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Sample records for murine el4 thymoma

  1. Identification of sequences within the murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA 3'-untranslated region that mediate mRNA stabilization induced by mitogen treatment of EL-4 thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Y; Bickel, M; Pluznik, D H; Cohen, R B

    1991-09-25

    Phorbol esters (TPA) and concanavalin A (ConA) are known to induce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production in murine thymoma EL-4 cells by mRNA stabilization. The role of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) in GM-CSF mRNA stabilization induced by TPA and ConA in EL-4 cells was examined by transfection studies using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) constructions. The GM-CSF 3'-UTR contains a 63-nucleotide region at its 3' end with repeating ATTTA motifs which is responsible for mRNA degradation in a variety of cell types (Shaw, G., and Kamen, R. (1986) Cell 46, 659-666). We produced constructs containing most of the GM-CSF 3'-UTR (303 nucleotides, pRSV-CATgm) or the 3'-terminal AT-rich region (116 nucleotides, pRSV-CATau) and measured CAT enzyme activity and CAT mRNA after transient transfection into EL-4 and NIH 3T3 cells. Low levels of CAT activity were seen in both cells with either plasmid compared with levels of CAT activity obtained with pRSV-CAT. TPA treatment caused an approximately 10-fold increase in CAT activity and mRNA in EL-4 cells transfected with pRSV-CATgm. No increases were seen in EL-4 cells transfected with pRSV-CATau or pRSV-CAT. No response to TPA was detected in transfected NIH 3T3 cells, indicating that the response to TPA is relatively cell-specific. There was no increase in CAT activity after ConA treatment in EL-4 or NIH 3T3 cells transfected with any of the constructs suggesting that the GM-CSF 3'-UTR lacks elements that can respond alone to ConA. Nuclear run-on and actinomycin D chase experiments in EL-4 cells showed that TPA induces CAT activity via mRNA stabilization. By linker-substitution mutagenesis we show that TPA inducibility depends on a 60-nucleotide region of the 3'-UTR whose 5' end is located 160 nucleotides upstream of the 5' end of the AU-rich region. PMID:1917935

  2. Ca2+ ionophore A23187-dependent stabilization of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor messenger RNA in murine thymoma EL-4 cells is mediated through two distinct regions in the 3'-untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Y; Akahane, K; Pluznik, D H; Cohen, R B

    1993-05-15

    We analyze the role of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 in the induction of GM-CSF mRNA expression in EL-4 thymoma cells. Northern analysis shows that A23187 increases the half-life of GM-CSF mRNA. To identify potential Ca2+ response elements in the GM-CSF mRNA, we produced stable transfectants containing pRSV-CAT (EL-4cat) or hybrid constructs in which most of the GM-CSF 3'-untranslated region (EL-4gm) or the adenosine-uridine boxes alone (EL-4au) were placed in a downstream position from the CAT coding region. A23187 induces a 4.4-fold increase in CAT activity in EL-4cat cells and a 210-fold and 48-fold increase in CAT activity in EL-4gm and EL-4au cells, respectively. Actinomycin D chase experiments in transfected cells demonstrate that A23187 increases the half-life of CAT mRNA from 15 min to 3 h in EL-4au cells and more than 3 h in EL-4gm cells, suggesting that the effect of Ca2+ is mediated predominantly by the adenosine-uridine boxes with a smaller contribution from upstream regions. To map these upstream regions, we transfected cells with constructs containing mutations of the 3'-untranslated region. With two of these mutations, corresponding to a region located about 160 bases upstream of the adenosine-uridine boxes, CAT activity was induced only 50-fold compared to 200-fold in EL-4gm cells. These data indicate that two regions within the GM-CSF 3'-untranslated region interact to modulate Ca2+ effects on GM-CSF mRNA half-life. PMID:8482841

  3. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, E.; Spector, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/10/sup 6/ cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine with an IC/sub 50/ value = 0.57..mu..M. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, (D-Pen/sup 2/, D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin and ..beta..-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC/sub 50/ = 60..mu..M, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Differential downstream functions of protein kinase Ceta and -theta in EL4 mouse thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Resnick, M S; Kang, B S; Luu, D; Wickham, J T; Sando, J J; Hahn, C S

    1998-10-16

    Sensitive EL4 mouse thymoma cells (s-EL4) respond to phorbol esters with growth inhibition, adherence to substrate, and production of cytokines including interleukin 2. Since these cells express several of the phorbol ester-sensitive protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes, the function of each isozyme remains unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that s-EL4 cells expressed substantially more PKCeta and PKCtheta than did EL4 cells resistant to phorbol esters (r-EL4). To examine potential roles for PKCeta and PKCtheta in EL4 cells, wild type and constitutively active versions of the isozymes were transiently expressed using a Sindbis virus system. Expression of constitutively active PKCeta, but not PKCtheta, in s- and r-EL4 cells altered cell morphology and cytoskeletal structure in a manner similar to that of phorbol ester treatment, suggesting a role for PKCeta in cytoskeletal organization. Prolonged treatment of s-EL4 cells with phorbol esters results in inhibition of cell cycling along with a decreased expression of most of the PKC isozymes, including PKCtheta. Introduction of virally expressed PKCtheta, but not PKCeta, overcame the inhibitory effects of the prolonged phorbol ester treatment on cell cycle progression, suggesting a possible involvement of PKCtheta in cell cycle regulation. These results support differential functions for PKCeta and PKCtheta in T cell activation. PMID:9765301

  5. [Thymoma].

    PubMed

    Gripp, Stephan; Bölke, Edwin; Orth, Klaus

    2005-09-01

    Thymoma is a rare epithelial tumor of the thymus, but the most common malignancy in the anterior mediastinum. A unique feature is its association with paraneoplastic syndromes, in particular myasthenia gravis. According to the WHO classification 6 histologic types of thymic epithelial tumors can be discriminated. Tumor stage according to MASAOKA is the most important prognostic factor. Non-invasive tumors (stage I) are usually completely resected and no further therapy is warranted. For incompletely resected tumors and locally advanced invasive thymomas (stage Ill-IV) postoperative radiotherapy with 50-60 Gy is advisable. Chemotherapy, preferably with Cisplatinum, is indicated with inoperable thymomas or metastatic disease. In general thymomas have a fair prognosis even in advanced stage. Long term follow-up is mandatory up to 10 years. PMID:16416343

  6. [Thymomas].

    PubMed

    Marx, A; Weis, C-A; Ströbel, P

    2016-09-01

    Thymomas are rare tumors but are one of the most common mediastinal neoplasms in adults and exhibit an enormous variability in histological, biological and genetic features. The morphological spectrum within a given entity is enormous and some tumors with histological patterns of more than one entity are more common than pure histological subtypes. Due to a lack of subtype-specific markers classification of thymomas often requires complex diagnostic algorithms. The refined presentation including the definition of obligatory and optional features and of diagnostic immunohistochemical profiles, is the focus of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of thymomas, aiming at improving diagnostic reproducibility. This review highlights novel aspects of the WHO classification of thymomas and addresses typical differential diagnostic challenges with a focus on diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:27558364

  7. Staurosporine, but not Ro 31-8220, induces interleukin 2 production and synergizes with interleukin 1alpha in EL4 thymoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, T M; Matthews, J S; O'Neill, L A

    1997-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) has been implicated in interleukin 1 (IL1) signal transduction in a number of cellular systems, either as a key event in IL1 action or as a negative regulator. Here we have examined the effects of two PKC inhibitors, staurosporine and the more selective agent Ro 31-8220, on IL1 responses in the murine thymoma line EL4.NOB-1. A 1 h pulse of staurosporine was found to strongly potentiate the induction of IL2 by IL1alpha in these cells. In contrast, neither a pulse nor prolonged incubation with Ro 31-8220 affected the response to IL1alpha. Both agents blocked the response to PMA, however. A 1 h pulse of staurosporine was also found to induce IL2 production on its own, activate the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) and increase the expression of a NFkappaB-linked reporter gene. It synergized with IL1alpha in all of these responses. Ro 31-8220 was again without effect, although both staurosporine and Ro 31-8220 blocked the activation of NFkappaB by PMA. Finally, staurosporine caused the translocation of PKC-alpha and -epsilon, and to a lesser extent PKC-beta, but not PKC-θ or -zeta, from the cytosol to the membrane, although a similar effect was observed with Ro 31-8220. The results suggest that PKC is not involved in IL1alpha signalling in EL4 cells. Furthermore, the potentiating effect of staurosporine on IL1alpha action does not involve PKC inhibition, and is likely to be at the level of NFkappaB activation. PMID:9224627

  8. Demethylation and expression of murine mammary tumor proviruses in mouse thymoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Mermod, J J; Bourgeois, S; Defer, N; Crépin, M

    1983-01-01

    Murine mammary tumor virus (MMTV) expression is analyzed in a T-lymphoid cell line (T1M1) sensitive to the killing effect of glucocorticoids and in two of its variants, one resistant (T1M1r) and one supersensitive (T1M1ss) to glucocorticoid-induced lymphocytolysis. In the T1M1 line, MMTV is expressed and induced approximately 10-fold by short treatment with dexamethasone. Southern blot analyses of restriction enzyme digests of DNA from T1M1 cells reveal three proviruses similar to those of normal C57BL mouse tissue. In the T1M1ss line, which has retained functional glucocorticoid receptors, MMTV mRNA is inducible by glucocorticoids, while induction is reduced in the T1M1r line defective in glucocorticoid receptors. Moreover, the T1M1r line expresses a strikingly elevated basal level of MMTV mRNA in the absence of hormone. No rearrangements or superinfection have occurred in the variants, but all the regions containing 5'-long terminal repeats are demethylated in the T1M1r variant although other sites of the provirus remain methylated. Because this variant was selected by prolonged treatment with dexamethasone, these observations raise the possibility that the continuous transcription of MMTV that occurred during this selection can result in glucocorticoid-induced demethylation of long-terminal-repeat sequences. Images PMID:6296860

  9. V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Valls Serón, Mercedes; Ferwerda, Bart; Engelen-Lee, JooYeon; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Jaspers, Valery; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Tanck, Michael W; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Here, we have performed a prospective nationwide genetic association study using the Human Exome BeadChip and identified gene variants in encoding dynactin 4 (DCTN4), retinoic acid early transcript 1E (RAET1E), and V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) to be associated with unfavourable outcome in patients with pneumococcal meningitis. No clinical replication cohort is available, so we validated the role of one of these targets, AKT3, in a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model. Akt3 deficient mice had worse survival and increased histopathology scores for parenchymal damage (infiltration) and vascular infiltration (large meningeal artery inflammation) but similar bacterial loads, cytokine responses, compared to wild-type mice. We found no differences in cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels between patients with risk or non-risk alleles. Patients with the risk genotype (rs10157763, AA) presented with low scores on the Glasgow Coma Scale and high rate of epileptic seizures. Thus, our results show that AKT3 influences outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27193124

  10. In vivo natural antitumor resistance against murine EL-4 lymphoma cells in lethally irradiated syngeneic C57Bl/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iorio, A.M.; Neri, M.; Bonmassar, E.; Titti, F.; Rossi, G.B.

    1987-08-01

    Natural resistance has been detected in lethally irradiated C57Bl/6 (B6) mice inoculated intravenously with the ascites form of a syngeneic B6 leukemia. EL-4 cells were injected into lethally irradiated (800 R) B6 mice and tumor cell proliferation was evaluated by /sup 125/IUdR uptake in different organs 4 days after the challenge. Differential growth of lymphoma cells was observed when young mice were injected as compared with older mice and when mice were treated with agents known to interfere with natural resistance (e.g., poly(I:C), FLV-P, carrageenan, cyclophosphamide, high doses of irradiated cells). Similar results were obtained by measuring rapid clearance of /sup 125/IUdR-labeled EL-4 cells from lungs of intact B6 mice. In vivo cold competition studies, employing EL-4 and several other tumor lines of the same or different haplotype, showed that only EL-4 and RBL-5 cells were capable of inhibiting syngeneic resistance against EL-4 tumor. On the contrary, YAC-1 lymphoma cells, the most susceptible target to natural killer-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, did not compete. These results suggest that EL-4 cells express membrane determinants not detectable on normal H-2b parental bone marrow cells and are susceptible to natural resistance against hemopoietic tumor cells in lethally irradiated syngeneic B6 mice.

  11. Malignant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, L S; Huang, M H; Lin, T S; Huang, B S; Chien, K Y

    1992-07-15

    Sixty-one patients underwent operations for malignant thymomas between 1961 and 1989. Twenty-three patients had associated myasthenia gravis (MG), an incidence of 37.7%. Upon being admitted to the hospital, the patients' most common symptoms included chest pain, MG, cough, and dyspnea. Only 7 of 61 (11.5%) patients had no symptom. Tumor staging of 58 patients with invasive thymomas was performed according to Masaoka classification. The patients were classified as follows: Stage II disease, 5; Stage III, 41; Stage IVa, 8; and Stage IVb, 4. In addition, thymic carcinoma was present in three patients. The series had a resection rate of 55.7%. The incidence of operative complications was 16.3%. Only one patient died of myocardial infarction; the incidence of operative mortality was 1.6%. The patients with MG had a higher rate of resection (69.6%) and a higher incidence of complete thymectomy (14 of 23 patients; 60.9%). Mixed lymphoepithelial tumors and epithelial cell predominant tumors were the most frequent histologic patterns (45.9% and 34.4%, respectively). Fifty-two patients had postoperative radiation therapy, and 10 patients had chemotherapy. The overall cumulative survival rates in the series were 59% and 34% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The results demonstrated that the factors affecting the prognosis may include resectability, postoperative irradiation or chemotherapy, MG, and tumor staging. The influence of histologic variation on survival rates could not be clearly defined in the series. Surgical resection, particularly complete thymectomy, followed by irradiation is the primary option of therapeutic management for malignant thymoma. PMID:1617594

  12. New class of leukemogenic ecotropic recombinant murine leukemia virus isolated from radiation-induced thymomas of C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rassart, E.; Sankar-Mistry, P.; Lemay, G.; DesGroseillers, L.; Jalicoeur, P.

    1983-02-01

    We previously reported the establishment of several lymphoid cell lines from X-ray-induced thymomas of C57BL/Ka mice, and all, except one, produce retroviruses. Biological characterization of five of these new primary radiation leukemia viruses (RadLVs) indicated that they had a B-tropic, fibrotropic, and ecotropic host range and were leukemogenic when reinjected into C57BL/Ka newborn mice. The leukemogenic potential of one isolate (G/sub 6/T/sub 2/) was further assessed and shown to be retained after prolonged passaging on fibroblasts in vitro. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA of four of our new RadLV isolates (G/sub 6/T/sub 2/, Ti-7, Ti-8, and Ti-9) revealed that G/sub 6/T/sub 2/ and Ti-7 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) genomes had identical restriction maps, whereas Ti-8 and Ti-9 genomes were different from each other and from the G/sub 6/T/sub 2/ and Ti-7 genomes. The physical maps of these genomes were similar to that of known ecotropic MuLV genomes (including the C57BL/Ka endogenous ecotropic MuLV) within their long terminal repeats, env, the right portion of pol, and the left portion of gag. However, a region covering the end of gag and the beginning of pol was different and showed several similarities with xenotropic MuLV genomes of BALB/c, AKR, and C58 mice previously mapped. Our results suggest that these primary RadLV genomes are recombinants between the parental ecotropic MuLV genome and a nonecotropic (xenotropic) sequence. To further study the leukemic potential of these RadLVs, the genome of one of them (G/sub 6/T/sub 2/) was cloned in Charon 21A as an infectious molecule.

  13. New Class of Leukemogenic Ecotropic Recombinant Murine Leukemia Virus Isolated from Radiation-Induced Thymomas of C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rassart, E.; Sankar-Mistry, P.; Lemay, G.; DesGroseillers, L.; Jolicoeur, P.

    1983-01-01

    We previously reported the establishment of several lymphoid cell lines from X-ray-induced thymomas of C57BL/Ka mice, and all, except one, produce retroviruses (P. Sankar-Mistry and P. Jolicoeur, J. Virol.35:270-275, 1980). Biological characterization of five of these new primary radiation leukemia viruses (RadLVs) indicated that they had a B-tropic, fibrotropic, and ecotropic host range and were leukemogenic when reinjected into C57BL/Ka newborn mice. The leukemogenic potential of one isolate (G6T2) was further assessed and shown to be retained after prolonged passaging on fibroblasts in vitro. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA of four of our new RadLV isolates (G6T2, Ti-7, Ti-8, and Ti-9) revealed that G6T2 and Ti-7 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) genomes had identical restriction maps, whereas Ti-8 and Ti-9 genomes were different from each other and from the G6T2 and Ti-7 genomes. The physical maps of these genomes were similar to that of known ecotropic MuLV genomes (including the C57BL/Ka endogenous ecotropic MuLV) within their long terminal repeats, env, the right portion of pol, and the left portion of gag. However, a region covering the end of gag and the beginning of pol was different and showed several similarities with xenotropic MuLV genomes of BALB/c, AKR, and C58 mice previously mapped. Our results suggest that these primary RadLV genomes are recombinants between the parental ecotropic MuLV genome and a nonecotropic (xenotropic) sequence. This nonecotropic gag-pol region might be important in conferring the leukemogenic potential to these isolates. Therefore, these RadLVs appear to form a new class of leukemogenic recombinant MuLVs recovered from leukemic tissues of mice. They appear to be distinct from the recombinant AKR mink cell focus-inducing MuLVs which have a dual-tropic host range and harbor xenotropic env sequences. To further study the leukemogenic potential of these RadLVs, the genome of one of them (G6T2) was cloned in Charon 21A

  14. Management of thymomas.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cameron D

    2008-02-01

    Thymoma is a rare neoplasm usually with an indolent growth pattern, however, local invasion and/or metastases may occur. The association with several paraneoplastic syndromes, especially myasthenia gravis, is noteworthy. Surgery has been the standard of care for early stage disease with high cure rates anticipated. The most important prognostic factors after resection are Masaoka stage, World Health Organization (WHO) histology, complete resection status and size. Multimodality therapy can result in long-term disease-free survival for patients presenting with locally advanced disease. Thymomas are sensitive to both chemotherapy and radiation therapy and are utilized with good effects in unresectable patients. PMID:17570676

  15. Thymoma with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kensuke; Inomata, Minehiko; Shiraishi, Shiori; Hayashi, Ryuji; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old Japanese male was referred to our hospital with abnormal chest X-ray results and severe Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. He was diagnosed with a stage IV, WHO type A thymoma and was treated with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and subsequent chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, the patient underwent surgical resection of the thymoma. Hemolysis rapidly disappeared and did not return after the discontinuation of oral corticosteroids. Corticosteroid therapy may be preferable to chemotherapy or thymoma surgical resection in the management of autoimmune hemolytic anemia with thymoma. PMID:25722666

  16. Cyclophilin A produced by thymocytes regulates the migration of murine bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Khromykh, Ludmila M; Kulikova, Natalia L; Anfalova, Tatiana V; Muranova, Tatiana A; Abramov, Vyacheslav M; Vasiliev, Anatoliy M; Khlebnikov, Valentin S; Kazansky, Dmitriy B

    2007-09-01

    Supernatant obtained from high dose hydrocortisone resistant thymocytes can induce migration of the bone marrow cell precursors to the periphery. This biological activity depends on the presence of the 18 kDa protein, whose amino acid sequence fits with the sequence of the secretory form of murine cyclophilin A (SP-18). Cyclophilin A isolated from the supernatant of the cortisone-resistant thymoma EL-4 shows its characteristic functional features as it demonstrates isomerase activity and binds with cyclosporine A. The cyclophilin A obtained manifests chemotactic activity that regulates migration of bone marrow cell precursors of neutrophils, T-, B- and dendritic cells. PMID:18082675

  17. Induction Therapy for Thymoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Usman; Huang, James

    2016-08-01

    Thymomas are uncommon tumors that can present as locally advanced tumors in approximately 30% of the patients. Stage and complete resection are the strongest prognostic factors. For locally advanced tumors, induction treatment may improve the ability to achieve a complete resection. Combination treatment with cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide is the most commonly used induction regimen. Similar rates of resectability are noted with the use of induction chemotherapy and chemoradiation therapy; however, more tumor necrosis is noted with the addition of radiation. PMID:27427527

  18. Treatment Options for Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of thymoma and thymic carcinoma include a cough and chest pain. Thymoma and thymic carcinoma may ... if you have any of the following: A cough that doesn't go away. Chest pain. Trouble ...

  19. Stages of Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of thymoma and thymic carcinoma include a cough and chest pain. Thymoma and thymic carcinoma may ... if you have any of the following: A cough that doesn't go away. Chest pain. Trouble ...

  20. Thymomas: Review of Current Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszek, Sandra; Wigle, Dennis A.; Keshavjee, Shaf; Fischer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Thymomas are the most common tumors of the mediastinum. The introduction of multimodality treatment strategies, as well as novel approaches to the diagnosis of these tumors, has led to changes in the clinical management of thymomas. Here we review the literature for current clinical practice in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of thymomas. PMID:19463649

  1. Thymoma: benign appearance, malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Richard F; Burfeind, William R

    2006-09-01

    Thymoma is a rare tumor with a largely indolent growth pattern. It does, however, have malignant potential as a result of its ability to invade locally and metastasize regionally. Often associated with a number of immune- and nonimmune-mediated paraneoplastic syndromes, patient outcomes are directly related to stage of disease and the ability to achieve a complete surgical resection. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with adjuvant radiation recommended for invasive thymoma. Sensitive to both chemotherapy and radiation, durable responses are achievable in incompletely resected and inoperable patients. We present two cases of thymoma followed by a general discussion with an emphasis on treatment for both early and advanced-stage disease. PMID:16951392

  2. Induction therapy for locally advanced thymoma.

    PubMed

    Riely, Gregory J; Huang, James

    2010-10-01

    Thymomas are the most frequently encountered tumors of the mediastinum and often present with either localized or locally advanced disease. The prognosis in thymoma has been consistently shown to correspond to the invasiveness of the tumor (as represented by the Masaoka stage of the tumor) and the completeness of surgical resection. Because treatment with a variety of different chemotherapy regimens has demonstrated radiographic response rates greater than 50% in patients with advanced thymoma, a number of investigators have explored the use of preoperative (induction, neoadjuvant) therapy for patients with locally advanced thymoma. In this review, we summarize the published experience with preoperative therapy for thymoma and discuss ongoing clinical trials exploring multimodality therapy for treatment of locally advanced thymoma. PMID:20859127

  3. Malignant thymoma: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Lara, P N

    2000-04-01

    Malignant thymomas are rare indolent tumours of the anterior superior mediastinum. Despite a benign histologic appearance, some thymomas invade nearby structures or metastasize. Patients are commonly asymptomatic, but some may present with unusual paraneoplastic syndromes such as myasthenia gravis, pure red cell aplasia, or hypogammaglobulinemia. Since tumour biopsy may potentially disrupt the thymic capsule, it is often not performed. Patients are therefore diagnosed and staged at the time of definitive surgery. Thymomas can generally be categorized into two stages: non-invasive and invasive. Prognosis closely parallels the disease stage. Surgery is the principal treatment and is curative in early stage disease. Radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, is an option for both incompletely or completely resected disease. Chemotherapy is offered to patients with locally advanced, recurrent, or metastatic thymoma, with excellent responses and prolonged survival. Multicentre co-operative group clinical trials are required to assess novel thymoma therapies to maximize patient resources in this uncommon tumour. PMID:10772969

  4. Metastatic thymoma involving the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Wenceslao, Stella; Krause, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, thymomas can be involved in a considerable variety of clinical presentations. Clinicians should be mindful of the breadth of associations with other diseases, including autoimmune disorders and many secondary nonthymic malignancies. For the pathologist, knowledge of the extremely varied histopathologic presentation of thymoma is vital to formulate a proper differential, workup, and diagnosis. The presented case illustrates the finding of very rare metastatic thymoma involvement of bone marrow, identified during evaluation for pancytopenia. The history of prior prostate cancer and an uncharacterized pancreatic lesion, as well as the familial presentation, also suggests a possible underlying hereditary syndrome. PMID:26722174

  5. [Case of agranulocytosis associated with thymoma].

    PubMed

    Sato, Keita; Nojiri, Satoko; Numata, Takanori; Kinoshita, Akira; Sakaguchi, Shinji; Homma, Sakae

    2008-02-01

    A 75-year-old-woman had undergone extended thymectomy, right upper and middle lobe resection, and radiation therapy (40 Gy) for thymoma at the age of 63. She visited our hospital complaining of low grade fever, cough, anorexia and a sore throat. Peripheral blood count revealed agranulocytosis. Agranulocytosis associated with thymoma was diagnosed, because there were no other possible causes of agranulocytosis such as drugs, infection, recent radiation therapy, or bone marrow invasion. In spite of giving G-CSF, steroid therapy and immunosuppressants, she died of pneumonia caused by agranulocytosis. We consider that agranulocytosis is a very rare complication of thymoma. PMID:18318251

  6. General Information about Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Thymic Carcinoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  7. Role of chemotherapy in malignant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Valente, Monica; Schinzari, Giovanni; Ricciotti, Adelaide; Barone, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Thymomas and thymic carcinomas, which are rare epithelial tumors arising from the thymus gland, are the most common tumors of the anterior mediastinum. Surgery is the principal treatment and is curative in early stage disease. Radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, may be an option both in not completely and completely resected disease. Chemotherapy is offered to patients with locally advanced or metastatic thymoma and induces excellent responses race and prolonged survival. PMID:18338542

  8. First description of cervical intradural thymoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Nicola; Mancarella, Cristina; Colistra, Davide; Landi, Alessandro; Dugoni, Demo Eugenio; Delfini, Roberto

    2015-11-16

    Thymoma and thymic carcinoma are rare epithelial tumors, which originate from the thymus gland. According to the World Health Organization there are "organotypic" (types A, AB, B1, B2, and B3) and "non-organotypic" (thymic carcinomas) thymomas. Type B3 thymomas are aggressive tumors, which can metastasize. Due to the rarity of these lesions, only 7 cases of extradural metastasis are described in the literature. We report the first and unique case of a man with cervical intradural B3 thymoma metastasis. A 46-year-old man underwent thymoma surgical removal. The year after the procedure he was treated for a parietal pleura metastasis. In 2006 he underwent cervical-dorsal extradural metastasis removal and C5-Th1 stabilization. Seven years after he came to our observation complaining left cervicobrachialgia and a reduction of strength of the left arm. He underwent a cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging, which showed a new lesion at the C5-C7 level. The patient underwent a surgery for the intradural B3 thymoma metastasis. Neurological symptoms improved although the removal was subtotal. He went through postoperative radiation therapy with further mass reduction. Spinal metastases are extremely rare. To date, only 7 cases of spinal extradural metastasis have been described in the literature. This is the first case of spinal intradural metastasis. Early individuation of these tumors and surgical treatment improve neurological outcome in patients with spinal cord compression. A multimodal treatment including neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and postoperative radiation therapy seems to improve survival in patients with metastatic thymoma. PMID:26601098

  9. Thymoma and thymic carcinoma: therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Anupama; Loehrer, Patrick J

    2004-07-01

    Thymomas and thymic carcinomas, which are rare epithelial tumors arising from the thymus gland, are the most common tumors of the anterior mediastinum. Thymomas are generally encapsulated, slow-growing tumors that have a "bland" histologic appearance. Thymic carcinomas possess more overtly malignant histologic features than thymomas and are more likely to present as invasive or disseminated disease. Surgery is the treatment of choice for localized thymic tumors, with complete resection being the most important prognostic factor. Complete resection also improves survival in locally invasive thymic tumors. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy may improve the outcome in patients with invasive disease, although the data are conflicting. Multimodal regimens, including neoadjuvant combination chemotherapy, surgery, and/or postoperative radiation therapy, are recommended for patients with advanced thymomas and thymic carcinomas. Use of octreotide plus prednisone has produced responses in thymomas, but the dosing and schedule have not been clearly defined. Prospective studies have been limited, and, as such, enrollment in clinical trials is encouraged. PMID:15310414

  10. Thymoma: from chemotherapy to targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Thymic malignancies are rare epithelial tumors that may be aggressive and difficult to treat. Thymomas are frequently eligible for upfront surgical resection. However, nearly 30% of patients present with locally advanced tumor at time of diagnosis, and chemotherapy is then used to reduce the tumor burden-possibly allowing subsequent surgery and/or radiotherapy. Metastatic and recurrent thymic malignancies may be similarly treated with chemotherapy. More recently, the molecular characterization of thymoma led to the identification of potentially druggable targets, laying the foundation to implement personalized medicine for patients. PMID:24451783

  11. Thymoma: current medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Kenneth A; Wright, Cameron D; Loehrer, Patrick J

    2004-03-01

    Thymoma is a rare neoplasm usually with an indolent growth pattern; however, local invasion and/or dissemination may occur. Surgery has been the standard of care for early stage disease with good to excellent cure rates anticipated. This neoplasm has been found to be relatively sensitive to cisplatinum-based chemotherapy as compared with most other epithelial tumors. Aggressive multimodality therapy therefore can result in long-term disease-free survival for patients presenting with locally advanced or even disseminated disease. This chapter outlines the current medical and surgical treatment options for thymoma. PMID:15229793

  12. Thymomaptysis: unusual presentation of invasive thymoma.

    PubMed

    Rena, Ottavio; Ramponi, Antonio; Roncon, Alberto; Casadio, Caterina

    2012-05-01

    Symptomatic thymomas are characterized by non-specific thoracic symptoms or symptoms related to associated para-thymic syndromes. We report the case of a 56-year old Caucasian male who was affected by invasive (Masaoka IVA) WHO mixed AB-B2 thymoma after the elimination through the sputum of a fragment of tumour vegetating in the left upper lobar bronchus. The patient received multimodal treatment consisting of neoadjuvant cisplatinum-based polychemiotherapy, radical surgical resection ('en bloc' thymectomy, thymomectomy and pulmonary left upper lobe exeresis and pleural implants resection) and subsequent mediastinal radiation therapy. At 18-month follow-up, the patient is alive and disease-free. PMID:22290246

  13. A rare case of necrotic thymoma*

    PubMed Central

    DE PALMA, A.; PAGLIARULO, V.; LORUSSO, M.; VERARDO, L.; DI GENNARO, F.; GENUALDO, M.; QUERCIA, R.; MONTRONE, T.; GENTILE, A.; LOIZZI, M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Authors report the case of a patient who underwent resection of a huge anterior mediastinal mass, revealing to be a necrotic thymoma. The patient had been previously submitted to surgical biopsies of the mass yielding non-diagnostic results due to extensive necrosis. A sternotomy was then performed to resect the mediastinal mass originating from the thymus, en-bloc with the mediastinal fat and the apparently infiltrated lung. Histopathology showed a possible cyst/thymoma in massive necrosis, not further definable; revision by a specialized experienced pathologist (J. Rosai) confirmed total mass necrosis and no lung infiltration, thus orientating diagnosis towards a necrotic thymoma and excluding a lymphoblastic lymphoma, with similar histopathological features but more frequent in children or characterized by neoplastic infiltration of surrounding lung. Total body computed tomography (CT) scan and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET)/CT, show neither local recurrence, nor distant metastases two years after surgery. In case of anterior mediastinal mass with difficult histopathological diagnosis due to massive necrosis, the hypothesis of a necrotic thymoma should be considered. After radical removal prognosis is generally favourable and no adjuvant treatment is required. PMID:24690340

  14. Development of combined thymic carcinoma and thymoma in an extrathymic lesion during long follow-up for recurrent thymoma

    PubMed Central

    OHUE, YASUHIRO; MATSUOKA, SHUNICHIRO; KUMEDA, HIROTAKA; AGATSUMA, HIROYUKI; HYOUGOTANI, AKIRA; TOISHI, MASAYUKI; SHIINA, TAKAYUKI; YOSHIDA, KAZUO; SHINGU, KUNIHIKO; FUKUSHIMA, TOSHIROU; KOIZUMI, TOMONOBU

    2016-01-01

    The present study reported a rare case of combined thymic squamous cell carcinoma and thymoma exhibiting a mass on the left chest wall. The patient underwent thoracotomy for invasive thymoma 15 years previously, however, suffered a relapse in the left intrathoracic space. Radiotherapy, chemotherapy and partial resection, as secondary surgery for the intrathoracic mass, were performed. The histological findings in the resected specimens revealed type B3 thymoma. As the patient developed a left chest wall mass and pain in 2013, the mass was resected. The histological findings indicated two separate components composed of type B3 thymoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistological findings revealed that the thymoma cells were positive for CD5, while the thymic carcinoma cells were negative for CD5. Several reports have demonstrated the coexistence of thymic carcinoma and thymoma in the primary thymus, however, the development of a combined tumor in an extrathymic lesion is extremely rare. The present case had a long follow-up for recurrent thymoma. The present case indicated that the development and/or coexistence of malignant components in the thymoma must be taken into consideration for the treatment and/or management of patients with thymoma and that a pre-existence of CD5 expression in thymoma and the lost change may be associated with the process of malignant transformation. PMID:26893849

  15. Invasive thymoma associated with lung cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shimada, T; Terashima, H; Shimizu, T; Hirayama, K

    2001-01-01

    We report herein a case of invasive thymoma simultaneously associated with lung cancer. A 64-year-old man presented with a cough and anterior chest pain, and preoperative examinations revealed an anterior mediastinal tumor as well as lung cancer. The patient underwent a total thymectomy, partial resection of the right lung, left lower lobectomy, and mediastinal lymph node dissection, followed by radiotherapy. Although it is well known that thymomas may be accompanied by nonthymic cancers, invasive thymomas occurring coincidentally with lung cancer are rarely reported in Japan. This case is very interesting in its relation to the oncogenesis of thymomas. PMID:11428602

  16. Intraoperative imaging identifies thymoma margins following neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Jane J.; Nims, Sarah; Venegas, Ollin; Jiang, Jack; Holt, David; Kucharczuk, John C.; Deshpande, Charuhas; Singhal, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) molecular imaging is useful to identify tumor margins during surgery; however, the value of this technology has not been evaluated for tumors that have been pre-treated with chemotherapy. We hypothesized that NIR molecular imaging could locate mediastinal tumor margins in a murine model after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Flank thymomas were established on mice. Two separate experiments were performed for tumor margin detection. The first experiment compared (i) surgery and (ii) surgery + NIR imaging. The second experiment compared (iii) preoperative chemotherapy + surgery, and (iv) preoperative chemotherapy + surgery + NIR imaging. NIR imaging occurred following systemic injection of indocyanine green. Margins were assessed for residual tumor cells by pathology. NIR imaging was superior at detecting retained tumor cells during surgery compared to standard techniques (surgery alone vs. surgery + NIR imaging, 20% vs. 80%, respectively). Following chemotherapy, the sensitivity of NIR imaging of tumor margins was not significantly altered. The mean in vivo tumor-to-background fluorescence ratio was similar in the treatment-naïve and chemotherapy groups ((p = 0.899): 3.79 ± 0.69 (IQR 3.29 - 4.25) vs. 3.79 ± 0.52 (IQR 3.40 – 4.03)). We conclude that chemotherapy does not affect tumor fluorescence or identification of retained cancer cells at margins. PMID:26689990

  17. Intraoperative imaging identifies thymoma margins following neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Keating, Jane J; Nims, Sarah; Venegas, Ollin; Jiang, Jack; Holt, David; Kucharczuk, John C; Deshpande, Charuhas; Singhal, Sunil

    2016-01-19

    Near infrared (NIR) molecular imaging is useful to identify tumor margins during surgery; however, the value of this technology has not been evaluated for tumors that have been pre-treated with chemotherapy. We hypothesized that NIR molecular imaging could locate mediastinal tumor margins in a murine model after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Flank thymomas were established on mice. Two separate experiments were performed for tumor margin detection. The first experiment compared (i) surgery and (ii) surgery + NIR imaging. The second experiment compared (iii) preoperative chemotherapy + surgery, and (iv) preoperative chemotherapy + surgery + NIR imaging. NIR imaging occurred following systemic injection of indocyanine green. Margins were assessed for residual tumor cells by pathology. NIR imaging was superior at detecting retained tumor cells during surgery compared to standard techniques (surgery alone vs. surgery + NIR imaging, 20% vs. 80%, respectively). Following chemotherapy, the sensitivity of NIR imaging of tumor margins was not significantly altered. The mean in vivo tumor-to-background fluorescence ratio was similar in the treatment-naïve and chemotherapy groups ((p = 0.899): 3.79 ± 0.69 (IQR 3.29 - 4.25) vs. 3.79 ± 0.52 (IQR 3.40 - 4.03)). We conclude that chemotherapy does not affect tumor fluorescence or identification of retained cancer cells at margins. PMID:26689990

  18. Thallium-201 uptake in a benign thymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Campeau, R.J.; Ey, E.H.; Varma, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    A 68-year-old woman was admitted with atypical angina. A chest radiograph showed an anterior mediastinal mass that was confirmed on CT. The mass was relatively avascular and separate from the heart and great vessels. She underwent stress thallium testing that demonstrated no exercise-induced ischemia; however, an abnormal focus of thallium activity was present in the anterior mediastinum on stress and redistribution images. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated a normal left ventriculogram, coronary arteries and thoracic aorta. Subsequent surgery and pathologic examination revealed the mass to be a benign thymoma arising in the right lobe of the thymus gland.

  19. Unusual clinical behaviour of thymoma with recurrent myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Keditsu, Keduovinuo K; Karimundackal, George; Jambhekar, Nirmala A; Pramesh, C S

    2012-06-01

    A 58-year old man with thymoma and myasthenia gravis (MG) had undergone thymectomy 8 years ago with histopathologically confirmed non-invasive WHO-type AB thymoma. After 5 years of complete remission, symptoms of MG resurfaced, and a recurrent anterior mediastinal mass was detected for which he received radiotherapy. He presented to us 3 years later with productive cough and exertional dyspnoea; the positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan revealed a metabolically active pulmonary nodule in the right lung as the only site of disease for which a right lower lobectomy was done. Microscopy established an intrapulmonary WHO-type B2 thymoma and the patient is currently asymptomatic on steroids, anticholinesterase and immunosuppressant therapy. We discuss the variable and unpredictable course of thymomas; the possibility of transformation into more aggressive types with each recurrence, association with recurrent MG post-thymectomy and presentation several years later with metastatic disease. PMID:22378319

  20. Myasthenia gravis and invasive thymoma with multiple intracranial metastases.

    PubMed

    Koç, Filiz; Yerdelen, Deniz; Sarica, Yakup

    2003-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease. Approximately 15% of patients with MG have thymoma. Approximately 30% to 40% of them are invasive. A 26-year-old man was admitted with cough and difficulty breathing. He had transsternal thymectomy resulting from MG accompanied by thymoma 6 years previously. Thorax computerized tomography (CT) scans showed metastases to the extra-mediastinum. Diagnosis of invasive thymoma was made by CT-guided biopsy. A PAC regimen (cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide) and radiotherapy were added to MG treatment. Ten months later, he presented again with headache, weakness, and difficulty swallowing. We determined that he had intracranial multiple metastases. He was hospitalized. Cerebral multiple metastases were evaluated as inoperable. However, he died of transtentorial herniation after 1 month. This MG case accompanied by invasive thymoma with multiple intracranial metastases is discussed. PMID:19078711

  1. Immunohistochemical Evidence of Active Thymocyte Proliferation in Thymoma

    PubMed Central

    Chilosi, Marco; Iannucci, Antonio; Menestrina, Fabio; Lestani, Maurizio; Scarpa, Aldo; Bonetti, Franco; Fiore-Donati, Luciano; Dipasquale, Bruno; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Palestro, Giorgio; Tridente, Giuseppe; Janossy, George

    1987-01-01

    Eight cases of human thymoma have been analyzed on cryostat sections with the monoclonal antibody Ki67, which reacts with cells in the proliferative phases of the cell cycle. The aim was to assess the proportion of proliferating thymocytes among lymphoid cells in the thymoma samples. In all cases a large number of cells (mean, 58.75%; range, 35-80%), recognized as thymocytes by morphology and lack of cytokeratin expression in a combined immunohistochemical assay, exhibited nuclear Ki67 staining. These findings differ from the reactivity pattern observed in age-matched nonneoplastic thymuses where lower growth activity of cortical thymocytes was observed (15-20% Ki67+ cells). Intensive thymocyte proliferation in thymomas may represent one of the factors which lead to autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis and thymomas. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:2443011

  2. The clinical features, diagnosis and management of recurrent thymoma.

    PubMed

    Luo, Taobo; Zhao, Hongguang; Zhou, Xinming

    2016-01-01

    Thymoma is a disease with malignant potential, which has a recurrence rate after complete resection ranging from 5 to 50 %. Multiple studies on the risk factors, treatment or prognosis have been reported. Many of them are controversial, however. In this review, we summarized some accepted risk factors, means of diagnosis and different treatments of recurrent thymoma. The risk factors of recurrent thymoma haven't been well-studied, and its management remains controversial. We reviewed the literatures and found some key points which should be noticed during the surgery of initial thymoma. Although reoperation should be taken into account preferentially, multimodal treatments are also available. The prognosis are also been discussed. PMID:27580949

  3. Recurrent Thymoma in the Retroperitoneal Space: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Li, Qin-qing; Ding, Ying-ying; Cheng-de, Liao

    2015-01-01

    Thymoma is an epithelial neoplasm of the thymus, which commonly lies in the anterior mediastinum and recurrences of thymoma generally are locally, and retroperitoneal recurrence is considered to be rare. A 46-year old Asian woman with invasive thymoma had undergone thymectomy 10 years ago. Computed tomography demonstrated a well-circumscribed mass in the left retroperitoneal space. The patient had not any symptom including myasthenia gravis. Because on the anterior mediastinum area shows no sign of tumor recurrence and the mass adjacent to the vertebral body, neurogenic tumor was suspected. Surgical resection was performed using a retroperitoneal approach, which revealed the tumor adhering neighboring diaphragm. The tumor was histologically diagnosed to be type B1 thymoma according to the World Health Organization classification. The retroperitoneal mass was an unusual local recurrence after thymectomy. The patients whose had under invasive thymectomy should be evaluated carefully when finding retroperitoneal mass during follow-up. PMID:26236455

  4. A rare thymoma case with seven paraneoplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Li; Zhang, Pei; Liu, Xue-Yuan; Fang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Thymoma is a kind of epithelial tumor of the thymus which about 30-50% patients accompanied by paraneoplastic disorders. However, the coexistence of seven symptoms in an individual is rare. This report represented a patient, diagnosed of thymoma, with myasthenia gravis, erythema multiforme, plasma cell cheilitis, recurrent oral ulcer, vitiligo, Raynaud’s phenomenon and fissured tongue. Detailed clinical manifestations, serum immune biomarkers, imaging study, electrophysiology examination and pathology results are described in this case. PMID:26770603

  5. A complicated case of metastatic thymoma.

    PubMed

    Mather, Harriet

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the case of a 49-year-old man who presented to the hospice with severe neuropathic pain, cramps, muscle twitching, generalised sweating, insomnia and anxiety in the context of metastatic thymoma. The symptoms were exquisitely corticosteroid sensitive raising the possibility of an immunogenic aetiology. Morvan's syndrome, a paraneoplastic, immune-mediated syndrome characterised by peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, dysautonomia and central nervous system dysfunction was thus considered. Nerve conduction studies and electromyography were negative as were initial serological assays. Subsequent assays for antibodies to leucine-rich, glioma inactivated one protein and contactin-associated protein-2, recently discovered to be associated with Morvan's syndrome, confirmed the diagnosis. By the time the diagnosis of Morvan's syndrome was reached the patient was too unwell to receive disease-modifying treatments. An awareness of Morvan's syndrome in Palliative and Supportive care is essential to improve the outcome of patients with this devastating syndrome. PMID:25394917

  6. Synchronous thymoma and oligodendroglioma: A rare association

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Mohammad; Rad, Kamelia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with thymoma are found to have another systemic illness and a broadly increased risk for secondary malignancies. We present the case of a 53-year-old female patient who harbored two synchronous primary malignant neoplasms—an anaplastic oligodendroglioma of the right frontal lobe and an anterior mediastinal thymoma. Presentation of case A 53-year-old female patient presented in her first hospital admission with nausea, chest pain and non-pulsatile bitemporal headache. Continued headache and nausea along with negative cardiac findings prompted radiological evaluation including chest CT scan and brain CT scan which revealed simultaneous anterior mediastinal mass and frontal lobe calcification respectively. The patient underwent craniotomy and the pathological diagnosis was anaplastic oligodendriglioma. The anterior mediastinal tumor resection was performed three months later, while the patient had no newly onset of any symptoms necessitating more investigation. Discussion Multiple primary malignancies have been diagnosed by the following criteria: each tumor must have an obvious picture of malignancy, each must be separate and discrete and the probability that one was a metastatic lesion from the other must be excluded. Treatment strategies in cases of double malignancy involve treating the malignancy that is more advanced first. In our case we concluded that synchronous double malignancy can be treated successfully according to the above mentioned criteria. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of synchronous malignancies in order to use screening procedures in patients with reported increased risk of double malignancy. Such clinical alertness may lead to a better outcome for double primary tumor cases. PMID:26957188

