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Sample records for murine cypt family

  1. Structure, distribution, and expression of an ancient murine endogenous retroviruslike DNA family.

    PubMed Central

    Obata, M M; Khan, A S

    1988-01-01

    An endogenous retroviruslike DNA, B-26, was cloned from a BALB/c mouse embryo gene library by using a generalized murine leukemia virus DNA probe. Southern blot hybridization and nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that B-26 DNA might be a novel member of the GLN DNA family (A. Itin and E. Keshet, J. Virol. 59:301-307, 1986) which contains murine leukemia virus-related pol and env sequences. Northern analysis indicated that B-26-related RNAs of 8.4 and 3.0 kilobases were transcribed in thymus, spleen, brain, and liver tissues of 6-week-old BALB/c mice. Images PMID:3172346

  2. Amplification of an ancestral mammalian L1 family of long interspersed repeated DNA occurred just before the murine radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pascale, E.; Valle, E.; Furano, A.V. )

    1990-12-01

    Each mammalian genus examined so far contains 50,000-100,000 members of an L1 (LINE 1) family of long interspersed repeated DNA elements. Current knowledge on the evolution of L1 families presents a paradox because, although L1 families have been in mammalian genomes since before the mammalian radiation {approximately}80 million years ago, most members of the L1 families are only a few million years old. Accordingly it has been suggested either that the extensive amplification that characterizes present-day L1 families did not occur in the past or that old members were removed as new one were generated. However, the authors show here that an ancestral rodent L1 family was extensively amplified {approximately}10 million years ago and that the relics of this amplification have persisted in modern murine genomes. This amplification occurred just before the divergence of modern murine genera from their common ancestor and identifies the murine node in the lineage of modern muroid rodents The results suggest that repeated amplification of L1 elements is a feature of the evaluation of mammalian genomes and that ancestral amplification events could provide a useful tool for determining mammalian lineages.

  3. Amplification of an ancestral mammalian L1 family of long interspersed repeated DNA occurred just before the murine radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Pascale, E; Valle, E; Furano, A V

    1990-01-01

    Each mammalian genus examined so far contains 50,000-100,000 members of an L1 (LINE 1) family of long interspersed repeated DNA elements. Current knowledge on the evolution of L1 families presents a paradox because, although L1 families have been in mammalian genomes since before the mammalian radiation approximately 80 million years ago, most members of the L1 families are only a few million years old. Accordingly it has been suggested either that the extensive amplification that characterizes present-day L1 families did not occur in the past or that old members were removed as new ones were generated. However, we show here that an ancestral rodent L1 family was extensively amplified approximately 10 million years ago and that the relics (approximately 60,000 copies) of this amplification have persisted in modern murine genomes (Old World rats and mice). This amplification occurred just before the divergence of modern murine genera from their common ancestor and identifies the murine node in the lineage of modern muroid rodents. Our results suggest that repeated amplification of L1 elements is a feature of the evolution of mammalian genomes and that ancestral amplification events could provide a useful tool for determining mammalian lineages. Images PMID:2251288

  4. Role of Murine Cytomegalovirus US22 Gene Family Members in Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Carine; Wagner, Markus; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Holak, Karina; Brune, Wolfram; Campbell, Ann E.; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2003-01-01

    The large cytomegalovirus (CMV) US22 gene family, found in all betaherpesviruses, comprises 12 members in both human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Conserved sequence motifs suggested a common ancestry and related functions for these gene products. Two members of this family, m140 and m141, were recently shown to affect MCMV replication on macrophages. To test the role of all US22 members in cell tropism, we analyzed the growth properties in different cell types of MCMV mutants carrying transposon insertions in all 12 US22 gene family members. When necessary, additional targeted mutants with gene deletions, ATG deletions, and ectopic gene revertants were constructed. Mutants with disruption of genes M23, M24, m25.1, m25.2, and m128 (ie2) showed no obvious growth phenotype, whereas growth of M43 mutants was reduced in a number of cell lines. Genes m142 and m143 were shown to be essential for virus replication. Growth of mutants with insertions into genes M36, m139, m140, and m141 in macrophages was severely affected. The common phenotype of the m139, m140, and m141 mutants was explained by an interaction at the protein level. The M36-dependent macrophage growth phenotype could be explained by the antiapoptotic function of the gene that was required for growth on macrophages but not for growth on other cell types. Together, the comprehensive set of mutants of the US22 gene family suggests that individual family members have diverged through evolution to serve a variety of functions for the virus. PMID:12719548

  5. Crystal structure of murine coronavirus receptor sCEACAM1a[1,4],a member of the carcinoembtyonic antigen family

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Zelus, B. D.; Meijers, R.; Liu, J.-H.; Bergelson, J. M.; Zhang, R.; Duke, N.; Joachimiak, A.; Holmes, K. V.; Wang, J.-H.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School; Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center; Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    CEACAM1 is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family. Isoforms of murine CEACAM1 serve as receptors for mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a murine coronavirus. Here we report the crystal structure of soluble murine sCEACAM1a[1,4], which is composed of two Ig-like domains and has MHV neutralizing activity. Its N-terminal domain has a uniquely folded CC' loop that encompasses key virus-binding residues. This is the first atomic structure of any member of the CEA family, and provides a prototypic architecture for functional exploration of CEA family members. We discuss the structural basis of virus receptor activities of murine CEACAM1 proteins, binding of Neisseria to human CEACAM1, and other homophilic and heterophilic interactions of CEA family members.

  6. Murine Cytomegalovirus Capsid Assembly Is Dependent on US22 Family Gene M140 in Infected Macrophages▿

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Laura K.; Slater, Jacquelyn S.; Cavanaugh, Victoria J.; Newcomb, William W.; Bolin, Lisa L.; Nelson, Christine N.; Fetters, Lisa D.; Tang, Qiyi; Brown, Jay C.; Maul, Gerd G.; Campbell, Ann E.

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages are an important target cell for infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV). A number of viral genes that either are expressed specifically in this cell type or function to optimize CMV replication in this host cell have now been identified. Among these is the murine CMV (MCMV) US22 gene family member M140, a nonessential early gene whose deletion (RVΔ140) leads to significant impairment in virus replication in differentiated macrophages. We have now determined that the defect in replication is at the stage of viral DNA encapsidation. Although the rate of RVΔ140 genome replication and extent of DNA cleavage were comparable to those for revertant virus, deletion of M140 resulted in a significant reduction in the number of viral capsids in the nucleus, and the viral DNA remained sensitive to DNase treatment. These data are indicative of incomplete virion assembly. Steady-state levels of both the major capsid protein (M86) and tegument protein M25 were reduced in the absence of the M140 protein (pM140). This effect may be related to the localization of pM140 to an aggresome-like, microtubule organizing center-associated structure that is known to target misfolded and overexpressed proteins for degradation. It appears, therefore, that pM140 indirectly influences MCMV capsid formation in differentiated macrophages by regulating the stability of viral structural proteins. PMID:19458005

  7. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency. PMID:26729813

  8. Molecular characterization and mapping of murine genes encoding three members of the stefin family of cysteine proteinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, F.W.L.; Hingwo Tsui; Mok, S. Toronto Hospital, Ontario ); Mlinaric, I.; Siminovitch, K.A. Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Stefins or Type 1 cystatins belong to a large, evolutionarily conserved protein superfamily, the members of which inhibit the papain-like cysteine proteinases. The authors report here on the molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of three newly identified members of the murine stefin gene family. These genes, designated herein as mouse stefins 1, 2, and 3, were isolated on the basis of their relatively increased expression in moth-eaten viable compared to normal congenic mouse bone marrow cells. The open reading frames of the stefin cDNAs encode proteins of approximately 11.5 kDa that show between 50 and 92% identity to sequences of stefins isolated from various other species. Data from Southern analysis suggest that the murine stefin gene family encompasses at least 6 and possible 10-20 membranes, all of which appear to be clustered in the genome. Analysis of interspecific backcross mice indicates that the genes encoding the three mouse stefins all map to mouse chromosome 16, a localization that is consistent with the recent assignment of the human stefin A gene to a region of conserved homology between human chromosome 3q and the proximal region of mouse chromosome 16. 51 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Murine Adseverin (D5), a Novel Member of the Gelsolin Family, and Murine Adseverin Are Induced by Interleukin-9 in T-Helper Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Robbens, Johan; Louahed, Jamila; De Pestel, Kathleen; Van Colen, Inge; Ampe, Christophe; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Renauld, Jean-Christophe

    1998-01-01

    We identified a number of upregulated genes by differential screening of interleukin-9-stimulated T-helper lymphocytes. Interestingly, two of these messengers encode proteins that are similar to proteins of the gelsolin family. The first displays a typical structure of six homologous domains and shows a high level of identity (90%) with bovine adseverin (or scinderin) and may therefore be considered the murine adseverin homolog. The second encodes a protein with only five segments. Sequence comparison shows that most of the fifth segment and a short amino-terminal part of the sixth segment (amino acids 528 to 628 of adseverin) are missing, and thus, this form may represent an alternatively spliced product derived from the same gene. The corresponding protein is called mouse adseverin (D5). We expressed both proteins in Escherichia coli and show that mouse adseverin displays the typical characteristics of all members of the gelsolin family with respect to actin binding (capping, severing, and nucleation) and its regulation by Ca2+. In contrast, mouse adseverin (D5) fails to nucleate actin polymerization, although like mouse adseverin and gelsolin, it severs and caps actin filaments in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Adseverin is present in all of the tissues and most of the cell lines tested, although at low concentrations. Mouse adseverin (D5) was found only in blood cells and in cell lines derived from T-helper lymphocytes and mast cells, where it is weakly expressed. In a gel filtration experiment, we demonstrated that mouse adseverin forms a 1:2 complex with G actin which is stable only in the presence of Ca2+, while no stable complex was observed for mouse adseverin (D5). PMID:9671468

  10. Murine GBP-5, a new member of the murine guanylate-binding protein family, is coordinately regulated with other GBPs in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tam Thuan; Hu, Yan; Widney, Daniel P; Mar, Rebecca A; Smith, Jeffrey B

    2002-08-01

    A new murine member of the interferon (IFN)-inducible guanylate-binding protein (GBP) family was cloned in a search for glucocorticoid-attenuated response genes induced in the lung during endotoxemia. The full-length MuGBP-5 cDNA encodes a 590 amino acid residue protein with GTP binding motifs identical to those in human GBP-1 (HuGBP-1) and a similar isoprenylation sequence at the C-terminus. An alternatively spliced form of MuGBP-5 that lacks the second GTP binding motif and differs at the C-terminus was also identified. The MuGBP-5 gene is located on chromosome 3, near MuGBP-3 and MuGBP-2, and has a genomic organization similar to other GBP genes. To facilitate the evaluation of GBP family message expression, we constructed RNase protection assay probes for MuGBP-1, MuGBP-2, MuGBP-3, MuGBP-4/Mag-2 (macrophage activation gene-2), and MuGBP-5 and validated their use in Swiss Webster, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice. In BALB/c mice, all five MuGBPs were induced in multiple organs during endotoxemia, and all had a similar pattern of expression in different tissues. With minor quantitative differences, the MuGBPs also had similar patterns of response to IFN-gamma, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in RAW 264.7 and Swiss 3T3 cells. The coordinate expression of the MuGBPs suggests that they share common mechanisms of regulation. PMID:12396730

  11. Identification of BC005512 as a DNA Damage Responsive Murine Endogenous Retrovirus of GLN Family Involved in Cell Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Qi, Xinming; Gong, Likun; Xing, Guozhen; Chen, Min; Miao, Lingling; Yao, Jun; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Furihata, Chie; Luan, Yang; Ren, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Genotoxicity assessment is of great significance in drug safety evaluation, and microarray is a useful tool widely used to identify genotoxic stress responsive genes. In the present work, by using oligonucleotide microarray in an in vivo model, we identified an unknown gene BC005512 (abbreviated as BC, official full name: cDNA sequence BC005512), whose expression in mouse liver was specifically induced by seven well-known genotoxins (GTXs), but not by non-genotoxins (NGTXs). Bioinformatics revealed that BC was a member of the GLN family of murine endogenous retrovirus (ERV). However, the relationship to genotoxicity and the cellular function of GLN are largely unknown. Using NIH/3T3 cells as an in vitro model system and quantitative real-time PCR, BC expression was specifically induced by another seven GTXs, covering diverse genotoxicity mechanisms. Additionally, dose-response and linear regression analysis showed that expression level of BC in NIH/3T3 cells strongly correlated with DNA damage, measured using the alkaline comet assay,. While in p53 deficient L5178Y cells, GTXs could not induce BC expression. Further functional studies using RNA interference revealed that down-regulation of BC expression induced G1/S phase arrest, inhibited cell proliferation and thus suppressed cell growth in NIH/3T3 cells. Together, our results provide the first evidence that BC005512, a member from GLN family of murine ERV, was responsive to DNA damage and involved in cell growth regulation. These findings could be of great value in genotoxicity predictions and contribute to a deeper understanding of GLN biological functions. PMID:22514700

  12. The BET family of proteins targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus integration near transcription start sites

    PubMed Central

    De Rijck, Jan; de Kogel, Christine; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vets, Sofie; Ashkar, Sara El; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D; Landuyt, Bart; Husson, Steven J.; Busschots, Katrien; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Summary A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome in the host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4) and MLV integrase specifically interact and co-localize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75, retargets MLV integration away from TSS and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conform to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration pattern. Together these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors. PMID:24183673

  13. Neuroprotective role of trans-resveratrol in a murine model of familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Porquet, David; Griñán-Ferré, Christian; Ferrer, Isidre; Camins, Antoni; Sanfeliu, Coral; Del Valle, Jaume; Pallàs, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid-β protein precursor/presenilin 1 (AβPP/PS1) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has provided robust neuropathological hallmarks of familial AD-like pattern. AD is a neurodegenerative process that causes severe cognitive impairment; it is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau forms and by oxidative and inflammatory processes in brain. Currently, efforts are made to understand biochemical pathways because there is no effective therapy for AD. Resveratrol is a polyphenol that induces expression and activation of several neuroprotective pathways involving Sirtuin1 and AMPK. The objective of this work was to assess the effect of oral resveratrol administration on AβPP/PS1 mice. Long-term resveratrol treatment significantly prevented memory loss as measured by the object recognition test. Moreover, resveratrol reduced the amyloid burden and increased mitochondrial complex IV protein levels in mouse brain. These protective effects of resveratrol were mainly mediated by increased activation of Sirtuin 1 and AMPK pathways in mice. However, an increase has been observed in IL1β and TNF gene expression, indicating that resveratrol promoted changes in inflammatory processes, although no changes were detected in other key actors of the oxidative stress pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that resveratrol is able to reduce the harmful process that occurs in AβPP/PS1 mouse hippocampus, preventing memory loss. PMID:25024312

  14. Members of the murine Pate family are predominantly expressed in the epididymis in a segment-specific fashion and regulated by androgens and other testicular factors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Spermatozoa leaving the testis are not able to fertilize the egg in vivo. They must undergo further maturation in the epididymis. Proteins secreted to the epididymal lumen by the epithelial cells interact with the spermatozoa and enable these maturational changes, and are responsible for proper storage conditions before ejaculation. The present study was carried out in order to characterize the expression of a novel Pate (prostate and testis expression) gene family, coding for secreted cysteine-rich proteins, in the epididymis. Methods Murine genome databases were searched and sequence comparisons were performed to identify members of the Pate gene family, and their expression profiles in several mouse tissues were characterized by RT-PCR. Alternate transcripts were identified by RT-PCR, sequencing and Northern hybridization. Also, to study the regulation of expression of Pate family genes by the testis, quantitative (q) RT-PCR analyses were performed to compare gene expression levels in the epididymides of intact mice, gonadectomized mice, and gonadectomized mice under testosterone replacement treatment. Results A revised family tree of Pate genes is presented, including a previously uncharacterized Pate gene named Pate-X, and the data revealed that Acrv1 and Sslp1 should also be considered as members of the Pate family. Alternate splicing was observed for Pate-X, Pate-C and Pate-M. All the Pate genes studied are predominantly expressed in the epididymis, whereas expression in the testis and prostate is notably lower. Loss of androgens and/or testicular luminal factors was observed to affect the epididymal expression of several Pate genes. Conclusions We have characterized a gene cluster consisting of at least 14 expressed Pate gene members, including Acrv1, Sslp1 and a previously uncharacterized gene which we named Pate-X. The genes code for putatively secreted, cysteine-rich proteins with a TFP/Ly-6/uPAR domain. Members of the Pate gene cluster

  15. HSP86 and HSP84 exhibit cellular specificity of expression and co-precipitate with an HSP70 family member in the murine testis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruppi, C. M.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This study extends to the protein level our previous observations, which had established the stage and cellular specificity of expression of hsp86 and hsp84 in the murine testis in the absence of exogenous stress. Immunoblot analysis was used to demonstrate that HSP86 protein was present throughout testicular development and that its levels increased with the appearance of differentiating germ cells. HSP86 was most abundant in the germ cell population and was present at significantly lower levels in the somatic cells. By contrast, the HSP84 protein was detected in the somatic cells of the testis rather than in germ cells. The steady-state levels of HSP86 and HSP84 paralleled the pattern of the expression of their respective mRNAs, suggesting that regulation at the level of translation was not a major mechanism controlling hsp90 gene expression in testicular cells. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that a 70-kDa protein coprecipitated with the HSP86/HSP84 proteins in testicular homogenates. This protein was identified as an HSP70 family member by immunoblot analysis, suggesting that HSP70 and HSP90 family members interact in testicular cells.

  16. Etomidate induces cytotoxic effects and gene expression in a murine leukemia macrophage cell line (RAW264.7).

    PubMed

    Wu, Rick Sai-Chuen; Wu, King-Chuen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chiou, Shang-Ming; Yu, Chun-Shu; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2011-06-01

    Etomidate is an important tool in the arsenal of the emergency physician, and it has been used in a variety of scenarios for both intubation and procedural sedation. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of etomidate including induction of apoptosis, and levels of protein and gene expressions associated with apoptotic cell death in murine leukemia RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Cytotoxic and apoptotic responses to etomidate of RAW264.7 cells, including cell morphological changes and cell viability were examined and measured by phase-contrast microscopy and flow cytometric assay, respectively. Results indicated that etomidate increased apoptotic cell morphological changes and reduced cell viability in RAW264.7 cells. 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining also showed that etomidate induced the formation of apoptotic bodies, a characteristic of apoptosis. Results from Western blotting indicated that etomidate enhanced the levels of cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), endonuclease G (Endo G), caspase-9, caspase-3 active form and Bax proteins, but it inhibited the expression of Bcl-xl, leading to apoptosis. DNA microarray assay indicated that etomidate increased the expression of 17 genes (LOC676175; Gm14636; 2810021G02Rik; Iltifb; Olfr1167; Ttc30b; Olfr766; Gas5; Rgs1; LOC280487; V1rd4; Hist1h2bc; V1rj3; Gm10366; Olfr192; Gm10002 and Cspp1) and reduced the expression of 15 genes: (Gm10152; Gm5334; Olfr216; Lcn9; Gm10683; Gm5100; Tdgf1; Cypt2; Gm5595; 1700018F24Rik; Gm10417; Maml2; Olfr591; Trdn and Apol7c). In conclusion, etomidate induced cytotoxic and apoptotic effects the in murine leukemia RAW264.7 cells in vitro. PMID:21737642

  17. Distinct transcripts are recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for a member of the murine HSP70 gene family, HSP70.2, in various reproductive tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of hsp70.2, an hsp70 gene family member, originally characterized by its high levels of expression in germ cells in the adult mouse testis, was detected in several other reproductive tissues, including epididymis, prostate, and seminal vesicles, as well as in extraembryonic tissues of mid-gestation fetuses. In addition, hybridization with RNA probes transcribed in the sense orientation surprisingly indicated the presence of slightly larger "antisense" transcripts in several tissues. The levels of antisense transcripts varied among the tissues, with the highest signal detected in the prostate and no signal being detectable in the testis. Consistent with these results, in situ hybridization analysis clearly localized the sense-orientation transcripts to pachytene spermatocytes, while no antisense-orientation transcripts were observed in adjacent sections of the same tubules. Our findings have thus shown that although hsp70.2 was expressed abundantly and in a highly stage-specific manner in the male germ line, it was also expressed in other murine tissues. Furthermore, we have made the surprising observation of antisense transcription of the hsp70.2 gene in several mouse tissues, revealing another level of complexity in the regulation and function of heat shock proteins.

  18. Developmentally regulated expression of APG-1, a member of heat shock protein 110 family in murine male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Y; Kimura, T; Nishiyama, H; Noda, Y; Fujita, J

    1997-04-01

    Apg-1 encodes a heat shock protein belonging to the heat shock protein 110 family, and is inducible by a 32 degrees C to 39 degrees C heat shock. Northern blot analysis of the testis from immature and adult mice, and of the purified germ cells revealed the quantitative change of the apg-1 transcripts during germ cell development. By in situ hybridization histochemistry the expressions of the apg-1 transcripts were detected in germ cells at specific stages of development including spermatocytes and spermatids. Although heat-induction of the apg-1 transcripts was observed in W/Wv mutant testis lacking germ cells, it was not detected in wild-type testis nor in the purified germ cells. Thus, the apg-1 expression is not heat-regulated but developmentally regulated in germ cells, suggesting that APG-1 plays a role in normal development of germ cells. PMID:9144406

  19. Differential effects of two pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 gene family on murine bone quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Lisa Marie

    Bax and Hrk are pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 gene family. Both Bax and Hrk have been previously implicated in ovarian cell survival. Effects on bone cells have also been studied in several members of the Bcl-2 gene family; thus, the focus of this work was to characterize the bone quality of mice deficient in Bax or Hrk. Bone quality of various age groups (3, 6, 12, 6 and 22 months) of Bax-knockout (KO) and Hrk-KO female mice were compared to age-matched control female mice. Additional groups of 6-month mice were ovariectomized (OVX) to determine whether effects are dependent on ovarian function. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry was performed on all mice to determine bone mineral density (BMD). To evaluate bone mechanical properties, 3-point bending, torsion testing and femoral neck fracture were performed on femora, while compression was performed on individual vertebrae. Mechanical properties were rationalized through evaluation of structural (strut analysis, micro computed tomography), remodeling (histomorphometry, osteoclast staining) and material (back-scattered electron imaging, x-ray diffraction) properties. Aged Bax-KO mice do not experience the loss in BMD, bone mechanics and trabecular bone structural properties typically observed with age. Enhanced ovarian cell numbers in Bax-KO mice likely indirectly leads to this enhanced bone phenotype. Ovariectomy results in the loss of the enhanced trabecular bone phenotype, but does not affect the cortical bone phenotype. As such, cortical bone may be protected from typical OVX effects due to sustained osteoblast function in Bax-KO mice. By contrast, young Hrk-KO mice exhibit higher BMD and trabecular bone structural properties compared to control mice, coupled with a compromised mechanical integrity. This subtle transient osteopetrotic-like phenotype is likely influenced by a potentially augmented osteoblast survival, albeit with a compromised activity. This osteopetrotic-like phenotype, and the effect of Hrk

  20. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  1. Antimicrobial proteins of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, P S; Eisenhauer, P B; Harwig, S S; van den Barselaar, M T; van Furth, R; Lehrer, R I

    1993-01-01

    Three murine microbicidal proteins (MUMPs) were purified from cells of the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 that had been activated by gamma interferon. Similar proteins were also present in nonactivated RAW264.7 cells, in cells of the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, and in resident and activated murine peritoneal macrophages. MUMP-1, MUMP-2, and MUMP-3 killed Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. MUMP-1 resembled an H1 histone but was unusual because its N-terminal residue (serine) was not N acetylated. Although MUMP-2 was N terminally blocked, its high lysine/arginine ratio and its reactivity with an antibody to H1 histones suggested that it also belonged to the H1 histone family. MUMP-3 was identical to histone H2B in 30 of 30 amino-terminal residues. Although the antimicrobial properties of histones have been recognized for decades, this is the first evidence that such proteins may endow the lysosomal apparatus of macrophages with nonoxidative antimicrobial potential. Other MUMPs, including some with a more restricted antimicrobial spectrum and one that appeared to be induced in RAW264.7 cells after gamma interferon stimulation, were noted but remain to be characterized. Images PMID:8514411

  2. Dynamic expression of Six family genes in the dental mesenchyme and the epithelial ameloblast stem/progenitor cells during murine tooth development

    PubMed Central

    Nonomura, Koji; Takahashi, Masanori; Wakamatsu, Yoshio; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Osumi, Noriko

    2010-01-01

    Six family transcription factor genes play multiple and crucial roles in the development of the vertebrate sensory system including the eye, olfactory epithelium and otic vesicle, and these genes are highly expressed in the neural crest-derived cranial mesenchymal cells in the mouse embryo. However, expression patterns have yet to be determined for the Six family genes in the developing tooth germ. In this study, we examined expression of six members of the Six family genes in the dental mesenchyme and the dental epithelium of the developing tooth germs in mice by in situ hybridization. We found dynamic expression patterns for Six1, Six2, Six4 and Six5 in the oral epithelium and mesenchymal cells with distinct expression patterns at the early stage before invagination of the dental epithelium. In addition, expression of Six1 and Six4 was observed in the inner enamel epithelium of the incisor and molar tooth germs at the cap stage. Expression of Six5 was maintained in the bell stage tooth germs, and intense expression of Six1 and Six4 was detected not only in the mesenchyme-derived dental follicle but also in the proliferating inner enamel epithelium of the labial cervical loop of the incisor tooth germ. Taken together, our results suggest that dynamic expression of Six family genes represents specific stages of the developing tooth germ. This dynamic expression is embodied in changes in both space and over time, and these changes in expression suggest that Six family genes may participate in tooth germ morphogenesis and the proliferation and/or differentiation of the incisor ameloblast stem/progenitor cells. PMID:19900183

  3. Ascofuranone stimulates expression of adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor through the modulation of mitogen activated protein kinase family members in 3T3-L1, murine pre-adipocyte cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Young-Chae; Cho, Hyun-Ji

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascofuranone increases expression of adiponectin and PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibitors for MEK and JNK increased the expression of adiponectin and PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascofuranone significantly suppressed phosho-ERK, while increasing phospho-p38. -- Abstract: Ascofuranone, an isoprenoid antibiotic, was originally isolated as a hypolipidemic substance from a culture broth of the phytopathogenic fungus, Ascochyta visiae. Adiponectin is mainly synthesized by adipocytes. It relieves insulin resistance by decreasing the plasma triglycerides and improving glucose uptake, and has anti-atherogenic properties. Here, we found that ascofuranone increases expression of adiponectin and PPAR{gamma}, a major transcription factor for adiponectin, in 3T3-L1, murine pre-adipocytes cell line, without promoting accumulation of lipid droplets. Ascofuranone induced expression of adiponectin, and increases the promoter activity of adiponectin and PPRE, PPAR response element, as comparably as a PPAR{gamma} agonist, rosiglitazone, that stimulates lipid accumulation in the preadipocyte cell line. Moreover, inhibitors for MEK and JNK, like ascofuranone, considerably increased the expression of adiponectin and PPAR{gamma}, while a p38 inhibitor significantly suppressed. Ascofuranone significantly suppressed ERK phosphorylation, while increasing p38 phosphorylation, during adipocyte differentiation program. These results suggest that ascofuranone regulates the expression of adiponectin and PPAR{gamma} through the modulation of MAP kinase family members.

