrees C are compared with the results obtained using ionization chambers and the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice in a 10 MV photon beam (TPR(20,10) = 0.734) and a 175 MeV proton beam (at a depth corresponding to the residual range, R(res) = 14.7 cm). Three NE 2571 and two FC65-G ionization chambers were calibrated in terms of absorbed-dose-to-water in (60)Co at the Swedish secondary standard dosimetry laboratory, directly traceable to the BIPM. In the photon beam quality, calorimetry was found to agree with ionometry within 0.3%, confirming the k(Q) values tabulated in TRS-398. In contrast, a 1.8% deviation was found in the proton beam at 6 g cm(-2) depth, suggesting that the TRS-398 tabulated k(Q) values for these two ionization chamber types are too high. Assuming no perturbation effect in the proton beam for the ionization chambers, a value for (w(air)/e)(Q) of 33.6 J C(-1) +/- 1.7% (k = 1) can be derived from these measurements. An analytical evaluation of the effect from non-elastic nuclear interactions in the ionization chamber wall indicates a perturbation effect of 0.6%. Including this estimated result in the proton beam would increase the determined (w(air)/e)(Q) value by the same amount. PMID:16510959

  2. The Muon Detector of Cms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunhua

    2005-04-01

    Muons are an unmistakable signature of most of the LHC physics is designed to explore. The ability to trigger on and reconstruct muons at highest luminorsities is central to the concept of CMS. CMS is characterized by simplicity of design, with one magnet whose solenoideal field facilitates precision racking in the central barrel region and triggering on muons through their bending in the tharnverse and side views. The CMS muon system has three purpose: muon identification, muon trigger and nuon momentum measurement.

  3. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  4. Densitometric tomography using the measurement of muon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivert, F.; Busto, J.; Brunner, J.; Salin, P.; Gaffet, S.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g. seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The present work develops a recent method to investigate the in situ density of rocks using atmospheric the muon flux measurement , its attenuation depending on the rock density and thickness. This new geophysical technique have been mainly applied in volcanology (Lesparre N., 2011) using scintillator detectors. The present project (T2DM2) aims to realize underground muons flux measurements in order to characterizing the rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measure with a new Muon telescope instrumentation using Micromegas detectors in Time Projection Chambers (TPC) configuration. The first step of the work presented considers the muon flux simulation using the Gaisser model, for the interactions between muons and atmospheric particles, and the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the muons/rock interactions. The results show that the muon flux attenuation caused by density variations are enough significant to be observed until around 500 m depth and for period of time in the order of one month. Such a duration scale and depth of investigation is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes involved within the Karst unsaturated zone where LSBB is located. Our work now concentrates on the optimization of the spatial distribution of detectors that will be deployed in future.

  5. Muon tomography of rock density using Micromegas-TPC telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivert, Fanny; Busto, José; Gaffet, Stéphane; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Brunner, Jurgen; Salin, Pierre; Decitre, Jean-Baptiste; Lázaro Roche, Ignacio; Martin, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g., seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The current work is based on a recently developed method to investigate in situ the density of rocks using a measurement of the muon flux, whose attenuation depends on the quantity of matter the particles travel through and hence on the rock density and thickness. The present project (T2DM2) aims at performing underground muon flux measurements in order to characterize spatial and temporal rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measured with a new muon telescope device using Micromegas-Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detectors. The first step of the work presented covers the muon flux simulation based on the Gaisser model (Gaisser T., 1990), for the muon flux at the ground level, and on the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the propagation of muons through the rock. The results show that the muon flux distortion caused by density variations is enough significant to be observed at 500 m depth for measurement times of about one month. This time-scale is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes within the unsaturated Karst zone where LSBB is located. The work now focuses on the optimization of the detector layout along the LSBB galleries in order to achieve the best sensitivity.

  6. Imaging a vertical shaft from a tunnel using muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Dorsey, D. J.; Schwellenbach, D.; Green, A.; Smalley, D.

    2015-12-01

    We use muon technology to image a vertical shaft from a tunnel. The density of the materials through which cosmic ray muons pass influences the flux of muons because muons are more attenuated by higher density material. Additionally, muons can travel several kilometers allowing measurements through deep rock. Density maps are generated from muon flux measurements to locate subsurface features like tunnel structures and ore bodies. Additionally, muon data can be jointly inverted with other data such as gravity and seismic to produce higher quality earth models than produced from a single method. We collected several weeks of data in a tunnel to image a vertical shaft. The minimum length of rock between the vertical shaft and the detector is 120 meters and the diameter of the vertical shaft is 4.6 meters. The rock the muons traveled through consists of Tertiary age volcanic tuff and steeply dipping, small-displacement faults. Results will be presented for muon flux in the tunnel and Monte-Carlo simulations of this experiment. Simulations from both GEANT4 (Geometry And Tracking version 4) and MCNP6 (Monte-Carlo N-Particle version 6) models will be compared. The tunnel overburden from muon measurements is also estimated and compared with actual the overburden. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Measurement of the energy of horizontal cosmic ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettert, Michael

    1993-03-01

    An experiment in which the energy of cosmic ray muons is determined by measuring the electron positron pairs that they radiate off when passing through matter is described. The detector is a stack of lead converters interspersed with ionization chambers for particle detection. The chambers use as active medium the liquid tetra methyl silane (TMS). The radiated quanta initiate electromagnetic cascades in the lead and are recognized due to the characteristic shower development. The energy spectrum of horizontal muons is presented and from this the primary cosmic ray spectrum is deduced.

  8. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  9. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  10. Underwater measurements of muon intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, V. M.; Pustovetov, V. P.; Trubkin, Y. A.; Kirilenkov, A. V.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental measurements of cosmic ray muon intensity deep underwater aimed at determining a muon absorption curve are of considerable interest, as they allow to reproduce independently the muon energy spectrum at sea level. The comparison of the muon absorption curve in sea water with that in rock makes it possible to determine muon energy losses caused by nuclear interactions. The data available on muon absorption in water and that in rock are not equivalent. Underground measurements are numerous and have been carried out down to the depth of approx. 15km w.e., whereas underwater muon intensity have been measured twice and only down to approx. 3km deep.

  11. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  12. Compensating for wall effects in IAQ (indoor air quality) chamber tests by mathematical modeling. Report for June 1986-February 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.E.; Tichenor, B.A.

    1987-04-01

    The paper presents mechanistic mathematical models that account for two phenomena: interior surfaces of a state-of-the-art emissions test chamber acting as a transient sink for organic emissions; and the effect of increasing chamber concentration on the emission rate of the source. As a consequence of this mathematical development, a source emission rate as a function of time and a steady-state emission rate factor are given precise definitions. Applications involve modeling 1,4 dichlorobenzene emission from moth crystals, and mixed emissions from latex caulk.

  13. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  14. High energy muon induced radioactive nuclides in nickel plate and its use for 2-D muon-beam image profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurebayashi, Y.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Doshita, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Tokanai, F.; Horiuchi, K.; Tajima, Y.; Oe, T.; Sato, T.; Gunji, S.; Inui, E.; Kondo, K.; Iwata, N.; Sasaki, N.; Matsuzaki, H.; Kunieda, S.

    2015-11-01

    Target materials were exposed to a muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV/c at the COMPASS experiment line in CERN-SPS to measure the production cross-sections for muon-induced radionuclides. A muon imager containing four nickel plates, each measuring 100 mm×100 mm, exposed to the IP plate successfully detected the muon beam image during an irradiation period of 33 days. The contrasting density rate of the nickel plate was (5.2±0.7)×10-9 PSL/muon per one-day exposure to IP. The image measured 122 mm and 174 mm in horizontal and vertical lengths, respectively, in relation to the surface of the base, indicating that 50±6% of the muon beam flux is confined to an area of 18% of the whole muon beam. The number of muons estimated from the PSL value in the total beam image area (0.81±0.1)×1013 was comparable to the total muon counts of the ion-chamber at the M2 beam line in the CERN-SPS. The production cross-sections of Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-58 in nickel were 0.19±0.08, 0.34±0.06, 0.5±0.05, 3.44±0.07, 0.4±0.03 in the unit of mb, respectively, reducing muon associated particles effects. They are approximately 10 times smaller than that a proceeding study by Heisinger et al.

  15. The Monitor online system of the OPERA muon magnetic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolino, U.; Ambrosio, M.; Acquafredda, R.; Masone, V.

    2008-06-01

    The OPERA muon magnetic spectrometer has been designed for muon detection, tracking and timing. The 44 bakelite Resistive Chambers (RPC) planes, imbibed inside the magnet iron slabs, must provide the tracking of the muon curved in the magnetic field to ease the momentum and charge measurement provided by the HPT. Furthermore, it provides the momentum for muons stopping in the iron. RPC signals will be also used as start of drift tube acquisition thanks to the very good time resolution of RPC detectors. Due to the required performances the tracking detector must be fully efficient and stable. In this conditions an online monitor is mandatory to continuously control stability of run conditions. We report the main characteristics and performances of the monitor system for the OPERA spectrometer and capabilities of the software developed for settings and data acquisition.

  16. Readout system of the ALICE Muon tracking detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Sylvain

    2010-11-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) will be aimed at studying heavy ion collisions at the extreme energy densities accessible at the CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma is expected. The ALICE muon forward spectrometer will identify muons with momentum above 4 GeV/c, allowing the study of quarkonia and heavy flavors in the pseudorapidity range -4.0< η<-2.5 with 2 π azimuthal coverage. The muon tracking system consists of 10 Cathode Pad Chambers (CPC) with 1.1 million of pads that represent the total number of acquisition channels to manage. In this article, we will give an overview of the ALICE Muon Spectrometer. Afterward, we will focus on tracking system Front end Electronics (FEE) and readout system. We will show that the Digital Signal Processor (DSP) architecture fulfills all the requirements, including radiation hardness against neutrons. Finally, real-time performances are discussed.

  17. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-05

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  18. Muons and neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first generation of large and precise detectors, some initially dedicated to search for nucleon decay has accumulated significant statistics on neutrinos and high-energy muons. A second generation of even better and bigger detectors are already in operation or in advanced construction stage. The present set of experimental data on muon groups and neutrinos is qualitatively better than several years ago and the expectations for the following years are high. Composition studies with underground muon groups, neutrino detection, and expected extraterrestrial neutrino fluxes are discussed.

  19. Neutrino physics at muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    King, B.J.

    1998-03-01

    An overview is given of the neutrino physics potential of future muon storage rings that use muon collider technology to produce, accelerate and store large currents of muons. After a general characterization of the neutrino beam and its interactions, some crude quantitative estimates are given for the physics performance of a muon ring neutrino experiment (MURINE) consisting of a high rate, high performance neutrino detector at a 250 GeV muon collider storage ring.

  20. High-quality diamond films grown at high deposition rates using high-power-density MWPCVD method with conventional quartz-type chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Takahiro; Arima, Kazuya; Maida, Osamu; Ito, Toshimichi

    2007-12-01

    Undoped and boron-doped homoepitaxial diamond films with high quality have been successfully grown on high-pressure/high-temperature-synthesized type-Ib single-crystalline diamond (1 0 0) substrates. In the growth process, a conventional microwave-plasma (MWP) chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) system with an easily-exchangeable 36-mm-inner-diameter quartz-tube growth chamber was employed under a condition of high MW power densities while a rather high methane concentration (4%) and high substrate temperatures (>1000 °C) were used. The growth conditions applied to the undoped and B-doped diamond thin films were separately optimized by controlling the MW plasma density and substrate temperatures. The homoepitaxial films thus grown yielded strong exciton-related luminescence even at room temperature, meaning that their crystalline quality was good and roughly comparable with that of homoepitaxial films deposited using a high-power MWPCVD system with a stainless steel chamber having a rather large diameter. This indicates that by using such a conventional deposition system with inexpensive and easily-exchangeable exclusive-use quartz-tube chambers, various growth experiments can be performed under different process conditions without any severe interference among the different experiments.

  1. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  2. Muons in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayden, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    Positive muons have long been used as extrinsic probes in chemistry, offering unique properties for the investigation of local magnetism, dynamics, transport and radical kinetics. Exciting new developments in muon beam lines offer the opportunity of extending these studies selectively to surfaces permitting, for example, the detection of increased mobility of polymer chains at the surface of a polymer film. So called pump and probe methods, involving external perturbations by laser irradiation to manipulate vibrational and electronic states, can be followed by muon pulses allowing the probing of the properties of these states. Muoniated radical probes are finding greater use in soft matter. Selectivity is achieved in these complex systems through an appropriate target molecule giving the chance to measure partitioning and interfacial transfer in surfactant systems. Improvements in sample environments allow the observation of muons in increasingly extreme combinations of temperature and pressure, such as supercritical water, allowing the characterization of the chemistry in these systems.

  3. Fast cooling, muon acceleration and the prospect of muon colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Mark

    Facilities based on stored muons offer unique potential for future high-energy physics capabilities. Three key characteristics of the muon make this possible: * The muon is a lepton; * The muon is roughly 200 times as massive as the electron; * The muon decays to an electron and two neutrinos. As the next heavier members of the lepton family with respect to the electron and positron, μ+ and μ-. beams can be collided to provide a precision lepton probe of the electroweak couplings. This makes a muon collider a suitable option for a lepton collider companion to a hadron collider discovery machine...

  4. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  5. On-line quality assurance of rotational radiotherapy treatment delivery by means of a 2D ion chamber array and the Octavius phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ann van; Clermont, Christian; Devillers, Magali; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P.