  7. Whole Genome and Transcriptome Sequencing of a B3 Thymoma

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Iacopo; Rajan, Arun; Pham, Trung; Voeller, Donna; Davis, Sean; Gao, James; Wang, Yisong; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Molecular pathology of thymomas is poorly understood. Genomic aberrations are frequently identified in tumors but no extensive sequencing has been reported in thymomas. Here we present the first comprehensive view of a B3 thymoma at whole genome and transcriptome levels. A 55-year-old Caucasian female underwent complete resection of a stage IVA B3 thymoma. RNA and DNA were extracted from a snap frozen tumor sample with a fraction of cancer cells over 80%. We performed array comparative genomic hybridization using Agilent platform, transcriptome sequencing using HiSeq 2000 (Illumina) and whole genome sequencing using Complete Genomics Inc platform. Whole genome sequencing determined, in tumor and normal, the sequence of both alleles in more than 95% of the reference genome (NCBI Build 37). Copy number (CN) aberrations were comparable with those previously described for B3 thymomas, with CN gain of chromosome 1q, 5, 7 and X and CN loss of 3p, 6, 11q42.2-qter and q13. One translocation t(11;X) was identified by whole genome sequencing and confirmed by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Ten single nucleotide variations (SNVs) and 2 insertion/deletions (INDELs) were identified; these mutations resulted in non-synonymous amino acid changes or affected splicing sites. The lack of common cancer-associated mutations in this patient suggests that thymomas may evolve through mechanisms distinctive from other tumor types, and supports the rationale for additional high-throughput sequencing screens to better understand the somatic genetic architecture of thymoma. PMID:23577124

  8. Association between thymoma and persistent hypothermia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Thymomas are rare, slow-growing tumours that present in a variety of ways such as incidental findings on chest radiographs following symptoms of cough and dyspnoea. Thymomas may also present with symptoms due to intrathoracic spread such as superior vena cava obstruction, or with symptoms of an associated paraneoplastic disorder. Such paraneoplastic disorders are typified by the generation of autoantibodies directed against a variety of self antigens including myasthenia gravis, neuromyotonia, and hypogammaglobulinaemia. Significant hypothermia in association with thymoma has been described previously in one published case report. The basis for hypothermia in that case was not clear, but was postulated to relate to abnormal central thermal regulation and was resolved completely following treatment with intravenous gammablobulin, thus suggesting an autoimmune aetiology. Case presentation We present the case of an 88-year-old man with Type A thymoma and persistent hypothermia. An extensive investigation of the hypothermia revealed no aetiology other than the thymoma itself. Symptoms of hypothermia were treated effectively with passive and active external rewarming. The patient's dyspnoea was much improved by intercostal drainage of a left-sided pleural effusion and talc pleurodesis. He was not offered definitive treatment for the thymoma in view of its relatively favourable prognosis, and because his symptoms were well controlled at the time of discharge. Conclusion We suggest that the possibility of thymoma be investigated once the more common causes of hypothermia have been excluded in an appropriate clinical context. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second published case report describing such an association. PMID:19946549

  9. Treatment of advanced thymoma and thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Arun; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    Although thymic epithelial tumors are rare, they are relatively common among neoplasms of the anterior superior mediastinum. They usually exhibit indolent behavior, but do have the capacity to invade surrounding structures and metastasize to distant sites. Thymic carcinomas are rare, but are highly aggressive tumors that are associated with a poor prognosis. The mainstay of therapy is complete surgical resection. Locally advanced thymoma and thymic carcinoma require a multimodality treatment approach with a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy to decrease the chances of recurrence and improve survival. The risk of disease recurrence lasts for a number of years after completion of primary therapy. A majority of cases of recurrent disease present as pleural recurrences. Once again, surgical resection of recurrent disease represents the cornerstone of successful therapy and is critical to long-term survival. In recent years, a better understanding of the biologic basis of thymic epithelial tumors has led to the emergence of targeted therapy directed against this malignancy. PMID:19381821

  10. Giant thymoma successfully resected via hemiclamshell thoracotomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weigang; Fang, Wentao

    2016-08-01

    Thymoma is an epithelial neoplasm of the thymus. It commonly lies in the anterior mediastinum and represents 20-30% of mediastinal tumours in adults. In this report we present a case of giant thymoma locating in the anterior-inferior mediastinum. A 46-year-old male came to our institute with slight pectoralgia and dyspnea. Chest CT shows a giant tumor measuring 19 cm × 16 cm × 15 cm in the left thoracic cavity. After careful examination, we performed surgery. At surgery, we found the tumor was adherent to left upper lobe of the lung, mediastinal pleura, and parietal pleural. The tumor was completely resected with combined resection of part left upper lobe of lung. The weight of the tumor was 2,135 g. Pathological diagnosis indicated a type AB thymoma according to the World Health Organization classification and a diagnosis of Masaoka stage IIB was made. PMID:27621898

  11. Surgical removal of a thymoma in a burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia).

    PubMed

    Kinney, Matthew E; Hanley, Christopher S; Trupkiewicz, John G

    2012-06-01

    A 12-year-old male burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) was presented for evaluation of a mass in the right cervical region. A thymoma was diagnosed after surgical resection and histopathologic evaluation. Extensive adherence of the thymoma to the esophagus and suspected invasion into the right jugular vein contributed to a poor postsurgical outcome. Diagnosis and treatment of thymomas in avian species is similar to that in mammals. Surgical removal of noninvasive thymomas is usually curative. Thymomas are rarely reported in avian species and this is the first report in a strigiform bird. PMID:22872980

  12. Thymoma treated with 177Lu DOTATATE induction and maintenance PRRT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2015-05-01

    A 47-year-old man presented with a recurrent thymoma World Health Organization type A of the anterior chest wall with pleural metastases after failing chemotherapy. The tumor was positive on In-octreotide, and he was referred for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with Lu DOTATATE. He received 4 induction and 2 maintenance Lu DOTATATE treatments (total dose, 1000 mCi) and reported significant improvement in symptoms. Before the seventh treatment, mild progression was diagnosed on CT, and PRRT was terminated. The use of induction and maintenance Lu DOTATATE PRRT therapy in the management of thymoma warrants further research. PMID:25783505

  13. Role of somatostatin analogue-based therapy in unresponsive malignant thymomas.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, G; Lastoria, S; Montella, L; Martignetti, A; Lombardi, G; Salvatore, M; Bianco, A R

    1999-10-01

    Thymomas are rare neoplasms that are usually associated with parathymic syndromes, pure red cell aplasia, myasthenia gravis, hypogammaglobulinaemia and other mainly immunological disorders. Therefore, the management of thymoma patients is often complex and presents many diagnostic and therapeutic issues. Controversies concerning the definition of the histological subtypes and the role played by thymoma-associated syndromes are of primary importance in determining the oncological approach. Although low-stage thymomas have a high percentage of recovery, thymomas which are locally advanced, metastatic or previously treated with standard therapeutic options have no well-defined and effective treatment approaches. The data previously described by us on somatostatin receptor scintigraphy showing high uptake of indium-labelled octreotide by thymic masses and the successful treatment of a patient with thymoma and pure red cell aplasia with octreotide and prednisone has provided us the rationale for using such treatment in patients with advanced thymoma. PMID:10574161

  14. Association of clinical and pathological variables with survival in thymoma.

    PubMed

    Aydiner, Adnan; Toker, Alper; Sen, Fatma; Bicakci, Ercan; Saglam, Esra Kaytan; Erus, Suat; Eralp, Yesim; Tas, Faruk; Oral, Ethem Nezih; Topuz, Erkan; Dilege, Sukru

    2012-09-01

    Our aim was to evaluate clinical and pathological features in prognosis of thymoma patients with particular emphasis on patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). From 1995 to 2010, 140 thymoma patients (women/men: 63/77) with a median age of 46 years (11-80 years) were admitted to our institution. According to World Health Organization (WHO), there were 23 (17%) type A, 12 (9%) type AB, 24 (17%) type B1, 42 (31%) type B2 and 36 (26%) type B3. The distribution of Masaoka stages I, II, III and IV was 24 (17%), 71 (51%), 18 (13%) and 27 (19%), respectively. MG coexisted in 61% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 34 months (1-158 months), 102 (73%) patients are alive and well while 14 (10%) are alive with disease. Twenty-three patients (16%) have died, only 9 died of thymoma. In univariate analyses, completeness of resection (P < .001), WHO histology (P = .008), Masaoka stage (P < .001) and MG (P = .002) were significant prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS). Young age (P = .008); Masaoka stages 1 and 2 (P = .039); WHO types A, AB and B1 (P = .031); complete resection (P = .024) and presence of MG (P = .05) significantly correlated with overall survival (OS). In multivariate analysis, Masaoka stages 1 and 2 (P = .038) and presence of MG (P = .01) were significantly correlated with a longer PFS; MG (P = .021) and WHO subtype (P = .022) were found to be significant prognostic factors for OS. Adjuvant radiotherapy improved neither OS nor PFS in completely resected stage 2 thymoma. Masaoka staging, WHO and MG are major determinants of prognosis in Turkish thymoma patients. Additionally, radiotherapy did not provide survival advantage to stage 2 patients with complete resection. PMID:22057358

  15. A Gene Signature to Determine Metastatic Behavior in Thymomas

    PubMed Central

    Gökmen-Polar, Yesim; Wilkinson, Jeff; Maetzold, Derek; Stone, John F.; Oelschlager, Kristen M.; Vladislav, Ioan Tudor; Shirar, Kristen L.; Kesler, Kenneth A.; Loehrer, Patrick J.; Badve, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Thymoma represents one of the rarest of all malignancies. Stage and completeness of resection have been used to ascertain postoperative therapeutic strategies albeit with limited prognostic accuracy. A molecular classifier would be useful to improve the assessment of metastatic behaviour and optimize patient management. Methods qRT-PCR assay for 23 genes (19 test and four reference genes) was performed on multi-institutional archival primary thymomas (n = 36). Gene expression levels were used to compute a signature, classifying tumors into classes 1 and 2, corresponding to low or high likelihood for metastases. The signature was validated in an independent multi-institutional cohort of patients (n = 75). Results A nine-gene signature that can predict metastatic behavior of thymomas was developed and validated. Using radial basis machine modeling in the training set, 5-year and 10-year metastasis-free survival rates were 77% and 26% for predicted low (class 1) and high (class 2) risk of metastasis (P = 0.0047, log-rank), respectively. For the validation set, 5-year metastasis-free survival rates were 97% and 30% for predicted low- and high-risk patients (P = 0.0004, log-rank), respectively. The 5-year metastasis-free survival rates for the validation set were 49% and 41% for Masaoka stages I/II and III/IV (P = 0.0537, log-rank), respectively. In univariate and multivariate Cox models evaluating common prognostic factors for thymoma metastasis, the nine-gene signature was the only independent indicator of metastases (P = 0.036). Conclusion A nine-gene signature was established and validated which predicts the likelihood of metastasis more accurately than traditional staging. This further underscores the biologic determinants of the clinical course of thymoma and may improve patient management. PMID:23894276

  16. Duplication of U3 sequences in the long terminal repeat of mink cell focus-inducing viruses generates redundancies of transcription factor binding sites important for the induction of thymomas.

    PubMed

    DiFronzo, Nancy L; Frieder, Marisa; Loiler, Scott A; Pham, Quynh N; Holland, Christie A

    2003-03-01

    The ability of mink cell focus-inducing (MCF) viruses to induce thymomas is determined, in part, by transcriptional enhancers in the U3 region of their long terminal repeats (LTRs). To elucidate sequence motifs important for enhancer function in vivo, we injected newborn mice with MCF 1dr (supF), a weakly pathogenic, molecularly tagged (supF) MCF virus containing only one copy of a sequence that is present as two copies (known as the directly repeated [DR] sequence) in the U3 region of MCF 247 and analyzed LTRs from supF-tagged proviruses in two resulting thymomas. Tagged proviruses integrated upstream and in the reverse transcriptional orientation relative to c-myc provided the focus of our studies. These proviruses are thought to contribute to thymoma induction by enhancer-mediated deregulation of c-myc expression. The U3 region in a tagged LTR in one thymoma was cloned and sequenced. Relative to MCF 1dr (supF), the cloned U3 region contained an insertion of 140 bp derived predominantly from the DR sequence of the injected virus. The inserted sequence contains predicted binding sites for transcription factors known to regulate the U3 regions of various murine leukemia viruses. Similar constellations of binding sites were duplicated in two proviral LTRs integrated upstream from c-myc in a second thymoma. We replaced the U3 sequences in an infectious molecular clone of MCF 247 with the cloned proviral U3 sequences from the first thymoma and generated an infectious chimeric virus, MCF ProEn. When injected into neonatal AKR mice, MCF ProEn was more pathogenic than the parental virus, MCF 1dr (supF), as evidenced by the more rapid onset and higher incidence of thymomas. Molecular analyses of the resultant thymomas indicated that the U3 region of MCF ProEn was genetically stable. These data suggest that the arrangement and/or redundancy of transcription factor binding sites generated by specific U3 sequence duplications are important to the biological events mediated

  17. P37: Locally advanced thymoma-robotic approach

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Belal B.; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Background The conventional approach to locally advanced thymoma has been via a sternotomy. VATS and robotic thymectomies have been described but typically are reserved for patients with myasthenia gravis only or for small, encapsulated thymic tumors. There have been few reports of minimally invasive resection of locally advanced thymomas. Our objective is to present a case in which a large, locally advanced thymoma was resected en bloc with the pericardium employing robotic assisted thoracoscopic approach. Methods This case illustrates a case of an asymptomatic 29-year-old female found to have an 11 cm anterior mediastinal mass on CT scan. A right-sided, 4 port robotic approach was utilized with the camera port in the 5th intercostal space anterior axillary line and two accessory ports for robotic arm 1 and 2 in the 3rd intercostal space anterior axillary line and 8th intercostal space anterior axillary line. A 5 mm port was used between the camera and 2nd robotic arm for assistance. On exploration the mass was found to be adherent to the pericardium that was resected en bloc via anterior pericardiectomy. Her post-operative course was uncomplicated, and she was discharged home on postoperative day 1. Results Final pathology revealed an 11 cm × 7.5 cm × 3.0 cm WHO class B2 thymoma invading the pericardium, TNM stage T3N0M0, with negative margins. The patient was subsequently sent to receive 5,040 cGy of adjuvant radiation, and follow-up CT scan 6 months postoperatively showed no evidence of disease. Conclusions Very little data exist demonstrating the efficacy of resecting locally advanced thymomas utilising the minimally invasive approach. Our case demonstrates that a robotic assisted thoracoscopic approach is feasible for performing thymectomy for locally advanced thymomas. This may help limit the morbidity of a trans-sternal approach while achieving comparable oncologic results. However, further studies are needed to evaluate its efficacy and long term

  18. Multi-institutional European experience of robotic thymectomy for thymoma

    PubMed Central

    Maessen, Jos; Melfi, Franca; Schmid, Thomas A.; Keijzers, Marlies; Fanucchi, Olivia; Augustin, Florian; Comacchio, Giovanni M.; Mussi, Alfredo; Hochstenbag, Monique; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Robotic thymectomy for early-stage thymomas has been recently suggested as a technically sound and safe approach. However, due to a lack of data on long term results, controversy still exists regarding its oncological efficacy. In this multi-institutional series collected from four European Centres with high volumes of robotic procedures, we evaluate the results after robot-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy for thymoma. Methods Between 2002 and 2014, 134 patients (61 males and 73 females, median age 59 years) with a clinical diagnosis of thymoma were operated on using a left-sided (38%), right-sided (59.8%) or bilateral (2.2%) robotic approach. Seventy (52%) patients had associated myasthenia gravis (MG). Results The average operative time was 146 minutes (range, 60-353 minutes). Twelve (8.9%) patients needed open conversion: in one case, a standard thoracoscopy was performed after robotic system breakdown, and in six cases, an additional access was required. Neither vascular and nerve injuries, nor perioperative mortality occurred. A total of 23 (17.1%) patients experienced postoperative complications. Median hospital stay was 4 days (range, 2–35 days). Mean diameter of resected tumors was 4.4 cm (range, 1–10 cm), Masaoka stage was I in 46 (34.4%) patients, II in 71 (52.9%), III in 11 (8.3%) and IVa/b in 6 (4.4%) cases. At last follow up, 131 patients were alive, three died (all from non-thymoma related causes) with a 5-year survival rate of 97%. One (0.7%) patient experienced a pleural recurrence. Conclusions Our data suggest that robotic thymectomy for thymoma is a technically feasible and safe procedure with low complication rates and short hospital stays. Oncological outcome appears to be good, particularly for early-stage tumors, but a longer follow-up period and more cases are necessary in order to consider this as a standard approach. Indications for robotic thymectomy for stage III or IVa thymomas are rare and should be carefully evaluated

  19. Murine interleukin 1 receptor. Direct identification by ligand blotting and purification to homogeneity of an interleukin 1-binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, T.A.; Gearing, A.J.; Saklatvala, J.

    1988-08-25

    Functional receptors (IL1-R) for the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 (IL1) were solubilized from plasma membranes of the NOB-1 subclone of murine EL4 6.1 thymoma cells using the zwitterionic detergent 3((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Membrane extracts were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and ligand blotted with /sup 125/I-labeled recombinant human IL1 alpha in order to reveal proteins capable of specifically binding IL1. A single polydisperse polypeptide of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 was identified in this way, which bound IL1 alpha and IL1 beta with the same affinity as the IL1-R on intact NOB-1 cells (approximately equal to 10(-10) M). The IL1-binding polypeptide was only seen in membranes from IL1-R-bearing cells and did not react with interleukin 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or interferon. IL1-R was purified to apparent homogeneity from solubilized NOB-1 membranes by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose and IL1 alpha-Sepharose. Gel electrophoresis and silver staining of purified preparations revealed a single protein of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 which reacted positively in the ligand-blotting procedure and which we identify as the ligand-binding moiety of the murine IL1-R. Purified IL1-R exhibited the same affinity and specificity as the receptor on intact cells. The relationship of this protein to proteins identified by covalent cross-linking studies is discussed.

  20. Standardized definitions and policies of minimally invasive thymoma resection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of technical approaches for the minimally invasive resection of thymus have been described. Most of the time, the benefits are superior cosmetic outcome and shorter duration of postoperative stay. Other demonstrable differences that have been reported include shorter duration of surgery, less intraoperative blood loss and less postoperative pleural drainage. Robotic surgery and video-assisted surgery (VATS) may become routinely used procedures in the treatment of stage I and II thymomas. PMID:26693149

  1. Multimodal treatment for stage IVA thymoma: a proposable strategy.

    PubMed

    Rena, Ottavio; Mineo, Tommaso Claudio; Casadio, Caterina

    2012-04-01

    A retrospective review of a series of consecutive patients was carried out to evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of a multimodal treatment in the management of stage IVA thymoma at first diagnosis. From 1998 to 2008, 18 patients affected by stage IVA thymoma underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and subsequent mediastinal radiation therapy. There were 10 males and 8 females, mean age 54.5 years (range 29-68). Not specific symptoms were present in 12 cases and thymus-related syndromes were reported in 4. Histological subtypes were 1 AB, 2 B1, 4 B2, 7 B3, 1 mixed B1-B2, 1 mixed B1-B3 and 2 mixed B2-B3 thymomas. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (4 courses of cisplatin-based chemotherapy) was well tolerated in all cases. Those patients demonstrating clinical response at restaging (16/18) received surgical resection: "en-bloc" thymoma, residual thymic tissue and tumour involved organs resection was carried out together with the pleural implants removal. Complete macroscopic resection was achieved 10/16 patients (64%). Postoperative mortality and morbidity were null and 24%, respectively. Adjuvant radiation therapy consisted of 45-54 Gy administered by a 6 MV linear accelerator to the whole mediastinum and previous tumour bed. Mean follow-up was 82±33 months (range 31-143); overall survival was 85% and 53% at 5- and 10-years. Disease-related survival of the entire cohort was 100% and 58% at 5- and 10-years, whereas freedom from relapse survival for patients submitted to complete resection was 58% and 42% at 5- and 10-years. Disease-related survival when complete and not complete resection were considered were 100% and 52% and 72% and 0% at 5- and 10-years respectively (p=0.048). Multimodal management based on induction chemotherapy, subsequent surgery and postoperative mediastinal radiation allows a good complete resection rate and it is demonstrated to be a safe and effective treatment to warrant a good long-term survival in stage IVA thymoma patients. PMID

  2. Serum parathyroid hormone-related protein concentration in a dog with a thymoma and persistent hypercalcemia.

    PubMed Central

    Foley, P; Shaw, D; Runyon, C; McConkey, S; Ikede, B

    2000-01-01

    A thymoma was tentatively diagnosed by radiographic and cytologic examination in a dog with hypercalcemia and elevated serum parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) concentration. Following surgical excision, the diagnosis of thymoma was confirmed via histopathologic examination, the hypercalcemia resolved, and the PTHrP concentration decreased to below detectable limits. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:11126493

  3. A malignant retroperitoneal mass--a rare presentation of recurrent thymoma.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Wouter H; Sietsma, Johanna; Roelofs, Pieter M M; Hiltermann, Thijo J N

    2011-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with a suspected retroperitoneal mass, after primarily resected thymoma (type B1/B2, Masaoke stage 1). A germ cell tumour was excluded and a diagnostic biopsy was performed. The mass appeared to be a local recurrence of the primary thymoma, for example, a droplet metastasis, progressed to type B3. PMID:22674945

  4. A malignant retroperitoneal mass – A rare presentation of recurrent thymoma

    PubMed Central

    van Geffen, Wouter H; Sietsma, Johanna; Roelofs, Pieter MM; Hiltermann, Thijo JN

    2011-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with a suspected retroperitoneal mass, after primarily resected thymoma (type B1/B2, Masaoke stage 1). A germ cell tumour was excluded and a diagnostic biopsy was performed. The mass appeared to be a local recurrence of the primary thymoma, for example, a droplet metastasis, progressed to type B3. PMID:22674945

  5. Superior vena caval syndrome and ipsilateral pleural effusion: A rare presentation of anterior mediastinal thymoma.

    PubMed

    Das, Anirban; Pandit, Sudipta; Choudhury, Sabyasachi; Das, Sibes K; Basuthakur, Sumitra

    2014-10-01

    Incidence of thymic malignancies is very low. Thymoma, a tumor of thymus gland, is of epithelial origin and is most common anterior mediastinal tumor. In most cases, thymomas are localized and locally advanced thymomas may rarely present with superior vena caval obstruction (SVCO) and malignant pleural deposits. Microscopically, capsular invasion is noted in case of locally advanced thymomas, which behave like a malignant neoplasm. Complete surgical removal of the tumor along with intact capsule is the treatment modality of choice in case of localized tumors. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy followed by surgical resection of residual tumor is useful in case of locally advanced tumors. RT is especially useful in case of SVCO to relieve the distressing respiratory symptoms. Here, we report a rare case of locally advanced thymoma, complicated by SVCO and ipsilateral pleural effusion in a 53-year-old male patient. PMID:25378848

  6. [Recurrence of thymoma accompanied with hypogammaglobulinemia 20 years after surgery: a case report].

    PubMed

    Naniwa, Taio; Kakihara, Hidetoshi; Zen-nami, Shuji; Tomita, Hiroshi; Sugiura, Yoshiki; Yoshinouchi, Takeo; Sato, Shigeki; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2002-03-01

    We reported a case of recurrence of localized thymoma accompanied with hypogammaglobulinemia (Good's syndrome) 20 years after surgery. A 74-year-old man was admitted to this hospital because of mediastinal tumor and chronic pulmonary infection. He had been thymectomised at the age of 55 because of spindle cell thymoma. After that, he had been asymptomatic until January 1997, when he began to have a recurrent productive cough, and low-grade fever. Laboratory findings revealed hypogammaglobulinemia. Percutaneous needle biopsy of the mediastinal tumor revealed spindle cell thymoma. Therefore, hypogammaglobulinemia with thymoma (Good's syndrome) accompanied with a chronic lower respiratory tract infection was diagnosed. Immunologic studies revealed a marked decrease of CD 20 positive cells and decreased lymphocyte activation under the stimuli of phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A. The thymoma was resected in Dec 1997, but the serum immunoglobulin showed no increase at al. PMID:11974900

  7. Concurrent thymoma, thymic carcinoma, and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma in an anterior mediastinal mass.

    PubMed

    Ito, Junko; Yoshida, Akihiko; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Nakagawa, Kazuo; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Kobayashi, Yukio; Fukuhara, Suguru; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of a 62-year-old man with concurrent thymoma, thymic carcinoma, and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Computed tomography revealed a 5.5-cm anterior mediastinal mass, and surgical resection was performed. Histologically, the mass showed concurrent thymoma (type AB), thymic carcinoma, and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Lymphoma cells infiltrated in the left lung, pulmonary hilar lymph nodes, and involved bone marrow. The patient underwent chemotherapy for T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma and achieved remission. One year after surgery, he remains free of both thymoma and thymic carcinoma, and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma remains complete remission under maintenance therapy. Thymoma and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma can combine in the same mass, although this is quite rare. At the time of the diagnosis of thymoma, additional attention should be directed toward lymphocytes in the background. PMID:26150396

  8. Good's Syndrome: Successful Management of Thymoma With Hypoimmunoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    DeBoard, Zachary M; Taylor, Benedict J W

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of Good's syndrome managed with surgery and immunotherapy in a 58-year-old man who presented with a left arm skin infection and cough for 2 months. Imaging and laboratory studies revealed a large anterior mediastinal mass and panhypoimmunoglobulinemia, respectively. A biopsy was consistent with thymoma, and a diagnosis of Good's syndrome was established. Thymectomy was followed by intravenous immunoglobulin G and filgrastim with complete recovery through 9 months after discharge. Good's syndrome remains a rare entity often associated with poor prognosis. Adequate surgical resection remains key to outcomes, whereas immunotherapy aids in reducing postoperative complications and may improve survival. PMID:26522540

  9. Incidental invasive thymoma during coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Smady, Moaath; Hammdan, Farouq F; Abu-Abeeleh, Mahmood M; Massad, Islam M

    2009-01-01

    We encountered 2 incidental cases of invasive thymomas at Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan; during routine coronary artery bypass graft surgery between 2005 and 2008 with an incidence of 0.6%. Both patients presented with angina pain. None of the 2 patients had pressure symptoms (cough, shortness of breath or superior vena cava syndrome) or Myasthenia Gravis symptoms. Total thymectomy with dissection of perithymic fat was performed on both cases. No radiotherapy was given. No recurrence of the tumor was seen in 2 years follow up. These cases are presented to emphasize the occurrence of this tumor. PMID:19139788

  10. Regulation of CD1d expression by murine tumor cells: escape from immunosurveillance or alternate target molecules?

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Tim; Walter, Wolfgang; Reichert, Torsten E; Maeurer, Markus J

    2002-03-20

    alpha beta+ TCR T cells recognize peptide fragments displayed by MHC-class I or -class II molecules. Recently, additional mechanisms of antigen recognition by T cells have been identified, including CD1-mediated presentation of nonpeptide antigens. Only a limited number of CD1 antigens is retained in the mouse, i.e., the group II CD1 antigens, which are split into CD1D1 and CD1d2. Several T cell subsets have been shown to interact with murine CD1 antigens, including NK cells or "natural T cells" with the invariant V alpha 14 J alpha 281 TCR chain. Even if TAP defects may prevent classical endogenous antigen presentation in tumor cell lines, antigen presentation via CD1 is still functional. Therefore, CD1-mediated recognition of transformed cells by NK cells or "natural T cells" may represent an alternative way for immune surveillance. CD1 cell surface expression in murine tumor cell lines of different histology, including the B cell lymphoma A20, macrophage cell lines J774 and P388D1, mastocytoma P815, thymoma EL-4, melanoma B16, colon adenocarcinoma MC-38 and renal carcinoma Renca is regulated by Th1- (IFN-gamma), Th2- (IL-4, IL-10 and vIL-10) or GM-CSF (Th1/Th2) cytokines, depending on the tumor histology. In order to distinguish between CD1D1 and CD1d2 molecules, we examined differential expression of these CD1 isoforms by ratio RT-PCR: A20, EL-4, P815 and MC-38 cells exclusively express CD1D1 transcripts but not CD1D2 mRNA independent of cytokine treatment. Decreased CD1d expression leads to reduced immune recognition of CD1d+ tumor cells by freshly isolated NK1.1(+) effector cells as defined by cytolysis and IFN-gamma release. Thus, modulation of CD1 expression on tumor cells by cytokines may be advantageous to drive cellular anti-tumor antigen directed immune responses directed against TAP-independent, non-classical MHC restricting molecules. PMID:11920590

  11. ASXL1 and DNMT3A mutation in a cytogenetically normal B3 thymoma.

    PubMed

    Belani, R; Oliveira, G; Erikson, G A; Ra, S; Schechter, M S; Lee, J K; Shipman, W J; Haaser, S M; Torkamani, A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular drivers of thymoma are poorly understood. Outside of the identification of rarely occurring epidermal growth factor receptor and v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog mutations via candidate gene sequencing, mutations in common cancer genes have yet to be observed. Only a single thymoma genome sequence has been previously reported, with no mutations in known cancer genes identified. Thus, we attempted to identify somatic driver mutations in a cytogenetically normal thymoma. A stage IVB type B3 thymoma from a 47-year-old male of Asian descent with no history of myasthenia gravis or other autoimmune condition was genomically evaluated. Exome sequencing and low-pass whole-genome sequencing was performed to identify somatic point mutations, copy number changes and structural variants. Mutations in known tumor suppressors DNMT3A (p.G728D) and ASXL1 (p.E657fs), consistent with mutations of known consequence in acute myeloid leukemia, were identified. Contrary to a previous report, this finding suggests the genetic etiology of thymomas may not be fundamentally distinct from other tumor types. Rather, these findings suggest that further sequencing of cytogenetically normal thymoma samples should reveal the specific molecular drivers of thymoma. PMID:25000259

  12. Myasthenia gravis in patients with thymoma affects survival rate following extended thymectomy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHEFENG; CUI, YOUBIN; JIA, RUI; XUE, LEI; LIANG, HUAGANG

    2016-01-01

    Thymomas are the most common adult tumors in the anterior mediastinal compartment, and a significant amount of thymomas are complicated by myasthenia gravis (MG). Extended thymectomy (ET) is the primary treatment method for thymomas and is used to completely resect possible ectopic thymus to avoid recurrence. Studies on the effect of MG in thymoma patients following ET are limited. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the presence of MG affects the prognosis of patients with thymoma. The present study consisted of 104 patients with thymoma that underwent ET; 61 men (58.7%) and 43 women (41.3%) (mean age, 54.6 years). In total, 38 patients had MG (36.5%). MG was most frequently observed in World Health Organization (WHO) classification type B2 thymoma compared with other types of thymoma. During the 5-year follow-up period, 11 patients succumbed to a recurrence of thymoma or respiratory failure due to MG. The overall 5-year survival rate in patients without MG or with MG was 89.1 and 76.0%, respectively. The overall survival (OS) rate in patients with Masaoka stages I + II and III + IV was 90.0 and 68.0%, respectively. The OS rate in patients with WHO type A + AB + B1 and type B2 + B3 was 96.9 and 76.8%, respectively. The patients with MG (P=0.026), Masaoka stages III + IV (P=0.008) and WHO type B2 + B3 (P=0.032) had a poorer prognosis compared with patients without these characteristics. Furthermore, multivariate analysis by Cox regression revealed that age [P=0.032; relative risk (RR)=1.097; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.097–1.192] and MG (P=0.042; RR=0.167; 95% CI=0.037–0.940) significantly affected OS rate. In summary, ET is a reliable method for the treatment of thymoma. Long-term survival is expected for patients at early Masaoka stages, and for patients without MG. The prognosis of patients with thymomas with MG is poorer compared with patients without MG. The present findings provide useful information for the future management of

  13. A comparison between the cytological and histological characteristics in thirteen canine and feline thymomas

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Catherine A.; Jacobs, Robert M.; Couto, C. Guillermo

    1989-01-01

    Cytological smears and histological sections collected from histologically diagnosed cases of thymoma in nine dogs and four cats were reviewed. Most of the histological features were apparent in the cytological specimens with two notable differences. The epithelial component was underestimated and Hassal's corpuscles were not observed using Wright's-stained cytological preparations. Features of thymoma were recognized in seven of the nine cases in which fine needle aspiration biopsy was done. Therefore, cytology, and specifically fine needle aspiration biopsy, has the potential to be a useful aid in the rapid diagnosis of canine and feline thymomas. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17423346

  14. The triad of lichen planus, thymoma and liver cirrhosis-hepatoma. First reported case.

    PubMed

    Hassan, J A; Saadiah, S; Roslina, A M; Atan, M; Masir, N; Hussein, S; Ganesapillai, T

    2000-07-01

    We describe a patient with liver cirrhosis who presented with erosive oral and cutaneous lichen planus (LP) and incidentally was found simultaneously to have thymoma and hepatoma. We support the notion forwarded earlier that LP and chronic liver disease is more than a mere coincidence and that there is a non-coincidental association between LP and thymoma. We believe this is also the first reported case in the English Literature of coexistence of the three condition LP, thymoma and hepatoma complicating liver disease. PMID:22977389

  15. The Triad of Lichen Planus, Thymoma and Liver Cirrhosis-Hepatoma. First Reported Case

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, J. A.; Saadiah, S; Roslina, A M; Atan, M; Masir, Noraidah; Hussein, S; Ganesapillai, T

    2000-01-01

    We describe a patient with liver cirrhosis who presented with erosive oral and cutaneous lichen planus (LP) and incidentally was found simultaneously to have thymoma and hepatoma. We support the notion forwarded earlier that LP and chronic liver disease is more than a mere coincidence and that there is a non-coincidental association between LP and thymoma. We believe this is also the first reported case in the English Literature of coexistence of the three condition LP, thymoma and hepatoma complicating liver disease. PMID:22977389

  16. Percutaneous cryoablation for the treatment of recurrent thymoma: preliminary safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Abtin, Fereidoun; Suh, Robert D; Nasehi, Leyla; Han, Simon X; Hsu, William; Quirk, Mathew; Genshaft, Scott; Gutierrez, Antony J; Cameron, Robert B

    2015-05-01

    Thymoma is the most common primary tumor of the anterior mediastinum and often recurs after initial surgical resection. In this case series, percutaneous cryoablation, a locally ablative technique, was used to treat 25 mediastinal and pleural recurrent thymoma lesions in five patients. Safety and short-term efficacy data were collected. In 23 percutaneous cryoablations (92%), there were no or minimal complications. One serious complication, myasthenia gravis flare, occurred. Over the duration of follow-up (median, 331 d), 18 of 20 ablated lesions (90%) showed no evidence of local recurrence. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a safe and effective treatment modality for recurrent thymoma. PMID:25921453

  17. Dramatic remission of anemia after thymectomy in a patient of idiopathic myelofibrosis with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Yih; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Yang, Ching-Fen; Wu, Yu-Chung; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is one of the characteristics of idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF), and malignant thymoma is usually associated with various hematologic disorders, including anemia, pancytopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia. However, the relationship between IMF and malignant thymoma has not been published before. Here, we report a 48-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed of IMF with severe anemia and transfusion dependent. Five years later, malignant thymoma was found when she was examined for chronic cough. After performing extended thymectomy, her anemia dramatically recovered to normal and sustained for 2 years till last follow-up. Her splenomegaly and myelofibrosis were also improved. We hypothesized that her malignant thymoma induced the progression of IMF, especially in anemia. PMID:18224414

  18. Pericardial ectopic thymoma presenting with cardiac tamponade: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Arai, Hiromasa; Rino, Yasushi; Fushimi, Ken-Ichi; Goda, Masami; Yoshioka, Emi; Okudela, Koji; Yukawa, Norio; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-09-01

    Ectopic thymoma arising from organs other than the thymus, such as the neck, trachea, thyroid, lung and pericardium, is rare. To date, there have been only seven other cases of pericardial thymoma reported in the English literature. We herein report a case of pericardial ectopic thymoma that presented with cardiac tamponade. A 72-year-old Japanese male noticed body weight gain and leg edema. Chest computed tomography (CT) revealed pericardial effusion and an irregularly shaped mass in the pericardial space compressing the right atrium. He was considered to have cardiac tamponade due to a paracardiac tumor that developed following acute cardiac failure. The intraoperative frozen diagnosis was thymoma. Pericardectomy of the thickened pericardium, tumorectomy and thymectomy via a median sternotomy were performed. The final pathological diagnosis was pericardial ectopic thymoma associated with constrictive pericarditis. The differential diagnosis and complete resection of mediastinal tumors such as this rare case of thymoma are important to obtain a better prognosis, as patients with such tumors often present in a state of shock. PMID:25069422

  19. Western thymomas lack Epstein-Barr virus by Southern blotting analysis and by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Inghirami, G.; Chilosi, M.; Knowles, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors investigated 16 western thymomas, 9 from the United States and 7 from Europe, for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA sequences by both Southern blot hybridization analysis and polymerase chain reaction using EBV-specific DNA probes that detect the long internal repeat and terminal repeat regions and the EBNA-1 gene. None of the 16 thymomas contained evidence of the EBV genome, even though we could detect EBV by Southern blotting when EBV DNA represents less than or equal to 1% of the total DNA and by polymerase chain reaction when a single EBV-positive cell is present among 10(5) EBV-negative cells. These results fail to demonstrate EBV genome in western thymomas and stand in contrast to those of McGuire et al (Am J Pathol 1988, 131:385) who previously reported that the EBV genome is present in thymomas occurring in southern Chinese patients. Therefore EBV does not appear to be implicated in the pathogenesis of all thymomas. The presence of EBV in eastern thymomas, regions where EBV is endemic may be due to epidemiologic factors and/or genetic predispositions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2162629

  20. Eomesodermin promotes interferon-γ expression and binds to multiple conserved noncoding sequences across the Ifng locus in mouse thymoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Natsuki; Harada, Misuzu; Nishida, Ai; Ito, Yuko; Shiota, Hideki; Kataoka, Takao

    2016-02-01

    The T-box transcription factors T-bet and eomesodermin (Eomes) have been shown to regulate the lineage-specific expression of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). However, in contrast to T-bet, the role of Eomes in the expression of IFN-γ remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the Eomes-dependent expression of IFN-γ in the mouse thymoma BW5147 and EL4 cells, which do not express T-bet or Eomes. The ectopic expression of Eomes induced BW5147 and EL4 cells to produce IFN-γ in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin (IM). In BW5147 cells, Eomes augmented luciferase activity driven by the Ifng promoter encoding from -2500 to +113 bp; however, it was not increased by a stimulation with PMA and IM. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Eomes bound to the Ifng promoter and conserved noncoding sequence (CNS) -22 kb across the Ifng locus with high efficacy in BW5147 cells. Moreover, Eomes increased permissive histone modifications in the Ifng promoter and multiple CNSs. The stimulation with PMA and IM greatly augmented Eomes binding to CNS-54, CNS-34, CNS+19 and CNS+30, which was inhibited by FK506. These results indicated that Eomes bound to the Ifng promoter and multiple CNSs in stimulation-dependent and stimulation-independent manners. PMID:26749212

  1. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Stage II Thymoma After Complete Tumor Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yidong

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with Masaoka stage II thymoma benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy after complete tumor resection. Methods and Materials: A total of 107 patients with stage II thymoma who underwent complete resection of their tumors between September 1964 and October 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. Sixty-six patients were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, and 41 patients received surgery alone. Results: Eight patients (7.5%) had a relapse of their disease, including two patients (4.5%) who had surgery alone, and 6 patients (9.5%) who had adjuvant radiation therapy. Disease-free survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 92.3% and 82.6%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group, and 97.6% and 93.1%, respectively, for the group that underwent surgery alone (p = 0.265). Disease-specific survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 96.4% and 89.3%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group and 97.5% and 97.5% for the surgery group (p = 0.973). On univariate analysis, patients with type B3 thymomas had the lowest disease-free survival rates among all subtypes (p = 0.001), and patients with large thymomas (>7 cm) had lower disease-specific survival rates than those with small tumors (<7 cm) (p = 0.017). On multivariate analysis, histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy after complete tumor resection for patients with stage II thymoma did not significantly reduce recurrence rates or improve survival rates. Histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Further investigation should be carried out using a multicenter randomized or controlled study.

  2. Phase II Study of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Advanced Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Girum L.; Lee, Ju-Whei; Aisner, Seena C.; Langer, Corey J.; Tester, William J.; Johnson, David H.; Loehrer, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with advanced previously untreated thymoma and thymic carcinoma. Patients and Methods We conducted a prospective multicenter study in patients with unresectable thymoma (n = 21) or thymic carcinoma (n = 23). Patients were treated with carboplatin (area under the curve, 6) plus paclitaxel (225 mg/m2) every 3 weeks for a maximum of six cycles. The primary end point of this trial was to evaluate the objective response rate. Results From February 2001 through January 2008, 46 patients were enrolled. Thirteen patients had grade 4 or greater toxicity, mostly neutropenia. Using RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) 1.0 criteria, three complete responses (CRs) and six partial responses (PRs; objective response rate [ORR], 42.9%; 90% CI, 24.5% to 62.8%) were observed in the thymoma cohort; 10 patients had stable disease. For patients with thymic carcinoma, no CRs and five PRs (ORR, 21.7%; 90% CI, 9.0% to 40.4%) were observed; 12 patients had stable disease. Progression-free survival (PFS) was 16.7 (95% CI, 7.2 to 19.8) and 5.0 (95% CI, 3.0 to 8.3) months for thymoma and thymic carcinoma cohorts, respectively. To date, only seven patients (33.3%) with thymoma have died, compared with 16 patients (69.6%) with thymic carcinoma. Median survival time was 20.0 months (95% CI, 5.0 to 43.6 months) for patients with thymic carcinoma, but it has not been reached for patients with thymoma. Conclusion Carboplatin plus paclitaxel has moderate clinical activity for patients with thymic malignancies, but this seems less than expected with anthracycline-based therapy. Patients with thymic carcinoma have poorer PFS and overall survival than patients with thymoma. PMID:21502559

  3. Pleural Photodynamic Therapy and Surgery in Lung Cancer and Thymoma Patients with Pleural Spread

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ying-Fan; Shieh, Ming-Jium; Chen, Jin-Shing; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Lee, Jang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Pleural spread is difficult to treat in malignancies, especially in lung cancer and thymoma. Monotherapy with surgery fails to have a better survival benefit than palliative chemotherapy, the currently accepted treatment. Photodynamic therapy utilizes a photosensitizer to target the tumor site, and the tumor is exposed to light after performing a pleurectomy and tumor resection. However, the benefits of this procedure to lung cancer or thymoma patients are unknown. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with lung cancer or thymoma with pleural seeding who underwent pleural photodynamic therapy and surgery between 2005 and 2013. Eighteen patients enrolled in this study. The mean patient age was 52.9 ± 12.2 years. Lung cancer was the inciting cancer of pleural dissemination in 10 patients (55.6%), and thymoma in 8 (44.4%). There was no procedure-related mortality. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the 3-year survival rate and the 5-year survival rate were 68.9% and 57.4%, respectively. We compared the PDT lung cancer patients with those receiving chemotherapy or target therapy (n = 51) and found that the PDT group had better survival than non-PDT patients (mean survival time: 39.0 versus 17.6 months; P = .047). With proper patient selection, radical surgical resection combined with intrapleural photodynamic therapy for pleural spread in patients with non-small cell lung cancer or thymoma is feasible and may provide a survival benefit. PMID:26193470

  4. Acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNAs in thymus and thymomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kornstein, M. J.; Asher, O.; Fuchs, S.