  4. Murine Norovirus: Propagation, Quantification and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seungmin; Alhatlani, Bader; Arias, Armando; Caddy, Sarah L; Christodoulou, Constantina; Cunha, Juliana; Emmott, Ed; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta; Kolawole, Abimbola; Lu, Jia; Rippinger, Christine; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Thorne, Lucy; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a positive-sense, plus-stranded RNA virus in the Caliciviridae family. It is the most common pathogen in biomedical research colonies. MNV is also related to the human noroviruses, which cause the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Like the human noroviruses, MNV is an enteric virus that replicates in the intestine and is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. MNV replicates in murine macrophages and dendritic cells in cells in culture and in the murine host. This virus is often used to study mechanisms in norovirus biology, because the human noroviruses are refractory to growth in cell culture. MNV combines the availability of a cell culture and reverse genetics system with the ability to study infection in the native host. Herein, we describe a panel of techniques that are commonly used to study MNV biology. PMID:24789596

  5. The nuclear IκB family protein IκBNS influences the susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shuhei; Hara, Akira; Isagawa, Takayuki; Manabe, Ichiro; Takeda, Kiyoshi; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear IκB family protein IκBNS is expressed in T cells and plays an important role in Interferon (IFN)-γ and Interleukin (IL)-2 production. IκB-ζ, the most similar homolog of IκBNS, plays an important role in the generation of T helper (Th)17 cells in cooperation with RORγt, a master regulator of Th17 cells. Thus, IκB-ζ deficient mice are resistant to Th17-dependent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, IκB-ζ deficient mice develop the autoimmune-like Sjögren syndrome with aging. Here we found that IκBNS-deficient (Nfkbid-/-) mice show resistance against developing Th17-dependent EAE. We found that Nfkbid-/- T cells have decreased expression of IL-17-related genes and RORγt in response to Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β1 and IL-6 stimulation. Thus, IκBNS plays a pivotal role in the generation of Th17 cells and in the control of Th17-dependent EAE. PMID:25347393

  6. Cloning of murine ferrochelatase.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D A; Frasier, F

    1991-01-01

    Ferrochelatase (protoheme ferro-lyase, EC 4.99.1.1) catalyzes the last step in the heme biosynthetic pathway, the chelation of ferrous iron and protoporphyrin to form heme. The activity of ferrochelatase is deficient in the inherited disease protoporphyria. In this study, murine ferrochelatase cDNAs were obtained by screening cDNA libraries with an oligonucleotide probe. The derived amino acid sequence of murine ferrochelatase has 47% identity with the recently cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae ferrochelatase, but it is not significantly similar to other published sequences. Results of Southern blotting are consistent with a single murine ferrochelatase gene, while Northern blotting demonstrates two ferrochelatase transcripts in all tissues examined. The ferrochelatase protein and mRNAs have different relative concentrations in different tissues. The cloning of murine ferrochelatase cDNAs provides the basis for future studies on ferrochelatase gene expression and on the identification of the molecular defect in protoporphyria. Images PMID:1704134

  7. Human and murine erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    An, Xiuli; Schulz, Vincent P.; Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Research into the fundamental mechanisms of erythropoiesis has provided critical insights into inherited and acquired disorders of the erythrocyte. Studies of human erythropoiesis have primarily utilized in-vitro systems, whereas murine models have provided insights from in-vivo studies. This report reviews recent insights into human and murine erythropoiesis gained from transcriptome-based analyses. Recent findings The availability of high-throughput genomic methodologies has allowed attainment of detailed gene expression data from cells at varying developmental and differentiation stages of erythropoiesis. Transcriptome analyses of human and murine reveal both stage and species-specific similarities and differences across terminal erythroid differentiation. Erythroid-specific long noncoding RNAs exhibit poor sequence conservation between human and mouse. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing reveal that complex, dynamic, stage-specific programs of alternative splicing program are utilized during terminal erythroid differentiation. Transcriptome data provide a significant resource for understanding mechanisms of normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. Understanding these processes will provide innovative strategies to detect, diagnose, prevent, and treat hematologic disease. Summary Understanding the shared and different mechanisms controlling human and murine erythropoiesis will allow investigators to leverage the best model system to provide insights in normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. PMID:25719574

  8. Caspase deficiency alters the murine gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, B M; Hildebrand, F; Kubica, M; Goosens, D; Del Favero, J; Declercq, W; Raes, J; Vandenabeele, P

    2011-01-01

    Caspases are aspartate-specific cysteine proteases that have an essential role in apoptosis and inflammation, and contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis in the intestine. These facts, together with the knowledge that caspases are implicated in host-microbe crosstalk, prompted us to investigate the effect of caspase (Casp)1, -3 and -7 deficiency on the composition of the murine gut microbiota. We observed significant changes in the abundance of the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla, in particular the Lachnospiraceae, Porphyromonodaceae and Prevotellacea families, when comparing Casp-1, -7 and -3 knockout mice with wild-type mice. Our data point toward an intricate relationship between these caspases and the composition of the murine gut microflora. PMID:22012254

  9. A pan inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immunogenic modulation and sensitizes murine and human carcinoma cells to antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing: implications for combination therapy with cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Renee N.; Duncan, Brynn B.; Fry, Terry J.; Jones, Barry; Bachovchin, William W.; Kiritsy, Christopher P.; Lai, Jack H.; Wu, Wengen; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Yuxin; Tsang, Kwong-Yok; Hodge, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that pan inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity and/or structure homologs (DASH), including ARI-4175, can mediate tumor regression by immune-mediated mechanisms. This study assessed the potential of combining ARI-4175 with cancer vaccines. We evaluated ARI-4175's effect on immunogenic modulation, ability to sensitize tumor cells to antigen-specific CTL killing, effect on immune-cell subsets and function, and antitumor activity in 2 tumor models, both as a monotherapy and in combination with a recombinant viral or dendritic cell (DC)-based tumor-cell vaccine. ARI-4175's effects on the growth, surface phenotype, and antigen-specific CTL-mediated lysis of murine and human carcinoma cell lines were assessed in vitro. In vivo, C57BL-6 mice were treated orally with ARI-4175, after which splenocytes were assessed by flow cytometry and functional assays. Antitumor studies were performed in murine models of colon carcinoma (MC38-CEA+ in CEA-transgenic C57BL-6 mice) and rhabdomyosarcoma (M3-9-M in C57BL-6 mice). Mice received oral ARI-4175 alone or in combination with a vaccine consisting of recombinant vaccinia/fowlpox CEA-TRICOM (colon model) or a DC-based tumor-cell vaccine (rhabdomyosarcoma model). Exposure to ARI-4175 had no effect on the proliferation or viability of carcinoma cells in vitro; however, it did alter tumor phenotype, making murine and human tumor cells more sensitive to antigen-specific CTL killing. Assessment of immune-cell subsets and function indicated that ARI-4175 increased levels of natural killer cells and DCs. Detrimental immune effects, including reduced T effector cells and increased immunosuppressive cells (Tregs, MDSCs), were normalized when treatment stopped, suggesting that scheduling is critical when combining this agent with vaccine. As a monotherapy, ARI-4175 had potent antitumor activity in both tumor models, and had even greater effects when combined with a vaccine (either DC-based or poxviral vector

  10. A pan inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immunogenic modulation and sensitizes murine and human carcinoma cells to antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing: implications for combination therapy with cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Renee N; Duncan, Brynn B; Fry, Terry J; Jones, Barry; Bachovchin, William W; Kiritsy, Christopher P; Lai, Jack H; Wu, Wengen; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Yuxin; Tsang, Kwong-Yok; Hodge, James W

    2014-05-30

    Recent studies have suggested that pan inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity and/or structure homologs (DASH), including ARI-4175, can mediate tumor regression by immune-mediated mechanisms. This study assessed the potential of combining ARI-4175 with cancer vaccines. We evaluated ARI-4175's effect on immunogenic modulation, ability to sensitize tumor cells to antigen-specific CTL killing, effect on immune-cell subsets and function, and antitumor activity in 2 tumor models, both as a monotherapy and in combination with a recombinant viral or dendritic cell (DC)-based tumor-cell vaccine. ARI-4175's effects on the growth, surface phenotype, and antigen-specific CTL-mediated lysis of murine and human carcinoma cell lines were assessed in vitro. In vivo, C57BL-6 mice were treated orally with ARI-4175, after which splenocytes were assessed by flow cytometry and functional assays. Antitumor studies were performed in murine models of colon carcinoma (MC38-CEA(+) in CEA-transgenic C57BL-6 mice) and rhabdomyosarcoma (M3-9-M in C57BL-6 mice). Mice received oral ARI-4175 alone or in combination with a vaccine consisting of recombinant vaccinia/fowlpox CEA-TRICOM (colon model) or a DC-based tumor-cell vaccine (rhabdomyosarcoma model). Exposure to ARI-4175 had no effect on the proliferation or viability of carcinoma cells in vitro; however, it did alter tumor phenotype, making murine and human tumor cells more sensitive to antigen-specific CTL killing. Assessment of immune-cell subsets and function indicated that ARI-4175 increased levels of natural killer cells and DCs. Detrimental immune effects, including reduced T effector cells and increased immunosuppressive cells (Tregs, MDSCs), were normalized when treatment stopped, suggesting that scheduling is critical when combining this agent with vaccine. As a monotherapy, ARI-4175 had potent antitumor activity in both tumor models, and had even greater effects when combined with a vaccine (either DC-based or poxviral

  11. Shared idiotypes and restricted immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain genes characterize murine autoantibodies of various specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Monestier, M; Manheimer-Lory, A; Bellon, B; Painter, C; Dang, H; Talal, N; Zanetti, M; Schwartz, R; Pisetsky, D; Kuppers, R

    1986-01-01

    The study of the Ig variable region heavy chain (VH) genes used to encode antibodies specific for self-epitopes from murine hybridomas showed that three VH families are primarily utilized: VH J558, the largest family, and VH QPC52 and VH 7183, the families most proximal to the Ig joining region heavy chain genes. These monoclonal autoantibodies express cross-reactive idiotopes shared by rheumatoid factors and antibodies specific for Sm. The expression of these idiotypes is independent of major histocompatibility complex and Ig constant region heavy chain haplotypes, self-antigen specificity, and even the VH gene family utilized. Though the experiments described here are limited to murine autoantibodies, similarities exist between murine and human autoimmune diseases. Studies that aim to investigate the relationship between VH gene expression and the presence of cross-reactive idiotypes among human autoantibodies should enable us to better understand the mechanisms of autoimmunity and self-tolerance. Images PMID:2427543

  12. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Parola, P.; Vogelaers, D.; Roure, C.; Janbon, F.; Raoult, D.

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers. PMID:9866749

  13. Antibacterial activity of recombinant murine beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, T; Tanaka, A

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant murine beta interferon was protective and therapeutic for mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection in vivo. The recombinant murine beta interferon caused enhanced H2O2 release by macrophages in vivo, but not in vitro. PMID:3343048

  14. Immunosuppressive effect of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Loh, L; Hudson, J B

    1980-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus suppressed the ability of spleen cells to respond to mitogens in vitro. The degree of suppression was proportional to the multiplicity of infection. This effect could not be explained by cytolysis of lymphocytes, an alteration in the kinetics of the response to mitogen, or a direct competition between virions and mitogen molecules for cell-surface receptors. Nor was it due to simple contact between cell and virus, since ultraviolet-inactivated murine cytomegalovirus failed to suppress the response to mitogens. Reconstitution experiments were performed which involved mixing various combinations of infected and uninfected macrophages and lymphocytes. Under these conditions, it was found that the infected macrophages and lymphocytes. Under these conditions, it was found that the infected macrophages had an impaired capacity to mediate the response ot T lymphocytes to concanavalin A. This suggests that murine cytomegalovirus may cause immunosuppression indirectly by interfering with macrophage function. PMID:6244228

  15. Expression of the Elm1 Gene, a Novel Gene of the CCN (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, Cyr61/Cef10, and Neuroblastoma Overexpressed Gene) Family, Suppresses In Vivo Tumor Growth and Metastasis of K-1735 Murine Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Shindo-Okada, Nobuko; Tani, Masachika; Nagamachi, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Kaori; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Toma, Hiroshi; Yokota, Jun

    1998-01-01

    We previously isolated a partial cDNA fragment of a novel gene, Elm1 (expressed in low-metastatic cells), that is expressed in low-metastatic but not in high-metastatic K-1735 mouse melanoma cells. Here we determined the full-length cDNA structure of Elm1 and investigated the effect of Elm1 expression on growth and metastatic potential of K-1735 cells. The Elm1 gene encodes a predicted protein of 367 amino acids showing ∼40% amino acid identity with the CCN (connective tissue growth factor [CTGF], Cyr61/Cef10, neuroblastoma overexpressed gene [Nov]) family proteins, which consist of secreted cysteine-rich proteins with growth regulatory functions. Elm1 is also a cysteine-rich protein and contains a signal peptide and four domains conserved in the CCN family proteins. Elm1 was highly conserved, expressed ubiquitously in diverse organs, and mapped to mouse chromosome 15. High-metastatic K-1735 M-2 cells, which did not express Elm1, were transfected with an Elm1 expression vector, and several stable clones with Elm1 expression were established. The in vivo growth rates of cells expressing a high level of Elm1 were remarkably slower than those of cells expressing a low level of Elm1. Metastatic potential of transfectants was reduced in proportion to the level of Elm1 expression. Thus, Elm1 is a novel gene of CCN family that can suppress the in vivo growth and metastatic potential of K-1735 mouse melanoma cells. PMID:9449709

  16. Genome Sequences of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Detected in Wild House Mice (Mus musculus)

    PubMed Central

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Moens, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Using generic PCR, we identified a variant of murine pneumotropic virus (MptV) (family Polyomaviridae) in 3 wild house mice (Mus musculus). The fully amplified and sequenced genomes display considerable differences from the MptV genomes published previously and enlighten us on the natural diversity of rodent polyomaviruses. PMID:26798094

  17. Family Preservation & Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCroskey, Jacquelyn; Meezan, William

    This book reports a study of the outcomes of home-based family preservation services for abusive and neglectful families in Los Angeles County. Using the Family Assessment Form, the research project evaluated services provided by two voluntary agencies, and focused on changes in family functioning between the opening and closing of services during…

  18. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  19. Homeobox family Hoxc localization during murine palate formation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Azumi; Katayama, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takehito; Imura, Hideto; Natsume, Nagato; Sugahara, Toshio; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2016-07-01

    Homeobox genes play important roles in craniofacial morphogenesis. However, the characteristics of the transcription factor Hoxc during palate formation remain unclear. We examined the immunolocalization patterns of Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6 in palatogenesis of cleft palate (Eh/Eh) mice. On the other hand, mutations in the FGF/FGFR pathway are exclusively associated with syndromic forms of cleft palate. We also examined the immunolocalization of Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 to clarify their relationships with Hoxc in palatogenesis. Some palatal epithelial cells showed Hoxc5 labeling, while almost no labeling of mesenchymal cells was observed in +/+ mice. As palate formation progressed in +/+ mice, Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6 were observed in medial epithelial seam cells. Hoxc5 and Hoxc6 were detected in the oral epithelium. The palatal mesenchyme also showed intense staining for Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 with progression of palate formation. In contrast, the palatal shelves of Eh/Eh mice exhibited impaired horizontal growth and failed to fuse, resulting in a cleft. Hoxc5 was observed in a few epithelial cells and diffusely in the mesenchyme of Eh/Eh palatal shelves. No or little labeling of Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 was detected in the cleft palate of Eh/Eh mice. These findings suggest that Hoxc genes are involved in palatogenesis. Furthermore, there may be the differences in the localization pattern between Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6. Additionally, Hoxc distribution in palatal cells during palate development may be correlated with FGF signaling. (228/250 words) © 2016 Japanese Teratology Society. PMID:26718736

  20. IL-10 regulates murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhinan; Bahtiyar, Gul; Zhang, Na; Liu, Lanzhen; Zhu, Ping; Robert, Marie E; McNiff, Jennifer; Madaio, Michael P; Craft, Joe

    2002-08-15

    MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6(lpr) (MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr); MRL-Fas(lpr)) mice develop a spontaneous lupus syndrome closely resembling human systemic lupus erythematosus. To define the role of IL-10 in the regulation of murine lupus, IL-10 gene-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) MRL-Fas(lpr) (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-)) mice were generated and their disease phenotype was compared with littermates with one or two copies of an intact IL-10 locus (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/-) and MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/+) mice, respectively). MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice developed severe lupus, with earlier appearance of skin lesions, increased lymphadenopathy, more severe glomerulonephritis, and higher mortality than their IL-10-intact littermate controls. The increased severity of lupus in MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice was closely associated with enhanced IFN-gamma production by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells and increased serum concentration of IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibodies. The protective effect of IL-10 in this lupus model was further supported by the observation that administration of rIL-10 reduced IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibody production in wild-type MRL-Fas(lpr) animals. In summary, our results provide evidence that IL-10 can down-modulate murine lupus through inhibition of pathogenic Th1 cytokine responses. Modulation of the level of IL-10 may be of potential therapeutic benefit for human lupus. PMID:12165544

  1. Erdr1 Suppresses Murine Melanoma Growth via Regulation of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyun; Jung, Min Kyung; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma, one of the aggressive cancers, is known to be resistant to chemotherapy. Because of its aggressive nature, effectively inducing apoptosis is necessary to treat melanoma. Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be a stress-related survival factor exhibiting anti-cancer effects in several cancers. However, little is known about the functions and underlying mechanisms of Erdr1 so far. To demonstrate the effect of Erdr1 in melanoma apoptosis, recombinant murine Erdr1 was injected into mice implanted with B16F10 melanoma cells. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited in mice injected with Erdr1 compared to the control. In addition, the tumor from Erdr1-injected mice showed an increased level of apoptosis. Accordingly, apoptosis-regulating factors including anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic marker Bax in the tumor tissues were examined. As expected, the decreased level of Bcl-2 and increased level of Bax were detected in tumors within the mice injected with Erdr1. Based on the in vivo study, the role of Erdr1 in tumor apoptosis was further tested by incubating it with cells of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10. Erdr1-induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells was observed. Additionally, Erdr1 downregulated STAT3 activity, inhibiting apoptosis via regulation of the Bcl-2 family. Overall, data demonstrate that Erdr1 induced murine melanoma apoptosis through the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax. These findings suggest that Erdr1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in melanoma. PMID:26784177

  2. Murine and Human Myogenic Cells Identified by Elevated Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity: Implications for Muscle Regeneration and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Joseph B.; Thompson, Seth D.; Bucsek, Mark J.; Song, Minjung; Huard, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the initial promise of myoblast transfer therapy to restore dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, clinical efficacy has been limited, primarily by poor cell survival post-transplantation. Murine muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) isolated from slowly adhering cells (SACs) via the preplate technique, induce greater muscle regeneration than murine myoblasts, primarily due to improved post-transplantation survival, which is conferred by their increased stress resistance capacity. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) represents a family of enzymes with important morphogenic as well as oxidative damage mitigating roles and has been found to be a marker of stem cells in both normal and malignant tissue. In this study, we hypothesized that elevated ALDH levels could identify murine and human muscle derived cell (hMDC) progenitors, endowed with enhanced stress resistance and muscle regeneration capacity. Methodology/Principal Findings Skeletal muscle progenitors were isolated from murine and human skeletal muscle by a modified preplate technique and unfractionated enzymatic digestion, respectively. ALDHhi subpopulations isolated by fluorescence activate cell sorting demonstrated increased proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacities compared to their ALDHlo counterparts when cultivated in oxidative and inflammatory stress media conditions. This behavior correlated with increased intracellular levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase. ALDHhi murine myoblasts were observed to exhibit an increased muscle regenerative potential compared to ALDHlo myoblasts, undergo multipotent differentiation (osteogenic and chondrogenic), and were found predominately in the SAC fraction, characteristics that are also observed in murine MDSCs. Likewise, human ALDHhi hMDCs demonstrated superior muscle regenerative capacity compared to ALDHlo hMDCs. Conclusions The methodology of isolating myogenic cells on the basis of elevated ALDH activity

  3. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  4. Chemoimmunotherapy of murine bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Stogdill, B J; Lamm, D L; Livingston, R B

    1981-11-01

    The lethality of invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) has prompted a search for effective, minimally toxic, adjuvant therapy. Such agents were evaluated in a murine bladder cancer (MBT2) model which parallels the clinical disease. One hundred C3H/He mice were inoculated i.d. with 2.5 x 10(4) viable MBT2 tumor cells and randomized to receive either normal saline (control), cis-Platinum (CPT), cyclophosphamide (CY), methotrexate (MTX), BCG, (CY + MTX), or (CY + MTX + BCG). Chemotherapy was given intraperitoneally weekly starting on day 7 after inoculation. Immunotherapy was given intralesionally on days 1 and 10 only. All mice were treated for 5 weeks followed by 5 weeks of observation. At 5 weeks, tumors of mice receiving cyclophosphamide alone or either of the combinations of therapy were smaller (P less than 0.01) than tumors of controls or other single agents alone. Each regimen increased survival, but only the combination regimen increase survival significantly (P less than 0.01). In the doses and schedule used in this model. Combination chemotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy significantly delay tumor growth and increase duration of survival (P less than 0.01) when compared with controls or single agent groups. PMID:7298287

  5. Functional expression of murine multidrug resistance in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, G.; Vera, J.C.; Rosen, O.M. ); Yang, Chiaping Huang; Horwitz, S.B. )

    1990-06-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is associated with the overproduction of a plasma membrane glycoprotein, P glycoprotein. Here the authors report the functional expression of a member of the murine MDR family of proteins and show that Xenopus oocytes injected with RNA encoding the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein develop a MDR-like phenotype. Immunological analysis indicated that oocytes injected with the mdr1b RNA synthesized a protein with the size and immunological characteristics of the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein. These oocytes exhibited a decreased accumulation of ({sup 3}H)vinblastine and showed an increased capacity to extrude the drug compared to control oocytes not expressing the P glycoprotein. In addition, competition experiments indicated that verapamil, vincristine, daunomycin, and quinidine, but not colchicine, can overcome the rapid drug efflux conferred by the expression of the mouse P glycoprotein.

  6. Analysis of the complete DNA sequence of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlinson, W D; Farrell, H E; Barrell, B G

    1996-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the Smith strain of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was determined from virion DNA by using a whole-genome shotgun approach. The genome has an overall G+C content of 58.7%, consists of 230,278 bp, and is arranged as a single unique sequence with short (31-bp) terminal direct repeats and several short internal repeats. Significant similarity to the genome of the sequenced human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strain AD169 is evident, particularly for 78 open reading frames encoded by the central part of the genome. There is a very similar distribution of G+C content across the two genomes. Sequences toward the ends of the MCMV genome encode tandem arrays of homologous glycoproteins (gps) arranged as two gene families. The left end encodes 15 gps that represent one family, and the right end encodes a different family of 11 gps. A homolog (m144) of cellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes is located at the end of the genome opposite the HCMV MHC class I homolog (UL18). G protein-coupled receptor (GCR) homologs (M33 and M78) occur in positions congruent with two (UL33 and UL78) of the four putative HCMV GCR homologs. Counterparts of all of the known enzyme homologs in HCMV are present in the MCMV genome, including the phosphotransferase gene (M97), whose product phosphorylates ganciclovir in HCMV-infected cells, and the assembly protein (M80). PMID:8971012

  7. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY TO PARATHION POISONING FOLLOWING MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased Susceptibility to Parathion Poisoning Following Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection. Fifty to 100 percent mortality occurred in mice treated with ordinarily sublethal doses of parathion 2 to 5 days post infection with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). These mortalities appear...