    2007-10-15

    For routine pretreatment verification of innovative treatment techniques such as (intensity modulated) dynamic arc therapy and helical TomoTherapy, an on-line and reliable method would be highly desirable. The present solution proposed by TomoTherapy, Inc. (Madison, WI) relies on film dosimetry in combination with up to two simultaneous ion chamber point dose measurements. A new method is proposed using a 2D ion chamber array (Seven29, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. The octagonal shape allows easy positioning for measurements in multiple planes. The directional dependence of the response of the detector was primarily investigated on a dual energy (6 and 18 MV) Clinac 21EX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) as no fixed angle incidences can be calculated in the Hi-Art TPS of TomoTherapy. The array was irradiated from different gantry angles and with different arc deliveries, and the dose distributions at the level of the detector were calculated with the AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm) photon dose calculation algorithm implemented in Eclipse (Varian). For validation on the 6 MV TomoTherapy unit, rotational treatments were generated, and dose distributions were calculated with the Hi-Art TPS. Multiple cylindrical ion chamber measurements were used to cross-check the dose calculation and dose delivery in Octavius in the absence of the 2D array. To compensate for the directional dependence of the 2D array, additional prototypes of Octavius were manufactured with built-in cylindrically symmetric compensation cavities. When using the Octavius phantom with a 2 cm compensation cavity, measurements with an accuracy comparable to that of single ion chambers can be achieved. The complete Octavius solution for quality assurance of rotational treatments consists of: The 2D array, two octagonal phantoms (with and without compensation layer), an insert for nine cylindrical ion chambers, and a set of inserts of

  6. On-line quality assurance of rotational radiotherapy treatment delivery by means of a 2D ion chamber array and the Octavius phantom.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Ann; Clermont, Christian; Devillers, Magali; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P

    2007-10-01

    For routine pretreatment verification of innovative treatment techniques such as (intensity modulated) dynamic arc therapy and helical TomoTherapy, an on-line and reliable method would be highly desirable. The present solution proposed by TomoTherapy, Inc. (Madison, WI) relies on film dosimetry in combination with up to two simultaneous ion chamber point dose measurements. A new method is proposed using a 2D ion chamber array (Seven29, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. The octagonal shape allows easy positioning for measurements in multiple planes. The directional dependence of the response of the detector was primarily investigated on a dual energy (6 and 18 MV) Clinac 21EX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) as no fixed angle incidences can be calculated in the Hi-Art TPS of TomoTherapy. The array was irradiated from different gantry angles and with different arc deliveries, and the dose distributions at the level of the detector were calculated with the AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm) photon dose calculation algorithm implemented in Eclipse (Varian). For validation on the 6 MV TomoTherapy unit, rotational treatments were generated, and dose distributions were calculated with the Hi-Art TPS. Multiple cylindrical ion chamber measurements were used to cross-check the dose calculation and dose delivery in Octavius in the absence of the 2D array. To compensate for the directional dependence of the 2D array, additional prototypes of Octavius were manufactured with built-in cylindrically symmetric compensation cavities. When using the Octavius phantom with a 2 cm compensation cavity, measurements with an accuracy comparable to that of single ion chambers can be achieved. The complete Octavius solution for quality assurance of rotational treatments consists of: The 2D array, two octagonal phantoms (with and without compensation layer), an insert for nine cylindrical ion chambers, and a set of inserts of

  7. Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    Japanese government announced cold-shutdown condition of the reactors at Fukushima Daiichi by the end of 2011, and mid- and long-term roadmap towards decommissioning has been drawn. However, little is known for the conditions of the cores because access to the reactors has been limited by the high radiation environment. The debris removal from the Unit 1 - 3 is planned to start as early as 2020, but the dismantlement is not easy without any realistic information of the damage to the cores, and the locations and amounts of the fuel debris. Soon after the disaster of Fukushima Daiichi, several teams in the US and Japan proposed to apply muon transmission or scattering imagings to provide information of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors without accessing inside the reactor building. GEANT4 modeling studies of Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 and 2 showed clear superiority of the muon scattering method over conventional transmission method. The scattering method was demonstrated with a research reactor, Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA), where a fuel assembly was imaged with 3-cm resolution. The muon scattering imaging of Fukushima Daiichi was approved as a national project and is aiming at installing muon trackers to Unit 2. A proposed plan includes installation of muon trackers on the 2nd floor (operation floor) of turbine building, and in front of the reactor building. Two 7mx7m detectors were assembled at Toshiba and tested.

  8. Precision muon physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorringe, T. P.; Hertzog, D. W.

    2015-09-01

    The muon is playing a unique role in sub-atomic physics. Studies of muon decay both determine the overall strength and establish the chiral structure of weak interactions, as well as setting extraordinary limits on charged-lepton-flavor-violating processes. Measurements of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment offer singular sensitivity to the completeness of the standard model and the predictions of many speculative theories. Spectroscopy of muonium and muonic atoms gives unmatched determinations of fundamental quantities including the magnetic moment ratio μμ /μp, lepton mass ratio mμ /me, and proton charge radius rp. Also, muon capture experiments are exploring elusive features of weak interactions involving nucleons and nuclei. We will review the experimental landscape of contemporary high-precision and high-sensitivity experiments with muons. One focus is the novel methods and ingenious techniques that achieve such precision and sensitivity in recent, present, and planned experiments. Another focus is the uncommonly broad and topical range of questions in atomic, nuclear and particle physics that such experiments explore.

  9. Muon Reconstruction and Identification in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, A.

    2010-02-10

    We present the design strategies and status of the CMS muon reconstruction and identification identification software. Muon reconstruction and identification is accomplished through a variety of complementary algorithms. The CMS muon reconstruction software is based on a Kalman filter technique and reconstructs muons in the standalone muon system, using information from all three types of muon detectors, and links the resulting muon tracks with tracks reconstructed in the silicon tracker. In addition, a muon identification algorithm has been developed which tries to identify muons with high efficiency while maintaining a low probability of misidentification. The muon identification algorithm is complementary by design to the muon reconstruction algorithm that starts track reconstruction in the muon detectors. The identification algorithm accepts reconstructed tracks from the inner tracker and attempts to quantify the muon compatibility for each track using associated calorimeter and muon detector hit information. The performance status is based on detailed detector simulations as well as initial studies using cosmic muon data.

  10. Production of muons for fusion catalysis in a magnetic mirror configuration. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.; Chapline, G.F. Jr.

    1986-07-25

    For muon-catalyzed fusion to be of practical interest, a very efficient means of producing muons must be found. We describe a scheme for producing muons that may be more energy efficient than any heretofore proposed. There are, in particular, some potential advantages of creating muons from collisions of high energy tritons confined in a magnetic mirror configuration. If one could catalyze 200 fusions per muon and employ a uranium blanket that would multiply the neutron energy by a factor of 10, one might produce electricity with an overall plant efficiency (ratio of electric energy produced to nuclear energy released) approaching 30%. One possible near term application of a muon-producing magnetic-mirror scheme would be to build a high-flux neutron source for radiation damage studies. The careful arrangement of triton orbits will result in many of the ..pi../sup -/'s being produced near the axis of the magnetic mirror. The pions quickly decay into muons, which are transported into a small (few-cm-diameter) reactor chamber producing approximately 1-MW/m/sup 2/ neutron flux on the chamber walls, using a laboratory accelerator and magnetic mirror. The costs of construction and operation of the triton injection accelerator probably introduces most of the uncertainty in the viability of this scheme. If a 10-..mu..A, 600 MeV neutral triton accelerator could be built for less than $100 million and operated cheaply enough, one might well bring muon-catalyzed fusion into practical use.

  11. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  12. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  13. Novel Muon Beam Facilities for Project X at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.V.; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Abrams, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    Innovative muon beam concepts for intensity-frontier experiments such as muon-to-electron conversion are described. Elaborating upon a previous single-beam idea, we have developed a design concept for a system to generate four high quality, low-energy muon beams (two of each sign) from a single beam of protons. As a first step, the production of pions by 1 and 3 GeV protons from the proposed Project X linac at Fermilab is being simulated and compared with the 8-GeV results from the previous study.

  14. LRL 25-inch Bubble Chamber

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Gow, J. D.; Barrera, F.; Eckman, G.; Shand, J.; Watt, R.; Norgren, D.; Hernandez, H. P.

    1964-07-08

    The recently completed 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber combines excellent picture quality with a fast operating cycle. The chamber has a unique optical system and is designed to take several pictures each Bevatron pulse, in conjunction with the Bevatron rapid beam ejection system.

  15. High Rate Proton Irradiation of 15mm Muon Drifttubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibell, A.; Biebel, O.; Hertenberger, R.; Ruschke, A.; Schmitt, Ch.; Kroha, H.; Bittner, B.; Schwegler, P.; Dubbert, J.; Ott, S.

    2012-08-01

    Future LHC luminosity upgrades will significantly increase the amount of background hits from photons, neutrons 11.11d protons in the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. At the proposed LHC peak luminosity of 5\\cdot 1034(1)/(cm2s), background hit rates of more than 10(kHz)/(cm2) are expected in the innermost forward region, leading to a loss of performance of the current tracking chambers. Based on the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube chambers, a new high rate capable drift tube detecor using tubes with a reduced diameter of 15mm was developed. To test the response to highly ionizing particles, a prototype chamber of 46 15mm drift tubes was irradiated with a 20 MeV proton beam at the tandem accelerator at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Munich. Three tubes in a planar layer were irradiated while all other tubes were used for reconstruction of cosmic muon tracks through irradiated and nonirradiated parts of the chamber. To determine the rate capability of the 15mm drifttubes we investigated the effect of the proton hit rate on pulse height, efficiency and spatial resolution of the cosmic muon signals.

  16. High-quality green tea leaf production by artificial cultivation under growth chamber conditions considering amino acids profile.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Shunsuke; Yuki, Takayuki; Fuji, Hiroshi; Kojima, Kunio; Yonetani, Tsutomu; Tomio, Ayako; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-12-01

    The current study focused on the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) as a target for artificial cultivation because of the variation in its components in response to light conditions. We analyzed its sensory quality by multi-marker profiling using multicomponent data based on metabolomics to optimize the conditions of light and the environment during cultivation. From the analysis of high-quality tea samples ranked in a tea contest, the ranking predictive model was created by the partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis to examine the correlation between the amino-acid content (X variables) and the ranking in the tea contest (Y variables). The predictive model revealed that glutamine, arginine, and theanine were the predominant amino acids present in high-ranking teas. Based on this result, we established a cover-culture condition (i.e., a low-light intensity condition) during the later stage of the culture process and obtained artificially cultured tea samples, which were predicted to be high-quality teas. The aim of the current study was to optimize the light conditions for the cultivation of tea plants by performing data analysis of their sensory qualities through multi-marker profiling in order to facilitate the development of high-quality teas by plant factories. PMID:24915994

  17. A large area cosmic muon detector located at Ohya stone mine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nii, N.; Mizutani, K.; Aoki, T.; Kitamura, T.; Mitsui, K.; Matsuno, S.; Muraki, Y.; Ohashi, Y.; Okada, A.; Kamiya, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical composition of the primary cosmic rays between 10 to the 15th power eV and 10 to the 18th power eV were determined by a Large Area Cosmic Muon Detector located at Ohya stone mine. The experimental aims of Ohya project are; (1) search for the ultra high-energy gamma-rays; (2) search for the GUT monopole created by Big Bang; and (3) search for the muon bundle. A large number of muon chambers were installed at the shallow underground near Nikko (approx. 100 Km north of Tokyo, situated at Ohya-town, Utsunomiya-city). At the surface of the mine, very fast 100 channel scintillation counters were equipped in order to measure the direction of air showers. These air shower arrays were operated at the same time, together with the underground muon chamber.

  18. Chamber QoE: a multi-instrumental approach to explore affective aspects in relation to quality of experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Moor, Katrien; Mazza, Filippo; Hupont, Isabelle; Ríos Quintero, Miguel; Mäki, Toni; Varela, Martín.

    2014-02-01

    Evaluating (audio)visual quality and Quality of Experience (QoE) from the user's perspective, has become a key element in optimizing users' experiences and their quality. Traditionally, the focus lies on how multi-level quality features are perceived by a human user. The interest has however gradually expanded towards human cognitive, affective and behavioral processes that may impact on, be an element of, or be influenced by QoE, and which have been underinvestigated so far. In addition, there is a major discrepancy between the new, broadly supported and more holistic conceptualization of QoE proposed by Le Callet et al. (2012) and traditional, standardized QoE assessment. This paper explores ways to tackle this discrepancy by means of a multi-instrumental approach. More concretely, it presents results from a lab study on video quality (N=27), aimed at going beyond the dominant QoE assessment paradigm and at exploring affective aspects in relation to QoE and in relation to perceived overall quality. Four types of data were collected: `traditional' QoE self-report measures were complemented with `alternative', emotional state- and user engagement-related self-report measures to evaluate QoE. In addition, we collected EEG (physiological) data, gazetracking data and facial expressions (behavioral) data. The video samples used in test were longer in duration than is common in standard tests allowing us to study e.g. more realistic experience and deeper user engagement. Our findings support the claim that the traditional QoE measures need to be reconsidered and extended with additional, affective staterelated measures.

  19. Magma chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of terrestrial magma chambers (MCs) are reviewed. Consideration is given to the evidence for MCs with active convection and crystal sorting, problems of direct MC detection, theoretical models of MC cooling, the rheology and dynamics of solidification fronts, crystal capture and differentiation, convection with solidification, MC wall flows, and MC roof melting. Diagrams, graphs, and a list of problems requiring further research are provided.