    1995-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder characterized in most cases by serological antibody against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Evidence for intrathymic localization of AChR suggests that the thymus has an important role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Using reverse transcription followed by the polymerase chain reaction, we have demonstrated AChR alpha-subunit mRNA in thymuses and thymomas from patients with and without myasthenia gravis. We have also studied the expression of myogenin which is known to be involved in the regulation of AChR expression. By using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we found myogenin mRNAs in all of the thymuses and thymomas. Thus, both AChR alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNA are present in all of these specimens. By immunohistochemistry myoid cells (desmin and myoglobin positive) were present in all (four of four) thymuses studied and in two of five thymomas. Thus, in thymomas, nonmyoid cells might express both AChR and myogenin. These results indicate that cells within the thymus and thymoma express AChR and its regulatory protein myogenin and that such cells, under certain conditions, might play a role in the triggering of myasthenia gravis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7778671

  5. Ectopic primary intrathyroidal thymoma: a clinicopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Weissferdt, Annikka; Moran, Cesar A

    2016-03-01

    Thymomas are rare tumors that occasionally arise from ectopic locations. Ectopic thymomas originating within the thyroid gland are an exceedingly uncommon clinical entity that has only been described sporadically. In this study, we present the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of 3 primary intrathyroidal thymomas. The patients were 2 women and 1 man between the ages of 43 and 53 years (average, 48 years). Clinically, the patients presented with neck pain or enlarged thyroid glands. Physical examination and thyroid ultrasound revealed the presence of nodular masses confined to the thyroid parenchyma. No concurrent mediastinal tumors were identified in any of the cases, and none of the patients had a history of thymoma. Fine needle aspirate performed in 1 case was interpreted as possibly Hashimoto thyroiditis. Surgical resection was performed in all cases. Grossly, the lesions were circumscribed masses measuring from 1 to 4 cm in size. Histologically, the lesions showed the classic biphasic cellular proliferation of thymomas characterized by varying proportions of epithelial cells and lymphocytes. Two patients remain alive and well 1.5 to 2 years after their surgical resection, whereas the third patient was lost to follow-up. The cases herein presented highlight an unusual tumor entity that can be clinically confused for more common lesions affecting the thyroid gland. Awareness of this entity is important to avoid misdiagnosis and secure appropriate clinical management. PMID:26826412

  6. [Thymoma and somatostatin analogs. Biology, diagnostic and clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Palmieri, G; Montella, L; Lastoria, S

    2001-09-01

    Thymic tumours are rare neoplasms which generally follow a slow pattern of growth, showing their aggressiveness locally through the infiltration of adjacent organs and they rarely metastasise hematogenically. In the presence of locally advanced, metastatic or inoperable disease, combined strategies including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery are now being evaluated. Scintigraphy with 111In DTPA-D-Phe 1 octreotide was used for the first time in a relevant series of patients with thymic tumour (13 cases) by our research group. The presence of somatostatin receptors (ss-R) assayed in vivo provided the rationale for the use of a treatment based on the octreotide analog in a patient with thymoma and aplasia of the erythroid series (pure red cell aplasia, PRCA) in whom a complete response for the tumour and the remission of anemia was obtained. The efficacy of this treatment was confirmed by our series of patients with chemoresistant thymic tumour and by national and international confirmations. These data, ranging from in vivo diagnosis to treatment and the in vitro study of receptor expression, confirm that somatostatin plays a major role in thymic tumours. PMID:11753243

  7. Surgical treatment of an invasive thymoma extending into the superior vena cava and right atrium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although invasive thymoma commonly infiltrates neighbouring mediastinal structures, its extension into the superior vena cava (SVC) and consequent SVC occlusion are rare. In such cases, the urgent removal of the thymoma and radical resection of the infiltrated SVC representreasonable options, since induction therapy is time-consuming and useless for symptom resolution. A case of invasive thymoma extending into the SVC and right atrium (RA) with SVC syndrome is reported. The patient underwent a combined resection of the invasive tumor and SVC under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and the SVC and bilateral brachiocephalic vein (BCV) were reconstructed with an autologous pericardial ‘Y’ conduit. After 40 months of follow-up, the patient showed a patent graft and no tumor recurrence. PMID:24400724

  8. Superior vena cava syndrome from an invasive thymoma with transcaval invasion to the right atrium

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Ashwad; Wong, Ivan; Korniyenko, Aleksandr; Ivanov, Alex; Worku, Berhane; Gulkarov, Iosif

    2016-01-01

    Invasive thymoma with transcaval extension to the right atrium is a rare cause of superior vena cava syndrome. We present a case on a 74-year-old female presenting with dyspnea on exertion, and facial and upper extremity swelling. Physical examination revealed mild facial swelling, non-pitting edema involving the upper extremities and distention of superficial veins of the anterior chest wall and jugular veins. An echocardiogram showed moderate right atrial dilation with a mobile mass in the atrial cavity prolapsing through the tricuspid valve. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 9.9 × 4.3 cm heterogeneous mass in the anterior mediastinum compressing the superior vena cava and endovenously extending into the right atrium. Tissue biopsy of the mediastinal mass revealed a type B1 thymoma, further staged as a Masaoka IVa invasive thymoma that underwent successful en bloc resection followed by removal of intracaval and right atrial mass. PMID:27099229

  9. [Surgical resection with adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced Masaoka stage IVa thymoma; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Takeshige, Mariko; Aoki, Tadashi; Motono, Nozomu; Shimada, Koji; Nakayama, Takashi; Yazawa, Masatomo

    2010-03-01

    A 39-year-old woman was presented with a mediastinal tumor and some pleural tumors. A computed tomography (CT)-guided needle biopsy of the pleural tumor was undertaken which showed thymoma, type B1 according to the World Health Organization classification. She had underwent extended-thymectomy and resection of all pleural tumors. Histopathology confirmed these lesions to be type B2 thymoma and pleural dissemination. She received adjuvant chemotherapy. Two years after surgery the patient is alive without recurrence. PMID:20214360

  10. Role of radiation therapy in locally advanced thymoma.

    PubMed

    Urgesi, A; Monetti, U; Rossi, G; Ricardi, U; Casadio, C

    1990-11-01

    The records of all patients treated for thymoma in the Department of Radiotherapy of the University of Torino between 1970 and 1988 were reviewed. There were 77 patients in stage III or IVa (59 in stage III and 18 in stage IVa); 74 patients were operated upon before radiotherapy and 3 had a pre-operative irradiation followed by surgery and post-operative boost. Complete resection was possible in 55.9% of cases with stage III and in none with stage IVa. Subtotal resection was done in 35.6% of patients in stage III and 83.3% in stage IVa. 8 patients had only a biopsy: 5 in stage III (8.5%) and 3 in stage IVa (16.6%). Post-operative radiation doses ranged between 39.6 and 46 Gy to the whole mediastinum followed by a 10-16 Gy boost on smaller fields in cases presenting residual disease after surgery. The pre-operative dose was 30 Gy followed by a post-operative boost of 16-24 Gy. Conventional fraction sizes of 1.8-2 Gy were always used. The 10 years survival rate was 58.3%. There was a significant difference between stage III (70.9%) and stage IVa (26.3%) (p less than 0.0004). Survival of patients in stage III was not significantly affected by the type of surgery. No significant difference in survival or recurrence rate was observed in patients with different histologies and in patients with or without myasthenia. Thoracic relapses occurred in 15.2% of patients in stage III and in 50% of patients in stage IVa (p less than 0.01). Only 7 relapses (9.1%) were within the limits of the radiation field.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2126388

  11. Thymoma of the left thymic lobe with a contralateral small pleural implant successfully detected with diffusion-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Thymoma is the most common primary neoplasm of the anterior mediastinum. At diagnosis, up to 40% of patients present with advanced disease. Because advanced thymomas receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, diagnostic imaging is crucial to plan the correct treatment. For characterizing thymomas, CT is the first choice modality, whereas 18F-FDG/PET is reserved for questionable cases and MRI is not routinely employed. Hereby, we describe a case of thymoma with a single contralateral pleural implant in a 30-year-old woman. The small pleural thickening detected at CT was correctly interpreted as pleural seeding related to thymoma at diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI after a negative 18F-FDG/PET scan, and was subsequently confirmed at surgery. Precise diagnosis and accurate preoperative staging are crucial in managing thymic epithelial tumours in order to design the appropriate treatment and improve prognosis. Indeed, when stage IVa for pleural seeding is diagnosed preoperatively, a multimodality approach including primary chemotherapy followed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy/chemotherapy is recommended. This is the first report that used DW-MRI for the characterization of pleural seeding in thymoma and demonstrates that DW-MRI could be useful for the correct pre-operatory staging in thymoma patients, especially in cases with indeterminate pleural thickenings at CT, in order to define the correct management. PMID:25702681

  12. Cardiac Metastasis from Invasive Thymoma Via the Superior Vena Cava: Cardiac MRI Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Dursun, Memduh Sarvar, Sadik; Cekrezi, Bledi; Kaba, Erkan; Bakir, Baris; Toker, Alper

    2008-07-15

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and metastatic deposits are more common than primary cardiac tumors. We present cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 50-year-old woman with invasive thymoma. Cardiac MRI revealed a heterogeneous, lobulated anterior mediastinal mass invading the superior vena cava and extending to the right atrium. In cine images there was no invasion to the right atrial wall.

  13. Myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma and toxic multinodular goiter. A case report.

    PubMed

    lonescu, Lidia; Stefănescu, Cipriana; Dănilă, R; Trifescu, Irina; Savin, M; Dragomir, C; Ferariu, D; Vulpoi, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Adequate antithyroid drug treatment or surgery usually generates remission of myasthenia gravis (MG) in patients with thymus hyperplasia associated with Graves' hyperthyroidism. The case of a 46-year-old woman diagnosed with MG based on the clinical picture, anticholinesterase drug test and positive electromyography (EMG) is presented. The cervico-thoracic computer tomography revealed a compressive nodular goiter and normal antero-superior mediastinum and led to the diagnosis of MG secondary to the hyperthyroidism. An uneventful total thyroidectomy was performed, but postoperatively the MG symptoms worsened. TC99m tetrofosmin scintigraphy revealed an area of hyperfixation in the antero-inferior mediastinum, suggestive for thymoma, as confirmed by a repeated thoracic CT scan. Following a longitudinal sternotomy, a well incapsulated tumor of approximately 6/5 cm located in the antero-inferior mediastinum was found and an extensive thymomectomy was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged 9 days later with complete remission of myasthenia. The pathology report of the specimen revealed a mixt thymoma or AB thymoma after Muller-Hermelink and WHO classification, with invasive capsular foci corresponding to Masaoka II stadium. In conclusion, scintigraphy proved to be useful in the diagnosis and decision making of a thymoma. PMID:23077950

  14. P15: The expression of Tc17 cells in thymoma accompany with autoimmune diseases or autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymoma is thymic epithelial cell tumor. Studies have shown that thymoma associated with autoimmune disorders and possible mechanisms of autoimmune diseases is the central immune tolerance and peripheral tolerance obstacles have resulted in the breaking of the autoimmune response activation and immune tolerance. Tc17 cells and Th17 cells have been shown play an important role in tumor and autoimmune diseases’ development process. This study test the distribution of Tc17cells in thymoma and the expression of RORγt in thymus of thymoma patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) or other autoimmune diseases, the frequency of Th17/Tc17 in PBMCs, to explore the expression of Th17/Tc17 cells in thymoma accompany with autoimmune diseases or autoimmune disorders. Methods In this study, grouped as follows: (I) thymoma non gravis group (Tm groups); (II) thymoma with MG group thymoma with MG (MG group); (III) thymoma with MG associated with other autoimmune diseases group or anti- nuclear antibodies abnormal elevation of the group (AD group), to analyze the basic differences between the groups. In this study, we examined the RT-PCR to detect RORγt in the thymoma tissue, immunohistochemical double staining method to detect Tc17 cells expression and localization in the thymoma tissue distribution expression Th17/Tc17 in PBMCs by flow cytometry [Interleukin (IL)-17-producing CD8+ cells as Thl7 cells and IL-17-producing CD4+ cells as Tcl7 cells], analysis of differential expression of three in each group thymoma; and explore of Th17/Tc17 expression. Results (I) Tm groups and AD group serum CD8+ cells was statistically significant (P<0.05), Tm groups and MG group serum CD4+ cells/CD8+ cells was statistically significant (P<0.05); Tm and MG/AD group serum, C3 statistically significant (P<0.05); Tm and MG/AD group serum, CRP statistically significant (P<0.05); Tm groups and AD group serum IgE cells was statistically significant (P<0.05); (II) in thymoma tissus, the level of

  15. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  16. Successful resection of thymoma directly invading the right atrium under cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    De Giacomo, Tiziano; Patella, Miriam; Mazzesi, Giuseppe; Venuta, Federico

    2015-08-01

    We present the case of an invasive thymoma with severe compression of the right atrium, and infiltration of the atrial wall, causing a superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome. The tumour was resected under cardiopulmonary bypass en bloc with the atrial wall. A bovine pericardial patch was used for atrial reconstruction. We obtained a complete resection of the tumour and regression of symptoms, and, after 1 year of the follow-up, no signs of recurrence are evident. To our knowledge, this is the first case of thymoma directly invading the right atrium, without involvement of the SVC. In this setting, the aggressive surgical approach led to an immediate resolution of the symptoms and contributed to prolonged long-term survival. PMID:25293404

  17. A novel thymoma-associated immunodeficiency with increased naive T cells and reduced CD247 expression.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Petros; Dopfer, Elaine P; Malkovsky, Miroslav; Esser, Philipp R; Schaefer, Hans-Eckart; Marx, Alexander; Kock, Sylvia; Rupp, Nicole; Lorenz, Myriam R; Schwarz, Klaus; Harder, Jan; Martin, Stefan F; Werner, Martin; Bogdan, Christian; Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Fisch, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying thymoma-associated immunodeficiency are largely unknown, and the significance of increased blood γδ Τ cells often remains elusive. In this study we address these questions based on an index patient with thymoma, chronic visceral leishmaniasis, myasthenia gravis, and a marked increase of rare γδ T cell subsets in the peripheral blood. This patient showed cutaneous anergy, even though he had normal numbers of peripheral blood total lymphocytes as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Despite his chronic infection, analyses of immunophenotypes and spectratyping of his lymphocytes revealed an unusual accumulation of naive γδ and αβ T cells, suggesting a generalized T cell activation defect. Functional studies in vitro demonstrated substantially diminished IL-2 and IFN-γ production following TCR stimulation of his "untouched" naive CD4(+) T cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that his γδ and αβ T cells carried an altered TCR complex with reduced amounts of the ζ-chain (CD247). No mutations were found in the CD247 gene that encodes the homodimeric ζ protein. The diminished presence of CD247 and increased numbers of γδ T cells were also observed in thymocyte populations obtained from three other thymoma patients. Thus, our findings describe a novel type of a clinically relevant acquired T cell immunodeficiency in thymoma patients that is distinct from Good's syndrome. Its characteristics are an accumulation of CD247-deficient, hyporresponsive naive γδ and αβ T cells and an increased susceptibility to infections. PMID:25732729

  18. Recurrence after thymoma resection according to the extent of the resection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complete resection of the thymus is considered appropriate for a thymoma resection because any remaining thymic tissue can lead to local recurrence. However, there are few studies concerning the extent of thymus resection. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether recurrence following thymoma resection correlated to the extent of resection. Methods Between 1986 and 2011, a total of 491 patients underwent resection of thymic epithelial tumors with curative intent. Of those, we excluded patients with an undetermined World Health Organization (WHO) histologic type, patients with type C thymoma, and patients who underwent incomplete resection (n = 21). The remaining 342 patients were reviewed retrospectively and compared recurrence according to the extent of resection. Results Extended thymectomy was performed in 239 patients (69.9%) and limited thymectomy was performed 103 patients (30.1%). In the extended thymectomy group, 29 recurrences occurred, and in the limited thymectomy group, 10 recurrences occurred. Comparing rates of freedom from recurrence between two groups, there was no significant statistical difference in total recurrence (p =0.472) or local recurrence (p =0.798). After matching patients by stage and tumor size, there was no significant difference in freedom from recurrence between the two groups (p = 0.162). Additionally, after adjusting for histologic type and MG, there was also no significant difference (p = 0.125) between groups. Conclusions No difference in the rate of recurrence was observed in patients following limited thymectomy compared with extended thymectomy. PMID:24646138

  19. [A case of myasthenia gravis with invasive thymoma associated with diffuse panbronchiolitis, alopecia, dysgeusia, cholangitis and myositis].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Risa; Shibuya, Hideki; Hideyama, Takuto; Shiio, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of diplopia, ptosis, and dysphagia that had begun three years previously. He was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG) and invasive thymoma and treated with corticosteroid, thymectomy, and radiation therapy. Ten years after the thymectomy, computed tomography (CT) showed metastasis of the thymoma in the left lower lobe of the lung. Two years after this recurrence, when the patient was 55, respiratory symptoms such as wheezing, persistent cough, and dyspnea appeared. Chronic sinusitis, diffuse centrilobular opacities on CT, and positivity for HLA-B54 led to a diagnosis of diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB). Despite treatment with clarithromycin, the respiratory symptoms worsened. The patient developed alopecia and body hair loss at the age of 56 followed by dysgeusia, cholangitis, and myositis with positivity for anti-Kv1.4 antibodies. Although treatment with an increased dose of corticosteroid improved hair loss, dysgeusia, cholangitis, and myositis, he died of progression of DPB and serious respiratory infection at the age of 58. In this case, various autoimmune disorders occurred together with MG as complications of thymoma. Although alopecia, dysgeusia, and myositis are already known as complications of MG associated with thymoma, cholangitis is not well-recognized since there have been few reports suggesting a causal relationship between cholangitis and thymoma. Furthermore, DPB caused by immunodeficiency and respiratory tract hypersensitivity associated with thymoma and HLA-B54, respectively, is the distinctive feature of our case. Neurologists should be aware that various organs can be damaged directly and indirectly by abnormal T cells from thymoma in patients with MG. PMID:25283823

  20. Evaluation of the Role of Radiation Therapy in the Management of Malignant Thymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shilpen; Macdonald, O. Kenneth; Nagda, Suneel; Bittner, Nathan

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The management of patients diagnosed with thymoma remains unclear. This report attempts to identify the impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) in patients diagnosed with thymoma. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with thymic malignancy between 1973 and 2003 were retrospectively identified from centers participating in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. Those patients classified as having thymic carcinoma were excluded from this analysis. OS and CSS were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Outcomes for patients treated with and without radiation therapy were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed with the Cox proportional hazards model to analyze factors predictive of OS and CSS. Results: A total of 1,464 patients were identified as having thymic malignancy, and of these, 1,254 patients were identified as having malignant thymoma. The median follow-up time was 41 months (range, 4-337 months). Among patients who did not receive radiotherapy (RT), the 10-year rate of OS was 41% compared to 42% for those who did receive RT (p = 0.06). The median OS for the patients who did not receive RT was 80 months compared to 97 months for those who did receive RT. In patients with Masaoka stage II-III malignancy, OS was significantly improved with RT (p = 0.002), and a trend in improved CSS was observed (p = 0.1). Patients were also analyzed based on resection status. For those patients who had an incomplete excision, the 10-year OS was 63% with RT and 46% without RT (p = 0.38). On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of OS included age, extent of surgery, stage, and number of lymph nodes examined. Conclusions: This study reports treatment results of a large cohort of patients who were diagnosed with malignant thymoma. This study demonstrates that the use of RT following resection for thymoma significantly improves OS for those with regional

  1. T-lymphocyte-rich Thymoma and Myasthenia Gravis in a Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)☆

    PubMed Central

    Allan, K.; Masters, N.; Rivers, S.; Berry, K.; Routh, A.; Lamm, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 10-year-old captive male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with acute onset collapse, vomiting and dyspnoea, preceded by a 6-month period of progressive muscle wasting. Following humane destruction, post-mortem examination revealed a large multilobulated mass in the cranial mediastinum, which was diagnosed as a T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Retrospective serology for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (titre 3.90 nmol/l) confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are reported rarely in wild carnivores, but when detected they appear to be similar in morphology to those seen in domestic carnivores and may also be accompanied by paraneoplastic syndromes. The clinical signs of myasthenia gravis in the tiger were consistent with those reported in cats and dogs and the condition is proposed as an important differential diagnosis for generalized weakness in captive Felidae. PMID:24444818

  2. [A CASE OF PULMONARY MYCOBACTERIUM ABSCESSUS INFECTION THAT DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY FOR MYASTHENIA GRAVIS WITH RECURRENT THYMOMA].

    PubMed

    Matsuse, Hiroto; Oshio, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Kumiko; Nakayama, Haruo

    2016-02-01

    A 58-year-old man developed cough, sputum, and low-grade fever during immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids and cyclosporine for myasthenia gravis with recurrent thymoma. Since chest CT revealed diffuse nodular opacities in both lung fields, he was referred to our department. Mycobacterium abscessus was repeatedly cultured from his sputum, and he was diagnosed with pulmonary M. abscessus infection. Although both chest radiological findings and clinical symptoms were mild, he required treatment with immunosuppressive agents and systemic anesthesia for resection of the recurrent thymoma. Based on complications and according to the patient's preference, oral treatment with clarithromycin 600 mg/day, levofloxacin 500 mg/day, and faropenem 600 mg/day was initiated on an outpatient basis. Following these treatments, his chest CT findings and clinical symptoms subsided, and the thymoma was successfully resected. Our experience with the present case suggests a possible treatment strategy for M. abscessus infection in immunocompromised and complicated cases. PMID:27263226

  3. Postoperative survival for patients with thymoma complicating myasthenia gravis—preliminary retrospective results of the ChART database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangrui; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan; Gu, Zhitao

    2016-01-01

    Background It is so far not clear that how myasthenia gravis (MG) affected the prognosis of thymoma patients. The aim of this assay is to compare the postoperative survival between patients with thymoma only and those with both thymoma and MG. Methods The Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) registry recruited patients with thymoma from 18 centers over the country on an intention to treat basis from 1992 to 2012. Two groups were formed according to whether the patient complicated MG. Demographic and clinical data were reviewed, patients were followed and their survival status were analyzed. Results There were 1,850 patients included in this study, including 421 with and 1,429 without MG. Complete thymectomy were done in 91.2% patients in MG group and 71.0% in non-MG group (P<0.05). There were more percentage of patients with the histology of thymoma AB, B1, or B2 (P<0.05) in MG group, and more percentage of patients with MG were in Masaoka stage I and II. The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were both higher in MG group (93% vs. 88%; 83% vs. 81%, P=0.034) respectively. The survival rate was significantly higher in patients with MG when the Masaoka staging was 3/4 (P=0.003). Among patients with advanced stage thymoma (stage 3, 4a, 4b), the constituent ratios of 3, 4a, 4b were similar between MG and non-MG group. Histologically, however, there were significantly more proportion of AB/B1/B2/B3 in the MG group while there were more C in the non-MG group (P=0.000). Univariate analyses for all patients showed that MG, WHO classification, Masaoka stage, surgical approach, chemotherapy and radiotherapy and resectability were significant factors, and multivariate analysis showed WHO classification, Masaoka stage, and resectability were strong independent prognostic indicators. Conclusions Although MG is not an independent prognostic factor, the survival of patients with thymoma was superior when MG was present, especially in late Masaoka stage

  4. The enlightenments from ITMIG Consensus on WHO histological classification of thymoma and thymic carcinoma: refined definitions, histological criteria, and reporting

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Fang, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) histological classification of the thymoma and thymic carcinoma (TC) has been criticized for poor interobserver reproducibility or inconsistencies in the routine pathological diagnosis. The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group (ITMIG) panel achieved an agreement to maintain the widely accepted WHO framework but to refine historic definitions and histological criteria, and further introduce some new terms with the aim to improve interobserver reproducibility. This review addresses the enlightenments we can get from the ITMIG consensus on the WHO histological classification of the thymoma and TC, which may be helpful for most pathologists. PMID:27114842

  5. Thymomas with prominent glandular differentiation: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Weissferdt, Annikka; Moran, Cesar A

    2013-08-01

    Twelve cases of thymomas with prominent glandular differentiation are presented. The patients were 7 men and 5 women aged between 45 and 68 years (average, 56.5 years). Clinically, the patients presented with nonspecific symptoms of chest pain, cough, and fatigue. None of the patients had a history of myasthenia gravis or other autoimmune syndrome. Thymectomy was performed in all patients. The tumor size ranged from 4 to 7 cm in greatest diameter. Macroscopically, the tumors were described as firm and light tan without areas of necrosis, hemorrhage, or cystic change. Histologically, 7 tumors were classified as spindle cell (World Health Organization type A), 2 as mixed spindle cell and conventional (A+B1), 2 as conventional (B1), and 1 as atypical thymoma (B3). In 4 cases, the tumors showed invasion into periadipose thymic tissue. All cases showed the typical growth patterns of their particular subtypes. In addition, a distinct glandular component was present in all cases showing mucinous differentiation in 4 of them. Immunohistochemical studies showed tumor cells positive for CAM5.2, cytokeratin 5/6, and Pax8 and negative for carcinoembryonic antigen, thyroid transcription factor 1, and epithelial membrane antigen. Calretinin showed focal weak staining in the nonmucinous glandular components in 3 cases. Follow-up information obtained in 8 patients showed that all were alive and well in a period ranging from 2 to 5 years. The possibility of a glandular component in thymomas should be kept in mind in the assessment of mediastinoscopic biopsies to avoid misdiagnosis for other neoplasms that may require different treatment modalities. PMID:23528863

  6. Primary chemotherapy with adriamycin, cisplatin, vincristine and cyclophosphamide in locally advanced thymomas: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Berruti, A; Borasio, P; Gerbino, A; Gorzegno, G; Moschini, T; Tampellini, M; Ardissone, F; Brizzi, M P; Dolcetti, A; Dogliotti, L

    1999-11-01

    From 1990 to 1997, 16 consecutive patients with stage III and IVa invasive thymoma were treated in a single institution with primary chemotherapy consisting in adriamycin (40 mg m(-2)), cisplatin (50 mg m(-2)) administered intravenously on day 1, vincristine (0.6 mg m(-2)) on day 2 and cyclophosphamide (700 mg m(-2)) on day 4 (ADOC). The courses were repeated every 3 weeks. The aim was to evaluate the impact of this cytotoxic regimen with respect to response rate, per cent of patients radically resected, time to progression and overall survival. Two complete responses (one clinical and one pathological) and 11 partial responses were observed (overall response rate 81.2%); two patients had stable disease and one progressed. Toxicity was mild as only two patients developed grade III/IV neutropenia and one patient grade III nausea/vomiting. Nine patients were radically resected (five out of ten with stage III, and four out of six with stage IVa). Median time to progression and overall survival was 33.2 and 47.5 months respectively. Three patients were alive and disease free after more than 5 years. The ADOC scheme is highly active and manageable in the treatment of locally advanced thymoma. As a preoperative approach it should be offered to patients not amenable to surgery or to those surgically resectable but with a great deal of morbidity. PMID:10555755

  7. Characterization of the human thymic microenvironment: lymphoepithelial interaction in normal thymus and thymoma.

    PubMed

    Müller-Hermelink, H K; Wilisch, A; Schultz, A; Marx, A

    1997-03-01

    Recent advances in tissue culture technology and molecular biology have extended our understanding of the functional morphology of the thymus. The importance of a crosstalk between lymphoid cells and stroma has been appreciated as a prerequisite for the normal development of both. The network of direct cellular interactions and soluble factors comprising part of the microenvironment is far from being elucidated but the highly ordered thymic architecture clearly plays a pivotal role in normal thymic function. Insight into the genetic control of stroma development is only emerging while knowledge on the genetic control of the various steps in T cell development is already advanced and rapidly expanding. The present paper gives an overview on the cellular components and matrix molecules of the human thymic microenvironment and their development during ontogeny. The intrathymic cytokine network is shortly reviewed. Special emphasis is put on molecules mediating lymphoepithelial interactions that are necessary for the expansion and early selection of immature thymocytes from precursor cells and for the generation of an MHC restricted and self tolerant T cell repertoire by positive and negative selection. Considering these physiological mechanisms we summarize the molecular pathology of the microenvironment and lymphocyte/stroma interactions in thymic epithelial tumors (thymomas). Finally, a pathogenetic model for paraneoplastic myasthenia gravis is given. We suggest abnormal auto-antigen-specific positive selection of naive T cells as the essential molecular mechanism by which thymomas contribute to the autoimmunization against the acetylcholine receptor and other muscle proteins. PMID:9161686

  8. State of the art: diagnostic tools and innovative therapies for treatment of advanced thymoma and thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ried, Michael; Marx, Alexander; Götz, Andrea; Hamer, Okka; Schalke, Berthold; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this review article, state-of-the-art diagnostic tools and innovative treatments of thymoma and thymic carcinoma (TC) are described with special respect to advanced tumour stages. Complete surgical resection (R0) remains the standard therapeutic approach for almost all a priori resectable mediastinal tumours as defined by preoperative standard computed tomography (CT). If lymphoma or germ-cell tumours are differential diagnostic considerations, biopsy may be indicated. Resection status is the most important prognostic factor in thymoma and TC, followed by tumour stage. Advanced (Masaoka-Koga stage III and IVa) tumours require interdisciplinary therapy decisions based on distinctive findings of preoperative CT scan and ancillary investigations [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] to select cases for primary surgery or neoadjuvant strategies with optional secondary resection. In neoadjuvant settings, octreotide scans and histological evaluation of pretherapeutic needle biopsies may help to choose between somatostatin agonist/prednisolone regimens and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as first-line treatment. Finally, a multimodality treatment regime is recommended for advanced and unresectable thymic tumours. In conclusion, advanced stage thymoma and TC should preferably be treated in experienced centres in order to provide all modern diagnostic tools (imaging, histology) and innovative therapy techniques. Systemic and local (hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy) medical treatments together with extended surgical resections have increased the therapeutic options in patients with advanced or recurrent thymoma and TC. PMID:26670806

  9. Association of a wide invasive malignant thymoma with myastenia gravis and primary hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid adenoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Vincenzo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Lolli, Ivan; Troccoli, Giuseppe; Resta, Francesco; Sabbà, Carlo; Ruggieri, Nadia; Tafaro, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    There are few cases described in the world literature reporting an association of thymoma (with myasthenia gravis or not) with hyperparathyroidism. In these cases the hyperparathyroidism was due to the presence of an adenoma or hyperplasic parathyroid tissue either in the cervical region or in an ectopic intrathymic location.(12345) In other cases the syndrome of hypercalcemia was due to the secretion of parathyroid-related protein (PTHRP) (6) or parathyroid hormone (PTH) (7) by the thymoma itself. We report the first case, at the best of our knowledge, of a wide invasive malignant thymoma (type B3), associated with myasthenia gravis and hyperparathyroidism caused by parathyroid adenoma. PMID:16873103

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Myasthenia Gravis with Thymoma and Thymic Hyperplasia Undergoing Extended Transsternal Thymectomy: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nazarbaghi, Surena; Amiri-Nikpour, Mohammad Reza; Mahmodlou, Rahim; Arjmand, Nasim; Rezaei, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the widespread use of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients, it has remained controversial as to whether this procedure is of a similar efficacy and clinical outcome among MG patients with thymoma and thymic hyperplasia. Aim: We sought to determine the long-term clinical outcomes of MG patients who received extended transsternal thymectomy associated with pyridostigmine and prednisolone postoperatively. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study from January 1999 to December 2013, MG patients who underwent thymectomy were followed up. Out of 41 MG patients admitted in our center, 25 patients had undergone thymectomy adjunctive to pyridostigmine and prednisolone therapy postoperatively. The primary endpoints included improvement in individual diplopia, ptosis, dysphagia, dysarthria, dyspnea, and limb weakness. In addition, according to the MG Foundation of America (MGFA) criteria, response to therapy was defined as complete stable remission (CSR), pharmacologic remission (PR), and minimal manifestation (MM) as secondary endpoints. Results: Majority of the patients were male (60%) and the mean age of the patients was 32.2 ± 13.9 years. Fifteen (60%) and 10 patients (40%) had thymoma and thymic hyperplasia, respectively. All the patients were followed up during a mean period of of 86.9 ± 50.3 months (minimum 10 months and maximum 168 months). The rates of CSR, PR, and MM were comparable between the thymoma and thymic hyperplasia groups (P = 0.584). Based on the Kaplan Meier analysis, the probabilities of CSR, PR, and MM were not significantly different between patients with thymoma and thymic hyperplasia. Conclusion: The extended transsternal thymectomy, along with the postoperative regimen of pyridostigmine and prednisolone was associated with a high rate of clinical improvement among MG patients with thymoma or thymic hyperplasia. PMID:26713298

  11. New onset of myasthenia gravis 10 years after proton beam therapy for thymoma.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Nitadori, Jun-Ichi; Anraku, Masaki; Kikuchi, Yoshinao; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Igaki, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Jun

    2016-05-01

    A 36-year-old woman underwent proton beam therapy for encapsulated type B1 thymoma for curative intent at 66 GyE. Radiographically partial response was achieved. Although the tumor size had been stable since that time, she developed systemic myasthenia gravis 10 years after the proton therapy. Extended thymectomy was performed. There were no adhesions between the tumor and the pericardium, and there were no adhesions also between the tumor and the sternum, probably due to the favor of Bragg peak effect. Extensive hyalinization with small foci of viable tumor cells showing degenerated type A-like morphology was observed in the resected tumor. Whether the viable cells represented recurrence with degenerative changes or de novo tumor formation was unable to be determined, and whether the viable cells were responsible for the onset of myasthenia gravis remained unclear. PMID:25301055

  12. [Concurrence of myasthenia gravis, polymyositis, thyroiditis and eosinophilia in a patient with type B1 thymoma].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Manabu; Kojima, Yasuhiro; Shinde, Akiyo; Satoi, Hitoshi; Makino, Fumi; Kanda, Masutarou; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    We presented a 43-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed weakness of all extremities and difficulty in swallowing and drooping of eyelids, characterized by easy fatigability at the end of December, 2005. On general physical examination, she had moderate goiter. No cervical lymphadenopathy, cardiac murmur, or skin rash was noted. Neurologically, she had blepharoptosis, more on the right, only in the upright position with easy fatigability and marked weakness in the neck flexor, trunk, and all limb muscles much more proximally than distally. She had neither muscular atrophy nor upper motor neuron sign. Laboratory data showed slight leukocytosis with eosinophilia (up to 31%), and serum creatine kinase was markedly increased to over 2,000 IU/l. TSH receptor antibody (11.9%) and anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (46.6 nmol/L) were also increased. Edrophonium test was positive. Electrophysiologically, muscle evoked potentials by repetitive motor nerve stimulation showed 13% and 50% waning in abductor pollicis brevis and deltoid muscle, respectively, at low frequency and no waxing at high frequency. Needle EMG showed fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves in proximal muscles. Polymyositis was diagnosed by muscle biopsy which showed infiltration of lymphocytes in the endomysium and around non-necrotic muscle fibers. Upper arm muscle MRI showed multifocal high signal intensity lesions on T2-weighted images which were likely related to myositis. This finding is atypical for polymyositis. X-ray and CT of chest showed a mass lesion in the left pulmonary hilum, which was histologically diagnosed as type B1 thymoma. Thus, the present case had myasthenia gravis, polymyositis, thyroidititis and eosinophilia associated with type B1 thymoma. After the thymectomy, corticosteroid administration and immunoadsorption therapy, clinical symptoms and all laboratory abnormalities markedly improved. PMID:17710886

  13. 7,12-DIMETHYLBENZ[A]ANTHRACENE-INDUCED MODULATION OF CYTOKINES INVOLVED IN CYTOTOXIC T LYMPHOCYTE INDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murine lymphocytes were exposed to the carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and several cytokines were measured. Production of interleukin-1 by macrophages, interleukin-2 by EL-4 thymoma, and gamma interferon by activated splenic lymp...

  14. Pure red cell aplasia associated with malignant thymoma, myasthenia gravis, polyclonal large granular lymphocytosis and clonal thymic T cell expansion.

    PubMed Central

    Handa, S I; Schofield, K P; Sivakumaran, M; Short, M; Pumphrey, R S

    1994-01-01

    A case with the triad of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), myasthenia gravis, and malignant thymoma is reported. There was a clonal proliferation of T cells within the thymoma, as demonstrated by a T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta chain gene rearrangement. However, despite a large granular lymphocytosis, clonality could not be shown in the peripheral blood either before or after thymectomy. There was no evidence of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 7 (HTLV1) infection. It is postulated that the clonal thymic T cell population secreted cytokine(s), which stimulated the polyclonal proliferation of large granular lymphocytes, which in turn suppressed erythropoiesis. Thymectomy removed the stimulus to the large granular lymphocytes and hence there was a resurgence of erythropoiesis. Images PMID:8089232

  15. Case Report Unicentric Castleman disease located in the anterior mediastinum misdiagnosed as invasive thymoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Xie, D Y; Lin, X M; Chi, C

    2015-01-01

    Castleman disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology. The localized form, which usually presents as a slow-growing mass, is most commonly located in the mediastinum. Invasion of the vena anonyma by a mass has rarely been reported. We herein describe a case of initially misdiagnosed invasive thymoma in a 72-year-old woman, but postoperatively proven to have anterior mediastinal Castleman disease with invasion of the vena anonyma. PMID:26125875

  16. Radiofrequency Ablation in the Management of Advanced Stage Thymomas: A Case Report on a Novel Multidisciplinary Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pala, Carlo; Versace, Renato

    2014-01-01

    We describe in this report a case of successful radiofrequency ablation of an unresectable stage III-type B3 thymoma, and we discuss the role of this novel approach in the management of patients with advanced stage thymoma. The patient, a 59-year-old Caucasian male underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy with only a slight reduction of the mass. Subsequently, an explorative sternotomy and debulking were performed; before closing the thorax, radiofrequency ablation of the residual tumor was carried out and a partial necrosis of the mass was achieved. A further percutaneous radiofrequency ablation was performed subsequently, obtaining complete necrosis of the lesion. Successively, the patient underwent adjuvant radiotherapy. As a result of this multidisciplinary treatment, complete and stable response was obtained. It is hard to say which of the single treatments had the major impact on cure; nevertheless, the results obtained suggest that radiofrequency ablation must be taken into account for the treatment of advanced stage thymomas, and its effectiveness must be further assessed in future studies. PMID:25574416

  17. [Intractable Myasthenia Gravis Accompanied with Thymoma;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Naomi, Akira; Oyamatsu, Yoshinori; Narita, Kunio; Nakayama, Masato; Maeda, Shoki

    2016-09-01

    A 46-year-old female visited a hospital due to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and then her chest computed tomography revealed an abnormal shadow in the upper mediastinum. Four months later,she complained muscle weakness with her limbs, dysphagia, and ptosis of her eyelids. Total thymectomy was performed through a median sternotomy for mass lesion, which was pathologically proven to be type B1 thymoma. Postoperative myasthenia gravis (MG) crisis, which led to respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation, developed and laboratory tests showed elevated serum anti-AChR Ab(130 nmol/l), antinuclear antibody( ×640 serum dilution, speckled pattern) and anti-RNP Ab(129.2 U/ml). For MG crisis, steroid pulse therapy, immunosuppressive therapy and immuno absorption were performed, and she successfully weaned from mechanical ventilaton on 41 post operative day (POD). Some factors such as inapparent mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and Anti RNP antibody were thought to be a cause for having any difficulty in MG treatment in the present case. PMID:27586323

  18. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis in APECED or thymoma patients correlates with autoimmunity to Th17-associated cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Bøe Wolff, Anette S.; Podkrajšek, Katarina Trebušak; Tserel, Liina; Link, Maire; Kisand, Kalle V.; Ersvaer, Elisabeth; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Erichsen, Martina Moter; Bratanic, Nina; Meloni, Antonella; Cetani, Filomena; Perniola, Roberto; Ergun-Longmire, Berrin; Maclaren, Noel; Krohn, Kai J. E.; Pura, Mikuláš; Schalke, Berthold; Ströbel, Philipp; Leite, Maria Isabel; Battelino, Tadej; Husebye, Eystein S.; Peterson, Pärt; Willcox, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is frequently associated with T cell immunodeficiencies. Specifically, the proinflammatory IL-17A–producing Th17 subset is implicated in protection against fungi at epithelial surfaces. In autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, or autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome 1), CMC is often the first sign, but the underlying immunodeficiency is a long-standing puzzle. In contrast, the subsequent endocrine features are clearly autoimmune, resulting from defects in thymic self-tolerance induction caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE). We report severely reduced IL-17F and IL-22 responses to both Candida albicans antigens and polyclonal stimulation in APECED patients with CMC. Surprisingly, these reductions are strongly associated with neutralizing autoantibodies to IL-17F and IL-22, whereas responses were normal and autoantibodies infrequent in APECED patients without CMC. Our multicenter survey revealed neutralizing autoantibodies against IL-17A (41%), IL-17F (75%), and/ or IL-22 (91%) in >150 APECED patients, especially those with CMC. We independently found autoantibodies against these Th17-produced cytokines in rare thymoma patients with CMC. The autoantibodies preceded the CMC in all informative cases. We conclude that IL-22 and IL-17F are key natural defenders against CMC and that the immunodeficiency underlying CMC in both patient groups has an autoimmune basis. PMID:20123959

  19. Cloning of murine ferrochelatase.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D A; Frasier, F

    1991-01-01

    Ferrochelatase (protoheme ferro-lyase, EC 4.99.1.1) catalyzes the last step in the heme biosynthetic pathway, the chelation of ferrous iron and protoporphyrin to form heme. The activity of ferrochelatase is deficient in the inherited disease protoporphyria. In this study, murine ferrochelatase cDNAs were obtained by screening cDNA libraries with an oligonucleotide probe. The derived amino acid sequence of murine ferrochelatase has 47% identity with the recently cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae ferrochelatase, but it is not significantly similar to other published sequences. Results of Southern blotting are consistent with a single murine ferrochelatase gene, while Northern blotting demonstrates two ferrochelatase transcripts in all tissues examined. The ferrochelatase protein and mRNAs have different relative concentrations in different tissues. The cloning of murine ferrochelatase cDNAs provides the basis for future studies on ferrochelatase gene expression and on the identification of the molecular defect in protoporphyria. Images PMID:1704134

  20. Familial occurrence of thymoma and autoimmune diseases with the constitutional translocation t(14;20)(q24.1;p12.3).

    PubMed

    Nicodème, Frédéric; Geffroy, Sandrine; Conti, Massimo; Delobel, Bruno; Soenen, Valérie; Grardel, Nathalie; Porte, Henri; Copin, Marie-Christine; Laï, Jean-Luc; Andrieux, Joris

    2005-10-01

    Thymomas are low-grade epithelial cancers of the thymus whose prevalence varies between 0.1/100,000 and 0.4/100,000. Familial occurrence of thymoma is very rare. We studied a family bearing the constitutional chromosome translocation t(14;20)(q24;p12), 3 of whose members had a thymoma. In this family, among 27 patients, 11 had the translocation: 3 had thymoma and 4 others had 5 different autoimmune diseases: type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves' disease, pernicious anemia, primitive Sjögren disease, and autoimmune pancytopenia. FISH studies allowed us to be more specific about the translocation breakpoints. The 14q24 breakpoint was in intron 5 of RAD51L1, and the 20p12 breakpoint was 100 kb telomeric to BMP2. RAD51L1 is a tumor-suppressor gene belonging to the RAD51 family, already implicated in many tumors (uterine leiomyomas, pseudo-Meigs syndromes, pulmonary chondroid hamartomas) and involved in recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks. BMP2 belongs to the TGFbeta superfamily, and the BMP2-BMP4 genes are involved in thymocyte differentiation by blocking progression from CD4-CD8- to CD4+CD8+ while maintaining a sufficient pool of immature precursors. Dysregulation of RAD51L1 and/or BMP2 may explain this familial occurrence of thymomas and autoimmune diseases. Using QRT-PCR, we studied the expression of BMP2 in 20 sporadic thymomas and found various levels of expression that may be associated with autoimmune diseases. PMID:15942943

  1. Ectopic micronodular thymoma with lymphoid stroma in the cervical region: a rare case associated with Langerhans cells proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Meng, Yuan; Xu, Bin; Zhao, Lin; Zhang, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Micronodular thymoma (MNT) with lymphoid stroma is a rare thymic epithelial neoplasm with the characteristics of multiple nodules separated by abundant lymphoid stroma. MNTs mainly arise in the anterior mediastinum and thymus, while ectopic MNTs are extremely rarely seen. Here, we report an ectopic MNT that occurred in the neck of a 62-year-old woman. There were also scattered eosinophilic granulocytes and S100+/CD1a+ Langerhans cells within the tumor. This case provides a better understanding of such rare, poorly understood cases. PMID:27486334

  2. Postoperative Radiotherapy After Surgical Resection of Thymoma: Differing Roles in Localized and Regional Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Forquer, Jeffrey A.; Rong Nan; Fakiris, Achilles J.; Loehrer, Patrick J.; Johnstone, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry data to determine the impact of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for thymoma and thymic carcinoma (T/TC). Methods and Materials: Patients with surgically resected localized (LOC) or regional (REG) malignant T/TC with or without PORT were analyzed for overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) by querying the SEER database from 1973-2005. Patients dying within the first 3 months after surgery were excluded. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate analyses with Cox proportional hazards were performed. Results: A total of 901 T/TC patients were identified (275 with LOC disease and 626 with REG disease). For all patients with LOC disease, PORT had no benefit and may adversely impact the 5-year CSS rate (91% vs. 98%, p = 0.03). For patients with REG disease, the 5-year OS rate was significantly improved by adding PORT (76% vs. 66% for surgery alone, p = 0.01), but the 5-year CSS rate was no better (91% vs. 86%, p = 0.12). No benefit was noted for PORT in REG disease after extirpative surgery (defined as radical or total thymectomy). On multivariate OS and CSS analysis, stage and age were independently correlated with survival. For multivariate CSS analysis, the outcome of PORT is significantly better for REG disease than for LOC disease (hazard ratio, 0.167; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results from SEER show that PORT for T/TC had no advantage in patients with LOC disease (Masaoka Stage I), but a possible OS benefit of PORT in patients with REG disease (Masaoka Stage II-III) was found, especially after non-extirpative surgery. The role of PORT in T/TC needs further evaluation.