  8. Murine typhus in Kuwait in 1978

    PubMed Central

    Al-Awadi, Abdul Rahman; Al-Kazemi, Nouri; Ezzat, Gaafar; Saah, Alfred J.; Shepard, Charles; Zaghloul, Talaat; Gherdian, Beatriz

    1982-01-01

    Murine typhus occurred in 254 individuals in Kuwait between April and August 1978; 81% of patients were aged between 15 and 44 years, and 63% were male. The highest attack rate occurred among people in the lowest socioeconomic class. The outbreak coincided with a period of high rat and flea density. A study of the first 104 cases suggested that infection was acquired in the home, but a case — control study revealed no significant differences between patients and control subjects in terms of exposure to rats or domestic animals, and other factors. This suggests that murine typhus is hyperendemic rather than epidemic in Kuwait. The disease is being controlled through reduction of both flea and rat populations. Murine typhus may be much more common in many areas than is generally realized, and its status should be re-evaluated regularly in all known and potential foci. PMID:6980739

  9. Family Meals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  10. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  11. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  12. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  13. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Family Health History Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Family Health History The Basics Family Health History & Chronic Disease Planning ...

  14. Functional and receptor binding characterization of recombinant murine macrophage inflammatory protein 2: sequence analysis and mutagenesis identify receptor binding epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Jerva, L. F.; Sullivan, G.; Lolis, E.

    1997-01-01

    Murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), a member of the alpha-chemokine family, is one of several proteins secreted by cells in response to lipopolysaccharide. Many of the alpha-chemokines, such as interleukin-8, gro-alpha/MGSA, and neutrophil activating peptide-2 (NAP-2), are associated with neutrophil activation and chemotaxis. We describe the expression, purification, and characterization of murine MIP-2 from Pichia pastoris. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that MIP-2 exhibits a highly ordered secondary structure consistent with the alpha/beta structures of other chemokines. Recombinant MIP-2 is chemotactic for human and murine neutrophils and up-regulates cell surface expression of Mac-1. MIP-2 binds to human and murine neutrophils with dissociation constants of 6.4 nM and 2.9 nM, respectively. We further characterize the binding of MIP-2 to the human types A and B IL-8 receptors and the murine homologue of the IL-8 receptor. MIP-2 displays low-affinity binding to the type A IL-8 receptor (Kd > 120 nM) and high-affinity binding to the type B IL-8 receptor (Kd 5.7 nM) and the murine receptor (Kd 6.8 nM). The three-dimensional structure of IL-8 and sequence analysis of six chemokines (IL-8, gro-alpha, NAP-2, ENA-78, KC, and MIP-2) that display high-affinity binding to the IL-8 type B receptor are used to identify an extended N-terminal surface that interacts with this receptor. Two mutants of MIP-2 establish that this region is also involved in binding and activating the murine homologue of the IL-8 receptor. Differences in the sequence between IL-8 and related chemokines identify a unique hydrophobic/aromatic region surrounded by charged residues that is likely to impart specificity to IL-8 for binding to the type A receptor. PMID:9260277

  15. PU.1 downregulation in murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML): from molecular mechanism to human AML

    PubMed Central

    Verbiest, Tom; Bouffler, Simon; Nutt, Stephen L.; Badie, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1, encoded by the murine Sfpi1 gene (SPI1 in humans), is a member of the Ets transcription factor family and plays a vital role in commitment and maturation of the myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Murine studies directly link primary acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and decreased PU.1 expression in specifically modified strains. Similarly, a radiation-induced chromosome 2 deletion and subsequent Sfpi1 point mutation in the remaining allele lead to murine radiation-induced AML. Consistent with murine data, heterozygous deletion of the SPI1 locus and mutation of the −14kb SPI1 upstream regulatory element were described previously in human primary AML, although they are rare events. Other mechanisms linked to PU.1 downregulation in human AML include TP53 deletion, FLT3-ITD mutation and the recurrent AML1-ETO [t(8;21)] and PML-RARA [t(15;17)] translocations. This review provides an up-to-date overview on our current understanding of the involvement of PU.1 in the initiation and development of radiation-induced AML, together with recommendations for future murine and human studies. PMID:25750172

  16. Murine neonatal intravascular injections: Modeling newborn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to perform murine neonatal intravascular injections likely will prove useful in studying many newborn-specific disease states that are modeled in mice. Unfortunately, effective intravascular injection in the neonatal mouse has been limited by developmental immaturity and small size. To e...

  17. Survivin suppressor (YM155) enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy against canine histiocytic sarcoma in murine transplantation models.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroki; Takagi, Satoshi; Hosoya, Kenji; Okumura, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) in dogs exhibits aggressive clinical and biological behavior. Currently, no effective treatments are available for dogs with HS. Survivin, a member of a family of apoptosis protein inhibitors, could serve as a potential therapeutic target in several canine cancers. Sepantronium bromide (YM155) has recently been established as a novel survivin-targeting agent. The aim of this study was to use YM155 as a tool for evaluating survivin-targeted therapies against dogs with HS, and to investigate how YM155 treatment affects antitumor and chemotherapeutic efficacies in murine xenograft models using canine HS cells. The results showed that in HS cells with lomustine (CCNU) resistance, YM155 treatment suppressed both the cell-growth potential and cell resistance to CCNU, which essentially increases the chemotherapy efficacy in the murine models. The evidence presented here supports the favorable preclinical evaluation that survivin-targeted therapies might be effective against HS in dogs. PMID:25744435

  18. Different expression patterns of TRP genes in murine B and T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Hitoshi; Iida, Tohko; Tominaga, Makoto . E-mail: tominaga@nips.ac.jp

    2006-11-24

    A prolonged increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is essential for lymphocyte activation that includes cell proliferation and differentiation. This increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} results from Ca{sup 2+} release from the intracellular store and the subsequent Ca{sup 2+} influx from the extracellular environment via calcium channels located on the plasma membrane. Although transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been reported to play important roles in the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in lymphocytes, the function of these channels in lymphocyte activation remains unknown. Here, we report the comprehensive expression profile of TRP channel gene families including TRPC, TRPV, and TRPM in the murine immune system. RT-PCR analysis revealed different expression patterns of the TRP channel genes in B and T lymphocytes isolated from the spleen. Therefore, our results provide an appropriate reference of TRP gene expression in murine lymphocytes.

  19. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  20. Recombinational junctions of variants of Moloney murine sarcoma virus: generation and divergence of a mammalian transforming gene.

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, D J; Hunter, T

    1983-01-01

    Different variants of Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MSV) were examined by nucleotide sequencing to compare the junctions between the acquired cellular sequence, v-mos, and the adjacent virus-derived sequences. These variants included 124-MSV, m1-MSV, and HT1-MSV and also the purportedly independent isolate Gazdar MSV. These four strains have an identical 5' junction between the murine leukemia virus env gene and the v-mos gene. This junction lies within the sixth codon of the chimeric env-mos coding region that encodes the transforming gene product. In contrast, at the 3' junction between the v-mos gene and the murine leukemia virus env gene, the three variants examined here were all different. A small deletion was found in the COOH-terminal portion of the m1-MSV env-mos coding region, indicating that the COOH terminus of this transforming gene product must be different from that of 124-MSV or HT1-MSV. The data presented here are consistent with the thesis that a virus closely related to HT1-MSV was the primordial Moloney MSV, and that all other related strains evolved from it by deletion or rearrangement. The variability observed in the Moloney MSV family is discussed in terms of possible mechanisms for the initial capture of mos sequences by the parental retrovirus and also in comparison with other transforming retrovirus families, such as Abelson murine leukemia virus and Rous sarcoma virus. PMID:6300424

  1. Isolation and characterization of recombinant murine Wnt3a

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Andrzej; Krishnamoorthy, Aparna; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    Wnt proteins are a family of morphogens that possess potent biological activity. Structure – function studies have been impeded by poor yield of biologically active recombinant Wnt as well as a propensity of isolated Wnt to self-associate in the absence of detergent. Using stably transfected Drosophila S2 cells, studies have been conducted to improve recovery of recombinant murine Wnt3a, establish conditions for a detergent-free Wnt preparation and examine the effects of limited proteolysis. S2 cell culture conditioned media was subjected to a 3-step protocol including dye-ligand chromatography, immobilized metal affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Through selective pooling of column fractions, homogeneous and purified Wnt3a preparations were obtained. Limited proteolysis of Wnt3a with thrombin resulted in site-specific cleavage within the N-terminal saposin-like motif. To generate detergent-free protein, Wnt3a was immobilized on Cu2+-charged, iminodiacetic acid-derivatized Sepharose beads, detergent-free buffer was applied and Wnt3a eluted from the beads with buffer containing imidazole plus 30 mM methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD). Wnt3a recovered in MβCD-containing buffer was soluble and biologically active. Insofar as MβCD is a member of a family of non-toxic, low molecular weight compounds capable of binding and solubilizing small hydrophobic ligands, Wnt-cyclodextrin complexes may facilitate structure-activity studies in the absence of adverse detergent effects. PMID:25448592

  2. Isolation and characterization of recombinant murine Wnt3a.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Andrzej; Krishnamoorthy, Aparna; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-02-01

    Wnt proteins are a family of morphogens that possess potent biological activity. Structure-function studies have been impeded by poor yield of biologically active recombinant Wnt as well as a propensity of isolated Wnt to self-associate in the absence of detergent. Using stably transfected Drosophila S2 cells, studies have been conducted to improve recovery of recombinant murine Wnt3a, establish conditions for a detergent-free Wnt preparation and examine the effects of limited proteolysis. S2 cell culture conditioned media was subjected to a 3-step protocol including dye-ligand chromatography, immobilized metal affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Through selective pooling of column fractions, homogeneous and purified Wnt3a preparations were obtained. Limited proteolysis of Wnt3a with thrombin resulted in site-specific cleavage within the N-terminal saposin-like motif. To generate detergent-free protein, Wnt3a was immobilized on Cu(2+)-charged, iminodiacetic acid-derivatized Sepharose beads, detergent-free buffer was applied and Wnt3a eluted from the beads with buffer containing imidazole plus 30mM methyl-ß-cyclodextrin (MßCD). Wnt3a recovered in MßCD-containing buffer was soluble and biologically active. Insofar as MßCD is a member of a family of non-toxic, low molecular weight compounds capable of binding and solubilizing small hydrophobic ligands, Wnt-cyclodextrin complexes may facilitate structure-activity studies in the absence of adverse detergent effects. PMID:25448592

  3. Cancer, Families, and Family Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maureen; Gillig, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of the family counselor in working with cancer patients and their families. Suggests ways in which the family counselor can work proactively with families in the area of cancer prevention and helping them cope more effectively with its impact on their lives. Uses a clinical case example to illustrate intervention with cancer…

  4. Family therapy by family doctors

    PubMed Central

    Neighbour, R.

    1982-01-01

    The experiences of a group of general practitioners learning and attempting family therapy are described. Three principles for working with whole families — facilitation, formulation and focussing — are illustrated by case histories. Family therapy in general practice can be effective for patients and worthwhile for family doctors. PMID:7153974

  5. Amplification of the murine mdr2 gene and a reconsideration of the structure of the murine mdr gene locus.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, L S

    1995-01-01

    A common feature of cells selected in vitro for the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype is the amplification and concomitant overexpression of the mdr genes. In murine macrophage-like J774.2-derived MDR cell lines, there is a good correlation between levels of amplification and expression for the mdr1b gene, but not for the other two gene family members, mdr1a and mdr2. To understand this phenomenon better, a study of the amplification and expression of the mdr2 gene was undertaken. Southern blotting of genomic DNAs from a series of six MDR cell lines revealed that five of these lines had 5'-end amplification of mdr2, whereas only three contained 3'-end amplification. The analysis also suggested the involvement of a recombination hot-spot in this phenomenon. Despite the observation that the ratio between the number of copies of the 5' and 3' ends of the gene differs among cell lines, the ratio of 5' to 3' end transcription of mdr2 was approximately 1 in all cell lines. An analysis of promoter methylation in MDR cell lines demonstrated that this mechanism may play a role in regulating the transcription of mdr2, but not of mdr1b. Long-range mapping of the mdr locus in parental and amplified cell lines suggested that the three mdr genes are oriented in the same direction, and also revealed the presence of a number of rearrangement events. Models for the murine mdr gene locus in wild-type cells and in a cell line containing a rearrangement are presented. PMID:7832992

  6. FAMILIAL SUICIDE

    PubMed Central

    Unni, K.E. Sadanaandan

    1996-01-01

    Seven completed suicides in a family of lower socioeconomic status and suburban domicile in Pondicherry are reported. The presence of bipolar affective disorder in the family members and the absence of exogenous factors are illustrated by utilising both family history method and family study method. The details collected formed the basis for the terminology ‘familial suicide’. The management of the index case, one of the only three surviving male members of the family, who presented with suicidal ruminations and depressive features, is described. PMID:21584122

  7. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  8. Myositis in a Child with Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Sheshashree; Fergie, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with fever, lower extremity pain and weakness. Examination revealed paraparesis, thigh and calf tenderness. Labs showed high creatinine phosphokinase and Rickettsia typhi titers. This case illustrates endemic typhus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of myositis especially in areas with high prevalence of the disease. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of myositis and paraparesis associated with a case of murine typhus. PMID:24757508

  9. Cone inputs to murine striate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ekesten, Björn; Gouras, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background We have recorded responses from single neurons in murine visual cortex to determine the effectiveness of the input from the two murine cone photoreceptor mechanisms and whether there is any unique selectivity for cone inputs at this higher region of the visual system that would support the possibility of colour vision in mice. Each eye was stimulated by diffuse light, either 370 (strong stimulus for the ultra-violet (UV) cone opsin) or 505 nm (exclusively stimulating the middle wavelength sensitive (M) cone opsin), obtained from light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the presence of a strong adapting light that suppressed the responses of rods. Results Single cells responded to these diffuse stimuli in all areas of striate cortex. Two types of responsive cells were encountered. One type (135/323 – 42%) had little to no spontaneous activity and responded at either the on and/or the off phase of the light stimulus with a few impulses often of relatively large amplitude. A second type (166/323 – 51%) had spontaneous activity and responded tonically to light stimuli with impulses often of small amplitude. Most of the cells responded similarly to both spectral stimuli. A few (18/323 – 6%) responded strongly or exclusively to one or the other spectral stimulus and rarely in a spectrally opponent manner. Conclusion Most cells in murine striate cortex receive excitatory inputs from both UV- and M-cones. A small fraction shows either strong selectivity for one or the other cone mechanism and occasionally cone opponent responses. Cells that could underlie chromatic contrast detection are present but extremely rare in murine striate cortex. PMID:19014590

  10. Family Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainor, Peggy

    2001-01-01

    Describes a Kellogg Family Collaborative project that involves the University of Montana and four tribal colleges in a family-strengths approach to improving student retention and achievement. States that the project is grounded in social work theory and research that recognize and reinforce family and student resilience through promotion of…

  11. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the 1990s" (James Knoll);…

  12. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  13. Murine isolated lymphoid follicles contain follicular B lymphocytes with a mucosal phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caihong; McDonald, Keely G.; McDonough, Jacquelyn S.; Newberry, Rodney D.

    2006-01-01

    Isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs) are organized intestinal lymphoid structures whose formation can be induced by luminal stimuli. ILFs have been demonstrated to act as inductive sites for the generation of immune responses directed toward luminal stimuli; however, the phenotype of the immune response initiated within ILFs has largely been uninvestigated. To gain a better understanding of the immune responses initiated within ILFs, we examined phenotypic and functional aspects of the largest cellular component of the murine ILF lymphocyte population, B lymphocytes. We observed that murine ILF B lymphocytes are composed of a relatively homogenous population of follicular B-2 B lymphocytes. Consistent with their proximity to multiple stimuli, ILF B lymphocytes displayed a more activated phenotype compared with their counterparts in the spleen and Peyer’s patch (PP). ILF B lymphocytes also expressed higher levels of immunomodulatory B7 and CD28 family members B7X and programmed death-1 compared with their counterparts in the spleen and PP. ILF B lymphocytes preferentially differentiate into IgA-producing plasma cells and produce more IL-4 and IL-10 and less interferon-γ compared with their counterparts in the spleen. Immunoglobulin repertoire analysis from individual ILFs demonstrated that ILFs contain a polyclonal population of B lymphocytes. These findings indicate that murine ILFs contain a polyclonal population of follicular B-2 B lymphocytes with a phenotype similar to PP B lymphocytes and that, in unchallenged animals, ILFs promote immune responses with a homeostatic phenotype. PMID:16782693

  14. Expression of decorin throughout the murine hair follicle cycle: hair cycle dependence and anagen phase prolongation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jing; Wu, Xian-Jie; Li, Yun-Ling; Cai, Sui-Qing; Zheng, Min; Lu, Zhong-Fa

    2014-07-01

    Decorin is a prototypical member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family, which is involved in numerous biological processes. The role of decorin, as a representative SLRP, in hair follicle morphogenesis has not been elucidated. We present our initial findings on decorin expression patterns during induced murine hair follicle (HF) cycles. It was found that decorin expression is exclusively restricted to the epidermis, outer root sheath and sebaceous glands during the anagen phase, which correlates with the upregulation of decorin mRNA and protein expression in depilated murine dorsal skin. Furthermore, we used a functional approach to investigate the effects of recombinant human decorin (rhDecorin) via cutaneous injection into HFs at various murine hair cycle stages. The local injection of rhDecorin (100 μg/ml) into the hypodermis of depilated C57BL/6 mice at anagen delayed catagen progression. In contrast, rhDecorin injection during the telogen phase caused the premature onset of anagen, as demonstrated by the assessment of the following parameters: (i) hair shaft length, (ii) follicular bulbar diameter, (iii) hair follicle cycling score and (iv) follicular phase percentage. Taken together, our results suggest that decorin may modulate follicular cycling and morphogenesis. In addition, this study also provides insight into the molecular control mechanisms governing hair follicular epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. PMID:24816226

  15. Gene expression of lactobacilli in murine forestomach biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Clarissa; Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli populate the gastro-intestinal tract of vertebrates, and are used in food fermentations and as probiotics. Lactobacilli are also major constituents of stable biofilms in the forestomach of rodents. In order to investigate the lifestyle of these biofilm lactobacilli in C57BL/6 mice, we applied metatranscriptomics to analyse gene expression (assessed by mRNA) and community composition (assessed by rRNA). Lactobacillales were the major biofilm inhabitants (62–82% of rRNA reads), followed by Clostridiales (8–31% of rRNA reads). To identify mRNA transcripts specific for the forestomach, we compared forestomach and hindgut metatranscriptomes. Gene expression of the biofilm microbiota was characterized by high abundance of transcripts related to glucose and maltose utilization, peptide degradation, and amino acid transport, indicating their major catabolic and anabolic pathways. The microbiota transcribed genes encoding pathways enhancing oxidative stress (glutathione synthesis) and acid tolerance. Various pathways, including metabolite formation (urea degradation, arginine pathway, γ-aminobutyrate) and cell wall modification (DltA, cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase), contributed to acid tolerance, as judged from the transcript profile. In addition, the biofilm microbiota expressed numerous genes encoding extracellular proteins involved in adhesion and/or biofilm formation (e.g. MucBP, glycosyl hydrolase families 68 and 70). This study shed light on the lifestyle and specific adaptations of lactobacilli in the murine forestomach that might also be relevant for lactobacilli biofilms in other vertebrates, including humans. PMID:24702817

  16. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  17. Efficacy of Posaconazole in Murine Experimental Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology. PMID:22330929

  18. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Rahat F.; Bouyer, Donald H.; Walker, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials. PMID:25695758

  19. FAMILY LYGISTORRHINIDAE.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2016-01-01

    The Lygistorrhinidae are a family belonging to the suborder Bibionomorpha, with no previous record from Colombia. This paper refers for the first time to the occurrence of the family in the country, an undetermined species of the genus Lygistorrhina (Probolaeus) Williston. PMID:27395260

  20. Family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  1. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of Disability: A…

  2. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  3. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  4. Sexual dimorphism of Murine Masticatory Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, David W.; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2008-01-01

    (1) Objective To determine if gender distinctions of force generating capacity existed in murine masticatory muscles. (2) Design In order to investigate the effect of sex on force generating capacity in this muscle group, an isolated muscle preparation was developed utilizing the murine anterior deep masseter. Age-matched male and female mice were utilized to assess function, muscle fiber type and size in this muscle. (3) Results Maximum isometric force production was not different between age-matched male and female mice. However, the rate of force generation and relaxation was slower in female masseter muscles. Assessment of fiber type distribution by immunohistochemistry revealed a threefold decrease in the proportion of myosin heavy chain 2b positive fibers in female masseters, which correlated with the differences in contraction kinetics. (4) Conclusions These results provide evidence that masticatory muscle strength in mice is not affected by sex, but there are significant distinctions in kinetics associated with force production between males and females. PMID:18028868

  5. Family Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document is made up of a selection of some of the papers distributed to participants in courses on "Family Health and Family Planning" which have been organized each year since 1973 by the International Children's Center and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Six courses, held between 1973 and 1978, brought together a…

  6. FAMILY BIBIONIDAE.

    PubMed

    Falaschi, Rafaela Lopes; Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2016-01-01

    The Bibionidae are a family belonging to the suborder Bibionomorpha with four genera and 17 species known from Colombia. This work expands the distribution of these species to other localities in the country. PMID:27395253

  7. Tomorrow's Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickett, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    Author states that "...the traditional form of family which has been the norm in recent times in the West will persist, but will be forced to "move over" to accommodate other forms of domestic life." (Author)

  8. Unusual families.

    PubMed

    Golombok, Susan

    2005-03-01

    The introduction of assisted reproduction has led to unusual forms of procreation. This article describes the social consequences of lesbian motherhood and of families headed by single heterosexual mothers. PMID:15819999

  9. FAMILY RHAGIONIDAE.

    PubMed

    Santos, Charles Morphy D; Carmo, Daniel D D

    2016-01-01

    The family Rhagionidae is one of the oldest Brachyeran lineages. Its monophyly is still uncertain. There are four rhagionid genera distributed in Neotropical Region but only three species of Chrysopilus are found in Colombia. PMID:27395270

  10. Family Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... not mean that everyone gets along all the time. Conflicts are a part of family life. Many things can lead to conflict, such as illness, disability, addiction, job loss, school problems, and marital issues. Listening to ...

  11. A returned traveller with persistent fever due to murine typhus.

    PubMed

    Ng, C P; Lo, C B; Wong, K K; Chung, C H

    2002-12-01

    Murine (endemic) typhus is a notifiable disease in Hong Kong, but its diagnosis can be difficult. We report a case of murine typhus in a middle-aged man who presented with persistent fever, headache, and skin rash 2 weeks after returning from a visit to China. The diagnosis of murine typhus requires a high index of suspicion for a febrile patient with a history of potential exposure to the disease vector (rat flea) in an endemic area. The importance of early recognition lies in the potential for early therapeutic intervention, leading to decreases in morbidity and duration of stay in hospital. PMID:12459604

  12. Family Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert

    1966-01-01

    Dr Robert Smith surveys the history of birth control and sounds a warning for the future of mankind, if the population explosion is allowed to continue unchecked. He stresses the importance of the role of the general practitioner in the limitation of births. Sir Theodore Fox describes the work of the Family Planning Association and stresses that, increasingly, this is a specialist service covering all aspects of fertility. He also feels that the general practitioner has a role in family planning. PMID:5954261

  13. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikado, Hideto; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2015-05-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity.

  14. Glucocorticoid receptors in murine erythroleukaemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, K.D.; Torrance, J.M.; DiDomenico, M.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors in murine erythroleukaemic cells were studied in relation to hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) induced differentiation. Specific binding of dexamethasone was measured. A single class of saturable, high affinity binding sites was demonstrated in intact cells; with cell homogenates or fractions binding was low and could not be reliably quantified. Receptor binding in whole cell suspensions was lower in cells which had been treated with HMBA (36.5 +/- 8.2 pmol/g protein) than in untreated controls (87.9 +/- 23.6 pmol/g protein); dissociation constants were similar in treated (2.7 nM) and untreated cells (2.5 nM). Dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, corticosterone and progesterone competed with tritium-labelled dexamethasone for receptor binding sites; cortisone, deoxycorticosterone and oestradiol had little effect.

  15. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for <1% of all patients with Alzheimer's disease. The inherited form is even regarded a 'rare' disease according to the regulations for funding of the European Union (www.erare.eu). Here, we show that mice that are double-deficient for neprilysin (encoded by Mme), one major amyloid-β-degrading enzyme, and the ABC transporter ABCC1, a major contributor to amyloid-β clearance from the brain, develop various aspects of sporadic Alzheimer's disease mimicking the clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows

  16. Family welfare.

    PubMed

    Sinha, N K

    1992-01-01

    Between 1901-1921, India gained 12.9 million people because mortality remained high. The death rate fell between 1921-1951, but birth rates remained the same. Therefore 110 million people were added--2 times the population increase between 1891-1921. Between 1951-1981, the population increased to 324 million. Socioeconomic development was responsible for most of the downward trend in the birth rate during the 20th century. Even though large families were the norm in early India, religious leaders encouraged small family size. The 1st government family planning clinics in the world opened in Mysore and Bangalore in 1930. Right before Independence, the Bhore Committee made recommendations to reduce population growth such as increasing the age of marriage for girls. Since 1951 there has been a change in measures and policies geared towards population growth with each of the 7 5-Year Plans because policy makers applied what they learned from each previous plan. The 1st 5-Year Plan emphasized the need to understand what factors contribute to population growth. It also integrated family planning services into health services of hospitals and health centers. The government was over zealous in its implementation of the sterilization program (2nd 5-Year Plan, 1956-1961), however, which hurt family planning programs for many years. As of early 1992, sterilization, especially tubectomy, remained the most popular family planning method, however. The 7th 5-Year Plan changed its target of reaching a Net Reproductive Rate of 1 by 2001 to 2006-2011. It set a goal of 100% immunization coverage by 1990 but it did not occur. In 1986, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare planned to make free contraceptives available in urban and rural areas and to involve voluntary organizations. The government needs to instill measures to increase women's status, women's literacy, and age of marriage as well as to eliminate poverty, ensure old age security, and ensure child survival and

  17. Novel Microbial Virulence Factor Triggers Murine Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiuli; Qin, Jinhong; Promnares, Kamoltip; Kariu, Toru; Anderson, John F.; Pal, Utpal

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi bba57 is a conserved gene encoding a potential lipoprotein of unknown function. Here we show that bba57 is up-regulated in vivo and is required for early murine infection and potential spirochete transmission process. Although BBA57 is dispensable for late murine infection, the mutants were unable to induce disease. We show that BBA57, an outer membrane and surface-exposed antigen, is a major trigger of murine Lyme arthritis; even in cases of larger challenge inocula, which allow their persistence in joints at a level similar to wild-type spirochetes, bba57 mutants are unable to induce joint inflammation. We further showed that BBA57 deficiency reduces the expression of selected “neutrophil-recruiting” chemokines and associated receptors, causing significant impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis. New approaches to combat Lyme disease may include strategies to interfere with BBA57, a novel virulence factor and a trigger of murine Lyme arthritis. PMID:23303811

  18. HDAC4 Does Not Act as a Protein Deacetylase in the Postnatal Murine Brain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Michal; Seredenina, Tamara; Stokes, Matthew P.; Osborne, Georgina F.; Landles, Christian; Inuabasi, Linda; Franklin, Sophie A.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Beaumont, Vahri; Bates, Gillian P.