  20. On muon energy spectrum in muon groups underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakatanov, V. N.; Chudakov, A. E.; Novoseltsev, Y. F.; Novoseltseva, M. V.; Stenkin, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which was used to measure muon energy spectrum characteristics in muon groups underground using mu-e decays recording. The Baksan Telescope's experimental data on mu-e decays intensity in muon groups of various multiplicities are analyzed. The experimental data indicating very flat spectrum does not however represent the total spectrum in muon groups. Obviously the muon energy spectrum depends strongly on a distance from the group axis. The core attraction effect makes a significant distortion, making the spectrum flatter. After taking this into account and making corrections for this effect the integral total spectrum index in groups has a very small depencence on muon multiplicity and agrees well with expected one: beta=beta (sub expected) = 1.75.

  1. Muon capture for the front end of a muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Yoshikawa, C.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the design of the muon capture front end for a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} Collider. In the front end, a proton bunch on a target creates secondary pions that drift into a capture transport channel, decaying into muons. A sequence of rf cavities forms the resulting muon beams into strings of bunches of differing energies, aligns the bunches to (nearly) equal central energies, and initiates ionization cooling. The muons are then cooled and accelerated to high energy into a storage ring for high-energy high luminosity collisions. Our initial design is based on the somewhat similar front end of the International Design Study (IDS) neutrino factory.

  2. Muon collider progress

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  3. Muon spin rotation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  4. The US Muon Accelerator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, Y.; Kirk, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, Steve; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Zisman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-01

    An accelerator complex that can produce ultra-intense beams of muons presents many opportunities to explore new physics. A facility of this type is unique in that, in a relatively straightforward way, it can present a physics program that can be staged and thus move forward incrementally, addressing exciting new physics at each step. At the request of the US Department of Energy's Office of High Energy Physics, the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC) and the Fermilab Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) have recently submitted a proposal to create a Muon Accelerator Program that will have, as a primary goal, to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for an energy-frontier Muon Collider by the end of a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a description of a Muon Collider facility and gives an overview of the proposal.

  5. Muon cherenkov telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamova, E.; Angelov, I.; Kalapov, I.; Davidkov, K.; Stamenov, J.

    2001-08-01

    : The Muon Cerenkov Telescope is a system of water cerenkov detectors, using the coincidence technique to register cosmic ray muons. It is constructed in order to study the variations of cosmic rays and their correlation with solar activity and processes in the Earth magnetosphere. 1 Basic design of the Muon Cerenkov Telescope The telescope has 18 water cerenkov detectors / 0.25 m2 each /, situated in two parallel planes. / Fig. 1/ Each detector /fig. 2/ consists of a container with dimensions 50x50x12.5 cm made of 3mm thick glass with mirror cover of the outer side. The container is filled with distilled water to 10cm level. A photomultiplier is attached to a transparent circle at the floor of the container and the discriminator is placed in its housing. When a charged particle with energy greater than the threshold energy for cerenkov radiation generation passes the radiator, cerenkov photons are initiated and a part of them reach the PMT cathode after multiple reflections from the mirror sides of the container.

  6. Proportional drift tubes for large area muon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, C.; Higashi, S.; Hiraoka, N.; Maruyama, A.; Okusawa, T.; Sato, T.; Suwada, T.; Takahashi, T.; Umeda, H.

    1985-01-01

    A proportional drift chamber which consists of eight rectangular drift tubes with cross section of 10 cm x 5 cm, a sense wire of 100 micron phi gold-plated tungsten wire and the length of 6 m, was tested using cosmic ray muons. Spatial resolution (rms) is between 0.5 and 1 mm over drift space of 50 mm, depending on incident angle and distance from sense wire.

  7. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  8. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  9. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, Steve

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate O(1021) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  10. From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

  11. Search for the neutrinoless muon decay. mu. /sup +/. -->. e/sup +/. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, S.L.

    1985-07-01

    Separate muon, electron, and tau numbers are conserved in the minimal standard model of electroweak interactions with massless neutrinos. However, in many extensions to the standard model, separate lepton numbers are not expected to be conserved quantities. A new search for muon number non-conserving processes has been undertaken at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), specifically to look for three neutrinoless decay modes of the muon. The search for the decay of a muon to an electron and a photon is discussed here. A new detector facility, located in the LAMPF stopped muon channel, was developed for this experiment. This Crystal Box detector consists of a cylindrical drift chamber surrounded by a plastic scintillator hodoscope and a large solid angle, modularized, NaI(Tl) calorimeter. The apparatus measures the trajectories, relative timing, and energies of charged particles and photons from the decays of positive muons stopped in a central target. The assembly and calibration of the detector are described, and the procedure for taking data is discussed. The sample of 1.3 million candidate events, from the first data run of the Crystal Box, was analyzed using a maximum-likelihood method. The upper limit on the branching ratio, relative to normal muon decay, for a muon decaying to an electron and a photon is found to be consistent with previous measurements. With 90% confidence, the branching ratio for this neutrinoless decay is observed to be less than 2.8 x 10/sup 10/.

  12. High-energy Physics with Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.

    1958-03-07

    Recent experience with liquid hydrogen bubble chambers of 25 and 40 cm dia. in high-energy physics experiments is discussed. Experiments described are: interactions of K{sup -} mesons with protons, interactions of antiprotons with protons, catalysis of nuclear fusion reactions by muons, and production and decay of hyperons from negative pions. (W.D.M.)

  13. Physical applications of muon catalysis: Muon capture in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filchenkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental research on capture of negative muons in hydrogen are reported with an emphasis on the accompanying phenomenon of muon catalysis in hydrogen and subtleties of the experimental method. A conclusion is drawn that precise determination of the capture rate is important for refining the standard model.

  14. Muon Spin Rotation Spectroscopy - Utilizing Muons in Solid State Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Andreas

    2012-10-17

    Over the past decades muon spin rotation techniques (mSR) have established themselves as an invaluable tool to study a variety of static and dynamic phenomena in bulk solid state physics and chemistry. Common to all these approaches is that the muon is utilized as a spin microprobe and/or hydrogen-like probe, implanted in the material under investigation. Recent developments extend the range of application to near surface phenomena, thin film and super-lattice studies. After briefly summarizing the production of so called surface muons used for bulk studies, and discussing the principle differences between pulsed and continuous muon beams, the production of keV-energy muon sources will be discussed. A few topical examples from different active research fields will be presented to demonstrate the power of these techniques.

  15. Electron-Muon Ranger: Performance in the MICE muon beam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adams, D.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. Lastly, the EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta inmore » the range 100–280 MeV/c.« less

  16. Electron-Muon Ranger: Performance in the MICE muon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. Lastly, the EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100–280 MeV/c.

  17. An intense low energy muon source for the muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Taqqu, D.

    1996-05-01

    A scheme for obtaining an intense source of low energy muons is described. It is based on the production of pions in a high field magnetic bottle trap. By ensuring efficient slowing down and extraction of the decay muons an intense intermediate energy muon beam is obtained. For the specific case of negative muons a novel technique called frictional accumulation provides efficient conversion into a 10 keV{mu}{sup {minus}} beam whose emittance is then reduced in a configuration providing extended frictional cooling. The result is a beam of very small transverse and longitudinal emittance that can be used together with an equivalent {mu}{sup +} beam as compact intense muon source for the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider. A final luminosity around 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} is expected to be obtained at 2 TeV. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Electron-muon ranger: performance in the MICE muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bene, P.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradshaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Cadoux, F.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Debieux, S.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J. S.; Greis, J.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Husi, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Masciocchi, F.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nicola, L.; Noah Messomo, E.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rothenfusser, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Sandström, R.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Wisting, H.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/c.

  19. Muon Cooling—emittance exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Zohreh

    2001-05-01

    Muon Cooling is the key factor in building of a Muon collider, (to a less degree) Muon storage ring, and a Neutrino Factory. Muon colliders potential to provide a probe for fundamental particle physics is very interesting, but may take a considerable time to realize, as much more work and study is needed. Utilizing high intensity Muon sources-Neutrino Factories, and other intermediate steps are very important and will greatly expand our abilities and confidence in the credibility of high energy muon colliders. To obtain the needed collider luminosity, the phase-space volume must be greatly reduced within the muon life time. The Ionization cooling is the preferred method used to compress the phase space and reduce the emittance to obtain high luminosity muon beams. We note that, the ionization losses results not only in damping, but also heating. The use of alternating solenoid lattices has been proposed, where the emittance are large. We present an overview of the cooling and discuss formalism, solenoid magnets and some beam dynamics.

  20. High luminosity muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  1. Muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-03-01

    The possibility of muon colliders was introduced by Skrinsky et al., Neuffer, and others. More recently, several workshops and collaboration meetings have greatly increased the level of discussion. In this paper we present scenarios for 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV colliders based on an optimally designed proton source, and for a lower luminosity 0.5 TeV demonstration based on an upgraded version of the AGS. It is assumed that a demonstration version based on upgrades of the FERMILAB machines would also be possible. 53 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Visualization tool for X-ray scanner for sTGC detector production quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, V. O.; Filippov, K. A.; Konovalov, S. P.; Mikenberg, G.; Romaniouk, A.; Shchukin, D.; Shoa, M.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Teterin, P. E.; Tsekhosh, V. I.; Vorobev, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has an ambitious program of the detector upgrade to meet an expected rise of accelerator luminosity. The first large system which supposed to be installed in 2019 is the New Small Wheel (NSW) for ATLAS muon spectrometer. In order to ensure high quality and reliability of NSW chambers an X-ray scanning technique is being developed. One of the main components of the X-ray scanner is a special software visualization tool which would allow a fast and clear representation of scanning results and an identification of possible chamber defects.

  3. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-05-30

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8{degree} angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3{degree} angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design.

  4. Muon tracking underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistoni, G.; Campana, P.; Chiarella, V.; Denni, U.; Iarocci, E.

    1986-04-01

    The design and performance of plastic streamer tubes for use in large underground particle-physics experiments such as the muon, astrophysics, and cosmic-ray observatory (MACRO) being developed for Gran Sasso Laboratory are reported. The large (1000 sq m or more) detector area required to achieve high-angular-resolution muon tracking in MACRO is covered by modules with eight 3 x 3-cm-cross section active streamer-tube cells each, similar to those used in the Mt. Blanc Laboratory detector. The MACRO modules have a maximum length of 12 m; and the cells have 60-micron-diameter wires, two conducting graphite sides, and two insulating sides (electrodeless electric-field shaping). The results of performance tests flowing 3:1 He:n-pentane through a tube module are presented graphically. Spatial resolution 1 cm and time resolution 100 ns are obtained, and the ability of the streamer tubes to detect large ionization losses with respect to the minimum is demonstrated.

  5. Research and Development of Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Quasi-isochronous Muon Collection Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, C.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Intense muon beams have many potential applications, including neutrino factories and muon colliders. However, muons are produced as tertiary beams, resulting in diffuse phase space distributions. To make useful beams, the muons must be rapidly cooled before they decay. An idea conceived recently for the collection and cooling of muon beams, namely, the use of a Quasi-Isochronous Helical Channel (QIHC) to facilitate capture of muons into RF buckets, has been developed further. The resulting distribution could be cooled quickly and coalesced into a single bunch to optimize the luminosity of a muon collider. After a brief elaboration of the QIHC concept, recent developments are described.

  7. Probing beyond the Standard Model with Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Hisano, Junji

    2008-02-21

    Muon's Properties are the most precisely studied among unstable particles. After discovery of muons in 40's, the studies of muons contributed to construction and establishment of the standard model in the particle physics. Now we are going to LHC era, however, precision frontier is still important in the particle physics. In this article, we review roles of muon physics in the particle physics. Muon g-2, lepton flavor violation (LFV) in muon decay, and electric dipole moment (EDM) of muon are mainly discussed.

  8. The Gran Sasso muon puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Mahbubani, Rakhi E-mail: rakhi@cern.ch

    2012-07-01

    We carry out a time-series analysis of the combined data from three experiments measuring the cosmic muon flux at the Gran Sasso laboratory, at a depth of 3800 m.w.e. These data, taken by the MACRO, LVD and Borexino experiments, span a period of over 20 years, and correspond to muons with a threshold energy, at sea level, of around 1.3 TeV. We compare the best-fit period and phase of the full muon data set with the combined DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA data, which spans the same time period, as a test of the hypothesis that the cosmic ray muon flux is responsible for the annual modulation detected by DAMA. We find in the muon data a large-amplitude fluctuation with a period of around one year, and a phase that is incompatible with that of the DAMA modulation at 5.2σ. Aside from this annual variation, the muon data also contains a further significant modulation with a period between 10 and 11 years and a power well above the 99.9% C.L threshold for noise, whose phase corresponds well with the solar cycle: a surprising observation for such high energy muons. We do not see this same period in the stratospheric temperature data.

  9. Muon Simulation at the Daya Bay SIte

    SciTech Connect

    Mengyun, Guan; Jun, Cao; Changgen, Yang; Yaxuan, Sun; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2006-05-23

    With a pretty good-resolution mountain profile, we simulated the underground muon background at the Daya Bay site. To get the sea-level muon flux parameterization, a modification to the standard Gaisser's formula was introduced according to the world muon data. MUSIC code was used to transport muon through the mountain rock. To deploy the simulation, first we generate a statistic sample of sea-level muon events according to the sea-level muon flux distribution formula; then calculate the slant depth of muon passing through the mountain using an interpolation method based on the digitized data of the mountain; finally transport muons through rock to get underground muon sample, from which we can get results of muon flux, mean energy, energy distribution and angular distribution.