  3. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery versus sternotomy in thymectomy for thymoma and myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Thymectomy involves the removal of all the soft tissue in the pre-vascular plane of the anterior mediastinum between the two phrenic nerves. Surgical success in controlling myasthenia and the most important factor influencing survival in patients with thymoma depends on complete clearance of thymic tissue. Currently there is a perception that the open (median sternotomy) approach offers better visualisation of the thymic tissue. This perceived advantage is thought to justify the invasive nature of the procedure associated with increased morbidity. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for thymectomy has evolved significantly over the last decade, including bilateral and unilateral VATS (either left or right) approaches. The laterality of the approach remains largely on surgeon preferences, with the decision influenced by their experience and training. VATS offers superior illumination and magnification, particularly with the availability of advanced cameras with variable angles that provide better exposure and lighting of the operative field. The use of three-dimensional-operating imaging has also revolutionised the VATS technique. VATS thymectomy is a superior and radical technique in minimising access trauma and removing all thymic tissue that may be scattered in the anterior mediastinum and cervical fat. Other advantages of VATS include less intraoperative blood loss, early removal of chest drains, less requirement for blood products, decreased inflammatory cytokine response, shorter hospital stay and superior cosmesis. There is also a decreased risk of respiratory and cardiac related complications compared to the open (sternotomy) technique. Furthermore, no significant difference has been found in long-term complications and survival rate between VATS and open approaches. Subsequently, the VATS approach should be encouraged as more surgeons are adopting the minimally invasive practice as routine. PMID:26904429

  4. Molecular genetic alterations in egfr CA-SSR-1 microsatellite and egfr copy number changes are associated with aggressiveness in thymoma

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Salvatore; Gallo, Enzo; Sioletic, Stefano; Facciolo, Francesco; Palmieri, Giovannella; Lauriola, Libero; Evoli, Amelia; Martucci, Robert; Di Benedetto, Anna; Novelli, Flavia; Giannarelli, Diana; Deriu, Gloria; Granone, Pierluigi; Ottaviano, Margaret; Muti, Paola; Pescarmona, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Background The key role of egfr in thymoma pathogenesis has been questioned following the failure in identifying recurrent genetic alterations of egfr coding sequences and relevant egfr amplification rate. We investigated the role of the non-coding egfr CA simple sequence repeat 1 (CA-SSR-1) in a thymoma case series. Methods We used sequencing and egfr-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to genotype 43 thymomas; (I) for polymorphisms and somatic loss of heterozygosity of the non-coding egfr CA-SSR-1 microsatellite and (II) for egfr gene copy number changes. Results We found two prevalent CA-SSR-1 genotypes: a homozygous 16 CA repeat and a heterozygous genotype, bearing alleles with 16 and 20 CA repeats. The average combined allele length was correlated with tumor subtype: shorter sequences were significantly associated with the more aggressive WHO thymoma subtype group including B2/B3, B3 and B3/C histotypes. Four out of 29 informative cases analysed for somatic CA-SSR-1 loss of heterozygosity showed allelic imbalance (AI), 3/4 with loss of the longer allele. By egfr-FISH analysis, 9 out of 33 cases were FISH positive. Moreover, the two integrated techniques demonstrated that 3 out of 4 CA-SSR-1-AI positive cases with short allele relative prevalence showed significantly low or high chromosome 7 “polysomy”/increased gene copy number by egfr-FISH. Conclusions Our molecular and genetic and follow up data indicated that CA-SSR-1-allelic imbalance with short allele relative prevalence significantly correlated with EGFR 3+ immunohistochemical score, increased egfr Gene Copy Number, advanced stage and with relapsing/metastatic behaviour in thymomas. PMID:27076933

  5. Human and murine erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    An, Xiuli; Schulz, Vincent P.; Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Research into the fundamental mechanisms of erythropoiesis has provided critical insights into inherited and acquired disorders of the erythrocyte. Studies of human erythropoiesis have primarily utilized in-vitro systems, whereas murine models have provided insights from in-vivo studies. This report reviews recent insights into human and murine erythropoiesis gained from transcriptome-based analyses. Recent findings The availability of high-throughput genomic methodologies has allowed attainment of detailed gene expression data from cells at varying developmental and differentiation stages of erythropoiesis. Transcriptome analyses of human and murine reveal both stage and species-specific similarities and differences across terminal erythroid differentiation. Erythroid-specific long noncoding RNAs exhibit poor sequence conservation between human and mouse. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing reveal that complex, dynamic, stage-specific programs of alternative splicing program are utilized during terminal erythroid differentiation. Transcriptome data provide a significant resource for understanding mechanisms of normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. Understanding these processes will provide innovative strategies to detect, diagnose, prevent, and treat hematologic disease. Summary Understanding the shared and different mechanisms controlling human and murine erythropoiesis will allow investigators to leverage the best model system to provide insights in normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. PMID:25719574

  6. Sunitinib in patients with chemotherapy-refractory thymoma and thymic carcinoma: an open-label phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Berman, Arlene; Tomita, Yusuke; Brzezniak, Christina; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Sunmin; Ling, Alexander; Spittler, Aaron J; Carter, Corey A; Guha, Udayan; Wang, Yisong; Szabo, Eva; Meltzer, Paul; Steinberg, Seth M; Trepel, Jane B; Loehrer, Patrick J; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background No standard treatments are available for advanced thymic epithelial tumours after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy. We investigated the activity of sunitinib, an orally administered tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Methods Between May 15, 2012, and Oct 2, 2013, we did an open-label phase 2 trial in patients with histologically confirmed chemotherapy-refractory thymic epithelial tumours. Patients were eligible if they had disease progression after at least one previous regimen of platinum-containing chemotherapy, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of two or lower, measurable disease, and adequate organ function. Patients received 50 mg of sunitinib orally once a day, in 6-week cycles (ie, 4 weeks of treatment followed by 2 weeks without treatment), until tumour progression or unacceptable toxic effects arose. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed best tumour response at any point, which we analysed separately in thymoma and thymic carcinoma cohorts. Patients who had received at least one cycle of treatment and had their disease reassessed were included in the analyses of response. The trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621568. Findings 41 patients were enrolled, 25 with thymic carcinoma and 16 with thymoma. One patient with thymic carcinoma was deemed ineligible after enrolment and did not receive protocol treatment. Of patients who received treatment, one individual with thymic carcinoma was not assessable because she died. Median follow-up on trial was 17 months (IQR 14·0–18·4). Of 23 assessable patients with thymic carcinoma, six (26%, 90% CI 12·1–45·3, 95% CI 10·2–48·4) had partial responses, 15 (65%, 95% CI 42·7–83·6) achieved stable disease, and two (9%, 1·1–28·0) had progressive disease. Of 16 patients with thymoma, one (6%, 95% CI 0·2–30·2) had a partial response, 12 (75%, 47·6–92·7) had stable disease, and three (19%, 4·1–45·7) had progressive disease

  7. Oral 2.01: Proton beam radiation therapy for adjuvant and definitive treatment of thymoma and thymic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jennifer H.; Berman, Abigail T.; Pechet, Taine T.; William, Levin P.; Gabriel, Peter E.; Khella, Sami; Singhal, Sunil; Kucharczuk, John C.; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is a critical component of treatment for thymic tumors. However, radiation-induced toxicity may reduce benefit, particularly in the adjuvant setting. Proton beam therapy (PBT), due to its characteristic Bragg peak, is ideally suited to treat the anterior mediastinum while sparing organs at risk. To date, PBT to treat thymic tumors has only been reported in three single-patient case studies. In this study, we evaluated patterns of failure and toxicity in patients treated for thymoma and thymic carcinoma using PBT and hypothesized that PBT can achieve excellent local control with limited high grade toxicity. Methods All patients with thymoma or thymic carcinoma treated with PBT between 2011–2015 were analyzed. Either double scattered proton therapy (DS-PT) or pencil beam scanning (PBS) were used. Toxicity was assessed using CTCAE v 4.2. Local control, distant control, and overall survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method from the time of PBT completion. Results Twenty-seven patients were included. Patients were a median age of 56 years, predominantly female (56%), and had thymoma (85%) or thymic carcinoma (15%). They were treated with definitive (22%) or salvage (15%) PBT or adjuvant (63%) PBT following resection with predominantly close (23%) or positive (50%) margins. Forty-one percent also received chemotherapy. Patients were treated to a median of 61.2 Gy (range 50.4–70.2 Gy) using DS-PT (85%) or PBS (15%). Median mean lung dose, volume of lung receiving ≥20 Gy (V20), and V5 were 98 cGy (1–2,050 cGy), 18% (0–38%), and 26.2% (0–55%). Median mean heart and esophagus doses were 1,065 cGy (105–3,356cGy) and 1,072cGy (0–4,655 cGy). No patient experienced grade ≥3 acute or chronic toxicity. Acute grade ≥2 toxicities included fatigue (11%), esophagitis (7%), dermatitis (37%), and pneumonitis in one patient (4%) who received 2 prior thoracic radiotherapy courses. Late grade ≥2 toxicity was limited to a single

  8. [Thymoma with extensive coagulative necrosis and high serum level of CYFRA 21-1; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Himuro, Naoya; Minakata, Takao; Oshima, Yutaka; Tomita, Yuri; Kataoka, Daisuke; Kadokura, Mitsutaka

    2014-12-01

    A 73-year-old woman complained of right chest discomfort. Chest X-ray during the follow-up for rheumatoid arthritis showed a mediastinal tumor. Chest computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 65-mm tumor in the right anterior mediastinum. A blood test showed high serum levels of CYFRA 21-1(29.8 ng/ml), white blood cells( WBC 10,800/µl), and C-reactive protein(CRP 16.1 mg/dl). Subsequently, inflammatory reactions improved, and the thymic tumor was resected. Histopathologically, the tumor was a type B2 thymoma with extensive coagulative necrosis. After resection, the serum CYFRA 21-1 level returned to the normal range. PMID:25434553

  9. Treatment Modalities and Outcomes in Patients with Advanced Invasive Thymoma or Thymic Carcinoma: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Modh, Ankit; Rimner, Andreas; Allen, Pamela K.; Greenfield, Brad; Marom, Edith M.; Rice, David; Huang, James; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We investigated relationships between treatment characteristics and long-term outcomes in patients with locally advanced thymoma or thymic carcinoma. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 146 patients treated in 1980–2011 at two tertiary cancer care centers, 110 with Masaoka-Koga stage III–IVa invasive thymoma and 36 with stage I–IVa thymic carcinoma. Survival probabilities were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors related to survival were identified by univariate and multivariate competing risk analysis, with overall survival (OS) as the competing risk. Cox regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for OS. Results Median follow-up time for all patients was 64 months. At 5/10 years, rates of OS and freedom from recurrence (FFR) were 81/58% and 81/65%, respectively. Of patients who underwent surgery, trimodality treatment produced better survival compared to less aggressive treatment among patients with stage III disease (p=0.03). Among patients who underwent trimodality treatment, patients with stage III disease had better OS (p=0.03) and FFR (p<0.001) than those with stage IVA disease. On Cox regression analysis, decreased OS was associated with thymic carcinoma (hazard ratio [HR]=7.36, 95% CI=2.38–22.77, p=0.001), R2/unresectable disease (HR=8.45, 95% CI=1.44–49.42, p=0.02) and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 1 (HR=8.14, 95% CI=1.55–42.75, p=0.01) or 2–3 (HR=29.60, 95% CI=4.0–218.98, p=0.001) versus 0. Conclusion Aggressive treatment with chemotherapy, surgical resection, and postoperative radiation therapy can produce long-term survival for patients with invasive thymic malignanices. PMID:24390276

  10. High-dose adriamycin (ADM) and cis-platinum (DDP) in advanced soft-tissue sarcomas and invasive thymomas. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Klippstein, T H; Mitrou, P S; Kochendörfer, K J; Bergmann, L

    1984-01-01

    Eighteen previously untreated patients with advanced unresectable or metastatic soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) and two patients with locally invasive thymoma were treated with a combination of adriamycin (ADM) 80 mg/m2 on day 1 and cis-platinum (DDP) 120 mg/m2 on day 1. The regimen was repeated at 4-weeks intervals. In STS the overall remission rate was 44%, with 21% complete remissions. The overall survival was 15 months (3-35+), responders surviving a median of 20 months (3-35+) and nonresponders, a median of 9 months (3-20+). Tumor responses lasted a median of 8 months (3-35+). Two patients with liposarcoma have now survived disease-free for at least 2 years and are potentially cured. The two patients with thymoma experienced complete remission lasting 4+ and 20+ months. Substantial hematologic toxicity was prominent, due to the high-doses used in this combination regimen. PMID:6540630

  11. Adjuvant treatment in patients at high risk of recurrence of thymoma: efficacy and safety of a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy regimen

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Francesco; Pisconti, Salvatore; Conson, Manuel; Pacelli, Roberto; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Gnoni, Antonio; D’Aniello, Carmine; Cavaliere, Carla; Licchetta, Antonella; Cella, Laura; Giuliano, Mario; Schiavone, Concetta; Falivene, Sara; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Ravo, Vincenzo; Muto, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical benefits of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) for patients with thymoma are still controversial. In the absence of defined guidelines, prognostic factors such as stage, status of surgical margins, and histology are often considered to guide the choice of adjuvant treatment (radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy). In this study, we describe our single-institution experience of three-dimensional conformal PORT administered as adjuvant treatment to patients with thymoma. Methods Twenty-two consecutive thymoma patients (eleven male and eleven female) with a median age of 52 years and treated at our institution by PORT were analyzed. The patients were considered at high risk of recurrence, having at least one of the following features: stage IIB or III, involved resection margins, or thymic carcinoma histology. Three-dimensional conformal PORT with a median total dose on clinical target volume of 50 (range 44–60) Gy was delivered to the tumor bed by 6–20 MV X-ray of the linear accelerator. Follow-up after radiotherapy was done by computed tomography scan every 6 months for 2 years and yearly thereafter. Results Two of the 22 patients developed local recurrence and four developed distant metastases. Median overall survival was 100 months, and the 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 83% and 74%, respectively. Median disease-free survival was 90 months, and the 5-year recurrence rate was 32%. On univariate analysis, pathologic stage III and presence of positive surgical margins had a significant impact on patient prognosis. Radiation toxicity was mild in most patients and no severe toxicity was registered. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved good local control and showed an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with high-risk thymoma. PMID:26089683

  12. Mining the human autoantibody repertoire: Isolation of potent IL17A-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies from a patient with thymoma

    PubMed Central

    Beerli, Roger R; Bauer, Monika; Fritzer, Andrea; Rosen, Lindsey B; Buser, Regula B; Hanner, Markus; Maudrich, Melanie; Nebenfuehr, Mario; Toepfer, Jorge Alejandro Sepulveda; Mangold, Susanne; Bauer, Anton; Holland, Steven M; Browne, Sarah K; Meinke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Anti-cytokine autoantibodies have been widely reported to be present in human plasma, both in healthy subjects and in patients with underlying autoimmune conditions, such as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) or thymic epithelial neoplasms. While often asymptomatic, they can cause or facilitate a wide range of diseases including opportunistic infections. The potential therapeutic value of specific neutralizing anti-cytokine autoantibodies has not been thoroughly investigated. Here we used mammalian cell display to isolate IL17A-specific antibodies from a thymoma patient with proven high-titer autoantibodies against the same. We identified 3 distinct clonotypes that efficiently neutralized IL17A in a cell-based in vitro assay. Their potencies were comparable to those of known neutralizing antibodies, including 2, AIN457 (secukinumab) and ixekizumab that are currently in clinical development for the treatment of various inflammatory disorders. These data clearly demonstrate that the human autoantibody repertoire can be mined for antibodies with high therapeutic potential for clinical development. PMID:25484038

  13. Thymectomy versus tumor resection for early-stage thymic malignancies: a Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas retrospective database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhitao; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the surgical outcomes of tumor resection with or without total thymectomy for thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) using the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) retrospective database. Methods Patients without preoperative therapy, who underwent surgery for early-stage (Masaoka-Koga stage I and II) tumors, were enrolled for the study. They were divided into thymectomy and thymomectomy groups according to the resection extent of the thymus. Demographic and surgical outcomes were compared between the two patients groups. Results A total of 1,047 patients were enrolled, with 796 cases in the thymectomy group and 251 cases in the thymomectomy group. Improvement rate of myasthenia gravis (MG) was higher after thymectomy than after thymomectomy (91.6% vs. 50.0%, P<0.001). Ten-year overall survival was similar between the two groups (90.9% after thymectomy and 89.4% after thymomectomy, P=0.732). Overall, recurrence rate was 3.1% after thymectomy and 5.4% after thymomectomy, with no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.149). Stratified analysis revealed no significant difference in recurrence rates in Masaoka–Koga stage I tumors (3.2% vs. 1.4%, P=0.259). However in patients with Masaoka-Koga stage II tumors, recurrence was significantly less after thymectomy group than after thymomectomy (2.9% vs. 14.5%, P=0.001). Conclusions Thymectomy, instead of tumor resection alone, should still be recommended as the surgical standard for thymic malignancies, especially for stage II tumors and those with concomitant MG. PMID:27114835

  14. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Parola, P.; Vogelaers, D.; Roure, C.; Janbon, F.; Raoult, D.

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers. PMID:9866749

  15. Antibacterial activity of recombinant murine beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, T; Tanaka, A

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant murine beta interferon was protective and therapeutic for mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection in vivo. The recombinant murine beta interferon caused enhanced H2O2 release by macrophages in vivo, but not in vitro. PMID:3343048

  16. Immunosuppressive effect of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Loh, L; Hudson, J B

    1980-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus suppressed the ability of spleen cells to respond to mitogens in vitro. The degree of suppression was proportional to the multiplicity of infection. This effect could not be explained by cytolysis of lymphocytes, an alteration in the kinetics of the response to mitogen, or a direct competition between virions and mitogen molecules for cell-surface receptors. Nor was it due to simple contact between cell and virus, since ultraviolet-inactivated murine cytomegalovirus failed to suppress the response to mitogens. Reconstitution experiments were performed which involved mixing various combinations of infected and uninfected macrophages and lymphocytes. Under these conditions, it was found that the infected macrophages and lymphocytes. Under these conditions, it was found that the infected macrophages had an impaired capacity to mediate the response ot T lymphocytes to concanavalin A. This suggests that murine cytomegalovirus may cause immunosuppression indirectly by interfering with macrophage function. PMID:6244228

  17. Antimicrobial proteins of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, P S; Eisenhauer, P B; Harwig, S S; van den Barselaar, M T; van Furth, R; Lehrer, R I

    1993-01-01

    Three murine microbicidal proteins (MUMPs) were purified from cells of the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 that had been activated by gamma interferon. Similar proteins were also present in nonactivated RAW264.7 cells, in cells of the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, and in resident and activated murine peritoneal macrophages. MUMP-1, MUMP-2, and MUMP-3 killed Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. MUMP-1 resembled an H1 histone but was unusual because its N-terminal residue (serine) was not N acetylated. Although MUMP-2 was N terminally blocked, its high lysine/arginine ratio and its reactivity with an antibody to H1 histones suggested that it also belonged to the H1 histone family. MUMP-3 was identical to histone H2B in 30 of 30 amino-terminal residues. Although the antimicrobial properties of histones have been recognized for decades, this is the first evidence that such proteins may endow the lysosomal apparatus of macrophages with nonoxidative antimicrobial potential. Other MUMPs, including some with a more restricted antimicrobial spectrum and one that appeared to be induced in RAW264.7 cells after gamma interferon stimulation, were noted but remain to be characterized. Images PMID:8514411

  18. [A case of radiation-related pneumonia and bilateral tension pneumothorax after extended thymectomy and adjuvant radiation for thymoma with myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Etsuko; Nakayama, Masayuki; Bando, Masashi; Endo, Shunsuke; Hironaka, Mitsugu; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2010-08-01

    A 62-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a 2-month history of progressive cough and dyspnea. He had undergone thymectomy for thymoma with myasthenia gravis. Adjuvant radiation of 50 Gy had been performed until 6 months before the symptoms developed. Chest computed tomography showed infiltrative findings even outside the irradiated area. We diagnosed radiation-related pneumonia, and 30 mg per day prednisolone was initiated. On the final day, he developed bilateral tension pneumothorax. After chest tube drainage, the right S5 bulla was resected with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The right pneumothorax caused the bilateral tension pneumothorax, because the right and left thoracic cavity communicated in the anterior mediastinum after thymectomy. We should be aware of the risk of bilateral tension pneumothorax following radiation-related pneumonia after extended thymectomy and adjuvant radiation in patients with myasthenia gravis. PMID:20803975

  19. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  20. IL-10 regulates murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhinan; Bahtiyar, Gul; Zhang, Na; Liu, Lanzhen; Zhu, Ping; Robert, Marie E; McNiff, Jennifer; Madaio, Michael P; Craft, Joe

    2002-08-15

    MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6(lpr) (MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr); MRL-Fas(lpr)) mice develop a spontaneous lupus syndrome closely resembling human systemic lupus erythematosus. To define the role of IL-10 in the regulation of murine lupus, IL-10 gene-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) MRL-Fas(lpr) (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-)) mice were generated and their disease phenotype was compared with littermates with one or two copies of an intact IL-10 locus (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/-) and MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/+) mice, respectively). MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice developed severe lupus, with earlier appearance of skin lesions, increased lymphadenopathy, more severe glomerulonephritis, and higher mortality than their IL-10-intact littermate controls. The increased severity of lupus in MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice was closely associated with enhanced IFN-gamma production by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells and increased serum concentration of IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibodies. The protective effect of IL-10 in this lupus model was further supported by the observation that administration of rIL-10 reduced IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibody production in wild-type MRL-Fas(lpr) animals. In summary, our results provide evidence that IL-10 can down-modulate murine lupus through inhibition of pathogenic Th1 cytokine responses. Modulation of the level of IL-10 may be of potential therapeutic benefit for human lupus. PMID:12165544

  1. Identification of cysteine-644 as the covalent site of attachment of dexamethasone 21-mesylate to murine glucocorticoid receptors in WEHI-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.I.; Bodwell, J.E.; Mendel, D.B.; Ciardelli, T.; North, W.G.; Munck, A.

    1988-05-17

    Dexamethasone 21-mesylate is a highly specific synthetic glucocorticoid derivative that binds covalently to glucocorticoid receptors via sulfhydryl groups. The authors have identified the amino acid that reacts with the dexamethasone 21-mesylate by using enzymatic digestion and microsequencing for radiolabel. Nonactivated glucocorticoid receptors obtained from labeling intact WEHI-7 mouse thymoma cells with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone 21-mesylate were immunopurified and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Trypsin digestion followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (reversed-phase HPLC) produced a single (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled peptide. Automated Edman degradation of this peptide revealed that the (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone 21-mesylate was located at position 5 from the amino terminus. Dual-isotope labeling studies with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone 21-mesylate and (/sup 35/S)methionine demonstrated that this peptide contained methionine. Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled steroid-binding subunits generated a different radiolabeled peptide containing label at position 7 from the amino terminus. On the basis of the published amino acid sequence of the murine glucocorticoid receptor, their data clearly identify cysteine-644 as the single residue in the steroid-binding domain that covalently binds dexamethasone 21-mesylate. They have confirmed this finding by demonstrating that a synthetic peptide representing the amino acid sequence 640-650 of the murine glucocorticoid receptor behaves in an identical manner on reversed-phase HPLC as the trypsin-generated peptide from intact cells.

  2. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  3. Chemoimmunotherapy of murine bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Stogdill, B J; Lamm, D L; Livingston, R B

    1981-11-01

    The lethality of invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) has prompted a search for effective, minimally toxic, adjuvant therapy. Such agents were evaluated in a murine bladder cancer (MBT2) model which parallels the clinical disease. One hundred C3H/He mice were inoculated i.d. with 2.5 x 10(4) viable MBT2 tumor cells and randomized to receive either normal saline (control), cis-Platinum (CPT), cyclophosphamide (CY), methotrexate (MTX), BCG, (CY + MTX), or (CY + MTX + BCG). Chemotherapy was given intraperitoneally weekly starting on day 7 after inoculation. Immunotherapy was given intralesionally on days 1 and 10 only. All mice were treated for 5 weeks followed by 5 weeks of observation. At 5 weeks, tumors of mice receiving cyclophosphamide alone or either of the combinations of therapy were smaller (P less than 0.01) than tumors of controls or other single agents alone. Each regimen increased survival, but only the combination regimen increase survival significantly (P less than 0.01). In the doses and schedule used in this model. Combination chemotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy significantly delay tumor growth and increase duration of survival (P less than 0.01) when compared with controls or single agent groups. PMID:7298287

  4. Thymidine phosphorylase is both a therapeutic and a suicide gene in a murine model of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    López-Estévez, S; Ferrer, G; Torres-Torronteras, J; Mansilla, M J; Casacuberta-Serra, S; Martorell, L; Hirano, M; Martí, R; Barquinero, J

    2014-07-01

    Suicide gene therapy (SGT) is a promising strategy for treating cancer. In this work, we show that thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficiency, the underlying genetic defect in mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), presents an opportunity to apply SGT using capecitabine, a commonly used prodrug that is converted into 5-fluorouracil by TP. Using an immortalised B-lymphoblastoid cell line from a patient with MNGIE, the tumourigenic EL-4 cell line, lentiviral vectors encoding TP and a double knockout (Tymp(-/-)Upp1(-/-)) murine model, we found that EL-4 cell-derived TP(+) tumours were exquisitely sensitive to capecitabine and generated a significant local bystander effect. In addition, we detected a spontaneous cytolytic immune response in a significant fraction of the animals surviving more than 20 days after termination of the therapy. These data indicate that, in individuals lacking TP expression, TP is a highly specific suicide gene, which can be used to treat tumours that could hypothetically arise in MNGIE patients undergoing gene therapy, as these tumours will likely originate from the gene-modified cells and will be selectively targeted by capecitabine. These observations have important implications for gene therapy for MNGIE. PMID:24807807

  5. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  6. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY TO PARATHION POISONING FOLLOWING MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased Susceptibility to Parathion Poisoning Following Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection. Fifty to 100 percent mortality occurred in mice treated with ordinarily sublethal doses of parathion 2 to 5 days post infection with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). These mortalities appear...

  7. Murine Norovirus: Propagation, Quantification and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seungmin; Alhatlani, Bader; Arias, Armando; Caddy, Sarah L; Christodoulou, Constantina; Cunha, Juliana; Emmott, Ed; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta; Kolawole, Abimbola; Lu, Jia; Rippinger, Christine; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Thorne, Lucy; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a positive-sense, plus-stranded RNA virus in the Caliciviridae family. It is the most common pathogen in biomedical research colonies. MNV is also related to the human noroviruses, which cause the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Like the human noroviruses, MNV is an enteric virus that replicates in the intestine and is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. MNV replicates in murine macrophages and dendritic cells in cells in culture and in the murine host. This virus is often used to study mechanisms in norovirus biology, because the human noroviruses are refractory to growth in cell culture. MNV combines the availability of a cell culture and reverse genetics system with the ability to study infection in the native host. Herein, we describe a panel of techniques that are commonly used to study MNV biology. PMID:24789596

  8. Murine typhus in Kuwait in 1978

    PubMed Central

    Al-Awadi, Abdul Rahman; Al-Kazemi, Nouri; Ezzat, Gaafar; Saah, Alfred J.; Shepard, Charles; Zaghloul, Talaat; Gherdian, Beatriz

    1982-01-01

    Murine typhus occurred in 254 individuals in Kuwait between April and August 1978; 81% of patients were aged between 15 and 44 years, and 63% were male. The highest attack rate occurred among people in the lowest socioeconomic class. The outbreak coincided with a period of high rat and flea density. A study of the first 104 cases suggested that infection was acquired in the home, but a case — control study revealed no significant differences between patients and control subjects in terms of exposure to rats or domestic animals, and other factors. This suggests that murine typhus is hyperendemic rather than epidemic in Kuwait. The disease is being controlled through reduction of both flea and rat populations. Murine typhus may be much more common in many areas than is generally realized, and its status should be re-evaluated regularly in all known and potential foci. PMID:6980739

  9. Synergistic effect of EMF-BEMER-type pulsed weak electromagnetic field and HPMA-bound doxorubicin on mouse EL4 T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Říhová, Blanka; Etrych, Tomáš; Šírová, Milada; Tomala, Jakub; Ulbrich, Karel; Kovář, Marek

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the effects of low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) produced by BEMER device on experimental mouse T-cell lymphoma EL4 growing on conventional and/or athymic (nude) mice. Exposure to EMF-BEMER slowed down the growth of tumor mass and prolonged the survival of experimental animals. The effect was more pronounced in immuno-compromised nude mice compared to conventional ones. Acceleration of tumor growth was never observed. No measurable levels of Hsp 70 or increased levels of specific anti-EL4 antibodies were detected in the serum taken from experimental mice before and at different intervals during the experiment, i.e. before solid tumor appeared, at the time of its aggressive growth, and at the terminal stage of the disease. A significant synergizing antitumor effect was seen when EL4 tumor-bearing mice were simultaneously exposed to EMF-BEMER and treated with suboptimal dose of synthetic HPMA copolymer-based doxorubicin, DOX(HYD)-HPMA. Such a combination may be especially useful for heavily treated patients suffering from advanced tumor and requiring additional aggressive chemotherapy which, however, at that time could represent almost life-threatening way of medication. PMID:21981636

  10. LEW 88180, LEW 87119, and ALH 85119: New EH6, EL7, and EL4 Enstatite Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1993-07-01

    The EH and EL chondrites formed in a uniquely reducing environment, containing low-Fe pyroxene, abundant metal, and a number of unusual sulphides and other minerals [1]. An important aspect of their history is that while the EL chondrites consist predominantly of metamorphosed meteorites, the EH consist primarily of little-metamorphosed meteorites (e.g., [2]), and yet EL chondrites have lower equilibrium temperatures than EH chondrite [3,4]. To help understand this observation and its implication for the history of the classes, we have been searching for new enstatite chondrites, looking especially for meteorites of previously unknown chemical-petrologic class. Using our normal INAA methods [5] and sample splits of 100-200 mg, the bulk composition of nine Antarctic enstatite chondrites and one fall were determined. The data were used to assign the meteorites to chemical classes, the Ni/Ir vs. Al/V plot (Fig. 1) being especially useful since it uses the refractory element difference between EH and EL chondrites and is insensitive to metal-silicate heterogeneity. The well-analyzed Qingzhen was included to check our method. ALH84170, ALH84206, and EET87746, which Mason described as E3, E4, and E4 were all found to be EH chondrites [6]. Our data for the three paired EL3 chondrites were discussed earlier (MAC88136, 88180, and 88184) [7,8]. LEW88180, LEW87119, and ALH85119, which Mason described as type E6, E6, and E4 respectively [6], are EH, EL, and EL; thus LEW88180 and ALH85119 appear to be the first EH6 and EL4 chondrites. The compositions of kamacite, phosphide, and niningerite-alabandite (Fig. 2) for ALH84170, ALH84206, EET87746, LEW88180, and ALH85119 are consistent with Mason's petrologic type assignments [6]. The mineral composition of LEW88180 (2.7% Si and 9.4% Ni in the kamacite, 7.8% Ni in the phosphide, and 60% FeS in the niningerite) confirms our classification of this meteorite as EH6. ALH85119 contains kamacite with 0.5% Si and 7% Ni, phosphide with 46

  11. Murine neonatal intravascular injections: Modeling newborn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to perform murine neonatal intravascular injections likely will prove useful in studying many newborn-specific disease states that are modeled in mice. Unfortunately, effective intravascular injection in the neonatal mouse has been limited by developmental immaturity and small size. To e...

  12. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  13. Caspase deficiency alters the murine gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, B M; Hildebrand, F; Kubica, M; Goosens, D; Del Favero, J; Declercq, W; Raes, J; Vandenabeele, P

    2011-01-01

    Caspases are aspartate-specific cysteine proteases that have an essential role in apoptosis and inflammation, and contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis in the intestine. These facts, together with the knowledge that caspases are implicated in host-microbe crosstalk, prompted us to investigate the effect of caspase (Casp)1, -3 and -7 deficiency on the composition of the murine gut microbiota. We observed significant changes in the abundance of the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla, in particular the Lachnospiraceae, Porphyromonodaceae and Prevotellacea families, when comparing Casp-1, -7 and -3 knockout mice with wild-type mice. Our data point toward an intricate relationship between these caspases and the composition of the murine gut microflora. PMID:22012254

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pek Siew; Hardy, Kristine; Peng, Kaiman; Shannon, Frances M

    2016-03-01

    T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionomycin (I) as stimuli. We were also interested to examine the importance of new protein synthesis in regulating the expression of genes involved in T cell activation. Thus we have pre-treated mouse EL4 T cells with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, and left the cells unstimulated or stimulated with PMA/I for 4 h. We performed microarray expression profiling of these cells to correlate the gene expression with chromatin state of T cells upon T cell activation [1]. Here, we detail further information and analysis of the microarray data, which shows that T cell activation leads to differential expression of genes and inducible genes can be further classified as primary and secondary response genes based on their protein synthesis dependency. The data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE13278. PMID:26981393

  15. Myositis in a Child with Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Sheshashree; Fergie, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with fever, lower extremity pain and weakness. Examination revealed paraparesis, thigh and calf tenderness. Labs showed high creatinine phosphokinase and Rickettsia typhi titers. This case illustrates endemic typhus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of myositis especially in areas with high prevalence of the disease. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of myositis and paraparesis associated with a case of murine typhus. PMID:24757508

  16. Cone inputs to murine striate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ekesten, Björn; Gouras, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background We have recorded responses from single neurons in murine visual cortex to determine the effectiveness of the input from the two murine cone photoreceptor mechanisms and whether there is any unique selectivity for cone inputs at this higher region of the visual system that would support the possibility of colour vision in mice. Each eye was stimulated by diffuse light, either 370 (strong stimulus for the ultra-violet (UV) cone opsin) or 505 nm (exclusively stimulating the middle wavelength sensitive (M) cone opsin), obtained from light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the presence of a strong adapting light that suppressed the responses of rods. Results Single cells responded to these diffuse stimuli in all areas of striate cortex. Two types of responsive cells were encountered. One type (135/323 – 42%) had little to no spontaneous activity and responded at either the on and/or the off phase of the light stimulus with a few impulses often of relatively large amplitude. A second type (166/323 – 51%) had spontaneous activity and responded tonically to light stimuli with impulses often of small amplitude. Most of the cells responded similarly to both spectral stimuli. A few (18/323 – 6%) responded strongly or exclusively to one or the other spectral stimulus and rarely in a spectrally opponent manner. Conclusion Most cells in murine striate cortex receive excitatory inputs from both UV- and M-cones. A small fraction shows either strong selectivity for one or the other cone mechanism and occasionally cone opponent responses. Cells that could underlie chromatic contrast detection are present but extremely rare in murine striate cortex. PMID:19014590

  17. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  18. Efficacy of Posaconazole in Murine Experimental Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology. PMID:22330929

  19. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Rahat F.; Bouyer, Donald H.; Walker, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials. PMID:25695758

  20. Sexual dimorphism of Murine Masticatory Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, David W.; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2008-01-01

    (1) Objective To determine if gender distinctions of force generating capacity existed in murine masticatory muscles. (2) Design In order to investigate the effect of sex on force generating capacity in this muscle group, an isolated muscle preparation was developed utilizing the murine anterior deep masseter. Age-matched male and female mice were utilized to assess function, muscle fiber type and size in this muscle. (3) Results Maximum isometric force production was not different between age-matched male and female mice. However, the rate of force generation and relaxation was slower in female masseter muscles. Assessment of fiber type distribution by immunohistochemistry revealed a threefold decrease in the proportion of myosin heavy chain 2b positive fibers in female masseters, which correlated with the differences in contraction kinetics. (4) Conclusions These results provide evidence that masticatory muscle strength in mice is not affected by sex, but there are significant distinctions in kinetics associated with force production between males and females. PMID:18028868

  1. A returned traveller with persistent fever due to murine typhus.

    PubMed

    Ng, C P; Lo, C B; Wong, K K; Chung, C H

    2002-12-01

    Murine (endemic) typhus is a notifiable disease in Hong Kong, but its diagnosis can be difficult. We report a case of murine typhus in a middle-aged man who presented with persistent fever, headache, and skin rash 2 weeks after returning from a visit to China. The diagnosis of murine typhus requires a high index of suspicion for a febrile patient with a history of potential exposure to the disease vector (rat flea) in an endemic area. The importance of early recognition lies in the potential for early therapeutic intervention, leading to decreases in morbidity and duration of stay in hospital. PMID:12459604

  2. Glucocorticoid receptors in murine erythroleukaemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, K.D.; Torrance, J.M.; DiDomenico, M.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors in murine erythroleukaemic cells were studied in relation to hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) induced differentiation. Specific binding of dexamethasone was measured. A single class of saturable, high affinity binding sites was demonstrated in intact cells; with cell homogenates or fractions binding was low and could not be reliably quantified. Receptor binding in whole cell suspensions was lower in cells which had been treated with HMBA (36.5 +/- 8.2 pmol/g protein) than in untreated controls (87.9 +/- 23.6 pmol/g protein); dissociation constants were similar in treated (2.7 nM) and untreated cells (2.5 nM). Dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, corticosterone and progesterone competed with tritium-labelled dexamethasone for receptor binding sites; cortisone, deoxycorticosterone and oestradiol had little effect.

  3. The C-Type Lectin OCILRP2 Costimulates EL4 T Cell Activation via the DAP12-Raf-MAP Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Guangchao; Ma, Yuanfang

    2014-01-01

    OCILRP2 is a typical Type-II transmembrane protein that is selectively expressed in activated T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and B cells and functions as a novel co-stimulator of T cell activation. However, the signaling pathways underlying OCILRP2 in T cell activation are still not completely understood. In this study, we found that the knockdown of OCILRP2 expression with shRNA or the blockage of its activity by an anti-OCILRP2 antagonist antibody reduced CD3/CD28-costimulated EL4 T cell viability and IL-2 production, inhibit Raf1, MAPK3, and MAPK8 activation, and impair NFAT and NF-κB transcriptional activities. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation results indicated that OCILRP2 could interact with the DAP12 protein, an adaptor containing an intracellular ITAM motif that can transduce signals to induce MAP kinase activation for T cell activation. Our data reveal that after binding with DAP12, OCILRP2 activates the Raf-MAP kinase pathways, resulting in T cell activation. PMID:25411776

  4. Novel Microbial Virulence Factor Triggers Murine Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiuli; Qin, Jinhong; Promnares, Kamoltip; Kariu, Toru; Anderson, John F.; Pal, Utpal

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi bba57 is a conserved gene encoding a potential lipoprotein of unknown function. Here we show that bba57 is up-regulated in vivo and is required for early murine infection and potential spirochete transmission process. Although BBA57 is dispensable for late murine infection, the mutants were unable to induce disease. We show that BBA57, an outer membrane and surface-exposed antigen, is a major trigger of murine Lyme arthritis; even in cases of larger challenge inocula, which allow their persistence in joints at a level similar to wild-type spirochetes, bba57 mutants are unable to induce joint inflammation. We further showed that BBA57 deficiency reduces the expression of selected “neutrophil-recruiting” chemokines and associated receptors, causing significant impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis. New approaches to combat Lyme disease may include strategies to interfere with BBA57, a novel virulence factor and a trigger of murine Lyme arthritis. PMID:23303811

  5. Dimerumic Acid and Deferricoprogen Activate Ak Mouse Strain Thymoma/Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathways and Prevent Apoptotic Cell Death in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, which can be modeled using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to generate oxidative stress. Here, we studied the effects of the antioxidants deferricoprogen (DFC) and dimerumic acid (DMA), produced by rice fermented with Monascus purpureus NTU 568, on 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and their potential protective mechanisms. DMA and DFC inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Molecular analysis demonstrated associated upregulation of the Ak mouse strain thymoma (Akt), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways along with inhibited phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways and altered homodimeric glycoprotein, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor gene expression. These results suggested that the neuroprotection elicited by DMA and DFC against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity was associated with the Akt, MAPK, and HO-1 pathways via regulating the gene expression of NMDA receptor, homodimeric glycoprotein, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor. PMID:27431098

  6. Partial characterization of murine migration inhibitory factor (MIF).

    PubMed

    Kühner, A L; David, J R

    1976-01-01

    These studies describe the production of murine migration inhibitory factor (MIF)3 in sufficient quantities to allow its partial characterization by physiochemical and enzymatic methods. MIF was obtained from murine spleen cell cultures (C57BL/6 strain) stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A). Characterization of murine MIF was performed using Sephadex G-100 gel chromatography, isopycnic centrifugation in a CsCl density gradient, polyacrylamide disc electrophoresis, heat stability, and enzymatic treatment. MIF-containing and control fractions were assayed on normal C57BL/6 peritoneal exudate cells by using a microcapillary tube assay. Peak MIF activity was found in a Sephadex G-100 fraction containing molecules the size of albumin and slightly smaller, molecular weight 67,000 to 48,000. Murine MIF was stable to heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min but lost its activity at 80 degrees C for 30 min. Incubation of G-100 fractions containing MIF with water insoluble chymotrypsin destroyed the activity of MIF, indicating its protein nature. CsCl density gradient centrifugation revealed that murine MIF had a buoyand density greater than protein, consistent with its being a glycoprotein. Further, when subjected to disc electrophoresis on polyacylamide gels, murine MIF migrated in a region cathodal to albumin. Thus, mitogen stimulation of murine spleen cells produced MIF in quantities which allowed its partial characterization and purification, and its comparison with human and guinea pig MIF; this makes it feasible to analyze the role of murine MIF in cellular immunity and in its relationship to lymphocyte mediators which regulate humoral immune responses. PMID:1107423

  7. Diphtheria toxin-based recombinant murine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting murine regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Marino, Jose; Trowell, Aaron; Zhang, Huiping; Stromp Peraino, Jaclyn; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Benichou, Gilles; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells which suppress immune responses of effector cells and are known to play a very important role in protection against autoimmune disease development, induction of transplantation tolerance and suppression of effective immune response against tumor cells. An effective in vivo Treg depletion agent would facilitate Treg-associated studies across many research areas. In this study, we have developed diphtheria toxin-based monovalent and bivalent murine IL-2 fusion toxins for depleting murine IL-2 receptor positive cells including CD25(+) Treg in vivo. Their potencies were assessed by in vitro protein synthesis inhibition and cell proliferation inhibition assays using a murine CD25(+) CTLL-2 cell line. Surprisingly, in contrast to our previously developed recombinant fusion toxins, the monovalent isoform (DT390-mIL-2) was approximately 4-fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart (DT390-bi-mIL-2). Binding analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that the monovalent isoform bound stronger than the bivalent version. In vivo Treg depletion with the monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin was performed using C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Spleen Treg were significantly depleted with a maximum reduction of ∼70% and detectable as early as 12 h after the last injection. The spleen Treg numbers were reduced until Day 3 and returned to control levels by Day 7. We believe that this monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin will be an effective in vivo murine Treg depleter. PMID:25147093

  8. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy. PMID:21874492

  9. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  10. A murine model of smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Matthew, E; Warden, G; Dedman, J

    2001-04-01

    The United States has one of the world's largest per capita fire death rates. House fires alone kill >9,000 Americans annually, and smoke inhalation is the leading cause of mortality from structural fires. Animal models are needed to develop therapies to combat this problem. We have developed a murine model of smoke inhalation through the design, construction, and use of a controlled-environment smoke chamber. There is a direct relationship between the quantity of wood combusted and mortality in mice. As with human victims, the primary cause of death from smoke inhalation is an elevated blood carboxyhemoglobin level. Lethal (78%) and sublethal (50%) carboxyhemoglobin levels were obtained in mice subjected to varying amounts of smoke. Mice exposed to wood smoke demonstrated more dramatic pathology than mice exposed to cotton or polyurethane smoke. A CD-1 model of wood smoke exposure was developed, demonstrating type II cell hypertrophy, cytoplasmic blebbing, cytoplasmic vacuolization, sloughing, hemorrhage, edema, macrophage infiltration, and lymphocyte infiltration. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of smoke-exposed mice demonstrated a significant increase in total cell counts compared with those in control mice. These findings are comparable to the lung tissue response observed in human victims of smoke inhalation. PMID:11238012

  11. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jennifer S; Gritz, Emily C; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Hirschi, Karen K

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  12. Eliminating Murine Norovirus by Cross-Fostering

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Laurence U.; DeRitis, Pierina C.; Chu, Niansheng; Conti, Pierre A.

