Science.gov

Sample records for murine aneurysm formation

  1. The role of β-arrestin2-dependent signaling in thoracic aortic aneurysm formation in a murine model of Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wisler, James W; Harris, Emily M; Raisch, Michael; Mao, Lan; Kim, Jihee; Rockman, Howard A; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Ang II type 1a receptor (AT1aR)-mediated activation of MAPKs contributes to thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) development in Marfan syndrome (MFS). β-Arrestin2 (βarr2) is known to mediate AT1aR-dependent MAPK activation, as well as proproliferative and profibrotic signaling in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Therefore, we investigated whether βarr2-dependent signaling contributes to TAA formation in MFS. We used a murine model of MFS [fibrillin (Fbn)(C1039G/+)] to generate an MFS murine model in combination with genetic βarr2 deletion (Fbn(C1039G/+)/βarr2(-/-)). Fbn(C1039G/+)/βarr2(-/-) mice displayed delayed aortic root dilation compared with Fbn(C1039G/+) mice. The mRNA and protein expression of several mediators of TAA formation, including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9, was reduced in the aorta of Fbn(C1039G/+)/βarr2(-/-) mice relative to Fbn(C1039G/+) mice. Activation of ERK1/2 was also decreased in the aortas of Fbn(C1039G/+)/βarr2(-/-) mice compared with Fbn(C1039G/+) animals. Small interfering RNA targeting βarr2 inhibited angiotensin-stimulated expression of proaneurysmal signaling mediators in primary aortic root smooth muscle cells. Angiotensin-stimulated expression of the proaneurysmal signaling mediators MMP-2 and -9 was inhibited by blockade of ERK1/2 or the EGF receptor, whereas blockade of the transforming growth factor-β receptor had no effect. These results suggest that βarr2 contributes to TAA formation in MFS by regulating ERK1/2-dependent expression of proaneurysmal genes and proteins downstream of the AT1aR. Importantly, this demonstration of the unique signaling mechanism by which βarr2 contributes to aneurysm formation identifies multiple novel, potential therapeutic targets in MFS. PMID:26371162

  2. Cerebral aneurysms: Formation, progression and developmental chronology

    PubMed Central

    Etminan, Nima; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dreier, Rita; Bruckner, Peter; Torner, James C.; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UAIs) in the general population is up to 3%. Existing epidemiological data suggests that only a small fraction of UIAs progress towards rupture over the lifetime of an individual, but the surrogates for subsequent rupture and the natural history of UIAs are discussed very controversially at present. In case of rupture of an UIA, the case-fatality is up to 50%, which therefore continues to stimulate interest in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysm formation and progression. Actual data on the chronological development of cerebral aneurysm has been especially difficult to obtain and, until recently, the existing knowledge in this respect is mainly derived from animal or mathematical models or short-term observational studies. Here, we highlight the current data on cerebral aneurysm formation and progression as well as a novel approach to investigate the developmental chronology of cerebral aneurysms. PMID:24323717

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  5. A New Murine Model of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rouer, Martin; Meilhac, Olivier; Delbosc, Sandrine; Louedec, Liliane; Pavon-Djavid, Graciela; Cross, Jane; Legagneux, Josette; Bouilliant-Linet, Maxime; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Alsac, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm exclusion is a validated technique to prevent aneurysm rupture. Long-term results highlight technique limitations and new aspects of Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pathophysiology. There is no abdominal aortic aneurysm endograft exclusion model cheap and reproducible, which would allow deep investigations of AAA before and after treatment. We hereby describe how to induce, and then to exclude with a covered coronary stentgraft an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a rat. The well known elastase induced AAA model was first reported in 19901 in a rat, then described in mice2. Elastin degradation leads to dilation of the aorta with inflammatory infiltration of the abdominal wall and intra luminal thrombus, matching with human AAA. Endovascular exclusion with small covered stentgraft is then performed, excluding any interactions between circulating blood and the aneurysm thrombus. Appropriate exclusion and stentgraft patency is confirmed before euthanasia by an angiography thought the left carotid artery. Partial control of elastase diffusion makes aneurysm shape different for each animal. It is difficult to create an aneurysm, which will allow an appropriate length of aorta below the aneurysm for an easy stentgraft introduction, and with adequate proximal and distal neck to prevent endoleaks. Lots of failure can result to stentgraft introduction which sometimes lead to aorta tear with pain and troubles to stitch it, and endothelial damage with post op aorta thrombosis. Giving aspirin to rats before stentgraft implantation decreases failure rate without major hemorrhage. Clamping time activates neutrophils, endothelium and platelets, and may interfere with biological analysis. PMID:23851958

  6. Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... is thought to play a role in abdominal aortic aneurysms. Atherosclerotic disease (cholesterol buildup in arteries) may also ... your risk of an aneurysm. Images Cerebral aneurysm Aortic aneurysm Intracerebellar hemorrhage - CT scan References Hauser SC. Vascular ...

  7. Computational analysis of anterior communicating artery aneurysm shear stress before and after aneurysm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2011-12-01

    It is widely accepted that complexity in the flow pattern at the anterior communicating artery (AComA) is associated with the high rate of aneurysm formation at that location observed in large studies. The purpose of this work is to study associations between hemodynamic patterns, and AComA aneurysm initiation by comparing hemodynamics in the aneurysm and the normal model where the aneurysm was computationally removed. Vascular models of both right and left circulation were independently reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography images using deformable models after image registration of both images, and fused using a surface merging algorithm. The geometric models were then used to generate high-quality volumetric finite element grids of tetrahedra with an advancing front technique. For each patient, the second anatomical model was created by digitally removing the aneurysm. It was iteratively achieved by applying a Laplacian smoothing filter and remeshing the surface. Finite element blood flow numerical simulations were performed for both the pathological and normal models under the same personalized pulsatile flow conditions imposed at the inlets of both models. The Navier-Stokes equations were numerically integrated by using a finite-element formulation. It was observed that aneurysms initiated in regions of high and moderate WSS in the counterpart normal models. Adjacent or close to those regions, low WSS portions of the arterial wall were not affected by the disease. These results are in line with previous observations at other vascular locations.

  8. New method for retrospective study of hemodynamic changes before and after aneurysm formation in patients with ruptured or unruptured aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospective observation of hemodynamic changes before and after formation of brain aneurysms is often difficult. We used a vessel surface repair method to carry out a retrospective hemodynamic study before and after aneurysm formation in a ruptured aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery (RPcomAA) and an unruptured aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery (URPcomAA). Methods Arterial geometries obtained from three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography of cerebral angiograms were used for flow simulation by employing finite-volume modeling. Hemodynamic parameters such as wall shear stress (WSS), blood-flow velocity, streamlines, pressure, and wall shear stress gradient (WSSG) in the aneurysm sac and at the site of aneurysm formation were analyzed in each model. Results At “aneurysm” status, hemodynamic analyses at the neck, body, and dome of the aneurysm revealed the distal aneurysm neck to be subjected to the highest WSS and blood-flow velocity, whereas the aneurysm dome presented the lowest WSS and blood-flow velocity in both model types. More apparent changes in WSSG at the aneurysm dome with an inflow jet and narrowed impaction zone were revealed only in the RPcomAA. At “pre-aneurysm” status, hemodynamic analyses in both models showed that the region of aneurysm formation was subjected to extremely elevated WSS, WSSG, and blood-flow velocity. Conclusions These data suggest that hemodynamic analyses in patients with ruptured or unruptured aneurysms using the vessel surface repair method are feasible, economical, and simple. Our preliminary results indicated that the arterial wall was subjected to elevated WSS, WSSG and blood-flow velocity before aneurysm generation. However, more complicated flow patterns (often with an inflow jet or narrowed impaction zone) were more likely to be observed in ruptured aneurysm. PMID:24195732

  9. Computational study of anterior communicating artery hemodynamics before aneurysm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2012-03-01

    It is widely accepted that complexity in the flow pattern at the anterior communicating artery (AComA) is associated with the high rate of aneurysm formation in that location observed in large studies. A previous computational hemodynamic study showed a possible association between high maximum intraaneurysmal wall shear stress (WSS) at the systolic peak with rupture in a cohort of AComA aneurysms. In another study it was observed a connection between location of aneurysm blebs and regions of high WSS in models where blebs were virtually removed. However, others reported associations between low WSS and either rupture or blister formation. The purpose of this work is to study associations between hemodynamic patterns and AComA aneurysm initiation by comparing hemodynamics in the aneurysm and the normal model where the aneurysm was computationally removed. Vascular models of both right and left circulation were independently reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography images using deformable models, and fused using a surface merging algorithm. The geometric models were then used to generate high-quality volumetric finite element grids of tetrahedra with an advancing front technique. For each patient, the second anatomical model was created by digitally removing the aneurysm. It was iteratively achieved by applying a Laplacian smoothing filter and remeshing the surface. Finite element blood flow numerical simulations were performed. It was observed that aneurysms initiated in regions of high and moderate WSS in the counterpart normal models. Adjacent or close to those regions, low WSS portions of the arterial wall were not affected by the disease.

  10. Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Aneurysms Basic Facts & Information Fill a balloon too full ... of what can happen when you have an aneurysm. Medically, when an artery “balloons,” or widens, it ...

  11. Pioglitazone Identifies a New Target for Aneurysm Treatment: Role of Egr1 in an Experimental Murine Model of Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Charolidi, Nicoletta; Pirianov, Grisha; Torsney, Evelyn; Pearce, Stuart; Laing, Ken; Nohturfft, Axel; Cockerill, Gillian W

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor x03B3; agonists have been shown to inhibit angiotensin II (AngII)-induced experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms. Macrophage infiltration to the vascular wall is an early event in this pathology, and therefore we explored the effects of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor x03B3; agonist pioglitazone on AngII-treated macrophages. Using microarray-based expression profiling of phorbol ester-stimulated THP-1 cells, we found that a number of aneurysm-related gene changes effected by AngII were modulated following the addition of pioglitazone. Among those genes, polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) was significantly up-regulated (multiple testing corrected p < 0.05). The analysis of the PKD1 proximal promoter revealed a putative early growth response 1 (EGR1) binding site, which was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and quantitative PCR. Further analysis of publicly available ChIP-sequencing data revealed that this putative binding site overlapped with a conserved EGR1 binding peak present in 5 other cell lines. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that EGR1 suppressed PKD1, while AngII significantly up-regulated PKD1, an effect counteracted by pioglitazone. Conversely, in EGR1 short hairpin RNA lentivirally transduced THP-1 cells, reduced EGR1 led to a significant up-regulation of PKD1, especially after treatment with pioglitazone. In vivo, deficiency of Egr1 in the haematopoietic compartment of mice completely abolished the incidence of CaCl2-induced aneurysm formation. PMID:26113112

  12. Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm Formation with Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Tadashi; Kamiya, Chiaki; Suzuki, Jun; Sato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Celiac stenosis or occlusion is attributed partly to increase blood flow at pancreatic arcade from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) system and may play a causal role in true aneurysm of pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDAA) formation. However, despite possible increased blood flow in the pancreatic arcades like celiac stenosis, PDAAs with a stenotic SMA are extremely rare, with only three cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of PDAA with SMA stenosis and review the literature. PMID:25298835

  13. miR-24 limits aortic vascular inflammation and murine abdominal aneurysm development.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M; Raaz, Uwe; Eken, Suzanne M; Toh, Ryuji; Azuma, Junya; Adam, Matti; Nakagami, Futoshi; Nagakami, Futoshi; Heymann, Helen M; Chernogubova, Ekaterina; Chernugobova, Ekaterina; Jin, Hong; Roy, Joy; Hultgren, Rebecka; Caidahl, Kenneth; Schrepfer, Sonja; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per; McConnell, Michael V; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Identification and treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remain among the most prominent challenges in vascular medicine. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial regulators of cardiovascular pathology and represent intriguing targets to limit AAA expansion. Here we show, by using two established murine models of AAA disease along with human aortic tissue and plasma analysis, that miR-24 is a key regulator of vascular inflammation and AAA pathology. In vivo and in vitro studies reveal chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1) to be a major target and effector under the control of miR-24, regulating cytokine synthesis in macrophages as well as their survival, promoting aortic smooth muscle cell migration and cytokine production, and stimulating adhesion molecule expression in vascular endothelial cells. We further show that modulation of miR-24 alters AAA progression in animal models, and that miR-24 and CHI3L1 represent novel plasma biomarkers of AAA disease progression in humans. PMID:25358394

  14. Endothelial Injury Preceding Intracranial Aneurysm Formation in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Li, M-H; Li, P-G; Huang, Q-L; Ling, J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the change of endothelial cell morphology and function at the rabbit basilar bifurcations in response to sustained high blood flow after bilateral common carotid artery ligation. Methods: Fifteen adult female New Zealand white rabbits were divided into experimental and sham control groups. The experimental group was subjected to bilateral common carotid artery ligation to increase the compensatory basilar artery flow. Basilar artery flow was monitored by transcranial Doppler after surgery. The endothelial cells at the arterial bifurcations were studied morphologically by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry using β-catenin antibodies. Basilar artery flow increased significantly following common carotid artery ligation. Results: Early-stage basilar artery bifurcation aneurysms were present in all rabbits at three months after ligation. The endothelial cells changed from a fusiform to column shape at the basilar artery bifurcation. Gaps between endothelial cells of the experimental group appeared wider in the electron microscopic photographs compared with those of the control group. The expression of endothelial β-catenin at the arterial bifurcations also decreased. Conclusion: This study is the first to present endothelial cell changes of basilar artery bifurcation in response to sustained high blood flow in rabbits. Endothelial cell impairment possibly initiates aneurysm formation. PMID:25303252

  15. Inhibition of microRNA-29b reduces murine abdominal aortic aneurysm development.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Azuma, Junya; Toh, Ryuji; Merk, Denis R; Deng, Alicia; Chin, Jocelyn T; Raaz, Uwe; Schoelmerich, Anke M; Raiesdana, Azad; Leeper, Nicholas J; McConnell, Michael V; Dalman, Ronald L; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2012-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and play crucial roles in vascular integrity. As such, they may have a role in modifying abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) expansion, the pathophysiological mechanisms of which remain incompletely explored. Here, we investigate the role of miRs in 2 murine models of experimental AAA: the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) infusion model in C57BL/6 mice and the AngII infusion model in Apoe-/- mice. AAA development was accompanied by decreased aortic expression of miR-29b, along with increased expression of known miR-29b targets, Col1a1, Col3a1, Col5a1, and Eln, in both models. In vivo administration of locked nucleic acid anti-miR-29b greatly increased collagen expression, leading to an early fibrotic response in the abdominal aortic wall and resulting in a significant reduction in AAA progression over time in both models. In contrast, overexpression of miR-29b using a lentiviral vector led to augmented AAA expansion and significant increase of aortic rupture rate. Cell culture studies identified aortic fibroblasts as the likely vascular cell type mediating the profibrotic effects of miR-29b modulation. A similar pattern of reduced miR-29b expression and increased target gene expression was observed in human AAA tissue samples compared with that in organ donor controls. These data suggest that therapeutic manipulation of miR-29b and its target genes holds promise for limiting AAA disease progression and protecting from rupture. PMID:22269326

  16. Neurofibromin Deficient Myeloid Cells are Critical Mediators of Aneurysm Formation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Downing, Brandon D.; Smiley, Lucy C.; Mund, Julie A.; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Bessler, Waylan K.; Sarchet, Kara N.; Hinds, Daniel M.; Kamendulis, Lisa M.; Hingtgen, Cynthia M.; Case, Jamie; Clapp, D. Wade; Conway, Simon J.; Stansfield, Brian K.; Ingram, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene. Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity in circulating hematopoietic and vascular wall cells, which are critical for maintaining vessel wall homeostasis. NF1 patients have evidence of chronic inflammation resulting in development of premature cardiovascular disease, including arterial aneurysms, which may manifest as sudden death. However, the molecular pathogenesis of NF1 aneurysm formation is unknown. Method and Results Utilizing an angiotensin II-induced aneurysm model, we demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1+/−) enhanced aneurysm formation with myeloid cell infiltration and increased oxidative stress in the vessel wall. Using lineage-restricted transgenic mice, we show loss of a single Nf1 allele in myeloid cells is sufficient to recapitulate the Nf1+/− aneurysm phenotype in vivo. Finally, oral administration of simvastatin or the antioxidant apocynin, reduced aneurysm formation in Nf1+/− mice. Conclusion These data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that Nf1+/− myeloid cells are the cellular triggers for aneurysm formation in a novel model of NF1 vasculopathy and provide a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24370551

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of the Formation and Progression of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    KATAOKA, Hiroharu

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, only a little was understood about molecular mechanisms of the development of an intracranial aneurysm (IA). Recent advancements over the last decade in the field of genetics and molecular biology have provided us a wide variety of evidences supporting the notion that chronic inflammation is closely associated with the pathogenesis of IA development. In the field of genetics, large-scale Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has identified some IA susceptible loci and genes related to cell cycle and endothelial function. Researches in molecular biology using human samples and animal models have revealed the common pathway of the initiation, progression, and rupture of IAs. IA formation begins with endothelial dysfunction followed by pathological remodeling with degenerative changes of vascular walls. Medical treatments inhibiting inflammatory cascades in IA development are likely to prevent IA progression and rupture. Statins and aspirin are expected to suppress IA progression by their anti-inflammatory effects. Decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) inhibiting inflammatory transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and Ets-1 are the other promising choice of the prevention of IA development. Further clarification of molecular mechanisms of the formation and progression of IAs will shed light to the pathogenesis of IA development and provide insight into novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IAs. PMID:25761423

  18. A spatio-temporal model for spontaneous thrombus formation in cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Malaspinas, O; Turjman, A; Ribeiro de Sousa, D; Garcia-Cardena, G; Raes, M; Nguyen, P-T T; Zhang, Y; Courbebaisse, G; Lelubre, C; Zouaoui Boudjeltia, K; Chopard, B

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new numerical model to describe thrombus formation in cerebral aneurysms. This model combines CFD simulations with a set of bio-mechanical processes identified as being the most important to describe the phenomena at a large space and time scales. The hypotheses of the model are based on in vitro experiments and clinical observations. We document that we can reproduce very well the shape and volume of patient specific thrombus segmented in giant aneurysms. PMID:26802480

  19. Extensive arterial aneurysm formation proximal to ligated arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, J M; McCollum, C H; Crawford, E S; DeBakey, M E

    1980-01-01

    As a result of abnormal flow patterns and hyperdynamic flow in arteries proximal to an arteriovenous fistula a particular susceptibility to atherosclerotic changes and aneurysmal deterioration develops. In the following report two patients are presented in which chronic arteriovenous fistulas existed for 15 and 33 years prior to correction. Each patient developed extensive and progressive aneurysmal dilation of the proximal arterial tree and subsequently required surgical resection and graft replacement. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6444798

  20. Traumatic Intracranial Aneurysm Formation following Closed Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miley, Jefferson T; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2008-01-01

    Background: Traumatic intracranial aneurysms are rare conditions that can be a result of non-penetrating head trauma. We report the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms in patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: All diagnostic cerebral angiograms performed in patients with traumatic brain injury at a level I trauma center from January 2006 to July 2007 were reviewed. Results: Diagnostic cerebral angiography was performed in 74 patients with the diagnosis of closed head injury. A total of 4 traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms were found in 4 patients, two in the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery, one in the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and one in the paraophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery. Two patients were treated with coil embolization. One patient had follow up imaging on which there was no change in the size and morphology of the aneurysm. Conclusion: Intracranial aneurysms can develop in patients with closed head injury presumably related to shear or rotational injury. It is unclear whether these aneurysms should be classified as traumatic intracranial aneurysms or pseudoaneurysms, but the pathological findings frequently reveal disruption of the three vascular layers fulfilling the definition of pseudoaneurysm. For these reason we favor the name of post-traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms. PMID:22518228

  1. Phosphorylation of AKT and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Lu, Guanyi; Su, Gang; McEvoy, Brendan; Sadiq, Omar; DiMusto, Paul D; Laser, Adriana; Futchko, John S; Henke, Peter K; Eliason, Jonathan L; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2014-01-01

    It is hypothesized that differential AKT phosphorylation between sexes is important in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation. Male C57BL/6 mice undergoing elastase treatment showed a typical AAA phenotype (80% over baseline, P < 0.001) and significantly increased phosphorylated AKT-308 (p308) and total-AKT (T-AKT) at day 14 compared with female mice. Elastase-treated Raw cells produced increased p308 and significant amounts of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and these effects were suppressed by LY294002 treatment, a known AKT inhibitor. Male and female rat aortic smooth muscle cells treated with elastase for 1, 6, or 24 hours demonstrated that the p308/T-AKT and AKT-Ser-473/T-AKT ratios peaked at 6 hours and were significantly higher in the elastase-treated cells compared with controls. Similarly, male cells had higher phosphorylated AKT/T-AKT levels than female cells. LY294002 also inhibited elastase-induced p308 formation more in female smooth muscle cells than in males, and the corresponding cell media had less pro-MMP-9. AKT siRNA significantly decreased secretion of pro-MMP-9, as well as pro-MMP-2 and active MMP-2 from elastase-treated male rat aortic smooth muscle cells. IHC of male mice AAA aortas showed increased p308, AKT-Ser-473, and T-AKT compared with female mice. Aortas from male AAA patients had a significantly higher p308/T-AKT ratio than female AAA tissues. These data suggest that AKT phosphorylation is important in the upstream regulation of MMP activity, and that differential phosphorylation may be important in sex differences in AAA. PMID:24332015

  2. A meta-analysis of aneurysm formation in laser assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Peng, Fei; Xu, Dahai; Cheng, Qinghua

    2009-08-01

    Laser assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA) is looked as a particularly promising non-suture method in future. However, aneurysm formation is one of the main reasons delay the clinical application of LAVA. Some scientists investigated the incidence of aneurysms in animal model. To systematically analyze the literature on reported incidence of aneurysm formation in LAVA therapy, we performed a meta-analysis comparing LAVA with conventional suture anastomosis (CSA) in animal model. Data were systematically retrieved and selected from PUBMED. In total, 23 studies were retrieved. 18 studies were excluded, and 5 studies involving 647 animals were included. Analysis suggested no statistically significant difference between LAVA and CSA (OR 1.24, 95%CI 0.66-2.32, P=0.51). Result of meta analysis shows that the technology of LAVA is very close to clinical application.

  3. Smooth Muscle PPARγ Plays a Critical Role in Formation and Rupture of Cerebral Aneurysms in Mice In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, David M.; Starke, Robert M.; Gu, He; Wilson, Katina; Chu, Yi; Chalouhi, Nohra; Heistad, Donald D.; Faraci, Frank M.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysms. PPARγ protects against vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis, whereas dominant-negative mutations in PPARγ promote atherosclerosis and vascular dysfunction. We tested the role of PPARγ in aneurysm formation and rupture. Aneurysms were induced with a combination of systemic infusion of angiotensin-II and local injection of elastase, in: 1) mice that received the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone, 2) mice carrying dominant-negative PPARγ mutations in endothelial or smooth muscle cells, and 3) mice that received the Cullin inhibitor MLN4924. Incidence of aneurysm formation, rupture, and mortality were quantified. Cerebral arteries were analyzed for expression of Cullin3, Keap1, Nrf2, NQO-1 and inflammatory marker mRNAs. Neither pioglitazone nor GW9662 altered the incidence of aneurysm formation. GW9662 significantly increased the incidence of aneurysm rupture, whereas pioglitazone tended to decrease the incidence of rupture. Dominant-negative endothelial-specific PPARγ did not alter the incidence of aneurysm formation or rupture. In contrast, dominant-negative smooth muscle-specific PPARγ resulted in an increase in aneurysm formation (p<0.05) and rupture (P=0.05). Dominant-negative smooth muscle-specific PPARγ, but not dominant-negative endothelial-specific PPARγ, resulted in significant decreases in expression of genes encoding Cullin3, Keap1, and Nrf2, along with significant increases in TNF-α, MCP-1, Cxcl1, CD68, MMP-3, -9, and -13. MLN4924 did not alter incidence of aneurysm formation, but increased the incidence of rupture (p<0.05). In summary, endogenous PPARγ, specifically smooth muscle PPARγ, plays an important role in protecting from formation and rupture of experimental cerebral aneurysms in mice. PMID:25916724

  4. Biomechanical behaviour of cerebral aneurysm and its relation with the formation of intraluminal thrombus: a patient-specific modelling study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Xiaoyang

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is an irreversible dilatation causing intracranial haemorrhage with severe complications. It is assumed that the biomechanical factor plays a significant role in the development of cerebral aneurysm. However, reports on the correlations between the formation of intraluminal thrombus and the flow pattern, wall shear stress (WSS) distribution of the cerebral aneurysm as well as wall compliance are still limited. In this research, patient-specific numerical simulation was carried out for three cerebral aneurysms based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data-sets. The interaction between pulsatile blood and aneurysm wall was taken into account. The biomechanical behaviour of cerebral aneurysm and its relation with the formation of intraluminal thrombus was studied systematically. The results of the numerical simulation indicated that the region of low blood flow velocity and the region of swirling recirculation were nearly coincident with each other. Besides, there was a significant correlation between the slow swirling flow and the location of thrombus deposition. Excessively low WSS was also found to have strong association with the regions of thrombus formation. Moreover, the relationship between cerebral aneurysm compliance and thrombus deposition was discovered. The patient-specific modelling study based on fluid-structure interaction) may provide a basis for future investigation on the prediction of thrombus formation in cerebral aneurysm. PMID:22292428

  5. Cigarette Smoke and Inflammation: Role in Cerebral Aneurysm Formation and Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Ali, Muhammad S.; Starke, Robert M.; Jabbour, Pascal M.; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I.; Gonzalez, L. Fernando; Rosenwasser, Robert H.; Koch, Walter J.; Dumont, Aaron S.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is an established risk factor for subarachnoid hemorrhage yet the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Recent data has implicated a role of inflammation in the development of cerebral aneurysms. Inflammation accompanying cigarette smoke exposure may thus be a critical pathway underlying the development, progression, and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Various constituents of the inflammatory response appear to be involved including adhesion molecules, cytokines, reactive oxygen species, leukocytes, matrix metalloproteinases, and vascular smooth muscle cells. Characterization of the molecular basis of the inflammatory response accompanying cigarette smoke exposure will provide a rational approach for future targeted therapy. In this paper, we review the current body of knowledge implicating cigarette smoke-induced inflammation in cerebral aneurysm formation/rupture and attempt to highlight important avenues for future investigation. PMID:23316103

  6. Numerical modeling of the flow in intracranial aneurysms: prediction of regions prone to thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Rayz, V.L.; Boussel, L.; Lawton, M.T.; Acevedo-Bolton, G.; Ge, L.; Young, W.L.; Higashida, R.T.; Saloner, D.