  10. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

    2007-12-01

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

  11. The coordinate-tracking detector based on the drift chambers for ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadeba, E. A.; Ampilogov, N. V.; Barbashina, N. S.; Bogdanov, A. G.; Borisov, A. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Dushkin, L. I.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Khohlov, S. S.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Kompaniets, K. G.; Kozhin, A. S.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Selyakov, V. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Yashin, I. I.

    2014-08-01

    The project of the tracking detector designed for a joint operation with Cherenkov water detector NEVOD and based on the drift chambers from the neutrino experiment at the IHEP accelerator U-70 is presented. The project is aimed at solving a problem called `muon puzzle' — growing with energy excess of muon content in EAS in comparison with contemporary models of their development, which was registered in various experiments. Joint operation of the coordinate-tracking detector and Cherenkov water calorimeter will allow to measure energy of muon groups and to answer the question about the reasons of the muon flux excess.

  12. The D0 muon system and early results on its performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, D. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-10-01

    The D0 detector is a large, general-purpose detector designed to take full advantage of the 2 TeV energy of the Fermilab collider. The design of the experiment emphasizes accurate identification, complete angular acceptance, and precise measurement of the decay products of W and Z bosons: charged leptons (both electrons and muons), quarks and gluons, which emerge as collimated jets of particles, and noninteracting particles, such as neutrinos. The primary physics goals of D0 include searching for new phenomena, such as the top quark or particles outside the standard model, and high-precision studies of the W and Z bosons. In addition, the excellent muon identification will allow the study of b-quark production and decay. This report will describe D0's muon system, give preliminary measurements of chamber and trigger rates, and discuss muon identification.

  13. The D0 muon system and early results on its performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, D.; The D0 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    The D0 detector is a large, general-purpose detector designed to take full advantage of the 2 TeV energy of the Fermilab collider. The design of the experiment emphasizes accurate identification, complete angular acceptance, and precise measurement of the decay products of W and Z bosons: charged leptons (both electrons and muons), quarks and gluons, which emerge as collimated jets of particles, and noninteracting particles, such as neutrinos. The primary physics goals of D0 include searching for new phenomena, such as the top quark or particles outside the standard model, and high-precision studies of the W and Z bosons. In addition, the excellent muon identification will allow the study of b-quark production and decay. This report will describe D0`s muon system, give preliminary measurements of chamber and trigger rates, and discuss muon identification.

  14. Laser-Assisted Muon Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Aihua; Li Shumin; Berakdar, Jamal

    2007-06-22

    We show theoretically that the muon lifetime can be changed dramatically by embedding the decaying muon in a strong linearly polarized laser field. Evaluating the S-matrix elements taking all electronic multiphoton processes into account we find that a CO{sub 2} laser with an electric field amplitude of 10{sup 6} V cm{sup -1} results in an order of magnitude shorter lifetime of the muon. We also analyze the dependencies of the decay rate on the laser frequency and intensity.

  15. Measurement of muon intensity by Cerenkov method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z. H.; Li, G. J.; Bai, G. Z.; Liu, J. G.; Geng, Q. X.; Ling, J.

    1985-01-01

    Optical detection is an important technique in studies and observations of air showers, muons and relevant phenomena. The muon intensity is measured in a proper energy range and to study some problems about Cerenkov radiation of cosmic rays are studied, by a muon-telescope operated with Cerenkov detector. It is found that the measured muon intensity agrees with the integral energy spectrum of cosmic ray muons.

  16. Muon front end for the neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. T.; Stratakis, D.; Prior, G.; Gilardoni, S.; Neuffer, D.; Snopok, P.; Alekou, A.; Pasternak, J.

    2013-04-01

    In the neutrino factory, muons are produced by firing high-energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons and pass through a capture channel known as the muon front end, before acceleration to 12.6 GeV. The muon front end comprises a variable frequency rf system for longitudinal capture and an ionization cooling channel. In this paper we detail recent improvements in the design of the muon front end.

  17. Muon ID - taking care of lower momenta muons

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    In the Muon package under study, the tracks are extrapolated using an algorithm which accounts for the magnetic field and the ionization (dE/dx). We improved the calculation of the field dependent term to increase the muon detection efficiency at lower momenta using a Runge-Kutta method. The muon identification and hadron separation in b-bbar jets is reported with the improved software. In the same framework, the utilization of the Kalman filter is introduced. The principle of the Kalman filter is described in some detail with the propagation matrix, with the Runge-Kutta term included, and the effect on low momenta for low momenta single muons particles is described.

  18. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Chamber Characteristics Test

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andy; Park, Seongtae; Hahn, Changhie; Baldeloma, Edwin; Tran, Nam; McIntire, Austin; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab

    2011-01-11

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) have been used in many HEP experiments as tracking detectors. They are sensitive to X-rays which allows use beyond that of HEP. The UTA High Energy group has been working on using GEMs as the sensitive gap detector in a DHCAL for the ILC. The physics goals at the ILC put a stringent requirement on detector performance. Especially the precision required for jet mass and positions demands an unprecedented jet energy resolution to hadronic calorimeters. A solution to meet this requirement is using the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). In order for PFA to work well, high calorimeter granularity is necessary. Previous studies based on GEANT simulations using GEM DHCAL gave confidence on the performance of GEM in the sensitive gap in a sampling calorimeter and its use as a DHCAL in PFA. The UTA HEP team has built several GEM prototype chambers, including the current 30cm x 30cm chamber integrated with the SLAC-developed 64 channel kPiX analog readout chip. This chamber has been tested on the bench using radioactive sources and cosmic ray muons. In order to have fuller understanding of various chamber characteristics, the experiments plan to expose 1-3 GEM chambers of dimension 35cm x 35cm x 5cm with 1cm x 1cm pad granularity with 64 channel 2-D simultaneous readout using the kPiX chip. In this experiment the experiments pan to measure MiP signal height, chamber absolute efficiencies, chamber gain versus high voltage across the GEM gap, the uniformity of the chamber across the 8cm x 8cm area, cross talk and its distance dependence to the triggered pad, chamber rate capabilities, and the maximum pad occupancy rate.

  19. Production of muons for fusion catalysis in a magnetic mirror configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.; Chapline, G.F. Jr.

    1986-06-25

    One possible near term application of a muon-producing magnetic-mirror scheme would be to build a high-flux neutron source for radiation damage studies. The careful arrangement of triton orbits will result in many of the ..pi../sup -/s being produced near the axis of the magnetic mirror. The pions quickly decay into muons, which are transported into a small (few-cm-diameter) reactor chamber producing approximately 1-MW/m/sup 2/ neutron flux on the chamber walls, using a laboratory accelerator and magnetic mirror. The costs of construction and operation of the triton injection accelerator probably introduces most of the uncertainty in the viability of this scheme. If a 10-..mu..A, 600 MeV neutral triton accelerator could be built for less than $100 million and operated cheaply enough, one might well bring muon-catalyzed fusion into practical use.

  20. Performance of the Level-1 Muon Trigger for the CMS Endcap Muon System with Cosmic Rays and First LHC Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartner, Joseph

    2008-10-01

    We report on the performance of the level-1 muon trigger for the cathode strip chambers (CSCs) comprising the endcaps of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. CMS is a general-purpose experiment designed to capitalize on the rich physics program of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which begins operation this autumn and which opens a window onto physics at the TeV energy scale. After many years of preparation, the CMS detectors and electronics have undergone a series of commissioning exercises involving the triggering and data acquisition of signals induced from cosmic ray muons, and most recently, first LHC beams. Here we report on the successful synchronization of signals from the 468 CSCs in the level-1 trigger path, and the successful triggering of the experiment based on those signals. The triggers that are provided by a specially built set of ``Track-Finder'' processors include triggers based on single CSC segments, tracks based on a coincidence of segments along a predefined road emanating from the beam collision point, and tracks parallel to the beam line that accept accelerator-induced halo muons. Evidence of the proper functioning of these triggers will be reported.

  1. LINACS FOR FUTURE MUON FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Slawomir Bogacz, Rolland Johnson

    2008-10-01

    Future Muon Colliders (MC) and Neutrino Factories (NF) based on muon storage rings will require innovative linacs to: produce the muons, cool them, compress longi-tudinally and ‘shape’ them into a beam and finally to rap-idly accelerate them to multi-GeV (NF) and TeV (MC) energies. Each of these four linac applications has new requirements and opportunities that follow from the na-ture of the muon in that it has a short lifetime (τ = 2.2 μsec) in its own rest frame, it is produced in a tertiary process into a large emittance, and its electron, photon, and neutrino decay products can be more than an annoy-ance. As an example, for optimum performance, the linac repetition rates should scale inversely with the laboratory lifetime of the muon in its storage ring, something as high as 1 kHz for a 40 GeV Neutrino Factory or as low as 20 Hz for a 5 TeV Muon Collider. A superconducting 8 GeV Linac capable of CW operation is being studied as a ver-satile option for muon production [1] for colliders, facto-ries, and muon beams for diverse purposes. A linac filled with high pressure hydrogen gas and imbedded in strong magnetic fields has been proposed to rapidly cool muon beams [2]. Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are possible because muons do not generate significant syn-chrotron radiation even at extremely high energy and in strong magnetic fields. We will describe the present status of linacs for muon applications; in particular the longitu-dinal bunch compression in a single pass linac and multi-pass acceleration in the RLA, especially the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using supercon-ducting RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both μ+ and μ- species, with pulsed linac quadrupoles to allow the maximum number of passes. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  2. Quality control studies of wavelength shifting fibers for a scintillator-based tail-catcher muon-tracker linear collider prototype detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Rykalin, V.; Zutshi, V.; Fisk, E.; Hahn, E.; Wayne, M.; /Notre Dame U.

    2006-05-01

    Detailed measurements of the wavelength shifting fiber response to a stable and reliable light source are presented. Details about materials, a double reference method, and measurement technique are included. The fibers studied were several hundred KURARAY, Y-11, multiclad, 1.2mm outer diameter wavelength shifting fibers each cut from a reel to about one meter length. The fibers were polished, mirrored, and the mirrors were UV epoxy protected. Each fiber passed quality control requirements before installation. About 94% of the fibers have a response within 1% of the overall mean.

  3. Muon spin rotation in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stronach, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The muon spin rotation (MuSR) technique is used to probe the microscopic electron density in materials. High temperature MuSR and magnetization measurements in nickel are in progress to allow an unambiguous determination of the muon impurity interaction and the impurity induced change in local spin density. The first results on uniaxial stress induced frequency shifts in an Fe single crystal are also reported.

  4. Web-based monitoring tools for Resistive Plate Chambers in the CMS experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. S.; Ban, Y.; Cai, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Qian, S.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Choi, Y.; Kim, D.; Goh, J.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Kang, J. W.; Kang, M.; Kwon, J. H.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. K.; Park, S. K.; Pant, L. M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Chudasama, R.; Singh, J. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Mehta, A.; Kumar, R.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Costantini, S.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Ocampo, A.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Doninck, W. V.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro, L.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Avila, C.; Ahmad, A.; Muhammad, S.; Shoaib, M.; Hoorani, H.; Awan, I.; Ali, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M. I.; Shahzad, H.; Sayed, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Elkafrawy, T.; Sharma, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Venditti, R.; Verwillingen, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Paolucci, P.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Merola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, O. M.; Braghieri, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Vai, I.; Magnani, A.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Stoykova, S.; Hadjiiska, R.; Ibargüen, H. S.; Morales, M. I. P.; Bernardino, S. C.; Bagaturia, I.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Crotty, I.

    2014-10-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) are used in the CMS experiment at the trigger level and also in the standard offline muon reconstruction. In order to guarantee the quality of the data collected and to monitor online the detector performance, a set of tools has been developed in CMS which is heavily used in the RPC system. The Web-based monitoring (WBM) is a set of java servlets that allows users to check the performance of the hardware during data taking, providing distributions and history plots of all the parameters. The functionalities of the RPC WBM monitoring tools are presented along with studies of the detector performance as a function of growing luminosity and environmental conditions that are tracked over time.

  5. Measuring the Rate of Muon Capture on the Deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, Luis

    2014-03-01

    The goal of the MuSun experiment is to measure the rate of nuclear muon capture on the deuteron with a precision of 1.5%. This rate will be used to fix the low-energy constant that describes the two-nucleon weak axial current in effective field theory models. It will therefore calibrate evaluations of proton-proton fusion and neutrino-deuteron scattering. The experiment uses many of the techniques and much of the apparatus that were developed for the successful MuCap measurement of the rate of muon capture on the proton. However, to optimize the molecular kinetics, the deuterium gas is cooled to 30 K in a cryogenic time projection chamber (TPC). Progress in the analysis of the data taken during the production run of 2011 will be presented, as well as a description of the hardware upgrades and performance during the 2013 run, in preparation for another high-statistics run in 2014.

  6. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema

    Tourun, Yagmur [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2010-01-08

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  7. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Tourun, Yagmur

    2009-07-29

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be 'at least 20 years away' for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  8. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Tourun, Yagmur

    2009-07-29

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  9. Perspectives of a mid-rapidity dimuon program at the RHIC: a novel and compact muon telescope detector

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Ruan, L.; Lin, G.; Xu, Z.; Asselta, K.; Chen, H.F.; Christie, W.; Crawford, H.k.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Hallman, T.J.; Li, C.; Liu, J.; Llope, W.J.; Majka, R.; Nussbaum, T.; Scheblein, J.; Shao, M.; Soja, R.; Sun, Y.; Tang, Z.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.