    2011-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a newly discovered and extremely prevalent pathogen of laboratory mouse colonies. MNV causes severe disease in some immunocompromised mouse strains and can cause persistent infections even in immunocompetent mice. Despite the fact that immunocompetent mice are generally asymptomatic, the possibility that MNV infection might alter immune responses makes its eradication a potentially useful goal for many facilities. Initial attempts by others to use a strategy of testing and culling were unsuccessful, whereas complete depopulation and facility decontamination was successful. However, these measures may be impractical, and finding less drastic approaches seemed prudent. Based on a report that cross-fostering of pups from MNV-positive mothers to MNV-negative ones could be successful in experimental MNV infection, we undertook a comprehensive fostering program using Swiss Webster mothers, careful sanitary measures, and fecal PCR testing to eradicate the virus from a mouse colony recently infected with MNV. We successfully decontaminated 17 of 18 (94%) litters and managed to prevent spread when a new MNV-infected mouse strain entered quarantine at our facility. These results suggest that cross-fostering, when performed in a setting of excellent sanitary procedures, may be practical for the large number of mouse facilities in which MNV is endemic. PMID:21838978

  13. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  14. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  15. A murine model of urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chia-Suei; Dodson, Karen W; Hultgren, Scott J

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) inflict extreme pain and discomfort to those affected and have profound medical and socioeconomic impact. Although acute UTIs are often treatable with antibiotics, a large proportion of patients suffer from multiple recurrent infections. Here, we describe and provide a protocol for a robust murine UTI model that allows for the study of uropathogens in an ideal setting. The infections in the urinary tract can be monitored quantitatively by determining the bacterial loads at different times post-infection. In addition, the simple bladder architecture allows observation of disease progression and the uropathogenic virulence cascade using a variety of microscopic techniques. This mouse UTI model is extremely flexible, allowing the study of different bacterial strains and species of uropathogens in a broad range of mouse genetic backgrounds. We have used this protocol to identify important aspects of the host-pathogen interaction that determine the outcome of infection. The time required to complete the entire procedure will depend on the number of bacterial strains and mice included in the study. Nevertheless, one should expect 4 h of hands-on time, including inoculum preparation on the day of infection, transurethral inoculation, tissue harvest and post-harvest processing for a small group of mice (e.g., 5 mice). PMID:19644462

  16. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release.

    PubMed

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  17. Cortactin is implicated in murine zygotic development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan; Zhang, Helin; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Smith, Elizabeth; Zhan, Xi

    2009-01-01

    Cortactin is a cortex-enriched protein implicated in Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. However, the physiological role of cortactin remains unknown. We have generated a mouse strain in which the allele of murine cortactin was disrupted by a gene trapping vector. The resulting heterozygous mice developed normally and were fertile, but embryonic fibroblasts derived from heterozygous animals displayed partial impairment in PDGF-induced membrane ruffling. No homozygous offspring or early embryos even at the two-cell stage were detected. Analysis of oocytes revealed a gradual decrease in the detection of homozygous zygotes after fertilization. In normal oocytes arrested at meiotic metaphase II (MII), cortactin immunoreactivity was detected in an apical layer that overlies the maternal chromosome and overlaps with a polarized cortex enriched with actin. The formation of the polarized cortactin layer was diminished upon treatment with latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor. After resumption of meiosis II, the majority of cortactin protein was accumulated into the second polar body. Microinjection of MII-arrested eggs with either cortactin antibody or RNA encoding a cortactin mutant deficient in Arp2/3 complex binding disrupted the integrity of the actin cap and inhibited emission of the second polar body triggered by parthenogenesis. Our data suggest that cortactin plays an important role in the mechanics of asymmetric division in oocytes. PMID:20004659

  18. Intestinal permeability and contractility in murine colitis.

    PubMed Central

    van Meeteren, M E; van Bergeijk, J D; van Dijk, A P; Tak, C J; Meijssen, M A; Zijlstra, F J

    1998-01-01

    We developed an in vitro organ bath method to measure permeability and contractility simultaneously in murine intestinal segments. To investigate whether permeability and contractility are correlated and influenced by mucosal damage owing to inflammation, BALB/c mice were exposed to a 10% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) solution for 8 days to induce colitis. The effect of pharmacologically induced smooth muscle relaxation and contraction on permeability was tested in vitro. Regional permeability differences were observed in both control and 10% DSS-treated mice. Distal colon segments were less permeable to 3H-mannitol and 14C-PEG 400 molecules compared with proximal colon and ileum. Intestinal permeability in control vs. 10% DSS mice was not altered, although histologic inflammation score and IFN-gamma pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were significantly increased in proximal and distal colon. IL-1beta levels were enhanced in these proximal and distal segments, but not significantly different from controls. Any effect of pharmacologically induced contractility on intestinal permeability could not be observed. In conclusion, intestinal permeability and contractility are not correlated in this model of experimentally induced colitis in mice. Although simultaneous measurement in a physiological set-up is possible, this method has to be further validated. PMID:9705603

  19. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  20. Murine models of cardiovascular comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Khedoe, P Padmini S J; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Currently, COPD patients with atherosclerosis (i.e., the most important underlying cause of CVD) receive COPD therapy complemented with standard CVD therapy. This may, however, not be the most optimal treatment. To investigate the link between COPD and atherosclerosis and to develop specific therapeutic strategies for COPD patients with atherosclerosis, a substantial number of preclinical studies using murine models have been performed. In this review, we summarize the currently used murine models of COPD and atherosclerosis, both individually and combined, and discuss the relevance of these models for studying the pathogenesis and development of new treatments for COPD patients with atherosclerosis. Murine and clinical studies have provided complementary information showing a prominent role for systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in the link between COPD and atherosclerosis. These and other studies showed that murine models for COPD and atherosclerosis are useful tools and can provide important insights relevant to understanding the link between COPD and CVD. More importantly, murine studies provide good platforms for studying the potential of promising (new) therapeutic strategies for COPD patients with CVD. PMID:26993520

  1. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  2. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S; Epstein, Ervin H; Tang, Jean Y

    2012-08-01

    When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1(+/-)K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology [2,20] and in response to drug therapy [19]. We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 ± 5 (SEM) mm(3) shrunk by 76 ± 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses. PMID:22771794

  3. Fetal outcome in murine Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Silver, R M; Yang, L; Daynes, R A; Branch, D W; Salafia, C M; Weis, J J

    1995-01-01

    Lyme disease is an inflammatory syndrome caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Although this syndrome has important implications for human pregnancy, little is known about gestational infection with B. burgdorferi. Fetal death occurred in 33 of 280 gestational sacs (12%) in 39 C3H/HeN female mice infected by intradermal injection of B. burgdorferi 4 days after mating (acute infection), compared with 0 of 191 sacs in 25 control mice (P = 0.0001). Forty-six percent of acutely infected mice suffered at least one fetal death, compared with none of the control animals (P = 0.0002). There were no fetal deaths in 18 C3H/HeN mice infected 3 weeks prior to mating (chronic infection). A sensitive PCR technique detected B. burgdorferi DNA in the uteri of acutely infected mice but did not detect DNA in the uteri of controls or chronically infected mice. Spirochete DNA was only rarely detected in fetal tissues, and its presence was not required for fetal death. The inclusion of an internal competitive PCR target indicated that the lack of B. burgdorferi sequences in fetal DNA was not due to the presence of a PCR inhibitor. Histologic analysis of gestational tissues from infected animals demonstrated nonspecific pathology consistent with fetal death. These findings indicate an association between murine fetal death and acute infection with B. burgdorferi early in gestation but not with chronic infection. Our data suggest that fetal death is due to a maternal response to infection rather than fetal infection. These findings could provide an explanation for observations in humans in which sporadic cases of fetal death in women infected with B. burgdorferi during pregnancy have been reported, while previous infection has not been associated with fetal death. PMID:7806385

  4. Lymph Node Macrophages Restrict Murine Cytomegalovirus Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Davis-Poynter, Nick; Bruce, Kimberley; Lawler, Clara; Dolken, Lars; Mach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) establish chronic infections that spread from a primary entry site to secondary vascular sites, such as the spleen, and then to tertiary shedding sites, such as the salivary glands. Human CMV (HCMV) is difficult to analyze, because its spread precedes clinical presentation. Murine CMV (MCMV) offers a tractable model. It is hypothesized to spread from peripheral sites via vascular endothelial cells and associated monocytes. However, viral luciferase imaging showed footpad-inoculated MCMV first reaching the popliteal lymph nodes (PLN). PLN colonization was rapid and further spread was slow, implying that LN infection can be a significant bottleneck. Most acutely infected PLN cells were CD169+ subcapsular sinus macrophages (SSM). Replication-deficient MCMV also reached them, indicating direct infection. Many SSM expressed viral reporter genes, but few expressed lytic genes. SSM expressed CD11c, and MCMV with a cre-sensitive fluorochrome switch showed switched infected cells in PLN of CD11c-cre mice but yielded little switched virus. SSM depletion with liposomal clodronate or via a CD169-diphtheria toxin receptor transgene shifted infection to ER-TR7+ stromal cells, increased virus production, and accelerated its spread to the spleen. Therefore, MCMV disseminated via LN, and SSM slowed this spread by shielding permissive fibroblasts and poorly supporting viral lytic replication. IMPORTANCE HCMV chronically infects most people, and it can cause congenital disability and harm the immunocompromised. A major goal of vaccination is to prevent systemic infection. How this is established is unclear. Restriction to humans makes HCMV difficult to analyze. We show that peripheral MCMV infection spreads via lymph nodes. Here, MCMV infected filtering macrophages, which supported virus replication poorly. When these macrophages were depleted, MCMV infected susceptible fibroblasts and spread faster. The capacity of filtering macrophages to limit

  5. Nanoelectroablation Therapy for Murine Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-01-01

    When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally as effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1+/−K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology [2;20] and in response to drug therapy [19]. We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5–7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 ± 5 (SEM) mm3 shrunk by 76 ± 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 minute-long treatment of 2700 pulses. PMID:22771794

  6. Follicular dendritic cell function and murine AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, A; Burton, G F; Fuchs, B A; Bhogal, B S; Rupper, R; Szakal, A K; Tew, J G

    1994-01-01

    Infection of mice with LP-BM5 elicits an immunodeficiency state referred to as murine acquired immune deficiency syndrome (MAIDS). Shortly after infection, retrovirus particles become associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and this study was undertaken to determine whether retroviruses alter FDC functions. The FDC functions examined included the ability to: (1) retain antigen (Ag) trapped prior to infection; (2) trap new Ag after infection; (3) maintain specific IgG responses; and (4) provide co-stimulatory signals to B cells. Mice were infected with LP-BM5 and the ability of their FDC to trap and retain 125I-Ag (HSA) was assessed. Serum anti-HSA levels were monitored and FDC co-stimulatory activity was indicated by increased B-cell proliferation. HSA trapped on FDC prior to infection began to disappear by 3 weeks and was practically gone by 6 weeks. Serum anti-HSA titres were maintained normally for about 3 weeks after infection and then declined precipitously. The ability of FDC to trap new Ag began to disappear around the second and third week of infection and was markedly depressed by the fourth week. However, FDC recovered from infected mice retained their ability to co-stimulate anti-mu- and interleukin-4 (IL-4)-activated B cells throughout a 5-week period. In short, the ability of FDC to trap and retain specific Ag and maintain specific antibody levels was markedly depressed after retrovirus infection. However, FDC from infected mice continued to provide co-stimulatory signals and these signals may contribute to the lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly characteristic of MAIDS. Images Figure 4 PMID:8132218

  7. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Ysasi, Alexandra B; Wagner, Willi L; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-06-15

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends ("E"). Septal retraction, observed in 20-30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  8. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  9. Preclinical Murine Models for Lung Cancer: Clinical Trial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kellar, Amelia; Egan, Cay; Morris, Don

    2015-01-01

    Murine models for the study of lung cancer have historically been the backbone of preliminary preclinical data to support early human clinical trials. However, the availability of multiple experimental systems leads to debate concerning which model, if any, is best suited for a particular therapeutic strategy. It is imperative that these models accurately predict clinical benefit of therapy. This review provides an overview of the current murine models used to study lung cancer and the advantages and limitations of each model, as well as a retrospective evaluation of the uses of each model with respect to accuracy in predicting clinical benefit of therapy. A better understanding of murine models and their uses, as well as their limitations may aid future research concerning the development and implementation of new targeted therapies and chemotherapeutic agents for lung cancer. PMID:26064932

  10. Telomere sister chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.

  11. Cloning and mapping of murine Nfe2L1

    SciTech Connect

    McKie, J.; Johnstone, K.; Scambler, P.

    1995-02-10

    The murine homologue of the human NFE2L1 basic leucine-zipper gene was isolated from an early embryo library. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 97% identity between the two proteins. Significant sequence similarity is also seen with the p45 subunit of NF-E2 and with the Drosophila CNC protein. Murine Nfe2l1 maps to chromosome 11DE with similar sequences at 7D1-7F1 and 2E4-2G. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  12. A Rapid Murine Coma and Behavior Scale for Quantitative Assessment of Murine Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Ryan W.; Wainwright, Mark S.; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Kidambi, Trilokesh; Gómez, Noé D.; Taylor, Terrie; Haldar, Kasturi

    2010-01-01

    Background Cerebral malaria (CM) is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM) models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. Methodology/Principal Findings A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS) comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA). Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. Conclusions/Significance Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field). The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed. PMID:20957049

  13. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  14. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  15. Analysis of murine HOXA-2 activity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Percival-Smith, A; Bondy, J A

    1999-01-01

    The murine HOXA-2 protein shares amino acid sequence similarity with Drosophila Proboscipedia (PB). In this paper, we test whether HOXA-2 and PB are functionally equivalent in Drosophila. In Drosophila, PB inhibits SCR activity required for larval T1 beard formation and adult tarsus formation and is required for maxillary palp and proboscis formation. HOXA-2 expressed from a heat-shock promoter weakly suppressed SCR activity required for T1 beard formation. But interestingly neither PB nor HOXA-2 expressed from a heat-shock promoter suppressed murine HOXA-5 activity, the murine SCR homologue, from inducing ectopic T1 beards in T2 and T3, indicating that HOXA-5 does not interact with PB. HOXA-2 activity expressed from the Tubulin alpha 1 promoter modified the pb null phenotype resulting in a proboscis-to-arista transformation, indicating that HOXA-2 was able to suppress SCR activity required for tarsus formation. However, HOXA-2 expressed from a Tubulin alpha 1 promoter was unable to direct maxillary palp determination when either ectopically expressed in the antenna or in the maxillary palp primordia of a pb null mutant. HOXA-2 was also unable to rescue pseudotrachea formation in a pb null mutant. These results indicate that the only activity that PB and HOXA-2 weakly share is the inhibition of SCR activity, and that murine HOXA-5 and Drosophila SCR do not share inhibition by PB activity. PMID:10322642

  16. Murine myocardium OCT imaging with a blood substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeehyun; Villard, Joseph W.; Lee, Ho; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Imaging of the in vivo murine myocardium using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. Application of conventional techniques (e.g. MRI, Ultrasound imaging) for imaging the murine myocardium is problematic because the wall thickness is less than 1.5mm (20g mouse), and the heart rate can be as high as six-hundred beats per minute. To acquire a real-time image of the murine myocardium, OCT can provide sufficient spatial resolution (10 micrometers ) and imaging speed (1000 A-Scans/s). Strong light scattering by blood in the heart causes significant light attenuation making delineation of the endocardium-chamber boundary problematic. By replacing whole blood in the mouse with an artificial blood substitute we demonstrate significant reduction of light scattering in the murine myocardium. The results indicate a significant reduction in light scattering as whole blood hematocrit is diminished below 5%. To measure thickness change of the myocardium during one cycle, a myocardium edge detection algorithm is developed and demonstrated.

  17. Manipulations of cholinesterase gene expression modulate murine megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Patinkin, D; Seidman, S; Eckstein, F; Benseler, F; Zakut, H; Soreq, H

    1990-01-01

    Megakaryocytopoiesis was selectively inhibited in cultured murine bone marrow cells by a 15-mer oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to the initiator AUG region in butyrylcholinesterase mRNA. Furthermore, conditioned medium from Xenopus oocytes producing recombinant butyrylcholinesterase stimulated megakaryocytopoiesis. These observations implicate butyrylcholinesterase in megakaryocytopoiesis and suggest application of oligodeoxynucleotides for modulating bone marrow development. Images PMID:2233731

  18. Cloning and expression analysis of murine phospholipase D1.

    PubMed Central

    Colley, W C; Altshuller, Y M; Sue-Ling, C K; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Branch, K D; Tsirka, S E; Bollag, R J; Bollag, W B; Frohman, M A

    1997-01-01

    Activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D(PLD) occurs as part of the complex signal-transduction cascade initiated by agonist stimulation of tyrosine kinase and G-protein-coupled receptors. A variety of mammalian PLD activities have been described, and cDNAs for two PLDs recently reported (human PLD1 and murine PLD2). We describe here the cloning and chromosomal localization of murine PLD1. Northern-blot hybridization and RNase protection analyses were used to examine the expression of murine PLD1 and PLD2 ina variety of cell lines and tissues. PLD1 and PLD2 were expressed in all RNA samples examined, although the absolute expression of each isoform varied, as well as the ratio of PLD1 to PLD2. Moreover, in situ hybridization of adult brain and murine embryo sections revealed high levels of expression of individual PLDs in some cell types and no detectable expression in others. Thus the two PLDs probably carry out distinct roles in restricted subsets of cells rather than ubiquitous roles in all cells. PMID:9307024

  19. Topical Apigenin Alleviates Cutaneous Inflammation in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Hupe, Melanie; Sun, Richard; Man, George; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used in preventing and treating skin disorders for centuries. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration of chrysanthemum extract exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether topical applications of apigenin, a constituent of chrysanthemum extract, influence cutaneous inflammation is still unclear. In the present study, we first tested whether topical applications of apigenin alleviate cutaneous inflammation in murine models of acute dermatitis. The murine models of acute allergic contact dermatitis and acute irritant contact dermatitis were established by topical application of oxazolone and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), respectively. Inflammation was assessed in both dermatitis models by measuring ear thickness. Additionally, the effect of apigenin on stratum corneum function in a murine subacute allergic contact dermatitis model was assessed with an MPA5 physiology monitor. Our results demonstrate that topical applications of apigenin exhibit therapeutic effects in both acute irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis models. Moreover, in comparison with the vehicle treatment, topical apigenin treatment significantly reduced transepidermal water loss, lowered skin surface pH, and increased stratum corneum hydration in a subacute murine allergic contact dermatitis model. Together, these results suggest that topical application of apigenin could provide an alternative regimen for the treatment of dermatitis. PMID:23304222

  20. Measurement and interpretation of electrocardiographic QT intervals in murine hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Wu, JingJing; King, James H; Huang, Christopher L-H; Fraser, James A

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in ECG QT intervals correlate with the risk of potentially fatal arrhythmias, for which transgenic murine hearts are becoming increasingly useful experimental models. However, QT intervals are poorly defined in murine ECGs. As a consequence, several different techniques have been used to measure murine QT intervals. The present work develops a consistent measure of the murine QT interval that correlates with changes in the duration of ventricular myocyte action potentials (APs). Volume-conducted ECGs were compared with simultaneously recorded APs, obtained using floating intracellular microelectrodes in Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts. QT intervals were measured from the onset of the QRS complex. The interval, Q-APR90, measured to the time at 90% AP recovery, was compared with two measures of the QT interval. QT1 was measured to the recovery of the ECG trace to the isoelectric baseline for entirely positive T-waves or to the trough of any negative T-wave undershoot. QT2-used extensively in previous studies-was measured to the return of any ECG trough to the isoelectric baseline. QT1, but not QT2, closely correlated with changes in Q-APR90. These findings were confirmed over a range of pacing rates, in low K(+) concentration solutions, and in Scn5a+/ΔKPQ hearts used to model human long QT syndrome. Application of this method in whole anesthetized mice similarly demonstrated a prolonged corrected QT (QTc) in Scn5a+/ΔKPQ hearts. We therefore describe a robust method for the determination of QT and QTc intervals that correlate with the duration of ventricular myocyte APs in murine hearts. PMID:24705556

  1. Characterization of the murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator system.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Van Hoef, B; Collen, D

    1996-11-01

    The murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator (u-PA) system was studied using purified proteins, plasma and endothelioma cells. Recombinant murine u-PA was obtained as a single-chain molecule of 45 kDa which was converted to two-chain u-PA with plasmin by cleavage of the Lys159-Ile160 peptide bond. Murine plasminogen, purified from plasma as a single-chain protein of 95 kDa, was resistant to quantitative activation with murine recombinant two-chain u-PA: only 15% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C was obtained in mixtures of 1 microM plasminogen and 5 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas quantitative activation was observed in the autologous human system. Addition of 6-aminohexanoic acid to native murine plasminogen resulted in quantitative activation within 1 h. In murine plasma in vitro, plasminogen was also resistant to quantitative activation with u-PA (50% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C with 50 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas in the human system nearly quantitative activation was obtained). Murine plasma clots submerged in murine plasma were resistant to lysis with u-PA; < or = 2% clot lysis in 2 h was obtained with 80 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous murine system whereas 50% clot lysis in 2 h required only 15 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous human system. Saturable binding of murine recombinant two-chain u-PA was observed to murine endothelioma cells that are genetically deficient in u-PA (u-PA-/- End cells). Binding was characterized by a Kd of 5.5 nM and 800000 binding sites/cell. However, u-PA-/- End cells did not significantly stimulate the activation rate of murine plasminogen by murine recombinant two-chain u-PA and did not enhance the plasmin-mediated conversion rate of murine recombinant single-chain u-PA to its two-chain derivative. Murine recombinant two-chain u-PA bound to murine endothelioma cells was quantitatively inhibited by murine plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Thus

  2. 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced modulation of cytokines involved in cytotoxic t lymphocyte induction

    SciTech Connect

    House, R.V.; Pallardy, M.J.; Burleson, G.R.; Dean, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Murine lymphocytes were exposed to the carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and several cytokines were measured. Production of interleukin-1 by macrophages, interleukin-2 by EL-4 thymoma, and gamma interferon by activated splenic lymphocytes were not affected by DMBA. However, interleukin-5 (also known as T cell replacing factor) was significantly suppressed by DMBA. Cloned cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by DMBA and the suppression was significantly enhanced by addition of beta or gamma interferon. The results support the hypothesis that, rather than acting as a non-specific inhibitor of lymphocyte proliferation, DMBA-induced suppression of antigen-specific cytolysis is a mechanism directed against highly-specific cellular targets in the immune process.

  3. Local induction of a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like cytotoxic factor in murine tissues with tumorous and nontumorous inflammation after systemic administration of antitumor polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Yamazaki, M; Abe, S

    1988-07-01

    Local induction of a cytotoxic factor (CF), which was reported by us to be a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like molecule, in murine tumor tissues by i.v. administration of antitumor polysaccharides was studied. The CF was measured by cytolysis assay against L929 fibroblasts in vitro. The antitumor polysaccharides mannoglucan polyalcohol (MGA), lentinan, carboxymethyl-(1----3)-beta-D-linear glucan DP540 (CM-TAK) and yeast mannan induced the CF in MH134 hepatoma tissues inoculated intradermally, with MGA inducing the highest level of the CF. MGA induced the CF in MM46 mammary carcinoma, Ehrlich carcinoma, and MH134 hepatoma, the growth of which were all inhibited by MGA, but not in Lewis lung carcinoma and EL-4 lymphoma, which are therapeutically resistant to MGA. MGA induced the CF in solid MH134 hepatoma tissues inoculated subcutaneously or intramuscularly as well as intradermally, but not in ascitic fluids with intraperitoneal MH134 hepatoma on which MGA is ineffective. These findings suggest that CF induction is correlated with the antitumor activity of polysaccharides. CF induction in tumor tissues was detectable 6 h after i.d. inoculation of MH134 hepatoma. Even in nontumorous inflammatory skin tissues produced by injection of TAK, the CF was induced by MGA. Thus, the early inflammatory reaction with accumulation of host cells and MGA treatment act cooperatively in local induction of the CF. PMID:3183925

  4. Genomic organization of the murine CTL lipase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.H.; Boyer, S.N.; Grusby, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    Murine cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lipase was originally identified as an IL-4-inducible gene in CD8-positive T cells. To further our understanding of both the function and the regulation of CTL lipase in T cells, we have cloned and characterized the murine gene. Two overlapping phage clones spanning 29 kb contain the entire CTL lipase gene. The exon structure in similar to those characterized for the human and canine pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 genes, with notable differences in the 5{prime} end. Transcripts initiate from a site that matches a consensus for an initiator sequence. Potential cis-regulatory elements in the CTL lipase 5{prime} regulatory region that would confer dual tissue specificity in exocrine pancreas and cytotoxic T lymphocytes are identified. The implications of this promoter organization are discussed. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Increased photosensitivity to near-ultraviolet light in murine SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, D.T.; Borel, Y.

    1984-02-01

    The authors investigated whether there is increased susceptibility to near-UVL in murine SLE. Cultured spleen cells from either strain of mice with lupus disease or conventional strains of mice were exposed to different UVL fractions in vitro. The effect of DNA synthesis, release, and repair was examined. DNA synthesis and release was measured as percent of (/sup 3/H)thymidine (dT) uptake into either total acid-precipitable radioactive material of cell sediment plus supernatant, or that of the medium alone, whereas hydroxyurea-resistant dT incorporation represented DNA repair. The data indicate that all SLE strains, in contrast to all non-SLE strains, show increased DNA synthesis and release after UV-A exposure. In addition, all murine SLE strains demonstrate increased susceptibility to induction of DNA damage by UV-A. The significance of these observations in relation to the clinical activity of SLE after sunlight exposure is discussed.

  6. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells Within Murine Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gjurich, Breanne N; Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the modulation of atherogenesis at all stages of the disease. However, there are many technical difficulties when studying the immune system within murine aortas. Common techniques such as PCR and immunohistochemistry have answered many questions about the presence of immune cells and mediators of inflammation within the aorta yet many questions remain unanswered due to the limitations of these techniques. On the other hand, cumulatively the flow cytometry approach has propelled the immunology field forward but it has been challenging to apply this technique to aortic tissues. Here, we describe the methodology to isolate and characterize the immune cells within the murine aorta and provide examples of functional assays for aortic leukocytes using flow cytometry. The method involves the harvesting and enzymatic digestion of the aorta, extracellular and intracellular protein staining, and a subsequent flow cytometric analysis. PMID:26445788

  7. A generalized transducing phage for the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Toribio, Ana L.; Goulding, David; Foulds, Ian; Thomson, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Salmond, George P. C.

    2008-01-01

    A virulent phage (φCR1) capable of generalized transduction in Citrobacter rodentium was isolated from the environment and characterized. C. rodentium is a natural pathogen of mice, causing transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia. Sequencing of its genome has recently been completed and will soon be fully annotated and published. C. rodentium is an important model organism for infections caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC). φCR1 uses a lipopolysaccharide receptor, has a genome size of approximately 300 kb, and is able to transduce a variety of markers. φCR1 is the first reported transducing phage for C. rodentium and will be a useful tool for functional genomic analysis of this important natural murine pathogen. PMID:17768241

  8. Practical Murine Hematopathology: A Comparative Review and Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Karyn E; Mikkola, Amy M; Stepanek, Aaron M; Vernet, Andyna; Hall, Christopher D; Sun, Chia C; Yildirim, Eda; Staropoli, John F; Lee, Jeannie T; Brown, Diane E

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic parameters are important markers of disease in human and veterinary medicine. Biomedical research has benefited from mouse models that recapitulate such disease, thus expanding knowledge of pathogenetic mechanisms and investigative therapies that translate across species. Mice in health have many notable hematologic differences from humans and other veterinary species, including smaller erythrocytes, higher percentage of circulating reticulocytes or polychromasia, lower peripheral blood neutrophil and higher peripheral blood and bone marrow lymphocyte percentages, variable leukocyte morphologies, physiologic splenic hematopoiesis and iron storage, and more numerous and shorter-lived erythrocytes and platelets. For accurate and complete hematologic analyses of disease and response to investigative therapeutic interventions, these differences and the unique features of murine hematopathology must be understood. Here we review murine hematology and hematopathology for practical application to translational investigation. PMID:25926395

  9. Resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carletto, Bruna; Berton, Juliana; Ferreira, Tamara Nascimento; Dalmolin, Luciana Facco; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Favero, Giovani Marino

    2016-08-01

    In this study, resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were developed and its antitumor activity tested on a melanoma mice model. These nanocapsules were spherically-shaped and presented suitable size, negative charge and high encapsulation efficiency for their use as a modified-release system of resveratrol. Nanoencapsulation leads to the drug amorphization. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles reduced cell viability of murine melanoma cells. There was a decrease in tumor volume, an increase in the necrotic area and inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma when resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were compared to free resveratrol in treated mice. Nanoencapsulation of resveratrol also prevented metastasis and pulmonary hemorrhage. This modified-release technology containing resveratrol can be used as a feasible approach in order to inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth. PMID:27070053

  10. Absence of generalized immunosuppression in C57B1/6 mice during progressive growth of syngeneic T-lymphoma EL-4 and of Lewis 3LL lung carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fuks, B.B.; Malaitsev, I.M.; Bogdanova, I.M.

    1986-11-01

    The authors describe the proliferative response of lymphocytes to mitogens and the generation of allospecific CTL in vivo were investigated in C57BL/6 mice during progressive growth of syngeneic T lymphoma EL-4 and Lewis carcinoma 3LL. Interleuken 2 activity was estimated from the incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 4-day T blast cells. Radioactivity of the samples was determined on a Packard-Tricarb scintillation beta-counter, after sedimentation on filters of the material precipitated by TCA. Spleen cells of immunized mice were used as the source of CTL in the 4-hourly test of /sup 51/Cr release from target cells. It is concluded that the level of Interleuken 2 production in mice with tumors EL-4 and 3LL was high enough to generate an effective CTL response and that the absence of CTL response to a syngeneic tumor cannot be explained by a nonspecific suppressor effect of the tumor carrier state on the immune system.

  11. Morphology and growth of murine cell lines on model biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Godek, Marisha L; Duchsherer, Nichole L; McElwee, Quinn; Grainger, David W

    2004-01-01

    All biomaterial implants are assaulted by the host "foreign body" immune response. Understanding the complex, dynamic relationship between cells, biomaterials and milieu is an important first step towards controlling this reaction. Material surface chemistry dictates protein adsorption, and thus subsequent cell interactions. The cell-implant is a microenvironment involving 1) proteins that coat the surface and 2) cells that interact with these proteins. Macrophages and fibroblasts are two cell types that interact with proteins on biomaterials surfaces and play different related, but equally important, roles in biomaterials rejection and implant failure. Growth characteristics of four murine cell lines on model biomaterials surfaces were examined. Murine monocyte-macrophages (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1), murine macrophage (IC-21) and murine fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines were tested to determine whether differences exist in adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, spreading, and fusion (macrophage lineages only) on these surfaces. Differences were observed in the ability of cells to adhere to and subsequently proliferate on polymer surfaces. (Monocyte-) macrophages grew well on all surfaces tested and growth rates were measured on three representative polymer biomaterials surfaces: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polystyrene, and Teflon-AF. J774A.1 cultures grown on TCPS and treated with exogenous cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF were observed to contain multinucleate cells with unusual morphologies. Thus, (monocyte-) macrophage cell lines were found to effectively attach to and interrogate each surface presented, with evidence of extensive spreading on Teflon-AF surfaces, particularly in the IC-21 cultures. The J774A.1 line was able to proliferate and/or differentiate to more specialized cell types (multinucleate/dendritic-like cells) in the presence of soluble chemokine cues. PMID:15133927

  12. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  13. Phase dispersion X-ray imaging of murine soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingal, V. N.; Ingal, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of phase-contrast (PC) images in the phase-dispersion introscopy (PDI) technique is the subject of this paper. Conditions for extreme sensitivity to murine soft-tissue anatomy are discussed. The unique information content and good contrast of the minutest details of anatomy, together with the high brilliance of X-ray optics, give the authors confidence that the PDI method can be successfully applied for medical diagnostics.

  14. Miniature Microwave Applicator for Murine Bladder Hyperthermia Studies

    PubMed Central

    Salahi, Sara; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Rodrigues, Dario B.; Etienne, Wiguins; Landon, Chelsea D.; Inman, Brant A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Novel combinations of heat with chemotherapeutic agents are often studied in murine tumor models. Currently, no device exists to selectively heat small tumors at depth in mice. In this project, we modelled, built and tested a miniature microwave heat applicator, the physical dimensions of which can be scaled to adjust the volume and depth of heating to focus on the tumor volume. Of particular interest is a device that can selectively heat murine bladder. Materials and Methods Using Avizo® segmentation software, we created a numerical mouse model based on micro-MRI scan data. The model was imported into HFSS™ simulation software and parametric studies were performed to optimize the dimensions of a water-loaded circular waveguide for selective power deposition inside a 0.15ml bladder. A working prototype was constructed operating at 2.45GHz. Heating performance was characterized by mapping fiber-optic temperature sensors along catheters inserted at depths of 0-1mm (subcutaneous), 2-3mm (vaginal), and 4-5mm (rectal) below the abdominal wall, with the mid-depth catheter adjacent to the bladder. Core temperature was monitored orally. Results Thermal measurements confirm the simulations which demonstrate that this applicator can provide local heating at depth in small animals. Measured temperatures in murine pelvis show well-localized bladder heating to 42-43°C while maintaining normothermic skin and core temperatures. Conclusions Simulation techniques facilitate the design optimization of microwave antennas for use in pre-clinical applications such as localized tumor heating in small animals. Laboratory measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of a new miniature water-coupled microwave applicator for localized heating of murine bladder. PMID:22690856

  15. Utilization of Murine Colonoscopy for Orthotopic Implantation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zigmond, Ehud; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Brazowski, Eli; Jung, Steffen; Varol, Chen

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal-cancer (CRC) research has greatly benefited from the availability of small animal tumor models. Spontaneous and chemically-induced CRC models are widely used yet limited in their resemblance to human disease and are often prolonged, not accurately repetitive, and associated with inflammatory side effects. In-situ murine or human tumor implantation in the gastrointestinal tract of mice is extremely challenging, and limited by inter-animal variability and procedure-related complications and mortality. As a result, in frequent studies CRC is implanted in distal sites, most commonly the subcutaneous region, an approach that is greatly limited by the absence of normal gastrointestinal tumor milieu and has substantial effects on tumor development. Aims In this study we aimed to develop a well-tolerated repetitive tool to study CRC in small animals by adapting the murine colonoscopy system to serve as a platform for colonic sub-mucosal orthotopic implantation of human and murine CRC tumor cells. Results We report the establishment of a novel small-animal CRC model that is minimally invasive, rapid, well-tolerated, highly reproducible, and confers precise control of tumor number, location and growth rate. Moreover, we show that this model uniquely allows the side-by-side induction of distinct genetically manipulated tumors, enabling the mechanistic study of tumor interaction and cross-talk within the native intestinal microenvironment. Conclusions Employment of this new approach may represent a major technical advance for the in-vivo study of CRC. PMID:22174916

  16. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D.

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD. PMID:26811642

  18. Evaluation of a Murine Single-Blood-Injection SAH Model

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Clemens; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Schneider, Toni; Hänggi, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) are poorly understood and continue to be a matter of debate. A valid murine SAH injection model is not yet available but would be the prerequisite for further transgenic studies assessing the mechanisms following SAH. Using the murine single injection model, we examined the effects of SAH on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the somatosensory (S1) and cerebellar cortex, neuro-behavioural and morphological integrity and changes in quantitative electrocorticographic and electrocardiographic parameters. Micro CT imaging verified successful blood delivery into the cisterna magna. An acute impairment of rCBF was observed immediately after injection in the SAH and after 6, 12 and 24 hours in the S1 and 6 and 12 hours after SAH in the cerebellum. Injection of blood into the foramen magnum reduced telemetric recorded total ECoG power by an average of 65%. Spectral analysis of ECoGs revealed significantly increased absolute delta power, i.e., slowing, cortical depolarisations and changes in ripples and fast ripple oscillations 12 hours and 24 hours after SAH. Therefore, murine single-blood-injection SAH model is suitable for pathophysiological and further molecular analysis following SAH. PMID:25545775

  19. Murine leukemia virus envelope gp70 is a shared biomarker for the high-sensitivity quantification of murine tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Scrimieri, Francesca; Askew, David; Corn, David J; Eid, Saada; Bobanga, Iuliana D; Bjelac, Jaclyn A; Tsao, Matthew L; Allen, Frederick; Othman, Youmna S; Wang, Shih-Chung G; Huang, Alex Y

    2013-01-01

    The preclinical development of anticancer drugs including immunotherapeutics and targeted agents relies on the ability to detect minimal residual tumor burden as a measure of therapeutic efficacy. Real-time quantitative (qPCR) represents an exquisitely sensitive method to perform such an assessment. However, qPCR-based applications are limited by the availability of a genetic defect associated with each tumor model under investigation. Here, we describe an off-the-shelf qPCR-based approach to detect a broad array of commonly used preclinical murine tumor models. In particular, we report that the mRNA coding for the envelope glycoprotein 70 (gp70) encoded by the endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is universally expressed in 22 murine cancer cell lines of disparate histological origin but is silent in 20 out of 22 normal mouse tissues. Further, we detected the presence of as few as 100 tumor cells in whole lung extracts using qPCR specific for gp70, supporting the notion that this detection approach has a higher sensitivity as compared with traditional tissue histology methods. Although gp70 is expressed in a wide variety of tumor cell lines, it was absent in inflamed tissues, non-transformed cell lines, or pre-cancerous lesions. Having a high-sensitivity biomarker for the detection of a wide range of murine tumor cells that does not require additional genetic manipulations or the knowledge of specific genetic alterations present in a given neoplasm represents a unique experimental tool for investigating metastasis, assessing antitumor therapeutic interventions, and further determining tumor recurrence or minimal residual disease. PMID:24482753

  20. Expression and modulation of IL-1 alpha in murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ansel, J.C.; Luger, T.A.; Lowry, D.; Perry, P.; Roop, D.R.; Mountz, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    Murine and human keratinocytes produce an IL-1-like factor that appears to be similar if not identical to monocyte-derived IL-1. IL-1 may be an important mediator in cutaneous inflammatory responses, however, little is currently known concerning factors that may modulate IL-1 expression in keratinocytes. To address this issue we examined the effect of LPS, UV, and the cell differentiation state on murine keratinocyte IL-1 mRNA expression. Our results indicated that as with the murine P388D1 monocyte cell line, PAM 212 keratinocytes constitutively express abundant amounts of IL-1 alpha mRNA. On exposure to LPS (100 micrograms/ml) for 8 h there was more than 10 times the increase in PAM 212 IL-1 alpha mRNA which was accompanied by a sixfold increase in supernatant IL-1 activity. Similarly UV irradiation had a significant effect on keratinocyte IL-1 alpha expression. High dose UV (300 mJ/cm2) inhibited PAM 212 IL-1 alpha expression at 4, 8, 24, 48 h post-UV whereas a lower dose of UV (100 mJ/cm2) inhibited UV at 4 and 8 h post-UV, but induced IL-1 expression at 24 and 48 h post-UV. The expression of IL-1 alpha varied with the differentiation state of the keratinocytes. Freshly removed newborn murine keratinocytes were found to constitutively express IL-1 alpha mRNA. Keratinocytes grown in low (Ca2+) tissue culture media (0.05 mM) for 6 days, functionally and phenotypically become undifferentiated and express increased quantities of IL-1 alpha mRNA, whereas cells grown in high (Ca2+) media (1.2 mM) for 6 days become terminally differentiated and IL-1 expression ceased. Keratinocytes cultured for 3 days in low (Ca2+) conditions expressed an intermediate level of IL-1 alpha. In contrast, little or no IL-1 beta mRNA was detected in either the PAM 212 cells or newborn murine keratinocytes.

  1. Murine norovirus transcytosis across an in vitro polarized murine intestinal epithelial monolayer is mediated by M-like cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B; Liu, Thomas; Blanco, Luz P; Auble, Heather; Payne, Hilary C; Wobus, Christiane E

    2013-12-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the causative agent of the vast majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the inability to culture human NoVs and the inability to orally infect a small animal model, little is known about the initial steps of viral entry. One particular step that is not understood is how NoVs breach the intestinal epithelial barrier. Murine NoV (MNV) is the only NoV that can be propagated in vitro by infecting murine macrophages and dendritic cells, making this virus an attractive model for studies of different aspects of NoV biology. Polarized murine intestinal epithelial mICcl2 cells were used to investigate how MNV interacts with and crosses the intestinal epithelium. In this in vitro model of the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), MNV is transported across the polarized cell monolayer in the absence of viral replication or disruption of tight junctions by a distinct epithelial cell with microfold (M) cell properties. In addition to transporting MNV, these M-like cells also transcytose microbeads and express an IgA receptor. Interestingly, B myeloma cells cultured in the basolateral compartment underlying the epithelial monolayer did not alter the number of M-like cells but increased their transcytotic activity. Our data demonstrate that MNV can cross an intact intestinal epithelial monolayer in vitro by hijacking the M-like cells' intrinsic transcytotic pathway and suggest a potential mechanism for MNV entry into the host. PMID:24049163

  2. Murine Norovirus Transcytosis across an In Vitro Polarized Murine Intestinal Epithelial Monolayer Is Mediated by M-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B.; Liu, Thomas; Blanco, Luz P.; Auble, Heather; Payne, Hilary C.

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the causative agent of the vast majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the inability to culture human NoVs and the inability to orally infect a small animal model, little is known about the initial steps of viral entry. One particular step that is not understood is how NoVs breach the intestinal epithelial barrier. Murine NoV (MNV) is the only NoV that can be propagated in vitro by infecting murine macrophages and dendritic cells, making this virus an attractive model for studies of different aspects of NoV biology. Polarized murine intestinal epithelial mICcl2 cells were used to investigate how MNV interacts with and crosses the intestinal epithelium. In this in vitro model of the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), MNV is transported across the polarized cell monolayer in the absence of viral replication or disruption of tight junctions by a distinct epithelial cell with microfold (M) cell properties. In addition to transporting MNV, these M-like cells also transcytose microbeads and express an IgA receptor. Interestingly, B myeloma cells cultured in the basolateral compartment underlying the epithelial monolayer did not alter the number of M-like cells but increased their transcytotic activity. Our data demonstrate that MNV can cross an intact intestinal epithelial monolayer in vitro by hijacking the M-like cells' intrinsic transcytotic pathway and suggest a potential mechanism for MNV entry into the host. PMID:24049163

  3. Nanomechanical phenotype of chondroadherin-null murine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Batista, Michael A; Nia, Hadi T; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Cox, Karen A; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Heinegård, Dick; Han, Lin

    2014-09-01

    Chondroadherin (CHAD), a class IV small leucine rich proteoglycan/protein (SLRP), was hypothesized to play important roles in regulating chondrocyte signaling and cartilage homeostasis. However, its roles in cartilage development and function are not well understood, and no major osteoarthritis-like phenotype was found in the murine model with CHAD genetically deleted (CHAD(-/-)). In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation to quantify the effects of CHAD deletion on changes in the biomechanical function of murine cartilage. In comparison to wild-type (WT) mice, CHAD-deletion resulted in a significant ≈70-80% reduction in the indentation modulus, Eind, of the superficial zone knee cartilage of 11 weeks, 4 months and 1 year old animals. This mechanical phenotype correlates well with observed increases in the heterogeneity collagen fibril diameters in the surface zone. The results suggest that CHAD mainly plays a major role in regulating the formation of the collagen fibrillar network during the early skeletal development. In contrast, CHAD-deletion had no appreciable effects on the indentation mechanics of middle/deep zone cartilage, likely due to the dominating role of aggrecan in the middle/deep zone. The presence of significant rate dependence of the indentation stiffness in both WT and CHAD(-/-) knee cartilage suggested the importance of both fluid flow induced poroelasticity and intrinsic viscoelasticity in murine cartilage biomechanical properties. Furthermore, the marked differences in the nanomechanical behavior of WT versus CHAD(-/-) cartilage contrasted sharply with the relative absence of overt differences in histological appearance. These observations highlight the sensitivity of nanomechanical tools in evaluating structural and mechanical phenotypes in transgenic mice. PMID:24892719

  4. Erdr1 Suppresses Murine Melanoma Growth via Regulation of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyun; Jung, Min Kyung; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma, one of the aggressive cancers, is known to be resistant to chemotherapy. Because of its aggressive nature, effectively inducing apoptosis is necessary to treat melanoma. Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be a stress-related survival factor exhibiting anti-cancer effects in several cancers. However, little is known about the functions and underlying mechanisms of Erdr1 so far. To demonstrate the effect of Erdr1 in melanoma apoptosis, recombinant murine Erdr1 was injected into mice implanted with B16F10 melanoma cells. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited in mice injected with Erdr1 compared to the control. In addition, the tumor from Erdr1-injected mice showed an increased level of apoptosis. Accordingly, apoptosis-regulating factors including anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic marker Bax in the tumor tissues were examined. As expected, the decreased level of Bcl-2 and increased level of Bax were detected in tumors within the mice injected with Erdr1. Based on the in vivo study, the role of Erdr1 in tumor apoptosis was further tested by incubating it with cells of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10. Erdr1-induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells was observed. Additionally, Erdr1 downregulated STAT3 activity, inhibiting apoptosis via regulation of the Bcl-2 family. Overall, data demonstrate that Erdr1 induced murine melanoma apoptosis through the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax. These findings suggest that Erdr1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in melanoma. PMID:26784177

  5. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  6. Lipoxygenation of arachidonic acid by subcellular preparations from murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ziboh, V.A.; Casebolt, T.L.; Marcelo, C.L.; Voorhees, J.J.