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of intralumenal thrombus in intracranial aneurysms adds a risk of thrombo-embolism over and above that posed by mass-effect and rupture. In addition to biochemical factors, hemodynamic factors that are governed by lumenal geometry and blood flow rates likely play an important role in the thrombus formation and deposition process. In this study, patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of blood flow were constructed from MRA data for three patients who had fusiform basilar aneurysms that were thrombus-free and then proceeded to develop intra-lumenal thrombus. In order to determine whether features of the flow fields could suggest which regions had an elevated potential for thrombus deposition, the flow was modeled in the baseline, thrombus-free geometries. Pulsatile flow simulations were carried out using patient-specific inlet flow conditions measured with MR velocimetry. Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood behavior was considered. A strong similarity was found between the intra-aneurysmal regions with CFD-predicted slow, recirculating flows and the regions of thrombus deposition observed in vivo in the follow-up MR studies. In two cases with larger aneurysms, the agreement between the low velocity zones and clotted off regions improved when non-Newtonian blood behavior was taken into account. A similarity was also found between the calculated low shear stress regions and the regions that were later observed to clot. PMID:18787954

  7. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  8. Participation of oleic acid in the formation of the aortic aneurysm in Marfan syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Soto, María Elena; Iturriaga Hernández, Alejandra Valeria; Guarner Lans, Verónica; Zuñiga-Muñoz, Alejandra; Aranda Fraustro, Alberto; Velázquez Espejel, Rodrigo; Pérez-Torres, Israel

    2016-03-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is associated with progressive aortic dilatation and endothelial dysfunction that lead to early acute dissection and rupture of the aorta and sudden death. Alteration in fatty acid (FA) metabolism can stimulate nitric oxide (NO) overproduction which increases the activity of the inducible form of NO synthase (iNOS) that is involved in endothelial dysfunction. We evaluated the participation of FA in the formation of thoracic aneurysms in MFS and its relation to the iNOS. Oleic acid (OA), iNOS, citrulline, nitrates and nitrites, TGF-β1, TNF-α, monounsaturated FA and NO synthase activity were significantly increased (p<0.05) in tissue from the aortas of MFS. Saturated FA, eNOS and HDL were significantly decreased (p<0.05). Arachidonic acid, delta-9 desaturase tended to increase and histological examination showed an increase in cystic necrosis, elastic fibers and collagen in MFS. The increase in OA contributes to the altered pathway of iNOS, which favors endothelial dysfunction and formation of the aortic aneurysms in MFS. PMID:27163200

  9. ACE2 Decreases Formation and Severity of Angiotensin II-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Sean E.; Zhang, Xuan; Howatt, Deborah A.; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Gurley, Susan B.; Ennis, Terri; Curci, John A.; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) cleaves angiotensin II (AngII) to form angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)), which generally opposes effects of AngII. AngII infusion into hypercholesterolemic male mice induces formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). This study tests the hypothesis that deficiency of ACE2 promotes AngII-induced AAAs, while ACE2 activation suppresses aneurysm formation. Approach and Results ACE2 protein was detectable by immunostaining in mice and human AAAs. Whole body deficiency of ACE2 significantly increased aortic lumen diameters and external diameters of suprarenal aortas from AngII-infused mice. Conversely, ACE2 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells had no effect on AngII-induced AAAs. In contrast to AngII-induced AAAs, ACE2 deficiency had no significant effect on external aortic diameters of elastase-induced AAAs. Since ACE2 deficiency promoted AAA formation in AngII-infused mice, we determined if ACE2 activation suppressed AAAs. ACE2 activation by administration of diminazine aceturate (DIZE, 30 mg/kg/day) to Ldlr−/− mice increased kidney ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and elevated plasma Ang-(1-7) concentrations. Unexpectedly, administration of DIZE significantly reduced total sera cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol concentrations. Notably, DIZE significantly decreased aortic lumen diameters and aortic external diameters of AngII-infused mice resulting in a marked reduction in AAA incidence (from 73 to 29%). None of these effects of DIZE were observed in the Ace2−/y mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that ACE2 exerts a modulatory role in AngII-induced AAA formation, and that therapeutic stimulation of ACE2 could be a benefit to reduce AAA expansion and rupture in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system. PMID:25301841

  10. Elastin-Derived Peptides Promote Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Dale, Matthew A; Xiong, Wanfen; Carson, Jeffrey S; Suh, Melissa K; Karpisek, Andrew D; Meisinger, Trevor M; Casale, George P; Baxter, B Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a dynamic vascular disease characterized by inflammatory cell invasion and extracellular matrix degradation. Damage to elastin in the extracellular matrix results in release of elastin-derived peptides (EDPs), which are chemotactic for inflammatory cells such as monocytes. Their effect on macrophage polarization is less well known. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages initially are recruited to sites of injury, but, if their effects are prolonged, they can lead to chronic inflammation that prevents normal tissue repair. Conversely, anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages reduce inflammation and aid in wound healing. Thus, a proper M1/M2 ratio is vital for tissue homeostasis. Abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue reveals a high M1/M2 ratio in which proinflammatory cells and their associated markers dominate. In the current study, in vitro treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with EDPs induced M1 macrophage polarization. By using C57BL/6 mice, Ab-mediated neutralization of EDPs reduced aortic dilation, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and proinflammatory cytokine expression at early and late time points after aneurysm induction. Furthermore, direct manipulation of the M1/M2 balance altered aortic dilation. Injection of M2-polarized macrophages reduced aortic dilation after aneurysm induction. EDPs promoted a proinflammatory environment in aortic tissue by inducing M1 polarization, and neutralization of EDPs attenuated aortic dilation. The M1/M2 imbalance is vital to aneurysm formation. PMID:27183603

  11. Smooth Muscle Cell Foam Cell Formation, Apolipoproteins, and ABCA1 in Intracranial Aneurysms: Implications for Lipid Accumulation as a Promoter of Aneurysm Wall Rupture.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Eliisa; Tulamo, Riikka; Lehti, Satu; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Kovanen, Petri T; Frösen, Juhana

    2016-07-01

    Saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA) aneurysm causes intracranial hemorrhages that are associated with high mortality. Lipid accumulation and chronic inflammation occur in the sIA wall. A major mechanism for lipid clearance from arteries is adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1)-mediated lipid efflux from foam cells to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). We investigated the association of wall degeneration, inflammation, and lipid-related parameters in tissue samples of 16 unruptured and 20 ruptured sIAs using histology and immunohistochemistry. Intracellular lipid accumulation was associated with wall remodeling (p = 0.005) and rupture (p = 0.020). Foam cell formation was observed in smooth muscle cells, in addition to CD68- and CD163-positive macrophages. Macrophage infiltration correlated with intracellular lipid accumulation and apolipoproteins, including apoA-I. ApoA-I correlated with markers of lipid accumulation and wall degeneration (p = 0.01). ApoA-I-positive staining colocalized with ABCA1-positive cells particularly in sIAs with high number of smooth muscle cells (p = 0.003); absence of such colocalization was associated with wall degeneration (p = 0.017). Known clinical risk factors for sIA rupture correlated inversely with apoA-I. We conclude that lipid accumulation associates with sIA wall degeneration and risk of rupture, possibly via formation of foam cells and subsequent loss of mural cells. Reduced removal of lipids from the sIA wall via ABCA1-apoA-I pathway may contribute to this process. PMID:27283327

  12. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  13. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta ...

  14. Aneurysm Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... to other parts of the body (the aorta). Aortic aneurysms can occur in the area below the stomach ( ... or in the chest (thoracic aneurysms). An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is usually located below the kidneys. In ...

  15. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  16. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells play a protective role in angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysm formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Yodoi, Keiko; Yamashita, Tomoya; Sasaki, Naoto; Kasahara, Kazuyuki; Emoto, Takuo; Matsumoto, Takuya; Kita, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Mizoguchi, Taiji; Sparwasser, Tim; Hirata, Ken-ichi

    2015-04-01

    Although regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to play a protective role in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation, it remains unclear whether expansion of endogenous Foxp3(+) Tregs prevents AAA. In the current study, we determined the effects of endogenous Foxp3(+) Treg expansion or depletion in an experimental model of AAA. We continuously infused 12-week-old apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed a high-cholesterol diet with angiotensin II (n=60) or normal saline (n=12) by implanting osmotic mini-pumps and evaluated AAA formation at 16 weeks. The angiotensin II-infused mice received interleukin-2/anti-interleukin-2 monoclonal antibody complex (interleukin-2 complex; n=31) or PBS (n=29). Eighty-one percent of angiotensin II-infused mice developed AAA, with 42% mortality possibly because of aneurysm rupture. Interleukin-2 complex treatment systemically increased the number of Foxp3(+) Tregs and significantly decreased the incidence (52%) and mortality (17%) of AAA. Immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced accumulation of macrophages and increased numbers of Foxp3(+) Tregs in aneurysmal tissues, suggesting that expansion of Tregs may suppress local inflammation in the vessel wall and provide protection against AAA formation. Furthermore, genetic depletion of Foxp3(+) Tregs led to a significant increase in the mortality of AAA, suggesting the protective role of Foxp3(+) Tregs against AAA. Our findings suggest that Foxp3(+) Tregs may play a protective role in AAA formation and that promotion of an endogenous regulatory immune response may be a potentially valuable therapeutic approach for preventing AAA. PMID:25601931

  17. Cytokine amplification and macrophage effector functions in aortic inflammation and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, Talha; Tilton, Ronald G; Brasier, Allan R

    2016-08-01

    On April 29, 2015, Son and colleagues published an article entitled "Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma" in Nature Communications. The authors observed that the heterozygous Kruppel-like transcription factor 6 (KLF6) deficiency or absence of myeloid-specific KLF6 led to upregulation of macrophage GM-CSF expression, promoted the development of aortic hematoma/dissection, and stimulated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation when the vessel wall was subjected to an inflammatory stimulus. The additional findings of increased adventitial fibrotic deposition, marked infiltration of macrophages, and increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and IL-6 were blocked with neutralizing GM-CSF antibodies, or recapitulated in normal mice with excess GM-CSF administration. The authors concluded that GM-CSF is a key regulatory molecule in the development of AAA and further suggested that activation of GM-CSF is independent of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-Smad pathway associated with the Marfan aortic pathology. In this perspective, we expand on this mechanism, drawing from previous studies implicating a similar essential role for IL-6 signaling in macrophage activation, Th17 expansion and aortic dissections. We propose a sequential "two-hit" model of vascular inflammation involving initial vascular injury followed by recruitment of Ly6C(hi) macrophages. Aided by fibroblast interactions inflammatory macrophages produce amplification of IL-6 and GM-CSF expression that converge on a common, pathogenic Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activations of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. This pathway stimulates effector functions of macrophages, promotes differentiation of Th17 lymphocytes and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression, ultimately resulting in deterioration of vascular wall structural integrity. Further research evaluating the impact of

  18. Cytokine amplification and macrophage effector functions in aortic inflammation and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Talha; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    On April 29, 2015, Son and colleagues published an article entitled “Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma” in Nature Communications. The authors observed that the heterozygous Kruppel-like transcription factor 6 (KLF6) deficiency or absence of myeloid-specific KLF6 led to upregulation of macrophage GM-CSF expression, promoted the development of aortic hematoma/dissection, and stimulated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation when the vessel wall was subjected to an inflammatory stimulus. The additional findings of increased adventitial fibrotic deposition, marked infiltration of macrophages, and increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and IL-6 were blocked with neutralizing GM-CSF antibodies, or recapitulated in normal mice with excess GM-CSF administration. The authors concluded that GM-CSF is a key regulatory molecule in the development of AAA and further suggested that activation of GM-CSF is independent of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-Smad pathway associated with the Marfan aortic pathology. In this perspective, we expand on this mechanism, drawing from previous studies implicating a similar essential role for IL-6 signaling in macrophage activation, Th17 expansion and aortic dissections. We propose a sequential “two-hit” model of vascular inflammation involving initial vascular injury followed by recruitment of Ly6Chi macrophages. Aided by fibroblast interactions inflammatory macrophages produce amplification of IL-6 and GM-CSF expression that converge on a common, pathogenic Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activations of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. This pathway stimulates effector functions of macrophages, promotes differentiation of Th17 lymphocytes and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression, ultimately resulting in deterioration of vascular wall structural integrity. Further research evaluating the impact of

  19. A rare case of a giant saphenous vein graft aneurysm with right atrial fistula formation.

    PubMed

    Moschonas, Konstantinos; Patterson, Tiffany; Rajani, Ronak; Young, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old hypertensive and dyslipidaemic man with a history of coronary artery bypass graft 19 years previously, presented with severe exertional angina and dyspnoea despite optimal anti-ischaemic pharmacological therapy and previous percutaneous coronary intervention to the left circumflex artery. CT revealed an aneurysm of the saphenous vein graft to the posterior left ventricular branch of the right coronary artery. The aneurysm had formed a fistulous connection with the right atrium. Initially, luminal reconstruction with serial stents was deemed the most appropriate treatment strategy. However, the procedure was abandoned due to the inability to visualise the graft distal to the aneurysm and the significant shunt to the right atrium. Surgical correction of the right atrial wall defect and replacement of the diseased grafts led to complete resolution of the patient's symptoms. PMID:26903470

  20. Alterations in membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase abundance after the induction of thoracic aortic aneurysm in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Ruddy, Jean Marie; Bouges, Shenikqua; Zavadzkas, Juozas A.; Brinsa, Theresa A.; Stroud, Robert E.; Mukherjee, Rupak; Spinale, Francis G.

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) develop as a result of dysregulated extracellular matrix remodeling mediated by several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) is the prototypical member of a unique family of membrane-bound MMPs, possessing multiple substrates and functions. The present study tested the hypothesis that MT1-MMP expression, abundance, and activity would be elevated during TAA development and that this protease is produced primarily by mesenchymal cells within the thoracic aorta. Descending thoracic aortas were harvested from C57BL/6J mice at multiple time points (2, 4, 8, and 16 wk, n = 15 each) post-TAA induction (0.5M CaCl2, 15 min) and compared with reference controls (n = 15). The expression and abundance of MT1-MMP, MMP-2, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 were assessed by quantitative PCR and immunoblot analysis. MT1-MMP activity was determined by fluorescent peptide assay. MT1-MMP was localized within the aortic wall by immunohistochemistry. MT1-MMP abundance and localization in live animals (8 wk post-TAA induction vs. control) was determined by microultrasound imaging with an MT1-MMP-targeted microbubble contrast agent. Aortic diameter was increased 172 ± 7% at 16 wk post-TAA induction (P < 0.05). MT1-MMP and MMP-2 mRNA levels were elevated at 2 wk post-TAA induction (P < 0.05). MT1-MMP protein abundance increased progressively to a maximum of 178 ± 26% at 16 wk post-TAA induction, whereas MMP-2 and TIMP-2 peaked at 2 wk post-TAA induction (526 ± 93% and 376 ± 48%, respectively, P < 0.05). MT1-MMP colocalized with fibroblasts, and MT1-MMP-targeted contrast binding was elevated in 8-wk TAA-induced mice versus control mice (217 ± 53% vs. 81 ± 8%, P < 0.05). In conclusion, these novel results suggest that MT1-MMP plays a dynamic multifunctional role in TAA development and, therefore, may provide a significant target for therapeutic strategies. PMID:20418476

  1. Homeobox family Hoxc localization during murine palate formation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Azumi; Katayama, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takehito; Imura, Hideto; Natsume, Nagato; Sugahara, Toshio; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2016-07-01

    Homeobox genes play important roles in craniofacial morphogenesis. However, the characteristics of the transcription factor Hoxc during palate formation remain unclear. We examined the immunolocalization patterns of Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6 in palatogenesis of cleft palate (Eh/Eh) mice. On the other hand, mutations in the FGF/FGFR pathway are exclusively associated with syndromic forms of cleft palate. We also examined the immunolocalization of Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 to clarify their relationships with Hoxc in palatogenesis. Some palatal epithelial cells showed Hoxc5 labeling, while almost no labeling of mesenchymal cells was observed in +/+ mice. As palate formation progressed in +/+ mice, Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6 were observed in medial epithelial seam cells. Hoxc5 and Hoxc6 were detected in the oral epithelium. The palatal mesenchyme also showed intense staining for Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 with progression of palate formation. In contrast, the palatal shelves of Eh/Eh mice exhibited impaired horizontal growth and failed to fuse, resulting in a cleft. Hoxc5 was observed in a few epithelial cells and diffusely in the mesenchyme of Eh/Eh palatal shelves. No or little labeling of Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 was detected in the cleft palate of Eh/Eh mice. These findings suggest that Hoxc genes are involved in palatogenesis. Furthermore, there may be the differences in the localization pattern between Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6. Additionally, Hoxc distribution in palatal cells during palate development may be correlated with FGF signaling. (228/250 words) © 2016 Japanese Teratology Society. PMID:26718736

  2. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  3. In vivo formation of polyphosphoinositide isomers and association with progression of murine polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Aukema, H M; Chapkin, R S; Tomobe, K; Takahashi, H; Holub, B J

    1992-08-01

    Polyphosphoinositide isomers have been demonstrated to be important mediators of cell proliferation in vitro. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, the in vivo formation of the novel isomer, phosphatidylinositol(3)phosphate, in the kidney and liver of intact animals following intraperitoneal administration of [3H]myo-inositol. The formation of renal [3H]phosphatidylinositol(3)phosphate relative to total [3H]phosphatidylinositol-phosphate was positively correlated with cyst proliferation and renal enlargement in a murine model of polycystic kidney disease. Furthermore, despite no difference in the formation of renal [3H]phosphatidylinositol(4)phosphate, a markedly lower accumulation (by 48%) of [3H]phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate was observed in the diseased animals as compared to controls. These results indicate that further studies on the in vivo formation of specific polyphosphoinositide isomers in disease states characterized by abnormal growth and oncogene expression are warranted. PMID:1327862

  4. Closed injury of the aortic arch and subsequent formation of a false aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Janevski, B

    1983-01-01

    The case history of a 25-year-old man who sustained a blunt trauma to the chest in a car accident and developed a false aneurysm of the aortic isthmus is reported. The injury of the aortic arch was not initially recognized. The diagnosis was established on the chest X-rays and arteriograms obtained 1 year after the trauma. The clinical and radiological signs of closed injuries of the aortic arch are reviewed. PMID:6617430

  5. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Decreases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation through GLP-1-Dependent Monocytic Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsin Ying; Huang, Chun Yao; Shih, Chun Ming; Chang, Wei Hung; Tsai, Chein Sung; Lin, Feng Yen; Shih, Chun Che

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening situation affecting almost 10% of elders. There has been no effective medication for AAA other than surgical intervention. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been shown to have a protective effect on cardiovascular disease. Whether DPP-4 inhibitors may be beneficial in the treatment of AAA is unclear. We investigated the effects of DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin on the angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused AAA formation in apoE-deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Mice with induced AAA were treated with placebo or 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day sitagliptin. Ang II-infused apoE-/- mice exhibited a 55.6% incidence of AAA formation, but treatment with sitagliptin decreased AAA formation. Specifically, administered sitagliptin in Ang II-infused mice exhibited decreased expansion of the suprarenal aorta, reduced elastin lamina degradation of the aorta, and diminished vascular inflammation by macrophage infiltration. Treatment with sitagliptin decreased gelatinolytic activity and apoptotic cells in aorta tissues. Sitaglipitn, additionally, was associated with increased levels of plasma active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). In vitro studies, GLP-1 decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cell migration, and MMP-2 as well as MMP-9 activity in Ang II-stimulated monocytic cells. The results conclude that oral administration of sitagliptin can prevent abdominal aortic aneurysm formation in Ang II-infused apoE-/-mice, at least in part, by increasing of GLP-1 activity, decreasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 production from macrophage infiltration. The results indicate that sitagliptin may have therapeutic potential in preventing the development of AAA. PMID:25876091

  6. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  7. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  8. SNP Formation Bias in the Murine Genome Provides Evidence for Parallel Evolution.

    PubMed

    Plyler, Zackery E; Hill, Aubrey E; McAtee, Christopher W; Cui, Xiangqin; Moseley, Leah A; Sorscher, Eric J

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we show novel DNA motifs that promote single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) formation and are conserved among exons, introns, and intergenic DNA from mice (Sanger Mouse Genomes Project), human genes (1000 Genomes), and tumor-specific somatic mutations (data from TCGA). We further characterize SNPs likely to be very recent in origin (i.e., formed in otherwise congenic mice) and show enrichment for both synonymous and parallel DNA variants occurring under circumstances not attributable to purifying selection. The findings provide insight regarding SNP contextual bias and eukaryotic codon usage as strategies that favor long-term exonic stability. The study also furnishes new information concerning rates of murine genomic evolution and features of DNA mutagenesis (at the time of SNP formation) that should be viewed as "adaptive." PMID:26253317

  9. Blood Clot Formation Does Not Affect Metastasis Formation or Tumor Growth in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rossnagl, Stephanie; von Au, Anja; Vasel, Matthaeus; Cecchini, arco G.; Nakchbandi, Inaam A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is associated with increased fracture risk, due either to metastasis or associated osteoporosis. After a fracture, blood clots form. Because proteins of the coagulation cascade and activated platelets promote cancer development, a fracture in patients with cancer often raises the question whether it is a pathologic fracture or whether the fracture itself might promote the formation of metastatic lesions. We therefore examined whether blood clot formation results in increased metastasis in a murine model of experimental breast cancer metastasis. For this purpose, a clot was surgically induced in the bone marrow of the left tibia of immundeficient mice. Either one minute prior to or five minutes after clot induction, human cancer cells were introduced in the circulation by intracardiac injection. The number of cancer cells that homed to the intervention site was determined by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Metastasis formation and longitudinal growth were evaluated by bioluminescence imaging. The number of cancer cells that homed to the intervention site after 24 hours was similar to the number of cells in the opposite tibia that did not undergo clot induction. This effect was confirmed using two more cancer cell lines. Furthermore, no difference in the number of macroscopic lesions or their growth could be detected. In the control group 72% developed a lesion in the left tibia. In the experimental groups with clot formation 79% and 65% developed lesions in the left tibia (p = ns when comparing each experimental group with the controls). Survival was similar too. In summary, the growth factors accumulating in a clot/hematoma are neither enough to promote cancer cell homing nor support growth in an experimental model of breast cancer bone metastasis. This suggests that blood clot formation, as occurs in traumatic fractures, surgical interventions, and bruises, does not increase the risk of metastasis formation. PMID:24740307

  10. Analysis of slipstream flow in two ruptured intracranial cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S G; Kerber, C W

    1999-10-01

    Replicas of ruptured posterior communicating and basilar artery aneurysms were created from cadaveric specimens and then were placed in a circuit of pulsating non-Newtonian fluid. Individual fluid slipstreams were opacified with isobaric dyes, and images were recorded on film. The slipstreams entered the distal aneurysm neck with impact against the distal lateral wall of the aneurysm. They then swirled slowly in a reverse vortical pattern within the aneurysm sac. Fluid exited the aneurysm at the proximal neck. The flow pattern clearly shows the impact zone of entering slipstreams (the point of aneurysm rupture) and provides information pertaining to aneurysm growth and formation. PMID:10543644

  11. Caveolin 1 is critical for abdominal aortic aneurysm formation induced by angiotensin II and inhibition of lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Takehiko; Crawford, Kevin J; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Elliott, Katherine J; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Rizzo, Victor; Eguchi, Satoru

    2014-06-01

    Although AngII (angiotensin II) and its receptor AT1R (AngII type 1 receptor) have been implicated in AAA (abdominal aortic aneurysm) formation, the proximal signalling events primarily responsible for AAA formation remain uncertain. Caveolae are cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains that serve as a signalling platform to facilitate the temporal and spatial localization of signal transduction events, including those stimulated by AngII. Cav1 (caveolin 1)-enriched caveolae in vascular smooth muscle cells mediate ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17)-dependent EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) transactivation, which is linked to vascular remodelling induced by AngII. In the present study, we have tested our hypothesis that Cav1 plays a critical role for the development of AAA at least in part via its specific alteration of AngII signalling within caveolae. Cav1-/- mice and the control wild-type mice were co-infused with AngII and β-aminopropionitrile to induce AAA. We found that Cav1-/- mice with the co-infusion did not develop AAA compared with control mice in spite of hypertension. We found an increased expression of ADAM17 and enhanced phosphorylation of EGFR in AAA. These events were markedly attenuated in Cav1-/- aortas with the co-infusion. Furthermore, aortas from Cav1-/- mice with the co-infusion showed less endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses compared with aortas from control mice. Cav1 silencing in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells prevented AngII-induced ADAM17 induction and activation. In conclusion, Cav1 appears to play a critical role in the formation of AAA and associated endoplasmic reticulum/oxidative stress, presumably through the regulation of caveolae compartmentalized signals induced by AngII. PMID:24329494

  12. An Integrated Fluid-Chemical Model Toward Modeling the Formation of Intra-Luminal Thrombus in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Biasetti, Jacopo; Spazzini, Pier Giorgio; Swedenborg, Jesper; Gasser, T. Christian

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs) are frequently characterized by the presence of an Intra-Luminal Thrombus (ILT) known to influence their evolution biochemically and biomechanically. The ILT progression mechanism is still unclear and little is known regarding the impact of the chemical species transported by blood flow on this mechanism. Chemical agonists and antagonists of platelets activation, aggregation, and adhesion and the proteins involved in the coagulation cascade (CC) may play an important role in ILT development. Starting from this assumption, the evolution of chemical species involved in the CC, their relation to coherent vortical structures (VSs) and their possible effect on ILT evolution have been studied. To this end a fluid-chemical model that simulates the CC through a series of convection-diffusion-reaction (CDR) equations has been developed. The model involves plasma-phase and surface-bound enzymes and zymogens, and includes both plasma-phase and membrane-phase reactions. Blood is modeled as a non-Newtonian incompressible fluid. VSs convect thrombin in the domain and lead to the high concentration observed in the distal portion of the AAA. This finding is in line with the clinical observations showing that the thickest ILT is usually seen in the distal AAA region. The proposed model, due to its ability to couple the fluid and chemical domains, provides an integrated mechanochemical picture that potentially could help unveil mechanisms of ILT formation and development. PMID:22934022

  13. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  14. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Aortic Aneurysm Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... cause of most deaths from aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysm in the United States Aortic aneurysms were the ...