    2013-01-01

    Reversible protein acetylation provides a central mechanism for controlling gene expression and cellular signaling events. It is governed by the antagonistic commitment of two enzymes families: the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and the histone deacetylases (HDACs). HDAC4, like its class IIa counterparts, is a potent transcriptional repressor through interactions with tissue specific transcription factors via its N-terminal domain. Whilst the lysine deacetylase activity of the class IIa HDACs is much less potent than that of the class I enzymes, HDAC4 has been reported to influence protein deacetylation through its interaction with HDAC3. To investigate the influence of HDAC4 on protein acetylation we employed the immunoaffinity-based AcetylScan proteomic method. We identified many proteins known to be modified by acetylation, but found that the absence of HDAC4 had no effect on the acetylation profile of the murine neonate brain. This is consistent with the biochemical data suggesting that HDAC4 may not function as a lysine deacetylase, but these in vivo data do not support the previous report showing that the enzymatic activity of HDAC3 might be modified by its interaction with HDAC4. To complement this work, we used Affymetrix arrays to investigate the effect of HDAC4 knock-out on the transcriptional profile of the postnatal murine brain. There was no effect on global transcription, consistent with the absence of a differential histone acetylation profile. Validation of the array data by Taq-man qPCR indicated that only protamine 1 and Igfbp6 mRNA levels were increased by more than one-fold and only Calml4 was decreased. The lack of a major effect on the transcriptional profile is consistent with the cytoplasmic location of HDAC4 in the P3 murine brain. PMID:24278330

  19. Environmentally determined differences in the murine lung microbiota and their relation to alveolar architecture.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yeojun; Srinivas, Girish; Kuenzel, Sven; Linnenbrink, Miriam; Alnahas, Safa; Bruce, Kenneth D; Steinhoff, Ulrich; Baines, John F; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacteria control the micro-ecology of metazoan epithelial surfaces with pivotal effect on tissue homeostasis and host defense. In contrast to the upper respiratory tract, the lower respiratory tract of healthy individuals has largely been considered free of microorganisms. To understand airway micro-ecology we studied microbiota of sterilely excised lungs from mice of different origin including outbred wild mice caught in the natural environment or kept under non-specific-pathogen-free (SPF) conditions as well as inbred mice maintained in non-SPF, SPF or germ-free (GF) facilities. High-throughput pyrosequencing of reverse transcribed 16S rRNA revealed metabolically active murine lung microbiota in all but GF mice. The overall composition across samples was similar at the phylum and family level. However, species richness was significantly different between lung microbiota from SPF and non-SPF mice. Non-cultivatable Betaproteobacteria such as Ralstonia spp. made up the major constituents and were also confirmed by 16S rRNA gene cloning analysis. Additionally, Pasteurellaceae, Enterobacteria and Firmicutes were isolated from lungs of non-SPF mice. Bacterial communities were detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at alveolar epithelia in the absence of inflammation. Notably, higher bacterial abundance in non-SPF mice correlated with more and smaller size alveolae, which was corroborated by transplanting Lactobacillus spp. lung isolates into GF mice. Our data indicate a common microbial composition of murine lungs, which is diversified through different environmental conditions and affects lung architecture. Identification of the microbiota of murine lungs will pave the path to study their influence on pulmonary immunity to infection and allergens using mouse models. PMID:25470730

  20. Partial characterization of murine migration inhibitory factor (MIF).

    PubMed

    Kühner, A L; David, J R

    1976-01-01

    These studies describe the production of murine migration inhibitory factor (MIF)3 in sufficient quantities to allow its partial characterization by physiochemical and enzymatic methods. MIF was obtained from murine spleen cell cultures (C57BL/6 strain) stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A). Characterization of murine MIF was performed using Sephadex G-100 gel chromatography, isopycnic centrifugation in a CsCl density gradient, polyacrylamide disc electrophoresis, heat stability, and enzymatic treatment. MIF-containing and control fractions were assayed on normal C57BL/6 peritoneal exudate cells by using a microcapillary tube assay. Peak MIF activity was found in a Sephadex G-100 fraction containing molecules the size of albumin and slightly smaller, molecular weight 67,000 to 48,000. Murine MIF was stable to heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min but lost its activity at 80 degrees C for 30 min. Incubation of G-100 fractions containing MIF with water insoluble chymotrypsin destroyed the activity of MIF, indicating its protein nature. CsCl density gradient centrifugation revealed that murine MIF had a buoyand density greater than protein, consistent with its being a glycoprotein. Further, when subjected to disc electrophoresis on polyacylamide gels, murine MIF migrated in a region cathodal to albumin. Thus, mitogen stimulation of murine spleen cells produced MIF in quantities which allowed its partial characterization and purification, and its comparison with human and guinea pig MIF; this makes it feasible to analyze the role of murine MIF in cellular immunity and in its relationship to lymphocyte mediators which regulate humoral immune responses. PMID:1107423

  1. FAMILY STRATIOMYIDAE.

    PubMed

    Fachin, Diego Aguilar; De Assis-Pujol, Cristiane Vieira

    2016-01-01

    The family Stratiomyidae has more than 2,800 described species, of which 1001 species belongs to the Neotropics. This catalog for Colombia presents 87 species distributed in 32 genera, and ten subfamilies. Merosargus gracilis and the genus Microchrysa, with a single species M. bicolor are recorded for the first time to Colombia. The fauna is very expressive but still poorly known, representing nearly one tenth of the Neotropical diversity of the family in numbers of species, and one fifth of generic diversity. PMID:27395274

  2. Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2016-03-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:26892994

  3. Family-Centered Child Care. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, M. Elena; Dorros, Sybilla

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  4. Income and Family Events: Family Income, Family Size, and Consumption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutright, Phillips

    1971-01-01

    This paper considers the structure of family income, examines some factors affecting family size, reviews alternative definitions of an adequate income for families with varying numbers, and presents data on actual consumption, according to family income and family size. A model depicting the causal relations among factors affecting consumption is…

  5. FAMILY ASILIDAE.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Marta; Lamas, Carlos José Einicker

    2016-01-01

    Asilidae is one of the largest Diptera families with more than 7,000 recognized species worldwide. All their species are predators on arthropods, mainly insects. This catalogue presents 71 species distributed in 26 genera, ten tribes or generic groups and four subfamilies. For each species we present the available geographical information and relevant references. PMID:27395278

  6. Familial hyperamylasemia.

    PubMed

    Koda, Yu Kar Ling; Vidolin, Eliana

    2002-01-01

    A 7-year-old white boy was referred to us with a history of 3 attacks of hypogastric pain over the previous 2 years and persistently elevated serum amylase concentrations. At physical examination, he was well with no evidence of clinical abnormalities. His weight and height were normal. Laboratory diagnostic investigations were all normal except for the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides in the feces and persistently elevated serum amylase levels. Serum amylase determinations in the family members were normal in his father and maternal grandmother but elevated in his mother, sister, maternal aunt, and uncle, all of whom asymptomatic. Macroamylasemia was excluded in the child and in the mother. The finding of persistently elevated amylasemia in the child and in the other family members spanning 3 generations, and the exclusion of diseases that lead to hyperamilasemia are consistent with the diagnosis of familial hyperamylasemia. Until now, only 1 similar case has been reported. Familial hyperamylasemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperamylasemias in childhood. PMID:11981589

  7. Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgen, Carol, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This quarterly publication, issued by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), contains articles dealing with family violence and alcohol abuse, children of alcoholic parents, training programs for counselors, and confidentiality of client records. The three articles on alcohol abuse suggest that: (1) there is a clear…

  8. Familial hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Stowasser, M; Gordon, R D

    2001-09-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PAL) may be as much as ten times more common than has been traditionally thought, with most patients normokalemic. The study of familial varieties has facilitated a fuller appreciation of the nature and diversity of its clinical, biochemical, morphological and molecular aspects. In familial hyperaldosteronism type I (FH-I), glucocorticoid-remediable PAL is caused by inheritance of an ACTH-regulated, hybrid CYP11B1/CYP11B2 gene. Genetic testing has greatly facilitated diagnosis. Hypertension severity varies widely, demonstrating relationships with gender, affected parent's gender, urinary kallikrein level, degree of biochemical disturbance and hybrid gene crossover point position. Analyses of aldosterone/PRA/cortisol 'day-curves' have revealed that (1) the hybrid gene dominates over wild type CYP11B2 in terms of aldosterone regulation and (2) correction of hypertension in FH-I requires only partial suppression of ACTH, and much smaller glucocorticoid doses than those previously recommended. Familial hyperaldosteronism type II is not glucocorticoid-remediable, and is clinically, biochemically and morphologically indistinguishable from apparently sporadic PAL. In one informative family available for linkage analysis, FH-II does not segregate with either the CYP11B2, AT1 or MEN1 genes, but a genome-wide search has revealed linkage with a locus in chromosome 7. As has already occurred in FH-I, elucidation of causative mutations is likely to facilitate earlier detection of PAL and other curable or specifically treatable forms of hypertension. PMID:11595502

  9. FAMILY SCIARIDAE.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Fernandes, Sheila Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    Sciaridae are a widely distributed family with high number of species. They are known as black fungus gnats due to their dark color and feeding activity. This catalogue presents 17 species from Colombia distributed in eight genera, and for each species the geographical distribution is provided. PMID:27395255

  10. FAMILY CECIDOMYIIDAE.

    PubMed

    Maia, Valéria Cid

    2016-01-01

    This large family is poorly known in Colombia, where only 44 species have been recorded in 20 genera. All of them are included in Cecidomyiinae, which is the most diverse subfamily of gall midges in number of species and feeding habits, including phytophagous, predaceous and fungivorous species. Most of them are galler. The other subfamilies have never been recorded in this country. PMID:27395254

  11. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific…

  12. FAMILY TYMOVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article provides a brief review of the taxonomic structure, virion properties, genome organization and replication strategy, antigenic properties, and biological properties of viruses in the family Tymoviridae. Criteria for demarcation of genus and species are provided. A brief review of each...

  13. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  14. Family Hypnotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  15. Autocrine fibroblast growth factor 18 mediates dexamethasone-induced osteogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Fromigué, Olivia; Nuber, Ulrike; Vaudin, Pascal; Pages, Jean-Christophe; Ebert, Regina; Jakob, Franz; Miraoui, Hichem; Marie, Pierre J

    2010-08-01

    The potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to differentiate into functional bone forming cells provides an important tool for bone regeneration. The identification of factors capable of promoting osteoblast differentiation in MSCs is therefore critical to enhance the osteogenic potential of MSCs. Using microarray analysis combined with biochemical and molecular approach, we found that FGF18, a member of the FGF family, is upregulated during osteoblast differentiation induced by dexamethasone in murine MSCs. We showed that overexpression of FGF18 by lentiviral (LV) infection, or treatment of MSCs with recombinant human (rh)FGF18 increased the expression of the osteoblast specific transcription factor Runx2, and enhanced osteoblast phenotypic marker gene expression and in vitro osteogenesis. Molecular silencing using lentiviral shRNA demonstrated that downregulation of FGFR1 or FGFR2 abrogated osteoblast gene expression induced by either LV-FGF18 or rhFGF18, indicating that FGF18 enhances osteoblast differentiation in MSCs via activation of FGFR1 or FGFR2 signaling. Biochemical and pharmacological analyses showed that the induction of phenotypic osteoblast markers by LV-FGF18 is mediated by activation of ERK1/2-MAPKs and PI3K signaling in MSCs. These results reveal that FGF18 is an essential autocrine positive regulator of the osteogenic differentiation program in murine MSCs and indicate that osteogenic differentiation induced by FGF18 in MSCs is triggered by FGFR1/FGFR2-mediated ERK1/2-MAPKs and PI3K signaling. PMID:20432451

  16. The ontogeny of Butyrophilin-like (Btnl) 1 and Btnl6 in murine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lebrero-Fernández, Cristina; Bas-Forsberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Murine Butyrophilin-like (Btnl) 1 and Btnl6 are primarily restricted to intestinal epithelium where they regulate the function of intraepithelial T lymphocytes. We recently demonstrated that Btnl1 and Btnl6 can form an intra-family heterocomplex and that the Btnl1-Btnl6 complex selectively expands Vγ7Vδ4 TCR IELs. To define the regulation of Btnl expression in the small intestine during ontogeny we examined the presence of Btnl1 and Btnl6 in the small bowel of newborn to 4-week-old mice. Although RNA expression of Btnl1 and Btnl6 was detected in the small intestine at day 0, Btnl1 and Btnl6 protein expression was substantially delayed and was not detectable in the intestinal epithelium until the mice reached 2-3 weeks of age. The markedly elevated Btnl protein level at week 3 coincided with a significant increase of γδ TCR IELs, particularly those bearing the Vγ7Vδ4 receptor. This was not dependent on gut microbial colonization as mice housed in germ-free conditions had normal Btnl protein levels. Taken together, our data show that the expression of Btnl1 and Btnl6 is delayed in the murine neonatal gut and that the appearance of the Btnl1 and Btnl6 proteins in the intestinal mucosa associates with the expansion of Vγ7Vδ4 TCR IELs. PMID:27528202

  17. The ontogeny of Butyrophilin-like (Btnl) 1 and Btnl6 in murine small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Lebrero-Fernández, Cristina; Bas-Forsberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Murine Butyrophilin-like (Btnl) 1 and Btnl6 are primarily restricted to intestinal epithelium where they regulate the function of intraepithelial T lymphocytes. We recently demonstrated that Btnl1 and Btnl6 can form an intra-family heterocomplex and that the Btnl1-Btnl6 complex selectively expands Vγ7Vδ4 TCR IELs. To define the regulation of Btnl expression in the small intestine during ontogeny we examined the presence of Btnl1 and Btnl6 in the small bowel of newborn to 4-week-old mice. Although RNA expression of Btnl1 and Btnl6 was detected in the small intestine at day 0, Btnl1 and Btnl6 protein expression was substantially delayed and was not detectable in the intestinal epithelium until the mice reached 2–3 weeks of age. The markedly elevated Btnl protein level at week 3 coincided with a significant increase of γδ TCR IELs, particularly those bearing the Vγ7Vδ4 receptor. This was not dependent on gut microbial colonization as mice housed in germ-free conditions had normal Btnl protein levels. Taken together, our data show that the expression of Btnl1 and Btnl6 is delayed in the murine neonatal gut and that the appearance of the Btnl1 and Btnl6 proteins in the intestinal mucosa associates with the expansion of Vγ7Vδ4 TCR IELs. PMID:27528202

  18. Diphtheria toxin-based recombinant murine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting murine regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Marino, Jose; Trowell, Aaron; Zhang, Huiping; Stromp Peraino, Jaclyn; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Benichou, Gilles; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells which suppress immune responses of effector cells and are known to play a very important role in protection against autoimmune disease development, induction of transplantation tolerance and suppression of effective immune response against tumor cells. An effective in vivo Treg depletion agent would facilitate Treg-associated studies across many research areas. In this study, we have developed diphtheria toxin-based monovalent and bivalent murine IL-2 fusion toxins for depleting murine IL-2 receptor positive cells including CD25(+) Treg in vivo. Their potencies were assessed by in vitro protein synthesis inhibition and cell proliferation inhibition assays using a murine CD25(+) CTLL-2 cell line. Surprisingly, in contrast to our previously developed recombinant fusion toxins, the monovalent isoform (DT390-mIL-2) was approximately 4-fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart (DT390-bi-mIL-2). Binding analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that the monovalent isoform bound stronger than the bivalent version. In vivo Treg depletion with the monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin was performed using C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Spleen Treg were significantly depleted with a maximum reduction of ∼70% and detectable as early as 12 h after the last injection. The spleen Treg numbers were reduced until Day 3 and returned to control levels by Day 7. We believe that this monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin will be an effective in vivo murine Treg depleter. PMID:25147093

  19. Timing and expression of the angiopoietin-1-Tie-2 pathway in murine lung development and congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Grzenda, Adrienne; Shannon, John; Fisher, Jason; Arkovitz, Marc S

    2013-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is one of the most common congenital abnormalities. Children born with CDH suffer a number of co-morbidities, the most serious of which is respiratory insufficiency from a combination of alveolar hypoplasia and pulmonary vascular hypertension. All children born with CDH display some degree of pulmonary hypertension, the severity of which has been correlated with mortality. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of pulmonary hypertension in CDH remain poorly understood. Angiopoitein-1 (Ang-1), a central mediator in angiogenesis, participates in the vascular development of many tissues, including the lung. Although previous studies have demonstrated that Ang-1 might play an important role in the development of familial pulmonary hypertension, the role of Ang-1 in the development of the pulmonary hypertension associated with CDH is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the Ang-1 pathway in a murine model of CDH. Here, we report that Ang-1 appears important in normal murine lung development, and have established its tissue-level expression and localization patterns at key time-points. Additionally, our data from a nitrofen and bisdiamine-induced murine model of CDH suggests that altered expression patterns of Ang-1, its receptor Tie-2 and one of its transcription factors (epithelium-specific Ets transcription factor 1) might be responsible for development of the pulmonary vasculopathy seen in the setting of CDH. PMID:22917924

  20. Coronavirus species specificity: murine coronavirus binds to a mouse-specific epitope on its carcinoembryonic antigen-related receptor glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Compton, S R; Stephensen, C B; Snyder, S W; Weismiller, D G; Holmes, K V

    1992-01-01

    Like most coronaviruses, the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) exhibits strong species specificity, causing natural infection only in mice. MHV-A59 virions use as a receptor a 110- to 120-kDa glycoprotein (MHVR) in the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family of glycoproteins (G. S. Dveksler, M. N. Pensiero, C. B. Cardellichio, R. K. Williams, G. S. Jiang, K. V. Holmes, and C. W. Dieffenbach, J. Virol. 65:6881-6891, 1991; and R. K. Williams, G. S. Jiang, and K. V. Holmes, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88:5533-5536, 1991). The role of virus-receptor interactions in determining the species specificity of MHV-A59 was examined by comparing the binding of virus and antireceptor antibodies to cell lines and intestinal brush border membranes (BBM) from many species. Polyclonal antireceptor antiserum (anti-MHVR) raised by immunization of SJL/J mice with BALB/c BBM recognized MHVR specifically in immunoblots of BALB/c BBM but not in BBM from adult SJL/J mice that are resistant to infection with MHV-A59, indicating a major difference in epitopes between MHVR and its SJL/J homolog which does not bind MHV (7). Anti-MHVR bound to plasma membranes of MHV-susceptible murine cell lines but not to membranes of human, cat, dog, monkey, or hamster cell lines. Cell lines from these species were resistant to MHV-A59 infection, and only the murine cell lines tested were susceptible. Pretreatment of murine fibroblasts with anti-MHVR prevented binding of radiolabeled virions to murine cells and prevented virus infection. Solid-phase virus-binding assays and virus overlay protein blot assays showed that MHV-A59 virions bound to MHVR on intestinal BBM from MHV-susceptible mouse strains but not to proteins on intestinal BBM from humans, cats, dogs, pigs, cows, rabbits, rats, cotton rats, or chickens. In immunoblots of BBM from these species, both polyclonal and monoclonal antireceptor antibodies that block MHV-A59 infection of murine cells recognized only the murine CEA-related glycoprotein

  1. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  2. A murine model of urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chia-Suei; Dodson, Karen W; Hultgren, Scott J

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) inflict extreme pain and discomfort to those affected and have profound medical and socioeconomic impact. Although acute UTIs are often treatable with antibiotics, a large proportion of patients suffer from multiple recurrent infections. Here, we describe and provide a protocol for a robust murine UTI model that allows for the study of uropathogens in an ideal setting. The infections in the urinary tract can be monitored quantitatively by determining the bacterial loads at different times post-infection. In addition, the simple bladder architecture allows observation of disease progression and the uropathogenic virulence cascade using a variety of microscopic techniques. This mouse UTI model is extremely flexible, allowing the study of different bacterial strains and species of uropathogens in a broad range of mouse genetic backgrounds. We have used this protocol to identify important aspects of the host-pathogen interaction that determine the outcome of infection. The time required to complete the entire procedure will depend on the number of bacterial strains and mice included in the study. Nevertheless, one should expect 4 h of hands-on time, including inoculum preparation on the day of infection, transurethral inoculation, tissue harvest and post-harvest processing for a small group of mice (e.g., 5 mice). PMID:19644462

  3. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release.

    PubMed

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  4. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy. PMID:21874492

  5. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  6. A murine model of smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Matthew, E; Warden, G; Dedman, J

    2001-04-01

    The United States has one of the world's largest per capita fire death rates. House fires alone kill >9,000 Americans annually, and smoke inhalation is the leading cause of mortality from structural fires. Animal models are needed to develop therapies to combat this problem. We have developed a murine model of smoke inhalation through the design, construction, and use of a controlled-environment smoke chamber. There is a direct relationship between the quantity of wood combusted and mortality in mice. As with human victims, the primary cause of death from smoke inhalation is an elevated blood carboxyhemoglobin level. Lethal (78%) and sublethal (50%) carboxyhemoglobin levels were obtained in mice subjected to varying amounts of smoke. Mice exposed to wood smoke demonstrated more dramatic pathology than mice exposed to cotton or polyurethane smoke. A CD-1 model of wood smoke exposure was developed, demonstrating type II cell hypertrophy, cytoplasmic blebbing, cytoplasmic vacuolization, sloughing, hemorrhage, edema, macrophage infiltration, and lymphocyte infiltration. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of smoke-exposed mice demonstrated a significant increase in total cell counts compared with those in control mice. These findings are comparable to the lung tissue response observed in human victims of smoke inhalation. PMID:11238012

  7. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jennifer S; Gritz, Emily C; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Hirschi, Karen K

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  8. Eliminating Murine Norovirus by Cross-Fostering

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Laurence U.; DeRitis, Pierina C.; Chu, Niansheng; Conti, Pierre A.

    2011-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a newly discovered and extremely prevalent pathogen of laboratory mouse colonies. MNV causes severe disease in some immunocompromised mouse strains and can cause persistent infections even in immunocompetent mice. Despite the fact that immunocompetent mice are generally asymptomatic, the possibility that MNV infection might alter immune responses makes its eradication a potentially useful goal for many facilities. Initial attempts by others to use a strategy of testing and culling were unsuccessful, whereas complete depopulation and facility decontamination was successful. However, these measures may be impractical, and finding less drastic approaches seemed prudent. Based on a report that cross-fostering of pups from MNV-positive mothers to MNV-negative ones could be successful in experimental MNV infection, we undertook a comprehensive fostering program using Swiss Webster mothers, careful sanitary measures, and fecal PCR testing to eradicate the virus from a mouse colony recently infected with MNV. We successfully decontaminated 17 of 18 (94%) litters and managed to prevent spread when a new MNV-infected mouse strain entered quarantine at our facility. These results suggest that cross-fostering, when performed in a setting of excellent sanitary procedures, may be practical for the large number of mouse facilities in which MNV is endemic. PMID:21838978

  9. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  10. Intestinal permeability and contractility in murine colitis.