    2009-07-17

    We propose a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) at mid-rapidity for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) and for the next generation of detectors at a possible electron-ion collider. We utilize large Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers with long readout strips (long-MRPC) in the detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam tests show the intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a long-MRPC are 60-70 ps and {approx} 1 cm, respectively. The performance of the prototype muon telescope detector at STAR indicates that muon identification at a transverse momentum of a few GeV/c can be achieved by combining information from track matching with the MTD, ionization energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber, and time-of-flight measurements. A primary muon over secondary muon ratio of better than 1/3 can be achieved. This provides a promising device for future quarkonium programs and primordial dilepton measurements at RHIC. Simulations of the muon efficiency, the signal-to-background ratio of J/{psi}, the separation of {Upsilon} 1S from 2S+3S states, and the electron-muon correlation from charm pair production in the RHIC environment are presented.

  10. Drift Chamber Alignment using Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Hays, Christopher P.

    2014-05-07

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a general-purpose experimental apparatus with an inner tracking detector for measuring charged particles, surrounded by a calorimeter for measurements of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, and a muon detector system. We present a technique for, and results of, a precise relative alignment of the drift chamber wires of the CDF tracker. This alignment has been an important component of the track momentum calibration, which is the basis for the charged-lepton calibration for the measurement of the W boson mass at CDF.

  11. Quasi-isochronous muon collection channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Neuffer, David; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2015-04-26

    Intense muon beams have many potential commercial and scientific applications, ranging from low-energy investigations of the basic properties of matter using spin resonance to large energy-frontier muon colliders. However, muons originate from a tertiary process that produces a diffuse swarm. To make useful beams, the swarm must be rapidly captured and cooled before the muons decay. In this STTR project a promising new concept for the collection and cooling of muon beams to increase their intensity and reduce their emittances was investigated, namely, the use of a nearly isochronous helical cooling channel (HCC) to facilitate capture of the muons into RF bunches. The muon beam can then be cooled quickly and coalesced efficiently to optimize the luminosity of a muon collider, or could provide compressed muon beams for other applications. Optimal ways to integrate such a subsystem into the rest of a muon collection and cooling system, for collider and other applications, were developed by analysis and simulation. The application of quasi-isochronous helical cooling channels (QIHCC) for RF capture of muon beams was developed. Innovative design concepts for a channel incorporating straight solenoids, a matching section, and an HCC, including RF and absorber, were developed, and its subsystems were simulated. Additionally, a procedure that uses an HCC to combine bunches for a muon collider was invented and simulated. Difficult design aspects such as matching sections between subsystems and intensity-dependent effects were addressed. The bunch recombination procedure was developed into a complete design with 3-D simulations. Bright muon beams are needed for many commercial and scientific reasons. Potential commercial applications include low-dose radiography, muon catalyzed fusion, and the use of muon beams to screen cargo containers for homeland security. Scientific uses include low energy beams for rare process searches, muon spin resonance applications, muon beams for

  12. Design and Performance of the ATLAS Muon Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polini, Alessandro; ATLAS Muon Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    Muon detection plays a key role at the Large Hadron Collider. The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer includes Monitored Drift Tubes (MDT) and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) for precision momentum measurement in the toroidal magnetic field. Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in the barrel region, and Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) in the end-caps, provide the level-1 trigger and a second coordinate used for tracking in conjunction with the MDT. The Detector Control System of each subdetector is required to monitor and safely operate tens of thousand of channels, which are distributed on several subsystems, including low and high voltage power supplies, trigger and front-end electronics, currents and thresholds monitoring, alignment and environmental sensors, gas and electronic infrastructure. The system is also required to provide a level of abstraction for ease of operation as well as expert level actions and detailed analysis of archived data. The hardware architecture and software solutions adopted are shown along with results from the commissioning phase and the routine operation with colliding beams at 3.5 + 3.5 TeV. Design peculiarities of each subsystem and their use to monitor the detector and the accelerator performance are discussed along with the effort for a simple and coherent operation in a running experiment. The material presented can be a base to future test facilities and projects.

  13. Muon-muon and other high energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The first section looks at the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron, of lepton and photon-photon colliders for comparison. The second section discusses the physics considerations for the muon collider. The third section covers muon collider components. The fourth section is about the intersection region and detectors. In the fifth section, the authors discuss modifications to enhance the muon polarization`s operating parameters with very small momentum spreads, operations at energies other than the maximum for which the machine is designed, and designs of machines for different maximum energies. The final section discusses a Research and Development plan aimed at the operation of a 0.5 TeV demonstration machine by the year 2010, and of the 4 TeV machine by the year 2020.

  14. Muon motion in titanium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempton, J. R.; Petzinger, K. G.; Kossler, W. J.; Schone, H. E.; Hitti, B. S.; Stronach, C. E.; Adu, N.; Lankford, W. F.; Reilly, J. J.; Seymour, E. F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Motional narrowing of the transverse-field muon spin rotation signal was observed in gamma-TiH(x) for x = 1.83, 1.97, and 1.99. An analysis of the data for TiH1.99 near room temperature indicates that the mechanism responsible for the motion of the muon out of the octahedral site is thermally activated diffusion with an attempt frequency comparable to the optical vibrations of the lattice. Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the effect of muon and proton motion upon the muon field-correlation time were used to interpret the motional narrowing in TiH1.97 near 500 K. The interpretation is dependent upon whether the Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound (BPP) theory or an independent spin-pair relaxation model is used to obtain the vacancy jump rate from proton NMR T1 measurements. Use of BPP theory shows that the field-correction time can be obtained if the rate of motion of the muon with respect to the rate of the motion for the protons is decreased. An independent spin-pair relaxation model indicates that the field-correlation time can be obtained if the rate of motion for the nearest-neighbor protons is decreased.

  15. Conceptual design and simulation of a water Cherenkov muon veto for the XENON1T experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, E.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Auger, M.; Balan, C.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Behrens, A.; Beltrame, P.; Bokeloh, K.; Breskin, A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Colijn, A. P.; Contreras, H.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; Duchovni, E.; Fattori, S.; Ferella, A. D.; Fulgione, W.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Grignon, C.; Gross, E.; Hampel, W.; Itay, R.; Kaether, F.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Le Calloch, M.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Levy, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lung, K.; Lyashenko, A.; MacMullin, S.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Mayani Paras, D.; Melgarejo Fernandez, A. J.; Meng, Y.; Messina, M.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Morana, G.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Oberlack, U.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Pantic, E.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Simgen, H.; Teymourian, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Vitells, O.; Wang, H.; Weber, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2014-11-01

    XENON is a dark matter direct detection project, consisting of a time projection chamber (TPC) filled with liquid xenon as detection medium. The construction of the next generation detector, XENON1T, is presently taking place at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy. It aims at a sensitivity to spin-independent cross sections of 2 · 10-47 c 2 for WIMP masses around 50 GeV2, which requires a background reduction by two orders of magnitude compared to XENON100, the current generation detector. An active system that is able to tag muons and muon-induced backgrounds is critical for this goal. A water Cherenkov detector of ~ 10 m height and diameter has been therefore developed, equipped with 8 inch photomultipliers and cladded by a reflective foil. We present the design and optimization study for this detector, which has been carried out with a series of Monte Carlo simulations. The muon veto will reach very high detection efficiencies for muons (>99.5%) and showers of secondary particles from muon interactions in the rock (>70%). Similar efficiencies will be obtained for XENONnT, the upgrade of XENON1T, which will later improve the WIMP sensitivity by another order of magnitude. With the Cherenkov water shield studied here, the background from muon-induced neutrons in XENON1T is negligible.

  16. Muon collider interaction region design

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.I.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; Alexakhin, V.Y.; /Dubna, JINR

    2010-05-01

    Design of a muon collider interaction region (IR) presents a number of challenges arising from low {beta}* < 1 cm, correspondingly large beta-function values and beam sizes at IR magnets, as well as the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. As a consequence, the designs of the IR optics, magnets and machine-detector interface are strongly interlaced and iterative. A consistent solution for the 1.5 TeV c.o.m. muon collider IR is presented. It can provide an average luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} with an adequate protection of magnet and detector components.

  17. Law of Conservation of Muons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Feinberg, G.; Weinberg, S.

    1961-02-01

    A multiplicative selection rule for mu meson-electron transitions is proposed. A "muon parity" = -1 is considered for the muon and its neutrino, while the "muon parity" for all other particles is +1. The selection rule then states that (-1) exp(no. of initial (-1) parity particles) = (-1) exp(no. of final (-1) parity particles). Several reactions that are forbidden by an additive law but allowed by the multiplicative law are suggested; these reactions include mu{sup +} .> e{sup +} + nu{sub mu} + {ovr nu}{sub e}, e{sup -} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + mu{sup -}, and muonium .> antimuonium (mu{sup +} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + e{sup +}). An intermediate-boson hypothesis is suggested. (T.F.H.)

  18. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-06

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  19. MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2006-03-20

    Ionization cooling of a muon beam is a key technique for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. An international collaboration is mounting an experiment to demonstrate muon ionization cooling at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. We aim to complete the experiment by 2010.

  20. A Highly intense DC muon source, MuSIC and muon CLFV search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, A.; Sakamoto, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Tran, N. H.; Hashim, I. H.; Fukuda, M.; Hayashida, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, M.

    2014-08-01

    MuSIC is a new muon facility, which provides the world's highest intense muon beam with continuous time structure at Research Center of Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. It's intensity is designed to be 108 muons per second with only 0.4 kW proton beam. Such a high intense muon beam is very important for searches of rare decay processes, for example search for the muon to electron conversion.

  1. Wire chambers revisited.

    PubMed

    Ott, R J

    1993-04-01

    ejection fraction information of the highest quality. The detection of higher energy gamma rays has proved more problematical, needing a solid photon-electron convertor to be incorporated into the chamber. Several groups have been working on this problem with modest success so far. The only clinical detectors have been developed for positron emission tomography, where thin lead or lead-glass can provide an acceptable convertor for 511 keV photons. Two MWPC positron cameras have been evaluated clinically and one is now in routine use in clinical oncology. The problems of detection efficiency have not been solved by these detectors although reliability and large-area PET imaging have been proven.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8491229

  2. A Personal Adventure in Muon-Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, John David

    2010-03-01

    Luis Alvarez and colleagues discovered muon-catalyzed fusion of hydrogen isotopes by chance in late 1956. On sabbatical leave at Princeton University during that year, I read the first public announcement of the discovery at the end of December in that well-known scientific journal, The New York Times. A nuclear theorist by prior training, I was intrigued enough in the phenomenon to begin some calculations. I describe my work here, my interaction with Alvarez, and a summary of the surprising developments, both before and after Alvarez’s discovery. The rare proton-deuteron ( p-d) fusion events in Alvarez’s liquid-hydrogen bubble chamber occurred only because of the natural presence of a tiny amount of deuterium (heavy hydrogen). Additionally, the fusion rate, once the proton-deuteron-muon ( pdμ - ) molecular ion has been formed, is sufficiently slow that only rarely does an additional catalytic act occur. A far different situation occurs for muons stopping in pure deuterium or a deuterium-tritium ( d- t) mixture where the fusion rates are many orders of magnitude larger and the molecular-formation rates are large compared to the muon’s decay rate. The intricate interplay of atomic, molecular, and nuclear science, together with highly fortuitous accidents in the molecular dynamics and the hope of practical application, breathed life into a seeming curiosity. A small but vigorous worldwide community has explored these myriad phenomena in the past 50 years.

  3. Muon Charge Sign Determination in LArIAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubasis, Brandon; LArIAT Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    LArTPC In A Test beam experiment (LArIAT) at the Fermilab aims to calibrate and characterize liquid argon time projection chambers with a beam of charges particles. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) are ideal neutrino detectors which has full 3D-imaging and particle Identification (PID) capability. Processes for which the μ undergoes capture vs. decay in LArIAT TPC for sign-determination (without magnetic field) is one area of studies we are currently interested in. Systematic study of the processes following μ- capture in argon have never been performed and LArTPC sign-determination capability has never been explored. Statistical analysis on topological criteria can be used to determine the sign of a particle's charge (without magnetic field). LArIAT test beam with selectable polarity will provide data for direct measurement of the sign separation efficiency (and purity) for muons.

  4. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  5. Physics with a millimole of muons

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1998-03-01

    The eventual prospect of muon colliders reaching several TeV encourages us to consider the experimental opportunities presented by very copious stores of muons, approaching 10{sup 21} per year. I summarize and comment upon some highlights of the Fermilab Workshop on Physics at the First Muon Collider and at the Front End of a Muon Collider. Topics include various varieties of {mu}{mu} colliders, {mu}p colliders, and applications of the intense neutrino beams that can be generated in muon storage rings.

  6. Superconducting magnet system for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Yonehara, K.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A helical cooling channel has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. A novel superconducting magnet system for a muon beam cooling experiment is being designed at Fermilab. The inner volume of the cooling channel is filled with liquid helium where passing muon beam can be decelerated and cooled in a process of ionization energy loss. The magnet parameters are optimized to match the momentum of the beam as it slows down. The results of 3D magnetic analysis for two designs of magnet system, mechanical and quench protection considerations are discussed.