  15. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  16. What Is an Aneurysm?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Aneurysm? An aneurysm (AN-u-rism) is a balloon-like bulge ... the weakened or injured walls can cause an aneurysm. An aneurysm can grow large and rupture (burst) ...

  17. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of the ... with high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who ...

  18. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  19. Role of 64 slice multidetector computed tomography and angiography to establish relationship between tumor size, aneurysm formation and spontaneous rupture of renal angiomyolipomas: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Shruti P.; Pal, Bipin Chandra; Patel, Kajal N.; Sutariya, Harsh; Trivedi, Hargovind L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) angiography using 64 slice multidetector CT scan to establish relationships among tumor size, aneurysm formation, and spontaneous rupture of renal angiomyolipomas (AML). Materials and Methods: Total 27 patients were diagnosed as having renal angiomyolipoma (AML) at institute of kidney disease and research center from June 2008 to June 2015. All patients with renal AML underwent contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) with CT angiography with 64 slice multidetector CT scan. Results: Total 34 kidneys were found to be affected by AML. Out of which 6 AML were ruptured and remaining 28 were unruptured. If tumor size of 4 cm or larger is used as predictor of rupture; sensitivity 20%, specificity 89%, positive predictive value 83.3%, and negative predictive value 28.5%; and If aneurysm size >5 mm is used as predictor of rupture; sensitivity 75%, specificity 90%, positive predictive value 50%, and negative predictive value 96.4% was found. Conclusion: Tumor size, aneurysm size and tumor multiplicity cannot use as a predictor of spontaneous rupture of the tumor. PMID:27141187

  20. Increased expression of leukotriene C4 synthase and predominant formation of cysteinyl-leukotrienes in human abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Di Gennaro, Antonio; Wågsäter, Dick; Mäyränpää, Mikko I.; Gabrielsen, Anders; Swedenborg, Jesper; Hamsten, Anders; Samuelsson, Bengt; Eriksson, Per; Haeggström, Jesper Z.

    2010-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators involved in the pathogenesis and progression of diverse inflammatory disorders. The cysteinyl-leukotrienes LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4 are important mediators of asthma, and LTB4 has recently been implicated in atherosclerosis. Here we report that mRNA levels for the three key enzymes/proteins in the biosynthesis of cysteinyl-leukotrienes, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP), and LTC4 synthase (LTC4S), are significantly increased in the wall of human abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). In contrast, mRNA levels of LTA4 hydrolase, the enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of LTB4, are not increased. Immunohistochemical staining of AAA wall revealed focal expression of 5-LO, FLAP, and LTC4S proteins in the media and adventitia, localized in areas rich in inflammatory cells, including macrophages, neutrophils, and mast cells. Human AAA wall tissue converts arachidonic acid and the unstable epoxide LTA4 into significant amounts of cysteinyl-leukotrienes and to a lesser extent LTB4. Furthermore, challenge of AAA wall tissue with exogenous LTD4 increases the release of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9, and selective inhibition of the CysLT1 receptor by montelukast blocks this effect. The increased expression of LTC4S, together with the predominant formation of cysteinyl-leukotrienes and effects on MMPs production, suggests a mechanism by which LTs may promote matrix degradation in the AAA wall and identify the components of the cysteinyl-leukotriene pathway as potential targets for prevention and treatment of AAA. PMID:21078989

  1. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  2. Life-Threatening Surgery for Mycotic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Mitrev, Zan K.; Anguseva, Tanja N.

    2013-01-01

    Infected aneurysm (or mycotic aneurysm) is defined as an infectious disease of the wall of an artery with formation of a blind, saccular out-pouching that is contiguous with the arterial lumen. Symptoms are frequently absent or nonspecific during the early stages. Once clinically presented, infected aneurysms are often at an advanced stage of development and associated with complications such as rupture. Nontreatment or delayed treatment of infected aneurysms has a poor outcome, with high morbidity and mortality rate via fulminant sepsis or hemorrhage. In clinically suspected cases, computed tomography is used for diagnosis. Urgent surgery, performed to prevent aortic rupture carries high morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:26798693

  3. ROLE OF COPPER,ZINC-SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE IN CATALYZING NITROTYROSINE FORMATION IN MURINE LIVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solely known function of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is to catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anion into hydrogen peroxide. Our objective was to determine if SOD1 catalyzed murine liver protein nitration induced by acetaminophen (APAP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Liver and plasma ...

  4. Cardiovascular syphilis with coronary stenosis and aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Satyendra; Moorthy, Nagaraja

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular manifestations of tertiary syphilis include aortitis, aortic root dilation, aneurysm formation, aortic regurgitation, and coronary ostial stenosis. Coronary ostial lesions have been detected in as many as 26% of patients with syphilitic aortitis. However nonostial coronary stenosis and coronary aneurysms in same patient is rarely described in cardiovascular syphilis. PMID:25634420

  5. Inflammation and human cerebral aneurysms: current and future treatment prospects

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Joseph S; Hoyne, Danielle S; Hasan, David M

    2013-01-01

    The formation of cerebral aneurysms and their rupture propensity is of immediate clinical importance. Current management includes observation with expectant management, microsurgical clipping and/or endovascular coiling. The surgical options are invasive and are not without increased risk despite the technological advances. Recent human and animal studies have shown that inflammation plays a critical role in aneurysm formation and progression to rupture. Modulating this inflammatory process may prove to be clinically significant. This review will discuss cerebral aneurysm pathogenesis with a focus on current and future research of potential use of pharmaceutical agents that attenuate inflammation in the aneurysm wall leading to decreased risk of aneurysm rupture. PMID:24376373

  6. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  7. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  8. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  9. Micromanaging abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M; Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Tsao, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to "fine tune" the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility. PMID:23852016

  10. Commentary on “Inhibition of interleukin-1beta decreases aneurysm formation and progression in a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms”

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yonghua; Zhong, Hongshan; Han, Xinwei; Xu, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is a silent but life-threatening disease, whose pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Aneurysm models have been induced in small animals to study its pathogenesis, Johnston WF et al. successfully induced a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) by periadventitial application of elastase in mice. We comment on this model according to our experiment. We hypothesize that endogenous MMPs, especially MMP2, play a vital role in complex repair process of aneurysmal wall, which should be a key target in the investigation and treatment of aortic aneurysms. PMID:26587231

  11. Mechanisms of Healing in Coiled Intracranial Aneurysms: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Kallmes, David F; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recanalization of intracranial aneurysms following endovascular coiling remains a frustratingly common occurrence. An understanding of the molecular and histopathological mechanisms of aneurysm healing following coil embolization is essential to improving aneurysm occlusion rates. Histolopathologic studies in coiled human and experimental aneurysms suggest that during the first month post-coiling, thrombus formation and active inflammation occur within the aneurysm dome. Several months following embolization, the aneurysm is excluded from the parent vessel by formation of a neointimal layer, which is often thin and discontinuous, across the aneurysm neck. Numerous coil modifications and systemic therapies have been tested in animals and humans in an attempt to improve the aneurysm healing process; these modifications have met with variable levels of success. In this review, we summarize the histopathologic and molecular biology of aneurysm healing and discuss how these findings have been applied in an attempt to improve angiographic outcomes in patients harboring intracranial aneurysm. PMID:25430855

  12. Mechanisms of Healing in Coiled Intracranial Aneurysms: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, W; Kallmes, D F; Kadirvel, R

    2015-07-01

    Recanalization of intracranial aneurysms following endovascular coiling remains a frustratingly common occurrence. An understanding of the molecular and histopathologic mechanisms of aneurysm healing following coil embolization is essential to improving aneurysm occlusion rates. Histopathologic studies in coiled human and experimental aneurysms suggest that during the first month postcoiling, thrombus formation and active inflammation occur within the aneurysm dome. Several months following embolization, the aneurysm is excluded from the parent vessel by formation of a neointimal layer, which is often thin and discontinuous, across the aneurysm neck. Numerous coil modifications and systemic therapies have been tested in animals and humans in an attempt to improve the aneurysm-healing process; these modifications have met with variable levels of success. In this review, we summarize the histopathologic and molecular biology of aneurysm healing and discuss how these findings have been applied in an attempt to improve angiographic outcomes in patients with intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25430855

  13. Popliteal aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Farina, C; Cavallaro, A; Schultz, R D; Feldhaus, R J; di Marzo, L

    1989-07-01

    A 15 year experience with 50 popliteal aneurysms in 36 patients is reviewed. Forty-seven popliteal aneurysms were atherosclerotic while three were related to entrapment of the popliteal artery. Fourteen asymptomatic popliteal aneurysms were observed preoperatively during a mean period of 26 months. Ischemic complications developed in five of these. At admission, 16 limbs were asymptomatic (group 1) while the other 34 limbs presented with ischemic symptoms (group 2). No operation was performed upon three limbs, and another two were surgically explored and amputated. No operative deaths resulted from 45 vascular reconstructions. Results from follow-up study of one to 176 months (a mean of 57 months) revealed a late patency rate of 62 per cent. The late patency rate of autologous saphenous vein (ASV) was 100 per cent; polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and Dacron (polyester fiber) grafts had a patency rate of 74 and 34 per cent, respectively (ASV versus PTFE, p = N.S.; ASV versus Dacron, p less than 0.002). The rate of late salvage of limbs was 88 per cent. The bypass grafts of group 1 and those performed upon limbs with good runoff fared significantly better than others (p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.001). The risk of natural complications of popliteal aneurysms and the good results from surgical treatment suggested that a revascularization procedure in the asymptomatic stage is always recommended. The use of PTFE grafts for repair of popliteal aneurysms is justified when the ASV is not available. The use of Dacron grafts is no longer indicated. PMID:2740973

  14. In vivo molecular MRI of cell survival and teratoma formation following embryonic stem cell transplantation into the injured murine myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaehoon; Kee, Kehkooi; Barral, Joëlle K.; Dash, Rajesh; Kosuge, Hisanori; Wang, Xi; Weissman, Irving; Robbins, Robert C.; Nishimura, Dwight; Quertermous, Thomas; Reijo-Pera, Renee A.; Yang, Phillip C.

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have shown the potential to restore cardiac function after myocardial injury. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) have been widely employed to label ESCs for cellular MRI. However, non-specific intracellular accumulation of SPIO limits long-term in vivo assessment of the transplanted cells. To overcome this limitation, a novel reporter gene (RG) has been developed to express antigens on the ESC surface. By employing SPIO-conjugated monoclonal antibody against these antigens (SPIO-MAb), the viability of transplanted ESCs can be detected in vivo. This study aims to develop a new molecular MRI method to assess in vivo ESC viability, proliferation, and teratoma formation. The RG is designed to express 2 antigens (hemagglutinin A and myc) and luciferase on the ESC surface. The two antigens serve as the molecular targets for SPIO-MAb. The human and mouse ESCs were transduced with the RG (ESC-RGs) and transplanted into the peri-infarct area using the murine myocardial injury model. In vivo MRI was performed following serial intravenous administration of SPIO-MAb. Significant hypointense signal was generated from the viable and proliferating ESCs and subsequent teratoma. This novel molecular MRI technique enabled in vivo detection of early ESC-derived teratoma formation in the injured murine myocardium. PMID:21604295

  15. A Case of Glucocorticoid Remediable Aldosteronism and Thoracoabdominal Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Shahrrava, Anahita; Moinuddin, Sunnan; Boddu, Prajwal; Shah, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid remediable aldosteronism (GRA) is rare familial form of primary aldosteronism characterized by a normalization of hypertension with the administration of glucocorticoids. We present a case of GRA and thoracoabdominal aneurysm complicated by multiple aortic dissections requiring complex surgical and endovascular repairs. Registry studies have shown a high rate of intracranial aneurysms in GRA patients with high case fatality rates. The association of thoracoabdominal aneurysms with GRA has not been described, thus far, in literature. Studies have shown that high tissue aldosterone levels concomitant with salt intake have a significant role in the pathogenesis of aneurysms and this may explain the formation of aneurysms in the intracranial vasculature and aorta. The association of GRA with thoracic aortic aneurysms needs to be further studied to develop screening recommendations for early identification and optimal treatment. Also, the early use of mineralocorticoid antagonists may have a significant preventive and attenuating effect in aneurysm formation, an association which needs to be confirmed in future studies. PMID:27366333

  16. Deficiency of endogenous acute phase serum amyloid A protects apoE−/− mice from angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    PubMed Central

    Webb, NR; De Beer, MC; Wroblewski, JM; Ji, A; Bailey, W; Shridas, P; Charnigo, RJ; Noffsinger, VP; Witta, J; Howatt, DA; Balakrishnan, A; Rateri, DL; Daugherty, A; De Beer, FC

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), a major cause of death in the aged population, is characterized by vascular inflammation and matrix degradation. Serum amyloid A (SAA), an acute phase reactant linked to inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase induction, correlates with aortic dimensions before aneurysm formation in humans. We investigated whether SAA deficiency in mice impacts AAA formation during angiotensin II (AngII) infusion. Approach and Results Plasma SAA increased ~60-fold in apoE−/− mice 24 hours after i.p. AngII injection (100 μg/kg; n = 4) and ~15-fold after chronic 28-day AngII infusion (1,000 ng/kg/min; n = 9). AAA incidence and severity after 28-day AngII infusion was significantly reduced in apoE−/− mice lacking both acute phase SAA isoforms (SAAKO; n = 20) compared to apoE−/− mice (SAAWT; n = 20) as assessed by in vivo ultrasound and ex vivo morphometric analyses, despite a significant increase in systolic blood pressure in SAAKO mice compared to SAAWT mice after AngII infusion. Atherosclerotic lesion area of the aortic arch was similar in SAAKO and SAAWT mice after 28-day AngII infusion. Immunostaining detected SAA in AAA tissues of AngII-infused SAAWT mice that co-localized with macrophages, elastin breaks, and enhanced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. MMP-2 activity was significantly lower in aortas of SAAKO mice compared to SAAWT mice after 10-day AngII infusion. Conclusion Lack of endogenous acute phase SAA protects against experimental AAA through a mechanism that may involve reduced MMP-2 activity. PMID:25745063

  17. Recoupling of eNOS with Folic Acid Prevents Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation in Angiotensin II-Infused Apolipoprotein E Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Kin Lung; Miao, Xiao Niu; Cai, Hua

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that eNOS uncoupling mediates abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation in hph-1 mice. In the present study we examined whether recoupling of eNOS prevents AAA formation in a well-established model of Angiotensin II-infused apolipoprotein E (apoE) null mice by targeting some common pathologies of AAA. Infusion of Ang II resulted in a 92% incidence rate of AAA in the apoE null animals. In a separate group, animals were treated orally with folic acid (FA), which is known to recouple eNOS through augmentation of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) function. This resulted in a reduction of AAA rate to 19.5%. Imaging with ultrasound showed that FA markedly inhibited expansion of abdominal aorta. FA also abolished elastin breakdown and macrophage infiltration in the AAA animals. The eNOS uncoupling activity, assessed by L-NAME-sensitive superoxide production, was minimal at baseline but greatly exaggerated with Ang II infusion, which was completely attenuated by FA. This was accompanied by markedly improved tetrahydrobiopterin and nitric oxide bioavailability. Furthermore, the expression and activity of DHFR was decreased in Ang II-infused apoE null mice specifically in the endothelial cells, while FA administration resulted in its recovery. Taken together, these data further establish a significant role of uncoupled eNOS in mediating AAA formation, and a universal efficacy of FA in preventing AAA formation via restoration of DHFR to restore eNOS function. PMID:24558445

  18. An integrated framework to quantitatively link mouse-specific hemodynamics to aneurysm formation in angiotensin II-infused ApoE -/- mice.

    PubMed

    Trachet, Bram; Renard, Marjolijn; De Santis, Gianluca; Staelens, Steven; De Backer, Julie; Antiga, Luca; Loeys, Bart; Segers, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    Locally disturbed flow has been suggested to play a (modulating) role in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation, but no longitudinal studies have been performed yet due to (a.o.) a lack of human data prior to AAA formation. In this study we made use of recent advances in small animal imaging technology in order to set up entirely mouse-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the abdominal aorta in an established ApoE -/- mouse model of AAA formation, combining (i) in vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT scans (geometrical model) and (ii) in vivo high-frequency ultrasound scans (boundary conditions). Resulting areas of disturbed flow at baseline were compared to areas of AAA at end-stage. Qualitative results showed that AAA dimension is maximal in areas that are situated proximal to those areas that experience most disturbed flow in three out of four S developing an AAA. Although further quantitative analysis did not reveal any obvious relationship between areas that experience most disturbed flow and the end-stage AAA dimensions, we cannot exclude that hemodynamics play a role in the initial phases of AAA formation. Due to its mouse-specific and in vivo nature, the presented methodology can be used in future research to link detailed and animal-specific (baseline) hemodynamics to (end-stage) arterial disease in longitudinal studies in mice. PMID:21614649

  19. How Is an Aneurysm Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. How Is an Aneurysm Treated? Aortic aneurysms are treated with medicines and surgery. Small aneurysms ... doing your normal daily activities Treatment for an aortic aneurysm is based on its size. Your doctor may ...

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Susceptibility Genes Associated with Coronary Artery Aneurysm Formation in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Yu, Hong-Ren; Huang, Fu-Chen; Jiao, Fuyong; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Andrade, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) or Kawasaki syndrome is known as a vasculitis of small to medium-sized vessels, and coronary arteries are predominantly involved in childhood. Generally, 20–25% of untreated with IVIG and 3–5% of treated KD patients have been developed coronary artery lesions (CALs), such as dilatation and aneurysm. Understanding how coronary artery aneurysms (CAAs) are established and maintained in KD patients is therefore of great importance. Upon our previous genotyping data of 157 valid KD subjects, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been conducted among 11 (7%) CAA-developed KD patients to reveal five significant genetic variants passed pre-defined thresholds and resulted in two novel susceptibility protein-coding genes, which are NEBL (rs16921209 (P = 7.44 × 10−9; OR = 32.22) and rs7922552 (P = 8.43 × 10−9; OR = 32.0)) and TUBA3C (rs17076896 (P = 8.04 × 10−9; OR = 21.03)). Their known functions have been reported to associate with cardiac muscle and tubulin, respectively. As a result, this might imply their putative roles of establishing CAAs during KD progression. Additionally, various model analyses have been utilized to determine dominant and recessive inheritance patterns of identified susceptibility mutations. Finally, all susceptibility genes hit by significant genetic variants were further investigated and the top three representative gene-ontology (GO) clusters were regulation of cell projection organization, neuron recognition, and peptidyl-threonine phosphorylation. Our results help to depict the potential routes of the pathogenesis of CAAs in KD patients and will facilitate researchers to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of KD in personalized medicine. PMID:27171184

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Susceptibility Genes Associated with Coronary Artery Aneurysm Formation in Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Li, Sung-Chou; Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Yu, Hong-Ren; Huang, Fu-Chen; Jiao, Fuyong; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Andrade, Jorge; Chan, Wen-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) or Kawasaki syndrome is known as a vasculitis of small to medium-sized vessels, and coronary arteries are predominantly involved in childhood. Generally, 20-25% of untreated with IVIG and 3-5% of treated KD patients have been developed coronary artery lesions (CALs), such as dilatation and aneurysm. Understanding how coronary artery aneurysms (CAAs) are established and maintained in KD patients is therefore of great importance. Upon our previous genotyping data of 157 valid KD subjects, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been conducted among 11 (7%) CAA-developed KD patients to reveal five significant genetic variants passed pre-defined thresholds and resulted in two novel susceptibility protein-coding genes, which are NEBL (rs16921209 (P = 7.44 × 10-9; OR = 32.22) and rs7922552 (P = 8.43 × 10-9; OR = 32.0)) and TUBA3C (rs17076896 (P = 8.04 × 10-9; OR = 21.03)). Their known functions have been reported to associate with cardiac muscle and tubulin, respectively. As a result, this might imply their putative roles of establishing CAAs during KD progression. Additionally, various model analyses have been utilized to determine dominant and recessive inheritance patterns of identified susceptibility mutations. Finally, all susceptibility genes hit by significant genetic variants were further investigated and the top three representative gene-ontology (GO) clusters were regulation of cell projection organization, neuron recognition, and peptidyl-threonine phosphorylation. Our results help to depict the potential routes of the pathogenesis of CAAs in KD patients and will facilitate researchers to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of KD in personalized medicine. PMID:27171184

  2. Swine Hybrid Aneurysm Model for Endovascular Surgery Training

    PubMed Central

    Namba, K.; Mashio, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Higaki, A.; Nemoto, S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to develop a technically simple swine aneurysm-training model by inserting a silicone aneurysm circuit in the cervical vessels. A silicone aneurysm circuit was created by designing multiple aneurysms in size and configuration on a silicone vessel. Five swine underwent surgical implantation of this circuit in the cervical vessels: one end in the common carotid artery and the other in the external jugular vein. Using this model, an aneurysm coiling procedure was simulated under fluoroscopic guidance, roadmapping and digital subtraction angiography. Creating an aneurysm model for training purposes by this method was technically simple and enabled the formation of a wide variety of aneurysms in a single procedure. The quality of the model was uniform and the model was reproducible. Coiling training using this model resembled a realistic clinical situation. The swine hybrid aneurysm-training model was advantageous from the standpoint of technical simplicity in the creation and variety of aneurysms it provided. The swine hybrid aneurysm model may be an additional option for aneurysm coiling training. PMID:23693037

  3. Swine hybrid aneurysm model for endovascular surgery training.

    PubMed

    Namba, K; Mashio, K; Kawamura, Y; Higaki, A; Nemoto, S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a technically simple swine aneurysm-training model by inserting a silicone aneurysm circuit in the cervical vessels. A silicone aneurysm circuit was created by designing multiple aneurysms in size and configuration on a silicone vessel. Five swine underwent surgical implantation of this circuit in the cervical vessels: one end in the common carotid artery and the other in the external jugular vein. Using this model, an aneurysm coiling procedure was simulated under fluoroscopic guidance, roadmapping and digital subtraction angiography. Creating an aneurysm model for training purposes by this method was technically simple and enabled the formation of a wide variety of aneurysms in a single procedure. The quality of the model was uniform and the model was reproducible. Coiling training using this model resembled a realistic clinical situation. The swine hybrid aneurysm-training model was advantageous from the standpoint of technical simplicity in the creation and variety of aneurysms it provided. The swine hybrid aneurysm model may be an additional option for aneurysm coiling training. PMID:23693037

  4. Peptide-induced de novo bone formation after tooth extraction prevents alveolar bone loss in a murine tooth extraction model.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Ono, Takashi; Murali, Ramachandran; Mise-Omata, Setsuko; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-07-01

    Tooth extraction causes bone resorption of the alveolar bone volume. Although recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) markedly promotes de novo bone formation after tooth extraction, the application of high-dose rhBMP-2 may induce side effects, such as swelling, seroma, and an increased cancer risk. Therefore, reduction of the necessary dose of rhBMP-2 which can still obtain sufficient bone mass is necessary by developing a new osteogenic reagent. Recently, we showed that the systemic administration of OP3-4 peptide, which was originally designed as a bone resorption inhibitor, had osteogenic ability both in vitro and in vivo. This study evaluated the ability of the local application of OP3-4 peptide to promote bone formation in a murine tooth extraction model with a very low-dose of BMP. The mandibular incisor was extracted from 10-week-old C57BL6/J male mice and a gelatin hydrogel containing rhBMP-2 with or without OP3-4 peptide (BMP/OP3-4) was applied to the socket of the incisor. Bone formation inside the socket was examined radiologically and histologically at 21 days after the extraction. The BMP/OP3-4-group showed significant bone formation inside the mandibular extraction socket compared to the gelatin-hydrogel-carrier-control group or rhBMP-2-applied group. The BMP/OP3-4-applied mice showed a lower reduction of alveolar bone and fewer osteoclast numbers, suggesting that the newly formed bone inside the socket may prevent resorption of the cortical bone around the extraction socket. Our data revealed that OP3-4 peptide promotes BMP-mediated bone formation inside the extraction socket of mandibular bone, resulting in preservation from the loss of alveolar bone. PMID:27118173

  5. Genetic variants in PLCB4/PLCB1 as susceptibility loci for coronary artery aneurysm formation in Kawasaki disease in Han Chinese in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Ju; Chang, Jeng-Sheng; Liu, Xiang; Tsang, Hsinyi; Chien, Wen-Kuei; Chen, Jin-Hua; Hsieh, Hsin-Yang; Hsueh, Kai-Chung; Shiao, Yi-Tzone; Li, Ju-Pi; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lai, Chih-Ho; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lin, Ting-Hsu; Liao, Chiu-Chu; Huang, Shao-Mei; Lan, Yu-Ching; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Liang, Wen-Miin; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lin, Jung-Chun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, inflammatory, and self-limited vasculitis affecting infants and young children. Coronary artery aneurysm (CAA) formation is the major complication of KD and the leading cause of acquired cardiovascular disease among children. To identify susceptible loci that might predispose patients with KD to CAA formation, a genome-wide association screen was performed in a Taiwanese KD cohort. Patients with both KD and CAA had longer fever duration and delayed intravenous immunoglobulin treatment time. After adjusting for these factors, 100 susceptibility loci were identified. Four genes were identified from a single cluster of 35 using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) Knowledge Base. Silencing KCNQ5, PLCB1, PLCB4, and PLCL1 inhibited the effect of lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial cell inflammation with varying degrees of proinflammatory cytokine expression. PLCB1 showed the most significant inhibition. Endothelial cell inflammation was also inhibited by using a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs6140791 was identified between PLCB4 and PLCB1. Plasma PLC levels were higher in patients with KD and CC+CG rs6140791genotypes, and these genotypes were more prevalent in patients with KD who also had CAA. Our results suggest that polymorphism of the PLCB4/B1 genes might be involved in the CAA pathogenesis of KD. PMID:26434682

  6. Zinc Prevents Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Induction of A20-Mediated Suppression of NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shu-Ling; Hou, Wei-Jian; Li, Xiang; Tong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and degradation of elastin are the main processes in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Recent studies show that zinc has an anti-inflammatory effect. Based on these, zinc may render effective therapy for the treatment of the AAA. Currently, we want to investigate the effects of zinc on AAA progression and its related molecular mechanism. Rat AAA models were induced by periaortic application of CaCl2. AAA rats were treated by daily intraperitoneal injection of ZnSO4 or vehicle alone. The aorta segments were collected at 4 weeks after surgery. The primary rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were stimulated with TNF-α alone or with ZnSO4 for 3 weeks. The results showed that zinc supplementation significantly suppressed the CaCl2-induced expansion of the abdominal aortic diameter, as well as a preservation of medial elastin fibers in the aortas. Zinc supplementation also obviously attenuated infiltration of the macrophages and lymphocytes in the aortas. In addition, zinc reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 production in the aortas. Most importantly, zinc treatment significantly induced A20 expression, along with inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway in vitro in VSMCs and in vivo in rat AAA. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that zinc supplementation could prevent the development of rat experimental AAA by induction of A20-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway. PMID:26918963

  7. Zinc Prevents Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Induction of A20-Mediated Suppression of NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ya-Wei; Fan, Jun; Bai, Shu-Ling; Hou, Wei-Jian; Li, Xiang; Tong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and degradation of elastin are the main processes in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Recent studies show that zinc has an anti-inflammatory effect. Based on these, zinc may render effective therapy for the treatment of the AAA. Currently, we want to investigate the effects of zinc on AAA progression and its related molecular mechanism. Rat AAA models were induced by periaortic application of CaCl2. AAA rats were treated by daily intraperitoneal injection of ZnSO4 or vehicle alone. The aorta segments were collected at 4 weeks after surgery. The primary rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were stimulated with TNF-α alone or with ZnSO4 for 3 weeks. The results showed that zinc supplementation significantly suppressed the CaCl2-induced expansion of the abdominal aortic diameter, as well as a preservation of medial elastin fibers in the aortas. Zinc supplementation also obviously attenuated infiltration of the macrophages and lymphocytes in the aortas. In addition, zinc reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 production in the aortas. Most importantly, zinc treatment significantly induced A20 expression, along with inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway in vitro in VSMCs and in vivo in rat AAA. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that zinc supplementation could prevent the development of rat experimental AAA by induction of A20-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway. PMID:26918963

  8. Acute and chronic complications of laser angioplasty: vascular wall damage and formation of aneurysms in the atherosclerotic rabbit.