    PubMed Central

    van Meeteren, M E; van Bergeijk, J D; van Dijk, A P; Tak, C J; Meijssen, M A; Zijlstra, F J

    1998-01-01

    We developed an in vitro organ bath method to measure permeability and contractility simultaneously in murine intestinal segments. To investigate whether permeability and contractility are correlated and influenced by mucosal damage owing to inflammation, BALB/c mice were exposed to a 10% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) solution for 8 days to induce colitis. The effect of pharmacologically induced smooth muscle relaxation and contraction on permeability was tested in vitro. Regional permeability differences were observed in both control and 10% DSS-treated mice. Distal colon segments were less permeable to 3H-mannitol and 14C-PEG 400 molecules compared with proximal colon and ileum. Intestinal permeability in control vs. 10% DSS mice was not altered, although histologic inflammation score and IFN-gamma pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were significantly increased in proximal and distal colon. IL-1beta levels were enhanced in these proximal and distal segments, but not significantly different from controls. Any effect of pharmacologically induced contractility on intestinal permeability could not be observed. In conclusion, intestinal permeability and contractility are not correlated in this model of experimentally induced colitis in mice. Although simultaneous measurement in a physiological set-up is possible, this method has to be further validated. PMID:9705603

  11. Cortactin is implicated in murine zygotic development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan; Zhang, Helin; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Smith, Elizabeth; Zhan, Xi

    2009-01-01

    Cortactin is a cortex-enriched protein implicated in Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. However, the physiological role of cortactin remains unknown. We have generated a mouse strain in which the allele of murine cortactin was disrupted by a gene trapping vector. The resulting heterozygous mice developed normally and were fertile, but embryonic fibroblasts derived from heterozygous animals displayed partial impairment in PDGF-induced membrane ruffling. No homozygous offspring or early embryos even at the two-cell stage were detected. Analysis of oocytes revealed a gradual decrease in the detection of homozygous zygotes after fertilization. In normal oocytes arrested at meiotic metaphase II (MII), cortactin immunoreactivity was detected in an apical layer that overlies the maternal chromosome and overlaps with a polarized cortex enriched with actin. The formation of the polarized cortactin layer was diminished upon treatment with latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor. After resumption of meiosis II, the majority of cortactin protein was accumulated into the second polar body. Microinjection of MII-arrested eggs with either cortactin antibody or RNA encoding a cortactin mutant deficient in Arp2/3 complex binding disrupted the integrity of the actin cap and inhibited emission of the second polar body triggered by parthenogenesis. Our data suggest that cortactin plays an important role in the mechanics of asymmetric division in oocytes. PMID:20004659

  12. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  13. Family Structure and Family Processes in Mexican American Families

    PubMed Central

    Zeiders, Katharine H.; Roosa, Mark W.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    Despite increases in single-parent families among Mexican Americans (MA), few studies have examined the association of family structure and family adjustment. Utilizing a diverse sample of 738 Mexican American families (21.7% single parent), the current study examined differences across family structure on early adolescent outcomes, family functioning, and parent-child relationship variables. Results revealed that early adolescents in single parent families reported greater school misconduct, CD/ODD and MDD symptoms, and greater parent-child conflict than their counterparts in two parent families. Single parent mothers reported greater economic hardship, depression and family stress. Family stress and parent-child conflict emerged as significant mediators of the association between family structure and early adolescent outcomes, suggesting important processes linking MA single parent families and adolescent adjustment. PMID:21361925

  14. Family Therapy and Disturbed Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H., Ed.; Boszormenyi-Nagy, Ivan, Ed.

    Presented at a conference at which authors represented major theoretical positions in the field, most of the papers use family therapy as an important source of observations or ideas, or as a means to pinpoint methodological problems. Papers are grouped in sections as follows: four which introduce the reader to the field of specialization, provide…

  15. FAMILY BOMBYLIIDAE.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Carlos José Einicker; Evenhuis, Neal L

    2016-01-01

    Bombyliidae is one of the largest Diptera families with more than 4,500 recognized species worldwide. Their species vary from robust to thin, and may be small to large (2-20mm) and looks like bees or wasps. They also present great variation in color. Adults can often be seen either resting and sunning themselves on trails, rocks or twigs or feeding on flowering plants as they are nectar feeders. All reared bee flies are predators or parasitoids of arthropods. The Colombian fauna of bombyliids comprises at the moment 22 species, and 12 genera, of which, six are endemic species. Nonetheless, this number may be much higher, as Colombia is a megadiverse country and there are not many specimens of this family deposited in collections all over the world. PMID:27395279

  16. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Pejic, Rade N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant-inherited genetic disorder that leads to elevated blood cholesterol levels. FH may present as severely elevated total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels or as premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods This review presents information on the disease and on the effects of drug treatment and lifestyle changes. Results Routine lipid testing should identify most patients with FH. Once an index case is identified, testing should be offered to family members. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment with therapeutic lifestyle changes and statins can prevent premature CHD and other atherosclerotic sequelae in patients with FH. Conclusion Emerging therapies such as LDL apheresis and novel therapeutic agents may be useful in patients with homozygous FH or treatment-resistant FH. Liver transplantation is the only effective therapy for severe cases of homozygous FH. PMID:25598733

  17. c-kit mRNA expression in human and murine hematopoietic cell lines.

    PubMed

    André, C; d'Auriol, L; Lacombe, C; Gisselbrecht, S; Galibert, F

    1989-08-01

    The c-kit proto-oncogene belongs to the tyrosine kinase receptor family. Although its ligand is still unknown, there is increasing evidence to suggest its involvement in hematopoiesis. In order to detect lineage or differentiation related specificity, we have studied c-kit mRNA expression in both human and murine hematopoietic organs and cell lines. We show that c-kit mRNA expression is found at early stages of erythroid and myeloid differentiation. There is however, no evidence of c-kit expression in the lymphoid lineage. Our results suggest a possible role for c-kit as a receptor in the early stages of the erythroid/myeloid differentiation. PMID:2474787

  18. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen and LDL apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with FH. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients in order to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:25939291

  19. Family affairs.

    PubMed

    Dupont, M

    1994-06-01

    It's no secret that your job is stressful, forcing you to deal with tragedy and death on a regular basis. You've become good at what you do because you pay attention to details and care about people. Most of the EMS providers I've known dedicate untold hours to their work, usually in addition to the regular jobs they hold. Their communities need them to be ready at a moment's notice when the pager sounds. Someone is in crisis. A life may hang in the balance-a life they may save. But what about the family that's left behind as you run out the door-yet again? How do your spouse/significant other and kids cope with whatever emotional state you're in when you return home? While your stress may be evident, their distress may be overlooked. What price do they pay to live with you? These questions were addressed during several workshops my colleagues and I conducted for EMS providers and their families. Many of the problems and frustrations identified in this article were shared by EMTs' family members who attended. PMID:10134394

  20. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Ricky D.; Barry, Arden R.; Pearson, Glen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the pathophysiology, epidemiology, screening, diagnosis, and treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Quality of evidence A PubMed search was conducted (inception to July 2014) for articles on pathophysiology, screening, diagnosis, and management of FH, supplemented with hand searches of bibliographies of guidelines and reviews. A supporting level of evidence for each recommendation was categorized as level I (randomized controlled trial or systematic review of randomized controlled trials), level II (observational study), or level III (expert opinion). The best available evidence is mostly level II or III. Main message Familial hypercholesterolemia affects 1 in 500 Canadians. Risk of a coronary event is high in these patients and is underestimated by risk calculators (eg, Framingham). Clinicians should screen patients according to guidelines and suspect FH in any patient with a premature cardiovascular event, physical stigmata of hypercholesterolemia, or an elevated plasma lipid level. Physicians should diagnose FH using either the Simon Broome or Dutch Lipid Network criteria. Management of heterozygous FH includes reducing low-density lipoprotein levels by 50% or more from baseline with high-dose statins and other lipid-lowering agents. Clinicians should refer any patient with homozygous FH to a specialized centre. Conclusion Familial hypercholesterolemia represents an important cause of premature cardiovascular disease in Canadians. Early identification and aggressive treatment of individuals with FH reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26796832

  1. Identification of distal silencing elements in the murine interferon-A11 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Roffet, P; Lopez, S; Navarro, S; Bandu, M T; Coulombel, C; Vignal, M; Doly, J; Vodjdani, G

    1996-01-01

    The murine interferon-A11 (Mu IFN-A11) gene is a member of the IFN-A multigenic family. In mouse L929 cells, the weak response of the gene's promoter to viral induction is due to a combination of both a point mutation in the virus responsive element (VRE) and the presence of negatively regulating sequences surrounding the VRE. In the distal part of the promoter, the negatively acting E1E2 sequence was delimited. This sequence displays an inhibitory effect in either orientation or position on the inducibility of a virus-responsive heterologous promoter. It selectively represses VRE-dependent transcription but is not able to reduce the transcriptional activity of a VRE-lacking promoter. In a transient transfection assay, an E1E2-containing DNA competitor was able to derepress the native Mu IFN-A11 promoter. Specific nuclear factors bind to this sequence; thus the binding of trans-regulators participates in the repression of the Mu IFN-A11 gene. The E1E2 sequence contains an IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. Recombinant IRF2 binds this sequence and anti-IRF2 antibodies supershift a major complex formed with nuclear extracts. The protein composing the complex is 50 kDa in size, indicating the presence of IRF2 or antigenically related proteins in the complex. The Mu IFN-A11 gene is the first example within the murine IFN-A family, in which a distal promoter element has been identified that can negatively modulate the transcriptional response to viral induction. PMID:8760352

  2. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  3. Murine models of cardiovascular comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Khedoe, P Padmini S J; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Currently, COPD patients with atherosclerosis (i.e., the most important underlying cause of CVD) receive COPD therapy complemented with standard CVD therapy. This may, however, not be the most optimal treatment. To investigate the link between COPD and atherosclerosis and to develop specific therapeutic strategies for COPD patients with atherosclerosis, a substantial number of preclinical studies using murine models have been performed. In this review, we summarize the currently used murine models of COPD and atherosclerosis, both individually and combined, and discuss the relevance of these models for studying the pathogenesis and development of new treatments for COPD patients with atherosclerosis. Murine and clinical studies have provided complementary information showing a prominent role for systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in the link between COPD and atherosclerosis. These and other studies showed that murine models for COPD and atherosclerosis are useful tools and can provide important insights relevant to understanding the link between COPD and CVD. More importantly, murine studies provide good platforms for studying the potential of promising (new) therapeutic strategies for COPD patients with CVD. PMID:26993520

  4. Existence of multiple isoforms of HS1-associated protein X-1 in murine and human tissues.

    PubMed

    Lees, Delphine M; Hart, Ian R; Marshall, John F

    2008-06-13

    To date, the literature concerning the HS1 (haematopoietic cell-specific protein 1)-associated protein X-1 (HAX1) protein has reported considerable variation regarding its function in mammalian cells, subcellular localisation and binding partners. We show here that HAX1 comprises a family of proteins. Murine tissues express three mRNA variants, encoded by two genes on chromosomes 2 and 3. The chromosome 2 gene is intronless and would encode a protein 100% identical with that encoded by chromosome 3. In humans, alternative splice variants, encoded by the chromosome 1 gene, produce a family of transcripts composed of up to eight members. Based on the sequences published in GenBank and Ensembl, we designed specific primers and detected by PCR three mRNA species in murine tissues and eight variants in human cells. We screened a panel of 19 human cell lines as well as primary fibroblasts, oral keratinocytes and freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. All human cells studied expressed at least six of the possible HAX1 mRNA variants. In silico analysis of the variants revealed an open reading frame in all of them, suggesting that murine and human tissues can express two and eight HAX1 proteins, respectively. Analysis of human protein lysates by Western blotting with the use of a monoclonal anti-HAX1 antibody revealed multiple bands. These bands were decreased after treatment of cells with a single small interfering RNA duplex targeting a region common to six of the variants, confirming their identity as HAX1 proteins. Comparison of the human variants with the six HAX1 homologues described to date in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the four homologues described in macaque (Macaca mulatta) revealed very high conservation with only one amino acid substitution between human and chimpanzee homologues. Moreover, a number of additional products were amplified and sequenced, which indicated that further human isoforms are likely to exist. These findings are

  5. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S; Epstein, Ervin H; Tang, Jean Y

    2012-08-01

    When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1(+/-)K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology [2,20] and in response to drug therapy [19]. We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 ± 5 (SEM) mm(3) shrunk by 76 ± 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses. PMID:22771794

  6. Fetal outcome in murine Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Silver, R M; Yang, L; Daynes, R A; Branch, D W; Salafia, C M; Weis, J J

    1995-01-01

    Lyme disease is an inflammatory syndrome caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Although this syndrome has important implications for human pregnancy, little is known about gestational infection with B. burgdorferi. Fetal death occurred in 33 of 280 gestational sacs (12%) in 39 C3H/HeN female mice infected by intradermal injection of B. burgdorferi 4 days after mating (acute infection), compared with 0 of 191 sacs in 25 control mice (P = 0.0001). Forty-six percent of acutely infected mice suffered at least one fetal death, compared with none of the control animals (P = 0.0002). There were no fetal deaths in 18 C3H/HeN mice infected 3 weeks prior to mating (chronic infection). A sensitive PCR technique detected B. burgdorferi DNA in the uteri of acutely infected mice but did not detect DNA in the uteri of controls or chronically infected mice. Spirochete DNA was only rarely detected in fetal tissues, and its presence was not required for fetal death. The inclusion of an internal competitive PCR target indicated that the lack of B. burgdorferi sequences in fetal DNA was not due to the presence of a PCR inhibitor. Histologic analysis of gestational tissues from infected animals demonstrated nonspecific pathology consistent with fetal death. These findings indicate an association between murine fetal death and acute infection with B. burgdorferi early in gestation but not with chronic infection. Our data suggest that fetal death is due to a maternal response to infection rather than fetal infection. These findings could provide an explanation for observations in humans in which sporadic cases of fetal death in women infected with B. burgdorferi during pregnancy have been reported, while previous infection has not been associated with fetal death. PMID:7806385

  7. Lymph Node Macrophages Restrict Murine Cytomegalovirus Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Davis-Poynter, Nick; Bruce, Kimberley; Lawler, Clara; Dolken, Lars; Mach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) establish chronic infections that spread from a primary entry site to secondary vascular sites, such as the spleen, and then to tertiary shedding sites, such as the salivary glands. Human CMV (HCMV) is difficult to analyze, because its spread precedes clinical presentation. Murine CMV (MCMV) offers a tractable model. It is hypothesized to spread from peripheral sites via vascular endothelial cells and associated monocytes. However, viral luciferase imaging showed footpad-inoculated MCMV first reaching the popliteal lymph nodes (PLN). PLN colonization was rapid and further spread was slow, implying that LN infection can be a significant bottleneck. Most acutely infected PLN cells were CD169+ subcapsular sinus macrophages (SSM). Replication-deficient MCMV also reached them, indicating direct infection. Many SSM expressed viral reporter genes, but few expressed lytic genes. SSM expressed CD11c, and MCMV with a cre-sensitive fluorochrome switch showed switched infected cells in PLN of CD11c-cre mice but yielded little switched virus. SSM depletion with liposomal clodronate or via a CD169-diphtheria toxin receptor transgene shifted infection to ER-TR7+ stromal cells, increased virus production, and accelerated its spread to the spleen. Therefore, MCMV disseminated via LN, and SSM slowed this spread by shielding permissive fibroblasts and poorly supporting viral lytic replication. IMPORTANCE HCMV chronically infects most people, and it can cause congenital disability and harm the immunocompromised. A major goal of vaccination is to prevent systemic infection. How this is established is unclear. Restriction to humans makes HCMV difficult to analyze. We show that peripheral MCMV infection spreads via lymph nodes. Here, MCMV infected filtering macrophages, which supported virus replication poorly. When these macrophages were depleted, MCMV infected susceptible fibroblasts and spread faster. The capacity of filtering macrophages to limit

  8. Nanoelectroablation Therapy for Murine Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-01-01

    When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally as effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1+/−K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology [2;20] and in response to drug therapy [19]. We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5–7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 ± 5 (SEM) mm3 shrunk by 76 ± 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 minute-long treatment of 2700 pulses. PMID:22771794

  9. Follicular dendritic cell function and murine AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, A; Burton, G F; Fuchs, B A; Bhogal, B S; Rupper, R; Szakal, A K; Tew, J G

    1994-01-01

    Infection of mice with LP-BM5 elicits an immunodeficiency state referred to as murine acquired immune deficiency syndrome (MAIDS). Shortly after infection, retrovirus particles become associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and this study was undertaken to determine whether retroviruses alter FDC functions. The FDC functions examined included the ability to: (1) retain antigen (Ag) trapped prior to infection; (2) trap new Ag after infection; (3) maintain specific IgG responses; and (4) provide co-stimulatory signals to B cells. Mice were infected with LP-BM5 and the ability of their FDC to trap and retain 125I-Ag (HSA) was assessed. Serum anti-HSA levels were monitored and FDC co-stimulatory activity was indicated by increased B-cell proliferation. HSA trapped on FDC prior to infection began to disappear by 3 weeks and was practically gone by 6 weeks. Serum anti-HSA titres were maintained normally for about 3 weeks after infection and then declined precipitously. The ability of FDC to trap new Ag began to disappear around the second and third week of infection and was markedly depressed by the fourth week. However, FDC recovered from infected mice retained their ability to co-stimulate anti-mu- and interleukin-4 (IL-4)-activated B cells throughout a 5-week period. In short, the ability of FDC to trap and retain specific Ag and maintain specific antibody levels was markedly depressed after retrovirus infection. However, FDC from infected mice continued to provide co-stimulatory signals and these signals may contribute to the lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly characteristic of MAIDS. Images Figure 4 PMID:8132218

  10. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Ysasi, Alexandra B; Wagner, Willi L; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-06-15

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends ("E"). Septal retraction, observed in 20-30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  11. Imidazolium Salts as Small-Molecule Urinary Bladder Exfoliants in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wagers, Patrick O.; Tiemann, Kristin M.; Shelton, Kerri L.; Kofron, William G.; Panzner, Matthew J.; Wooley, Karen L.; Youngs, Wiley J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel family of small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants that are expected to be of great value in preclinical studies of urologic conditions and have improved potential for translation compared with prior agents. There is broad urologic interest in the therapeutic potential of such exfoliating agents. The primary agent used in preclinical models, the cationic peptide protamine sulfate (PS), has limited translational potential due to concerns including systemic adverse reactions and bladder tissue injury. Intravesical application of a safe, systemically nontoxic exfoliant would have potential utility in the eradication of Escherichia coli and other uropathogens that reside in the bladder epithelium following cystitis, as well as in chronic bladder pain and bladder cancer. Here, we introduce a family of imidazolium salts with potent and focused exfoliating activity on the bladder epithelium. Synthesis and purification were straightforward and scalable, and the compounds exhibited prolonged stability in lyophilized form. Most members of the compound family were cytotoxic to cultured uroepithelial cells, with >10-fold differences in potency across the series. Upon topical (intravesical) administration of selected compounds to the murine bladder, complete epithelial exfoliation was achieved with physiologically relevant imidazolium concentrations and brief contact times. The exfoliative activity of these compounds was markedly improved in comparison to PS, as assessed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting for uroplakins. Bladder uroepithelium regenerated within days to yield a histologically normal appearance, and no toxicity was observed. Finally, the chemical scaffold offers an opportunity for inclusion of antimicrobials or conjugation with chemotherapeutic or other moieties. PMID:26124168

  12. Imidazolium salts as small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Wagers, Patrick O; Tiemann, Kristin M; Shelton, Kerri L; Kofron, William G; Panzner, Matthew J; Wooley, Karen L; Youngs, Wiley J; Hunstad, David A

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel family of small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants that are expected to be of great value in preclinical studies of urologic conditions and have improved potential for translation compared with prior agents. There is broad urologic interest in the therapeutic potential of such exfoliating agents. The primary agent used in preclinical models, the cationic peptide protamine sulfate (PS), has limited translational potential due to concerns including systemic adverse reactions and bladder tissue injury. Intravesical application of a safe, systemically nontoxic exfoliant would have potential utility in the eradication of Escherichia coli and other uropathogens that reside in the bladder epithelium following cystitis, as well as in chronic bladder pain and bladder cancer. Here, we introduce a family of imidazolium salts with potent and focused exfoliating activity on the bladder epithelium. Synthesis and purification were straightforward and scalable, and the compounds exhibited prolonged stability in lyophilized form. Most members of the compound family were cytotoxic to cultured uroepithelial cells, with >10-fold differences in potency across the series. Upon topical (intravesical) administration of selected compounds to the murine bladder, complete epithelial exfoliation was achieved with physiologically relevant imidazolium concentrations and brief contact times. The exfoliative activity of these compounds was markedly improved in comparison to PS, as assessed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting for uroplakins. Bladder uroepithelium regenerated within days to yield a histologically normal appearance, and no toxicity was observed. Finally, the chemical scaffold offers an opportunity for inclusion of antimicrobials or conjugation with chemotherapeutic or other moieties. PMID:26124168

  13. Preclinical Murine Models for Lung Cancer: Clinical Trial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kellar, Amelia; Egan, Cay; Morris, Don

    2015-01-01

    Murine models for the study of lung cancer have historically been the backbone of preliminary preclinical data to support early human clinical trials. However, the availability of multiple experimental systems leads to debate concerning which model, if any, is best suited for a particular therapeutic strategy. It is imperative that these models accurately predict clinical benefit of therapy. This review provides an overview of the current murine models used to study lung cancer and the advantages and limitations of each model, as well as a retrospective evaluation of the uses of each model with respect to accuracy in predicting clinical benefit of therapy. A better understanding of murine models and their uses, as well as their limitations may aid future research concerning the development and implementation of new targeted therapies and chemotherapeutic agents for lung cancer. PMID:26064932

  14. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  15. Telomere sister chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.

  16. FAMILY MYCETOPHILIDAE.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2016-01-01

    The Mycetophilidae include small fungus-gnats which life cycle is associated with fungi, especially of the larvae. The known diversity of the family in the Neotropical region is 1,145 species, but only some very few papers have been published on the Colombian species of Mycetophilidae, with records for the genera Docosia Winnertz, Paraleia Tonnoir, and Dziedzickia Johannsen. This catalogue gathers the information available on mycetophilids from Colombia, including genera and some species that for the first time are mentioned to occur in the country-as Leiella unicincta Edwards and Leiella zonalis Edwards. PMID:27395261

  17. FAMILY ANISOPODIDAE.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Dalton De Souza; Falaschi, Rafaela Lopes; Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira

    2016-01-01

    This considerably small family is poorly known in Colombia, with only two species reported for the genus Sylvicola Harris (1776) so far. We synonymize Neomesochria Amorim & Tozoni (1994) to Mycetobia Meigen (1818), hence transferring the Dominican amber species Neomesochria antillea (Grimaldi 1991) and N. cryptambra (Grimaldi 1991), and the recent Neotropical species N. limanda (Stone 1966) and N. stonei (Lane & d'Andretta 1958) back to the genus Mycetobia. This paper provides new records for Mycetobia and Olbiogaster Osten-Sacken (1886) for Colombia. PMID:27395252

  18. FAMILY SCIOMYZIDAE.

    PubMed

    Marinoni, Luciane; Murphy, William L

    2016-01-01

    The Sciomyzidae are a family of acalyptrate flies of worldwide distribution, with 543 extant species and 14 described subspecies in 63 genera. Although 274 species in 37 genera are found in the Western Hemisphere, the sciomyzid fauna of Central and South America remains relatively unknown, comprising 103 species in 25 genera, with only seven species in five genera having been recorded from Colombia: Dictya bergi Valley, Perilimnia albifacies Becker, Pherbellia guttata (Coquillett), Sepedomerus bipuncticeps (Malloch), S. macropus (Walker), Sepedonea guianica (Steyskal), and S. isthmi (Steyskal). PMID:27395301

  19. GM-CSF provides autocrine protection for murine alveolar epithelial cells from oxidant-induced mitochondrial injury.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Anne; Seedahmed, Elfateh; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Boltax, Jonathan; McManus, Michael L; Paine, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Exposure of mice to hyperoxia induces alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury, acute lung injury and death. Overexpression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the lung protects against these effects, although the mechanisms are not yet clear. Hyperoxia induces cellular injury via effects on mitochondrial integrity, associated with induction of proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. We hypothesized that GM-CSF protects AEC through effects on mitochondrial integrity. MLE-12 cells (a murine type II cell line) and primary murine type II AEC were subjected to oxidative stress by exposure to 80% oxygen and by exposure to H(2)O(2). Exposure to H(2)O(2) induced cytochrome c release and decreased mitochondrial reductase activity in MLE-12 cells. Incubation with GM-CSF significantly attenuated these effects. Protection induced by GM-CSF was associated with Akt activation. GM-CSF treatment also resulted in increased expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, Mcl-1. Primary murine AEC were significantly more tolerant of oxidative stress than MLE-12 cells. In contrast to MLE-12 cells, primary AEC expressed significant GM-CSF at baseline and demonstrated constitutive activation of Akt and increased baseline expression of Mcl-1. Treatment with exogenous GM-CSF further increased Akt activation and Mcl-1 expression in primary AEC. Conversely, suppression of AEC GM-CSF expression by use of GM-CSF-specific small interfering RNA resulted in decreased tolerance of oxidative stress, Furthermore, silencing of Mcl-1 prevented GM-CSF-induced protection. We conclude that GM-CSF protects alveolar epithelial cells against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial injury via the Akt pathway and its downstream components, including Mcl-1. Epithelial cell-derived GM-CSF may contribute to intrinsic defense mechanisms limiting lung injury. PMID:22140071

  20. Cloning and mapping of murine Nfe2L1

    SciTech Connect

    McKie, J.; Johnstone, K.; Scambler, P.

    1995-02-10

    The murine homologue of the human NFE2L1 basic leucine-zipper gene was isolated from an early embryo library. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 97% identity between the two proteins. Significant sequence similarity is also seen with the p45 subunit of NF-E2 and with the Drosophila CNC protein. Murine Nfe2l1 maps to chromosome 11DE with similar sequences at 7D1-7F1 and 2E4-2G. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  1. A Rapid Murine Coma and Behavior Scale for Quantitative Assessment of Murine Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Ryan W.; Wainwright, Mark S.; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Kidambi, Trilokesh; Gómez, Noé D.; Taylor, Terrie; Haldar, Kasturi

    2010-01-01

    Background Cerebral malaria (CM) is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM) models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. Methodology/Principal Findings A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS) comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA). Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. Conclusions/Significance Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field). The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed. PMID:20957049

  2. Family and family therapy in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Karin; Baars, Jan

    2012-04-01

    This article describes how families are functioning in the Netherlands, and how family therapy is used in mental healthcare. In the open Dutch society, new ideas are easily incorporated, as exemplified by the rapid introduction and growth of family therapy in the 1980s. In recent decades, however, family therapy has lost ground to other treatment models that are more individually orientated, and adhere to stricter protocols. This decline of family therapy has been exacerbated by recent budget cuts in mental healthcare. In regular healthcare institutes family therapy now has a marginal position at best, although family treatment models are used in specific areas such as forensic treatments. In addition, the higher trained family therapists have found their own niches to work with couples and families. We argue that a stronger position of family therapy would be beneficial for patients and for families, in order to counteract the strong individualization of Dutch society. PMID:22515464

  3. Roles within the Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Text Size Email Print Share Roles Within the Family Page Content Article Body Families are not democracies. ...