  7. The Japanese Radon and Thoron Reference Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    Passive detectors used for large-scale and long-term surveys are generally calibrated in a well-controlled environment such as a radon chamber. It has been also pointed out that some of them are sensitive to thoron. Thus it is necessary to check the thoron contribution to the detector response with the proposed or similar test before practical use. The NIRS accommodates radon/aerosol and thoron chambers for quality assurance and quality control of radon measurements. Thus both chambers work so well that they can supply us with the calibration technique and consequently, a good level of knowledge of the radon and thoron issue.

  8. Muon g-2 Experiment Shimming

    ScienceCinema

    Kiburg, Brendan

    2016-06-28

    The Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab will use as its primary instrument a 52-foot-wide electromagnet that creates a precise magnetic field. In this video, Fermilab's Brendan Kiburg explains the lengthy process of finely "shimming" that magnetic field into shape.

  9. Cosmic muons, as messengers from the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brancus, I. M.; Rebel, H.

    2015-02-01

    Penetrating from the outer space into the Earth atmosphere, primary cosmic rays are producing secondary radiation by the collisions with the air target subsequently decaying in hadrons, pions, muons, electrons and photons, phenomenon called Extensive air Shower (EAS). The muons, considered as the "penetrating" component, survive the propagation to the Earth and even they are no direct messenger of the Universe, they reflect the features of the primary particles. The talk gives a description of the development of the extensive air showers generating the secondary particles, especially the muon component. Results of the muon flux and of the muon charge ratio, (the ratio between the positive and the negative muons), obtained in different laboratories and in WILLI experiment, are shown. At the end, the contribution of the muons measured in EAS to the investigation of the nature of the primary cosmic rays is emphasized in KASCADE and WILLI-EAS experiments.

  10. Cosmic muons, as messengers from the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Brancus, I. M.; Rebel, H.

    2015-02-24

    Penetrating from the outer space into the Earth atmosphere, primary cosmic rays are producing secondary radiation by the collisions with the air target subsequently decaying in hadrons, pions, muons, electrons and photons, phenomenon called Extensive air Shower (EAS). The muons, considered as the “penetrating” component, survive the propagation to the Earth and even they are no direct messenger of the Universe, they reflect the features of the primary particles. The talk gives a description of the development of the extensive air showers generating the secondary particles, especially the muon component. Results of the muon flux and of the muon charge ratio, (the ratio between the positive and the negative muons), obtained in different laboratories and in WILLI experiment, are shown. At the end, the contribution of the muons measured in EAS to the investigation of the nature of the primary cosmic rays is emphasized in KASCADE and WILLI-EAS experiments.

  11. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ~1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is fπ < 1.4% at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  12. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  13. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  14. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-06-18

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu} factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-} {mu}. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider.

  15. On method of muon spectrum measurements by the scintillation detectors of a large thickness T4t sub o

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryazhskaya, O. G.

    1985-01-01

    Various methods for the study of muon spectrum are presented. The direct ones include the muon energy measurements by magnetic spectrometers. The indirect ones deal with the reconstruction of the muon spectrum from the spectrum of secondary particles obtained by burst or calorimeter technique. The burst technique is based on the measurement of the number of cascade particles, mainly in the cascade maximum, by the detectors of small thickness T sub 0. The calorimeter method consist in determination of the cascade energy with help of the cascade curve shape. The multilayer detectors are used for this purpose. They are usually comprised of proportional counters, X-ray emulsion chambers or scintillation counters with the target material placed between them. The scintillation detectors of a large thickness measures the total cascade energy directly and the detector works as a true calorimeter. When the total energy is detected, the cascade spectrum differs from the muon one.

  16. Upgrade of the CMS muon system with triple-GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaneo, D.; Abbas, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abi Akl, M.; Ahmed, W.; Ahmed, W.; Altieri, P.; Aly, R.; Ashfaq, A.; Aspell, P.; Assran, Y.; Awan, I.; Bally, S.; Ban, Y.; Banerjee, S.; Barria, P.; Benussi, L.; Bhopatkar, V.; Bianco, S.; Bos, J.; Bouhali, O.; Braibant, S.; Buontempo, S.; Cai, J.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Cassese, F.; Castaneda, A.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Cavallo, F. R.; Celik, A.; Choi, M.; Choi, K.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, J.; Cimmino, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Colaleo, A.; Conde Garcia, A.; Dabrowski, M. M.; De Lentdecker, G.; De Oliveira, R.; de Robertis, G.; Dildick, S.; Dorney, B.; Elmetenawee, W.; Fabrice, G.; Ferry, S.; Giacomelli, P.; Gilmore, J.; Guiducci, L.; Gutierrez, A.; Hadjiiska, R. M.; Hassan, A.; Hauser, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Hohlmann, M.; Hoorani, H.; Jeng, Y. G.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kim, H.; Krutelyov, S.; Kumar, A.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lenzi, T.; Litov, L.; Loddo, F.; Maerschalk, T.; Magazzu, G.; Maggi, M.; Maghrbi, Y.; Magnani, A.; Majumdar, N.; Mal, P. K.; Mandal, K.; Marchioro, A.; Marinov, A.; Merlin, J. A.; Mohammed, N.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, A.; Muhammad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Oliveri, E.; Pant, L. M.; Paolucci, P.; Park, I.; Passeggio, G.; Pavlov, B.; Philipps, B.; Phipps, M.; Piccolo, D.; Postema, H.; Pugliese, G.; Baranac, A. Puig; Radi, A.; Radogna, R.; Raffone, G.; Ramkrishna, S.; Ranieri, A.; Riccardi, C.; Rodrigues, A.; Ropelewski, L.; Roychoddhury, S.; Ryu, M. S.; Ryu, G.; Safonov, A.; Sakharov, A.; Salva, S.; Saviano, G.; Sharma, A.; Swain, S. K.; Talvitie, J. P.; Tamma, C.; Tatarinov, A.; Turini, N.; Tuuva, T.; Twigger, J.; Tytgat, M.; Vai, I.; van Stenis, M.; Venditi, R.; Verhagen, E.; Verwilligen, P.; Vitulo, P.; Yang, U.; Yang, Y.; Yonamine, R.; Zaganidis, N.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, A.

    2014-10-01

    The CMS collaboration considers upgrading the muon forward region which is particularly affected by the high-luminosity conditions at the LHC. The proposal involves Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers, which are able to handle the extreme particle rates expected in this region along with a high spatial resolution. This allows to combine tracking and triggering capabilities, which will improve the CMS muon High Level Trigger, the muon identification and the track reconstruction. Intense R&D has been going on since 2009 and it has lead to the development of several GEM prototypes and associated detector electronics. These GEM prototypes have been subjected to extensive tests in the laboratory and in test beams at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). This contribution will review the status of the CMS upgrade project with GEMs and its impact on the CMS performance.

  17. Production of charged hadrons by positive muons on deuterium and xenon at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aderholz, M.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Caroll, T. J.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, R.; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1994-06-01

    Results on the production of charged hadrons in muon-deuteron and muon-xenon interactions are presented. The data were taken with the E665 spectrometer, which was exposed to the 490 GeV muon beam of the Tevatron at Fermilab. The use of a streamer chamber as vertex detector provides nearly 4π acceptance for charged particles. The μD data are compared with the μXe data in terms of multiplicity distributions, average multiplicities, forward-backward multiplicity correlations, rapidity and transverse momentum distributions and of two-particle rapidity correlations of charged hadrons. The data cover a range of invariant hadronic masses W from 8 to 30 GeV.

  18. Precision muon tracking detectors and read-out electronics for operation at very high background rates at future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Nowak, S.; Richter, R.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schwegler, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    The experience of the ATLAS MDT muon spectrometer shows that drift-tube chambers provide highly reliable precision muon tracking over large areas. The ATLAS muon chambers are exposed to unprecedentedly high background of photons and neutrons induced by the proton collisions. Still higher background rates are expected at future high-energy and high-luminosity colliders beyond HL-LHC. Therefore, drift-tube detectors with 15 mm tube diameter (30 mm in ATLAS), optimised for high rate operation, have been developed for such conditions. Several such full-scale sMDT chambers have been constructed with unprecedentedly high sense wire positioning accuracy of better than 10 μm. The chamber design and assembly methods have been optimised for large-scale production, reducing considerably cost and construction time while maintaining the high mechanical accuracy and reliability. Tests at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN showed that the rate capability of sMDT chambers is improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to the MDT chambers. By using read-out electronics optimised for high counting rates, the rate capability can be further increased.

  19. Exclusive Muon-Neutrino Charged Current Muon Plus Any Number of Protons Topologies In ArgoNeuT

    SciTech Connect

    Partyka, Kinga Anna

    2013-01-01

    Neutrinos remain among the least understood fundamental particles even after decades of study. As we enter the precision era o f neutrino measurements bigger and more sophisticated detectors have emerged. The leading candidate among them is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC ) detector technology due to its bubble-like chamber imaging, superb background rejection and scalability. I t is a perfect candidate that w ill aim to answer the remaining questions of the nature o f neutrino and perhaps our existence. Studying neutrinos with a detector that employs detection via beautiful images o f neutrino interactions can be both illuminating and surprising. The analysis presented here takes the full advantage of the LArTPC power by exploiting the first topological analysis of charged current muon neutrino p + N p , muon and any number of protons, interactions with the ArgoNeuT LArTPC experiment on an argon target. The results presented here are the first that address the proton multiplicity at the vertex and the proton kinematics. This study also addresses the importance o f nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. Furthermore, the developed here reconstruction techniques present a significant step forward for this technology and can be employed in the future LArTPC detectors.

  20. Exclusive Muon-Neutrino Charged Current muon plus any number of protons topologies in ArgoNeuT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partyka, Kinga Anna

    Neutrinos remain among the least understood fundamental particles even after decades of study. As we enter the precision era of neutrino measurements bigger and more sophisticated detectors have emerged. The leading candidate among them is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) detector technology due to its bubble-like chamber imaging, superb background rejection and scalability. It is a perfect candidate that will aim to answer the remaining questions of the nature of neutrino and perhaps our existence. Studying neutrinos with a detector that employs detection via beautiful images of neutrino interactions can be bath illuminating and surprising. The analysis presented here takes the full advantage of the LArTPC power by exploiting the first topological analysis of charged current muon neutrino mu + Np, muon and any number of protons, interactions with the ArgoNeuT LArTPC experiment on an argon target. The results presented here are the first that address the proton multiplicity at the vertex and the proton kinematics. This study also addresses the importance of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. Furthermore, the developed here reconstruction techniques present a significant step forward for this technology and can be employed in the future LArTPC detectors.

  1. Invention and History of the Bubble Chamber (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Glaser, Don

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Don Glaser won the 1960 Nobel Prize for Physics for his 1952 invention of the bubble chamber at Berkeley Lab, a type of particle detector that became the mainstay of high-energy physics research throughout the 1960s and 1970s. He discusses how, inspired by bubbles in a glass of beer, he invented the bubble chamber and detected cosmic-ray muons.

  2. Invention and History of the Bubble Chamber (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, Don

    2006-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Don Glaser won the 1960 Nobel Prize for Physics for his 1952 invention of the bubble chamber at Berkeley Lab, a type of particle detector that became the mainstay of high-energy physics research throughout the 1960s and 1970s. He discusses how, inspired by bubbles in a glass of beer, he invented the bubble chamber and detected cosmic-ray muons.

  3. Toward a RPC-based muon tomography system for cargo containers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baesso, P.; Cussans, D.; Thomay, C.; Velthuis, J.

    2014-10-01

    A large area scanner for cosmic muon tomography is currently being developed at University of Bristol. Thanks to their abundance and penetrating power, cosmic muons have been suggested as ideal candidates to scan large containers in search of special nuclear materials, which are characterized by high-Z and high density. The feasibility of such a scanner heavily depends on the detectors used to track the muons: for a typical container, the minimum required sensitive area is of the order of 100 2. The spatial resolution required depends on the geometrical configuration of the detectors. For practical purposes, a resolution of the order of 1 mm or better is desirable. A good time resolution can be exploited to provide momentum information: a resolution of the order of nanoseconds can be used to separate sub-GeV muons from muons with higher energies. Resistive plate chambers have a low cost per unit area and good spatial and time resolution; these features make them an excellent choice as detectors for muon tomography. In order to instrument a large area demonstrator we have produced 25 new readout boards and 30 glass RPCs. The RPCs measure 1800 mm× 600 mm and are read out using 1.68 mm pitch copper strips. The chambers were tested with a standardized procedure, i.e. without optimizing the working parameters to take into account differences in the manufacturing process, and the results show that the RPCs have an efficiency between 87% and 95%. The readout electronics show a signal to noise ratio greater than 20 for minimum ionizing particles. Spatial resolution better than 500 μm can easily be achieved using commercial read out ASICs. These results are better than the original minimum requirements to pass the tests and we are now ready to install the detectors.

  4. Simulation of large acceptance LINAC for muons

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, H; Kurennoy, S; Jason, A J

    2010-01-01

    There has been a recent need for muon accelerators not only for future Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders but also for other applications in industry and medical use. We carried out simulations on a large-acceptance muon linac with a new concept 'mixed buncher/acceleration'. The linac can accept pions/muons from a production target with large acceptance and accelerate muon without any beam cooling which makes the initial section of muon-linac system very compact. The linac has a high impact on Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider (NF/MC) scenario since the 300-m injector section can be replaced by the muon linac of only 10-m length. The current design of the linac consists of the following components: independent 805-MHz cavity structure with 6- or 8-cm-radius aperture window; injection of a broad range of pion/muon energies, 10-100 MeV, and acceleration to 150 - 200 MeV. Further acceleration of the muon beam are relatively easy since the beam is already bunched.