    PubMed

    Lee, G; Ikeda, R M; Theis, J H; Chan, M C; Stobbe, D; Ogata, C; Kumagai, A; Mason, D T

    1984-01-15

    Acute and chronic vascular responses to laser exposure in atherosclerotic rabbits were studied. In 7 rabbits fed an atherogenic diet for 3 to 5 months before the study to induce aortic atherosclerosis, a flexible quartz fiber, 400 micron core diameter, attached to an argon ion laser was passed anterogradely or retrogradely to the atherosclerotic ascending aorta. The laser was turned on using power intensities of 1 to 2 W for 3 seconds. After laser treatment, the aortas were studied acutely in 3 rabbits and chronically in 4 rabbits after recovery for 1 to 14 days. In 2 rabbits studied acutely, the argon laser produced a vaporized crater within the atherosclerotic plaque at the endothelial surface; however, in 1 there was also vascular damage extending deep into the medial layer. In addition, aortic aneurysm with muscular wall damage occurred in 2 of the 4 animals studied chronically. Thus, vascular complications may arise when catheter laser angioplasty is randomly applied without visualizing specific plaque targets or without using safe dose increments of power intensities and durations of exposure. This study suggests caution in the clinical use of intensive phototherapy to cardiovascular lesions and stresses the need for further understanding of laser vascular consequences before application of laser angioplasty in patients. PMID:6695725

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Multiple HIV-related Aneurysms Using Multilayer Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Euringer, Wulf; Suedkamp, Michael; Rylski, Bartosz; Blanke, Philipp

    2012-08-15

    Complex peripheral aneurysm anatomy with major artery branches in the immediate vicinity and mycotic aneurysm often impede endovascular management using covered stent grafts. The Cardiatis Multilayer Stent (Cardiatis, Isnes, Belgium) is a recently approved innovative stent system for peripheral aneurysm management. Its multilayer design aims at decreasing mean velocity and vorticity within the aneurysm sac to cause thrombus formation while maintaining patency of branching vessels due to laminar flow. We present a case of bilateral subclavian artery aneurysms and perivisceral aortic aneurysms in an AIDS patient successfully treated with the Cardiatis Multilayer Stent at 18 months' follow-up.

  10. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss of nerve function may indicate that an aneurysm may be causing pressure on adjacent brain tissue. ... changes or other neurological changes can indicate the aneurysm has ruptured and is bleeding into the brain. ...

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ... blood pressure Male gender Genetic factors An abdominal aortic aneurysm is most often seen in males over age ...

  12. New bone formation by murine osteoprogenitor cells cultured on corticocancellous allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ehren R; Huang, Zhinong; Ma, Ting; Lindsey, Derek; Jacobs, Christopher; Smith, Robert L; Goodman, Stuart B

    2008-12-01

    The gold standard for bone grafting in orthopedics is autograft, however autograft has a limited supply and is associated with significant morbidity at the harvest site. One alternative, allograft bone, provides an osteoconductive scaffold, is in less limited supply, and it does not require a harvest from the patient. However, allograft lacks both osteogenic cells and osteoinductive proteins that make autograft bone so advantageous. This study provides a model to investigate strategies for augmentation of corticocancellous allograft bone discs with bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells (OPCs) plus exogenous growth factors in vitro. In this model, allograft bone discs were created by cutting 1-mm thick slices from the distal femur and proximal tibia of euthanized mice. The allografts were sterilized and scanned by micro-computed tomography (microCT) to provide the pre-culture graft volume and trabecular characteristics. The discs were then seeded with OPCs harvested from murine bone marrow. The seeded grafts were placed in organ culture until harvest, after which they were re-scanned by microCT and the data compared to the corresponding pre-culture data. In addition, bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7, also know as osteogenic protein-1 or OP-1), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and OP-1 combined with bFGF were added on a daily basis to the cultures. After final microCT scanning, all grafts were sectioned and evaluated histologically after hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. microCT scans of cultured allografts with cells at 3, 5, and 9 weeks showed a time-dependent, statistically significant increase in bone volume. The trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.) of grafts, from both groups that were augmented with OP-1, showed a statistically significant increase in trabecular thickness of allografts with OPCs. These data suggest that bone marrow-derived OPCs adhere to, and produce, new bone on corticocancellous allograft in vitro. When exogenous OP-1 is added to

  13. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Michael B.; Orner, Caitlin A.; Bawany, Fatima; Awad, Hani A.; Hammert, Warren C.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Loiselle, Alayna E.

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1) expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1). Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism would improve the

  14. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Geary, Michael B; Orner, Caitlin A; Bawany, Fatima; Awad, Hani A; Hammert, Warren C; O'Keefe, Regis J; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1) expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1). Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism would improve the

  15. Recurrent cerebral aneurysm formation and rupture within a short period due to invasive aspergillosis of the nasal sinus; pathological analysis of the catastrophic clinical course.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Yuki; Miyawaki, Satoru; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Okano, Atsushi; Imai, Hideaki; Shin, Masahiro; Sato, Kazuya; Tsuchida, Takeyuki; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Terao, Yasuo; Numakura, Satoe; Morikawa, Teppei; Shibahara, Junji; Kikuta, Shu; Kondo, Kenji; Tatsuno, Keita; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Tsuji, Shoji; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Destructive infiltration of invasive fungal sinusitis can easily occur into the central nervous system (CNS). Cerebral aneurysms associated with fungal infection are highly vulnerable to rupture, and can frequently and rapidly take a serious clinical course. We experienced a patient who twice developed cerebral aneurysm followed by rupture due to invasive fugal sinusitis. This 77-year-old man was admitted for progressive bilateral visual disturbance, which was initially treated as idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis. The patient subsequently suffered subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) twice in only 12 days. Both SAH originated from different newly formed cerebral aneurysms. Trapping was performed for both ruptured aneurysms. Pathological examination of the resected aneurysms indicated the presence of fungi determined to be Aspergillus. This Aspergillus infection was also discovered inside the frontal sinus by endoscopic biopsy, so a regimen of antifungal agents was instituted. Prolonged antifungal therapy caused renal impairment, which ultimately led to the patient's death. Autopsy detected no mycotic infiltration of the major cerebral arteries, except for the 2 ruptured cerebral aneurysms. However, prolonged mycosis of the CNS, such as in the deep part in the falx cerebri and in the small veins proximal to the tentorium cerebelli, was observed, indicating that mycosis invading the cranium is refractory even to long-term administration of antifungal agents. The present case strongly suggests that urgent and proactive definitive diagnosis is essential to successfully treat invasive paranasal sinus aspergillosis. If infiltration of the CNS is suspected, early surgical resection and antifungal therapy must be initiated immediately. PMID:26722566

  16. Celiac Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, D. Michael; McBride, Michael; Livesay, James J.; Dougherty, Kathryn G.; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2006-01-01

    Aneurysm of the celiac artery is an uncommon clinical problem; fewer than 180 cases have been reported in the world medical literature. Most patients are symptomatic at the time of diagnosis. However, occasionally such aneurysms are detected incidentally during diagnostic imaging for other diseases. We present the case of a 72-year-old man who had an asymptomatic celiac artery aneurysm detected by computed tomographic angiography after endoluminal exclusion of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm. The patient underwent successful resection of the aneurysm and revascularization of the aorta–common hepatic and splenic arteries with use of an autologous saphenous vein graft. PMID:16878636

  17. [Idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Uehara, Mayuko; Kuroda, Yosuke; Ohori, Syunsuke; Mawatari, Toru; Morishita, Kiyofumi

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary trunk aneurysm is generally associated with congenital cardiac defects, pulmonary hypertension, or infection. Idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm without any associated diseases is a rare lesion and has seldom been reported. Here, we report a case of a 68-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm. The maximum diameter of the aneurysm was 53 mm while she was 142 cm in height. We successfully performed aneurysmorrhaphy and her postoperative course was uneventful. Aneurysmorrhaphy was an effective technique for idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm without pulmonary hypertention. PMID:20662238

  18. Mechano-rheological properties of the murine thrombus determined via nanoindentation and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Slaboch, Constance L; Alber, Mark S; Rosen, Elliot D; Ovaert, Timothy C

    2012-06-01

    Deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and abdominal aortic aneurysms are blood-related diseases that represent a major public health problem. These diseases are characterized by the formation of a thrombus (i.e., blood clot) that either blocks a major artery or causes an aortic rupture. Identifying the mechanical properties of thrombi can help determine when these incidents will occur. In this investigation, a murine thrombus, formed from platelet-rich plasma, calcium, and thrombin, was nanoindented and the elastic modulus was estimated via elastic contact theory. This information was used as input to an inverse finite element simulation, which determined optimal values for the elastic modulus and viscosity of the thrombus using a viscoelastic material model. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to determine which material parameters have the greatest affect on the simulation. Results from this investigation demonstrate the feasibility of the mechanical characterization of a murine thrombus using nanoindentation. PMID:22520420

  19. Ruptured Gastric Aneurysm in α-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Scott Gallacher, T.

    2016-01-01

    We present a unique vascular complication of α-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) in a patient with an acute onset of epigastric pain and hemodynamic instability. Abdominal computed tomography angiography detected hemoperitoneum and hematoma within the gastrohepatic ligament with active extravasation. Abdominal angiography revealed left gastric aneurysms. An association between AATD and vascular aneurysms has been suggested to be secondary to unopposed proteolytic activity against arterial structural proteins. The aneurysm formation in aortic, superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic arteries has been reported. We report the first case with ruptured gastric artery aneurysm as a complication of AATD. PMID:27622197

  20. Ruptured Gastric Aneurysm in α-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jaruvongvanich, Veeravich; Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Scott Gallacher, T

    2016-07-01

    We present a unique vascular complication of α-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) in a patient with an acute onset of epigastric pain and hemodynamic instability. Abdominal computed tomography angiography detected hemoperitoneum and hematoma within the gastrohepatic ligament with active extravasation. Abdominal angiography revealed left gastric aneurysms. An association between AATD and vascular aneurysms has been suggested to be secondary to unopposed proteolytic activity against arterial structural proteins. The aneurysm formation in aortic, superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic arteries has been reported. We report the first case with ruptured gastric artery aneurysm as a complication of AATD. PMID:27622197

  1. Giant syphilitic aortic aneurysm: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tomey, Matthew I; Murthy, Venkatesh L; Beckman, Joshua A

    2011-10-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm formation is a known complication of late syphilis. Large aneurysms may cause symptoms via mass effect. When aneurysms compress the pulmonary artery, pulmonary arterial hypertension and right heart failure may result. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented with right heart failure secondary to an 11-cm syphilitic thoracic aortic aneurysm, and discuss the evolving epidemiology, complications, diagnosis and management of syphilitic aortitis. PMID:21844068

  2. Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations/Fistulas Embolization of brain aneurysms ... Aneurysms and Fistulas? What is Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? Embolization of brain aneurysms and arteriovenous ...

  3. Genetic factors involves in intracranial aneurysms – actualities

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, D; Munteanu, V; Coman, T; Ciurea, AV

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a common vascular disorder, which frequently leads to fatal vascular rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although various acquired risk factors associated with IAs have been identified, heritable conditions are associated with IAs formation but these syndromes account for less than 1% of all IAs in the population. Cerebral aneurysm disease is related to hemodynamic and genetic factors, associated with structural weakness in the arterial wall, which was acquired by a specific, often unknown, event. Possibly, the trigger moment of aneurysm formation may depend on the dynamic arterial growth, which is closely related to aging/ atherosclerosis. Genetic factors are known to have an important role in IA pathogenesis. Literature data provide complementary evidence that the variants on chromosomes 8q and 9p are associated with IA and that the risk of IA in patients with these variants is greatly increased with cigarette smoking. Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5-10% of the population). In comparison with sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located in the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Abbreviations: DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid, FIA = familial Intracranial Aneurysm, GWAS = genome-wide association studies, IL-6 = interleukin-6, ISUIA = International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms, IA = Intracranial aneurysm, mRNA = Messager ribonucleic acid, SNPs = single-nucleotide polymorphisms, SMCs = smooth muscle cells, sIAs = sporadic IAs, SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage, TNF-α = tumor necrosis factor-alpha, COL4A1 = type IV collagen alpha-1 PMID:26351537

  4. Effects of long-term chloroquine administration on the natural history of aortic aneurysms in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Azza; Wheatcroft, Mark D; Quan, Adrian; Singh, Krishna K; Lovren, Fina; Dhingra, Natasha; Teoh, Hwee; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Leong-Poi, Howard; Verma, Subodh

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy regulates cellular homeostasis and integrates the cellular pro-survival machinery. We investigated the role of autophagy in the natural history of murine abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). ApoE(-/-) mice were implanted with saline- or angiotensin II (Ang-II)-filled miniosmotic pumps then treated with either the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ; 50 mg·(kg body mass)(-1)·day(-1), by intraperitoneal injection) or saline. Ang-II-elicited aneurysmal expansion of the suprarenal aorta coupled with thrombus formation were apparent 8 weeks later. CQ had no impact on the incidence (50% for Ang-II compared with 46.2% for Ang-II + CQ; P = NS) and categorical distribution of aneurysms. The markedly reduced survival rate observed with Ang-II (57.1% for Ang-II compared with 100% for saline; P < 0.05) was unaffected by CQ (61.5% for Ang-II + CQ; P = NS compared with Ang-II). CQ did not affect the mean maximum suprarenal aortic diameter (1.91 ± 0.19 mm for Ang-II compared with 1.97 ± 0.21 mm for Ang-II + CQ; P = NS). Elastin fragmentation, collagen accumulation, and smooth muscle attrition, which were higher in Ang-II-treated mice, were unaffected by CQ treatment. Long-term CQ administration does not affect the natural history and prognosis of experimental AAA, suggesting that global loss of autophagy is unlikely to be a causal factor in the development of aortic aneurysms. Manipulation of autophagy as a mechanism to reduce AAA may need re-evaluation. PMID:26099030

  5. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a fungal aneurysm of the vertebral artery as a complication of intracranial aneurysm clipping. Case report.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, W P; Pilz, P; Chuang, I H

    1990-12-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are an uncommon manifestation of fungal infection. A case is described in which the formation of an aneurysm followed an intracranial intraoperative Aspergillus infection attributable to a long period of preoperative antibiotic medication and immunosuppressive therapy with steroids. PMID:2230983

  6. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000236.htm Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular - discharge To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. AAA repair - endovascular - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular - discharge; EVAR - discharge; Endovascular aneurysm repair - discharge ...

  7. P-body formation limits proinflammatory cytokine synthesis in endotoxin tolerant monocytes and murine septic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Clara; Brudecki, Laura; Yao, Zhi Q.; McCall, Charles E.; Gazzar, Mohamed El

    2015-01-01

    An anti-inflammatory phenotype with pronounced immunosuppression develops during sepsis, during which time neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages limit their toll-like receptor 4 responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS/endotoxin). We previously reported that during this endotoxin tolerant state, distinct signaling pathways differentially repress transcription and translation of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IL-6. Sustained endotoxin tolerance contributes to sepsis mortality. While transcription repression requires chromatin modifications, a translational repressor complex of Ago2 and RBM4, which bind the 3’ UTR of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA, limits protein synthesis. Here, we show that Dcp1 supports the assembly of Ago2 and RBM4 repressor complex into cytoplasmic p-bodies in endotoxin-tolerant THP-1 human monocytes following stimulation with LPS, resulting in translational repression and limiting protein synthesis. Importantly, this translocation process is reversed by Dcp1 knockdown, which restores TNFα and IL-6 protein levels. We also find this translational repression mechanism in primary macrophages of septic mice. Because p-body formation is a critical step in mRNA translation repression, we conclude that Dcp1 is a major component of the translational repression machinery of endotoxin tolerance and may contribute to sepsis outcome. PMID:25998849

  8. Immunomodulatory gene therapy prevents antibody formation and lethal hypersensitivity reactions in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2010-02-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 x 10(10) particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement. PMID:19690517

  9. Immunomodulatory Gene Therapy Prevents Antibody Formation and Lethal Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-01-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 × 1010 particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement. PMID:19690517

  10. In Vivo Formation of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance-Detectable Nitric Oxide and of Nitrotyrosine Is Not Impaired during Murine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Selma; Linares, Edlaine; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Von Zuben, Fernando José; Yamada, Aureo; Augusto, Ohara

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for a dual role of nitric oxide (NO) during murine leishmaniasis. To explore this problem, we monitored the formation of NO and its derived oxidants during the course of Leishmania amazonensis infection in tissues of susceptible (BALB/c) and relatively resistant (C57BL/6) mice. NO production was detected directly by low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of animal tissues. Both mouse strains presented detectable levels of hemoglobin nitrosyl (HbNO) complexes and of heme nitrosyl and iron-dithiol-dinitrosyl complexes in the blood and footpad lesions, respectively. Estimation of the nitrosyl complex levels demonstrated that most of the NO is synthesized in the footpad lesions. In agreement, immunohistochemical analysis of the lesions demonstrated the presence of nitrotyrosine in proteins of macrophage vacuoles and parasites. Since macrophages lack myeloperoxidase, peroxynitrite is likely to be the nitrating NO metabolite produced during the infection. The levels of HbNO complexes in the blood reflected changes occurring during the infection such as those in parasite burden and lesion size. The maximum levels of HbNO complexes detected in the blood of susceptible mice were higher than those of C57BL/6 mice but occurred at late stages of infection and were accompanied by the presence of bacteria in the cutaneous lesions. The results indicate that the local production of NO is an important mechanism for the elimination of parasites if it occurs before the parasite burden becomes too high. From then on, elevated production of NO and derived oxidants aggravates the inflammatory process with the occurrence of a hypoxic environment that may favor secondary infections. PMID:9453645

  11. Detection of left ventricular aneurysm on two dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Baur, H R; Daniel, J A; Nelson, R R

    1982-07-01

    The differentiation of left ventricular aneurysm from diffuse left ventricular dilation and hypokinesia may have important therapeutic consequences. Thus the diagnostic accuracy of wide angle two dimensional echocardiography for the detection of left ventricular aneurysm was evaluated in a prospective study of 26 consecutive patients with the clinical suspicion of left ventricular aneurysm referred over a 10 month period. Every patients was examined with two dimensional echocardiography and left ventricular cineangiography, and findings were interpreted by two independent observers. A dilated hypokinetic left ventricle without aneurysm formation on cineangiography in nine patients was identified in all with two dimensional echocardiography. A left ventricular aneurysm on cineangiography in 17 patients was correctly identified in 14 with the two dimensional study, as were the site and extent of the lesion (apical in 12, anterior in 1 and inferior in 1). One apical aneurysm was interpreted on the two dimensional study as apical dyskinesia; one anterior and one posterobasal aneurysm were missed with this technique. Mural thrombi were correctly identified with two dimensional echocardiography in seven of seven patients. It is concluded that two dimensional echocardiography is an accurate noninvasive method that allows differentiation of left ventricular aneurysm from diffuse left ventricular dilation in the majority of patients. It provides information regarding the resectability of the aneurysm and may obviate cineangiography in many cases. PMID:7091001

  12. Cardiac ventricular aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Hugh R. S.

    1969-01-01

    A case of successful excision of a ventricular aneurysm due to myocardial infarction is presented. The aetiology, incidence, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical features, and diagnosis of the condition are discussed. An account is given of the haemodynamic upset caused by aneurysms of the ventricle. The prognosis of untreated aneurysms is discussed. Although there is difference of opinion, it is concluded that a ventricular aneurysm adversely affects the prognosis after myocardial infarction. The indications for, and the mortality and results of, resection of ventricular aneurysms are discussed. The conclusion is drawn that persistent cardiac failure and angina can be relieved and the risk of systemic embolism reduced by the excision of expansile ventricular aneurysms of a fibrous nature. It is possible that excision may also reduce the incidence of subsequent acute myocardial infarction. Images PMID:5821618

  13. Cloning murine antibody V-genes with non-degenerate primers and conversion to a recombinant antibody format.

    PubMed

    Bialon, Magdalena; Schellenberg, Ludmila; Herzog, Nicolas; Kraus, Stefan; Jörißen, Hannah; Fischer, Rainer; Stein, Christoph; Nähring, Jörg; Barth, Stefan; Püttmann, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are produced in cultured hybridoma cell lines, but these cells tend to be unstable; it is therefore necessary to rescue the corresponding genetic information. Here we describe an improved method for the amplification of antibody variable gene (V-gene) information from murine hybridoma cells using a panel of specific, non-degenerate primers. This primer set allows sequences to be rescued from all murine V-genes, except the lambda light chain genes, which rarely contribute to murine immune diversity. We tested the primers against a range of antibodies and recovered specific amplification products in all cases. The heavy and light chain variable regions were subsequently joined by a two-step cloning strategy or by splice overlap extension PCR. PMID:25545205

  14. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, George; Johansen, Kaj

    1984-01-01

    Aneurysms are common in our increasingly elderly population, and are a major threat to life and limb. Until the advent of vascular reconstructive techniques, aneurysm patients were subject to an overwhelming risk of death from exsanguination. The first successful repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using an interposed arterial homograft was reported by Dubost in 1952. A milestone in the evolution of vascular surgery, this event and subsequent diagnostic, operative and prosthetic graft refinements have permitted patients with an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to enjoy a better prognosis than patients with almost any other form of major systemic illness. Images PMID:6702193

  15. Parosteal aneurysmal bone cyst☆

    PubMed Central

    Meohas, Walter; de Sá Lopes, Ana Cristina; da Silveira Möller, João Victor; Barbosa, Luma Duarte; Oliveira, Marcelo Bragança dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of aneurysmal bone cysts is 0.14 cases per 100,000 individuals. Parosteal aneurysmal bone cysts are the least prevalent subtype and represent 7% of all aneurysmal bone cysts. We present the case of a 38-year-old male patient with pain and bulging in his right arm for eight months. He had previously been diagnosed as presenting giant-cell tumor, but his slides were reviewed and his condition was then diagnosed as parosteal aneurysmal bone cyst. The patient was treated with corticosteroid and calcitonin infiltration into the lesion and evolved with clinical and radiological improvement within the first five weeks after the operation. PMID:26535209

  16. Hemodynamic Characteristics Regarding Recanalization of Completely Coiled Aneurysms: Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis Using Virtual Models Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wonhyoung; Song, Yunsun; Park, Kye Jin; Koo, Hae-Won; Yang, Kuhyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hemodynamic factors are considered to play an important role in initiation and progression of the recurrence after endosaccular coiling of the intracranial aneurysms. We made paired virtual models of completely coiled aneurysms which were subsequently recanalized and compared to identify hemodynamic characteristics related to the recurred aneurysmal sac. Materials and Methods We created paired virtual models of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in five aneurysms which were initially regarded as having achieved complete occlusion and then recurred during follow-up. Paired virtual models consisted of the CFD model of 3D rotational angiography obtained in the recurred aneurysm and the control model of the initial, parent artery after artificial removal of the coiled and recanalized aneurysm. Using the CFD analysis of the virtual model, we analyzed the hemodynamic characteristics on the neck of each aneurysm before and after its recurrence. Results High wall shear stress (WSS) was identified at the cross-sectionally identified aneurysm neck at which recurrence developed in all cases. A small vortex formation with relatively low velocity in front of the neck was also identified in four cases. The aneurysm recurrence locations corresponded to the location of high WSS and/or small vortex formation. Conclusion Recanalized aneurysms revealed increased WSS and small vortex formation at the cross-sectional neck of the aneurysm. This observation may partially explain the hemodynamic causes of future recanalization after coil embolization. PMID:26958410

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  18. Aneurysm in the brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → ... JavaScript. An aneurysm is a weak area in the wall of a blood vessel that causes the blood vessel to bulge or balloon out. When an aneurysm occurs in a blood ...

  19. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → ... You had a brain aneurysm. An aneurysm is a weak area in the wall of a blood vessel that bulges or balloons out. Once it reaches a certain size, it ...