  4. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinton and Trump Stand Behind the Uniform? Military families have some questions... More Suicide Prevention Awareness Month ... quick fact sheet about this program. Operation Purple Family Retreats Operation Purple Family Retreats provide military families ...

  5. In Support of Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Albert T.

    1979-01-01

    The article discusses support services and sources for the families of handicapped children. Aspects covered include family involvement in early childhood education programs, emotional support, and family mental health. The characteristics of the "ideal" family are also discussed. (DLS)

  6. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  7. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  8. Transforming Training. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  9. Credentialing Caregivers. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Christiana

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  10. Reclaiming Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John

    2012-01-01

    The pull for family is strong, almost primeval, most likely it is evolutionary, and for those lacking the benefit of family or Family Privilege, the loss of family is painful and profoundly sad. Young people who struggle to cope without stable family connections are profoundly aware of their lack of "Family Privilege." In this article, the author…

  11. Family Psychology and Family Therapy in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kameguchi, Kenji; Murphy-Shigematsu, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the development of family psychology and family therapy in Japan, tracing the origins of these movements, explaining how these fields were activated by the problem of school refusal, and describing an approach to family therapy that has been developed to work with families confronting this problem, as well as preventive programs of family…

  12. The Family Hero in Black Alcoholism Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisbane, Francis L.

    1989-01-01

    Uses data from 20 case studies of Black adult female children of alcoholic parents to discuss Family Hero role often assumed by oldest or only female child in Black alcoholism families. Explains how female-dominated survival role of Family Hero in Black families is significantly more related to racial and cultural factors than numbers alone may…

  13. Integrating Family Resilience and Family Stress Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Joan M.

    2002-01-01

    The construct, family resilience, is defined differently by practitioners and researchers. This study tries to clarify the concept of family resilience. The foundation is family stress and coping theory, particularly the stress models that emphasize adaptation processes in families exposed to major adversities. (JDM)

  14. Whole Family: Whole Child. Broken Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVaul, Sue; Davis, John U.

    A literature review on the family environments of gifted students found that gifted children are more likely to be living in intact families than in divorced families. Children of single parents were more likely to be low-achieving, tardy, absent, truant, discipline problems, suspended, expelled, and dropouts than students in two-parent families.…

  15. Family Law and Family Studies: Professor's Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Mary W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The results of a survey of family studies faculty concerning the inclusion of family law topics in family studies courses are discussed. The professor's needs for training and resources in the area of family and the law are identified and recommendations for meeting these needs are suggested. (Author)

  16. Cloning and expression analysis of murine phospholipase D1.

    PubMed Central

    Colley, W C; Altshuller, Y M; Sue-Ling, C K; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Branch, K D; Tsirka, S E; Bollag, R J; Bollag, W B; Frohman, M A

    1997-01-01

    Activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D(PLD) occurs as part of the complex signal-transduction cascade initiated by agonist stimulation of tyrosine kinase and G-protein-coupled receptors. A variety of mammalian PLD activities have been described, and cDNAs for two PLDs recently reported (human PLD1 and murine PLD2). We describe here the cloning and chromosomal localization of murine PLD1. Northern-blot hybridization and RNase protection analyses were used to examine the expression of murine PLD1 and PLD2 ina variety of cell lines and tissues. PLD1 and PLD2 were expressed in all RNA samples examined, although the absolute expression of each isoform varied, as well as the ratio of PLD1 to PLD2. Moreover, in situ hybridization of adult brain and murine embryo sections revealed high levels of expression of individual PLDs in some cell types and no detectable expression in others. Thus the two PLDs probably carry out distinct roles in restricted subsets of cells rather than ubiquitous roles in all cells. PMID:9307024

  17. Murine myocardium OCT imaging with a blood substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeehyun; Villard, Joseph W.; Lee, Ho; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Imaging of the in vivo murine myocardium using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. Application of conventional techniques (e.g. MRI, Ultrasound imaging) for imaging the murine myocardium is problematic because the wall thickness is less than 1.5mm (20g mouse), and the heart rate can be as high as six-hundred beats per minute. To acquire a real-time image of the murine myocardium, OCT can provide sufficient spatial resolution (10 micrometers ) and imaging speed (1000 A-Scans/s). Strong light scattering by blood in the heart causes significant light attenuation making delineation of the endocardium-chamber boundary problematic. By replacing whole blood in the mouse with an artificial blood substitute we demonstrate significant reduction of light scattering in the murine myocardium. The results indicate a significant reduction in light scattering as whole blood hematocrit is diminished below 5%. To measure thickness change of the myocardium during one cycle, a myocardium edge detection algorithm is developed and demonstrated.

  18. Manipulations of cholinesterase gene expression modulate murine megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Patinkin, D; Seidman, S; Eckstein, F; Benseler, F; Zakut, H; Soreq, H

    1990-01-01

    Megakaryocytopoiesis was selectively inhibited in cultured murine bone marrow cells by a 15-mer oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to the initiator AUG region in butyrylcholinesterase mRNA. Furthermore, conditioned medium from Xenopus oocytes producing recombinant butyrylcholinesterase stimulated megakaryocytopoiesis. These observations implicate butyrylcholinesterase in megakaryocytopoiesis and suggest application of oligodeoxynucleotides for modulating bone marrow development. Images PMID:2233731

  19. Analysis of murine HOXA-2 activity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Percival-Smith, A; Bondy, J A

    1999-01-01

    The murine HOXA-2 protein shares amino acid sequence similarity with Drosophila Proboscipedia (PB). In this paper, we test whether HOXA-2 and PB are functionally equivalent in Drosophila. In Drosophila, PB inhibits SCR activity required for larval T1 beard formation and adult tarsus formation and is required for maxillary palp and proboscis formation. HOXA-2 expressed from a heat-shock promoter weakly suppressed SCR activity required for T1 beard formation. But interestingly neither PB nor HOXA-2 expressed from a heat-shock promoter suppressed murine HOXA-5 activity, the murine SCR homologue, from inducing ectopic T1 beards in T2 and T3, indicating that HOXA-5 does not interact with PB. HOXA-2 activity expressed from the Tubulin alpha 1 promoter modified the pb null phenotype resulting in a proboscis-to-arista transformation, indicating that HOXA-2 was able to suppress SCR activity required for tarsus formation. However, HOXA-2 expressed from a Tubulin alpha 1 promoter was unable to direct maxillary palp determination when either ectopically expressed in the antenna or in the maxillary palp primordia of a pb null mutant. HOXA-2 was also unable to rescue pseudotrachea formation in a pb null mutant. These results indicate that the only activity that PB and HOXA-2 weakly share is the inhibition of SCR activity, and that murine HOXA-5 and Drosophila SCR do not share inhibition by PB activity. PMID:10322642

  20. Topical Apigenin Alleviates Cutaneous Inflammation in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Hupe, Melanie; Sun, Richard; Man, George; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used in preventing and treating skin disorders for centuries. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration of chrysanthemum extract exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether topical applications of apigenin, a constituent of chrysanthemum extract, influence cutaneous inflammation is still unclear. In the present study, we first tested whether topical applications of apigenin alleviate cutaneous inflammation in murine models of acute dermatitis. The murine models of acute allergic contact dermatitis and acute irritant contact dermatitis were established by topical application of oxazolone and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), respectively. Inflammation was assessed in both dermatitis models by measuring ear thickness. Additionally, the effect of apigenin on stratum corneum function in a murine subacute allergic contact dermatitis model was assessed with an MPA5 physiology monitor. Our results demonstrate that topical applications of apigenin exhibit therapeutic effects in both acute irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis models. Moreover, in comparison with the vehicle treatment, topical apigenin treatment significantly reduced transepidermal water loss, lowered skin surface pH, and increased stratum corneum hydration in a subacute murine allergic contact dermatitis model. Together, these results suggest that topical application of apigenin could provide an alternative regimen for the treatment of dermatitis. PMID:23304222

  1. Measurement and interpretation of electrocardiographic QT intervals in murine hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Wu, JingJing; King, James H; Huang, Christopher L-H; Fraser, James A

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in ECG QT intervals correlate with the risk of potentially fatal arrhythmias, for which transgenic murine hearts are becoming increasingly useful experimental models. However, QT intervals are poorly defined in murine ECGs. As a consequence, several different techniques have been used to measure murine QT intervals. The present work develops a consistent measure of the murine QT interval that correlates with changes in the duration of ventricular myocyte action potentials (APs). Volume-conducted ECGs were compared with simultaneously recorded APs, obtained using floating intracellular microelectrodes in Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts. QT intervals were measured from the onset of the QRS complex. The interval, Q-APR90, measured to the time at 90% AP recovery, was compared with two measures of the QT interval. QT1 was measured to the recovery of the ECG trace to the isoelectric baseline for entirely positive T-waves or to the trough of any negative T-wave undershoot. QT2-used extensively in previous studies-was measured to the return of any ECG trough to the isoelectric baseline. QT1, but not QT2, closely correlated with changes in Q-APR90. These findings were confirmed over a range of pacing rates, in low K(+) concentration solutions, and in Scn5a+/ΔKPQ hearts used to model human long QT syndrome. Application of this method in whole anesthetized mice similarly demonstrated a prolonged corrected QT (QTc) in Scn5a+/ΔKPQ hearts. We therefore describe a robust method for the determination of QT and QTc intervals that correlate with the duration of ventricular myocyte APs in murine hearts. PMID:24705556

  2. Familial Hypercholesterolaemia

    PubMed Central

    Marais, A David

    2004-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), defined as the heritable occurrence of severe hypercholesterolaemia with cholesterol deposits in tendons and premature heart disease, is caused by at least four genes in sterol and lipoprotein pathways and displays varying gene-dose effects. The genes are the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, apolipoprotein (apo) B, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9, and the autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia (ARH) adaptor protein. All of these disorders have in common defective clearance of LDL within a complex system of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and regulation. Normal cellular cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism is reviewed before describing the disorders, their metabolic derangements and their clinical effects. FH is classified as two simplified phenotypes of disease according to the severity of the metabolic derangement. The dominantly inherited heterozygous phenotype comprises defects in the LDL receptor, apoB100, and neural apoptosis regulatory cleavage protein. The homozygous phenotype is co-dominant in defects of the LDL receptor, and occurs also as the ARH of adapter protein mutations. Defective binding of apoB100 does not result in a significant gene dose effect, but enhances the severity of heterozygotes for LDL receptor mutations. The genetic diagnosis of FH has provided greater accuracy in definition and detection of disease and exposes information about migration of populations. All of these disorders pose a high risk of atherosclerosis, especially in the homozygous phenotype. Studies of influences on the phenotype and responses to treatment are also discussed in the context of the metabolic derangements. PMID:18516203

  3. Characterization of the murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator system.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Van Hoef, B; Collen, D

    1996-11-01

    The murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator (u-PA) system was studied using purified proteins, plasma and endothelioma cells. Recombinant murine u-PA was obtained as a single-chain molecule of 45 kDa which was converted to two-chain u-PA with plasmin by cleavage of the Lys159-Ile160 peptide bond. Murine plasminogen, purified from plasma as a single-chain protein of 95 kDa, was resistant to quantitative activation with murine recombinant two-chain u-PA: only 15% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C was obtained in mixtures of 1 microM plasminogen and 5 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas quantitative activation was observed in the autologous human system. Addition of 6-aminohexanoic acid to native murine plasminogen resulted in quantitative activation within 1 h. In murine plasma in vitro, plasminogen was also resistant to quantitative activation with u-PA (50% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C with 50 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas in the human system nearly quantitative activation was obtained). Murine plasma clots submerged in murine plasma were resistant to lysis with u-PA; < or = 2% clot lysis in 2 h was obtained with 80 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous murine system whereas 50% clot lysis in 2 h required only 15 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous human system. Saturable binding of murine recombinant two-chain u-PA was observed to murine endothelioma cells that are genetically deficient in u-PA (u-PA-/- End cells). Binding was characterized by a Kd of 5.5 nM and 800000 binding sites/cell. However, u-PA-/- End cells did not significantly stimulate the activation rate of murine plasminogen by murine recombinant two-chain u-PA and did not enhance the plasmin-mediated conversion rate of murine recombinant single-chain u-PA to its two-chain derivative. Murine recombinant two-chain u-PA bound to murine endothelioma cells was quantitatively inhibited by murine plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Thus

  4. IL-33 promotes MHC class II expression in murine mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tomonobu; Egusa, Chizu; Maeda, Tatsuo; Numata, Takafumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs), recognized as tissue-resident cells of hematopoietic origin, are involved in cellular and pathological manifestations of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis. IL-33, a member of the IL-1 cytokine family, activates Th2-type immune responses, and promotes the degranulation and maturation of MCs. However, it is uncertain whether IL-33 treatment induces mature mast cells to acquire the characteristics of the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage.We investigated the effect of IL-33 on the MHC class II expression and function of murine mast cells. IL-33-treated mature murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were analyzed by FACS, real-time PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, and Western blotting. The morphology and degranulation activity of BMMCs and T-cell activation by BMMCs were also examined. BMMCs treated with IL-33 for 10 days induced cell surface expression of the MHC class II protein, whereas the expression of FcεRI and c-kit was not affected by IL-33. The expression of CIITA, driven from pIII and pIV, was up-regulated in IL-33-treated BMMCs. The amount of PU.1 mRNA and protein significantly increased in IL-33-treated BMMCs. The ChIP assay showed PU.1 binding to CIITA pIII, and enhanced histone acetylation due to IL-33 treatment. Syngeneic T cells were activated by co-culture with IL-33-treated BMMCs, although the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80, CD86, and PDL-1, was not detected. Mast cells express MHC class II after prolonged exposure to IL-33, probably due to enhanced recruitment of PU.1 to CIITA pIII, resulting in transactivation of CIITA and MHC class II. IL-33 is an important cytokine in allergic disorders. Mast cells have the ability to express MHC class II after prolonged exposure to IL-33 in a murine model. IL-33 holds a key to understanding the etiology of atopic dermatitis. PMID:26417437

  5. IL-33 promotes MHC class II expression in murine mast cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomonobu; Egusa, Chizu; Maeda, Tatsuo; Numata, Takafumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2015-09-01

    Mast cells (MCs), recognized as tissue-resident cells of hematopoietic origin, are involved in cellular and pathological manifestations of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis. IL-33, a member of the IL-1 cytokine family, activates Th2-type immune responses, and promotes the degranulation and maturation of MCs. However, it is uncertain whether IL-33 treatment induces mature mast cells to acquire the characteristics of the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage.We investigated the effect of IL-33 on the MHC class II expression and function of murine mast cells. IL-33-treated mature murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were analyzed by FACS, real-time PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, and Western blotting. The morphology and degranulation activity of BMMCs and T-cell activation by BMMCs were also examined. BMMCs treated with IL-33 for 10 days induced cell surface expression of the MHC class II protein, whereas the expression of FcεRI and c-kit was not affected by IL-33. The expression of CIITA, driven from pIII and pIV, was up-regulated in IL-33-treated BMMCs. The amount of PU.1 mRNA and protein significantly increased in IL-33-treated BMMCs. The ChIP assay showed PU.1 binding to CIITA pIII, and enhanced histone acetylation due to IL-33 treatment. Syngeneic T cells were activated by co-culture with IL-33-treated BMMCs, although the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80, CD86, and PDL-1, was not detected. Mast cells express MHC class II after prolonged exposure to IL-33, probably due to enhanced recruitment of PU.1 to CIITA pIII, resulting in transactivation of CIITA and MHC class II. IL-33 is an important cytokine in allergic disorders. Mast cells have the ability to express MHC class II after prolonged exposure to IL-33 in a murine model. IL-33 holds a key to understanding the etiology of atopic dermatitis. PMID:26417437

  6. Purification and Crystallization of Murine Myostatin: A Negative Regulator of Muscle Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Young S.; Adamek, Daniel; Bridge, Kristi; Malone, Christine C.; Young, Ronald B.; Miller, Teresa; Karr, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) has been crystallized and its preliminary X-ray diffraction data were collected. MSTN is a negative regulator of muscle growt/differentiation and suppressor of fat accumulation. It is a member of TGF-b family of proteins. Like other members of this family, the regulation of MSTN is critically tied to its process of maturation. This process involves the formation of a homodimer followed by two proteolytic steps. The first proteolytic cleavage produces a species where the n-terminal portion of the dimer is covalently separated from, but remains non-covalently bound to, the c-terminal, functional, portion of the protein. The protein is activated upon removal of the n-terminal "pro-segment" by a second n-terminal proteolytic cut by BMP-1 in vivo, or by acid treatment in vitro. Understanding the structural nature and physical interactions involved in these regulatory processes is the objective of our studies. Murine MSTN was purified from culture media of genetically engineered Chinese Hamster Ovary cells by multicolumn purification process and crystallized using the vapor diffusion method.

  7. C-kit signaling promotes proliferation and invasion of colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jun; Yang, Shu; Shen, Ping; Sun, Haimei; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Yaxi; Wu, Bo; Ji, Fengqing; Yan, Jihong; Xue, Hong; Zhou, Deshan

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family often highly expressed in several mucinous carcinomas. In the present study, we established a murine model of colorectal mucinous adenocardinoma (CRMAC) by treating C57 mice [both wild type (WT) and loss-of-function c-kit mutant type (Wads−/−)] with AOM+DSS for 37 weeks and found that c-kit, a member of RTK family, clearly enhanced the tumor cell proliferation by decreasing p53 and increasing cyclin D1 through AKT pathway. Significantly, c-kit strongly promoted tumor cell invasiveness by increasing ETV4, which induced MMP7 expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via ERK pathway. In vitro up- or down-regulating c-kit activation in human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells further consolidated these results. In conclusion, our data suggested that the c-kit signaling obviously promoted proliferation and invasion of CRMAC. Therefore, targeting the c-kit signaling and its downstream molecules might provide the potential strategies for treatment of patients suffering from CRMAC in the future. PMID:26356816

  8. Disruption of canonical TGFβ-signaling in murine coronary progenitor cells by low level arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Patrick; Huang, Tianfang; Broka, Derrick; Parker, Patti; Barnett, Joey V.; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to arsenic results in several types of cancers as well as heart disease. A major contributor to ischemic heart pathologies is coronary artery disease, however the influences by environmental arsenic in this disease process are not known. Similarly, the impact of toxicants on blood vessel formation and function during development has not been studied. During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types including smooth muscle cells which contribute to the coronary vessels. The TGFβ family of ligands and receptors is essential for developmental cardiac epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and differentiation into coronary smooth muscle cells. In this in vitro study, 18 hour exposure to 1.34 μM arsenite disrupted developmental EMT programming in murine epicardial cells causing a deficit in cardiac mesenchyme. The expression of EMT genes including TGFβ2, TGFβ receptor-3, Snail, and Has-2 are decreased in a dose-dependent manner following exposure to arsenite. TGFβ2 cell signaling is abrogated as detected by decreases in phosphorylated Smad2/3 when cells are exposed to 1.34 μM arsenite. There is also loss of nuclear accumulation pSmad due to arsenite exposure. These observations coincide with a decrease in vimentin positive mesenchymal cells invading three-dimensional collagen gels. However, arsenite does not block TGFβ2 mediated smooth muscle cell differentiation by epicardial cells. Overall these results show that arsenic exposure blocks developmental EMT gene programming in murine coronary progenitor cells by disrupting TGFβ2 signals and Smad activation, and that smooth muscle cell differentiation is refractory to this arsenic toxicity. - Highlights: • Arsenic blocks TGFβ2 induced expression of EMT genes. • Arsenic blocks TGFβ2 triggered Smad2/3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • Arsenic blocks epicardial cell differentiation into cardiac mesenchyme.

  9. A flavone derivative from Sesbania sesban leaves and its cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianhar, Hanhan; Syah, Yana Maolana; Mujahidin, Didin; Hakim, Euis Holisotan; Juliawaty, Lia Dewi

    2014-03-01

    Sesbania sesban, locally named as Jayanti, is one of Indonesia plants belonging to Fabaceae family. This species is traditionally used by Indonesian people to cure digestive disorders, fever, or headache. Jayanti can grow well in tropical to subtropical region, such as in Asia and Africa. Based on literature, qualitative analysis of the methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban showed that it contained flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. In addition, the activity assay of extracts of different tissues of this species showed antitumor, antimalarial, and antidiabetic activityies (leaves and seed extracts), antioxidants (flower extract), and analgesic (wood extract). Though the extracts of S. sesban parts showed interesting activities, chemical study of those extracts have not been widely reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to isolate the secondary metabolites from methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban and to determine their cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells. One compound has been obtained and identified as 3-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (1), a new isolated compound from nature. This compound was obtained through separation of methanol extract using various chromatographic techniques, such as vacuum liquid chromatography and radial chromatography. The structure elucidation of isolated compound was based on 1D NMR (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR) and 2D NMR (HMBC). The cytotoxicity of methanol extract and compound 1 against murine leukemia P-388 cells examined through MTT assay showed IC50 value of 60.04 μg/mL and 5.40 μg/mL, respectively.

  10. A flavone derivative from Sesbania sesban leaves and its cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dianhar, Hanhan Syah, Yana Maolana Mujahidin, Didin Hakim, Euis Holisotan Juliawaty, Lia Dewi

    2014-03-24

    Sesbania sesban, locally named as Jayanti, is one of Indonesia plants belonging to Fabaceae family. This species is traditionally used by Indonesian people to cure digestive disorders, fever, or headache. Jayanti can grow well in tropical to subtropical region, such as in Asia and Africa. Based on literature, qualitative analysis of the methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban showed that it contained flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. In addition, the activity assay of extracts of different tissues of this species showed antitumor, antimalarial, and antidiabetic activityies (leaves and seed extracts), antioxidants (flower extract), and analgesic (wood extract). Though the extracts of S. sesban parts showed interesting activities, chemical study of those extracts have not been widely reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to isolate the secondary metabolites from methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban and to determine their cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells. One compound has been obtained and identified as 3-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (1), a new isolated compound from nature. This compound was obtained through separation of methanol extract using various chromatographic techniques, such as vacuum liquid chromatography and radial chromatography. The structure elucidation of isolated compound was based on 1D NMR ({sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR) and 2D NMR (HMBC). The cytotoxicity of methanol extract and compound 1 against murine leukemia P-388 cells examined through MTT assay showed IC{sub 50} value of 60.04 μg/mL and 5.40 μg/mL, respectively.

  11. Family Reading Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Darcy; Greenfeld, Marsha; Epstein, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This book offers clear and practical guidelines to help engage families in student success. It shows families how to conduct a successful Family Reading Night at their school. Family Night themes include Scary Stories, Books We Love, Reading Olympics, Dr. Seuss, and other themes. Family reading nights invite parents to come to school with their…

  12. The Changing Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue contains feature articles and short reports on how and why family structures are undergoing substantial change in many parts of the world. These articles include: (1) "The Changing Family Structure," a review of how families are changing and why; (2) "Peru: Families in the Andes"; (3) "Thailand: Families of the Garbage Dump";…

  13. Family Treatment Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawicki, Donna

    The document describes the Family Treatment Unit, a demonstration program to provide a variety of family treatment services to status offenders (11 to 17 years old) and their families. The goals of the program are: (1) to provide family services to families of status offenders; (2) to maintain status offenders in their natural homes by…

  14. Expression of surfactant proteins SP-A and SP-D in murine decidua and immunomodulatory effects on decidual macrophages.

    PubMed

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Koippallil Gopalakrishnan, Aghila Rani; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Marri, Eswari Dodagatta-; Kouser, Lubna; Jamil, Kaiser; Alhamlan, Fatimah S; Kishore, Uday; Madan, Taruna

    2016-02-01

    Surfactant proteins SP-A and SP-D are pattern recognition innate immune molecules that belong to the C-type lectin family. In lungs, they play an important role in the clearance of pathogens and control of inflammation. SP-A and SP-D are also expressed in the female reproductive tract where they play an important role in pregnancy and parturition. However, the role of SP-A and SP-D expressed at the feto-maternal interface (decidua) remains unclear. Here, we have examined the expression of SP-A and SP-D in the murine decidua at 17.5 (pre-parturition) and 19.5dpc (near parturition) and their effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated decidual macrophages. SP-A and SP-D were localized to stromal cells in the murine decidua at 17.5 and 19.5dpc in addition to cells lining the maternal spiral artery. Purified pre-parturition decidual cells were challenged with LPS with and without SP-A or SP-D, and expression of F4/80 and TNF-α were measured by flow cytometry. On their own, SP-A or SP-D did not affect the percentage of F4/80 positive cells while they suppressed the percentage of TNF-α positive cells. However, simultaneous addition of SP-A or SP-D, together with LPS, reduced TNF-α secreting F4/80 positive cells. It is likely that exogenous administration of SP-A and SP-D in decidua can potentially control infection and inflammation mediators during spontaneous term labor and infection-induced preterm labor. Thus, the presence of SP-A and SP-D in the murine decidua is likely to play a protective role against intrauterine infection during pregnancy. PMID:26421960

  15. Family Capital: Implications for Interventions with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, John R.; Peckuonis, Edward V.; Deforge, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been extensively discussed in the literature as building blocks that individuals and communities utilize to leverage system resources. Similarly, some families also create capital, which can enable members of the family, such as children, to successfully negotiate the outside world. Families in poverty confront serious…

  16. Developing Strengths in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ted

    1976-01-01

    There are few descriptions of growth experiences for total families. This paper describes one such model. It expresses the conviction that families need opportunities to come together with other families to identify strengths, sharpen communication skills, and establish goals. (Author)

  17. Family Reunion Health Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone (Continued) 1. Send a Kidney Health Message Hi Family, I came across this information and thought ... mails to family members. Before the Reunion 1. Hi family! Taking care of your kidneys is important. ...