    1984-10-01

    In these studies, we examined the possibility that cell-free preparations from murine keratinocytes possess 5-lipoxygenase activity in addition to the well-established cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid (AA) in these cells. Our data demonstrated that the high-speed (105,000 g) supernatant preparations of the murine keratinocytes metabolized (14C)AA into labeled lipoxygenase products. Portions of these radioactive metabolites cochromatographed and comigrated with 12-HETE (a marker for 12-lipoxygenase pathway) and with authentic LTB4 (a marker for 5-lipoxygenase pathway) on silicic acid column chromatography and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) in two solvent systems respectively. Identity of the novel 14C which comigrated with LTB4 on both TLC and column chromatography was verified further by cochromatography of the free acid with authentic LTB4 on a reverse phase (RP) and the methyl esters on a straight phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Incubation of the cell-free preparations with (14C)AA in the presence of ETYA, NDGA (inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways) as well as with 15-HETE (an inhibitor of lipoxygenase pathway) resulted in decreased formation of (14C) 12-HETE and the (14C)LTB4-like metabolite. On the contrary, incubations of the cell-free extracts with (14C) AA in the presence of indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor) resulted in increased biosynthesis of the labeled lipoxygenase metabolites. These data indicate the existence of enzymes in soluble fraction of murine keratinocyte which can catalyze the transformation of (14C) AA into products of both the 12- and 5-lipoxygenase pathways.

  7. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  8. Protective role of murine norovirus against Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Thépaut, Marion; Grandjean, Teddy; Hober, Didier; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bortolotti, Perrine; Faure, Karine; Dessein, Rodrigue; Kipnis, Eric; Guery, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered mouse pathogen, representing the most common contaminant in laboratory mouse colonies. Nevertheless, the effects of MNV infection on biomedical research are still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that MNV infection could alter immune response in mice with acute lung infection. Here we report that co-infection with MNV increases survival of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute lung injury and decreases in vivo production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that MNV infection can deeply modify the parameters studied in conventional models of infection and lead to false conclusions in experimental models. PMID:26338794

  9. Inhibition of angiogenesis and murine tumour growth by laminarin sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, R.; Paper, D. H.; Donaldson, J.; Vogl, H.

    1996-01-01

    LAM S5 is a polysulphated derivative of the glucan laminarian that inhibits basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) binding and the bFGF-stimulated proliferation of fetal bovine heart endothelial (FBHE) cells. This report demonstrates that LAM S5 has anti-angiogenic activity, as shown by inhibition of tubule formation by endothelial cells cultured on Matrigel and inhibition of vascularisation of the chick chorioallantoic membrane. In addition, LAM S5 caused a tumour growth delay of the murine RIF-1 tumour of 2.6 days (P = 0.01). Images Figure 2 PMID:8630276

  10. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  11. Replication of the Moloney murine sarcoma-leukemia virus in XC cells.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, S T; Benyesh-Melnick, M; Biswal, N

    1973-01-01

    The XC rat cell line was found to support the replication of a strain of the Moloney murine sarcoma-leukemia virus. In growth curve experiments cytopathology was paralleled by the production of murine sarcoma virus and leukemia virus progeny having the biologic, antigenic, and biophysical properties of the infecting virus. PMID:4346280

  12. Assessment of murine lung mechanics outcome measures: alignment with those made in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Julia K. L.; Kraft, Monica; Fisher, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Although asthma is characterized as an inflammatory disease, recent reports highlight the importance of pulmonary physiology outcome measures to the clinical assessment of asthma control and risk of asthma exacerbation. Murine models of allergic inflammatory airway disease have been widely used to gain mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of asthma; however, several aspects of murine models could benefit from improvement. This review focuses on aligning lung mechanics measures made in mice with those made in humans, with an eye toward improving the translational utility of these measures. A brief description of techniques available to measure murine lung mechanics is provided along with a methodological consideration of their utilization. How murine lung mechanics outcome measures relate to pulmonary physiology measures conducted in humans is discussed and we recommend that, like human studies, outcome measures be standardized for murine models of asthma. PMID:23408785

  13. Measles virus persistence in an immortalized murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M B; Buckthal, D J; Picciotto, S; O'Bryan, T A; Goldman, J N

    1995-02-20

    Persistent infection with the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) has been established in IC-21 cells, an immortalized murine macrophage cell line. Persistence was established immediately without syncytia formation or cytopathic effects. MV was expressed in the majority of the cells as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, infectious centers assays, and limiting dilution analysis. Hemagglutinin (H) and phosphoprotein expressed in persistently infected IC-21 cells had retarded migration in SDS-PAGE gels when compared to these proteins expressed in Vero cells. H protein differences were also found between freshly infected IC-21 cells and persistently infected IC-21 cells passaged for over 2 years. Six sublines of IC-21 cells, infected at different times, have maintained these characteristics for 2 years of passage. During this time period the intensity of immunofluorescence and the number of infectious virus particles recoverable fluctuated in five of the six cell lines. In one cell line virus expression remained at a consistent high level. The ability to establish a persistent MV infection in murine macrophages allows studies using a cell important in disseminating the infection. It facilitates experiments on immunological aspects of viral immunity by enabling cell mixing experiments with histocompatible cell populations and by making available the wide array of cellular and humoral reagents in the mouse. PMID:7871720

  14. Murine models of Aspergillosis: Role of collectins in host defense.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mamta; Mahajan, Lakshna; Chaudhary, Neelkamal; Kaur, Savneet; Madan, Taruna; Sarma, P Usha

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a ubiquitous fungus, causes a wide spectrum of clinical conditions ranging from allergic to invasive aspergillosis depending upon the hosts' immune status. Several animal models have been generated to mimic the human clinical conditions in allergic and invasive aspergillosis. The onset, duration and severity of the disease developed in models varied depending on the animal strain/fungal isolate, quantity and mode of administration of fungal antigens/spores, duration of the treatment, and type of immunosuppressive agent used. These models provide insight into host and pathogen factors and prove to be useful for evaluation of diagnostic markers and effective therapies. A series of studies established the protective role of collectins in murine models of Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis and Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis. Collectins, namely surfactant protein A (SP-A), surfactant protein D (SP-D) and mannan binding lectin (MBL), are pattern recognition molecules regulating both innate and adaptive immune response against pathogens. In the present review, we discussed various murine models of allergic and invasive aspergillosis and the role of collectins in host defense against aspergillosis. PMID:26669011

  15. Tensile Properties of the Murine Ventral Vertical Midline Incision

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Mark A.; Chakkalakal, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Background In clinical surgery, the vertical midline abdominal incision is popular but associated with healing failures. A murine model of the ventral vertical midline incision was developed in order to study the healing of this incision type. Methodology/Principal Findings The strength of the wild type murine ventral abdominal wall in the midline was contained within the dermis; the linea alba made a negligible contribution. Unwounded abdominal wall had a downward trend (nonsignificant) in maximal tension between 12 and 29 weeks of age. The incision attained 50% of its final strength by postoperative day 40. The maximal tension of the ventral vertical midline incision was nearly that of unwounded abdominal wall by postwounding day 60; there was no difference in unwounded vs. wounded maximal tension at postwounding day 120. Conclusions/Significance After 120 days of healing, the ventral vertical midline incision in the wild type mouse was not significantly different from age-matched nonwounded controls. About half of the final incisional strength was attained after 6 weeks of healing. The significance of this work was to establish the kinetics of wild type incisional healing in a model for which numerous genotypes and genetic tools would be available for subsequent study. PMID:21915298

  16. Global transcriptome analyses of human and murine terminal erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    An, Xiuli; Schulz, Vincent P.; Li, Jie; Wu, Kunlu; Liu, Jing; Xue, Fumin; Hu, Jingping; Mohandas, Narla

    2014-01-01

    We recently developed fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based methods to purify morphologically and functionally discrete populations of cells, each representing specific stages of terminal erythroid differentiation. We used these techniques to obtain pure populations of both human and murine erythroblasts at distinct developmental stages. RNA was prepared from these cells and subjected to RNA sequencing analyses, creating unbiased, stage-specific transcriptomes. Tight clustering of transcriptomes from differing stages, even between biologically different replicates, validated the utility of the FACS-based assays. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that there were marked differences between differentiation stages, with both shared and dissimilar gene expression profiles defining each stage within transcriptional space. There were vast temporal changes in gene expression across the differentiation stages, with each stage exhibiting unique transcriptomes. Clustering and network analyses revealed that varying stage-specific patterns of expression observed across differentiation were enriched for genes of differing function. Numerous differences were present between human and murine transcriptomes, with significant variation in the global patterns of gene expression. These data provide a significant resource for studies of normal and perturbed erythropoiesis, allowing a deeper understanding of mechanisms of erythroid development in various inherited and acquired erythroid disorders. PMID:24637361

  17. Comparative study of different isolates of murine sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, D J; Sharp, P A; Weinberg, R A

    1979-01-01

    The RNA genomes of a variety of murine sarcoma viruses (MSV) were compared by heteroduplex analysis. These viruses included the Moloney-derived isolates 124-MSV, m1-MSV, m3-MSV, HT1-MSV, and NP-MSV and also two independent isolates, Gazdar MSV and 1712-MSV. All of these viral genomes exhibited the acquired cellular sequences previously identified in 3124-MSV and thought to be responsible for transformation and sarcomagenesis. The location of the acquired cellular sequences within the envelope gene was variable in different MSV isolates, suggesting that the cellular sequences can be expressed in different positions relative to murine leukemia virus-derived information present in MSV. Deletions in the gag coding region of the different MSVs were consistent with their known gag-related gene products. Based on several features of the hetero-duplex analysis and the known genealogical relationships of the different MSVs, various possible mechanisms for the formation of MSV are considered. Images PMID:229256

  18. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-01

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. PMID:26168730

  19. Surface Contaminants Inhibit Osseointegration in a Novel Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Colbrunn, Robb W.; Tatro, Joscelyn M.; Messerschmitt, Patrick J.; Hernandez, Christopher J.; Goldberg, Victor M.; Stewart, Matthew C.; Greenfield, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface contaminants, such as bacterial debris and manufacturing residues, may remain on orthopaedic implants after sterilization procedures and affect osseointegration. The goals of this study were to develop a murine model of osseointegration in order to determine whether removing surface contaminants enhances osseointegration. To develop the murine model, titanium alloy implants were implanted into a unicortical pilot hole in the mid-diaphysis of the femur and osseointegration was measured over a five week time course. Histology, backscatter scanning electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy showed areas of bone in intimate physical contact with the implant, confirming osseointegration. Histomorphometric quantification of bone-to-implant contact and peri-implant bone and biomechanical pullout quantification of ultimate force, stiffness and work to failure increased significantly over time, also demonstrating successful osseointegration. We also found that a rigorous cleaning procedure significantly enhances bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures by two-fold compared with implants that were autoclaved, as recommended by the manufacturer. The most likely interpretation of these results is that surface contaminants inhibit osseointegration. The results of this study justify the need for the development of better detection and removal techniques for contaminants on orthopaedic implants and other medical devices. PMID:21801863

  20. Viruses in Rodent Colonies: Lessons Learned from Murine Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Wobus, Christiane E

    2015-11-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are highly prevalent, positive-sense RNA viruses that infect a range of mammals, including humans and mice. Murine noroviruses (MuNoVs) are the most prevalent pathogens in biomedical research colonies, and they have been used extensively as a model system for human noroviruses (HuNoVs). Despite recent successes in culturing HuNoVs in the laboratory and a small animal host, studies of human viruses have inherent limitations. Thus, owing to its versatility, the MuNoV system-with its native host, reverse genetics, and cell culture systems-will continue to provide important insights into NoV and enteric virus biology. In the current review, we summarize recent findings from MuNoVs that increase our understanding of enteric virus pathogenesis and highlight similarities between human and murine NoVs that underscore the value of MuNoVs to inform studies of HuNoV biology. We also discuss the potential of endemic MuNoV infections to impact other disease models. PMID:26958927

  1. Fluorescence tomography in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Kumar, Anand T. N.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.

    2007-02-01

    Noninvasive molecular imaging of amyloid plaques in murine Alzheimer's disease models would accelerate drug development and basic Alzheimer's research. Amyloid plaques differ from traditional fluorescent targets in size and spatial distribution and therefore present a unique challenge for biomarker development and tomography. To study imaging feasibility and establish biomarker criteria, we developed a digital mouse head model from a 100 μm-resolution, digital, segmented mouse atlas1. The cortical region of the brain was filled with a spatially uniform distribution of plaques that had different fluorescent properties from the surrounding brain tissue, similar to current transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence was simulated with a Monte Carlo algorithm using different plaque densities, detection geometries, and background fluorescence. Our preliminary results demonstrated that shielding effects might require nonlinear reconstruction algorithms and that background fluorescence would seriously hinder quantitative burden estimation. The Monte Carlo based approach presented here offers a powerful way to study the feasibility of non-invasive imaging in murine Alzheimer's models and to optimize experimental conditions.

  2. Surgical Modification of the Murine Calvaria Osteolysis Model

    PubMed Central

    Al-quhali, Ali Mohammed; Sun, Yu; Bai, Xizhuang; Jin, Zhe; Yu, Guibo

    2015-01-01

    The murine calvaria model has been adopted for evaluation of osteolysis and inflammation induced by polyethylene (PE) or metal wear debris. However, this model suffers from several complications. The purpose of our study is to introduce a surgical modification with lower complication rates, thus providing more accurate results. Forty C57/BL6 mice were divided into two groups, both receiving polyethylene particles. Surgical modifications were performed in group 1, and group 2 underwent traditional surgeries. The incidence of fluid leakage was recorded on the operative day. Curst formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were recorded on day 7. Histological osteolysis was demonstrated by HE staining of tissue slices. Micro-CT was used for quantifying evaluation of osteolysis in two groups. Intraoperative fluid leakage was significantly reduced in group 1. Postoperative crust formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were also significantly decreased in group 1. HE staining results revealed obvious osteolysis in group 1 and more obvious osteolysis in group 2. Bone volume fraction (BVF) was (0.32 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (0.24 ± 0.05). Bone mineral density (BMD) was (1.11 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (1.01 ± 0.02). Surgical modifications provide a reliable way for establishment of the murine calvaria osteolysis model. PMID:26769571

  3. Isolation of a murine osteoclast colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M Y; Eyre, D R; Osborne, W R

    1991-01-01

    Cultures of a cell line derived from a murine mammary carcinoma that induces hypercalcemia were examined for soluble products that could induce osteoclasts to differentiate from murine bone marrow cells. The serum-free culture supernatant of this cell line stimulated growth of colonies from bone marrow cells that exhibited tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase) activity. These TRAPase-positive cells demonstrated essential features of osteoclasts when cultured with mineralized bone or dentin. The culture period required for colony development and the frequency of colony-forming cells indicated that relatively primitive marrow progenitors were stimulated by a tumor-derived factor(s) to form immature osteoclasts. Other colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), including granulocyte CSF, macrophage CSF, granulocyte-macrophage CSF and interleukin 3, were ruled out as the source of the activity produced by the tumor cells. The biological activity was successfully purified by gel filtration chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. By SDS/PAGE, the activity was traced to a protein of approximately 17 kDa. Functional and biochemical studies of the purified factor suggest that it is distinct from any known CSF of myeloid cells. This protein appears to be a CSF for the osteoclast lineage, osteoclast CSF (O-CSF). Images PMID:1924309

  4. Induction of murine p30 by superinfecting herpesviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, C L; Rapp, F

    1976-01-01

    The interaction of endogenous type C viruses with superinfecting herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was investigated in two murine cell lines. Replication of HSV-2 was suboptimal in random-bred Swiss/3T3A cells and, in initial experiments, infection with a low virus-to-cell ratio resulted in carrier cultures with enhanced murine leukemia virus (MuLV) p30 expression. Immunofluorescence tests with Swiss/3T3A cells productively infected with HSV-2 also showed HSV-associated cytoplasmic antigens and enhanced MuLV p30 expression when compared with uninfected controls. Inactivation of HSV-2 with UV light did not abolish this reaction, although the number of cells expressing p30 was reduced. HSV-2 replicated more efficiently in a line of NIH Swiss cells (N c1 A c1 10). These cells are not readily inducible for type C expression by conventional methods; however, untreated and UV-inactivated HSV-2 induced both HSV-2-associated antigens and MuLV p30 in these cells. Although the Birch strain of human cytomegalovirus induced MuLV p30, neither mouse cytomegalovirus nor vesicular stomatitis virus induced MuLV p30 in either cell line. Images PMID:184296

  5. Dynamic Determination of Oxygenation and Lung Compliance in Murine Pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gibney, Barry; Lee, Grace S.; Houdek, Jan; Lin, Miao; Miele, Lino; Chamoto, Kenji; Konerding, Moritz A.; Tsuda, Akira; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic surgical procedures in mice have been applied to a wide range of investigations, but little is known about the murine physiologic response to pulmonary surgery. Using continuous arterial oximetry monitoring and the FlexiVent murine ventilator, we investigated the effect of anesthesia and pneumonectomy on mouse oxygen saturation and lung mechanics. Sedation resulted in a dose-dependent decline of oxygen saturation that ranged from 55–82%. Oxygen saturation was restored by mechanical ventilation with increased rate and tidal volumes. In the mouse strain studied, optimal ventilatory rates were a rate of 200/minute and a tidal volume of 10ml/kg. Sustained inflation pressures, referred to as a "recruitment maneuver," improved lung volumes, lung compliance and arterial oxygenation. In contrast, positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) had a detrimental effect on oxygenation; an effect that was ameliorated after pneumonectomy. Our results confirm that lung volumes in the mouse are dynamically determined and suggest a threshold level of mechanical ventilation to maintain perioperative oxygen saturation. PMID:21574875

  6. Differential chemokine responses in the murine brain following lyssavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Hicks, D J; Núñez, A; Banyard, A C; Williams, A; Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N

    2013-11-01

    The hallmark of lyssavirus infection is lethal encephalomyelitis. Previous studies have reported distinct lyssavirus isolate-related differences in severity of cellular recruitment into the encephalon in a murine model of infection following peripheral inoculation with rabies virus (RABV) and European bat lyssavirus (EBLV)-1 and -2. In order to understand the role of chemokines in this process, comparative studies of the chemokine pattern, distribution and production in response to infection with these lyssaviruses were undertaken. Expression of CCL2, CCL5 and CXCL10 was observed throughout the murine brain with a distinct caudal bias in distribution, similar to both inflammatory changes and virus antigen distribution. CCL2 immunolabelling was localized to neuronal and astroglial populations. CCL5 immunolabelling was only detected in the astroglia, while CXCL10 labelling, although present in the astroglia, was more prominent in neurons. Isolate-dependent differences in the amount of chemokine immunolabelling in specific brain regions and chemokine production by neurons in vitro were observed, with a greater expression of CCL5 in vivo and CXCL10 production in vitro after EBLV infection. Additionally, strong positive associations between chemokine immunolabelling and perivascular cuffing and, to a lesser extent, virus antigen score were also observed. These differences in chemokine expression may explain the variation in severity of encephalitic changes observed in animals infected with different lyssavirus isolates. PMID:23746482

  7. Murine Models of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elshafa Hassan; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B-lymphotropic gamma herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies. Most EBV-related cancers present complex medical management challenges; thus it has been essential to develop preclinical in vivo models allowing for the study of pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Early in vivo models used nonhuman primates; however, such models were limited by the inability of EBV to achieve viral latency, availability, and cost. Immunodeficient mouse strains emerged as efficient models that allow for engraftment of human mononuclear cells and controlled evaluation of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). By using highly immunodeficient strains of mice such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid ILrg(-/-)(NOG) mice, investigators have developed efficient platforms for evaluating pathogenesis of benign (HLH) and malignant (EBV-LPD) diseases associated with EBV. Humanized murine chimeric models have been essential tools for evaluating preventive strategies with vaccine and adoptive cellular approaches, as well as development of experimental therapeutic strategies. Manipulation of the human immune cells before engraftment or mutation of viral lytic and latent genes has enhanced our understanding of the oncogenic nature of EBV and the complexity of human immune responses to EBV. In this review, we discuss how the EBV murine models have evolved to become essential tools for studying the virology of EBV as it relates to human EBV-LPD pathogenesis, the immunobiology of innate and adaptive responses, and limitations of these models. PMID:27034395

  8. Directed Ig class switch recombination in activated murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, E; Krawinkel, U; Radbruch, A

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination occurs at frequencies of up to 10%/cell/generation in activated murine B-lymphocytes. We analysed cH gene rearrangements and switch recombinations from active and inactive IgH loci of B-cells activated in various ways and immortalized by cell fusion. Although about half of the IgM+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes, the deletion of c mu is a rare event. Half of the IgG3+ and IgG1+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes on the inactive IgH locus and the other half of the IgG+ cells have deleted c mu from both IgH loci by switch recombination. This recombination is directed to the same switch regions on both IgH loci in 60-80% of all cases. Interleukin 4 may play a critical role in programming murine B-lymphocytes for specific switch recombination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3038529

  9. Growth and metabolism of murine and bovine embryos in bovine uterine flushing-supplemented culture media.

    PubMed Central

    Rondeau, M; Guay, P; Goff, A K; Cooke, G M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the development and metabolic activity of cultured murine and bovine embryos in 2 standard media (HAM F-10 and RPMI) in the presence or absence of bovine uterine flushings. Murine morulae (n = 653) and day 7 bovine embryos (n = 273) were cultured for 18 h or 36 h in either HAM F-10 or RPMI in the presence or absence of bovine uterine flushings. After culture, the development, quality, and metabolic activity (glucose utilization or methionine uptake and incorporation) of embryos was assessed. It was found that HAM F-10 (without uterine flushings) was a more suitable medium than RPMI for optimal development and metabolism of murine and bovine embryos. Poor quality and development, as well as decreased metabolism, were evident after culture of murine embryos in RPMI; in contrast, this medium had no adverse effects on bovine embryos in culture. Supplementation of HAM F-10 with bovine uterine flushings improved the growth of murine embryos and the protein synthesis (as measured by an increased methionine incorporation) for both murine and bovine embryos. However, supplementation with bovine uterine flushings could not overcome deficiencies of an inappropriate medium (RPMI) for murine embryos. Supplementation of a well-defined culture medium with uterine flushings increased metabolism of embryos in culture, and thus might help to increase pregnancy rates after transfer of such embryos to recipient cows. PMID:8825988

  10. Murine typhus is a common cause of febrile illness in Bedouin children in Israel.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Hanna; Raissa, Rotkane; Evgenia, Zislin; Yagupsky, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    Murine typhus is known to be endemic among populations living in poverty and exposed to rats and their fleas. A prospective 2-y study was conducted to determine the contribution of murine typhus to undifferentiated febrile illnesses among Bedouin children attending an outpatient clinic in southern Israel. Children with fever > or = 38.5 degrees C lasting for > or = 3 d were enrolled in the study. Murine typhus was serologically confirmed by the microimmunofluorescence test. A total of 549 children met the inclusion criteria of whom 76 (13.8%) had serologically-confirmed murine typhus. The disease was diagnosed in 27 of 434 (6.2%) patients aged < 5 y and in 49 of 115 (42.6%) older children (p<0.001). Murine typhus was diagnosed in 54 of 288 (18.8%) patients between June and November and in 22 of 261 (8.4%) between December and May (p<0.001). Patients with murine typhus had significantly higher prevalence of anaemia, leukopenia, hyponatraemia, and elevated liver enzymes compared to children without the disease. A single child was hospitalized and all 76 patients recovered without complications. Murine typhus is an important cause of febrile illnesses among Bedouin children > or = 5 y of age living in southern Israel and usually runs a benign clinical course. PMID:16798692

  11. Expression of murine Fc receptors for IgG.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, R E; Buku, A; Unkeless, J C

    1990-06-15

    There are two distinct genes that encode murine low affinity Fc gamma RII, murine Fc gamma RII alpha, and murine Fc gamma RII beta, which are transcribed in specific cell lineages. Fc gamma RII alpha transcripts are present in macrophages, NK cells, and mesangial cells; Fc gamma RII beta transcripts are expressed in Fc gamma R-bearing B cells, T cells, and macrophages. We have devised a sandwich ELISA to quantify the expression of Fc gamma RII alpha protein. The ELISA is specific for Fc gamma RII alpha, and does not detect the closely related Fc gamma RII beta protein. Upon stimulation with IFN-gamma the Fc gamma RII beta- macrophage cell line J774a expressed a twelvefold enhanced level of Fc gamma RII alpha protein. Peritoneal macrophages synthesized varying amounts of Fc gamma RII alpha. High levels of Fc gamma RII alpha were observed in resident and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, but no Fc gamma RII alpha was detected in Bacillus Calmette Guérin-elicited macrophages. J774a cells stimulated with rIL-6 bound approximately twice as much anti-Fc gamma RII mAb 2.4G2 IgG as did unstimulated controls. However, the Fc gamma RII alpha-specific ELISA showed no change in the amount of Fc gamma RII alpha expressed. A probe encompassing the extracellular coding sequence of Fc gamma RII beta hybridized to two distinct transcripts that were elevated in rIL-6-stimulated J774a cells. One of these transcripts had the same mobility in electrophoresis as Fc gamma RII alpha mRNA and hybridized to an Fc gamma RII alpha-specific probe, whereas the other transcript was larger and did not hybridize to probes specific for either Fc gamma RII alpha or Fc gamma RII beta. Moreover, we confirmed, with an Fc gamma RII beta-specific probe, that J774a cells do not make Fc gamma RII beta mRNA. Thus, the larger transcript appears to encode a novel Fc gamma RII. We suggest that the increased level of binding of the anti-Fc gamma RII mAb 2.4G2 to rIL-6-induced cells represents

  12. Murine Tumor Models for Oncolytic Rhabdo-Virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Falls, Theresa; Roy, Dominic Guy; Bell, John Cameron; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical optimization and validation of novel treatments for cancer therapy requires the use of laboratory animals. Although in vitro experiments using tumor cell lines and ex vivo treatment of patient tumor samples provide a remarkable first-line tool for the initial study of tumoricidal potential, tumor-bearing animals remain the primary option to study delivery, efficacy, and safety of therapies in the context of a complete tumor microenvironment and functional immune system. In this review, we will describe the use of murine tumor models for oncolytic virotherapy using vesicular stomatitis virus. We will discuss studies using immunocompetent and immunodeficient models with respect to toxicity and therapeutic treatments, as well as the various techniques and tools available to study cancer therapy with Rhabdoviruses. PMID:27034397

  13. Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa Extract Attenuates DSS-Induced Murine Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kang Min

    2016-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa (AAK) extract on a murine model of acute experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water of male C57BL/6 mice, for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of AAK extract (500 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated DSS-induced symptoms such as anorexia, weight loss, events of diarrhea or bloody stools, and colon shortening. Histological damage was also ameliorated, as evidenced by the architectural preservation and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in colonic samples. Treatment improved the colonic mRNA expression of different inflammatory markers: cytokines, inducible enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases, and tight junction-related proteins. In the isolated serum, IgE levels were downregulated. Collectively, these findings indicate the therapeutic potentials of AAK as an effective complementary or alternative modality for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. PMID:27293323

  14. Effects of trichostatins on differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, M.; Nomura, S.; Beppu, T.

    1987-07-15

    The fungistatic antibiotics trichostatins (TS) A and C were isolated from culture broth of Streptomyces platensis No. 145 and were found to be potent inducers of differentiation in murine erythroleukemia (Friend and RV133) cells at concentrations of 1.5 X 10(-8) M for TSA and 5 X 10(-7) M for TSC. Differentiation induced by TS was cooperatively enhanced by UV irradiation but not by treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide. This enhanced activity was completely inhibited by adding cycloheximide to the culture medium 2 h after exposure to TS, suggesting that TS are dimethyl sulfoxide-type inducers of erythroid differentiation. No inhibitory effect of TS was observed on macromolecular synthesis in cultured cells.

  15. Multiphoton Imaging of Ultrasound Bioeffects in the Murine Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott; Skoch, Jesse; Bacskai, Brian; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of multiphoton imaging in the murine brain during exposure to ultrasound. Our experimental setup coupled ultrasound through the ventral surface of the mouse while allowing imaging through a cranial window from the dorsal surface. Field attenuation was estimated by scanning the field after insertion of a freshly sacrificed mouse; beam profile and peak position were preserved, suggesting adequate targeting for imaging experiments. C57 mice were imaged with a Biorad multiphoton microscope while being exposed to ultrasound (f = 1.029 MHz, peak pressure ˜ 200 kPa, average power ˜ 0.18 W) with IV injection of Optison. We observed strong vasoconstriction coincident with US and Optison, as well as permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier.

  16. Large-scale characterization of the murine cardiac proteome.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Jake; Emili, Andrew; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2013-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart that result in impaired cardiac muscle function. This dysfunction can progress to an inability to supply blood to the body. Cardiovascular diseases play a large role in overall global morbidity. Investigating the protein changes in the heart during disease can uncover pathophysiological mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. Establishing a global protein expression "footprint" can facilitate more targeted studies of diseases of the heart.In the technical review presented here, we present methods to elucidate the heart's proteome through subfractionation of the cellular compartments to reduce sample complexity and improve detection of lower abundant proteins during multidimensional protein identification technology analysis. Analysis of the cytosolic, microsomal, and mitochondrial subproteomes separately in order to characterize the murine cardiac proteome is advantageous by simplifying complex cardiac protein mixtures. In combination with bioinformatic analysis and genome correlation, large-scale protein changes can be identified at the cellular compartment level in this animal model. PMID:23606244

  17. Extrathymic development of murine T cells after bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Amanda M.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Hanash, Alan M.; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Smith, Odette M.; West, Mallory L.; Singer, Natalie V.; Brill, Jessie; Sun, Joseph C.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Restoring T cell competence is a significant clinical challenge in patients whose thymic function is severely compromised due to age or cytoreductive conditioning. Here, we demonstrate in mice that mesenteric LNs (MLNs) support extrathymic T cell development in euthymic and athymic recipients of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Furthermore, in aged murine BMT recipients, the contribution of the MLNs to the generation of T cells was maintained, while the contribution of the thymus was significantly impaired. Thymic impairment resulted in a proportional increase in extrathymic-derived T cell progenitors. Extrathymic development in athymic recipients generated conventional naive TCRαβ T cells with a broad Vβ repertoire and intact functional and proliferative potential. Moreover, in the absence of a functional thymus, immunity against known pathogens could be augmented using engineered precursor T cells with viral specificity. These findings demonstrate the potential of extrathymic T cell development for T cell reconstitution in patients with limited thymic function. PMID:23160195

  18. Dye-mediated photosensitization of murine neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, F.; Sieber-Blum, M.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if photosensitization mediated by the fluorescent dye, merocyanine 540, could be used to preferentially kill murine neuroblastoma cells in simulated autologous remission marrow grafts. Simultaneous exposure of Neuro 2a or NB41A3 neuroblastoma cells to merocyanine 540 and white light reduced the concentration of in vitro-clonogenic tumor cells 50,000-fold. By contrast, the same treatment had little effect on the graft's ability to rescue lethally irradiated syngeneic hosts. Lethally irradiated C57BL/6J X A/J F1 mice transplanted with photosensitized mixtures of neuroblastoma cells and normal marrow cells (1:100 or 1:10) survived without developing neuroblastomas. It is conceivable that merocyanine 540-mediated photosensitization will prove useful for the extracorporeal purging of residual neuroblastoma cells from human autologous remission marrow grafts.

  19. Oxygen sensitivity severely limits the replicative lifespan of murine fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Parrinello, Simona; Samper, Enrique; Krtolica, Ana; Goldstein, Joshua; Melov, Simon; Campisi, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Most mammalian cells do not divide indefinitely, owing to a process termed replicative senescence. In human cells, replicative senescence is caused by telomere shortening, but murine cells senesce despite having long stable telomeres1. Here, we show that the phenotypes of senescent human fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) differ under standard culture conditions, which include 20% oxygen. MEFs did not senesce in physiological (3%) oxygen levels, but underwent a spontaneous event that allowed indefinite proliferation in 20% oxygen. The proliferation and cytogenetic profiles of DNA repair-deficient MEFs suggested that DNA damage limits MEF proliferation in 20% oxygen. Indeed, MEFs accumulated more DNA damage in 20% oxygen than 3% oxygen, and more damage than human fibroblasts in 20% oxygen. Our results identify oxygen sensitivity as a critical difference between mouse and human cells, explaining their proliferative differences in culture, and possibly their different rates of cancer and ageing. PMID:12855956

  20. Functional expression of murine multidrug resistance in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, G.; Vera, J.C.; Rosen, O.M. ); Yang, Chiaping Huang; Horwitz, S.B. )

    1990-06-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is associated with the overproduction of a plasma membrane glycoprotein, P glycoprotein. Here the authors report the functional expression of a member of the murine MDR family of proteins and show that Xenopus oocytes injected with RNA encoding the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein develop a MDR-like phenotype. Immunological analysis indicated that oocytes injected with the mdr1b RNA synthesized a protein with the size and immunological characteristics of the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein. These oocytes exhibited a decreased accumulation of ({sup 3}H)vinblastine and showed an increased capacity to extrude the drug compared to control oocytes not expressing the P glycoprotein. In addition, competition experiments indicated that verapamil, vincristine, daunomycin, and quinidine, but not colchicine, can overcome the rapid drug efflux conferred by the expression of the mouse P glycoprotein.

  1. Zika Virus Infection and Development of a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), there is an urgent need to investigate the pathogenesis of the symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Since the first identification of the virus in 1947, the pathologies associated with ZIKV infection were thought to be limited with mild illness that presented fever, rashes, muscle aches, and weakness. However, ZIKV infection has been shown to cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and numerous cases of congenital microcephaly in children have been reported when pregnant females were exposed to the virus. The severity and the rate of spread of ZIKV in the last year has drawn alarming interest among researchers to investigate murine models to study viral pathogenesis and develop candidate vaccines. A recent study by Lazear and colleagues, in the May 2016 issue of cell host and microbe, is an effort to study the pathogenesis of contemporary and historical virus strains in various mouse models. PMID:27260223

  2. Methylation of inorganic arsenic by murine fetal tissue explants.

    PubMed

    Broka, Derrick; Ditzel, Eric; Quach, Stephanie; Camenisch, Todd D

    2016-07-01

    Although it is generally believed that the developing fetus is principally exposed to inorganic arsenic and the methylated metabolites from the maternal metabolism of arsenic, little is known about whether the developing embryo can autonomously metabolize arsenic. This study investigates inorganic arsenic methylation by murine embryonic organ cultures of the heart, lung, and liver. mRNA for AS3mt, the gene responsible for methylation of arsenic, was detected in all embryonic tissue types studied. In addition, methylated arsenic metabolites were generated by all three tissue types. The fetal liver explants yielded the most methylated arsenic metabolites (∼7% of total arsenic/48 h incubation) while the heart, and lung preparations produced slightly greater than 2% methylated metabolites. With all tissues the methylation proceeded mostly to the dimethylated arsenic species. This has profound implications for understanding arsenic-induced fetal toxicity, particularly if the methylated metabolites are produced autonomously by embryonic tissues. PMID:26446802

  3. Metronidazole-induced alterations in murine spermatozoa morphology.

    PubMed

    Mudry, Marta D; Palermo, Ana M; Merani, María S; Carballo, Marta A

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of metronidazole (MTZ) on the stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle and spermatozoa morphology when the drug is administered in human therapeutic doses to 60-day-old CFW male mice. The frequency of the stages was established by counting spermatocytes in pachytene and spermatids. Abnormalities in the flagellum or the head, lack of maturity and multiple malformations, were considered in the morphological analysis. Murine control strain was compared with MTZ treated group (v.ip 130 mg/kg/bw) both kept in standard captivity conditions. Cellular composition or number of stages in the seminiferous tubules were not altered in MTZ exposed animals, though the number of cells in stages I, V and XII was increased. The sperm cell morphology was severely affected by the treatment with potentially serious consequences on the normal fertilization process. Thus, the MTZ has to be considered as a conceivable thread regarding male fertility. PMID:17184970

  4. Efficacy of echinocandins against murine infections by Diutina (Candida) rugosa.

    PubMed

    Sanchis, Marta; Sutton, Deanna A; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Guarro, Josep; Capilla, Javier

    2016-09-01

    Echinocandins are recommended as a first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis. Candida rugosa was recently transferred to the new genus Diutina. We have determined the in vitro killing kinetics of two echinocandins, anidulafungin, and caspofungin and their in vivo efficacy, administering doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg, and 1 or 5 mg/kg, respectively against 2 clinical strains of D. rugosa. Both drugs showed a fungicidal concentration-dependent activity and, in a neutropenic murine model of disseminated infection, were able to reduce tissue burden and to prolong survival of mice. These results suggest that both echinocandins could be useful to treat infections by this fungus when isolates show minimal inhibitory concentrations within the range of susceptibility for both drugs. PMID:27342787

  5. A novel inexpensive murine model of oral chronic digitalization.

    PubMed

    Helber, Izo; Kanashiro, Rosemeire M; Alarcon, Ernesto A; Antonio, Ednei L; Tucci, Paulo J F

    2004-01-01

    A novel inexpensive murine model of oral administration of digitoxin (100 micro g/kg per day) added to routine chow is described. Serum digitoxin levels achieved after oral (n = 5; 116 +/- 14 ng/mL) and subcutaneous (n = 5; 124 +/- 11 ng/mL) administration were similar. A significant increase in the maximal left ventricular pressure rise of treated (n = 9) compared with control (n = 6) rats (dP/dt: 8956 +/- 233 vs 7980 +/- 234 mmHg/s, respectively; P = 0.01) characterized the positive inotropic action of digitoxin. In addition, no differences were observed in treated compared with control rats with regard to the electrocardiogram and systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressures. PMID:15191413

  6. Collagen-induced thrombosis in murine arteries and veins.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is a powerful thrombotic stimulus that functions by direct and indirect binding to various platelet receptors. A variety of collagen types are known and several (e.g., collagen Types I, III, IV) are found in vascular tissues and are exposed upon disruption of the endothelium or more extensive vessel wall rupture. Some murine models of thrombosis purport to expose collagen to initiate thrombosis, however, the nature and extent of this exposure is not clear. This study was undertaken to place a known collagen-dominated surface into the in vivo arterial or venous circulation as a method for direct study of collagen-induced thrombosis in mice. The epigastric artery was removed from donor mice and a microsuture with attached needle was knotted into one cut end. Anesthetized mice had this needle/suture/small-artery inserted into and out of a 0.5-mm length of the larger carotid artery or femoral vein, leaving the collagen-rich adventitial surface of the epigastric artery intralumenally in the larger vessel. Extensive platelet and fibrin deposition on this surface were in evidence and were quantitated with fluorescence imaging; administration of clopidogrel reduced thrombus development in both arteries and veins. A method was developed to evert the epigastric artery and disrupt the exteriorized endothelium; with the same needle/suture vessel-insertion technique, this surface stimulated significantly less thrombotic response in both arteries and veins, suggesting differential thrombogenesis based on the molecular composition of the induction factor. This new model of thrombosis offers a method for directly assessing the role of collagen-mediated thrombosis in murine arteries and veins. PMID:23063056

  7. Deep sequencing of the murine olfactory receptor neuron transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Kanageswaran, Ninthujah; Demond, Marilen; Nagel, Maximilian; Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Baumgart, Sabrina; Scholz, Paul; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Doerner, Julia F; Conrad, Heike; Oberland, Sonja; Wetzel, Christian H; Neuhaus, Eva M; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and differentiate among thousands of odorants relies on a large set of olfactory receptors (OR) and a multitude of accessory proteins within the olfactory epithelium (OE). ORs and related signaling mechanisms have been the subject of intensive studies over the past years, but our knowledge regarding olfactory processing remains limited. The recent development of next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques encouraged us to assess the transcriptome of the murine OE. We analyzed RNA from OEs of female and male adult mice and from fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-sorted olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) obtained from transgenic OMP-GFP mice. The Illumina RNA-Seq protocol was utilized to generate up to 86 million reads per transcriptome. In OE samples, nearly all OR and trace amine-associated receptor (TAAR) genes involved in the perception of volatile amines were detectably expressed. Other genes known to participate in olfactory signaling pathways were among the 200 genes with the highest expression levels in the OE. To identify OE-specific genes, we compared olfactory neuron expression profiles with RNA-Seq transcriptome data from different murine tissues. By analyzing different transcript classes, we detected the expression of non-olfactory GPCRs in ORNs and established an expression ranking for GPCRs detected in the OE. We also identified other previously undescribed membrane proteins as potential new players in olfaction. The quantitative and comprehensive transcriptome data provide a virtually complete catalogue of genes expressed in the OE and present a useful tool to uncover candidate genes involved in, for example, olfactory signaling, OR trafficking and recycling, and proliferation. PMID:25590618

  8. Antioxidants as novel therapy in a murine model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Oz, Helieh S; Chen, Theresa S; McClain, Craig J; de Villiers, Willem J S

    2005-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are increased in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and have been implicated as mediators of intestinal inflammation. We investigated the hypothesis that antioxidants with diverse properties attenuate disease progression in a murine dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model. These antioxidants were (A) S-adenosylmethionine, a glutathione (GSH) precursor; (B) green tea polyphenols, a well-known antioxidant; and (C) 2(R,S)-n-propylthiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (PTCA), a cysteine prodrug, involved in GSH biosynthesis. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups and provided with the above mentioned antioxidants or the vehicle incorporated into chow. The animals were further divided into two subgroups and given normal drinking water (control) or water supplemented with DSS (to induce colitis), and the progression of the disease was studied. DSS-treated mice developed severe colitis as shown by bloody diarrhea, weight loss and pathological involvement (P<.001). However, all the antioxidants significantly improved diarrhea and colon lesions (P<.01), and increased body weights (P<.05). Hematocrits were significantly less affected in DSS-treated animals receiving antioxidants (P<.01). Colon lengths were significantly decreased due to mucosal inflammation in DSS-treated animals, but antioxidant therapy normalized this pathological finding (P<.001). The blood level of reduced GSH was decreased in DSS-treated mice (P<.05) and returned to normal when treated with antioxidants. Serum amyloid A (acute phase protein; P=.0015) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; pro-inflammatory cytokine; P<.01) were significantly increased in DSS-treated animals (161+/-40 pg/ml) and improved with antioxidant treatment (P<.01). Finally, actin cytoskeleton was distorted and fragmented in the mucosa of DSS-treated mice and improved with antioxidant therapy. In conclusion, three structurally dissimilar antioxidants provided protection against DSS

  9. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfate attenuates murine graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Budde, Holger; Sorns, Marie-Sophie; Welker, Pia; Licha, Kai; Wolff, Hendrik; Riggert, Joachim; Wulf, Gerald; Legler, Tobias J

    2016-02-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a severe immune reaction commonly occurring after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The outcome of patients who do not respond to the currently used immunosuppressive drugs is poor, thus there is an urgent need for the evaluation of new therapies. Heparin has a well-known anti-inflammatory effect and heparin analogues with a low anticoagulant effect are interesting candidates as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We explored the therapeutic potential of dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS), a novel class of heparin derivatives, on murine acute GvHD in vivo. The therapeutic effect of dPGS on murine GvHD was more intense after intravenous application compared to subcutaneous injection. An increased survival rate and improved clinical scores were observed in mice treated with 5 mg/kg once a week. In these animals, there was a reduction in the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, which are the main effectors of GvHD. In addition, dPGS treatment decreased the number of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-producing T cells. Increasing the dose of dPGS reversed the positive effect on survival as well as the clinical score, which indicates a small therapeutic range. Here, we report for the first time that dPGS have a significant immunosuppressive in vivo effect in a mouse model of severe acute GvHD. Therefore, we propose to study dPGS as promising candidates for the development of potential new drugs in the treatment of steroid-refractory GvHD patients first in larger animals and later in humans. PMID:26634847