  20. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after ‘Ecstasy’ abuse

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2014-01-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or ‘Ecstasy’ has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting ‘Ecstasy’. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2 mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. ‘Ecstasy’ can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision. PMID:24994748

  1. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sangwoo; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Chong-gue

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disorder involving multiple organs. Its cause is still unknown, but vasculitis is the major pathologic characteristic. The common vascular lesions associated with Behçet's disease are aneurysm formation, arterial or venous occlusive diseases, and varices. Arterial aneurysms mostly occur in large arteries. Intracranial aneurysms hardly occur with Behçet's disease. We would like to present a 41-year-old female patient with Behçet's disease who showed symptoms of severe headache due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain computed tomography revealed multiple aneurysms. We also present a literature review of intracranial arterial aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. PMID:27114964

  2. Flow in experimental berry aneurysms: method and model.

    PubMed

    Kerber, C W; Heilman, C B

    1983-01-01

    This study addresses two basic questions: What are the flow dynamics in aneurysms? Can these flows be modified to enhance retention of adhesive? Using Pyrex glass bifurcations, fluid flow was studied in a variety of aneurysms placed at varying positions around the bifurcations. Indicators injected into the slipstreams were recorded and studied both by stop-frame high-speed movie analysis and with 35 mm slides. Even at low-flow rates, a central slipstream strikes the apex of bifurcations, and may be partly responsible for the initial production of berry aneurysms. A low-pressure zone occurs at the lateral angle of bifurcations, probably explaining the formation of endovascular cushions. Flow into symmetrically placed narrow neck aneurysms did not occur. Indicator entered the aneurysm in a turbulent fashion only when there was orifice (lip) asymmetry. Both lip asymmetry and rapid flow favor intraaneurysmal turbulent flow. PMID:6410748

  3. Acquired Jugular Vein Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hopsu, Erkki; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Vento, Seija I.; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Venous malformations of the jugular veins are rare findings. Aneurysms and phlebectasias are the lesions most often reported. We report on an adult patient with an abruptly appearing large tumorous mass on the left side of the neck identified as a jugular vein aneurysm. Upon clinical examination with ultrasound, a lateral neck cyst was primarily suspected. Surgery revealed a saccular aneurysm in intimate connection with the internal jugular vein. Histology showed an organized hematoma inside the aneurysmal sac, which had a focally thinned muscular layer. The terminology and the treatment guidelines of venous dilatation lesions are discussed. For phlebectasias, conservative treatment is usually recommended, whereas for saccular aneurysms, surgical resection is the treatment of choice. While an exact classification based on etiology and pathophysiology is not possible, a more uniform taxonomy would clarify the guidelines for different therapeutic modalities for venous dilatation lesions. PMID:20107571

  4. Internal Carotid Artery Blister-Like Aneurysm Caused by Aspergillus – Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Masaki; Sakurai, Keita; Kawaguchi, Takatsune; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Nakagawa, Motoo; Okita, Kenji; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Blister-like aneurysm of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) is a well-documented cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Generally, this type of aneurysm is associated with various conditions such as hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and ICA dissection. Although Aspergillus is the most common organism causing intracranial fungal aneurysmal formation, there is no report of a blister-like aneurysm caused by Aspergillus infection. Case Report An 83-year-old man received corticosteroid pulse therapy followed by oral steroid therapy for an inflammatory pseudotumor of the clivus. Two months later, the patient was transported to an emergency department due to the diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage, classified as Fisher group 4. Subsequent 3D computed tomography angiogram revealed a blister-like aneurysm at the superior wall of the left ICA. Six days later, the patient died of subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by the left ICA aneurysm rerupture. Autopsy revealed proliferation of Aspergillus hyphae in the wall of the aneurysm. Notably, that change was present more densely in the inner membrane than in the outer one. Thus, it was considered that Aspergillus hyphae caused infectious aneurysm formation in the left ICA via hematogenous seeding rather than direct invasion. Conclusions The blister-like aneurysm is a rare but important cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. This case report documents another cause of blister-like aneurysms, that is an infectious aneurysm associated with Aspergillus infection. PMID:25848441

  5. Sexual intercourse and cerebral aneurysmal rupture: potential mechanisms and precipitants.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Willie, Jon T; Zipfel, Gregory J; Dacey, Ralph G

    2011-04-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a significant cause of death in young and middle-aged individuals and causes tremendous morbidity in affected patients. Despite the identification of various risk factors, the series of events leading to the formation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms is poorly understood. Cerebral aneurysm rupture has been associated with sexual intercourse and other forms of physical exercise. In fact, multiple case series reported that coitus was the immediate preceding activity in 3.8-14.5% of patients suffering from aneurysmal SAH. This may be related to the large elevations in mean arterial blood pressure that occur in both males and females during sexual intercourse (130-175 and 125-160 mm Hg, respectively). While coitus and physical exercise share important physiological similarities, each may differentially affect the probability that a preformed aneurysm will rupture. In this literature review and synthesis, the authors analyze the physiological human response to sexual intercourse in an effort to delineate those factors that may precipitate aneurysmal rupture. The authors' analysis is based on the original data collected by Masters and Johnson. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review to address the link between sexual intercourse and intracranial aneurysmal rupture. While actual measurements of the physiological variables relevant to SAH were not performed in this article, the authors make reasonable assumptions based on the available data to help elucidate the mechanism of sexually induced aneurysmal rupture. PMID:20540599

  6. Intracranial Aneurysms: Review of Current Treatment Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Brad; Tummala, Ramachandra P.; Chow, Ricky; Faridar, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed A.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are present in roughly 5% of the population, yet most are often asymptomatic and never detected. Development of an aneurysm typically occurs during adulthood, while formation and growth are associated with risk factors such as age, hypertension, pre-existing familial conditions, and smoking. Subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common presentation due to aneurysm rupture, represents a serious medical condition often leading to severe neurological deficit or death. Recent technological advances in imaging modalities, along with increased understanding of natural history and prevalence of aneurysms, have increased detection of asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Studies reporting on the risk of rupture and outcomes have provided much insight, but the debate remains of how and when unruptured aneurysms should be managed. Treatment methods include two major intervention options: clipping of the aneurysm and endovascular methods such as coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and flow diversion stents. The studies reviewed here support the generalized notion that endovascular treatment of UIA provides a safe and effective alternative to surgical treatment. The risks associated with endovascular repair are lower and incur shorter hospital stays for appropriately selected patients. The endovascular treatment option should be considered based on factors such as aneurysm size, location, patient medical history, and operator experience. PMID:21779274

  7. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  8. A solitary iliac artery aneurysm caused by Candida infection. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tsunezuka, Y; Urayama, H; Ohtake, H; Watanabe, Y

    1998-08-01

    We report a very rare case of an infected aneurysm of solitary common iliac artery by Candida albicans. The patient, a 70 year-old male, had a history of systemic Candidemia infected through intravenous hyperlimentation (i.v.H) catheter 2 years ago. By physical examinations and laboratory data, infectious disease was suspected. Computed tomography showed right hydronephrosis and right solitary common iliac artery aneurysm, and operation was performed with diagnosis of infected aneurysm. The aneurysm was removed with the end of the abdominal aorta, and the arterial blood flow was restored by axillo-bifemoral bypass. Histopathological findings revealed abscess formation around the aneurysm with phlogocytes infiltration in both outer media of aneurysmal wall and vasa vasorum. Candida albicans was found as causative pathogen from resected specimens. This aneurysm is considered to be resulted from surviving candida in vasa vasorum after previous candidemia. PMID:9788788

  9. Embolization of experimental aneurysms using a heparin-loaded stent graft with micropores

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Shogo; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Ueda-Ishibashi, Hatsue; Matsuda, Takehisa

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: For percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), a heparin-loaded stent graft, composed of a commercially available metallic stent with a microporous and surface-modified thin film, has been developed. Early controlled endothelialization is promoted by a regular array of micropores produced by an excimer laser ablation technique. Early thrombus is prevented by a drug delivery system established by impregnation of photoreactive gelatin with heparin. Our stent grafts were used for embolization of experimental carotid aneurysms with an autologous external jugular vein patch in dogs. Materials and methods: At 1 month after formation, the aneurysms were occluded with stent grafts. Affected arteries were removed with the aneurysms, immediately (two aneurysms in one dog), 1 week (four aneurysms in two dogs), 1 month (three aneurysms in two dogs) and 3 months (four aneurysms in two dogs) after embolization, and were studied histologically to evaluate patency and endothelialization over the intraluminal surface of the thin film. Results: Treated carotid arteries were all patent with occluded aneurysms completely at any periods. Even at 1 week after embolization, endothelialization was confirmed on the surface of the stent graft on the lumen side. At 1 and 3 months, all treated aneurysms with enough patent parent arteries were filled with organized tissues and completely occluded. Conclusion: Our developed stent graft appears to be promising for the treatment of aneurysms, especially with respect to immediate termination of blood inflow and early endothelialization in the neck of the aneurysm.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann Modeling of Thrombosis in Giant Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopard, B.; Ouared, R.; Ruefenacht, D. A.; Yilmaz, H.

    We propose a numerical model of blood flow and blood clotting whose purpose is to describe thrombus formation in cerebral aneurysms. We identify possible mechanisms that can cause occurence of spontaneous thrombosis in unruptured giant intracranial aneurysms. Our main claim is that, under normal conditions, there is a low shear rate threshold below which thrombosis starts and growths. This assumption is supported by several evidences from literature. The proposed mechanisms are incorporated into a Lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for blood flow and platelets adhesion and aggregation. Numerical simulations show that the low shear rate threshold assumption together with aneurysm geometry account well for the observations.

  11. Endovascular treatment of basilar aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Evan S; Ikeda, Daniel S; Shaw, Andrew; Powers, Ciarán J; Sauvageau, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Basilar artery aneurysms account for a small percentage of intracranial aneurysms; however, they are a diverse group of lesions necessitating different treatment techniques for those that are ruptured and unruptured. Basilar apex aneurysms are the most common type and are frequently wide-necked, necessitating stent-assisted coiling or balloon remodeling. Other techniques have evolved to forego stenting in acutely ruptured wide-necked aneurysms. The prevention of delayed thromboembolic complications with dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with stents is critical. After treatment, basilar aneurysms require close follow-up to ensure complete occlusion. Basilar apex aneurysms often require delayed re-treatment, especially when previously ruptured. PMID:24994086

  12. Matricellular protein CCN3 mitigates abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; van der Voort, Dustin; Shi, Hong; Qing, Yulan; Hiraoka, Shuichi; Takemoto, Minoru; Yokote, Koutaro; Moxon, Joseph V.; Norman, Paul; Rittié, Laure; Atkins, G. Brandon; Gerson, Stanton L.; Shi, Guo-Ping; Golledge, Jonathan; Dong, Nianguo; Perbal, Bernard; Prosdocimo, Domenick A.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; however, the mechanisms that are involved in disease initiation and progression are incompletely understood. Extracellular matrix proteins play an integral role in modulating vascular homeostasis in health and disease. Here, we determined that the expression of the matricellular protein CCN3 is strongly reduced in rodent AAA models, including angiotensin II–induced AAA and elastase perfusion–stimulated AAA. CCN3 levels were also reduced in human AAA biopsies compared with those in controls. In murine models of induced AAA, germline deletion of Ccn3 resulted in severe phenotypes characterized by elastin fragmentation, vessel dilation, vascular inflammation, dissection, heightened ROS generation, and smooth muscle cell loss. Conversely, overexpression of CCN3 mitigated both elastase- and angiotensin II–induced AAA formation in mice. BM transplantation experiments suggested that the AAA phenotype of CCN3-deficient mice is intrinsic to the vasculature, as AAA was not exacerbated in WT animals that received CCN3-deficient BM and WT BM did not reduce AAA severity in CCN3-deficient mice. Genetic and pharmacological approaches implicated the ERK1/2 pathway as a critical regulator of CCN3-dependent AAA development. Together, these results demonstrate that CCN3 is a nodal regulator in AAA biology and identify CCN3 as a potential therapeutic target for vascular disease. PMID:26974158

  13. Segmental Aortic Stiffening Contributes to Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Development

    PubMed Central

    Raaz, Uwe; Zöllner, Alexander M.; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Brandt, Moritz; Emrich, Fabian C.; Kayama, Yosuke; Eken, Suzanne; Adam, Matti; Maegdefessel, Lars; Hertel, Thomas; Deng, Alicia; Jagger, Ann; Buerke, Michael; Dalman, Ronald L.; Spin, Joshua M.; Kuhl, Ellen; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stiffening of the aortic wall is a phenomenon consistently observed in age and in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). However, its role in AAA pathophysiology is largely undefined. Methods and Results Using an established murine elastase-induced AAA model, we demonstrate that segmental aortic stiffening (SAS) precedes aneurysm growth. Finite element analysis (FEA) reveals that early stiffening of the aneurysm-prone aortic segment leads to axial (longitudinal) wall stress generated by cyclic (systolic) tethering of adjacent, more compliant wall segments. Interventional stiffening of AAA-adjacent aortic segments (via external application of surgical adhesive) significantly reduces aneurysm growth. These changes correlate with reduced segmental stiffness of the AAA-prone aorta (due to equalized stiffness in adjacent segments), reduced axial wall stress, decreased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), attenuated elastin breakdown, and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines and macrophage infiltration, as well as attenuated apoptosis within the aortic wall. Cyclic pressurization of segmentally stiffened aortic segments ex vivo increases the expression of genes related to inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Finally, human ultrasound studies reveal that aging, a significant AAA risk factor, is accompanied by segmental infrarenal aortic stiffening. Conclusions The present study introduces the novel concept of segmental aortic stiffening (SAS) as an early pathomechanism generating aortic wall stress and triggering aneurysmal growth, thereby delineating potential underlying molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets. In addition, monitoring SAS may aid the identification of patients at risk for AAA. PMID:25904646

  14. Popliteal vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, A; Poncyljusz, W; Zawierucha, D; Kuczmik, W

    2006-06-01

    The incidence of a popliteal vein aneurysm is extremely low. Two cases of this rare venous anomaly are described. The epidemiology, morphology, and diagnostic methods are discussed and the potentially dangerous complications and treatment methods are presented. PMID:16796307

  15. Giant Subclavian Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Counts, Sarah; Zeeshan, Ahmad; Elefteriades, John

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old construction executive presenting with chest pain, shortness of breath, and dizziness on exertion secondary to a giant left subclavian artery aneurysm and aortic valvular disease. PMID:27231430

  16. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... main blood vessel that supplies blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs ... dissection). Symptoms of rupture include: Pain in the abdomen or back. The pain may be severe, sudden, ...

  17. Temporary surgical clipping of flow-diverted arteries in an experimental aneurysm model.

    PubMed

    Darsaut, Tim E; Salazkin, Igor; Gentric, Jean-Christophe; Magro, Elsa; Gevry, Guylaine; Bojanowski, Michel W; Raymond, Jean

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical management of recurrent aneurysms following failed flow diversion may pose difficulties in securing vascular control with temporary clips. The authors tested the efficacy and impact of different types of aneurysm clips on flow-diverted arteries. METHODS Six wide-necked experimental aneurysms were created in canines and treated with Pipeline flow diverters. In 4 aneurysms, occlusion of the artery at the level of the proximal and distal landing zones (n = 2 per aneurysm) was attempted, using temporary, fenestrated, single, and double permanent aneurysm clips. Two aneurysms served as unclipped controls. Serial angiography was performed to investigate the efficacy of clip occlusion, flow diverter deformation, and thrombus formation. After the animals were killed, the flow-diverted aneurysm constructs were opened and photographed to determine neointimal or device damage as a result of clip placement. RESULTS Angiography-confirmed clip occlusion was only possible for 4 of 8 of the tested flow-diverted arterial segments. Clip application attempts led to filling defects consistent with thrombus formation in 2 of 4 flow-diverted constructs, and to minor damage of the flow diverter with neointimal fracture in 1 of 4 cases. CONCLUSIONS Aneurysm clips placed on canine parent arteries bearing a Pipeline flow diverter were unable to reliably stop blood flow. Application of aneurysm clips can cause mild damage to the device and neointima, which might translate into thromboembolic risks. If possible, vascular control should be sought beyond the terminal ends of the implanted device. PMID:26745475

  18. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Francesco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; De Donato, Gianmarco; Benevento, Domenico; Guerrieri, Massimiliano W; Ruzzi, Umberto; Borrelli, Maria P; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has become a milestone in the treatment of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. Technological improvement allows treatment in more and more complex cases. This review summarizes all grafts available on the market. A complete review of most important trial on this topic is provided to the best of our knowledge, and technical tips and tricks for standard cases are also included. PMID:26771730

  20. Pelvic aneurysmal bone cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sharifah, MIA; Nor Hazla, MH; Suraya, A; Tan, SP

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an extremely rare case of a huge aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) in the pelvis, occurring in the patient’s 5th decade of life. The patient presented with a history of painless huge pelvic mass for 10 years. Plain radiograph and computed tomography showed huge expansile lytic lesion arising from the right iliac bone. A biopsy was performed and histology confirmed diagnosis of aneurysmal bone cyst. Unfortunately, the patient succumbed to profuse bleeding from the tumour. PMID:22279501

  1. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  2. New Bone Formation after Ligation of the External Carotid Artery and Resection of a Large Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of the Mandible with Reconstruction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Colin; Mohamed, Ashraf; Singh, Avin

    2011-01-01

    The aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign cystic and expanding osteolytic lesion consisting of bone-filled spaces of variable size, separated by connective tissue containing trabeculae of bone or osteoid tissue and osteoclast giant cells. Radiographic findings may vary from unicystic or moth-eaten radiolucencies to extensive multilocular lesions with bilateral expansion and destruction of mandibular cortices. Treatment modalities include curettage (with reported recurrences) and resection with immediate reconstruction. The main arterial and feeder vessels may be embolized to prevent profuse intraoperative blood loss and achieve a bloodless surgical field. Failed embolization may necessitate ligation of the external carotid artery of the affected side. PMID:23450035

  3. Giant atrial septal aneurysm originating from the right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hiroaki; Kanemitsu, Naoki; Meshii, Katsuaki; Ohnaka, Motoaki

    2016-08-01

    Giant coronary artery aneurysm is a rare clinical entity and its involvement in the interatrial space is extremely rare. We here report the rare surgical case of a 67-year old man with giant right coronary artery aneurysm located in the atrial septum with fistula formation to the right atrium, complicated with congestive heart failure, rapid atrial fibrillation and left atrial appendage thrombus. The patient eventually recovered fully without sequelae. PMID:27118290

  4. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  5. Perianeurysmal edema as a predictive sign of aneurysmal rupture.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Felix Hendrik; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes; Ferreira, Nelson Paes Fortes Diniz; de Macedo, Leonardo Lopes; Brock, Roger Schmidt; de Souza, Valéria Cardoso

    2014-11-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage following intracranial aneurysmal rupture is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Several factors may affect the probability of rupture, such as tobacco and alcohol use; size, shape, and location of the aneurysm; presence of intraluminal thrombus; and even the sex of the patient. However, few data correlate such findings with the timing of aneurysmal rupture. The authors report 2 cases of middle-age women with headache and MRI findings of incidental aneurysms. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of surrounding parenchymal edema, and in one case there was a clear increase in edema during follow-up, suggesting a progressive inflammatory process that culminated with rupture. These findings raise the possibility that bleb formation and an enlargement of a cerebral aneurysm might be associated with an inflammatory reaction of the aneurysm wall resulting in perianeurysmal edema and subsequent aneurysmal rupture. There may be a temporal link between higher degree of edema and higher risk for rupture, including risk for immediate rupture. PMID:25036206

  6. Heparin binding by murine recombinant prion protein leads to transient aggregation and formation of RNA-resistant species.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Tuane C R G; Reynaldo, Daniel P; Gomes, Mariana P B; Almeida, Marcius S; Cordeiro, Yraima; Silva, Jerson L

    2011-01-19

    The conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathological conformer PrP(Sc) requires contact between both isoforms and probably also requires a cellular factor, such as a nucleic acid or a glycosaminoglycan (GAG). Little is known about the structural features implicit in the GAG-PrP interaction. In the present work, light scattering, fluorescence, circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to describe the chemical and physical properties of the murine recombinant PrP 23-231 interaction with low molecular weight heparin (LMWHep) at pH 7.4 and 5.5. LMWHep interacts with rPrP 23-231, thereby inducing transient aggregation. The interaction between murine rPrP and heparin at pH 5.5 had a stoichiometry of 2:1 (LMWHep:rPrP 23-231), in contrast to a 1:1 binding ratio at pH 7.4. At binding equilibrium, NMR spectra showed that rPrP complexed with LMWHep had the same general fold as that of the free protein, even though the binding can be indicated by significant changes in few residues of the C-terminal domain, especially at pH 5.5. Notably, the soluble LMWHep:rPrP complex prevented RNA-induced aggregation. We also investigated the interaction between LMWHep and the deletion mutants rPrP Δ51-90 and Δ32-121. Heparin did not bind these constructs at pH 7.4 but was able to interact at pH 5.5, indicating that this glycosaminoglycan binds the octapeptide repeat region at pH 7.4 but can also bind other regions of the protein at pH 5.5. The interaction at pH 5.5 was dependent on histidine residues of the murine rPrP 23-231. Depending on the cellular milieu, the PrP may expose different regions that can bind GAG. These results shed light on the role of GAGs in PrP conversion. The transient aggregation of PrP may explain why some GAGs have been reported to induce the conversion into the misfolded, scrapie conformation, whereas others are thought to protect against conversion. The acquired resistance of the complex against RNA

  7. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  8. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Yuan; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Induced embryonic stem (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell resources for the observation of the cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  9. Central Pseudo-Aneurysm Formation Following Arterial Closure with a StarClose SE Device: When a StarClose Doesn’t Completely Close

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Sehrish; Ball, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 77 Final Diagnosis: Femoral artery pseudoaneurysm Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardiac catheterization and coronary stenting with Starclose vascular closure Specialty: Interventional Cardiology Objective: Educational Purpose (only if useful for a systematic review or synthesis) Background: Vascular closure devices (VCDs) are frequently used for hemostasis with endovascular procedures by employing sutures or plug devices (using collagen or hydrogel) or through the use of a metal clip made of nickel and titanium, such as the StarClose SE device. In comparison to manual compression (MC), VCDs are associated with earlier time to discharge and ambulation, improved patient comfort, and better cost-effectiveness. Case Report: A 77-year-old man with history of ischemic cardiomyopathy with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization with deployment of a StarClose SE vascular closure device for hemostasis. Upon repeat access 4 days later for coronary intervention, retrograde sheath angiography revealed a pseudo-aneurysm emanating from the center of the StarClose clip. Conclusions: A review of the literature shows VCDs to be non-inferior to MC, with an overall high success rate. Major and minor complications rates are comparable to those with MC, and pseudo-aneurysm is an infrequent complication. PMID:27026227

  10. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed? If you have an aortic aneurysm but no symptoms, your doctor may find it ... a routine physical exam. More often, doctors find aneurysms during tests done for other reasons, such as ...

  11. Endovascular Broad-Neck Aneurysm Creation in a Porcine Model Using a Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlenbruch, Georg Nikoubashman, Omid; Steffen, Bjoern; Dadak, Mete; Palmowski, Moritz; Wiesmann, Martin

    2013-02-15

    Ruptured cerebral arterial aneurysms require prompt treatment by either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling. Training for these sophisticated endovascular procedures is essential and ideally performed in animals before their use in humans. Simulators and established animal models have shown drawbacks with respect to degree of reality, size of the animal model and aneurysm, or time and effort needed for aneurysm creation. We therefore aimed to establish a realistic and readily available aneurysm model. Five anticoagulated domestic pigs underwent endovascular intervention through right femoral access. A total of 12 broad-neck aneurysms were created in the carotid, subclavian, and renal arteries using the Amplatzer vascular plug. With dedicated vessel selection, cubic, tubular, and side-branch aneurysms could be created. Three of the 12 implanted occluders, two of them implanted over a side branch of the main vessel, did not induce complete vessel occlusion. However, all aneurysms remained free of intraluminal thrombus formation and were available for embolization training during a surveillance period of 6 h. Two aneurysms underwent successful exemplary treatment: one was stent-assisted, and one was performed with conventional endovascular coil embolization. The new porcine aneurysm model proved to be a straightforward approach that offers a wide range of training and scientific applications that might help further improve endovascular coil embolization therapy in patients with cerebral aneurysms.

  12. Periadventitial adipose-derived stem cell treatment halts elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm progression

    PubMed Central

    Blose, Kory J; Ennis, Terri L; Arif, Batool; Weinbaum, Justin S; Curci, John A; Vorp, David A

    2014-01-01

    Aim Demonstrate that periadventitial delivery of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) slows aneurysm progression in an established murine elastase-perfusion model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Materials & methods AAAs were induced in C57BL/6 mice using porcine elastase. During elastase perfusion, a delivery device consisting of a subcutaneous port, tubing and porous scaffold was implanted. Five days after elastase perfusion, 100,000 ADMSCs were delivered through the port to the aorta. After sacrifice at day 14, analyzed metrics included aortic diameter and structure of aortic elastin. Results ADMSC treated aneurysms had a smaller diameter and less fragmented elastin versus saline controls. Conclusion Periadventitial stem cell delivery prevented the expansion of an established aneurysm between days 5 and 14 after elastase perfusion. PMID:25431910

  13. Commercial Honeybush (Cyclopia spp.) Tea Extract Inhibits Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption in RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages—An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, Amcois; Kasonga, Abe; Deepak, Vishwa; Moosa, Shaakirah; Marais, Sumari; Kruger, Marlena C.; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Honeybush tea, a sweet tasting caffeine-free tea that is indigenous to South Africa, is rich in bioactive compounds that may have beneficial health effects. Bone remodeling is a physiological process that involves the synthesis of bone matrix by osteoblasts and resorption of bone by osteoclasts. When resorption exceeds formation, bone remodeling can be disrupted resulting in bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors of monocytic lineage. These precursors fuse and differentiate into mature osteoclasts in the presence of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL), produced by osteoblasts. In this study, the in vitro effects of an aqueous extract of fermented honeybush tea were examined on osteoclast formation and bone resorption in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. We found that commercial honeybush tea extract inhibited osteoclast formation and TRAP activity which was accompanied by reduced bone resorption and disruption of characteristic cytoskeletal elements of mature osteoclasts without cytotoxicity. Furthermore, honeybush tea extract decreased expression of key osteoclast specific genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K. This study demonstrates for the first time that honeybush tea may have potential anti-osteoclastogenic effects and therefore should be further explored for its beneficial effects on bone. PMID:26516894

  14. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms:

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chagnon, M.; Gevry, G.