  18. Improving Family Communications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Improving Family Communications Page Content Article Body How can I ...

  19. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  20. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  1. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Houseal, M. Trevor; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA2/J (D2)—the BXD family—was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs) in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01) with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes. PMID:26829228

  2. Proteomic analysis of murine testes lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyi; Wei, Suning; Li, Linghai; Su, Xueying; Du, Congkuo; Li, Fengjuan; Geng, Bin; Liu, Pingsheng; Xu, Guoheng

    2015-01-01

    Testicular Leydig cells contain abundant cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) as a cholesteryl-ester store for releasing cholesterols as the precursor substrate for testosterone biosynthesis. Here, we identified the protein composition of testicular LDs purified from adult mice by using mass spectrometry and immunodetection. Among 337 proteins identified, 144 were previously detected in LD proteomes; 44 were confirmed by microscopy. Testicular LDs contained multiple Rab GTPases, chaperones, and proteins involved in glucuronidation, ubiquination and transport, many known to modulate LD formation and LD-related cellular functions. In particular, testicular LDs contained many members of both the perilipin family and classical lipase/esterase superfamily assembled predominately in adipocyte LDs. Thus, testicular LDs might be regulated similar to adipocyte LDs. Remarkably, testicular LDs contained a large number of classical enzymes for biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and hormonal steroids, so steroidogenic reactions might occur on testicular LDs or the steroidogenic enzymes and products could be transferred through testicular LDs. These characteristics differ from the LDs in most other types of cells, so testicular LDs could be an active organelle functionally involved in steroidogenesis. PMID:26159641

  3. Practical Murine Hematopathology: A Comparative Review and Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Karyn E; Mikkola, Amy M; Stepanek, Aaron M; Vernet, Andyna; Hall, Christopher D; Sun, Chia C; Yildirim, Eda; Staropoli, John F; Lee, Jeannie T; Brown, Diane E

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic parameters are important markers of disease in human and veterinary medicine. Biomedical research has benefited from mouse models that recapitulate such disease, thus expanding knowledge of pathogenetic mechanisms and investigative therapies that translate across species. Mice in health have many notable hematologic differences from humans and other veterinary species, including smaller erythrocytes, higher percentage of circulating reticulocytes or polychromasia, lower peripheral blood neutrophil and higher peripheral blood and bone marrow lymphocyte percentages, variable leukocyte morphologies, physiologic splenic hematopoiesis and iron storage, and more numerous and shorter-lived erythrocytes and platelets. For accurate and complete hematologic analyses of disease and response to investigative therapeutic interventions, these differences and the unique features of murine hematopathology must be understood. Here we review murine hematology and hematopathology for practical application to translational investigation. PMID:25926395

  4. Genomic organization of the murine CTL lipase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.H.; Boyer, S.N.; Grusby, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    Murine cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lipase was originally identified as an IL-4-inducible gene in CD8-positive T cells. To further our understanding of both the function and the regulation of CTL lipase in T cells, we have cloned and characterized the murine gene. Two overlapping phage clones spanning 29 kb contain the entire CTL lipase gene. The exon structure in similar to those characterized for the human and canine pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 genes, with notable differences in the 5{prime} end. Transcripts initiate from a site that matches a consensus for an initiator sequence. Potential cis-regulatory elements in the CTL lipase 5{prime} regulatory region that would confer dual tissue specificity in exocrine pancreas and cytotoxic T lymphocytes are identified. The implications of this promoter organization are discussed. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Increased photosensitivity to near-ultraviolet light in murine SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, D.T.; Borel, Y.

    1984-02-01

    The authors investigated whether there is increased susceptibility to near-UVL in murine SLE. Cultured spleen cells from either strain of mice with lupus disease or conventional strains of mice were exposed to different UVL fractions in vitro. The effect of DNA synthesis, release, and repair was examined. DNA synthesis and release was measured as percent of (/sup 3/H)thymidine (dT) uptake into either total acid-precipitable radioactive material of cell sediment plus supernatant, or that of the medium alone, whereas hydroxyurea-resistant dT incorporation represented DNA repair. The data indicate that all SLE strains, in contrast to all non-SLE strains, show increased DNA synthesis and release after UV-A exposure. In addition, all murine SLE strains demonstrate increased susceptibility to induction of DNA damage by UV-A. The significance of these observations in relation to the clinical activity of SLE after sunlight exposure is discussed.

  6. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells Within Murine Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gjurich, Breanne N; Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the modulation of atherogenesis at all stages of the disease. However, there are many technical difficulties when studying the immune system within murine aortas. Common techniques such as PCR and immunohistochemistry have answered many questions about the presence of immune cells and mediators of inflammation within the aorta yet many questions remain unanswered due to the limitations of these techniques. On the other hand, cumulatively the flow cytometry approach has propelled the immunology field forward but it has been challenging to apply this technique to aortic tissues. Here, we describe the methodology to isolate and characterize the immune cells within the murine aorta and provide examples of functional assays for aortic leukocytes using flow cytometry. The method involves the harvesting and enzymatic digestion of the aorta, extracellular and intracellular protein staining, and a subsequent flow cytometric analysis. PMID:26445788

  7. A generalized transducing phage for the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Toribio, Ana L.; Goulding, David; Foulds, Ian; Thomson, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Salmond, George P. C.

    2008-01-01

    A virulent phage (φCR1) capable of generalized transduction in Citrobacter rodentium was isolated from the environment and characterized. C. rodentium is a natural pathogen of mice, causing transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia. Sequencing of its genome has recently been completed and will soon be fully annotated and published. C. rodentium is an important model organism for infections caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC). φCR1 uses a lipopolysaccharide receptor, has a genome size of approximately 300 kb, and is able to transduce a variety of markers. φCR1 is the first reported transducing phage for C. rodentium and will be a useful tool for functional genomic analysis of this important natural murine pathogen. PMID:17768241

  8. Resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carletto, Bruna; Berton, Juliana; Ferreira, Tamara Nascimento; Dalmolin, Luciana Facco; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Favero, Giovani Marino

    2016-08-01

    In this study, resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were developed and its antitumor activity tested on a melanoma mice model. These nanocapsules were spherically-shaped and presented suitable size, negative charge and high encapsulation efficiency for their use as a modified-release system of resveratrol. Nanoencapsulation leads to the drug amorphization. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles reduced cell viability of murine melanoma cells. There was a decrease in tumor volume, an increase in the necrotic area and inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma when resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were compared to free resveratrol in treated mice. Nanoencapsulation of resveratrol also prevented metastasis and pulmonary hemorrhage. This modified-release technology containing resveratrol can be used as a feasible approach in order to inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth. PMID:27070053

  9. The murine Sim-2 gene product inhibits transcription by active repression and functional interference.

    PubMed

    Moffett, P; Reece, M; Pelletier, J

    1997-09-01

    The Drosophila single-minded (Dsim) gene encodes a master regulatory protein involved in cell fate determination during midline development. This protein is a member of a rapidly expanding family of gene products possessing basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) and hydrophobic PAS (designated a conserved region among PER, ARNT [aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator] and SIM) protein association domains. Members of this family function as central transcriptional regulators in cellular differentiation and in the response to environmental stimuli such as xenobiotics and hypoxia. We have previously identified a murine member of this family, called mSim-2, showing sequence homology to the bHLH and PAS domains of Dsim. Immunoprecipitation experiments with recombinant proteins indicate that mSIM-2 associates with the arnt gene product. In the present work, by using fine-structure mapping we found that the HLH and PAS motifs of both proteins are required for optimal association. Forced expression of GAL4/mSIM-2 fusion constructs in mammalian cells demonstrated the presence of two separable repression domains within the carboxy terminus of mSIM-2. We found that mSIM-2 is capable of repressing ARNT-mediated transcriptional activation in a mammalian two-hybrid system. This effect (i) is dependent on the ability of mSIM-2 and ARNT to heterodimerize, (ii) is dependent on the presence of the mSIM-2 carboxy-terminal repression domain, and (iii) is not specific to the ARNT activation domain. These results suggest that mSIM-2 repression activity can dominantly override the activation potential of adjacent transcription factors. We also demonstrated that mSIM-2 can functionally interfere with hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha)/ARNT transcription complexes, providing a second mechanism by which mSIM-2 may inhibit transcription. PMID:9271372

  10. Phase dispersion X-ray imaging of murine soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingal, V. N.; Ingal, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of phase-contrast (PC) images in the phase-dispersion introscopy (PDI) technique is the subject of this paper. Conditions for extreme sensitivity to murine soft-tissue anatomy are discussed. The unique information content and good contrast of the minutest details of anatomy, together with the high brilliance of X-ray optics, give the authors confidence that the PDI method can be successfully applied for medical diagnostics.

  11. Miniature Microwave Applicator for Murine Bladder Hyperthermia Studies

    PubMed Central

    Salahi, Sara; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Rodrigues, Dario B.; Etienne, Wiguins; Landon, Chelsea D.; Inman, Brant A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Novel combinations of heat with chemotherapeutic agents are often studied in murine tumor models. Currently, no device exists to selectively heat small tumors at depth in mice. In this project, we modelled, built and tested a miniature microwave heat applicator, the physical dimensions of which can be scaled to adjust the volume and depth of heating to focus on the tumor volume. Of particular interest is a device that can selectively heat murine bladder. Materials and Methods Using Avizo® segmentation software, we created a numerical mouse model based on micro-MRI scan data. The model was imported into HFSS™ simulation software and parametric studies were performed to optimize the dimensions of a water-loaded circular waveguide for selective power deposition inside a 0.15ml bladder. A working prototype was constructed operating at 2.45GHz. Heating performance was characterized by mapping fiber-optic temperature sensors along catheters inserted at depths of 0-1mm (subcutaneous), 2-3mm (vaginal), and 4-5mm (rectal) below the abdominal wall, with the mid-depth catheter adjacent to the bladder. Core temperature was monitored orally. Results Thermal measurements confirm the simulations which demonstrate that this applicator can provide local heating at depth in small animals. Measured temperatures in murine pelvis show well-localized bladder heating to 42-43°C while maintaining normothermic skin and core temperatures. Conclusions Simulation techniques facilitate the design optimization of microwave antennas for use in pre-clinical applications such as localized tumor heating in small animals. Laboratory measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of a new miniature water-coupled microwave applicator for localized heating of murine bladder. PMID:22690856

  12. Morphology and growth of murine cell lines on model biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Godek, Marisha L; Duchsherer, Nichole L; McElwee, Quinn; Grainger, David W

    2004-01-01

    All biomaterial implants are assaulted by the host "foreign body" immune response. Understanding the complex, dynamic relationship between cells, biomaterials and milieu is an important first step towards controlling this reaction. Material surface chemistry dictates protein adsorption, and thus subsequent cell interactions. The cell-implant is a microenvironment involving 1) proteins that coat the surface and 2) cells that interact with these proteins. Macrophages and fibroblasts are two cell types that interact with proteins on biomaterials surfaces and play different related, but equally important, roles in biomaterials rejection and implant failure. Growth characteristics of four murine cell lines on model biomaterials surfaces were examined. Murine monocyte-macrophages (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1), murine macrophage (IC-21) and murine fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines were tested to determine whether differences exist in adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, spreading, and fusion (macrophage lineages only) on these surfaces. Differences were observed in the ability of cells to adhere to and subsequently proliferate on polymer surfaces. (Monocyte-) macrophages grew well on all surfaces tested and growth rates were measured on three representative polymer biomaterials surfaces: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polystyrene, and Teflon-AF. J774A.1 cultures grown on TCPS and treated with exogenous cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF were observed to contain multinucleate cells with unusual morphologies. Thus, (monocyte-) macrophage cell lines were found to effectively attach to and interrogate each surface presented, with evidence of extensive spreading on Teflon-AF surfaces, particularly in the IC-21 cultures. The J774A.1 line was able to proliferate and/or differentiate to more specialized cell types (multinucleate/dendritic-like cells) in the presence of soluble chemokine cues. PMID:15133927

  13. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  14. Families and family therapy in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Tse, Samson; Ng, Roger M K; Tonsing, Kareen N; Ran, Maosheng

    2012-04-01

    Family therapy views humans not as separate entities, but as embedded in a network of relationships, highlighting the reciprocal influences of one's behaviours on one another. This article gives an overview of family demographics and the implementation of family therapy in Hong Kong. We start with a review of the family demographics in Hong Kong and brief notes on families in mainland China. Demographics show that the landscape has changed markedly in the past decade, with more cross-border marriages, an increased divorce rate, and an ageing overall population - all of which could mean that there is increasing demand for professional family therapy interventions. However, only a limited number of professionals are practising the systems-based approach in Hong Kong. Some possible reasons as to why family therapy is not well disseminated and practised are discussed. These reasons include a lack of mental health policy to support family therapy, a lack of systematic family therapy training, and a shortage of skilled professionals. Furthermore, challenges in applying the western model in Chinese culture are also outlined. We conclude that more future research is warranted to investigate how family therapy can be adapted for Chinese families. PMID:22515459

  15. Utilization of Murine Colonoscopy for Orthotopic Implantation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zigmond, Ehud; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Brazowski, Eli; Jung, Steffen; Varol, Chen

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal-cancer (CRC) research has greatly benefited from the availability of small animal tumor models. Spontaneous and chemically-induced CRC models are widely used yet limited in their resemblance to human disease and are often prolonged, not accurately repetitive, and associated with inflammatory side effects. In-situ murine or human tumor implantation in the gastrointestinal tract of mice is extremely challenging, and limited by inter-animal variability and procedure-related complications and mortality. As a result, in frequent studies CRC is implanted in distal sites, most commonly the subcutaneous region, an approach that is greatly limited by the absence of normal gastrointestinal tumor milieu and has substantial effects on tumor development. Aims In this study we aimed to develop a well-tolerated repetitive tool to study CRC in small animals by adapting the murine colonoscopy system to serve as a platform for colonic sub-mucosal orthotopic implantation of human and murine CRC tumor cells. Results We report the establishment of a novel small-animal CRC model that is minimally invasive, rapid, well-tolerated, highly reproducible, and confers precise control of tumor number, location and growth rate. Moreover, we show that this model uniquely allows the side-by-side induction of distinct genetically manipulated tumors, enabling the mechanistic study of tumor interaction and cross-talk within the native intestinal microenvironment. Conclusions Employment of this new approach may represent a major technical advance for the in-vivo study of CRC. PMID:22174916

  16. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D.

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Evaluation of a Murine Single-Blood-Injection SAH Model

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Clemens; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Schneider, Toni; Hänggi, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) are poorly understood and continue to be a matter of debate. A valid murine SAH injection model is not yet available but would be the prerequisite for further transgenic studies assessing the mechanisms following SAH. Using the murine single injection model, we examined the effects of SAH on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the somatosensory (S1) and cerebellar cortex, neuro-behavioural and morphological integrity and changes in quantitative electrocorticographic and electrocardiographic parameters. Micro CT imaging verified successful blood delivery into the cisterna magna. An acute impairment of rCBF was observed immediately after injection in the SAH and after 6, 12 and 24 hours in the S1 and 6 and 12 hours after SAH in the cerebellum. Injection of blood into the foramen magnum reduced telemetric recorded total ECoG power by an average of 65%. Spectral analysis of ECoGs revealed significantly increased absolute delta power, i.e., slowing, cortical depolarisations and changes in ripples and fast ripple oscillations 12 hours and 24 hours after SAH. Therefore, murine single-blood-injection SAH model is suitable for pathophysiological and further molecular analysis following SAH. PMID:25545775

  18. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD. PMID:26811642

  19. Guanylate cyclase C limits systemic dissemination of a murine enteric pathogen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Guanylate Cyclase C (GC-C) is an apically-oriented transmembrane receptor that is expressed on epithelial cells of the intestine. Activation of GC-C by the endogenous ligands guanylin or uroguanylin elevates intracellular cGMP and is implicated in intestinal ion secretion, cell proliferation, apoptosis, intestinal barrier function, as well as the susceptibility of the intestine to inflammation. Our aim was to determine if GC-C is required for host defense during infection by the murine enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium of the family Enterobacteriacea. Methods GC-C+/+ control mice or those having GC-C genetically ablated (GC-C−/−) were administered C. rodentium by orogastric gavage and analyzed at multiple time points up to post-infection day 20. Commensal bacteria were characterized in uninfected GC-C+/+ and GC-C−/− mice using 16S rRNA PCR analysis. Results GC-C−/− mice had an increase in C. rodentium bacterial load in stool relative to GC-C+/+. C. rodentium infection strongly decreased guanylin expression in GC-C+/+ mice and, to an even greater degree, in GC-C−/− animals. Fluorescent tracer studies indicated that mice lacking GC-C, unlike GC-C+/+ animals, had a substantial loss of intestinal barrier function early in the course of infection. Epithelial cell apoptosis was significantly increased in GC-C−/− mice following 10 days of infection and this was associated with increased frequency and numbers of C. rodentium translocation out of the intestine. Infection led to significant liver histopathology in GC-C−/− mice as well as lymphocyte infiltration and elevated cytokine and chemokine expression. Relative to naïve GC-C+/+ mice, the commensal microflora load in uninfected GC-C−/− mice was decreased and bacterial composition was imbalanced and included outgrowth of the Enterobacteriacea family. Conclusions This work demonstrates the novel finding that GC-C signaling is an essential component of host defense during

  20. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a culturally-adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9–12 year old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted with each family. Parental stress, parent-child dysfunctional relations, and child behavior problems were reduced in the families receiving the intervention; family hardiness and family attachment were improved. Findings contribute to the validation of the SFP with Latinos, and can be used to inform social work practice with Puerto Rican families. PMID:20871785

  1. Restoration of murine femoral segmental defect using CTGF-overexpressing MC3T3-E1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiangyu; Li, Yanqiu; Xu, Jiantao; Liu, Kai; Yu, Xin; Cheng, Xin; Xu, Dongdong; Li, Zubing

    2016-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a member of the CCN super family and is reported to widely participate in bone development and regeneration. This study aimed to restore murine femoral segmental defect using CTGF-overexpressing MC3T3-E1 cells. MC3T3-E1 cells were transinfected by lenti-CTGF (LvCTGF) and lenti-negative control (LvNC) virus to obtain stably transinfected cells. Real-time PCR, Western blot, alkaline phosphatase activity assay, and alizarin red staining demonstrated that the overexpression of CTGF enhanced osteogenesis in vitro. Cell migration assay results showed that LvCTGF cells expressed higher migration ability than LvNC cells, while CCK-8 assay revealed no significant difference in cell proliferation. The LvCTGF and LvNC cells were then seeded into a chitosan/β-TCP scaffold and were used to restore a murine femoral segmental defect. Samples were harvested by the end of 2 and 5 weeks respectively. Micro-CT analysis and Masson’s trichrome staining results showed that the LvCTGF-scaffold group expressed better bone healing compared with the LvNC-scaffold and scaffold-only groups. CTGF-overexpressed cells serve as an efficient source of seeding cells for bone regeneration. PMID:27186279

  2. Aminopeptidase A activity of the murine B-lymphocyte differentiation antigen BP-1/6C3.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Q; Li, L; Cooper, M D; Pierres, M; Gorvel, J P

    1991-01-01

    The predicted amino acid sequence of the cDNA encoding the murine B-lymphocyte differentiation antigen BP-1/6C3 suggested that it is a member of the zinc-dependent metalloprotease family, possibly an aminopeptidase related to aminopeptidase N [microsomal aminopeptidase; alpha-aminoacyl-peptide hydrolase (microsomal), EC 3.4.11.2]. In the present studies, we examined the enzymatic activity of this antigen. From brush border preparations of the small intestine, a rich source of many endopeptidases and exopeptidases, the BP-1 antibody selectively removed aminopeptidase A [APA; L-alpha-aspartyl(L-alpha-glutamyl)-peptide hydrolase, EC 3.4.11.7] activity. The APA activity of a panel of cell lines correlated in linear fashion with cell-surface levels of the BP-1/6C3 antigen. APA activity was demonstrated for the BP-1/6C3 antigen immunopurified from the pre-B-cell membrane. This activity was enhanced by alkaline earth metals such as Ca2+ and was abrogated by amastatin and angiotensin, which are known competitive inhibitors of APA. The data indicate that the murine BP-1/6C3 antigen is active APA, an enzyme that catalyzes specifically the removal of unsubstituted, N-terminal glutamic acid and aspartic acid residues from peptides. Images PMID:1988965

  3. Nek8, a NIMA family kinase member, is overexpressed in primary human breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Alex J; Boylan, John F

    2004-03-17

    The family of human Nek (NIMA Related Kinase) kinases currently contains 11 members. We have identified Nek8 as a new member of the Nek kinase family. For many of the Nek family members, primary tumor expression data and function have been limited. However, all of the Nek family proteins share considerable homology with the Never In Mitosis, gene A (NIMA) kinase from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. NIMA, as well as its most closely related human ortholog, Nek2, are required for G(2)/M progression and promote centrosome maturation during mitosis. We isolated Nek8 from a primary human colon cDNA library, and found it to be highly homologous to murine Nek8. Recently, a previously named Nek8 sequence was renamed Nek9/Nercc1 in Genbank due to its lack of homology to murine Nek8 and its high homology to murine Nek9. Interestingly, in our study, phylogenetic analysis suggests that human Nek8 and Nek9 form a subfamily within the Nek family. Nek8 has high homology to the Nek family kinase domain as well as to a regulator of chromosome condensation domain (RCC1), which is also present in Nek9. The open reading frame of human Nek8 encodes a 692 amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 75 kDa. Nek8 is differently expressed between normal human breast tissue and breast tumors. Overexpression of a mutated kinase domain Nek8 in U2-0S cells led to a decrease in actin protein, and a small increase in the level of cdk1/cyclinB1. Our data demonstrate for the first time that Nek8 is a novel tumor associated gene, and shares considerable sequence homology with the Nek family of protein kinases and may be involved in G(2)/M progression. PMID:15019993

  4. Murine leukemia virus envelope gp70 is a shared biomarker for the high-sensitivity quantification of murine tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Scrimieri, Francesca; Askew, David; Corn, David J; Eid, Saada; Bobanga, Iuliana D; Bjelac, Jaclyn A; Tsao, Matthew L; Allen, Frederick; Othman, Youmna S; Wang, Shih-Chung G; Huang, Alex Y

    2013-01-01

    The preclinical development of anticancer drugs including immunotherapeutics and targeted agents relies on the ability to detect minimal residual tumor burden as a measure of therapeutic efficacy. Real-time quantitative (qPCR) represents an exquisitely sensitive method to perform such an assessment. However, qPCR-based applications are limited by the availability of a genetic defect associated with each tumor model under investigation. Here, we describe an off-the-shelf qPCR-based approach to detect a broad array of commonly used preclinical murine tumor models. In particular, we report that the mRNA coding for the envelope glycoprotein 70 (gp70) encoded by the endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is universally expressed in 22 murine cancer cell lines of disparate histological origin but is silent in 20 out of 22 normal mouse tissues. Further, we detected the presence of as few as 100 tumor cells in whole lung extracts using qPCR specific for gp70, supporting the notion that this detection approach has a higher sensitivity as compared with traditional tissue histology methods. Although gp70 is expressed in a wide variety of tumor cell lines, it was absent in inflamed tissues, non-transformed cell lines, or pre-cancerous lesions. Having a high-sensitivity biomarker for the detection of a wide range of murine tumor cells that does not require additional genetic manipulations or the knowledge of specific genetic alterations present in a given neoplasm represents a unique experimental tool for investigating metastasis, assessing antitumor therapeutic interventions, and further determining tumor recurrence or minimal residual disease. PMID:24482753

  5. Expression and modulation of IL-1 alpha in murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ansel, J.C.; Luger, T.A.; Lowry, D.; Perry, P.; Roop, D.R.; Mountz, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    Murine and human keratinocytes produce an IL-1-like factor that appears to be similar if not identical to monocyte-derived IL-1. IL-1 may be an important mediator in cutaneous inflammatory responses, however, little is currently known concerning factors that may modulate IL-1 expression in keratinocytes. To address this issue we examined the effect of LPS, UV, and the cell differentiation state on murine keratinocyte IL-1 mRNA expression. Our results indicated that as with the murine P388D1 monocyte cell line, PAM 212 keratinocytes constitutively express abundant amounts of IL-1 alpha mRNA. On exposure to LPS (100 micrograms/ml) for 8 h there was more than 10 times the increase in PAM 212 IL-1 alpha mRNA which was accompanied by a sixfold increase in supernatant IL-1 activity. Similarly UV irradiation had a significant effect on keratinocyte IL-1 alpha expression. High dose UV (300 mJ/cm2) inhibited PAM 212 IL-1 alpha expression at 4, 8, 24, 48 h post-UV whereas a lower dose of UV (100 mJ/cm2) inhibited UV at 4 and 8 h post-UV, but induced IL-1 expression at 24 and 48 h post-UV. The expression of IL-1 alpha varied with the differentiation state of the keratinocytes. Freshly removed newborn murine keratinocytes were found to constitutively express IL-1 alpha mRNA. Keratinocytes grown in low (Ca2+) tissue culture media (0.05 mM) for 6 days, functionally and phenotypically become undifferentiated and express increased quantities of IL-1 alpha mRNA, whereas cells grown in high (Ca2+) media (1.2 mM) for 6 days become terminally differentiated and IL-1 expression ceased. Keratinocytes cultured for 3 days in low (Ca2+) conditions expressed an intermediate level of IL-1 alpha. In contrast, little or no IL-1 beta mRNA was detected in either the PAM 212 cells or newborn murine keratinocytes.