  5. Methods to improve track fit parameters in the PHENIX muon arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiwade, Olusoji

    2003-10-01

    During the summer of 2003, several problems in the muon tracking chambers of the PHENIX experiment at Brookhaven National Lab needed to be fixed. This presentation discusses the needed software to help speed up the task of analyzing the data that were used to find broken cathode strips on one of the muon tracker stations. The inclusion of cathode strips that have been scratched or broken causes problems for chamber alignment issues and for correct track reconstruction. First we had to take the raw data obtained using the muon tracker calibration system, which sent pulses to selected anode wires through the high-voltage distributions system, and convert it into data that the CERN ROOT program could manipulate. Most of the work here will describe the set of software scripts that greatly reduced the amount of work required so that more time could be spent looking at the results of the analysis to improve other software. The ROOT macros and C++ programs written were essential for handling the job. This should result in more accurate tracking and better mass resolution for the muon arms in the PHENIX experiment.

  6. Quality assurance procedures for environmental control and monitoring in plant growth facilities. Report of the North Central Regional 101 Committee on Growth Chamber Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    This report includes procedures for ensuring the quality of the environment provided for plant growth in controlled environment facilities. Biologists and engineers may use these procedures for ensuring quality control during experiments or for ensuring quality control in the design of plant growth facilities. Environmental monitoring prior to and during experiments is included in these procedures. Specific recommendations cover control, acquisition, and calibration for sensor types for the separate parameters of radiation (light), temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide, and air movement.

  7. The ATLAS conditions database architecture for the Muon spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verducci, Monica; ATLAS Muon Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    The Muon System, facing the challenge requirement of the conditions data storage, has extensively started to use the conditions database project 'COOL' as the basis for all its conditions data storage both at CERN and throughout the worldwide collaboration as decided by the ATLAS Collaboration. The management of the Muon COOL conditions database will be one of the most challenging applications for Muon System, both in terms of data volumes and rates, but also in terms of the variety of data stored. The Muon conditions database is responsible for almost all of the 'non event' data and detector quality flags storage needed for debugging of the detector operations and for performing reconstruction and analysis. The COOL database allows database applications to be written independently of the underlying database technology and ensures long term compatibility with the entire ATLAS Software. COOL implements an interval of validity database, i.e. objects stored or referenced in COOL have an associated start and end time between which they are valid, the data is stored in folders, which are themselves arranged in a hierarchical structure of folder sets. The structure is simple and mainly optimized to store and retrieve object(s) associated with a particular time. In this work, an overview of the entire Muon conditions database architecture is given, including the different sources of the data and the storage model used. In addiction the software interfaces used to access to the conditions data are described, more emphasis is given to the Offline Reconstruction framework ATHENA and the services developed to provide the conditions data to the reconstruction.

  8. Directivity function of muon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetyan, G. G.

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a new concept of directivity function (DF) to describe directional sensitivity of a particle detector. DF is a 3D function, describing the sensitivity of a detector to asymptotic directions of primary protons. It defines the contribution of primary protons, arriving from different asymptotic directions to the count rate of the detector. We develop the approach for computing the DF and derive it in particular case of SEVAN muon detector, located at mount Aragats, Armenia. Obtained data enable one to outline the region of solid angles, inside of which the arriving protons contribute a given percentage of count rate. In general, the DF can have the multi peak shape. It provides the most detailed and accurate description of directional sensitivity of a particle detector and we suggest that it is used in space research based on neutron and muon detectors.

  9. Muon data analysis program RUMDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, S. H.

    1994-07-01

    There are currently two data analysis programs available for muon users at ISIS. Both programs can be used for analyzing MuSR and EMU data and can be run on (MUSR01), (EMU01) or set-up to run on a user's account. RUMDA - 'Reading University Muon Data Analysis' was originally from Reading University and is now controlled at ISIS. At present (mid 1994) this suite of programs is run using VAX/VMS and the ISIS plotting package 'GENIE'. It is possible to fit data to any function with a maximum of 10 variables. UDA - 'mu Data Analysis' is a dashboard driven program which allows the user to plot and fit data files on the screen or as hard copies. It is possible to fit data to a combination of Gaussian and/or Lorentzian line shapes. A manual describing this program can be found in the back of the MuSR User Guide.

  10. The first muon beam from a new highly-intense DC muon source, MuSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nam Hoai; MuSIC Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    A new DC muon source, MuSIC, is now under construction at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Japan. The MuSIC adopts a new pion/muon collection system and a curved transport solenoid. These techniques are important in realization of future muon programs such as the muon to electron conversion experiments (COMET/Mu2e), neutrino factories, and muon colliders. The pion capture magnet and a part of the transport solenoid have been built and beam tests were carried out to assess the MuSIC's performance. Muon lifetime measurements and muonic X-ray measurements have been used for estimation of muon yield of the MuSIC. The result indicates that the MuSIC would be one of the most intense DC muon beams in the world.

  11. Muon ID at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a new way to reconstruct and identify muons with high efficiency and high pion rejection. Since muons at the ILC are often produced with or in jets, for many of the physics channels of interest [1], an efficient algorithm to deal with the identification and separation of particles within jets is important. The algorithm at the core of the method accounts for the effects of the magnetic field and for the loss of energy by charged particles due to ionization in the detector. We have chosen to develop the analysis within the setup of one of the Linear Collider Concept Detectors adopted by the US. Within b-pair production jets, particles cover a wide range in momenta; however {approx}80% of the particles have a momentum below 30 GeV[2]. Our study, focused on bbar-b jets, is preceded by a careful analysis of single energy particles between 2 and 50 GeV. As medium energy particles are a substantial component of the jets, many of the particles lose part of their energy in the calorimeters and the solenoid coil before reaching the muon detector where they may have energy below 2 GeV. To deal with this problem we have implemented a Runge-Kutta correction of the calculated trajectory to better handle these lower energy particles. The multiple scattering and other stochastic processes, more important at lower energy, is addressed by a Kalman-filter integrated into the reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm provides a unique and powerful separation of muons from pions. The 5 Tesla magnetic field from a solenoid surrounds the hadron calorimeter and allows the reconstruction and precision.

  12. Neutron densities from muon capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan Ching, Chiang; Oset, Eulogio

    1991-10-01

    We show that, because of Pauli blocking and renormalization of the weak currents in nuclei, the muon capture rates are rather sensitive to the neutron distributions. We also show that, because of intrinsic theoretical uncertainties, neutron radia cannot be determined with precision but some reasonable limits can be given. However, the ratio of capture rates in different isotopes serves to determine the neutron radii of the isotopes provided the neutron density distribution for one of them is known.

  13. Introduction to Mini Muon Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, Konstantin N.

    2012-08-13

    Using a mini muon tracker developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory we performed experiments of simple landscapes of various materials, including TNT, 9501, lead, tungsten, aluminium, and water. Most common scenes are four two inches thick step wedges of different dimensions: 12-inch x 12-inch, 12-inch x 9-inch, 12-inch x 6-inch, and 12-inch x 3-inch; and a one three inches thick hemisphere of lead with spherical hollow, and a similar full lead sphere.

  14. Information extraction from muon radiography data

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, K. N.; Asaki, T. J.; Chartrand, R.; Hengartner, N. W.; Hogan, G. E.; Morris, C. L.; Priedhorsky, W. C.; Schirato, R.C.; Schultz, L. J.; Sottile, M. J.; Vixie, K. R.; Wohlberg, B. E.; Blanpied, G.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering muon radiography was proposed recently as a technique of detection and 3-d imaging for dense high-Z objects. High-energy cosmic ray muons are deflected in matter in the process of multiple Coulomb scattering. By measuring the deflection angles we are able to reconstruct the configuration of high-Z material in the object. We discuss the methods for information extraction from muon radiography data. Tomographic methods widely used in medical images have been applied to a specific muon radiography information source. Alternative simple technique based on the counting of high-scattered muons in the voxels seems to be efficient in many simulated scenes. SVM-based classifiers and clustering algorithms may allow detection of compact high-Z object without full image reconstruction. The efficiency of muon radiography can be increased using additional informational sources, such as momentum estimation, stopping power measurement, and detection of muonic atom emission.

  15. Muon cooling in a quadrupole magnet channel

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Poklonskiy, A.; /Michigan State U.

    2007-10-01

    As discussed before,[1] a cooling channel using quadrupole magnets in a FODO transport channel can be used for initial cooling of muons. In the present note we discuss this possibility of a FODO focusing channel for cooling, and we present ICOOL simulations of muon cooling within a FODO channel. We explore a 1.5m cell-length cooling channel that could be used for the initial transverse cooling stage of a muon collider or neutrino factory.

  16. Status of the MANX muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Hu, M.; Jansson, A.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Lopes, M.; Shiltsev, V.; Yarba, V.; Yu, M.; /Fermilab /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2008-06-01

    A demonstration experiment of six-dimensional (6D) phase space muon beam cooling is a key milestone on the roadmap toward to a real muon collider. In order to achieve this goal, they have designed the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory Experiment (MANX) channel, which consists of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC). They discuss the status of the simulation study of the MANX in this document.

  17. The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

  18. Materials science with muon spin rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    During this reporting period, the focus of activity in the Materials Science with Muon Spin Rotation (MSMSR) program was muon spin rotation studies of superconducting materials, in particular the high critical temperature and heavy-fermion materials. Apart from these studies, work was continued on the analysis of muon motion in metal hydrides. Results of these experiments are described in six papers included as appendices.

  19. Question of Lorentz violation in muon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, J. P.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Wilschut, H. W.; Timmermans, R. G. E.

    2016-06-01

    Possibilities to test the Lorentz invariance of the weak interaction in muon decay are considered. We derive the direction-dependent muon-decay rate with a general Lorentz-violating addition to the W -boson propagator. We discuss measurements of the directional and boost dependence of the Michel parameters and of the muon lifetime as a function of absolute velocity. The total muon-decay rate in the Lorentz-violating standard model extension is addressed. Suggestions are made for dedicated (re)analyses of the pertinent data and for future experiments.

  20. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Flanagan, Gene

    2014-09-10

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  1. Neutrino induced muons in Soudan 2.

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, D. M.; Soudan 2 Collaboration

    1999-06-23

    The neutrino-induced muon rate underground has been measured at Soudan 2. To discriminate from the intense background of atmospheric muons we consider only the through-going muons which originate from horizontal direction ({minus}0.14 < cos{theta} < 0.14). We calculate the horizontal, neutrino-induced muon rate at Soudan 2 from an exposure of 1.23 x 10{sup 8} s as {Phi}{sub {nu}{mu}} = (3.45 {+-} 0.52 {+-} 0.61) x 10{sup {minus}13} (cm{sup 2} sr s){sup {minus}1}.

  2. The MANX Muon Cooling Experiment Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S. A.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Johnson, R. P.; Robertsa, T. J.; Yoneharab, K.

    2010-03-30

    The MANX experiment is being proposed to demonstrate the reduction of 6D muon phase space emittance, using a continuous liquid absorber to provide ionization cooling in a helical solenoid magnetic channel. The experiment involves the construction of a two-period-long helical cooling channel (HCC) to reduce the muon invariant emittance by a factor of two. The HCC would replace the current cooling section of the MICE experiment now being set up at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The MANX experiment would use the existing MICE spectrometers and muon beam line. We discuss the placement of detection planes to optimize the muon track resolution.

  3. Magnet designs for muon collider ring and interactions regions

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A.V.; Alexahin, Y.I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Conceptual designs of superconducting magnets for the storage ring of a Muon Collider with a 1.5 TeV c.o.m. energy and an average luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} are presented. All magnets are based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor and designed to provide an adequate operating field/field gradient in the aperture with the critical current margin required for reliable magnet operation in the machine. Magnet cross-sections were optimized to achieve the accelerator field quality in the magnet aperture occupied with beams. The magnets and corresponding protective measures are designed to handle about 0.5 kW/m of dynamic heat load from the muon beam decays. Magnet parameters are reported and compared with the requirements.

  4. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  5. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  6. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  8. Hadronic interactions and EAS muon pseudorapidities investigated with the Muon Tracking Detector in KASCADE-Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabierowski, J.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, H.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; KASCADE-Grande Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    The Muon Tracking Detector in the KASCADE-Grande EAS experiment allows the precise measurement of shower muon directions up to 700 m distance from the shower center. This directional information is used to study the pseudorapidity of muons in EAS, closely related to the pseudorapidity of their parent mesons. Moreover, the mean value of muon pseudorapidity in a registered shower reflects the longitudinal development of its hadronic component. All of this makes it a good tool for testing hadronic interaction models. The possibilities of such tests given by the KASCADE-Grande experimental setup are discussed and an example of the obtained muon pseudorapidity spectrum is shown.

  9. First results of the cosmic ray muon variation study by means of the scintillation muon hodoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampilogov, N. V.; Astapov, I. I.; Barbashina, N. S.; Borog, V. V.; Dmitrieva, A. N.; Kovylyaeva, A. A.; Kompaniets, K. G.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Yashin, I. I.

    2016-02-01

    The new scintillation muon hodoscope to study cosmic ray muon flux variations was created in MEPhI. The basic characteristics of the hodoscope (sensitivity area, precision of the muon track reconstruction, ‘live’ time etc.) are comparable with other hodoscopes (TEMP and URAGAN) of MEPhI. Modular design is a distinctive feature of the detector, supplying relativity easy transportability, and low maintenance requirements give a possibility of a long-term autonomic operation. First results of the cosmic ray muon variation study by means of the scintillation muon hodoscope are presented and discussed.