    2007-01-01

    'if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; 'but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties'. Sir Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning Summary In the absence of level one evidence, the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is grounded on opinions. Results of the largest registry available, ISUIA (the International Study on Unruptured Intraacranial Aneurysms) suggest that surgical or endovascular treatments are rarely justified. Yet the unruptured aneurysm is the most frequent indication for treatment in many endovascular centres. In preparation for the initiation of a randomized trial, we aimed at a better knowledge of endovascular expert opinions on unruptured aneurysms. We administered a standard questionnaire to 175 endovascular experts gathered at the WFITN meeting in Val d'lsère in 2007. Four paradigm unruptured aneurysms were used to poll opinions on risks of treatment or observation, as well as on their willingness to treat, observe or propose to the patient participation in a randomized trial, using six questions for each aneurysm. Opinions varied widely among lesions and among participants. Most participants (92.5%) were consistent, as they would offer treatment only if their estimate of the ten-year risk of spontaneous hemorrhage would exceed risks of treatment. Estimates of the natural history were consistently higher than that reported by ISUIA. Conversely, treatment risks were underestimated compared to those reported in ISUIA, but within the range reported in a recent French registry (ATENA). Participants were more confident in their evaluation of treatment risks and in their skills at treating aneurysms than in their estimates of risks of rupture entailed by the presence of the lesion, the latter being anchored at or close to 1% /year. The gulf between expert opinions, clinical practices and available data from registries persist. Expert opinions are compatible with the primary hypothesis

  15. Relationship between Postmenopausal Estrogen Deficiency and Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, Sadaharu

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is one of the most severe forms of stroke, which results from the rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. SAH is the only type of stroke with a female predominance, suggesting that reproductive factors may play a significant role in the etiology. Estrogen has important effects on vascular physiology and pathophysiology of cerebral aneurysm and SAH and, thus, potential therapeutic implications. There have been growing bodies of epidemiological and experimental studies which support the hypothesis of a significant relationship between estrogen deficiency and cerebral aneurysm formation with subsequent SAH. This hypothesis is the focus of this review as well as possible pathology-based therapeutics with regard to aspects of molecular pathophysiology, especially related to women's health. PMID:26538819

  16. A persistent sciatic artery aneurysm containing a free-floating thrombus: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Unosawa, Satoshi; Ishii, Yusuke; Niino, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    A persistent sciatic artery is a rare vascular anomaly in which the sciatic artery, which involutes in the embryonic stage, persists as the blood supply to the lower limb. This vascular anomaly is often associated with aneurysm formation. A persistent sciatic artery aneurysm is a rare cause of peripheral arterial embolic disease. We herein describe the case of a 72-year-old female with a free-floating thrombus in a persistent sciatic artery aneurysm. She underwent iliac-popliteal artery bypass and exclusion of the aneurysm to prevent an embolic event. PMID:25016369

  17. Successful endovascular treatment of rupture of mycotic left main coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Torii, Sho; Ohta, Hiroshi; Morino, Yoshihiro; Nakashima, Makoto; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Murata, Seiichiro; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Ikari, Yuji; Tamura, Tsutomu

    2013-08-01

    Mycotic coronary aneurysm formation is a rare complication in patients with infective endocarditis. Furthermore, rupture of coronary artery aneurysm, also rare, is life threatening. Sudden rupture of left main mycotic coronary aneurysm occurred in a patient, aged 68 years, 1 month after root replacement for aortic regurgitation caused by infectious endocarditis. A polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent was implanted covering the entire aneurysmal portion crossing over the left circumflex coronary artery in this emergent situation. After a successful hemostatic procedure, the patient recovered from cardiogenic shock. We confirmed the sustained patency of the stent segment by coronary angiography 6 months after the procedure. PMID:23395219

  18. Neonatal vitelline vein aneurysm with thrombosis: prompt treatment should be needed.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Hong; Yu, Hyeong Won; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jo, Heui Seung

    2015-12-01

    Vitelline veins are a pair of embryonic structures. The veins develop the portal vein system. Serious problems occur if the vitelline vein does not regress and becomes an aneurysm. Thrombus formation in the vitelline vein aneurysm could lead to portal vein thrombosis and portal hypertension unless promptly and correctly treated. Though vitelline vein aneurysm is an extremely rare anomaly, it rapidly progresses to portal vein thrombosis that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. We reported a case of neonatal vitelline vein aneurysm and thrombosis that was cured by prompt operation. PMID:26665130

  19. Ruptured aneurysm of major aortopulmonary collateral artery: management using amplatzer vascular plug

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Priya, Sarv

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm of a major aortopulmonary collateral artery (MAPCA) is quite rare. Aneurysmally dilated MAPCA may be complicated with rupture and massive hemoptysis leading to sudden death. Possible pathophysiology for aneurysm formation is persistent high pressure state in collateral circulation. High index of suspicion is necessary to avoid catastrophic complications as the amount of hemoptysis does not correlate with disease severity and etiology. We present a case of large ruptured aneurysm of a MAPCA presenting with massive haemoptysis in a patient of cyanotic congenital heart disease which was salvaged by endovascular deployment of vascular plug. PMID:27280092

  20. Disappearance of a Ruptured Distal Flow-Related Aneurysm after Arteriovenous Malformation Nidal Embolization.

    PubMed

    He, Lucy; Gao, Junwei; Thomas, Ajith J; Fusco, Matthew R; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    Aneurysms associated with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are well represented in the literature. Their exact etiology is poorly understood, but likely global hemodynamic changes coupled with vascular wall pathology play into their formation. Flow-related and intranidal aneurysms, in particular, appear to have an increased risk for hemorrhagic presentation. Treatment strategies for these aneurysms are particularly challenging. We report the case of an AVM-associated aneurysm causing intraventricular hemorrhage that disappeared after embolization of unrelated, distal feeding pedicles to the nidus, at a site distant from the aneurysm. We also review the literature with regards to these so-called "disappearing aneurysms" in the context of AVMs and other vascular pathologies. PMID:26072456

  1. Characterization of the transport topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by disturbed blood flow patterns that are hypothesized to contribute to disease progression. The transport topology in six patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was studied. Velocity data were obtained by image-based computational fluid dynamics modeling, with magnetic resonance imaging providing the necessary simulation parameters. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from the velocity data, and used to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS). The combination of FTLE fields and LCS was used to characterize topological flow features such as separation zones, vortex transport, mixing regions, and flow impingement. These measures offer a novel perspective into AAA flow. It was observed that all aneurysms exhibited coherent vortex formation at the proximal segment of the aneurysm. The evolution of the systolic vortex strongly influences the flow topology in the aneurysm. It was difficult to predict the vortex dynamics from the aneurysm morphology, motivating the application of image-based flow modeling.

  2. Contrasting roles for CD4 vs. CD8 T-cells in a murine model of virally induced "T1 black hole" formation.

    PubMed

    Pirko, Istvan; Chen, Yi; Lohrey, Anne K; McDole, Jeremiah; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Allen, Kathleen S; Pavelko, Kevin D; Lindquist, Diana M; Dunn, R Scott; Macura, Slobodan I; Johnson, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    MRI is sensitive to tissue pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, most lesional MRI findings have limited correlation with disability. Chronic T1 hypointense lesions or "T1 black holes" (T1BH), observed in a subset of MS patients and thought to represent axonal damage, show moderate to strong correlation with disability. The pathogenesis of T1BH remains unclear. We previously reported the first and as of yet only model of T1BH formation in the Theiler's murine encephalitis virus induced model of acute CNS neuroinflammation induced injury, where CD8 T-cells are critical mediators of axonal damage and related T1BH formation. The purpose of this study was to further analyze the role of CD8 and CD4 T-cells through adoptive transfer experiments and to determine if the relevant CD8 T-cells are classic epitope specific lymphocytes or different subsets. C57BL/6 mice were used as donors and RAG-1 deficient mice as hosts in our adoptive transfer experiments. In vivo 3-dimensional MRI images were acquired using a 7 Tesla small animal MRI system. For image analysis, we used semi-automated methods in Analyze 9.1; transfer efficiency was monitored using FACS of brain infiltrating lymphocytes. Using a peptide depletion method, we demonstrated that the majority of CD8 T-cells are classic epitope specific cytotoxic cells. CD8 T-cell transfer successfully restored the immune system's capability to mediate T1BH formation in animals that lack adaptive immune system, whereas CD4 T-cell transfer results in an attenuated phenotype with significantly less T1BH formation. These findings demonstrate contrasting roles for these cell types, with additional evidence for a direct pathogenic role of CD8 T-cells in our model of T1 black hole formation. PMID:22348089

  3. Verminous aneurysm caused by filaria.

    PubMed

    Toledo, F V; de Araújo, A P; da Cunha, A M; Sidow, J R; Pavão, S G; de Araújo, E D

    1983-06-01

    Aneurysms caused by atherosclerosis are relatively frequent, as a consequence of the high incidence of this degenerative disease of the arteries. Other types of aneurysm, for example, those of infectious etiology, are more uncommon. Bacterias and fungi are able to cause aneurysms in several parts of the arterial tree. Stengel et al (1943), in a review of world literature described 217 cases of mycotic aneurysms. The Stedman's Medical Dictionary refers to a special type of aneurysm observed in horses, caused by intra-vascular migration of a worm, the Strongylus vulgaris. It has been named verminous aneurysm and generally involves the mesenteric arteries. We haven't found in medical literature any similar observations refering to human cases. The purpose of this paper is to describe a case of aneurysm the etiology of which we have imputed to the filaria (Wuchereria bancrofti). This case was observed in Marcilio Dias Naval Hospital, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:6346961

  4. Epiplakin Deficiency Aggravates Murine Caerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis and Favors the Formation of Acinar Keratin Granules

    PubMed Central

    Wögenstein, Karl L.; Szabo, Sandra; Lunova, Mariia; Wiche, Gerhard; Haybaeck, Johannes; Strnad, Pavel; Boor, Peter; Wagner, Martin; Fuchs, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Epiplakin, a member of the plakin protein family, is exclusively expressed in epithelial tissues and was shown to bind to keratins. Epiplakin-deficient (EPPK−/−) mice showed no obvious spontaneous phenotype, however, EPPK−/− keratinocytes displayed faster keratin network breakdown in response to stress. The role of epiplakin in pancreas, a tissue with abundant keratin expression, was not yet known. We analyzed epiplakin’s expression in healthy and inflamed pancreatic tissue and compared wild-type and EPPK−/− mice during caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. We found that epiplakin was expressed primarily in ductal cells of the pancreas and colocalized with apicolateral keratin bundles in murine pancreatic acinar cells. Epiplakin’s diffuse subcellular localization in keratin filament-free acini of K8-deficient mice indicated that its filament-associated localization in acinar cells completely depends on its binding partner keratin. During acute pancreatitis, epiplakin was upregulated in acinar cells and its redistribution closely paralleled keratin reorganization. EPPK−/− mice suffered from aggravated pancreatitis but showed no obvious regeneration phenotype. At the most severe stage of the disease, EPPK−/− acinar cells displayed more keratin aggregates than those of wild-type mice. Our data propose epiplakin to be a protective protein during acute pancreatitis, and that its loss causes impaired disease-associated keratin reorganization. PMID:25232867

  5. Complex Formation among Murine Cytomegalovirus US22 Proteins Encoded by Genes M139, M140, and M141

    PubMed Central

    Karabekian, Zaruhi; Hanson, Laura K.; Slater, Jacquelyn S.; Krishna, Neel K.; Bolin, Lisa L.; Kerry, Julie A.; Campbell, Ann E.

    2005-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) proteins encoded by US22 genes M139, M140, and M141 function, at least in part, to regulate replication of this virus in macrophages. Mutant MCMV having one or more of these genes deleted replicates poorly in macrophages in culture and in the macrophage-dense environment of the spleen. In this report, we demonstrate the existence of stable complexes formed by the products of all three of these US22 genes, as well as a complex composed of the products of M140 and M141. These complexes form in the absence of other viral proteins; however, the pM140/pM141 complex serves as a requisite binding partner for the M139 gene products. Products from all three genes colocalize to a perinuclear region of the cell juxtaposed to or within the cis-Golgi region but excluded from the trans-Golgi region. Interestingly, expression of pM141 redirects pM140 from its predominantly nuclear residence to the perinuclear, cytoplasmic locale where these US22 proteins apparently exist in complex. Thus, complexing of these nonessential, early MCMV proteins likely confers a function(s) independent of each individual protein and important for optimal replication of MCMV in its natural host. PMID:15731247

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open - discharge ... You had open aortic aneurysm surgery to repair an aneurysm (a widened part) in your aorta, the large artery that carries blood to your ...

  7. Mast cells modulate the pathogenesis of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiusong; Sukhova, Galina K.; Yang, Min; Wolters, Paul J.; MacFarlane, Lindsey A.; Libby, Peter; Sun, Chongxiu; Zhang, Yadong; Liu, Jian; Ennis, Terri L.; Knispel, Rebecca; Xiong, Wanfen; Thompson, Robert W.; Baxter, B. Timothy; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), an inflammatory disease, involves leukocyte recruitment, immune responses, inflammatory cytokine production, vascular remodeling, neovascularization, and vascular cell apoptosis, all of which contribute to aortic dilatation. This study demonstrates that mast cells, key participants in human allergic immunity, participate in AAA pathogenesis in mice. Mast cells were found to accumulate in murine AAA lesions. Mast cell–deficient KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice failed to develop AAA elicited by elastase perfusion or periaortic chemical injury. KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice had reduced aortic expansion and internal elastic lamina degradation; decreased numbers of macrophages, CD3+ T lymphocytes, SMCs, apoptotic cells, and CD31+ microvessels; and decreased levels of aortic tissue IL-6 and IFN-γ. Activation of mast cells in WT mice via C48/80 injection resulted in enhanced AAA growth while mast cell stabilization with disodium cromoglycate diminished AAA formation. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that mast cells participated in angiogenesis, aortic SMC apoptosis, and matrix-degrading protease expression. Reconstitution of KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice with bone marrow–derived mast cells from WT or TNF-α–/– mice, but not from IL-6–/– or IFN-γ–/– mice, caused susceptibility to AAA formation to be regained. These results demonstrate that mast cells participate in AAA pathogenesis in mice by releasing proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IFN-γ, which may induce aortic SMC apoptosis, matrix-degrading protease expression, and vascular wall remodeling, important hallmarks of arterial aneurysms. PMID:17932568

  8. Computational Hemodynamics Framework for the Analysis of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Mut, Fernando; Löhner, Rainald; Chien, Aichi; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Putman, Christopher; Cebral, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the risk of rupture of intracranial aneurysms is important for clinicians because the natural rupture risk can be exceeded by the small but significant risk carried by current treatments. To this end numerous investigators have used image-based computational fluid dynamics models to extract patient-specific hemodynamics information, but there is no consensus on which variables or hemodynamic characteristics are the most important. This paper describes a computational framework to study and characterize the hemodynamic environment of cerebral aneurysms in order to relate it to clinical events such as growth or rupture. In particular, a number of hemodynamic quantities are proposed to describe the most salient features of these hemodynamic environments. Application to a patient population indicates that ruptured aneurysms tend to have concentrated inflows, concentrated wall shear stress distributions, high maximal wall shear stress and smaller viscous dissipation ratios than unruptured aneurysms. Furthermore, these statistical associations are largely unaffected by the choice of physiologic flow conditions. This confirms the notion that hemodynamic information derived from image-based computational models can be used to assess aneurysm rupture risk, to test hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for aneurysm formation, progression and rupture, and to answer specific clinical questions. PMID:21643491

  9. Hemodynamic Study of Flow Remodeling Stent Graft for the Treatment of Highly Angulated Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yeow, Siang Lin; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a novel flow remodeling stent graft (FRSG) on the hemodynamic characteristics in highly angulated abdominal aortic aneurysm based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. An idealized aortic aneurysm with varying aortic neck angulations was constructed and CFD simulations were performed on nonstented models and stented models with FRSG. The influence of FRSG intervention on the hemodynamic performance is analyzed and compared in terms of flow patterns, wall shear stress (WSS), and pressure distribution in the aneurysm. The findings showed that aortic neck angulations significantly influence the velocity flow field in nonstented models, with larger angulations shifting the mainstream blood flow towards the center of the aorta. By introducing FRSG treatment into the aneurysm, erratic flow recirculation pattern in the aneurysm sac diminishes while the average velocity magnitude in the aneurysm sac was reduced in the range of 39% to 53%. FRSG intervention protects the aneurysm against the impacts of high velocity concentrated flow and decreases wall shear stress by more than 50%. The simulation results highlighted that FRSG may effectively treat aneurysm with high aortic neck angulations via the mechanism of promoting thrombus formation and subsequently led to the resorption of the aneurysm. PMID:27247612

  10. Differential Sex Response to Aspirin in Decreasing Aneurysm Rupture in Humans and Mice.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M; Correa, Tatiana; Jabbour, Pascal M; Zanaty, Mario; Brown, Robert D; Torner, James C; Hasan, David M

    2016-08-01

    We previously found that aspirin decreases the risk of cerebral aneurysm rupture in humans. We aim to assess whether a sex differential exists in the response of human cerebral aneurysms to aspirin and confirm these observations in a mouse model of cerebral aneurysm. A nested case-control analysis from the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms was performed to assess whether a sex differential exists in the response of human cerebral aneurysms to aspirin. A series of experiments were subsequently performed in a mouse model of cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysms were induced with hypertension and elastase injection into mice basal cisterns. We found that aspirin decreased the risk of aneurysm rupture more significantly in men than in women in the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms. In mice, aspirin and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor did not affect cerebral aneurysm formation but significantly decreased the incidence of rupture. The incidence of rupture was significantly lower in male versus female mice on aspirin. Gene expression analysis from cerebral arteries showed higher 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase levels in male mice. The rate of cerebral aneurysm rupture was similar in male mice receiving aspirin and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase inhibitor compared with females receiving aspirin and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase agonist, signaling a reversal of the sex-differential response to aspirin. Aspirin decreases aneurysm rupture in human and mice, in part through cyclooxygenase-2 pathways. Evidence from animal and human studies suggests a consistent differential effect by sex. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase activation in females reduces the incidence of rupture and eliminates the sex-differential response to aspirin. PMID:27296993

  11. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  12. Hepatic artery aneurysm developing after Billroth's operation.

    PubMed

    Fatic, Nikola; Music, Davor; Zornic, Nenad; Radojevic, Nemanja

    2014-05-01

    In this report we review the unusual case of a patient with a common hepatic artery aneurysm presenting 30 years after a Billroth's II resection. A 65-year-old man with epigastric pain and 10 kg of weight loss in the previous 6 months was referred to our clinic. Computed tomography revealed the presence of an aneurysm of the common hepatic artery (HAA) of 35 mm. This HAA was surgically excluded by aneurysmectomy and prosthetic bypass. Intraoperatively we observed extensive peritoneal adhesions and connective tissue formation in the region of the hepatoduodenal and hepatogastric ligaments, and the outer wall of the HAA was tightly affixed to the root of the transverse mesocolon by connective adhesions. Retraction of the adhesions slowly brought about a continued stretching and thinning of the arterial wall likely caused the HAA. PMID:24184460

  13. EX VIVO ADHERENCE TO MURINE ILEAL, BIOFILM FORMATION ABILITY AND PRESENCE OF ADHERENCE-ASSOCIATED OF HUMAN AND ANIMAL DIARRHEAGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    Sukkua, Kannika; Rattanachuay, Pattamarat; Sukhumungoon, Pharanai

    2016-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are important bacteria causing gastrointestinal infection, which can lead to severe forms of illnesses. This study focused on DEC adherent capabilities using murine intestinal tissue as a model. Ex vivo adherence results showed that enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) strain PSU280 exhibited the highest level of adherence, followed by strains from ETEC category. Scanning electron micrographs displayed tight binding and putative bacterial curli fibers, including putative fimbrial structures. The presence of putative curli fibers was confirmed by the presence of csgA, a curli major structural subunit gene. Five and 3 of 15 DEC possessed lpf (encoding long polar fimbriae) and agn43 (encoding antigen43), respectively. Comparable biofilm formation efficiency but variable levels autoaggregation were observed among the DEC strains. In addition, yeast agglutination could be visualized in 11/15 strains. This study demonstrates the adherent ability of DEC strains isolated in southern Thailand as well as a number of crucial adherence-associated genes, information of importance to the understanding of DEC pathogenesis in this region of the country. PMID:27086424

  14. Integration of a Notch-dependent mesenchymal gene program and Bmp2-driven cell invasiveness regulates murine cardiac valve formation.

    PubMed

    Luna-Zurita, Luis; Prados, Belén; Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Luxán, Guillermo; del Monte, Gonzalo; Benguría, Alberto; Adams, Ralf H; Pérez-Pomares, José María; de la Pompa, José Luis

    2010-10-01

    Cardiac valve formation is crucial for embryonic and adult heart function. Valve malformations constitute the most common congenital cardiac defect, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating valve formation and homeostasis. Here, we show that endocardial Notch1 and myocardial Bmp2 signal integration establish a valve-forming field between 2 chamber developmental domains. Patterning occurs through the activation of endocardial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) exclusively in prospective valve territories. Mice with constitutive endocardial Notch1 activity ectopically express Hey1 and Heyl. They also display an activated mesenchymal gene program in ventricles and a partial (noninvasive) EMT in vitro that becomes invasive upon BMP2 treatment. Snail1, TGF-β2, or Notch1 inhibition reduces BMP2-induced ventricular transformation and invasion, whereas BMP2 treatment inhibits endothelial Gsk3β, stabilizing Snail1 and promoting invasiveness. Integration of Notch and Bmp2 signals is consistent with Notch1 signaling being attenuated after myocardial Bmp2 deletion. Notch1 activation in myocardium extends Hey1 expression to nonchamber myocardium, represses Bmp2, and impairs EMT. In contrast, Notch deletion abrogates endocardial Hey gene transcription and extends Bmp2 expression to the ventricular endocardium. This embryonic Notch1-Bmp2-Snail1 relationship may be relevant in adult valve disease, in which decreased NOTCH signaling causes valve mesenchyme cell formation, fibrosis, and calcification. PMID:20890042

  15. Immunolocalization of calbindin D28k and vitamin D receptor during root formation of murine molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Tomoyuki; Okawa, Rena; Murakami, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Ooshima, Takashi; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2003-08-01

    Cells in the epithelial rest of Malassez (ERM cells) express calbindin D28k (CB); however, the hormonal regulation of CB in ERM cells remains to be elucidated. We investigated the immunohistochemical localization of CB and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor (VDR) during root formation of mouse molar teeth in order to clarify whether the expression of CB in ERM cells is dependent on vitamin D. At the early stage of root formation (postnatal (PN) days 10-14), both CB- and VDR-immunoreactive cells were observed intermittently along the root surface. In the apical portion, almost all CB-immunoreactive cells showed VDR immunoreactivity; however, VDR-immunoreactive cells in the most apical portion were immunonegative for CB. In the middle and cervical portions, the distributions of the two proteins were completely different. At the late stage of root formation (PN28d) and in adult animals, CB immunoreactivity was distributed in cells found along the acellular cementum at the bifurcation region, as well as between the dentin and cellular cementum in the apical portion (although these lacked immunoreactivity for VDR). The present results indicate that CB expression in newly disrupted cells from Hertwig's epithelial root sheath occurs in a vitamin-D dependent manner, whereas the expression of CB in mature ERM cells may be independent of vitamin D. PMID:12845706

  16. Effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor against cutaneous scar formation in murine full-thickness wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Seok; Lew, Dae Hyun; Tark, Kwan Chul; Rah, Dong Kyun; Hong, Joon Pio

    2010-04-01

    A visible cutaneous scar develops from the excess formation of immature collagen in response to an inflammatory reaction. This study examined the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the formation of cutaneous scars. Twenty Crl:CD-1 (ICR) mice were used and 2 full-thickness skin wounds were made on the dorsum of each mouse. One of the wounds was treated with recombinant human EGF by local application and the other was treated with saline for control until complete healing was achieved. The EGF-treated group's wounds healed faster than the control group's. The width of the scar was smaller by 30% and the area was smaller by 26% in the EGF-treated group. Inflammatory cell numbers were significantly lower in the EGF-treated group. The expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta(1) in the EGF-treated group was increased. It was observed that the amount of collagen in the EGF-treated group was larger than the control group. In the EGF-treated group, the visible external scars were less noticeable than that in the control group. These results suggest that EGF can reduce cutaneous scars by suppressing inflammatory reactions, decreasing expression of TGF-beta(1), and mediating the formation of collagen. PMID:20358003

  17. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies. PMID:27443382

  18. Another late complication after endovascular aneurysm repair: aneurysmal degeneration at the iliac artery landing site.

    PubMed

    Agu, Obekieze; Boardley, Dee; Adiseshiah, Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a hitherto underreported late complication of infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), namely type Ib endoleakage resulting from aneurysmal degeneration at the iliac artery landing site. In a prospectively recorded audit, between 1994 and 2007, 297 patients underwent EVAR. All cases that developed iliac artery aneurysm (IAA) were studied. Ten cases of IAA in seven patients (2.4% of the cohort) developed 5 to 9 years after EVAR. Eight of the 10 involved the lower landing site of the stent graft. Landing site diameter before EVAR was 12 mm (range 10-15 mm). Three IAAs presented as emergencies with rapidly expanding sacs and impending rupture. All cases underwent further endovascular intervention with no < 30-day mortality. Iliac artery landing site aneurysm formation after EVAR occurs uncommonly after 5 or more years. It should be regarded as an indication for intervention prior to type Ib endoleakage development. The need for lifelong surveillance is highlighted. PMID:19344588

  19. Antibody formation and mannose-6-phosphate receptor expression impact the efficacy of muscle-specific transgene expression in murine Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Yi, Haiqing; Kemper, Alex; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lysosomal storage disorders such as Pompe disease can be more effectively treated, if immune tolerance to enzyme or gene replacement therapy can be achieved. Alternatively, immune responses against acid α-glucosidase (GAA) might be evaded in Pompe disease through muscle-specific expression of GAA with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. METHODS An AAV vector containing the MHCK7 regulatory cassette to drive muscle-specific GAA expression was administered to GAA knockout (KO) mice, immune tolerant GAA-KO mice, and mannose-6-phosphate deficient GAA-KO mice. GAA activity and glycogen content were analyzed in striated muscle to determine biochemical efficacy. RESULTS The biochemical efficacy from GAA expression was slightly reduced in GAA-KO mice, as demonstrated by higher residual glycogen content in skeletal muscles. Next immune tolerance to GAA was induced in GAA-KO mice by co-administration of a second AAV vector encoding liver-specific GAA along with the AAV vector encoding muscle-specific GAA. Antibody formation was prevented by liver-specific GAA, and the biochemical efficacy of GAA expression was improved in absence of antibodies as evidenced by significantly reduced glycogen content in the diaphragm. Efficacy was reduced in old GAA-KO mice despite the absence of antibodies. The greatest impact upon gene therapy was observed in GAA-KO mice lacking the mannose-6-phosphate receptor in muscle. The clearance of stored glycogen was markedly impaired despite high GAA expression in receptor-deficient Pompe disease mice. CONCLUSIONS Overall, antibody formation had a subtle effect upon efficacy, while the absence of mannose-6-phosphate receptors markedly impaired muscle-targeted gene therapy in murine Pompe disease. PMID:20967919

  20. A Thrombus Generation Model Applied to Aneurysms Treated with Shape Memory Polymer Foam and Metal Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, John; Ortega, Jason; Hartman, Jonathan; Maitland, Duncan

    2015-11-01

    To prevent their rupture, intracranial aneurysms are often treated with endovascular metal coils which fill the aneurysm sac and isolate it from the arterial flow. Despite its widespread use, this method can result in suboptimal outcomes leading to aneurysm recurrence. Recently, shape memory polymer foam has been proposed as an alternative aneurysm filler. In this work, a computational model has been developed to predict thrombus formation in blood in response to such cardiovascular implantable devices. The model couples biofluid and biochemical phenomena present as the blood interacts with a device and stimulates thrombus formation. This model is applied to simulations of both metal coil and shape memory polymer foam treatments within an idealized 2D aneurysm geometry. Using the predicted thrombus responses, the performance of these treatments is evaluated and compared. The results suggest that foam-treated aneurysms may fill more quickly and more completely with thrombus than coil-filled aneurysms, potentially leading to improved long-term aneurysm healing. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Rectal strictures following abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. M.; Bentley, P. G.