  10. Hyperlipidemia affects multiscale structure and strength of murine femur

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Lutz, Andre; Du, Xia; Klimecky, Laureen; Kawas, Neal; Hourany, Talia; Jahng, Joelle; Chin, Jesse; Tintut, Yin; Nackenhors, Udo; Keyak, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    To improve bone strength prediction beyond limitations of assessment founded solely on the bone mineral component, we investigated the effect of hyperlipidemia, present in more than 40% of osteoporotic patients, on multiscale structure of murine bone. Our overarching purpose is to estimate bone strength accurately, to facilitate mitigating fracture morbidity and mortality in patients. Because i) orientation of collagen type I affects, independently of degree of mineralization, cortical bone’s micro-structural strength; and, ii) hyperlipidemia affects collagen orientation and µCT volumetric tissue mineral density (vTMD) in murine cortical bone, we have constructed the first multiscale finite element (mFE), mouse-specific femoral model to study the effect of collagen orientation and vTMD on strength in Ldlr−/−, a mouse model of hyperlipidemia, and its control wild type, on either high fat diet or normal diet. Each µCT scan-based mFE model included either element-specific elastic orthotropic properties calculated from collagen orientation and vTMD (collagen-density model) by experimentally validated formulation, or usual element-specific elastic isotropic material properties dependent on vTMD-only (density-only model). We found that collagen orientation, assessed by circularly polarized light and confocal microscopies, and vTMD, differed among groups; and that microindentation results strongly correlate with elastic modulus of collagen-density models (r2=0.85, p=10−5). Collagen-density models yielded 1) larger strains, and therefore lower strength, in simulations of 3-point bending and physiological loading; and 2) higher correlation between mFE-predicted strength and 3-point bending experimental strength, than density-only models. This novel method supports ongoing translational research to achieve the as yet elusive goal of accurate bone strength prediction. PMID:24795172

  11. Hyperlipidemia affects multiscale structure and strength of murine femur.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Lutz, Andre; Du, Xia; Klimecky, Laureen; Kawas, Neal; Hourany, Talia; Jahng, Joelle; Chin, Jesse; Tintut, Yin; Nackenhors, Udo; Keyak, Joyce

    2014-07-18

    To improve bone strength prediction beyond limitations of assessment founded solely on the bone mineral component, we investigated the effect of hyperlipidemia, present in more than 40% of osteoporotic patients, on multiscale structure of murine bone. Our overarching purpose is to estimate bone strength accurately, to facilitate mitigating fracture morbidity and mortality in patients. Because (i) orientation of collagen type I affects, independently of degree of mineralization, cortical bone׳s micro-structural strength; and, (ii) hyperlipidemia affects collagen orientation and μCT volumetric tissue mineral density (vTMD) in murine cortical bone, we have constructed the first multiscale finite element (mFE), mouse-specific femoral model to study the effect of collagen orientation and vTMD on strength in Ldlr(-/-), a mouse model of hyperlipidemia, and its control wild type, on either high fat diet or normal diet. Each µCT scan-based mFE model included either element-specific elastic orthotropic properties calculated from collagen orientation and vTMD (collagen-density model) by experimentally validated formulation, or usual element-specific elastic isotropic material properties dependent on vTMD-only (density-only model). We found that collagen orientation, assessed by circularly polarized light and confocal microscopies, and vTMD, differed among groups and that microindentation results strongly correlate with elastic modulus of collagen-density models (r(2)=0.85, p=10(-5)). Collagen-density models yielded (1) larger strains, and therefore lower strength, in simulations of 3-point bending and physiological loading; and (2) higher correlation between mFE-predicted strength and 3-point bending experimental strength, than density-only models. This novel method supports ongoing translational research to achieve the as yet elusive goal of accurate bone strength prediction. PMID:24795172

  12. Deep Sequencing of the Murine Olfactory Receptor Neuron Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kanageswaran, Ninthujah; Demond, Marilen; Nagel, Maximilian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Baumgart, Sabrina; Scholz, Paul; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Doerner, Julia F.; Conrad, Heike; Oberland, Sonja; Wetzel, Christian H.; Neuhaus, Eva M.; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and differentiate among thousands of odorants relies on a large set of olfactory receptors (OR) and a multitude of accessory proteins within the olfactory epithelium (OE). ORs and related signaling mechanisms have been the subject of intensive studies over the past years, but our knowledge regarding olfactory processing remains limited. The recent development of next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques encouraged us to assess the transcriptome of the murine OE. We analyzed RNA from OEs of female and male adult mice and from fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-sorted olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) obtained from transgenic OMP-GFP mice. The Illumina RNA-Seq protocol was utilized to generate up to 86 million reads per transcriptome. In OE samples, nearly all OR and trace amine-associated receptor (TAAR) genes involved in the perception of volatile amines were detectably expressed. Other genes known to participate in olfactory signaling pathways were among the 200 genes with the highest expression levels in the OE. To identify OE-specific genes, we compared olfactory neuron expression profiles with RNA-Seq transcriptome data from different murine tissues. By analyzing different transcript classes, we detected the expression of non-olfactory GPCRs in ORNs and established an expression ranking for GPCRs detected in the OE. We also identified other previously undescribed membrane proteins as potential new players in olfaction. The quantitative and comprehensive transcriptome data provide a virtually complete catalogue of genes expressed in the OE and present a useful tool to uncover candidate genes involved in, for example, olfactory signaling, OR trafficking and recycling, and proliferation. PMID:25590618

  13. Force-Induced Craniosynostosis in the Murine Sagittal Suture

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Rhee, Samuel T.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The etiology of non-syndromic craniosynostosis remains elusive. While compressive forces have been implicated in premature suture fusion, conclusive evidence of force-induced craniosynostosis is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if cyclical loading of the murine calvarium could induce suture fusion. METHODS Calvarial coupons from post-natal day 21, B6CBA wild-type mice (n = 18) were harvested and cultured. A custom appliance capable of delivering controlled, cyclical, compressive loads was applied perpendicular to the sagittal suture within the coupon in vitro. Nine coupons were subjected to 0.3g of force for 30 minutes each day for a total of 14 days. A control group of nine coupons was clamped in the appliance without loading. Analysis of suture phenotype was performed using alkaline phosphatase and H&E staining techniques, as well as in situ hybridization analysis using Bone Sialoprotein (BSP). RESULTS Control group sagittal sutures—which normally remain patent in mice—showed their customary histological appearance. In contradistinction, sagittal sutures subjected to cyclic loading showed histological evidence of premature fusion (craniosynostosis). In addition, alkaline phosphatase activity and BSP expression was observed to be increased in the experimental group when compared to matched controls. CONCLUSIONS An in vitro model of forced-induced craniosynostosis has been devised. Premature fusion of the murine sagittal suture was induced with the application of controlled, cyclical, compressive loads. These results implicate abnormal forces in the development of non-syndromic craniosynostosis, which supports our global hypothesis that epigenetic phenomena have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. PMID:19952640

  14. Functional characterization of muscarinic receptors in murine airways.

    PubMed Central

    Garssen, J.; Van Loveren, H.; Gierveld, C. M.; Van der Vliet, H.; Nijkamp, F. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists considered to be selective for M1 receptors (pirenzepine; PZ), M2 receptors (AFDX-116), and for M3 receptors (4-diphenyl acetoxy N-methyl-piperidine (4-DAMP)) were used to investigate the existence of muscarinic receptors subtypes in murine airways. Atropine was used as a nonselective antagonist. The effects of these antagonists were studied upon tracheal contractions induced either by EFS (electric field stimulation) or by application of an exogenous cholinoceptor agonist (arecoline). 2. The muscarinic receptor antagonists tested inhibited arecoline-induced tracheal contractions with the following rank order of potency: 4-DAMP = atropine > pirenzepine = AFDX-116. The rank order of potency of the muscarinic antagonists used in inhibiting EFS-induced tracheal contractions was: 4-DAMP = atropine > PZ > AFDX-116. The pA2 values for these antagonists were similar when compared to the pA2 values determined in guinea-pig and bovine airway smooth muscle. 3. In addition to in vitro studies, the effects of inhalation of the different muscarinic antagonists on lung function parameters in vivo were investigated. Inhalation of 4-DAMP induced a decrease in airway resistance and an increase in lung compliance. In contrast, inhalation of AFDX-116 induced an increase in airway resistance and almost no change in lung compliance. Apart from some minor effects of atropine on airway resistance, atropine, PZ, and pilocarpine failed to induce changes in lung mechanics as determined by in vivo lung function measurements. 4. The results provide evidence for the existence of M3 receptors on murine tracheae that are involved in the contraction of tracheal smooth muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8495246

  15. Murine Double Minute-2 Inhibition Ameliorates Established Crescentic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Romoli, Simone; Desai, Jyaysi; Honarpisheh, Mohammad Mohsen; Kumar, Santhosh V; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Thomasova, Dana

    2016-06-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis is characterized by glomerular necroinflammation and crescent formation. Its treatment includes unspecific and toxic agents; therefore, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is required. The E3-ubiquitin ligase murine double minute (MDM)-2 is a nonredundant element of NF-κB signaling and the negative regulator of tumor suppressor gene TP53-mediated cell cycle arrest and cell death. We hypothesized that the MDM2 would drive crescentic glomerulonephritis by NF-κB-dependent glomerular inflammation and by p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell hyperproliferation. Indeed, the pre-emptive MDM2 blockade by nutlin-3a ameliorated all aspects of crescentic glomerulonephritis. MDM2 inhibition had identical protective effects in Trp53-deficient mice, with the exception of crescent formation, which was not influenced by nutlin-3a treatment. In vitro experiments confirmed the contribution of MDM2 for induction of NF-κB-dependent cytokines in murine glomerular endothelial cells and for p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell proliferation. To evaluate MDM2 blockade as a potential therapeutic intervention in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, we treated mice with established glomerulonephritis with nutlin-3a. Delayed onset of nutlin-3a treatment was equally protective as the pre-emptive treatment in abrogating crescentic glomerulonephritis. Together, the pathogenic effects of MDM2 are twofold, that is, p53-independent NF-κB activation increasing intraglomerular inflammation and p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell hyperplasia and crescent formation. We therefore propose MDM2 blockade as a potential novel therapeutic strategy in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. PMID:27102769

  16. Isolation of Primary Murine Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruck, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Epping, Lisa; Herrmann, Alexander M.; Meuth, Sven G.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier is ultrastructurally assembled by a monolayer of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) interconnected by a junctional complex of tight and adherens junctions. Together with other cell-types such as astrocytes or pericytes, they form the neurovascular unit (NVU), which specifically regulates the interchange of fluids, molecules and cells between the peripheral blood and the CNS. Through this complex and dynamic system BMECs are involved in various processes maintaining the homeostasis of the CNS. A dysfunction of the BBB is observed as an essential step in the pathogenesis of many severe CNS diseases. However, specific and targeted therapies are very limited, as the underlying mechanisms are still far from being understood. Animal and in vitro models have been extensively used to gain in-depth understanding of complex physiological and pathophysiological processes. By reduction and simplification it is possible to focus the investigation on the subject of interest and to exclude a variety of confounding factors. However, comparability and transferability are also reduced in model systems, which have to be taken into account for evaluation. The most common animal models are based on mice, among other reasons, mainly due to the constantly increasing possibilities of methodology. In vitro studies of isolated murine BMECs might enable an in-depth analysis of their properties and of the blood-brain-barrier under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Further insights into the complex mechanisms at the BBB potentially provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies. This protocol describes a method to isolate primary murine microvascular endothelial cells by a sequence of physical and chemical purification steps. Special considerations for purity and cultivation of MBMECs as well as quality control, potential applications and limitations are discussed. PMID:25489873

  17. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Basco, Maria D S; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L; Hart, Mark E; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together. PMID:26658916

  18. Amplification of the murine mdr2 gene and a reconsideration of the structure of the murine mdr gene locus.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, L S

    1995-01-01

    A common feature of cells selected in vitro for the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype is the amplification and concomitant overexpression of the mdr genes. In murine macrophage-like J774.2-derived MDR cell lines, there is a good correlation between levels of amplification and expression for the mdr1b gene, but not for the other two gene family members, mdr1a and mdr2. To understand this phenomenon better, a study of the amplification and expression of the mdr2 gene was undertaken. Southern blotting of genomic DNAs from a series of six MDR cell lines revealed that five of these lines had 5'-end amplification of mdr2, whereas only three contained 3'-end amplification. The analysis also suggested the involvement of a recombination hot-spot in this phenomenon. Despite the observation that the ratio between the number of copies of the 5' and 3' ends of the gene differs among cell lines, the ratio of 5' to 3' end transcription of mdr2 was approximately 1 in all cell lines. An analysis of promoter methylation in MDR cell lines demonstrated that this mechanism may play a role in regulating the transcription of mdr2, but not of mdr1b. Long-range mapping of the mdr locus in parental and amplified cell lines suggested that the three mdr genes are oriented in the same direction, and also revealed the presence of a number of rearrangement events. Models for the murine mdr gene locus in wild-type cells and in a cell line containing a rearrangement are presented. PMID:7832992

  19. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S.; Basco, Maria D. S.; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L.; Hart, Mark E.; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P.

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together. PMID:26658916

  20. A murine-ES like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem cells have been shown to exist in two functionally distinct pluripotent states, embryonic stem cells (ES cell)- and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), which are defined by the culture growth factor conditions. Human ES cells appear to exist in an epiblast-like state, which in comparison to their murine counterparts, is relatively difficult to propagate and manipulate. As a result, gene targeting is difficult and to-date only a handful of human knock-in or knock-out cell lines exist. We explored whether an alternative stem cell state exists for human stem cells as well, and demonstrate that manipulation of the growth factor milieu allows the derivation of a novel human stem cell type that displays morphological, molecular and functional properties of murine ES cells and facilitates gene targeting. As such, the murine ES-like state provides a powerful tool for the generation of recombinant human pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:20569691

  1. Cross-reactivity of autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with murine collagen VII.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Kinga; Sesarman, Alina; Oswald, Eva; Feldrihan, Vasile; Fritsch, Anja; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sitaru, Cassian

    2010-04-01

    The pathomechanism of antibody-mediated tissue damage in autoimmune diseases can be best studied in experimental models by passively transferring specific autoantibodies into animals. The reproduction of the disease in animals depends on several factors, including the cross-reactivity of patient autoantibodies with the animal tissue. Here, we show that autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease, recognize multiple epitopes on murine collagen VII. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that EBA patients' IgG cross-reacts with mouse skin. Overlapping, recombinant fragments of murine collagen VII were used to characterize the reactivity of EBA sera and to map the epitopes on the murine antigen by ELISA and immunoblotting. The patients' autoantibody binding to murine collagen VII triggered pathogenic events as demonstrated by a complement fixing and an ex vivo granulocyte-dependent dermal-epidermal separation assay. These findings should greatly facilitate the development of improved disease models and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20084423

  2. FLOW CYTOMETRIC COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF TRIALKYTING ON THE MURINE ERYTHROLEUKEMIC CELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cellular effects of exposure to tributyltin (TBT), triethyltin (TET), or trimethyltin (TMT) were investigated by flow cytometry employing the murine erythroleukemic cell (MELC) as a model cellular system. Cell viability was investigated by the carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) ...

  3. Differential effects of processing time and duration of collagenase digestion on human and murine fat grafts

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, SA; Tannan, ST; Cao, Y; Peirce, SM; Lin, KY

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous fat graft retention is unpredictable and mechanisms of optimization are poorly understood. Attempts at improving retention utilize collagenase experimentally and clinically to isolate the stromal vascular fraction to “enhance” fat grafts. However, no standardized duration for collagenase digestion or time following fat graft harvest has been established. This study investigates the effect of 1.) time after fat graft harvest and 2.) collagenase digestion time on interstitial cell and adipocyte viability in murine fat and human lipoaspirate. Methods Murine fat and human lipoaspirate were incubated ex vivo after harvest at room temperature for 120 minutes. Additional groups were incubated with collagenase for increasing five minute intervals from 30-60 minutes. Samples from each group were stained with BODIPY to quantify intact adipocytes and LIVE/DEAD kit to quantify interstitial cell viability. Results With increased time post-harvest, the number of intact adipocytes in murine fat and human lipoaspirate remained unchanged. Human interstitial cells were resistant to the effect of increased time ex vivo, while murine interstitial cells decreased in viability. In both populations, increased collagenase digestion time significantly decreased the number of viable adipocytes (murine: p-value ≤ 0.001, human: p-value ≤ 0.001) and interstitial cells (murine: p-value ≤ 0.001, human: p-value ≤ 0.001). Conclusions Human and murine adipocytes and human interstitial cells appear resistant to deleterious effects of increasing time following harvest. However, murine interstitial cells including are sensitive to increased time and prolonged collagenase digestion. These studies highlight the complex cellular components of fat grafts and how they respond differentially to time and collagenase digestion. PMID:26218393

  4. Behavior of a cloned murine interferon alpha/beta receptor expressed in homospecific or heterospecific background.

    PubMed Central

    Uzé, G; Lutfalla, G; Bandu, M T; Proudhon, D; Mogensen, K E

    1992-01-01

    A murine interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor was cloned from the IFN-sensitive L1210 cell line on the basis of its homology with the human receptor. A combination of methods that includes the screening of random-primed and oligo(dT)-primed cDNA libraries and polymerase chain reactions with a single-side specificity was used. At the amino acid level, the murine IFN-alpha/beta shows 46% identity with its human counterpart. Both human WISH cells presenting a low sensitivity to mouse IFN and a murine L1210 mutant subline that does not express the receptor have been stably transfected with the murine IFN-alpha/beta receptor. Whereas transfected human cells became sensitive to a limited number of mouse IFN-alpha/beta subtypes, the transfected murine L1210 mutant was found to be fully complemented and became sensitive to all mouse IFN-alpha/beta subtypes tested, including those that were not active on transfected human cells. These results strongly suggest that the receptor described here is implicated in the mediation of the activities of all murine IFN-alpha/beta subtypes. Images PMID:1533935

  5. A Functional Murine Model of Hind Limb Demand Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Michael A.; Crawford, Robert S.; Abularrage, Christopher J.; Patel, Virendra I.; Conrad, Mark F.; Yoo, Jin Hyung; Watkins, Michael T.; Albadawi, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction To date murine models of treadmill exercise have been used to study general exercise physiology and angiogenesis in ischemic hind limbs. The purpose of these experiments was to develop a murine model of demand ischemia in an ischemic limb to mimic claudication in humans. The primary goal was to determine whether treadmill exercise reflected a hemodynamic picture which might be consistent with the hyperemic response observed in humans. Methods Aged hypercholesterolemic ApoE null mice ( ApoE−/−, n=13) were subjected to Femoral Artery Ligation (FAL), and allowed to recover from the acute ischemic response. Peripheral perfusion of the hind limbs at rest was determined by serial evaluation using laser Doppler imaging (LDI) on days 0, 7, and 14 following FAL. During the duration of the experiments, the mice were also assessed on an established 5 point clinical ischemic score which assessed the degree of digital amputation, necrosis, and cyanosis as compared to the non ischemic contralateral limb. After stabilization of the LDI ratio (ischemic limb flux/contralateral non ischemic limb flux) and clinical ischemic score, mice underwent two days of treadmill training (10 min @ 10 m/min, incline of 10°) followed by 60 minutes daily treadmill exercise (13 m/min, incline of 10°) through day 25. An evaluation of pre-exercise and post exercise perfusion using LDI was performed on two separate occasions following the onset of daily exercise. During the immediate 15 minute post exercise evaluation, LDI scanning was obtained in quadruplicate, to allow identification of peak flux ratios. Statistical analysis included unpaired t-tests and ANOVA. Results After FAL, the LDI Flux ratio reached a nadir between days one and two, then stabilized by day 14 and remained stable through day 25. The clinical ischemic score stabilized at day 7, and remained stable throughout the rest of the experiment. Based on stabilization of both the clinical ischemic score and LDI ratio

  6. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  7. Development of a mechanical testing assay for fibrotic murine liver

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Stephanie L.; Lyshchik, Andrej; Washington, Mary K.; Gore, John C.; Miga, Michael I.

    2007-11-15

    In this article, a novel protocol for mechanical testing, combined with finite element modeling, is presented that allows the determination of the elastic modulus of normal and fibrotic murine livers and is compared to an independent mechanical testing method. The novel protocol employs suspending a portion of murine liver tissue in a cylindrical polyacrylamide gel, imaging with a microCT, conducting mechanical testing, and concluding with a mechanical property determination via a finite element method analysis. More specifically, the finite element model is built from the computerized tomography (CT) images, and boundary conditions are imposed in order to simulate the mechanical testing conditions. The resulting model surface stress is compared to that obtained during mechanical testing, which subsequently allows for direct evaluation of the liver modulus. The second comparison method involves a mechanical indentation test performed on a remaining liver lobe for comparison. In addition, this lobe is used for histological analysis to determine relationships between elasticity measurements and tissue health. This complete system was used to study 14 fibrotic livers displaying advanced fibrosis (injections with irritant), three control livers (injections without irritant), and three normal livers (no injections). The moduli evaluations for nondiseased livers were estimated as 0.62{+-}0.09 kPa and 0.59{+-}0.1 kPa for indenter and model-gel-tissue (MGT) assay tests, respectively. Moduli estimates for diseased liver ranged from 0.6-1.64 kPa and 0.96-1.88 kPa for indenter and MGT assay tests, respectively. The MGT modulus, though not equivalent to the modulus determined by indentation, demonstrates a high correlation, thus indicating a relationship between the two testing methods. The results also showed a clear difference between nondiseased and diseased livers. The developed MGT assay system is quite compact and could easily be utilized for controlled evaluation of

  8. A role for smoothened during murine lens and cornea development.

    PubMed

    Choi, Janet J Y; Ting, Chao-Tung; Trogrlic, Lidia; Milevski, Stefan V; Familari, Mary; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U

    2014-01-01

    Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316-30) showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3) were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre) did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre) resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5-E12.5) in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs secondary to defects

  9. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  10. A Role for Smoothened during Murine Lens and Cornea Development

    PubMed Central

    Trogrlic, Lidia; Milevski, Stefan V.; Familari, Mary; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U

    2014-01-01

    Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316–30) showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3) were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre) did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre) resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5–E12.5) in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs secondary to

  11. Bone marrow mononuclears from murine tibia after spaceflight on biosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Elena; Roe, Maria; Buravkova, Ludmila; Andrianova, Irina; Goncharova, Elena; Gornostaeva, Alexandra

    Elucidation of the space flight effects on the adult stem and progenitor cells is an important goal in space biology and medicine. A unique opportunity for this is provided by project "BION -M1". The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 30-day flight on biosatellite "BION - M1" and the subsequent 7-day recovery on the quantity, viability, immunophenotype of mononuclears from murine tibia bone marrow. Also the in vitro characterization of functional capacity of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) was scheduled. Under the project, the S57black/6 mice were divided into groups: spaceflight/vivarium control, recovery after spaceflight/ vivarium control to recovery. Bone marrow mononuclears were isolated from the tibia and immunophenotyped using antibodies against CD45, CD34, CD90 on a flow cytometer Epics XL (Beckman Coulter). A part of the each pool was frozen for subsequent estimation of hematopoietic colony-forming units (CFU), the rest was used for the evaluation of fibroblast CFU (CFUf) number, MSC proliferative activity and osteogenic potency. The cell number in the flight group was significantly lower than in the vivarium control group. There were no differences in this parameter between flight and control groups after 7 days of recovery. The mononuclears viability was more than 95 percent in all examined groups. Flow cytometric analysis showed no differences in the bone marrow cell immunophenotype (CD45, CD34, CD90.1 (Thy1)), but the flight animals had more large-sized CD45+mononuclears, than the control groups of mice. There was no difference in the CFUf number between groups. After 7 days in vitro the MSC number in flight group was twice higher than in vivarium group, after 10 days - 4 times higher. These data may indicate a higher proliferative activity of MSCs after spaceflight. MSCs showed the same and high alkaline phosphatase activity, both in flight and in the control groups, suggesting no effect of spaceflight factors on early

  12. Resistance to cyclopentenylcytosine in murine leukemia L1210 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Cooney, D A; Zhang, M H; Ahluwalia, G; Ford, H; Johns, D G

    1993-12-01

    Cyclopentenyl cytosine (CPEC) exhibits oncological activity in murine and human tumor cells and has now entered Phase I clinical trials. Its mode of action as an antitumor agent appears to be inhibition by its triphosphate (CPEC-TP) of CTP synthase, the enzyme which converts UTP to CTP. In an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of resistance to CPEC, a murine leukemia cell line resistant to CPEC (L1210/CPEC) was developed by N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced mutagenesis and subsequent selection by cultivation of the L1210 cells in the presence of 2 microM CPEC. Resistant clones were maintained in CPEC-free medium for 6 generations before biochemical studies were performed. The resistant clone selected for further studies was approximately 13,000-fold less sensitive to growth inhibition by CPEC than the parental cells, and the concentration of CPEC required to deplete CTP in the resistant cells was 50-fold higher than in the sensitive cells. A comparison of the kinetic properties of CTP synthase from sensitive and resistant cells indicated alteration in the properties of the enzyme from the latter; the median inhibitory concentration for CPEC-TP increased from 2 to 14 microM, Km for UTP decreased from 126 to 50 microM, and Vmax increased 12-fold from 0.2 to 2.3 nmol/mg/min. Northern blot analyses of polyadenylated RNA from the resistant and sensitive cells indicated a 3-fold increase in transcripts of the CTP synthase gene in the resistant line. Consistent with these alterations in the properties of the enzyme, the resistant cells exhibited significantly expanded CTP and dCTP pools (4- 5-fold) when compared with the sensitive cells. No change was observed, however, in the properties of uridine-cytidine kinase, the enzyme responsible for the initial phosphorylation of CPEC; despite this, however, cellular uptake of CPEC was greatly decreased, and phosphorylation of CPEC and its incorporation into RNA were 10-fold less than in the parental cells. These latter

  13. Reverse genetics mediated recovery of infectious murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Ureña, Luis; Thorne, Lucy; Yunus, Muhammad A; Goodfellow, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Human noroviruses are responsible for most cases of human gastroenteritis (GE) worldwide and are recurrent problem in environments where close person-to-person contact cannot be avoided (1, 2). During the last few years an increase in the incidence of outbreaks in hospitals has been reported, causing significant disruptions to their operational capacity as well as large economic losses. The identification of new antiviral approaches has been limited due to the inability of human noroviruses to complete a productive infection in cell culture (3). The recent isolation of a murine norovirus (MNV), closely related to human norovirus (4) but which can be propagated in cells (5) has opened new avenues for the investigation of these pathogens (6, 7). MNV replication results in the synthesis of new positive sense genomic and subgenomic RNA molecules, the latter of which corresponds to the last third of the viral genome (Figure 1). MNV contains four different open reading frames (ORFs), of which ORF1 occupies most of the genome and encodes seven non-structural proteins (NS1-7) released from a polyprotein precursor. ORF2 and ORF3 are contained within the subgenomic RNA region and encode the capsid proteins (VP1 and VP2, respectively) (Figure 1). Recently, we have identified that additional ORF4 overlapping ORF2 but in a different reading frame is functional and encodes for a mitochondrial localised virulence factor (VF1) (8). Replication for positive sense RNA viruses, including noroviruses, takes place in the cytoplasm resulting in the synthesis of new uncapped RNA genomes. To promote viral translation, viruses exploit different strategies aimed at recruiting the cellular protein synthesis machinery (9-11). Interestingly, norovirus translation is driven by the multifunctional viral protein-primer VPg covalently linked to the 5' end of both genomic and subgenomic RNAs (12-14). This sophisticated mechanism of translation is likely to be a major factor in the limited

  14. Toxicity of Calcium Hydroxide Nanoparticles on Murine Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Omid; Azadnia, Sina; Mozayeni, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major contributing factors, which may cause failure of endodontic treatment, is the presence of residual microorganisms in the root canal system. For years, most dentists have been using calcium hydroxide (CH) as the intracanal medicament between treatment sessions to eliminate remnant microorganisms. Reducing the size of CH particles into nanoparticles enhances the penetration of this medicament into dentinal tubules and increases their antimicrobial efficacy. This in vitro study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles and conventional CH on fibroblast cell line using the Mosmann’s Tetrazolium Toxicity (MTT) assay. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted on L929 murine fibroblast cell line by cell culture and evaluation of the direct effect of materials on the cultured cells. Materials were evaluated in two groups of 10 samples each at 24, 48 and 72 h. At each time point, 10 samples along with 5 positive and 5 negative controls were evaluated. The samples were transferred into tubes and exposed to fibroblast cells. The viability of cells was then evaluated. The Two-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Cytotoxicity of both materials decreased over time and for conventional CH was lower than that of nanoparticles. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles was similar to that of conventional CH. PMID:25598810

  15. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  16. Lack of XBP-1 Impedes Murine Cytomegalovirus Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Drori, Adi; Messerle, Martin; Brune, Wolfram; Tirosh, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-nucleus signaling cascade induced in response to ER stress. The UPR aims at restoring homeostasis, but can also induce apoptosis if stress persists. Infection by human and murine cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) provokes ER stress and induces the UPR. However, both CMVs manipulate the UPR to promote its prosurvival activity and delay apoptosis. The underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that MCMV and HCMV encode a late protein to target IRE1 for degradation. However, the importance of its downstream effector, X Box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), has not been directly studied. Here we show that deletion of XBP-1 prior to or early after infection confers a transient delay in viral propagation in fibroblasts that can be overcome by increasing the viral dose. A similar phenotype was demonstrated in peritoneal macrophages. In vivo, acute infection by MCMV is reduced in the absence of XBP-1. Our data indicate that removal of XBP-1 confers a kinetic delay in early stages of MCMV infection and suggest that the late targeting of IRE1 is aimed at inhibiting activities other than the splicing of XBP-1 mRNA. PMID:25333725

  17. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Heller, Horace Craig

    2014-01-01

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages. PMID:25140132

  18. Curcumin modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion in murine sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula; Wang, Si-Wei; Mishra, Nilamadhab; El-Gazzar, Mohammad; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective Circulating cell-endothelial cell interaction in sepsis is a rate-determining factor in organ dysfunction, and interventions targeting this process have a potential therapeutic value. In this project, we examined whether curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric and an anti-inflammatory agent, could disrupt interactions between circulating blood cells and endothelium and improve survival in a murine model of sepsis. Methods Mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis vs. sham surgery. We studied leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation using intravital fluorescent video microscopy technique, blood brain barrier dysfunction using Evans Blue leakage method, P-selectin expression using dual radiolabeling technique and survival in mice subjected to Sham, CLP and CLP with curcumin pre-treatment (CLP+Curcumin). Results Curcumin significantly attenuated leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation, Evans Blue leakage in the brain tissue and improved survival in mice with CLP. P-selectin expression in mice with CLP+Curcumin was significantly attenuated compared to CLP in various microcirculatory beds including brain. Reduction in platelet adhesion was predominantly via modulation of endothelium by curcumin. Conclusion Curcumin pre-treatment modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion and blood brain barrier dysfunction in mice with CLP via P-selectin expression and improves survival in mice with CLP. PMID:20690979

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  20. A novel postoperative immobilization model for murine Achilles tendon sutures.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Yoichiro; Takayama, Yuzo; Kushige, Hiroko; Jacinto, Sandra; Sekido, Mitsuru; Kida, Yasuyuki S

    2016-08-01

    The body's motion and function are all in part effected by a vital tissue, the tendon. Tendon injury often results in limited functioning after postoperative procedures and even for a long time after rehabilitation. Although numerous studies have reported surgical procedures using animal models which have contributed to both basic and clinical research, modeling of tendon sutures or postoperative immobilizations has not been performed on small experimental animals, such as mice. In this study we have developed an easy Achilles tendon suture and postoperative ankle fixation model in a mouse. Right Achilles tendons were incised and 10-0 nylons were passed through the proximal and distal ends using a modified Kessler method. Subsequently, the right ankle was immobilized in a plantarflexed position with novel splints, which were made from readily available extension tubes. Restriction of the tendon using handmade splints reduced swelling, as opposed to fixating with the usual plaster of Paris. Using this method, the usage of the right Achilles tendons began on postoperative days 13.5 ± 4.6, which indicated healing within two weeks. Therefore our simple short-term murine Achilles tendon suture procedure is useful for studying immediate tendon repair mechanisms in various models, including genetically-modified mice. PMID:26678297

  1. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Melanie; Schnierle, Barbara S. . E-mail: schba@pei.de

    2005-06-20

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles.

  2. Quercetin Aglycone Is Bioavailable in Murine Pancreas and Pancreatic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifeng; Angst, Eliane; Park, Jenny L.; Moro, Aune; Dawson, David W.; Reber, Howard A.; Eibl, Guido; Hines, O. Joe; Go, Vay-Liang W.; Lu, Qing-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Quercetin is a potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic and other cancers. This study was to examine the distribution of quercetin in plasma, lung, liver, pancreas and pancreatic cancer xenografts in a murine in vivo model and the uptake of quercetin in pancreatic cancer MiaPaCa-2 cells in cellular in vitro model. Mice were randomly allocated to control diet, 0.2 and 1% quercetin diet groups utilizing the AIN93G-based diet (n=12 per group) for 6 weeks. In addition, 6 mice from each group were injected weekly with chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine (120 mg/kg mouse, i.p.). MiaPaCa cells were collected from culture medium after cells were exposed to 30 µM of quercetin for 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hrs. Levels of quercetin and 3-O’-methyl-quercetin in mice tissues and MiaPaCa-2 cells were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography following enzymatic hydrolysis and then extraction. Our study showed that quercetin is accumulated in pancreatic cancer cells, and is absorbed in the circulating system, tumors and tissues of pancreas, liver and lung in vivo. A higher proportion of total quercetin found in tumors and pancreas are aglycones. Gemcitabine co-treatment with quercetin reduced absorption of quercetin in mice circulatory system and liver. Results from the study provide important information on the interpretation of chemo-therapeutic efficacy of quercetin. PMID:20499918

  3. Mathematical modeling of primary succession of murine intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Simeone; Baxter, Nielson T.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Schloss, Patrick D.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the nature of interpopulation interactions in host-associated microbial communities is critical to understanding gut colonization, responses to perturbations, and transitions between health and disease. Characterizing these interactions is complicated by the complexity of these communities and the observation that even if populations can be cultured, their in vitro and in vivo phenotypes differ significantly. Dynamic models are the cornerstone of computational systems biology and a key objective of computational systems biologists is the reconstruction of biological networks (i.e., network inference) from high-throughput data. When such computational models reflect biology, they provide an opportunity to generate testable hypotheses as well as to perform experiments that are impractical or not feasible in vivo or in vitro. We modeled time-series data for murine microbial communities using statistical approaches and systems of ordinary differential equations. To obtain the dense time-series data, we sequenced the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene from DNA isolated from the fecal material of germfree mice colonized with cecal contents of conventionally raised animals. The modeling results suggested a lack of mutualistic interactions within the community. Among the members of the Bacteroidetes, there was evidence for closely related pairs of populations to exhibit parasitic interactions. Among the Firmicutes, the interactions were all competitive. These results suggest future animal and in silico experiments. Our modeling approach can be applied to other systems to provide a greater understanding of the dynamics of communities associated with health and disease. PMID:24367073

  4. In vivo reprogramming of murine cardiac fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Huang, Yu; Spencer, C. Ian; Foley, Amy; Vedantham, Vasanth; Liu, Lei; Conway, Simon J.; Fu, Ji-dong; Srivastava, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The reprogramming of adult cells into pluripotent cells or directly into alternative adult cell types holds great promise for regenerative medicine. We reported that cardiac fibroblasts, which represent 50% of the cells in the mammalian heart, can be directly reprogrammed to adult cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro by the addition of Gata4, Mef2c and Tbx5 (GMT). Here, we use genetic lineage-tracing to show that resident non-myocytes in the murine heart can be reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vivo by local delivery of GMT after coronary ligation. Induced cardiomyocytes became bi-nucleate, assembled sarcomeres and had cardiomyocyte-like gene expression. Analysis of single cells revealed ventricular cardiomyocyte-like action potentials, beating upon electrical stimulation, and evidence of electrical coupling. In vivo delivery of GMT decreased infarct size and modestly attenuated cardiac dysfunction up to 3 months after coronary ligation. Delivery of the pro-angiogenic and fibroblast activating peptide, Thymosin β4, along with GMT, resulted in further improvements in scar area and cardiac function. These findings demonstrate that cardiac fibroblasts can be reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells in their native environment for potential regenerative purposes. PMID:22522929

  5. Isolation and characterization of recombinant murine Wnt3a

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Andrzej; Krishnamoorthy, Aparna; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    Wnt proteins are a family of morphogens that possess potent biological activity. Structure – function studies have been impeded by poor yield of biologically active recombinant Wnt as well as a propensity of isolated Wnt to self-associate in the absence of detergent. Using stably transfected Drosophila S2 cells, studies have been conducted to improve recovery of recombinant murine Wnt3a, establish conditions for a detergent-free Wnt preparation and examine the effects of limited proteolysis. S2 cell culture conditioned media was subjected to a 3-step protocol including dye-ligand chromatography, immobilized metal affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Through selective pooling of column fractions, homogeneous and purified Wnt3a preparations were obtained. Limited proteolysis of Wnt3a with thrombin resulted in site-specific cleavage within the N-terminal saposin-like motif. To generate detergent-free protein, Wnt3a was immobilized on Cu2+-charged, iminodiacetic acid-derivatized Sepharose beads, detergent-free buffer was applied and Wnt3a eluted from the beads with buffer containing imidazole plus 30 mM methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD). Wnt3a recovered in MβCD-containing buffer was soluble and biologically active. Insofar as MβCD is a member of a family of non-toxic, low molecular weight compounds capable of binding and solubilizing small hydrophobic ligands, Wnt-cyclodextrin complexes may facilitate structure-activity studies in the absence of adverse detergent effects. PMID:25448592

  6. Isolation and characterization of recombinant murine Wnt3a.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Andrzej; Krishnamoorthy, Aparna; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-02-01

    Wnt proteins are a family of morphogens that possess potent biological activity. Structure-function studies have been impeded by poor yield of biologically active recombinant Wnt as well as a propensity of isolated Wnt to self-associate in the absence of detergent. Using stably transfected Drosophila S2 cells, studies have been conducted to improve recovery of recombinant murine Wnt3a, establish conditions for a detergent-free Wnt preparation and examine the effects of limited proteolysis. S2 cell culture conditioned media was subjected to a 3-step protocol including dye-ligand chromatography, immobilized metal affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Through selective pooling of column fractions, homogeneous and purified Wnt3a preparations were obtained. Limited proteolysis of Wnt3a with thrombin resulted in site-specific cleavage within the N-terminal saposin-like motif. To generate detergent-free protein, Wnt3a was immobilized on Cu(2+)-charged, iminodiacetic acid-derivatized Sepharose beads, detergent-free buffer was applied and Wnt3a eluted from the beads with buffer containing imidazole plus 30mM methyl-ß-cyclodextrin (MßCD). Wnt3a recovered in MßCD-containing buffer was soluble and biologically active. Insofar as MßCD is a member of a family of non-toxic, low molecular weight compounds capable of binding and solubilizing small hydrophobic ligands, Wnt-cyclodextrin complexes may facilitate structure-activity studies in the absence of adverse detergent effects. PMID:25448592

  7. The dynamics of murine mammary stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, Qiaoxiang; SUN, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The stem/progenitor cells in the murine mammary gland are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for ductal elongation in puberty, homeostasis maintenance in adult, and lobulo-alveolar genesis during pregnancy. In recent years understanding the epithelial cell hierarchy within the mammary gland is becoming particularly important as these different stem/progenitor cells were perceived to be the cells of origin for various subtypes of breast cancer. Although significant advances have been made in enrichment and isolation of stem/progenitor cells by combinations of antibodies against cell surface proteins together with flow cytometry, and in identification of stem/progenitor cells with multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal using mammary fat pad reconstitution assay and in vivo genetic labeling technique, a clear understanding of how these different stem/progenitors are orchestrated in the mammary gland is still lacking. Here we discuss the different in vivo and in vitro methods currently available for stem/progenitor identification, their associated caveats, and a possible new hierarchy model to reconcile various putative stem/progenitor cell populations identified by different research groups. PMID:25580105

  8. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  9. Immunodetection of osteoadherin in murine tooth extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Couble, Marie-Lise; Bleicher, Françoise; Farges, Jean-Christophe; Peyrol, Simone; Lucchini, Marion; Magloire, Henry; Staquet, Marie-Jeanne

    2004-01-01

    An antiserum was generated from synthetic peptides highly conserved between different mammalian species to immunolocalise the small leucine-rich proteoglycan osteoadherin (OSAD) in murine teeth. In 19-day-old embryos of rats and mice, a positive staining was found in incisor predentin and alveolar bone surrounding developing incisors and molars. In newborns, OSAD was detected at the tip of the first molar cusp where it accumulated in predentin concomitantly with odontoblast differentiation. In 2-day-old rats and mice, in the first molar, immunostaining revealed positive predentin, enamel matrix close to the apical pole of ameloblasts and a strong signal in dentin. At this stage, OSAD was detected in predentin in the second molar. Ultrastructural immunocytochemistry showed gold particles associated with collagen fibres in predentin and in foci at the dentin mineralisation front. Gold particles were also detected near the secretory pole of ameloblasts where enamel crystallites elongate. No staining was detected in pulp tissue and dental follicle. Restriction of OSAD expression to the extracellular matrix of bone, dentin and enamel suggests a role of this proteoglycan in the organisation of mineralised tissues. PMID:14673660

  10. High-dimensional analysis of the murine myeloid cell system.

    PubMed

    Becher, Burkhard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Chen, Jinmiao; Mair, Florian; Sumatoh, Hermi R; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; Low, Donovan; Ruedl, Christiane; Riccardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Poidinger, Michael; Greter, Melanie; Ginhoux, Florent; Newell, Evan W

    2014-12-01

    Advances in cell-fate mapping have revealed the complexity in phenotype, ontogeny and tissue distribution of the mammalian myeloid system. To capture this phenotypic diversity, we developed a 38-antibody panel for mass cytometry and used dimensionality reduction with machine learning-aided cluster analysis to build a composite of murine (mouse) myeloid cells in the steady state across lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. In addition to identifying all previously described myeloid populations, higher-order analysis allowed objective delineation of otherwise ambiguous subsets, including monocyte-macrophage intermediates and an array of granulocyte variants. Using mice that cannot sense granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor GM-CSF (Csf2rb(-/-)), which have discrete alterations in myeloid development, we confirmed differences in barrier tissue dendritic cells, lung macrophages and eosinophils. The methodology further identified variations in the monocyte and innate lymphoid cell compartment that were unexpected, which confirmed that this approach is a powerful tool for unambiguous and unbiased characterization of the myeloid system. PMID:25306126

  11. Current advances of murine models for food allergy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiange; Navarro, Severine; Lopata, Andreas L

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy affects an increasing population in Western world but also developing countries. Researchers have been taking great efforts in identifying and characterising food allergens using molecular tools. However, there are still many mechanistic hypotheses that need to be tested using an appropriate in vivo experimental platform. To date, a number of mouse models for food allergy have been established and provided valuable insights into food allergenicity, development of therapies and allergic inflammation mechanisms. Nevertheless, a large diversity of protocols have been developed for the establishment of relevant mouse models. As a result, comparisons of outcomes between different models are very difficult to be conducted. The phenotypes of mouse models are greatly influenced by genetic background, gender, route of allergen exposure, the nature and concentration of food allergens, as well as the usage of adjuvants. This review focuses on IgE-mediated food allergy, compares the differential approaches in developing appropriate murine models for food allergy and details specific findings for three major food allergens, peanut, milk and shellfish. PMID:26759987

  12. Stabilization of the murine gut microbiome following weaning

    PubMed Central

    Schloss, Patrick D.; Schubert, Alyxandria M.; Zackular, Joseph P.; Iverson, Kathryn D.; Young, Vincent B.; Petrosino, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Ecologists hypothesize that community structure and stability affect productivity, sensitivity to invasion and extinction, and resilience and resistance to perturbations. Viewed in the context of the gut microbiome, the stability of the gut community is important for understanding the effects of antibiotics, diet change and other perturbations on host health and colonization resistance. Here we describe the dynamics of a self-contained community, the murine gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing of fecal samples collected daily from individual mice, we characterized the community membership and structure to determine whether there were significant changes in the gut community during the first year of life. Based on analysis of molecular variance, we observed two community states. The first was observed in the 10 days following weaning and the second was observed by 15 days following weaning. Interestingly, these two states had the same bacterial populations, but those populations had different relative abundances in the two states. By calculating the root mean squared distances between samples collected in the early and late states for each mouse, we observed that the late state was more stable than the early state. This increase in stability was not correlated with increased taxonomic richness, taxonomic diversity, or phylogenetic diversity. In the absence of an experimentally induced perturbation, the second community state was relatively constant through 364 days post weaning. These results suggest a high degree of stability in the microbiome once the community reached the second state. PMID:22688727

  13. Mechanical Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Particles: Effect of Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kol, Nitzan; Gladnikoff, Micha; Barlam, David; Shneck, Roni Z.; Rein, Alan; Rousso, Itay

    2006-01-01

    After budding from the host cell, retroviruses undergo a process of internal reorganization called maturation, which is prerequisite to infectivity. Viral maturation is accompanied by dramatic morphological changes, which are poorly understood in physical/mechanistic terms. Here, we study the mechanical properties of live mature and immature murine leukemia virus particles by indentation-type experiments conducted with an atomic force microscope tip. We find that both mature and immature particles have an elastic shell. Strikingly, the virus shell is twofold stiffer in the immature (0.68 N/m) than the mature (0.31 N/m) form. However, finite-element simulation shows that the average Young's modulus of the immature form is more than fourfold lower than that of the mature form. This finding suggests that per length unit, the protein-protein interactions in the mature shell are stronger than those in the immature shell. We also show that the mature virus shell is brittle, since it can be broken by application of large loading forces, by firm attachment to a substrate, or by repeated application of force. Our results are the first analysis of the mechanical properties of an animal virus, and demonstrate a linkage between virus morphology and mechanical properties. PMID:16632508

  14. Effects of sodium fluoride on immune response in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Beatriz; Vázquez, Marta; Rocha, René Antonio; Devesa, Vicenta; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2016-08-01

    Excessive fluoride intake may be harmful for health, producing dental and skeletal fluorosis, and effects upon neurobehavioral development. Studies in animals have revealed effects upon the gastrointestinal, renal and reproductive systems. Some of the disorders may be a consequence of immune system alterations. In this study, an in vitro evaluation is made of fluoride immunotoxicity using the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage line over a broad range of concentrations (2.5-75mg/L). The results show that the highest fluoride concentrations used (50-75mg/L) reduce the macrophage population in part as a consequence of the generation of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species and consequent redox imbalance, which in turn is accompanied by lipid peroxidation. A decrease in the expression of the antiinflammatory cytokine Il10 is observed from the lowest concentrations (5mg/L). High concentrations (50mg/L) in turn produce a significant increase in the proinflammatory cytokines Il6 and Mip2 from 4h of exposure. In addition, cell phagocytic capacity is seen to decrease at concentrations of ≥20mg/L. These data indicate that fluoride, at high concentrations, may affect macrophages and thus immune system function - particularly with regard to the inflammation autoregulatory processes, in which macrophages play a key role. PMID:26965474

  15. Effect of Premedications in a Murine Model of Asparaginase Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Christian A.; Smith, Colton; Karol, Seth E.; Ramsey, Laura B.; Liu, Chengcheng; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima; Evans, William E.; Finkelman, Fred D.