  10. Imaging the Subsurface with Upgoing Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Schwellenbach, D.; Dreesen, W.; Green, A.

    2014-12-01

    We assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upgoing muons. Traditional muon imaging focuses on more-prevalent downgoing muons. Muons are subatomic particles capable of penetrating the earth's crust several kilometers. Downgoing muons have been used to image the Pyramid of Khafre of Giza, various volcanoes, and smaller targets like cargo. Unfortunately, utilizing downgoing muons requires below-target detectors. For aboveground objects like a volcano, the detector is placed at the volcano's base and the top portion of the volcano is imaged. For underground targets like tunnels, the detector would have to be placed below the tunnel in a deeper tunnel or adjacent borehole, which can be costly and impractical for some locations. Additionally, detecting and characterizing subsurface features like voids from tunnels can be difficult. Typical characterization methods like sonar, seismic, and ground penetrating radar have shown mixed success. Voids have a marked density contrast with surrounding materials, so using methods sensitive to density variations would be ideal. High-energy cosmic ray muons are more sensitive to density variation than other phenomena, including gravity. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, tomography using downgoing muons can resolve features to the sub-meter scale. We present results of exploratory work, which demonstrates that upgoing muon fluxes appear sufficient to achieve target detection within a few months. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. CMS Resistive Plate Chamber overview, from the present system to the upgrade phase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolucci, P.; Hadjiiska, R.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Dimitrov, A.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Guillaume, G.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Ocampo, A.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Shopova, M.; Sultanov, G.; Ban, Y.; Cai, J.; Xue, Z.; Ge, Y.; Li, Q.; Qian, S.; Avila, C.; Chaparro, L. F.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Assran, Y.; Sharma, A.; Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Pugliese, G.; Loddo, F.; Calabria, C.; Maggi, M.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Piccolo, D.; Carrillo, C.; Iorio, O.; Buontempo, S.; Vitulo, P.; Berzano, U.; Gabusi, M.; Kang, M.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Shin, S.; Kim, M. S.; Seo, H. K.; Goh, J.; Choi, Y.-I.

    2013-04-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers have been chosen as dedicated trigger muon detector for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment [1] at the Large Hadron Collider [2] at CERN. The system consists of about 3000 m2 of double gap RPC chambers placed in both the barrel and endcap muon regions. About 5.6 fb-1 (2010-2011) of proton-proton collision data have been used to study the performance of the RPC detector and trigger. A full high voltage scan of all the RPC chambers has been done at beginning of 2011 data taking to evaluate the working point chamber by chamber and to eventually spot aging effects. The excellent behaviour of the RPC detector can be summarized with an average detector efficiency of about 97%, an average cluster size of 1.8 and an intrinsic noise rate of 0.1 Hz/cm2. This is a clear fulfilment of all the requirements decided 18 years ago in the CMS TDR document [3].

  12. A plastic scintillator-based muon tomography system with an integrated muon spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, V.; Armitage, J.; Baig, F.; Boniface, K.; Boudjemline, K.; Bueno, J.; Charles, E.; Drouin, P.-L.; Erlandson, A.; Gallant, G.; Gazit, R.; Godin, D.; Golovko, V. V.; Howard, C.; Hydomako, R.; Jewett, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Liu, Z.; Robichaud, A.; Stocki, T. J.; Thompson, M.; Waller, D.

    2015-10-01

    A muon scattering tomography system which uses extruded plastic scintillator bars for muon tracking and a dedicated muon spectrometer that measures scattering through steel slabs has been constructed and successfully tested. The atmospheric muon detection efficiency is measured to be 97% per plane on average and the average intrinsic hit resolution is 2.5 mm. In addition to creating a variety of three-dimensional images of objects of interest, a quantitative study has been carried out to investigate the impact of including muon momentum measurements when attempting to detect high-density, high-Z material. As expected, the addition of momentum information improves the performance of the system. For a fixed data-taking time of 60 s and a fixed false positive fraction, the probability to detect a target increases when momentum information is used. This is the first demonstration of the use of muon momentum information from dedicated spectrometer measurements in muon scattering tomography.

  13. Density Imaging of Puy de Dôme Volcano with Atmospheric Muons in French Massif Central as a Case Study for Volcano Muography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carloganu, Cristina; Le Ménédeu, Eve

    2016-04-01

    High energy atmospheric muons have high penetration power that renders them appropriate for geophysical studies. Provided the topography is known, the measurement of the muon flux transmittance leads in an univoque way to 2D density mapping (so called radiographic images) revealing spatial and possibly also temporal variations. Obviously, several radiographic images could be combined into 3D tomographies, though the inverse 3D problem is generally ill-posed. The muography has a high potential for imaging remotely (from kilometers away) and with high resolution (better than 100 mrad2) volcanoes. The experimental and methodological task is however not straightforward since atmospheric muons have non trivial spectra that fall rapidly with muon energy. As shown in [Ambrosino 2015] successfully imaging km-scale volcanoes remotely requires state-of-the art, high-resolution and large-scale muon detectors. This contribution presents the geophysical motivation for muon imaging as well as the first quantitative density radiographies of Puy de Dôme volcano obtained by the TOMUVOL collaboration using a highly segmented muon telescope based on Glass Resistive Plate Chambers. In parallel with the muographic studies, the volcano was imaged through standard geophysical methods (gravimetry, electrical resistivity) [Portal 2013] allowing in depth comparisons of the different methods. Ambrosino, F., et al. (2015), Joint measurement of the atmospheric muon flux through the Puy de Dôme volcano with plastic scintillators and Resistive Plate Chambers detectors, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 120, doi:10.1002/2015JB011969 A. Portal et al (2013) , "Inner structure of the Puy de Dme volcano: cross-comparison of geophysical models (ERT, gravimetry, muon imaging)", Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 2, 47-54, 2013

  14. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  15. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2013-06-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large-scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  16. ACCELERATION FOR A HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S

    2000-04-07

    The authors describe a method for designing the acceleration systems for a muon collider, with particular application and examples for a high energy muon collider. This paper primarily concentrates on design considerations coming from longitudinal motion, but some transverse issues are briefly discussed.

  17. Neutrino physics at a muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    King, B.J.

    1998-02-01

    This paper gives an overview of the neutrino physics possibilities at a future muon storage ring, which can be either a muon collider ring or a ring dedicated to neutrino physics that uses muon collider technology to store large muon currents. After a general characterization of the neutrino beam and its interactions, some crude quantitative estimates are given for the physics performance of a muon ring neutrino experiment (MURINE) consisting of a high rate, high performance neutrino detector at a 250 GeV muon collider storage ring. The paper is organized as follows. The next section describes neutrino production from a muon storage rings and gives expressions for event rates in general purpose and long baseline detectors. This is followed by a section outlining a serious design constraint for muon storage rings: the need to limit the radiation levels produced by the neutrino beam. The following two sections describe a general purpose detector and the experimental reconstruction of interactions in the neutrino target then, finally, the physics capabilities of a MURINE are surveyed.

  18. Polarization Effects at a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-11-01

    For Muon Colliders, Polarization will be a useful tool if high polarization is achievable with little luminosity loss. Formulation and effects of beam polarization and luminosity including polarization effects in Higgs resonance studies are discussed for improving precision measurements and Higgs resonance ''discovery'' capability e.g. at the First Muon Collider (FMC).

  19. Non-Invasive Imaging of Reactor Cores Using Cosmic Ray Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Edward

    2011-10-01

    Cosmic ray muons penetrate deeply in material, with some passing completely through very thick objects. This penetrating quality is the basis of two distinct, but related imaging techniques. The first measures the number of cosmic ray muons transmitted through parts of an object. Relatively fewer muons are absorbed along paths in which they encounter less material, compared to higher density paths, so the relative density of material is measured. This technique is called muon transmission imaging, and has been used to infer the density and structure of a variety of large masses, including mine overburden, volcanoes, pyramids, and buildings. In a second, more recently developed technique, the angular deflection of muons is measured by trajectory-tracking detectors placed on two opposing sides of an object. Muons are deflected more strongly by heavy nuclei, since multiple Coulomb scattering angle is approximately proportional to the nuclear charge. Therefore, a map showing regions of large deflection will identify the location of uranium in contrast to lighter nuclei. This technique is termed muon scattering tomography (MST) and has been developed to screen shipping containers for the presence of concealed nuclear material. Both techniques are a good way of non-invasively inspecting objects. A previously unexplored topic was applying MST to imaging large objects. Here we demonstrate extending the MST technique to the task of identifying relatively thick objects inside very thick shielding. We measured cosmic ray muons passing through a physical arrangement of material similar to a nuclear reactor, with thick concrete shielding and a heavy metal core. Newly developed algorithms were used to reconstruct an image of the ``mock reactor core,'' with resolution of approximately 30 cm.

  20. Performance of the ALICE muon trigger system in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronzé, G. G.

    2016-06-01

    The ALICE muon spectrometer studies the production of quarkonia and open heavy-flavour particles. It is equipped with a trigger system composed of Resistive Plate Chambers which, by applying a transverse-momentum-based muon selection, minimises the background from light-hadron decays. The system has been continuously taking data throughout the LHC Run I; it has undergone maintenance and consolidation operations during the LHC shutdown period 1. In the first year of the LHC Run II, the system, fully recommissioned, has participated in data taking in pp and Pb-Pb collisions. The performance of the system throughout the last data-taking period is presented.

  1. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  2. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  3. Recirculating Linac Accelerators For Future Muon Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Yves Roblin, Alex Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Kevin Beard

    2012-04-01

    Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV and TeV energies. A Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) that uses superconducting RF structures can provide exceptionally fast and economical acceleration to the extent that the focusing range of the RLA quadrupoles allows each muon to pass several times through each high-gradient cavity. A new concept of rapidly changing the strength of the RLA focusing quadrupoles as the muons gain energy is being developed to increase the number of passes that each muon will make in the RF cavities, leading to greater cost effectiveness. We discuss the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both m+ and m- species. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  4. Can 250 fusions per muon be achieved

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear fusion of hydrogen isotopes can be induced by negative muons ( ) in reactions such as: + d + t + n + . This reaction is analagous to the nuclear fusion reaction achieved in stars in which hydrogen isotopes (such as deuterium, d, and tritium, t) at very high temperatures first penetrate the Coulomb repulsive barrier and then fuse together to produce an alpha particle ( ) and a neutron (n), releasing energy. The muon in general reappears after inducing fusion so that the reaction can be repeated many (N) times. Thus, the muon may serve as an effective catalyst for nuclear fusion. Muon-catalozed fusion is unique in that it proceeds rapidly in deuterium-tritium mixtures at relatively cold temperatures, e.g., room temperature. The need for plasma temperatures to initiate fusion is overcome by the presence of the muon.

  5. Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

  6. 45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), VIEW LOOKING EAST. LEAD ENCLOSED PIPING IS DRAIN FROM BOILER CHAMBER No. 1 - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  7. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Loiacono, Laura Jean

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  8. Searching for possible hidden chambers in the Pyramid of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, R.; Belmont, E.; Grabski, V.; Manzanilla, L.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Moreno, M.; Sandoval, A.

    The Pyramid of the Sun, at Teotihuacan, Mexico, is being searched for possible hidden chambers, using a muon tracking technique inspired in the experiment carried out by Luis Alvarez over 30 years ago at the Chephren Pyramid, in Giza. A fortunate similarity between this monument and the Pyramid of the Sun is a tunnel, running 8 m below the base and ending close to the symmetry axis, which permits the use muon attenuation measurements. A brief account of the project, including planning, detector design, construction and simulations, as well as the current status of the project is presented

  9. Muon spin rotation research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stronach, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Data from cyclotron experiments and room temperature studies of dilute iron alloys and iron crystals under strain were analyzed. The Fe(Mo) data indicate that the effect upon the contact hyperfine field in Fe due to the introduction of Mo is considerably less than that expected from pure dilution, and the muon (+) are attracted to the Mo impurity sites. There is a significant change in the interstitial magnetic field with Nb concentration. The Fe(Ti) data, for which precession could clearly be observed early only at 468K and above, show that the Ti impurities are attractive to muon (+), and the magnitude of B(hf) is reduced far beyond the amount expected from pure dilution. Changes in the intersitital magnetic field with the introduction of Cr, W, Ge, and Si are also discussed. When strained to the elastic limit, the interstitial magnetic field in Fe crystals is reduced by 33 gauss, and the relaxation rate of the precession signal increases by 47%.

  10. The muon collider (Sandro's snake)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a feasibility study for the design of a muon collider. Recognized the fact that the particle lifetime increases linearly with the energy, we have adopted a scheme where steps of cooling and acceleration are entwined. We have indeed found convenient to accelerate the beam as fast as possible to increase its chances of survival, and necessary to dilute the action of cooling throughout the entire accelerating process to make it more effective and affordable. All acceleration and cooling steps are executed in a single pass essentially along a curvilinear and open path. We do not believe it is possible to handle the beam otherwise in circular and closed rings, as it has been proposed in the past. The example shown in this paper describes a muon collider at the energy of 250 GeV per beam and a luminosity of 4 [times] 10[sup 28] cm[sup [minus]2]s[sup [minus]1]. We have adopted an extrapolation of the stochastic cooling method for the reduction of the beam emittance.