    2000-01-01

    Rectal stricture formation is a rare complication of aortic aneurysm repair. Two case are described here. A combination of hypotension, a compromised internal iliac circulation and poor collateral supply following inferior mesenteric artery ligation can result in acute ischaemic proctitis--an infrequently described clinical entity. Ulceration and necrosis are the sequelae of prolonged ischaemia and fibrous stricture formation may result. One patient responded to dilatation and posterior mid-rectal myotomy; the other failed to respond to conservative measures and eventually had an end colostomy fashioned following intractable symptoms. PMID:11103163

  2. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  3. Flow modification in canine intracranial aneurysm model by an asymmetric stent: studies using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hoi, Yiemeng; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Tranquebar, Rekha V.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Woodward, Scott, H.; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    An asymmetric stent with low porosity patch across the intracranial aneurysm neck and high porosity elsewhere is designed to modify the flow to result in thrombogenesis and occlusion of the aneurysm and yet to reduce the possibility of also occluding adjacent perforator vessels. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the flow field induced by an asymmetric stent using both numerical and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) methods and to quantify the flow dynamics of an asymmetric stent in an in vivo aneurysm model. We created a vein-pouch aneurysm model on the canine carotid artery. An asymmetric stent was implanted at the aneurysm, with 25% porosity across the aneurysm neck and 80% porosity elsewhere. The aneurysm geometry, before and after stent implantation, was acquired using cone beam CT and reconstructed for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Both steady-state and pulsatile flow conditions using the measured waveforms from the aneurysm model were studied. To reduce computational costs, we modeled the asymmetric stent effect by specifying a pressure drop over the layer across the aneurysm orifice where the low porosity patch was located. From the CFD results, we found the asymmetric stent reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 51%, and appeared to create a stasis-like environment which favors thrombus formation. The DSA sequences also showed substantial flow reduction into the aneurysm. Asymmetric stents may be a viable image guided intervention for treating intracranial aneurysms with desired flow modification features. PMID:21666881

  4. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 overexpression and tumor formation are blocked by sulindac in a murine model of familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Boolbol, S K; Dannenberg, A J; Chadburn, A; Martucci, C; Guo, X J; Ramonetti, J T; Abreu-Goris, M; Newmark, H L; Lipkin, M L; DeCosse, J J; Bertagnolli, M M

    1996-06-01

    Inducible cyclooxygenase (Cox-2), also known as prostaglandin H synthase 2 (PGH-2) is a key enzyme in the formation of prostaglandins and thromboxanes. Cox-2 is the product of an immediate-early gene that is expressed in response to growth factors, tumor promoters, or cytokines. Overexpression of Cox-2 is associated with both human colon cancers and suppression of apoptosis in cultured epithelia] cells, an activity that is reversed by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, sulindac sulfide. To address the relationship between Cox-2, apoptosis, and tumor development in vivo, we studied C57BL/6J-Min/+(Min) mice, a strain containing a fully penetrant dominant mutation in the Apc gene, leading to the development of gastrointestinal adenomas by 110 days of age. Min mice were fed AIN-76A chow diet and given sulindac (0.5 +/- 0.1 mg/day) in drinking water. Control Min mice and homozygous C57BL/6J-+/+ normal littermates lacking the Apc mutation (+/+) were fed AIN-76A diet and given tap water to drink. At 110 days of age, all mice were sacrificed, and their intestinal tracts were examined. Control Min mice had 11.9 +/- 7.8 tumors per mouse compared to 0.1 +/- 0.1 tumors for sulindac-treated Min mice. As expected, +/+ littermates had no macroscopic tumors. Examination of histologically normal-appearing small bowel from Min animals revealed increased amounts of Cox-2 and prostaglandin E(2) compared to +/+ littermates. Using two different in situ techniques, terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling and a direct immunoperoxidase method, Min animals also demonstrated a 27-47% decrease in enterocyte apoptosis compared to +/+ animals. Treatment with sulindac not only inhibited tumor formation but decreased small bowel Cox-2 and prostaglandin E(2) to baseline and restored normal levels of apoptosis. These data suggest that overexpression of Cox-2 is associated with tumorigenesis in the gastrointestinal epithelium, and that both are inhibited by sulindac administration

  10. Presentation and management of aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, A. P.

    1976-01-01

    The aetiology and pathology of aneurysms, their sites of occurrence, and their general management are outlined. Since the abdominal aortic aneurysm is the type most commonly encountered by the surgeon its presentation, assessment, and operative and postoperative management are discussed in detail. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:1259327

  11. Onyx embolization of a ruptured aneurysm in a patient with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Daou, Badih; Chalouhi, Nohra; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Jabbour, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    We report a woman who presented with an intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Her cerebral angiogram showed a middle cerebral artery (MCA) M1 occlusion with multiple collaterals supplying the distal MCA territory, compatible with moyamoya disease. Also, an associated 8 mm dysplastic distal aneurysm fed by a left-sided P2 perforator was seen, collateral from the posterior cerebral artery. The aneurysm was successfully occluded with Onyx (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN, USA) embolization. The woman had an uneventful postoperative course. Aneurysm formation in patients with moyamoya disease represents a major hemorrhagic risk. Several treatment strategies exist including endovascular and surgical approaches. Patients with moyamoya disease who present with aneurysmal intracerebral hemorrhage should be treated to prevent rebleeding. Onyx embolization can be an effective treatment of aneurysms that are associated with moyamoya disease and would otherwise be difficult to treat surgically. PMID:26209917

  12. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multiscale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier–Stokes solver NεκTαr. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers (NεκTαr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300 K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in

  13. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multi-scale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier-Stokes solver εκ αr . The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers ( εκ αr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in future

  14. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multiscale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier-Stokes solver NɛκTαr. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers (NɛκTαr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300 K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in future

  15. True aneurysm of brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovričević, Ivo; Franjić, Dario Bjorn; Brkić, Petar; Tomas, Davor

    2010-10-01

    True upper extremity peripheral artery aneurysms are a rarely encountered arterial disorder. Following computer-tomography angiographic (CT-a) imaging examination, true saccular aneurysm, originating from the left brachial artery was diagnosed in the 77-year-old female without history of trauma. The aneurysm was resected by surgical intervention, and primary repair of the brachial artery was performed by interposition of a part of great saphenous vein harvested from the left groin and creation of two end-to-end anastomoses between interposition graft and previously resected part of brachial artery. No complication was observed during the follow-up. Surgical intervention for upper extremity aneurysms should be initiated without delay. Factors combined with minimal morbidity associated with repair suggest that surgical repair should be performed routinely for true upper extremity arterial aneurysms. PMID:20865459

  16. Defective Association of the Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX Complex with the Glycosphingolipid-Enriched Membrane Domain Inhibits Murine Thrombus and Atheroma Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Ran, Yali; Da, Qi; Shaw, Tanner S; Shang, Dan; Reddy, Anilkumar K; López, José A; Ballantyne, Christie M; Ware, Jerry; Wu, Huaizhu; Peng, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    Localization of the platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX complex to the membrane lipid domain is essential for platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor and subsequent platelet activation in vitro. Yet, the in vivo importance of this localization has never been addressed. We recently found that the disulfide linkage between Ibα and Ibβ is critical for the association of Ibα with the glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane domain; in this study, we established a transgenic mouse model expressing this mutant human Ibα that is also devoid of endogenous Ibα (HαSSMα(-/-)). Characterization of this model demonstrated a similar dissociation of Ibα from murine platelet glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane to that expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, which correlates well with the impaired adhesion of the transgenic platelets to von Willebrand factor ex vivo and in vivo. Furthermore, we bred our transgenic mice into an atherosclerosis-prone background (HαSSMα(-/-)ApoE(-/-) and HαWTMα(-/-)ApoE(-/-)). We observed that atheroma formation was significantly inhibited in mutant mice where fewer platelet-bound CD11c(+) leukocytes were circulating (CD45(+)/CD11c(+)/CD41(+)) and residing in atherosclerotic lesions (CD45(+)/CD11c(+)), suggesting that platelet-mediated adhesion and infiltration of CD11c(+) leukocytes may be one of the mechanisms. To our knowledge, these observations provide the first in vivo evidence showing that the membrane GEM is physiologically and pathophysiologically critical in the function of the glycoprotein Ib-IX complex. PMID:27206768

  17. Transluminal Attenuation Gradient for Thrombotic Risk Assessment in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande Gutierrez, Noelia; Kahn, Andrew; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2014-11-01

    Kawasaki Disease (KD) can result in coronary aneurysms in up to 25% of patients if not treated early putting patients at risk of thrombus formation, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines for administering anti-coagulation therapy currently rely on anatomy alone. Previous studies including patient specific modeling and computer simulations in KD patients have suggested that hemodynamic data can predict regions susceptible to thrombus formation. In particular, high Particle Residence Time gradient (PRTg) regions have shown to correlate with regions of thrombus formation. Transluminal Attenuation Gradient (TAG) is determined from the change in radiological attenuation per vessel length. TAG has been used for characterizing coronary artery stenoses, however this approach has not yet been used in aneurysmal vessels. The aim of this study is to analyze the correlation between TAG and PRTg in KD patients with aneurysms and evaluate the use of TAG as an index to quantify thrombotic risk. Patient specific anatomic models for fluids simulations were constructed from CT angiographic image data from 3 KD aneurysm patients and one normal control. TAG values for the aneurysm patients were markedly lower than for the non-aneurysmal patient (mean -18.38 vs. -2). In addition, TAG values were compared to PRTg obtained for each patient. Thrombotic risk stratification for KD aneurysms may be improved by incorporating TAG and should be evaluated in future prospective studies.

  18. CFD-based Thrombotic Risk Assessment in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Kung, Ethan; Kahn, Andrew; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Coronary aneurysms occur in 25% of untreated Kawasaki Disease (KD) patients and put patients at increased risk for myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines recommend using aneurysm diameter >8 mm as the arbitrary criterion for treating with anti-coagulation therapy. This study uses patient-specific modeling to non-invasively determine hemodynamic parameters and quantify thrombotic risk. Anatomic models were constructed from CT angiographic image data from 5 KD aneurysm patients and one normal control. CFD simulations were performed to obtain hemodynamic data including WSS and particle residence times (PRT). Thrombosis was clinically observed in 4/9 aneurysmal coronaries. Thrombosed vessels required twice as many cardiac cycles (mean 8.2 vs. 4.2) for particles to exit, and had lower mean WSS (1.3 compared to 2.8 dynes/cm2) compared to vessels with non-thrombosed aneurysms of similar max diameter. 1 KD patient in the cohort with acute thrombosis had diameter < 8 mm. Regions of low WSS and high PRT predicted by simulations correlated with regions of subsequent thrombus formation. Thrombotic risk stratification for KD aneurysms may be improved by incorporating both hemodynamic and geometric quantities. Current clinical guidelines to assess patient risk based only on aneurysm diameter may be misleading. Further prospective study is warranted to evaluate the utility of patient-specific modeling in risk stratifying KD patients with coronary aneurysms. NIH R21.

  19. Radical surgical treatment for recurrent giant fusiform thrombosed vertebral artery aneurysm previously coiled

    PubMed Central

    J-O’Shanahan, Aruma; Noda, Kosumo; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Ota, Nakao; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Tokuda, Sadahisa; Tanikawa, Rokuya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fusiform aneurysms are rare (<1%) and the underlying pathophysiology is not well known. Endovascular coiling is the standard of treatment; however, a surgical procedure with vascular reconstruction by excluding the pathological segment of the vessel and restoring the blood flow, seems to be the most effective and definitive treatment. Case Description: We report a patient who presented a fusiform vertebral artery aneurysm previously coiled which developed a giant enlargement and a new contralateral fusiform aneurysm. Hemodynamic changes resulting in the formation of contralateral aneurysm might be the result of aneurysm occlusion without revascularization. In addition, continued blood flow to the aneurysmal wall through the vasa vasorum might result in aneurysm recanalization or regrowth. In order to account for these possible sources of complications, we performed a vascular reconstruction with high and low flow bypasses after trapping the aneurysm. Conclusions: We hypothesize that, in this and similar cases, surgical vascular reconstruction should be the first and definitive treatment under experienced cerebrovascular surgeons. PMID:27127714

  20. Vein graft aneurysms following popliteal aneurysm repair are more common than we think.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Alistair; Kay, Mark; Sykes, Timothy; Fox, Anthony; Houghton, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    True infrainguinal vein graft aneurysms are reported infrequently in the literature. We sought to identify the true incidence of these graft aneurysms after popliteal aneurysm repair and identify factors which may increase the risk of such aneurysms developing. Using a prospectively compiled database, we identified patients who underwent a popliteal aneurysm repair between January 1996 and January 2011 at a single district general hospital. Patients were routinely followed up in a graft surveillance programme. Out of 45 patients requiring repair of a popliteal aneurysm over a 15-year period, four (8.8%) patients developed aneurysmal graft disease. Of the patients who developed graft aneurysms, all had aneurysmal disease at other sites compared with 18 (45.0%) patients who did not develop graft aneurysms. Patients with graft aneurysms had a mean of 1.60 aneurysms elsewhere compared to 0.58 in patients with non-aneurysmal grafts (P = 0.005). True vein graft aneurysms occur in a significant number of patients following popliteal aneurysm repair. Our data would suggest this to be more likely in patients who have aneurysms elsewhere and therefore a predisposition to aneurysmal disease. It may be appropriate for patients with aneurysms at other sites to undergo more prolonged post-operative graft surveillance. PMID:25331071

  1. Aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome with visceral and iliac artery aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    van der Linde, Denise; Verhagen, Hence J. M.; Moelker, Adriaan; van de Laar, Ingrid M. B. H.; Van Herzeele, Isabelle; De Backer, Julie; Dietz, Harry C.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aneurysms-osteoarthritis syndrome (AOS), caused by SMAD3 mutations, is a recently described autosomal-dominant syndrome characterized by arterial aneurysms, tortuosity, and aortic dissections in combination with osteoarthritis. Our objective was to evaluate the AOS-related vascular consequences in the visceral and iliac arteries and raise awareness for this aggressive syndrome among vascular specialists. Methods All AOS patients were monitored regularly according to our clinical AOS protocol. The study included those with one or more visceral aneurysms or tortuosity, or both. Clinical and surgical data were obtained from record abstraction. Results The study included 17 AOS patients (47% men) aged 47 ± 13 years. A total of 73 aneurysms were encountered, of which 46 were located in the abdomen. The common iliac artery was most commonly affected (37%), followed by the superior mesenteric artery (15%), celiac trunk (11%), and splenic artery (9%). Rapid aneurysm growth ≤1 year was found in three arteries (gastric, hepatic, and vertebral artery). Furthermore, arterial tortuosity was noted in 94% of patients. Four patients underwent six elective (endo) vascular interventions for aneurysms in the iliac, hepatic, gastric, or splenic artery, without major perioperative or postoperative complications. Conclusions AOS predisposes patients to widespread visceral and iliac artery aneurysms and extreme arterial tortuosity. Early elective aneurysm repair should be considered because the risk of aneurysm rupture is estimated to be very high and elective (endo) vascular interventions were not complicated by fragility of arterial tissue. Given the aggressive behavior of AOS, it is of utmost importance that vascular specialists are aware of this new syndrome. PMID:22975338

  2. Thrombosed aneurysm as the initial manifestation of Takayasu arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Joel; Rodríguez, Yerania; Ríos, Grissel

    2014-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is a large-vessel vasculitis characterised by stenosis, dilation and/or aneurysm formation. We present a case of a 43-year-old man with an initial manifestation of an acute thrombosed aneurysm. He was found to have a thrombosed right common femoral artery aneurysm on Doppler ultrasound. Physical examinations revealed a substantial difference in blood pressure level between bilateral upper extremities, and absent pulses at right upper and lower extremities. The diagnosis was confirmed by angiography, which revealed 100% occlusion of the right common femoral artery. Biopsy of the thrombosed aneurysm was consistent with a diffuse lymphocytic subendothelial infiltrate. The patient was treated with high-dose corticosteroids and had a good response to treatment, as demonstrated by a decrease in sedimentation rate, and recovery of the right side pulses. This case helps to create awareness among physicians that TA may present with an acute occlusion of an aneurysm without the typical warning symptoms of TA. PMID:24913078

  3. Left Atrial Appendage Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Saeid; Hashemi, Arash; Saedi, Sedigheh; Jalili, Farshad; Maleki, Majid; Jalalian, Rozita; Rezaei, Yousef

    2016-09-01

    Left atrial appendage aneurysms (LAAA) are extremely rare. This condition is usually diagnosed incidentally or after the occurrence of thrombotic events or cardiac tachyarrhythmias in the second to fourth decades of life. It can predispose to hazardous adverse events, including atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, and systemic thromboembolism. We report a case of LAAA in a 68-year-old woman presenting with atypical chest pain, exertional dyspnea, and episodes of sudden-onset palpitation. Aneurysmectomy with the patient under cardiac arrest with cardiopulmonary bypass was performed. In addition, we explore the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of this entity through a meticulous literature review. PMID:27549544

  4. MicroRNAs in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are an important source of morbidity and mortality in the U.S. and worldwide. Treatment options are limited, with open surgery or endovascular repair remaining the only curative treatments. Classical cardiovascular medications have generally failed to prevent or significantly alter AAA formation or progression. Therefore, there is a tremendous need for better therapeutic approaches. With increasing knowledge of microRNA (miR) regulation in the context of cardiovascular disease, and with improving technical options permitting alteration of miRexpression levels in vitro and in vivo, we are offered a glimpse into the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of using miRs to treat vascular pathobiology. This review focuses on the role of miRs in aneurysmal disease of the abdominal aorta, summarizing recent publications regarding this topic, and outlining known effects of relevant miRs in AAA formation, including miR-21 and miR-29b. Despite there being only limited studies available, several other miRs also display clear potential for alteration of the disease process including miR-26a, the miR-17-92-cluster, miRs-221/222, miR-133 and miR-146a. While studies have shown that miRs can regulate the activity and interplay of vascular inflammatory cells, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, all key elements leading to AAA formation, much work remains to be done. PMID:23713862

  5. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Innominate Artery Aneurysm in Behcet Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Kazumasa; Ohkura, Kazuhiro; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Saito, Takaaki; Shiiya, Norihiko

    2016-05-01

    In Behcet disease (BD), vascular complication such as false aneurysm formation is common after surgical treatment in the arterial lesion, and the optimal treatment method remains controversial. Concerning the innominate artery aneurysm, lack of experience due to its rarity in vasculo BD makes decision making even more difficult. We report a ruptured innominate artery aneurysm in a 70-year-old man with BD, which was successfully treated by innominate artery stent grafting through the right common carotid artery, axillo-axillary artery bypass grafting, and right subclavian artery coil embolization. The patient is doing well without any vascular complications at eighth postoperative month. PMID:26907373

  6. In vitro expanded bone marrow-derived murine (C57Bl/KaLwRij) mesenchymal stem cells can acquire CD34 expression and induce sarcoma formation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Song; De Becker, Ann; De Raeve, Hendrik; Van Camp, Ben; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Riet, Ivan

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Murine MSCs can undergo spontaneously malignant transformation and form sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acquisition of CD34 is a transformation type for MSCs into sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch/Hh/Wnt pathways are related to the malignant phenotype of transformed MSCs. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have currently generated numerous interests in pre-clinical and clinical applications due to their multiple lineages differentiation potential and immunomodulary effects. However, accumulating evidence indicates that MSCs, especially murine MSCs (mMSCs), can undergo spontaneous transformation after long-term in vitro culturing, which might reduce the therapeutic application possibilities of these stem cells. In the present study, we observed that in vitro expanded bone marrow (BM) derived mMSCs from the C57Bl/KaLwRij mouse strain can lose their specific stem cells markers (CD90 and CD105) and acquire CD34 expression, accompanied with an altered morphology and an impaired tri-lineages differentiation capacity. Compared to normal mMSCs, these transformed mMSCs exhibited an increased proliferation rate, an enhanced colony formation and migration ability as well as a higher sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs. Transformed mMSCs were highly tumorigenic in vivo, resulting in aggressive sarcoma formation when transplanted in non-immunocompromised mice. Furthermore, we found that Notch signaling downstream genes (hey1, hey2 and heyL) were significantly upregulated in transformed mMSCs, while Hedgehog signaling downstream genes Gli1 and Ptch1 and the Wnt signaling downstream gene beta-catenin were all decreased. Taken together, we observed that murine in vitro expanded BM-MSCs can transform into CD34 expressing cells that induce sarcoma formation in vivo. We assume that dysregulation of the Notch(+)/Hh(-)/Wnt(-) signaling pathway is associated with the malignant phenotype of the transformed mMSCs.

  7. Ventricular Aneurysm Following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M. B.

    1966-01-01

    Cineradiographic examination appears to be the best method for the study of cardiac pulsations. Fifty consecutive patients, who had sustained transmural myocardial infarction at least six months previously, were studied by this technique. Thirty-six had some abnormality of pulsation and eight had dynamic ventricular aneurysm. Six of the eight had suffered severe infarct. Functional recovery in those with aneurysm was not as complete as in the rest of the group. Two made a poor functional recovery, two a fair recovery, and four a moderately good recovery. Clinically, there were no systemic emboli in the patients with dynamic aneurysms. Five of the 50 had persistent ST-segment elevation and “coving” of the T waves; three of these patients had aneurysms. There was no good correlation between the electrocardiographic site of the infarct and the site of the abnormal pulsation. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5928534

  8. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  9. Aneurysm of the Splenic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, P. D.; Lodge, Brian

    1960-01-01

    This paper records an incidence of 10·4% of aneurysm of the splenic artery in 250 consecutive routine post-mortem examinations. Medial degeneration seemed to be the commonest cause of such aneurysms and although a number were associated with other intraabdominal pathology, including portal hypertension, the association may be fortuitous and not causal. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:13688586

  10. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  11. Serine protease inhibitor A3 in atherosclerosis and aneurysm disease.

    PubMed

    Wågsäter, Dick; Johansson, Daniel; Fontaine, Vincent; Vorkapic, Emina; Bäcklund, Alexandra; Razuvaev, Anton; Mäyränpää, Mikko I; Hjerpe, Charlotta; Caidahl, Kenneth; Hamsten, Anders; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Wilbertz, Johannes; Swedenborg, Jesper; Zhou, Xinghua; Eriksson, Per

    2012-08-01

    Remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in both atherosclerosis and aneurysm disease. Serine protease inhibitor A3 (serpinA3) is an inhibitor of several proteases such as elastase, cathepsin G and chymase derived from mast cells and neutrophils. In this study, we investigated the putative role of serpinA3 in atherosclerosis and aneurysm formation. SerpinA3 was expressed in endothelial cells and medial smooth muscle cells in human atherosclerotic lesions and a 14-fold increased expression of serpinA3n mRNA was found in lesions from Apoe-/- mice compared to lesion-free vessels. In contrast, decreased mRNA expression (-80%) of serpinA3 was found in biopsies of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) compared to non-dilated aortas. Overexpression of serpinA3n in transgenic mice did not influence the development of atherosclerosis or CaCl2-induced aneurysm formation. In situ zymography analysis showed that the transgenic mice had lower cathepsin G and elastase activity, and more elastin in the aortas compared to wild-type mice, which could indicate a more stable aortic phenotype. Differential vascular expression of serpinA3 is clearly associated with human atherosclerosis and AAA but serpinA3 had no major effect on experimentally induced atherosclerosis or AAA development in mouse. However, serpinA3 may be involved in a phenotypic stabilization of the aorta. PMID:22580763

  12. When Blood Vessels Bulge: All About Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vessels Bulge When Blood Vessels Bulge All About Aneurysms An aneurysm—a balloon-like bulge in an artery—can ... for years without causing any symptoms. But an aneurysm is a silent threat to your health. If ...