  6. Identification of Novel Protein Kinase A Phosphorylation Sites in the M-domain of Human and Murine Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Using Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Weitao; Shaffer, Justin F.; Harris, Samantha P.; Leary, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) is a large multi-domain accessory protein bound to myosin thick filaments in striated muscle sarcomeres. It plays an important role in the regulation of muscle contraction and mutations in the gene encoding cMyBP-C are a common cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people1. The N-terminal domains including the C0, C1, cMyBP-C motif, and C2 domains play a crucial role in maintaining and modulating actomyosin interactions (keeping normal cardiac function) in a phosphorylation dependent manner. The cMyBP-C motif or “M-domain” is a highly conserved linker domain in the N-terminus of cMyBP-C that contains three to five protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites, depending on species. For the human isoform, three PKA sites were previously identified (Ser275, Ser284, and Ser304), while three homologous sites exist in the murine isoform (Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302). The murine cMyBP-C isoform contains an additional conserved consensus site, Ser307 that is not present in the human isoform. In this study, we investigated sites of PKA phosphorylation of murine and human cMyBP-C by treating the recombinant protein C0C2 (~50 KDa, which contains the N-terminal C0, C1, M, and C2 domains) and C1C2 (~35 KDa, contains C1, M and C2 domains) with PKA and assessing the phosphorylation states using SDS-PAGE with ProQ Diamond staining, and powerful hybrid mass spectrometric analyses. Both high-accuracy bottom-up and measurements of intact proteins mass spectrometric approaches were used to determine the phosphorylation states of C0C2 and C1C2 proteins with or without PKA treatment. Herein, we report for the first time that there are four PKA phosphorylation sites in both murine and human M-domains; both murine Ser307 and a novel human Ser311 can be phosphorylated in vitro by PKA. Future studies are needed to investigate the phosphorylation state of murine and human cMyBP-C in vivo

  7. Generation of mink cell focus-forming viruses by Friend murine leukemia virus: recombination with specific endogenous proviral sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, L H; Cloyd, M W

    1984-01-01

    A family of recombinant mink cell focus-forming viruses (MCF) was derived by inoculation of NFS mice with a Friend murine leukemia virus, and their genomes were analyzed by RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotide fingerprinting. The viruses were obtained from the thymuses and spleens of preleukemic and leukemic animals and were evaluated for dualtropism and oncogenicity. All these isolates induced cytopathic foci on mink cells but could be classified into two groups based on their relative infectivities for SC-1 (mouse) or mink (ATCC CCL64) cells. One group of Friend MCFs (F-MCFs) (group I) exhibited approximately equal infectivities for SC-1 and mink cells, whereas a second group (group II) infected mink cells 1,000- to 10,000-fold more efficiently than SC-1 cells. Structural analyses of the F-MCFs revealed that group I and group II viruses correlated with recombination of Friend murine leukemia virus with two distinct, but closely related, endogenous NFS proviral sequences. No correlation was found between the type of F-MCF and the tissue of origin or the disease state of the animal. Furthermore, none of the F-MCF isolates were found to be oncogenic in NFS/N or AKR/J mice. F-MCFs of both groups underwent extensive substitution of ecotropic sequences, involving much of the gag and env genes of group I F-MCFs and most of the gag, pol, and env genes of group II F-MCFs. All F-MCF isolates retained the 3' terminal U3 region of Friend murine leukemia virus. Comparison of the RNAs of the F-MCFs with RNAs of MCFs derived from NFS.Akv-1 or NFS.Akv-2 mice indicated that the F-MCFs were derived from NFS proviral sequences which are distinct from the sequences contained in NFS.Akv MCF isolates. This result suggested that recombination with particular endogenous proviral sequences to generate MCFs may be highly specific for a given murine leukemia virus. Images PMID:6422051

  8. Murine Norovirus Transcytosis across an In Vitro Polarized Murine Intestinal Epithelial Monolayer Is Mediated by M-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B.; Liu, Thomas; Blanco, Luz P.; Auble, Heather; Payne, Hilary C.

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the causative agent of the vast majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the inability to culture human NoVs and the inability to orally infect a small animal model, little is known about the initial steps of viral entry. One particular step that is not understood is how NoVs breach the intestinal epithelial barrier. Murine NoV (MNV) is the only NoV that can be propagated in vitro by infecting murine macrophages and dendritic cells, making this virus an attractive model for studies of different aspects of NoV biology. Polarized murine intestinal epithelial mICcl2 cells were used to investigate how MNV interacts with and crosses the intestinal epithelium. In this in vitro model of the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), MNV is transported across the polarized cell monolayer in the absence of viral replication or disruption of tight junctions by a distinct epithelial cell with microfold (M) cell properties. In addition to transporting MNV, these M-like cells also transcytose microbeads and express an IgA receptor. Interestingly, B myeloma cells cultured in the basolateral compartment underlying the epithelial monolayer did not alter the number of M-like cells but increased their transcytotic activity. Our data demonstrate that MNV can cross an intact intestinal epithelial monolayer in vitro by hijacking the M-like cells' intrinsic transcytotic pathway and suggest a potential mechanism for MNV entry into the host. PMID:24049163

  9. Murine norovirus transcytosis across an in vitro polarized murine intestinal epithelial monolayer is mediated by M-like cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B; Liu, Thomas; Blanco, Luz P; Auble, Heather; Payne, Hilary C; Wobus, Christiane E

    2013-12-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the causative agent of the vast majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the inability to culture human NoVs and the inability to orally infect a small animal model, little is known about the initial steps of viral entry. One particular step that is not understood is how NoVs breach the intestinal epithelial barrier. Murine NoV (MNV) is the only NoV that can be propagated in vitro by infecting murine macrophages and dendritic cells, making this virus an attractive model for studies of different aspects of NoV biology. Polarized murine intestinal epithelial mICcl2 cells were used to investigate how MNV interacts with and crosses the intestinal epithelium. In this in vitro model of the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), MNV is transported across the polarized cell monolayer in the absence of viral replication or disruption of tight junctions by a distinct epithelial cell with microfold (M) cell properties. In addition to transporting MNV, these M-like cells also transcytose microbeads and express an IgA receptor. Interestingly, B myeloma cells cultured in the basolateral compartment underlying the epithelial monolayer did not alter the number of M-like cells but increased their transcytotic activity. Our data demonstrate that MNV can cross an intact intestinal epithelial monolayer in vitro by hijacking the M-like cells' intrinsic transcytotic pathway and suggest a potential mechanism for MNV entry into the host. PMID:24049163

  10. Families in Transition .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  11. Black Families. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes, Ed.

    The chapters of this collection explore the experiences of black families in the United States and Africa, today and in the past. They are: (1) "African American Families: A Historical Note" (John Hope Franklin); (2) "African American Families and Family Values" (Niara Sudarkasa); (3) "Old-Time Religion: Benches Can't Say 'Amen'" (William Harrison…

  12. Building Family Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Penny

    2007-01-01

    The family is centre stage of many current policy agendas and this is an exciting time to expand the understanding of the wider benefits of learning as a family and in a family. This article aims to open up new discussions and debate on using the concept of "family capital". The author states that as the debate on the social value of learning and…

  13. [Teaching about Family Law].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John Paul, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "Focus on Law Studies""contains a special emphasis on teaching about law and the family", in the form of the following three articles: "Teaching Family Law: Growing Pains and All" (Susan Frelich Appleton); "The Family Goes to Court: Including Law in a Sociological Perspective on the Family" (Mary Ann Lamanna); and Michael Grossberg's…

  14. Dual-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKitric, Eloise J.

    The impact of economic conditions on two-earner families was examined. Three family types were studied: (1) dual-career family--both the husband and wife are in the labor force but in occupations classified as professional-technical or managerial; (2) dual-earner--both the husband and wife are in the labor force; and (3) traditional family--the…

  15. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. PMID:25955461

  16. CD27 costimulation is not critical for the development of asthma and respiratory tolerance in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Ann-Kathrin; Hansen, Gesine

    2010-09-01

    CD27 is a costimulatory molecule of the TNFR family strongly expressed on activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Binding with its ligand CD70, present on lymphocytes and DCs, leads to enhanced T cell activation and proliferation. Several other costimulatory molecules of the TNFR family like CD30, CD134 (OX40) or CD137 (4-1BB) have been shown to be critically involved in the development of asthma and/or respiratory tolerance. However, the role of CD27/CD70 signalling in these disease models has not been studied intensively. The aim of this study was to directly investigate the role of CD27 for the development of asthma and respiratory tolerance by comparative analysis of wild type (WT) and CD27(-/-) mice in the corresponding murine models. Ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and challenged CD27(-/-) mice developed comparably increased airway hyperreactivity (AHR), eosinophilic airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and elevated OVA-specific serum IgE levels in response to OVA sensitization as WT mice. In addition, Th2 cytokine production in spleen cell culture supernatants and proliferation of splenocytes after in vitro OVA restimulation was equally enhanced when derived from WT and CD27(-/-) mice. Furthermore, the absence of CD27 had no decisive impact on tolerance induction, so that WT and CD27(-/-) mice were comparably protected from asthma development by mucosal antigen application before sensitization. Our results suggest that CD27 costimulation is dispensable for a Th2 cell mediated allergic asthma response and respiratory tolerance induction in murine models. PMID:20600327

  17. Identification of a novel series of BET family bromodomain inhibitors: binding mode and profile of I-BET151 (GSK1210151A).

    PubMed

    Seal, Jonathan; Lamotte, Yann; Donche, Frédéric; Bouillot, Anne; Mirguet, Olivier; Gellibert, Françoise; Nicodeme, Edwige; Krysa, Gael; Kirilovsky, Jorge; Beinke, Soren; McCleary, Scott; Rioja, Inma; Bamborough, Paul; Chung, Chun-Wa; Gordon, Laurie; Lewis, Toni; Walker, Ann L; Cutler, Leanne; Lugo, David; Wilson, David M; Witherington, Jason; Lee, Kevin; Prinjha, Rab K

    2012-04-15

    A novel series of quinoline isoxazole BET family bromodomain inhibitors are discussed. Crystallography is used to illustrate binding modes and rationalize their SAR. One member, I-BET151 (GSK1210151A), shows good oral bioavailability in both the rat and minipig as well as demonstrating efficient suppression of bacterial induced inflammation and sepsis in a murine in vivo endotoxaemia model. PMID:22437115

  18. Crystal Structure of the Murine Cytomegalovirus MHC-I Homolog m144

    SciTech Connect

    Natarajan,K.; Hicks, A.; Mans, J.; Robinson, H.; Guan, R.; Mariuzza, R.; Margulies, D.

    2006-01-01

    Large DNA viruses of the herpesvirus family produce proteins that mimic host MHC-I molecules as part of their immunoevasive strategy. The m144 glycoprotein, expressed by murine cytomegalovirus, is thought to be an MHC-I homolog whose expression prolongs viral survival in vivo by preventing natural killer cell activation. To explore the structural basis of this m144 function, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of an m144/{beta}2-microglobulin ({beta}2m) complex at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. This structure reveals the canonical features of MHC-I molecules including readily identifiable {alpha}1, {alpha}2, and {alpha}3 domains. A unique disulfide bond links the {alpha}1 helix to the {beta}-sheet floor, explaining the known thermal stability of m144. Close juxtaposition of the {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 helices and the lack of critical residues that normally contribute to anchoring the peptide N and C termini eliminates peptide binding. A region of 13 amino acid residues, corresponding to the amino-terminal portion of the {alpha}2 helix, is missing in the electron density map, suggesting an area of structural flexibility that may be involved in ligand binding.

  19. Pleural cavity type 2 innate lymphoid cells precede Th2 expansion in murine Litomosoides sigmodontis infection.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alexis; Killoran, Kristin; Mitre, Edward; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a family of innate cells has been identified that respond to IL-25 and IL-33 in murine intestinal helminths. Termed Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) they facilitate the development of Th2 responses responsible for helminth clearance. We evaluated these cells in a tissue-invasive helminth model. Using Litomosides sigmodontis (a strong Th2 polarizing filarial infection) we observed a robust Th2 response in the pleural cavity, where adult worms reside, marked by increased levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in infected mice. In parallel, ILC2s were expanded in the pleural cavity early in the infection, peaking during the pre-patent period. L. sigmodontis also elicits a strong systemic Th2 response, which includes significantly increased levels of IgG1, IgE and IL-5 in the plasma of infected mice. Although ILC2s were expanded locally, they were not expanded in the spleen, blood, or mediastinal lymph nodes in response to L. sigmodontis infection, suggesting that ILC2s function primarily at the site of infection. The increase in ILC2s in the pleural cavity and the expansion in Th2 responses indicates a probable role for these cells in initiating and maintaining the Th2 response and highlights the importance of these cells in helminth infections and their role in Th2 immunity. PMID:26394284

  20. β-Catenin/Tcf signaling in murine oocytes identifies nonovulatory follicles.

    PubMed

    Usongo, Macalister; Rizk, Aida; Farookhi, Riaz

    2012-12-01

    WNTS are secreted glycoprotein molecules that signal through one of three signaling pathways. The best-characterized pathway involves stabilization of the multifunctional protein β-catenin, which in concert with members of the T-cell factor (Tcf) family activates specific gene transcription. We have examined putative Wnt/β-catenin in the murine ovary using transgenic mice harboring a reporter construct that activates β-galactosidase (lacZ) expression in response to β-catenin/Tcf binding (TopGal mice). Primordial and primary follicles did not stain for lacZ, and the proportion of β-catenin/Tcf signaling oocytes was lower than that of nonsignaling oocytes throughout estrous cycle. β-Catenin/Tcf signaling oocytes were observed in follicles from the secondary stage of development and their proportion increased with follicular maturation (secondary follicles, 20%; early antral and antral follicles, 70%). In contrast, the majority (>90%) of ovulated oocytes did not stain for lacZ. As the oocyte possesses components for WNT signal transduction, our data suggest that β-catenin/Tcf signaling is involved in the development of follicular ovulatory capability and identifies nonovulatory follicles. PMID:23006471

  1. Antitumour Effects of Isocurcumenol Isolated from Curcuma zedoaria Rhizomes on Human and Murine Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, S.; Padmaja, G.; Remani, P.

    2011-01-01

    Curcuma zedoaria belonging to the family Zingiberaceae has been used in the traditional system of medicine in India and Southwest Asia in treating many human ailments and is found to possess many biological activities. The rationale of the present study was to isolate, identify, and characterize antitumour principles from the rhizomes of Curcuma zedoaria, to assess its cytotoxic effects on human and murine cancer cells, to determine its apoptosis inducing capacity in cancer cells, and to evaluate its tumour reducing properties in in vivo mice models. Isocurcumenol was characterized as the active compound by spectroscopy and was found to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells without inducing significant toxicity to the normal cells. Fluorescent staining exhibited the morphological features of apoptosis in the compound-treated cancer cells. In vivo tumour reduction studies revealed that a dose of 35.7 mg/kg body weight significantly reduced the ascitic tumour in DLA-challenged mice and increased the lifespan with respect to untreated control mice.

  2. The Expression of Tubb2b Undergoes a Developmental Transition in Murine Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Breuss, Martin; Morandell, Jasmin; Nimpf, Simon; Gstrein, Thomas; Lauwers, Mattias; Hochstoeger, Tobias; Braun, Andreas; Chan, Kelvin; Sánchez Guajardo, Edmundo R; Zhang, Lijuan; Suplata, Marek; Heinze, Katrin G; Elsayad, Kareem; Keays, David A

    2015-10-15

    The development of the mammalian brain requires the generation, migration, and differentiation of neurons, cellular processes that are dependent on a dynamic microtubule cytoskeleton. Mutations in tubulin genes, which encode for the structural subunits of microtubules, cause detrimental neurological disorders known as the tubulinopathies. The disease spectra associated with different tubulin genes are overlapping but distinct, an observation believed to reflect functional specification of this multigene family. Perturbation of the β-tubulin TUBB2B is known to cause polymicrogyria, pachygyria, microcephaly, and axon guidance defects. Here we provide a detailed analysis of the expression pattern of its murine homolog Tubb2b. The generation and characterization of BAC-transgenic eGFP reporter mouse lines has revealed that it is highly expressed in progenitors and postmitotic neurons during cortical development. This contrasts with the 8-week-old cortex, in which Tubb2b expression is restricted to macroglia, and expression is almost completely absent in mature neurons. This developmental transition in neurons is mirrored in the adult hippocampus and the cerebellum but is not a universal feature of Tubb2b; its expression persists in a population of postmitotic neurons in the 8-week-old retina. We propose that the dynamic spatial and temporal expression of Tubb2b reflects specific functional requirements of the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:26105993

  3. Structural Heterogeneity and Functional Domains of Murine Immunoglobulin G Fc Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Luster, Andrew D.; Weinshank, Richard; Kochan, Jarema; Pavlovec, Amalia; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Hulmes, Jeffrey; Pan, Yu-Ching E.; Unkeless, Jay C.

    1986-11-01

    Binding of antibodies to effector cells by way of receptors to their constant regions (Fc receptors) is central to the pathway that leads to clearance of antigens by the immune system. The structure and function of this important class of receptors on immune cells is addressed through the molecular characterization of Fc receptors (FcR) specific for the murine immunoglobulin G isotype. Structural diversity is encoded by two genes that by alternative splicing result in expression of molecules with highly conserved extracellular domains and different transmembrane and intracytoplasmic domains. The proteins encoded by these genes are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family, most homologous to the major histocompatibility complex molecule Eβ. Functional reconstitution of ligand binding by transfection of individual FcR genes demonstrates that the requirements for ligand binding are encoded in a single gene. These studies demonstrate the molecular basis for the functional heterogeneity of FcR's, accounting for the possible transduction of different signals in response to a single ligand.

  4. Apoptosis induced by oxysterols in murine lymphoma cells and in normal thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Christ, M; Luu, B; Mejia, J E; Moosbrugger, I; Bischoff, P

    1993-01-01

    Oxygenated derivatives of cholesterol (oxysterols), a family of naturally occurring compounds, possess marked anti-proliferative and immunosuppressive activities, in particular they have been shown to inhibit T-cell responses to different stimuli. 25-Hydroxycholesterol (25-OHC) and 7 beta,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7.25-OHC) are able to kill not only RDM4 murine lymphoma in vitro, but also, surprisingly, mouse thymocytes after several hours of incubation. In this study, we report that the death of RDM4 and thymocytes induced by oxysterols exhibits the features of apoptosis. This phenomenon was identified by agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA fragments extracted from the cells and quantified by flow cytometric analysis of the DNA fluorescence of propidium iodide-stained cells. Cycloheximide and actinomycin D were found to decrease the number of apoptotic cells and to increase cell viability, indicating a requirement for the synthesis of macromolecules in oxysterol-induced programmed cell death. The pathway by which 25-OHC and 7.25-OHC are able to induce apoptosis in this type of cell and the possible contribution of these compounds to thymus involution during development are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7682990

  5. B7-H3 protein expression in a murine model of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, JIA-LI; CHEN, FENG-LI; ZHOU, QUAN; PAN, WEI; WANG, XIN-HONG; XU, JIN; ZHANG, SHAO-XIAN; NI, LI; YANG, HUI-LIN

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive type of bone tumor that commonly occurs in pediatric age groups. The complete molecular mechanisms behind osteosarcoma formation and progression require elucidation. B7-H3 is a protein of the B7 family that acts as a co-stimulatory molecule with a significant role in adaptive immune responses. The link between B7-H3 expression and its role in different types of cancer remains unclear. B7-H3 protein exhibits different functional roles in in vivo and in vitro conditions that remain controversial. In the present study, a murine model of osteosarcoma was successfully established using a modified protocol so as to easily obtain a low grade and metastatic form of osteosarcoma tissue without complication. Histological data showed that a less organized and highly proliferative mass of cells was observed in the osteosarcoma tissue. A higher expression level of B7-H3 protein was also observed at each advanced stage of osteosarcoma, which indicated the contributory role of the protein in the development of the primary and metastatic forms of osteosarcoma. Immunohistochemistry was performed, which showed that the overexpression of B7-H3 protein in the metastatic form of osteosarcoma may be associated with its migration and invasion. PMID:27347155

  6. Galectin-8 Ameliorates Murine Autoimmune Ocular Pathology and Promotes a Regulatory T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, James F.; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Mulki, Lama; Suryawanshi, Amol; Jiang, Shuhong; Chen, Wei-Sheng; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Connor, Kip M.; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-01-01

    Galectins have emerged as potent immunoregulatory agents that control chronic inflammation through distinct mechanisms. Here, we report that treatment with Galectin-8 (Gal-8), a tandem-repeat member of the galectin family, reduces retinal pathology and prevents photoreceptor cell damage in a murine model of experimental autoimmune uveitis. Gal-8 treatment increased the number of regulatory T cells (Treg) in both the draining lymph node (dLN) and the inflamed retina. Moreover, a greater percentage of Treg cells in the dLN and retina of Gal-8 treated animals expressed the inhibitory coreceptor cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4, the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, and the tissue-homing integrin CD103. Treg cells in the retina of Gal-8-treated mice were primarily inducible Treg cells that lack the expression of neuropilin-1. In addition, Gal-8 treatment blunted production of inflammatory cytokines by retinal T helper type (TH) 1 and TH17 cells. The effect of Gal-8 on T cell differentiation and/or function was specific for tissues undergoing an active immune response, as Gal-8 treatment had no effect on T cell populations in the spleen. Given the need for rational therapies for managing human uveitis, Gal-8 emerges as an attractive therapeutic candidate not only for treating retinal autoimmune diseases, but also for other TH1- and TH17-mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:26126176

  7. Regulation of TLR2 and NLRP3 in Primary Murine Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kasimsetty, Sashi G.; DeWolf, Sean E.; Shigeoka, Alana A.; McKay, Dianne B.

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are now recognized to be key triggers of injury in a variety of renal diseases. Several families of these receptors are present in the kidney, and recent data suggest that they are differentially expressed and regulated in the kidney. This study evaluated the interaction between two distinct PRRs that are expressed in the kidney, i.e. TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2) and the NLRP3 inflammasome. The regulation and activation of these receptors in primary renal tubular epithelial (RTE) cells from murine kidneys were evaluated. RTE cells were extracted from WT and NLRP3-mutant mice and treated ex vivo with ligands specific for TLR2 or NLRP3. We found that TLR2 upregulated NLRP3 as well as its substrate IL-1β, and that signaling through the NLRP3 inflammasome induced RTE cell necrosis. The results of this study suggest a previously unknown interaction between TLR2 and NLRP3 in primary RTE cells and highlight the importance of the cross talk that occurs in kidney-related PRRs. Understanding how PRRs are regulated is important for the design of rationale therapeutic strategies to modulate these receptors in renal disease. PMID:25343834

  8. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL. PMID:25523759

  9. Heterogeneity of Matrin 3 in the developing and aging murine central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rayaprolu, Sruti; D'Alton, Simon; Crosby, Keith; Moloney, Christina; Howard, John; Duffy, Colin; Cabrera, Mariela; Siemienski, Zoe; Hernandez, Abigail R; Gallego-Iradi, Carolina; Borchelt, David R; Lewis, Jada

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in the MATR3 gene encoding the nucleotide binding protein Matrin 3 have recently been identified as causing a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS) and more rarely causing distal myopathy. Translating the identification of MATR3 mutations into an understanding of disease pathogenesis and the creation of mouse models requires a complete understanding of normal Matrin 3 levels and distribution in vivo. Consequently, we examined the levels of murine Matrin 3 in body tissues and regions of the central nervous system (CNS). We observed a significant degree of variability in Matrin 3 protein levels among different tissues of adult animals, with the highest levels found in reproductive organs and the lowest in muscle. Within the adult CNS, Matrin 3 levels were lowest in spinal cord. Further, we found that Matrin 3 declines significantly in CNS through early development and young adulthood before stabilizing. As previously reported, antibodies to Matrin 3 primarily stain nuclei, but the intensity of staining was not uniform in all nuclei. The low levels of Matrin 3 in spinal cord and muscle could mean that that these tissues are particularly vulnerable to alterations in Matrin 3 function. Our study is the first to characterize endogenous Matrin 3 in rodents across the lifespan, providing the groundwork for deciphering disease mechanisms and developing mouse models of MATR3-linked ALS. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2740-2752, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26878116

  10. Omics Studies of the Murine Intestinal Ecosystem Exposed to Subchronic and Mild Social Defeat Stress.

    PubMed

    Aoki-Yoshida, Ayako; Aoki, Reiji; Moriya, Naoko; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Kubota, Yoshifumi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Takayama, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Chise

    2016-09-01

    The microbiota-gut-brain axis plays an important role in the development of stress-induced mental disorders. We previously established the subchronic and mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) model, a murine experimental model of depression, and investigated the metabolomic profiles of plasma and liver. Here we used omics approaches to identify stress-induced changes in the gastrointestinal tract. Mice exposed to sCSDS for 10 days showed the following changes: (1) elevation of cholic acid and reduction of 5-aminovaleric acid among cecal metabolites; (2) downregulation of genes involved in the immune response in the terminal ileum; (3) a shift in the diversity of the microbiota in cecal contents and feces; and (4) fluctuations in the concentrations of cecal metabolites produced by gut microbiota reflected in plasma and hepatic metabolites. Operational taxonomic units within the family Lachnospiraceae showed an inverse correlation with certain metabolites. The social interaction score correlated with cecal metabolites, IgA, and cecal and fecal microbiota, suggesting that sCSDS suppressed the ileal immune response, altering the balance of microbiota, which together with host cells and host enzymes resulted in a pattern of accumulated metabolites in the intestinal ecosystem distinct from that of control mice. PMID:27482843