  13. Aneurysms - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Aneurysms URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/aneurysms.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  14. Aneurysms - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Aneurysms URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/aneurysms.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  15. Aspergillus mycotic aneurysm--case report.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Y; Narushima, K; Kobayashi, E; Tomono, Y; Nose, T

    1991-06-01

    A 61-year-old female developed subarachnoid hemorrhage after trans-sphenoidal surgery for Rathke's cleft cyst. Neuroradiological examination revealed a large aneurysm at the C1 portion of the right internal carotid artery. Autopsy revealed marked proliferation of aspergillus hyphae in the wall of the aneurysm. A review of previously reported cases of fungal aneurysm proposes two developmental processes. Aneurysms secondary to fungal meningitis tend to be large in size and located in the major cerebral artery trunk, but aneurysms following fungal sepsis tend to be small and in peripheral branches. The former aneurysms are probably caused by fungus invasion into the intracranium, usually from the paranasal sinus, and the latter may be due to fungal emboli like bacterial emboli in bacterial endocarditis. Ruptured fungal aneurysms are difficult to treat, so fungal meningitis or sepsis must be eradicated before an aneurysm develops. PMID:1724300

  16. Aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Timothy B; Ward, James P; Alaia, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are rare skeletal tumors that most commonly occur in the first two decades of life. They primarily develop about the knee but may arise in any portion of the axial or appendicular skeleton. Pathogenesis of these tumors remains controversial and may be vascular, traumatic, or genetic. Radiographic features include a dilated, radiolucent lesion typically located within the metaphyseal portion of the bone, with fluid-fluid levels visible on MRI. Histologic features include blood-filled lakes interposed between fibrous stromata. Differential diagnosis includes conditions such as telangiectatic osteosarcoma and giant cell tumor. The mainstay of treatment is curettage and bone graft, with or without adjuvant treatment. Other management options include cryotherapy, sclerotherapy, radionuclide ablation, and en bloc resection. The recurrence rate is low after appropriate treatment; however, more than one procedure may be required to completely eradicate the lesion. PMID:22474093

  17. Subcutaneous Angiotensin II Infusion using Osmotic Pumps Induces Aortic Aneurysms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Rateri, Debra L.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic pumps continuously deliver compounds at a constant rate into small animals. This article introduces a standard protocol used to induce aortic aneurysms via subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) from implanted osmotic pumps. This protocol includes calculation of AngII amount and dissolution, osmotic pump filling, implantation of osmotic pumps subcutaneously, observation after pump implantation, and harvest of aortas to visualize aortic aneurysms in mice. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII through osmotic pumps following this protocol is a reliable and reproducible technique to induce both abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice. Infusion durations range from a few days to several months based on the purpose of the study. AngII 1,000 ng/kg/min is sufficient to provide maximal effects on abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation in male hypercholesterolemic mouse models such as apolipoprotein E deficient or low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice. Incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms induced by AngII infusion via osmotic pumps is 5 - 10 times lower in female hypercholesterolemic mice and also lower in both genders of normocholesterolemic mice. In contrast, AngII-induced thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice are not hypercholesterolemia or gender-dependent. Importantly, multiple features of this mouse model recapitulate those of human aortic aneurysms. PMID:26436287

  18. Subcutaneous Angiotensin II Infusion using Osmotic Pumps Induces Aortic Aneurysms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Rateri, Debra L; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic pumps continuously deliver compounds at a constant rate into small animals. This article introduces a standard protocol used to induce aortic aneurysms via subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) from implanted osmotic pumps. This protocol includes calculation of AngII amount and dissolution, osmotic pump filling, implantation of osmotic pumps subcutaneously, observation after pump implantation, and harvest of aortas to visualize aortic aneurysms in mice. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII through osmotic pumps following this protocol is a reliable and reproducible technique to induce both abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice. Infusion durations range from a few days to several months based on the purpose of the study. AngII 1,000 ng/kg/min is sufficient to provide maximal effects on abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation in male hypercholesterolemic mouse models such as apolipoprotein E deficient or low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice. Incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms induced by AngII infusion via osmotic pumps is 5-10 times lower in female hypercholesterolemic mice and also lower in both genders of normocholesterolemic mice. In contrast, AngII-induced thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice are not hypercholesterolemia or gender-dependent. Importantly, multiple features of this mouse model recapitulate those of human aortic aneurysms. PMID:26436287

  19. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  20. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair: current endovascular perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nathan; Minion, David; Bobadilla, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysms account for roughly 3% of identified aneurysms annually in the United States. Advancements in endovascular techniques and devices have broadened their application to these complex surgical problems. This paper will focus on the current state of endovascular thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, including specific considerations in patient selection, operative planning, and perioperative complications. Both total endovascular and hybrid options will be considered. PMID:25170271

  1. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Satoshi Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm.

  2. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Orlando; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are abnormal dilations of the intracranial vessels, in which all the layers of the vascular wall are affected by degenerative changes that lead to distension of the vessel. Intracranial aneurysms can be classified based on their anatomic location, size, and morphology. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most devastating clinical presentation. The goal of preventing hemorrhage or rehemorrhage can only be achieved by excluding the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation. Endovascular or surgical clipping can achieve this goal. Multiple surgical and endovascular approaches have been described for treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Surgical approaches for anterior-circulation intracranial aneurysms include: pterional, orbitozygomatic, and lateral supraorbital craniotomies. Modern microsurgical techniques involve skull base dissection to achieve adequate exposure with minimal brain retraction. Endovascular techniques can be divided into: parent artery reconstruction with coil deposition (primary coil, balloon-assisted coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and other new techniques such as neck reconstruction devices and intraluminal occlusion devices); reconstruction with flow diversion; and deconstructive techniques with involving parent artery sacrifice with or without bypass. PMID:27430470

  3. Surgical and Antimicrobial Management of a Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Due to Q Fever: A Case Report and Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Robinson, William P; Schuksz, Manuela

    2016-05-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, has been associated with vascular infection and aneurysm formation. We report the case of a 36-year-old woman from Iraq who presented with long-standing malaise as well as vague chest and shoulder discomfort and was found to have a saccular aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. Serology assays were positive for chronic C burnetii infection. She was treated with successful aneurysm resection and aortic replacement with a rifampin-impregnated Maquet Hemashield (TM) Dacron interposition graft interposition graft in addition to 18 months of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine. The patient is without evidence of recurrent infection on follow-up at 3 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case of aortic aneurysm secondary to Q fever reported in the United States. We review the diagnosis, surgical management, antibiotic therapy, and surveillance of a thoracic aortic aneurysm secondary to Q fever. PMID:27075992

  4. Transitional flow in aneurysms and the computation of haemodynamic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Poelma, Christian; Watton, Paul N.; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2015-01-01

    Haemodynamic forces appear to play an influential role in the evolution of aneurysms. This has led to numerous studies, usually based on computational fluid dynamics. Their focus is predominantly on the wall shear stress (WSS) and associated derived parameters, attempting to find correlations between particular patterns of haemodynamic indices and regions subjected to disease formation and progression. The indices are generally determined by integration of flow properties over a single cardiac cycle. In this study, we illustrate that in some cases the transitional flow in aneurysms can lead to significantly different WSS distributions in consecutive cardiac cycles. Accurate determination of time-averaged haemodynamic indices may thus require simulation of a large number of cycles, which contrasts with the common approach to determine parameters using data from a single cycle. To demonstrate the role of transitional flow, two exemplary cases are considered: flow in an abdominal aortic aneurysm and in an intracranial aneurysm. The key differences that are observed between these cases are explained in terms of the integral timescale of the transitional flows in comparison with the cardiac cycle duration: for relatively small geometries, transients will decay before the next cardiac cycle. In larger geometries, transients are still present when the systolic phase produces new instabilities. These residual fluctuations serve as random initial conditions and thus seed different flow patterns in each cycle. To judge whether statistics are converged, the derived indices from at least two successive cardiac cycles should be compared. PMID:25694540

  5. Cavitation instability as a trigger of aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y

    2015-10-01

    Aneurysm formation and growth is accompanied by microstructural alterations in the arterial wall. Particularly, the loss of elastin may lead to tissue disintegration and appearance of voids or cavities at the micron scale. Unstable growth and coalescence of voids may be a predecessor and trigger for the onset of macroscopic cracks. In the present work, we analyze the instability of membrane (2D) and bulk (3D) voids under hydrostatic tension by using two experimentally calibrated constitutive models of abdominal aortic aneurysm enhanced with energy limiters. The limiters provide the saturation value for the strain energy, which indicates the maximum energy that can be stored and dissipated by an infinitesimal material volume. We find that the unstable growth of voids can start when the critical stress is considerably less than the aneurysm strength. Moreover, this critical stress may even approach the arterial wall stress in the physiological range. This finding suggests that cavitation instability can be a rational indicator of the aneurysm rupture. PMID:25637515

  6. Surgical Resection of a Giant Coronary Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mehall, John R; Verlare, Jordan L

    2015-06-01

    Coronary aneurysms are quite uncommon, and those qualifying as giant aneurysms are even more so. Currently, no standardized treatment protocol exists. We report the case of a 46-year-old man presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of acute myocardial infarction who was found to have a giant coronary aneurysm. The patient was initially evaluated with a computed tomography angiogram, which revealed a 9-cm aneurysm of the left circumflex coronary artery. Surgical resection of the aneurysm, ligation of the proximal circumflex artery, and bypass using the left internal mammary artery to vascularize the proximal circumflex artery was performed. PMID:26046882

  7. Iatrogenic cortical aneurysm post-craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Marco Antonio; Borges, Rodrigo Almeida; Nunes Aquino, Gustavo Henrique; de Freitas, Carlos Clayton Macedo

    2010-04-01

    Taking into account the number of craniotomies performed every day around the world, iatrogenic aneurysm post-craniotomy is extremely rare with only anecdotal cases reported in literature. We report an iatrogenic aneurysm affecting a cortical vessel which probably developed during dural closure of a conventional craniotomy. The aneurysm was discovered 6 months after surgery on a routine control angiography. The patient was successfully treated by trapping the parent vessel and excising the aneurysm. Histopathological findings were compatible with a true type of traumatic aneurysm. The possibility of this rare condition occurring highlights the risk of arterial injury during craniotomy. PMID:20121386

  8. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  9. Bilateral asymptomatic giant renal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, G; Ulusoy, Ş; Dinç, H; Kaynar, K; Sönmez, B; Akagündüz, K

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of renal artery aneurysm is very low. Approximately in 20% of these patients hypertension is observed. The diameter of aneurysm increases with accompanying complication rates. The most feared complication is rupture. The risk of rupture also increases with the diameter of aneurysm. We report an aneurysm with the biggest diameter reported in the literature. The patient had a 12 cm-diameter of aneurysm in one kidney and did not show any symptoms including hypertension until she was seventy years old. PMID:22435028

  10. Experimental study of physiological flow in a cerebral saccular tip aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, William; Savas, Omer; Ortega, Jason; Maitland, Duncan; Saloner, David

    2006-11-01

    Allowed to grow unchecked, a cerebral aneurysm may hemorrhage, leading to possible brain damage or death. Preventive treatment can alleviate this risk. The research presented will focus on cerebral saccular aneurysms. Flow visualization and particle image velocimetry are used at physiological input flow conditions in a simplified model geometry of a basilar artery bifurcation with a tip aneurysm. The results show the formation of vortical structures at the neck which impinge near the fundus and travel along the walls of the aneurysm. The goal of this research is to aid in the development of the implementation of laser-activated shape memory polymer devices for treatment. Future work on this project includes fluid flow and temperature studies during and post treatment.

  11. Adult Vascular Wall Resident Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Arterial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Bruno; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Maurizio; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; Rossi, Alessio; Naso, Agostino; Ruggiero, Michele; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Evidences have shown the presence of multipotent stem cells (SCs) at sites of arterial aneurysms: they can differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and are activated after residing in a quiescent state in the vascular wall. Recent studies have implicated the role of matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of arterial aneurysms: in fact the increased synthesis of MMPs by arterial SMCs is thought to be a pivotal mechanism in aneurysm formation. The factors and signaling pathways involved in regulating wall resident SC recruitment, survival, proliferation, growth factor production, and differentiation may be also related to selective expression of different MMPs. This review explores the relationship between adult vascular wall resident multipotent vascular SCs, MMPs, and arterial aneurysms. PMID:25866513

  12. Protective Role of Diabetes Mellitus on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Pathogenesis: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed

    Radak, Djordje; Tanaskovic, Slobodan; Katsiki, Niki; Isenovic, Esma R

    2016-01-01

    An inverse association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) risk have been reported. Apart from a lower AAA prevalence among patients with vs without DM, there are data showing that DM may exert a protective role on aneurysmal growth in patients with small AAAs, thus decreasing the risk of rupture. As atherosclerosis has almost the same risk factors as aneurysms, the decreased AAA prevalence in patients with DM may indicate that atherosclerosis is an associated feature and not a cause of the aneurysms. Alternatively, DM may be associated with factors that influence AAA formation. In this narrative review, we discuss the inverse association between DM and AAA. We also comment on underlying cellular and genetic pathophysiological mechanisms of DM, AAA and atherosclerosis. The effects of drugs, commonly prescribed in DM patients, on AAA development and growth are also considered. PMID:26022380

  13. Optical coherence tomography of traumatic aneurysms of the internal carotid artery: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul M; Deveikis, John P; Harrigan, Mark R

    2016-02-01

    The pathophysiology of extracranial traumatic aneurysm formation has not been fully elucidated. Intraarterial optical coherence tomography (OCT), an imaging modality capable of micrometer cross-sectional resolution, was used to evaluate patients presenting with saccular traumatic aneurysms of the internal carotid artery (ICA). Two consecutive trauma patients diagnosed with saccular traumatic aneurysms of the cervical ICA, per the institutional screening protocol for traumatic cerebrovascular injury, underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with OCT. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated disruption of the intima with preservation and stretching of the more peripheral layers. In 1 patient the traumatic aneurysm was associated with thrombus formation and a separate, more proximal dissection not visible on CT angiography (CTA) or DSA. Imaging with OCT indicates that saccular traumatic aneurysms may develop from disruption of the intima with at least partial preservation of the media and adventitia. This provides in vivo evidence that saccular traumatic aneurysms result from a partial arterial wall tear rather than complete disruption. Interestingly, OCT was also able to detect arterial injury and thrombi not visible on CTA or DSA. PMID:26252460

  14. Management of Symptomatic Venous Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Roberto; Rosati, Maria Sofia; Siani, Andrea; Irace, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Venous aneurysms (VAs) have been described in quite of all the major veins. They represent uncommon events but often life-threatening because of pulmonary or paradoxical embolism. We describe our twelve patients' series with acute pulmonary emboli due to venous aneurysm thrombosis. Our experience underlines the importance of a multilevel case-by-case approach and the immediate venous lower limbs duplex scan evaluation in pulmonary embolism events. Our data confirm that anticoagulant alone is not effective in preventing pulmonary embolism. We believe that all the VAs of the deep venous system of the extremities should be treated with surgery as well as symptomatic superficial venous aneurysm. A simple excision can significantly improve symptoms and prevent pulmonary embolism. PMID:22566766

  15. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy. PMID:26454306

  16. Management of symptomatic venous aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Roberto; Rosati, Maria Sofia; Siani, Andrea; Irace, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Venous aneurysms (VAs) have been described in quite of all the major veins. They represent uncommon events but often life-threatening because of pulmonary or paradoxical embolism. We describe our twelve patients' series with acute pulmonary emboli due to venous aneurysm thrombosis. Our experience underlines the importance of a multilevel case-by-case approach and the immediate venous lower limbs duplex scan evaluation in pulmonary embolism events. Our data confirm that anticoagulant alone is not effective in preventing pulmonary embolism. We believe that all the VAs of the deep venous system of the extremities should be treated with surgery as well as symptomatic superficial venous aneurysm. A simple excision can significantly improve symptoms and prevent pulmonary embolism. PMID:22566766

  17. Changes of size and shape of small, unruptured intracranial aneurysms in repeated computed tomography angiography studies

    PubMed Central

    Kunert, Przemysław; Jaworski, Maciej; Rosiak, Grzegorz; Marchel, Andrzej; Rowiński, Olgierd

    2015-01-01

    years of observation. Daughter sac formation and fast increase in size are strong predictors of aneurysm rupture. PMID:26240617

  18. [Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Kalder, J; Kotelis, D; Jacobs, M J

    2016-09-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) are rare events with an incidence of 5.9 cases per 100,000 persons per year. In Germany approximately 940 TAAA procedures are performed annually. The cause of TAAA is mostly degenerative but they can also occur on the basis of an aortic dissection or connective tissue disease (e. g. Marfan's syndrome). Patients often have severe comorbidities and suffer from hypertension, coronary heart disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly as a result of smoking. Operative treatment is indicated when the maximum aortic diameter has reached 6 cm (> 5 cm in patients with connective tissue disease) or the aortic diameter rapidly increases (> 5 mm/year). Treatment options are open surgical aortic repair with extracorporeal circulation, endovascular repair with branched/fenestrated endografts and parallel grafts (chimneys) or a combination of open and endovascular procedures (hybrid procedures). Mortality rates after both open and endovascular procedures are approximately 8 % depending on the extent of the repair. Furthermore, there are relevant risks of complications, such as paraplegia (up to 20 %) and the necessity for dialysis. In recent years several approaches to minimize these risks have been proposed. Besides cardiopulmonary risk evaluation, clinical assessment of patients by the physician with respect to the patient-specific anatomy influences the allocation of patients to one treatment option or another. Surgery of TAAA should ideally be performed in high-volume centers in order to achieve better results. PMID:27558261

  19. BIOMECHANICS OF ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM

    PubMed Central

    Vorp, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a condition whereby the terminal aorta permanently dilates to dangerous proportions, risking rupture. The biomechanics of AAA has been studied with great interest since aneurysm rupture is a mechanical failure of the degenerated aortic wall and is a significant cause of death in developed countries. In this review article, the importance of considering the biomechanics of AAA is discussed, and then the history and the state-of-the-art of this field is reviewed - including investigations into the biomechanical behavior of AAA tissues, modeling AAA wall stress and factors which influence it, and the potential clinical utility of these estimates in predicting AAA rupture. PMID:17254589

  20. [Coronary aneurysm after drug-eluting stent implantation].

    PubMed

    Paulista, Paulo Paredes; Paulista, Paulo Henrique Dágola; Centemero, Marinella Patrizia; Feres, Fausto

    2008-01-01

    The use of drug-eluting stents aiming at by-pass the disadvantage of stainless steel stents have been associated to late thrombosis after withdrawal of anti-platelet agents. We report a case with another complication, the development of a coronary aneurysm in the stent area more than three years after index procedure. Late chronic local inflammatory responses may be responsible for the weakening, erosion and aneusrysm formation. PMID:18719840

  1. Establishment of a chronic left ventricular aneurysm model in rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Cang-Song; Gao, Chang-Qing; Li, Li-Bing; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tao; Ye, Wei-Hua; Ren, Chong-Lei; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To establish a cost-effective and reproducible procedure for induction of chronic left ventricular aneurysm (LVA) in rabbits. Methods Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was induced in 35 rabbits via concomitant ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery and the circumflex (Cx) branch at the middle portion. Development of AMI was confirmed by ST segment elevation and akinesis of the occluded area. Echocardiography, pathological evaluation, and agar intra-chamber casting were utilized to validate the formation of LVA four weeks after the surgery. Left ventricular end systolic pressure (LVESP) and diastolic pressure (LVEDP) were measured before, immediately after and four weeks after ligation. Dimensions of the ventricular chamber, thickness of the interventricular septum (IVS) and the left ventricular posterior wall (LVPW) left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVEDV), systolic volume (LVESV), and ejection fraction (EF) were recorded by echocardiogram. Results Thirty one (88.6%) rabbits survived myocardial infarction and 26 of them developed aneurysm (83.9%). The mean area of aneurysm was 33.4% ± 2.4% of the left ventricle. LVEF markedly decreased after LVA formation, whereas LVEDV, LVESV and the thickness of IVS as well as the dimension of ventricular chamber from apex to mitral valve annulus significantly increased. LVESP immediately dropped after ligation and recovered to a small extent after LVA formation. LVEDP progressively increased after ligation till LVA formation. Areas in the LV that underwent fibrosis included the apex, anterior wall and lateral wall but not IVS. Agar intra-chamber cast showed that the bulging of LV wall was prominent in the area of aneurysm. Conclusions Ligation of LAD and Cx at the middle portion could induce development of LVA at a mean area ratio of 33.4% ± 2.4% which involves the apex, anterior wall and lateral wall of the left ventricle. PMID:25009567

  2. Glucocorticoids induce focus formation and increase sarcoma viral expression in a mink cell line that contains a murine sarcoma viral genome.

    PubMed Central

    Lowy, D R; Scolnick, E M

    1978-01-01

    Dexamethasone (3 X 10(-10) to 3 X 10(-6) M) induced foci of morphologically transformed cells in a small proportion of a mink cell line that contains the Moloney murine sarcoma viral genome (S+L-). The induction was glucocorticoid specific, since other steroids with glucocorticoid activity (prednisolone, cortisol, and aldosterone) induced foci with an efficiency that paralleled their glucocorticoid activity, and steroids lacking glucocorticoid activity (17B-estradiol, testosterone, and progesterone) failed to induce foci. Viral antigen, as measured by specific immunofluorescence, was localized to the foci. The induction of foci by dexamethasone (3 X 10(-7)) was accompanied by an approximately 10-fold increase in intracellular Moloney murine sarcoma virus-specific RNA and viral p30 antigen. Removal of dexamethasone was followed by the disappearance of foci and a decrease in viral RNA and p30. In this cell system, therefore, glucocorticoids can affect the intracellular levels of type C viral RNA and protein. Images PMID:202733

  3. Multiple coronary aneurysms in a young adult with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heizer, Justin; Petersen, Timothy C.; Flemmer, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection can cause multiple deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system. Emerging evidence has supported a direct association between HIV infection and accelerated atherosclerosis. The mechanism for atherosclerosis in HIV-positive patients is multifactorial, an interplay between conventional risk factors, HIV itself and highly active antiretroviral therapy. The case described is a 29-year-old man with HIV, non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy and with few cardiovascular risk factors, who presented with chest pain and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Cardiac catheterization revealed multiple coronary artery aneurysms in the left main coronary artery and the right coronary artery. Aneurysmal formation may develop from vasculitis, HIV itself, accelerated atherosclerosis, congenital formation or medications (e.g. protease inhibitors). The researchers provide a review of coronary artery disease, aneurysmal formation and vasculitic processes in the context of HIV. As this clinical entity becomes more apparent, alternative therapeutic options may need to be explored. PMID:27168940

  4. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  5. Extracellular Matrix Defects in Aneurysmal Fibulin-4 Mice Predispose to Lung Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Ramnath, Natasja W. M.; van de Luijtgaarden, Koen M.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; van Nimwegen, Menno; van Heijningen, Paula M.; Swagemakers, Sigrid M. A.; van Thiel, Bibi S.; Ridwan, Ruziedi Y.; van Vliet, Nicole; Vermeij, Marcel; Hawinkels, Luuk J. A. C.; de Munck, Anne; Dzyubachyk, Oleh; Meijering, Erik; van der Spek, Peter; Rottier, Robbert; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Hendriks, Rudi W.; Kanaar, Roland; Rouwet, Ellen V.; Kleinjan, Alex; Essers, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study we set out to investigate the clinically observed relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and aortic aneurysms. We tested the hypothesis that an inherited deficiency of connective tissue might play a role in the combined development of pulmonary emphysema and vascular disease. Methods We first determined the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a clinical cohort of aortic aneurysms patients and arterial occlusive disease patients. Subsequently, we used a combined approach comprising pathological, functional, molecular imaging, immunological and gene expression analysis to reveal the sequence of events that culminates in pulmonary emphysema in aneurysmal Fibulin-4 deficient (Fibulin-4R) mice. Results Here we show that COPD is significantly more prevalent in aneurysm patients compared to arterial occlusive disease patients, independent of smoking, other clinical risk factors and inflammation. In addition, we demonstrate that aneurysmal Fibulin-4R/R mice display severe developmental lung emphysema, whereas Fibulin-4+/R mice acquire alveolar breakdown with age and upon infectious stress. This vicious circle is further exacerbated by the diminished antiprotease capacity of the lungs and ultimately results in the development of pulmonary emphysema. Conclusions Our experimental data identify genetic susceptibility to extracellular matrix degradation and secondary inflammation as the common mechanisms in both COPD and aneurysm formation. PMID:25255451

  6. Endovascular Treatment of a Symptomatic Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Chimney and Periscope Techniques for Total Visceral and Renal Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Cariati, Maurizio; Mingazzini, Pietro; Dallatana, Raffaello; Rossi, Umberto G.; Settembrini, Alberto; Santuari, Davide

    2013-05-02

    Conventional endovascular therapy of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with involving visceral and renal arteries is limited by the absence of a landing zone for the aortic endograft. Solutions have been proposed to overcome the problem of no landing zone; however, most of them are not feasible in urgent and high-risk patients. We describe a case that was successfully treated by total endovascular technique with a two-by-two chimney-and-periscope approach in a patient with acute symptomatic type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with supra-anastomotic aneurysm formation involving the renal and visceral arteries and a pseduaneurismatic sac localized in the left ileopsoas muscle.

  7. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:25705591

  8. Resolution of Large Azygos Vein Aneurysm Following Stent-Graft Shunt Placement in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Estelle S.; Williams, David M.; Deeb, G.M.; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-10-15

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a rare connective tissue disorder associated with thin-walled, friable arteries and veins predisposing patients to aneurysm formation, dissection, fistula formation, and vessel rupture. Azygos vein aneurysm is an extremely rare condition which has not been reported in association with EDS in the literature. We present a patient with EDS type IV and interrupted inferior vena cava (IVC) with azygos continuation who developed an azygos vein aneurysm. In order to decrease flow through the azygos vein and reduce the risk of aneurysm rupture, a stent-graft shunt was created from the right hepatic vein to the azygos vein via a transhepatic, retroperitoneal route. At 6 month follow-up the shunt was open and the azygos vein aneurysm had resolved.

  9. The coagulopathy associated with aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Gétaz, E. P.; Louw, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The authors in this article record their experience with eight-four patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Twenty-seven patients (32%) presented with ruptured aneurysms with an overall mortality of 56%. Of the unruptured aneurysms, 67% were operable with a mortality of 5.3%. The highest mortality amongst the patients with ruptured aneurysms was in the group who was shocked. In the group with ruptured aneurysms, of those in whom platelet counts were performed, 50% were abnormally low, and 56% had evidence of abnormal coagulation. Seventy per cent of those with coagulation abnormalities died. In the unruptured group 28.2% had thrombocytopenia but no other abnormalities of coagulation. All patients undergoint aneurysm resection should have a platelet count and a full clotting screen. Therapy should be directed to normalization of the coagulation system. PMID:593992

  10. Intracranial fungal aneurysm caused by Candida endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Wakabayashi, K; Yamazaki, K; Miyakawa, T; Arai, H

    1998-01-01

    We describe a 67-year-old man who died 4 days after suffering a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Autopsy revealed a fresh subarachnoid hemorrhage and a ruptured fungal aneurysm near the trifurcation of the right middle cerebral artery. In comparison with 21 previously reported cases in which the fungal aneurysms were proved to be intracranial, the present case had several characteristic features: the causative fungus of the aneurysm was Candida (only one such case has been reported previously). The aneurysm was caused by direct Candida invasion of the arterial wall from the Candida embolus (previously reported aneurysms have been caused by direct invasion of the arterial wall during fungal meningitis). The source of the Candida was endocarditis (the main sources of fungus in previously reported cases have been sinusitis, dental extraction wounds, and some forms of surgery). We describe the features of this rare autopsy case of a ruptured fungal aneurysm caused by Candida originating from endocarditis and review the literature. PMID:9707334