    2015-01-01

    A murine model was developed that recapitulates key features of clinical hypersensitivity to Escherichia coli asparaginase. Sensitized mice developed high levels of anti-asparaginase IgG antibodies and had immediate hypersensitivity reactions to asparaginase upon challenge. Sensitized mice had complete inhibition of plasma asparaginase activity (P = 4.2 × 10−13) and elevated levels of mouse mast cell protease 1 (P = 6.1 × 10−3) compared with nonsensitized mice. We investigated the influence of pretreatment with triprolidine, cimetidine, the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist CV-6209 [2-(2-acetyl-6-methoxy-3,9-dioxo-4,8-dioxa-2,10-diazaoctacos-1-yl)-1-ethyl-pyridinium chloride], or dexamethasone on the severity of asparaginase-induced allergies. Combining triprolidine and CV-6209 was best for mitigating asparaginase-induced hypersensitivity compared with nonpretreated, sensitized mice (P = 1.2 × 10−5). However, pretreatment with oral dexamethasone was the only agent capable of mitigating the severity of the hypersensitivity (P = 0.03) and partially restoring asparaginase activity (P = 8.3 × 10−4). To rescue asparaginase activity in sensitized mice without requiring dexamethasone, a 5-fold greater dose of asparaginase was needed to restore enzyme activity to a similar concentration as in nonsensitized mice. Our results suggest a role of histamine and PAF in asparaginase-induced allergies and indicate that mast cell–derived proteases released during asparaginase allergy may be a useful marker of clinical hypersensitivity. PMID:25573198

  16. Mieap suppresses murine intestinal tumor via its mitochondrial quality control

    PubMed Central

    Tsuneki, Masayuki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Kinjo, Takao; Nakanishi, Ruri; Arakawa, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Mieap, a novel p53-inducible protein, plays a key role in maintaining healthy mitochondria in various pathophysiological states. Here, we show that Mieap deficiency in ApcMin/+ mice is strikingly associated with the malignant progression of murine intestinal tumors. To understand the role that Mieap plays in in vivo tumorigenesis, we generated Mieap heterozygous (ApcMin/+ Mieap+/−) and homozygous (ApcMin/+ Mieap−/−) ApcMin/+ mice. Interestingly, the ApcMin/+ mice with the Mieap+/− and Mieap−/− genetic background revealed remarkable shortening of the lifetime compared to ApcMin/+ mice because of severe anemia. A substantial increase in the number and size of intestinal polyps was associated with Mieap gene deficiency. Histopathologically, intestinal tumors in the Mieap-deficient ApcMin/+ mice clearly demonstrated advanced grades of adenomas and adenocarcinomas. We demonstrated that the significant increase in morphologically unhealthy mitochondria and trace accumulations of reactive oxygen species may be mechanisms underlying the increased malignant progression of the intestinal tumors of Mieap-deficient ApcMin/+ mice. These findings suggest that the Mieap-regulated mitochondrial quality control plays a critical role in preventing mouse intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:26216032

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  18. A Linkage Map of Endogenous Murine Leukemia Proviruses

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, W. N.; Stoye, J. P.; Taylor, B. A.; Coffin, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty endogenous proviruses belonging to the modified polytropic (Mpmv) class of murine leukemia virus (MLV) were identified by proviral-cellular DNA junction fragment segregation in several sets of recombinant inbred mice. Twenty-six Mpmv loci were mapped to chromosomal regions by matching proviral strain distribution patterns to those of previously assigned genes. Like other endogenous nonecotropic MLVs, Mpmv loci were present on several chromosomes in all strains examined. We pooled recombinant inbred strain linkage data from 110 MLV loci and selected marker genes in order to construct a chromosomal linkage map. Every mouse chromosome was found to harbor at least one proviral insertion, and several regions contained multiple integrations. However, the overall distribution of the 110 mapped proviruses did not deviate significantly from a random distribution. Because of their polymorphism in inbred strains of mice, and the ability to score as many as 57 proviruses per strain using only three hybridization probes, the nonecotropic MLVs mapped in common strains of mice offer a significant advantage over older methods (e.g., biochemical or individual restriction fragment polymorphisms) as genetic markers. These endogenous insertion elements should also be useful for assessing strain purity, and for studying the relatedness of common and not-so-common inbred strains. PMID:2155154

  19. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  20. Can microbiota transplantation abrogate murine colonization resistance against Campylobacter jejuni?

    PubMed Central

    Plickert, R.; Fischer, A.; Göbel, U. B.; Bereswill, S.

    2013-01-01

    Enterocolitis caused by Campylobacter jejuni represents an important socioeconomic burden worldwide. The host-specific intestinal microbiota is essential for maintaining colonization resistance (CR) against C. jejuni in conventional mice. Notably, CR is abrogated by shifts of the intestinal microbiota towards overgrowth with commensal E. coli during acute ileitis. Thus, we investigated whether oral transplantation (TX) of ileal microbiota derived from C. jejuni susceptible mice with acute ileitis overcomes CR of healthy conventional animals. Four days following ileitis microbiota TX or ileitis induction and right before C. jejuni infection, mice displayed comparable loads of main intestinal bacterial groups as shown by culture. Eight days following ileitis induction, but not ileal microbiota TX, however, C. jejuni could readily colonize the gastrointestinal tract of conventional mice and also translocate to extra-intestinal tissue sites such as mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and blood within 4 days following oral infection. Of note, C. jejuni did not further deteriorate histopathology following ileitis induction. Lack of C. jejuni colonization in TX mice was accompanied by a decrease of commensal E. coli loads in the feces 4 days following C. jejuni infection. In summary, oral ileal microbiota TX from susceptible donors is not sufficient to abrogate murine CR against C. jejuni. PMID:24265916

  1. Contemporary murine models in preclinical astrocytoma drug development

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Robert S.; Vitucci, Mark; Wu, Jing; Miller, C. Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Despite 6 decades of research, only 3 drugs have been approved for astrocytomas, the most common malignant primary brain tumors. However, clinical drug development is accelerating with the transition from empirical, cytotoxic therapy to precision, targeted medicine. Preclinical animal model studies are critical for prioritizing drug candidates for clinical development and, ultimately, for their regulatory approval. For decades, only murine models with established tumor cell lines were available for such studies. However, these poorly represent the genomic and biological properties of human astrocytomas, and their preclinical use fails to accurately predict efficacy in clinical trials. Newer models developed over the last 2 decades, including patient-derived xenografts, genetically engineered mice, and genetically engineered cells purified from human brains, more faithfully phenocopy the genomics and biology of human astrocytomas. Harnessing the unique benefits of these models will be required to identify drug targets, define combination therapies that circumvent inherent and acquired resistance mechanisms, and develop molecular biomarkers predictive of drug response and resistance. With increasing recognition of the molecular heterogeneity of astrocytomas, employing multiple, contemporary models in preclinical drug studies promises to increase the efficiency of drug development for specific, molecularly defined subsets of tumors. PMID:25246428

  2. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  3. Dystrophic Spinal Deformities in a Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dalong; Yang, Hao; Chen, Shi; Wu, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xianlin; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Guise, Theresa A.; Bergner, Amanda L.; Stevenson, David A.; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col2.3Cre mice, with analogous histological features present in a human patient with dystrophic scoliosis. Intriguingly, 36–60% of Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col2.3Cre mice exhibit segmental vertebral fusion anomalies with boney obliteration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). While analogous findings have not yet been reported in the NF1 patient population, we herein present two case reports of IVD defects and interarticular vertebral fusion in patients with NF1. Collectively, these data provide novel insights regarding the pathophysiology of dystrophic spinal anomalies in NF1, and provide impetus for future radiographic analyses of larger patient cohorts to determine whether IVD and vertebral fusion defects may have been previously overlooked or underreported in the NF1 patient population. PMID:25786243

  4. Dystrophic spinal deformities in a neurofibromatosis type 1 murine model.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Steven D; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Dalong; Yang, Hao; Chen, Shi; Wu, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xianlin; Mohammad, Khalid S; Guise, Theresa A; Bergner, Amanda L; Stevenson, David A; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice, with analogous histological features present in a human patient with dystrophic scoliosis. Intriguingly, 36-60% of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice exhibit segmental vertebral fusion anomalies with boney obliteration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). While analogous findings have not yet been reported in the NF1 patient population, we herein present two case reports of IVD defects and interarticular vertebral fusion in patients with NF1. Collectively, these data provide novel insights regarding the pathophysiology of dystrophic spinal anomalies in NF1, and provide impetus for future radiographic analyses of larger patient cohorts to determine whether IVD and vertebral fusion defects may have been previously overlooked or underreported in the NF1 patient population. PMID:25786243

  5. Analytical workflow profiling gene expression in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Scott E.; González-Peña, Dianelys; Lawson, Marcus A.; McCusker, Robert H.; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; O’Connor, Jason C.; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive and simultaneous analysis of all genes in a biological sample is a capability of RNA-Seq technology. Analysis of the entire transcriptome benefits from summarization of genes at the functional level. As a cellular response of interest not previously explored with RNA-Seq, peritoneal macrophages from mice under two conditions (control and immunologically challenged) were analyzed for gene expression differences. Quantification of individual transcripts modeled RNA-Seq read distribution and uncertainty (using a Beta Negative Binomial distribution), then tested for differential transcript expression (False Discovery Rate-adjusted p-value < 0.05). Enrichment of functional categories utilized the list of differentially expressed genes. A total of 2079 differentially expressed transcripts representing 1884 genes were detected. Enrichment of 92 categories from Gene Ontology Biological Processes and Molecular Functions, and KEGG pathways were grouped into 6 clusters. Clusters included defense and inflammatory response (Enrichment Score = 11.24) and ribosomal activity (Enrichment Score = 17.89). Our work provides a context to the fine detail of individual gene expression differences in murine peritoneal macrophages during immunological challenge with high throughput RNA-Seq. PMID:25708305

  6. Naturally occurring murine norovirus infection in a large research institution.

    PubMed

    Perdue, Kathy A; Green, Kim Y; Copeland, Michelle; Barron, Elyssa; Mandel, Myrna; Faucette, Lawrence J; Williams, Elizabeth M; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Elkins, William R; Ward, Jerrold M

    2007-07-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered infectious agent in mice and may be the most common naturally occurring infection of laboratory mice in North America. In 2005, we surveyed the Swiss Webster female sentinel mice in our institute's research facilities. Of the 4 facilities surveyed, 3 had sentinel mice that were positive for MNV antibodies, whereas our largest facility (which only receives mice directly from select vendors or by embryo rederivation directly into the facility) was apparently MNV-free. However, testing of sentinel mice in this large facility 1 y later found that 2% of the animals had developed MNV-specific antibodies. In a recently opened fifth facility, a serologic survey in 2006 identified MNV-antibody-positive Tac:SW sentinel mice that had received bedding from experimental mice on the same rack quadrant. Reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction analysis of feces from the cages of these mice showed evidence for shedding of MNV. These sentinel mice were used to study the fecal excretion, antibody development, gross lesions upon necropsy, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry of the viral infection. None of the MNV-antibody-positive sentinel mice exhibited clinical signs or gross lesions, but these mice excreted virus in feces and developed antibodies to MNV. Histopathologic lesions consisted only of a few hepatic inflammatory foci in each liver section, some of which were immunoreactive with antibodies to MNV. MNV viral antigens also were present in the mesenteric lymph nodes. PMID:17645294

  7. Role of Cytosolic Calcium Diffusion in Murine Cardiac Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Limbu, Bijay; Shah, Kushal; Weinberg, Seth H.; Deo, Makarand

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Purkinje cells (PCs) are morphologically and electrophysiologically different from ventricular myocytes and, importantly, exhibit distinct calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that PCs are more susceptible to action potential (AP) abnormalities than ventricular myocytes; however, the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we utilized a detailed biophysical mathematical model of a murine PC to systematically examine the role of cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion in shaping the AP in PCs. A biphasic spatiotemporal Ca2+ diffusion process, as recorded experimentally, was implemented in the model. In this study, we investigated the role of cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics on AP and ionic current properties by varying the effective Ca2+ diffusion rate. It was observed that AP morphology, specifically the plateau, was affected due to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. Elevated Ca2+ concentration in the sarcolemmal region activated inward sodium–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) current, resulting in a prolongation of the AP plateau at faster diffusion rates. Artificially clamping the NCX current to control values completely reversed the alterations in the AP plateau, thus confirming the role of NCX in modifying the AP morphology. Our results demonstrate that cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion waves play a significant role in shaping APs of PCs and could provide mechanistic insights in the increased arrhythmogeneity of PCs. PMID:27478391

  8. Analysis of the complete DNA sequence of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlinson, W D; Farrell, H E; Barrell, B G

    1996-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the Smith strain of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was determined from virion DNA by using a whole-genome shotgun approach. The genome has an overall G+C content of 58.7%, consists of 230,278 bp, and is arranged as a single unique sequence with short (31-bp) terminal direct repeats and several short internal repeats. Significant similarity to the genome of the sequenced human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strain AD169 is evident, particularly for 78 open reading frames encoded by the central part of the genome. There is a very similar distribution of G+C content across the two genomes. Sequences toward the ends of the MCMV genome encode tandem arrays of homologous glycoproteins (gps) arranged as two gene families. The left end encodes 15 gps that represent one family, and the right end encodes a different family of 11 gps. A homolog (m144) of cellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes is located at the end of the genome opposite the HCMV MHC class I homolog (UL18). G protein-coupled receptor (GCR) homologs (M33 and M78) occur in positions congruent with two (UL33 and UL78) of the four putative HCMV GCR homologs. Counterparts of all of the known enzyme homologs in HCMV are present in the MCMV genome, including the phosphotransferase gene (M97), whose product phosphorylates ganciclovir in HCMV-infected cells, and the assembly protein (M80). PMID:8971012

  9. Dynamic imaging of preimplantation embryos in the murine oviduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Jason C.; Wang, Shang; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    Studying the dynamic events involved in early preimplantation embryo development during their transport from the ovary to the uterus is of great significance to improve the understanding of infertility, and eventually to help reduce the infertility rate. The mouse is a widely used mammalian model in reproductive biology, however, dynamic imaging studies of mouse preimplantation embryos have been very limited due to the lack of proper imaging tools for such analysis. Here, we introduce an innovative approach, which can potentially be used for three-dimensional imaging and tracking of murine oocytes with optical coherence tomography (OCT) as they exit the ovary and migrate through the oviduct to the uterus. The imaging is performed with spectral-domain OCT system operating at 70 kHz A-scan rate. The preimplantation embryos and surrounding cumulus cells can be clearly visualized. Results from our experiments indicate that OCT has great potential for dynamic imaging of the oviduct and oocyte tracking, which provides the foundation for future investigations aimed at understanding dynamic events during preimplantation stages in normal development as well as in mouse models of infertility.

  10. Microenvironment influences vascular differentiation of murine cardiovascular progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gluck, Jessica M; Delman, Connor; Chyu, Jennifer; MacLellan, W Robb; Shemin, Richard J; Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh

    2014-11-01

    We examined the effects of the microenvironment on vascular differentiation of murine cardiovascular progenitor cells (CPCs). We isolated CPCs and seeded them in culture exposed to the various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D culture systems. To better understand the contribution of the microenvironment to vascular differentiation, we analyzed endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiation at both day 7 and day 14. We found that laminin and vitronectin enhanced vascular endothelial cell differentiation while fibronectin enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation. We also observed that the effects of the 3D electrospun scaffolds were delayed and not noticeable until the later time point (day 14), which may be due to the amount of time necessary for the cells to migrate to the interior of the scaffold. The study characterized the contributions of both ECM proteins and the addition of a 3D culture system to continued vascular differentiation. Additionally, we demonstrated the capability bioengineer a CPC-derived vascular graft. PMID:24687591

  11. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition is immunomodulatory and vasculoprotective in murine lupus

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jason S.; Zhao, Wenpu; Luo, Wei; Subramanian, Venkataraman; O’Dell, Alexander A.; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Thompson, Paul R.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation activates plasmacytoid dendritic cells and serves as a source of autoantigens in SLE. We propose that aberrant NET formation is also linked to organ damage and to the premature vascular disease characteristic of human SLE. Here, we demonstrate enhanced NET formation in the New Zealand mixed 2328 (NZM) model of murine lupus. NZM mice also developed autoantibodies to NETs as well as the ortholog of human cathelicidin/LL37 (CRAMP), a molecule externalized in the NETs. NZM mice were treated with Cl-amidine, an inhibitor of peptidylarginine deiminases (PAD), to block NET formation and were evaluated for lupus-like disease activity, endothelial function, and prothrombotic phenotype. Cl-amidine treatment inhibited NZM NET formation in vivo and significantly altered circulating autoantibody profiles and complement levels while reducing glomerular IgG deposition. Further, Cl-amidine increased the differentiation capacity of bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells, improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and markedly delayed time to arterial thrombosis induced by photochemical injury. Overall, these findings suggest that PAD inhibition can modulate phenotypes crucial for lupus pathogenesis and disease activity and may represent an important strategy for mitigating cardiovascular risk in lupus patients. PMID:23722903

  12. A new method for skin grafting in murine model.

    PubMed

    Pakyari, Mohammadreza; Farokhi, Ali; Khosravi-Maharlooei, Mohsen; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Ghahary, Aziz; Brown, Erin

    2016-07-01

    Skin transplantation provides an excellent potential model to investigate the immunology of allograft rejection and tolerance induction. Despite the theoretical ease of performing skin transplantation, as well as the potential of directly observing the reaction to the transplanted tissue, the poor reliability of skin transplantation in the mouse has largely precluded the use of this model. Furthermore, there is controversy regarding the most appropriate skin graft donor site due to poor success of back skin transplantation, as compared with the thinner ear or tail skin. This study demonstrates a reliable method to successfully perform skin grafts in a mouse model, as well as the clinical and histologic outcome of syngeneic grafts. A total of 287 grafts were performed (in 126 mice) utilizing donor skin from the ear, tail or back. No graft failure or postoperative mortality was observed. Comparison of this technique with two previously established protocols of skin transplantation (5.0 absorbable Suture + tissue glue technique and no-suture technique) demonstrates the significant improvement in the engraftment success of the new technique. In summary, a new technique for murine skin grafting demonstrates improved reliability across donor site locations and strains, increasing the potential for investigating interventions to alter the rejection process. PMID:27197606

  13. Murine mammary stem/progenitor cell isolation: Different method matters?

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Chen, Yuanhong; Zhang, Fuchuang; Wu, Anqi; Shi, Yuanshuo; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Daniel, Benjamin J; Huang, Changjiang; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Murine mammary stem/progenitor cell isolation has been routinely used in many laboratories, yet direct comparison among different methods is lacking. In this study, we compared two frequently used digestion methods and three sets of frequently used surface markers for their efficiency in enriching mammary stem and progenitor cells in two commonly used mouse strains, C57BL/6J and FVB. Our findings revealed that the slow overnight digestion method using gentle collagenase/hyaluronidase could be easily adopted and yielded reliable and consistent results in different batches of animals. In contrast, the different fast digestion protocols, as described in published studies, yielded high percent of non-epithelial cells with very few basal epithelial cells liberated in our hands. The three sets of markers tested in our hands reveal rather equally efficiency in separating luminal and basal cells if same fluorochrome conjugations were used. However, the tendency of non-epithelial cell inclusion in the basal cell gate was highest in samples profiled by CD24/CD29 and lowest in samples profiled by CD49f/EpCAM, this is especially true in mammary cells isolated from C57BL/6J mice. This finding will have significant implication when sorted basal cells are used for subsequent gene expression analysis. PMID:26933638

  14. Virulence characteristics of oral treponemes in a murine model.

    PubMed Central

    Kesavalu, L; Walker, S G; Holt, S C; Crawley, R R; Ebersole, J L

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the virulence characteristics of Treponema denticola, T. socranskii, T. pectinovorum, and T. vincentii following challenge infection of mice. These microorganisms induced well-demarcated, dose-dependent, raised subcutaneous (s.c.) abscesses which were similar in time of onset, lesion progression, and duration of healing. Only viable cells were capable of inducing these characteristic s.c. abscesses. Histological examination of the skin lesion 3 and 5 days postinfection revealed abscess formation in the s.c. tissues, and abundant spiral organisms were demonstrated to be present in the abscess. Host resistance modulation by dexamethasone (neutrophil alteration) and cyclophosphamide (neutrophil depletion) pretreatment had a minimal effect on the virulence expression by any of these treponemes. The T. denticola isolates demonstrated significant trypsin-like protease (TLPase) activity, while both T. socranskii and T. vincentii were devoid of this activity. Interestingly, T. pectinovorum strains were heterogeneous with respect to TLPase as high producers, low producers, and nonproducers. However, no differences in lesion formation were noted regardless of whether the species expressed this proteolytic activity or whether treatment with N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and dithiothreitol was performed. These results showed that (i) a murine model may be used to evaluate virulence expression by oral treponemes; (ii) while TLPase activity varies among the oral treponemes, this protease does not appear to participate in abscess induction in the mouse model; and (iii) T. pectinovorum strains show variation in TLPase activity. PMID:9393801

  15. Biological effectiveness of fast neutrons on a murine osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Ando, K.; Koike, S.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of fast neutrons and gamma rays on a murine osteosarcoma was studied. The NROS tumor, a radiation-induced osteosarcoma in a C3H mouse, was transplanted into the right hind legs of syngeneic female mice and locally irradiated with single or four daily doses of either fast neutrons or gamma rays. The NROS contained 13-30% hypoxic cells. It took approximately 7 days for the NROS tumor to show apparent reoxygenation following gamma ray irradiations. Two assays were used to determine the neutrons' relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to gamma rays: tumor growth delay time and tumor control dose. The largest RBE of 4.5 was obtained at the smallest dose of neutrons examined, followed by a gradual decrease down to 2.3. The tumor growth delay assay indicated that the RBE values of 2.6-3.1 after single doses of fast neutrons increased to 3.1-4.5 after four daily fractions. The 50% tumor control doses were 78.5 Gy and 33.0 Gy after single doses of gamma rays and fast neutrons, resulting in an RBE of 2.3. Fractionated doses increased the RBE to 2.6. Mitotic cells disappeared shortly after irradiation but reappeared 7 days after irradiation.

  16. Murine and epidemic typhus rickettsiae: how close is their relationship?

    PubMed

    Woodward, T E

    1982-01-01

    Typhus fever has occurred globally as epidemic and endemic disorders. In 1910, Brill reported a typhus-like illness which Zinsser and others determined to be recurrent epidemic typhus fever. Maxcy, in 1926, proposed rodents and fleas as reservoir and vector, respectively, of endemic typhus, which Dyer confirmed in 1930. Animals experimentally infected with epidemic typhus (Rickettsia prowazeki) are immune to murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi) and vice versa. Similar solid cross-immunity exists for humans. The two diseases are clinically similar in pathologic and serologic reactions. Human epidemic typhus presumably involved a man-louse-man cycle without an animal reservoir. This concept is now questioned. Antibodies to R. prowazeki have been reported in livestock in Africa, rats in Manila, and from flying squirrels and humans in the United States. R. prowazeki was recovered from blood specimens of goats, sheep, from ixodid ticks, louse, and flea-ectoparasites of flying squirrels, and tissues of flying squirrels. More than 20 cases of squirrel-related acute epidemic typhus have been reported in the United States. R. prowazeki has not been recovered from human cases. Chemical studies of R. prowazeki and R. typhi show genetic similarities but differences in genome size and degree of hybridization suggest that interconversions between the two agents do not occur rapidly in nature. It is proposed that, with time, their relatedness will become even closer. PMID:6817526

  17. Hydroxymethylnitrofurazone Is Active in a Murine Model of Chagas' Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Carolina; Cardozo, Rubén Marino; Negrette, Olga Sánchez; Mora, María Celia; Chung, Man Chin; Basombrío, Miguel Ángel

    2010-01-01

    The addition of a hydroxymethyl group to the antimicrobial drug nitrofurazone generated hydroxymethylnitrofurazone (NFOH), which had reduced toxicity when its activity against Trypanosoma cruzi was tested in a murine model of Chagas' disease. Four groups of 12 Swiss female mice each received 150 mg of body weight/kg/day of NFOH, 150 mg/kg/day of nitrofurazone (parental compound), 60 mg/kg/day of benznidazole (BZL), or the solvent as a placebo. Treatments were administered orally once a day 6 days a week until the completion of 60 doses. NFOH was as effective as BZL in keeping direct parasitemia at undetectable levels, and PCR results were negative. No histopathological lesions were seen 180 days after completion of the treatments, a time when the levels of anti-T. cruzi antibodies were very low in mice treated with either NFOH or BZL. Nitrofurazone was highly toxic, which led to an overall rate of mortality of 75% and necessitated interruption of the treatment. In contrast, the group treated with its hydroxymethyl derivative, NFOH, displayed the lowest mortality (16%), followed by the BZL (33%) and placebo (66%) groups. The findings of histopathological studies were consistent with these results, with the placebo group showing the most severe parasite infiltrates in skeletal muscle and heart tissue and the NFOH group showing the lowest. The present evidence suggests that NFOH is a promising anti-T. cruzi agent. PMID:20566772

  18. Mapping cyclic stretch in the postpneumonectomy murine lung

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, Nenad; Gibney, Barry C.; Kojic, Milos; Nikolic, Dalibor; Isailovic, Velibor; Ysasi, Alexandra; Konerding, Moritz A.; Tsuda, Akira

    2013-01-01

    In many mammalian species, the removal of one lung [pneumonectomy (PNX)] is associated with the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. To investigate the hypothesis that parenchymal deformation may trigger lung regeneration, we used respiratory-gated micro-computed tomography scanning to create three-dimensional finite-element geometric models of the murine cardiac lobe with cyclic breathing. Models were constructed of respiratory-gated micro-computed tomography scans pre-PNX and 24 h post-PNX. The computational models demonstrated that the maximum stretch ratio map was patchy and heterogeneous, particularly in subpleural, juxta-diaphragmatic, and cephalad regions of the lobe. In these parenchymal regions, the material line segments at peak inspiration were frequently two- to fourfold greater after PNX; some regions of the post-PNX cardiac lobe demonstrated parenchymal compression at peak inspiration. Similarly, analyses of parenchymal maximum shear strain demonstrated heterogeneous regions of mechanical stress with focal regions demonstrating a threefold increase in shear strain after PNX. Consistent with previously identified growth patterns, these subpleural regions of enhanced stretch and shear strain are compatible with a mechanical signal, likely involving cyclic parenchymal stretch, triggering lung growth. PMID:23990237

  19. Suspension culture of Besnoitia caprae by murine macrophage.

    PubMed

    Sadoughifar, R; Namavari, M; Oryan, A

    2015-12-01

    Besnoitia caprae is a tissue cyst-forming protozoan that infects goats and has considerable economic importance in certain regions of Asia and Africa. Murine macrophage J774 cell line was inoculated with tachyzoites of Besnoitia caprae (BC-Pars isolate) collected from mice. A significant growth of tachyzoites was observed in J774. Mice were inoculated with tachyzoites harvested from J774 cell culture. Skin samples from the mice infected with tachyzoites of BC-Pars were PCR positive. One mouse showed alopecia and skin lesions on 45 DPI. Dermal lesions started from around right eye and gradually developed more and more. After euthanasia on 60 DPI, histopathological evaluation of skins around the eye showed necrosis of the epidermis and follicular adnexa with chronic inflammatory cell infiltration. Histopathological sections of their skin showed the presence of necrosis and mononuclear cell infiltration. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of successful production of Besnoitia caprae tachyzoites was achieved in vitro by suspension culture technique. Another interesting finding is the report of the alopecia and skin lesions around the eye in mouse that quite similar to lesions of goats due to infection of Besnoitia caprae. PMID:26688623

  20. Transcriptional interference among the murine β-like globin genes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Eszterhas, Susan; Pallazzi, Nicolas; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Fields, Jennifer; Tanabe, Osamu; Gerber, Scott A.; Bulger, Michael; Engel, James Douglas; Groudine, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian β-globin loci contain multiple genes that are activated at different developmental stages. Studies have suggested that the transcription of one gene in a locus can influence the expression of the other locus genes. The prevalent model to explain this transcriptional interference is that all potentially active genes compete for locus control region (LCR) activity. To investigate the influence of transcription by the murine embryonic genes on transcription of the other β-like genes, we generated mice with deletions of the promoter regions of Ey and βh1 and measured transcription of the remaining genes. Deletion of the Ey and βh1 promoters increased transcription of βmajor and βminor 2-fold to 3-fold during primitive erythropoiesis. Deletion of Ey did not affect βh1 nor did deletion of βh1 affect Ey, but Ey deletion uniquely activated transcription from βh0, a β-like globin gene immediately downstream of Ey. Protein analysis showed that βh0 encodes a translatable β-like globin protein that can pair with alpha globin. The lack of transcriptional interference between Ey and βh1 and the gene-specific repression of βh0 did not support LCR competition among the embryonic genes and suggested that direct transcriptional interference from Ey suppressed βh0. PMID:17077320

  1. Identification of a novel lymphoid population in the murine epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Francisca F.; Tenno, Mari; Brzostek, Joanna; Li, Jackson LiangYao; Allies, Gabriele; Hoeffel, Guillaume; See, Peter; Ng, Lai Guan; Fehling, Hans Jörg; Gascoigne, Nicholas R. J.; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-01-01

    T cell progenitors are known to arise from the foetal liver in embryos and the bone marrow in adults; however different studies have shown that a pool of T cell progenitors may also exist in the periphery. Here, we identified a lymphoid population resembling peripheral T cell progenitors which transiently seed the epidermis during late embryogenesis in both wild-type and T cell-deficient mice. We named these cells ELCs (Epidermal Lymphoid Cells). ELCs expressed Thy1 and CD2, but lacked CD3 and TCRαβ/γδ at their surface, reminiscent of the phenotype of extra- or intra- thymic T cell progenitors. Similarly to Dendritic Epidermal T Cells (DETCs), ELCs were radioresistant and capable of self-renewal. However, despite their progenitor-like phenotype and expression of T cell lineage markers within the population, ELCs did not differentiate into conventional T cells or DETCs in in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo differentiation assays. Finally, we show that ELC expressed NK markers and secreted IFN-γ upon stimulation. Therefore we report the discovery of a unique population of lymphoid cells within the murine epidermis that appears related to NK cells with as-yet-unidentified functions. PMID:26223192

  2. Pharmacokinetics of rhodanese-thiosulfate loaded murine carrier erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, P.; Yao, C.C.; Makary, M.H.; Way, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Since the therapeutic potential of murine erythrocytes employed in the encapsulation of rhodanese as a cyanide detoxification mechanism is dependent on a prolong circulatory lifespan, in vivo survival studies were initiated in normal adult Balb/c mice. After a single intravenous administration of the /sup 14/C-sucrose loaded carrier erythrocytes, radioactive analyses in whole blood indicated a biexponential decay. Initially, a rapid decline in /sup 14/C-sucrose radioactivity in whole blood (t/sub 1/2/ = 23 minutes) is followed by a slower decline with an apparent t/sub 1/2/ of 11 days. In contrast, when /sup 14/C-sucrose was not encapsulated, greater than 90% was eliminated from the circulation within 10 minutes. Leakage of /sup 14/C-sucrose out of the carrier erythrocytes is minimal, since less than 2% of the initial dose of encapsulated /sup 14/C-sucrose appear in plasma. When rhodanese-loaded carrier erythrocytes was employed, a similar survival curve was observed. In summary, these results suggest that carrier erythrocytes represent a viable alternative approach for the detoxification of exogenous chemical toxicants.

  3. Histamine and neuroinflammation: insights from murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Passani, Maria B.; Ballerini, Clara

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory, neurodegenerative disease of the CNS whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown, and available therapies are rarely successful in reversing neurological deficits or stopping disease progression. Ongoing studies on MS and the widely used murine model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are focused on the many components of this complex and heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease in the hope of providing a mechanism-based characterization of MS that will afford successful strategies to limit and repair the neuronal damage. Recently, histamine has been postulated to have a key regulatory role in EAE and MS pathogenesis. Histamine is a mediator of inflammation and immune responses, exerting its many actions through four G protein-coupled receptors (H1,2,3,4R) that signal through distinct intracellular pathways and have different therapeutic potentials as they vary in expression, isoform distribution, signaling properties, and function. Immune cells involved in MS/EAE, including dendritic cells (DCs) and T lymphocytes, express H1R, H2R and H4R, and histamine may have varying and counteracting effects on a particular cell type, depending on the receptor subtypes being activated. Here, we review evidence of the complex and controversial role of histamine in the pathogenesis of MS and EAE and evaluate the therapeutic potential of histaminergic ligands in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:22563309

  4. Chinese medicinal herbs inhibit growth of murine renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lau, B H; Ruckle, H C; Botolazzo, T; Lui, P D

    1994-01-01

    Tumors are known to produce factors suppressing immune functions. We previously showed that a murine renal cell carcinoma (Renca) suppressed macrophage function in vitro and that this suppression was abolished by co-incubation with extracts of two Chinese medicinal herbs. We now report that these phytochemicals are capable of inhibiting growth of Renca in vivo. BALB/c mice were transplanted intraperitoneally (IP) with 1-2 x 10(5) Renca cells. One day after tumor transplant, mice were randomized into two groups. One group was treated IP, daily for 10 days, with 100 microliters of phytochemicals containing 500 micrograms each of Astragalus membranaceus and Ligustrum lucidum, while the other group received saline as controls. A cure rate of 57% was obtained with these phytochemicals when the initial tumor load was 2 x 10(5), and 100% when the initial tumor load was 1 x 10(5). Additional experiments were performed to investigate the mechanisms involved in this protection. Splenic macrophages from tumor-bearing mice were shown to have depressed chemiluminescent oxidative burst activity, and this depression was restored with phytochemical treatment. Splenocytes from mice transplanted with Renca responded less favorably to interleukin-2 (IL-2) in generating lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells; again this depression was restored with phytochemical treatment. Our data suggest that these phytochemicals may have exerted their antitumor effects via augmentation of phagocyte and LAK cell activities. PMID:7812364

  5. Gene expression of lactobacilli in murine forestomach biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Clarissa; Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli populate the gastro-intestinal tract of vertebrates, and are used in food fermentations and as probiotics. Lactobacilli are also major constituents of stable biofilms in the forestomach of rodents. In order to investigate the lifestyle of these biofilm lactobacilli in C57BL/6 mice, we applied metatranscriptomics to analyse gene expression (assessed by mRNA) and community composition (assessed by rRNA). Lactobacillales were the major biofilm inhabitants (62–82% of rRNA reads), followed by Clostridiales (8–31% of rRNA reads). To identify mRNA transcripts specific for the forestomach, we compared forestomach and hindgut metatranscriptomes. Gene expression of the biofilm microbiota was characterized by high abundance of transcripts related to glucose and maltose utilization, peptide degradation, and amino acid transport, indicating their major catabolic and anabolic pathways. The microbiota transcribed genes encoding pathways enhancing oxidative stress (glutathione synthesis) and acid tolerance. Various pathways, including metabolite formation (urea degradation, arginine pathway, γ-aminobutyrate) and cell wall modification (DltA, cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase), contributed to acid tolerance, as judged from the transcript profile. In addition, the biofilm microbiota expressed numerous genes encoding extracellular proteins involved in adhesion and/or biofilm formation (e.g. MucBP, glycosyl hydrolase families 68 and 70). This study shed light on the lifestyle and specific adaptations of lactobacilli in the murine forestomach that might also be relevant for lactobacilli biofilms in other vertebrates, including humans. PMID:24702817

  6. The murine cardiac 26S proteasome: an organelle awaiting exploration.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aldrin V; Zong, Chenggong; Edmondson, Ricky D; Berhane, Beniam T; Wang, Guang-Wu; Le, Steven; Young, Glen; Zhang, Jun; Vondriska, Thomas M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Jones, Richard C; Joshua, Irving G; Thyparambil, Sheeno; Pantaleon, Dawn; Qiao, Joe; Loo, Joseph; Ping, Peipei

    2005-06-01

    Multiprotein complexes have been increasingly recognized as essential functional units for a variety of cellular processes, including the protein degradation system. Selective degradation of proteins in eukaryotes is primarily conducted by the ubiquitin proteasome system. The current knowledge base, pertaining to the proteasome complexes in mammalian cells, relies largely upon information gained in the yeast system, where the 26S proteasome is hypothesized to contain a 20S multiprotein core complex and one or two 19S regulatory complexes. To date, the molecular structure of the proteasome system, the proteomic composition of the entire 26S multiprotein complexes, and the specific designated function of individual components within this essential protein degradation system in the heart remain virtually unknown. A functional proteomic approach, employing multidimensional chromatography purification combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and protein chemistry, was utilized to explore the murine cardiac 26S proteasome system. This article presents an overview on the subject of protein degradation in mammalian cells. In addition, this review shares the limited information that has been garnered thus far pertaining to the molecular composition, function, and regulation of this important organelle in the cardiac cells. PMID:16093497

  7. Neuroimmunopathology in a murine model of neuropsychiatric lupus

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Animal models are extremely useful tools in defining pathogenesis and treatment of human disease. For many years researchers believed that structural damage to the brain of neuropsychiatric (NP) patients lead to abnormal mental function, but this possibility was not extensively explored until recently. Imaging studies of NP-systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) support the notion that brain cell death accounts for the emergence of neurologic and psychiatric symptoms, and evidence suggests that it is an autoimmunity-induced brain disorder characterized by profound metabolic alterations and progressive neuronal loss. While there are a number of murine models of SLE, this article reviews recent literature on the immunological connections to neurodegeneration and behavioral dysfunction in the Fas-deficient MRL model of NP-SLE. Probable links between spontaneous peripheral immune activation, the subsequent central autoimmune/inflammatory responses in MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6lpr (MRL–lpr) mice and the sequential mode of events leading to Fas-independent neurodegenerative autoimmune-induced encephalitis will be reviewed. The role of hormones, alternative mechanisms of cell death, the impact of central dopaminergic degeneration on behavior, and germinal layer lesions on developmental/regenerative capacity of MRL–lpr brains will also be explored. This model can provide direction for future therapeutic interventions in patients with this complex neuroimmunological syndrome. PMID:17223198

  8. Immunocompetent murine models for the study of glioblastoma immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains a lethal diagnosis with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. (NEJM 352:987-96, 2005) Although immunotherapy-based approaches are capable of inducing detectable immune responses against tumor-specific antigens, improvements in clinical outcomes are modest, in no small part due to tumor-induced immunosuppressive mechanisms that promote immune escape and immuno-resistance. Immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at bolstering the immune response while neutralizing immunosuppression will play a critical role in improving treatment outcomes for glioblastoma patients. In vivo murine models of glioma provide an invaluable resource to achieving that end, and their use is an essential part of the preclinical workup for novel therapeutics that need to be tested in animal models prior to testing experimental therapies in patients. In this article, we review five contemporary immunocompetent mouse models, GL261 (C57BL/6), GL26 (C57BL/6) CT-2A (C57BL/6), SMA-560 (VM/Dk), and 4C8 (B6D2F1), each of which offer a suitable platform for testing novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:24779345

  9. A pre-clinical murine model of oral implant osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Mouraret, S.; Hunter, D.J.; Bardet, C.; Brunski, J.B.; Bouchard, P.; Helms, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Many of our assumptions concerning oral implant osseointegration are extrapolated from experimental models studying skeletal tissue repair in long bones. This disconnect between clinical practice and experimental research hampers our understanding of bone formation around oral implants and how this process can be improved. We postulated that oral implant osseointegration would be fundamentally equivalent to implant osseointegration elsewhere in the body. Mice underwent implant placement in the edentulous ridge anterior to the first molar and peri-implant tissues were evaluated at various timepoints after surgery. Our hypothesis was disproven; oral implant osseointegration is substantially different from osseointegration in long bones. For example, in the maxilla peri-implant pre-osteoblasts are derived from cranial neural crest whereas in the tibia peri-implant osteoblasts are derived from mesoderm. In the maxilla, new osteoid arises from periostea of the maxillary bone but in the tibia the new osteoid arises from the marrow space. Cellular and molecular analyses indicate that osteoblast activity and mineralization proceeds from the surfaces of the native bone and osteoclastic activity is responsible for extensive remodeling of the new peri-implant bone. In addition to histologic features of implant osseointegration, molecular and cellular assays conducted in a murine model provide new insights into the sequelae of implant placement and the process by which bone is generated around implants. PMID:23886841

  10. Disruption of Murine Cardiac Allograft Acceptance by Latent Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Charles H.; Bickerstaff, Alice A.; Wang, Jiao-Jing; Zimmerman, Peter D.; Forster, Meghan R.; Nadasdy, Tibor; Colvin, Robert B.; Hadley, Gregg A.; Orosz, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation is a well described complication of solid organ transplantation. These studies were performed to 1.) determine if cardiac allograft transplantation of latently infected recipients results in reactivation of CMV, and 2.) determine what impact CMV might have on development of graft acceptance/tolerance. BALB/c cardiac allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 mice with/without latent murine CMV (MCMV). Recipients were treated with gallium nitrate induction and monitored for graft survival, viral immunity, and donor reactive DTH responses. Latently infected allograft recipients had ∼80% graft loss by 100 days after transplant, compared with ∼8% graft loss in naïve recipients. PCR evaluation demonstrated that MCMV was transmitted to cardiac grafts in all latently infected recipients, and 4/8 allografts had active viral transcription compared to 0/6 isografts. Latently infected allograft recipients showed intragraft IFN-α expression consistent with MCMV reactivation, but MCMV did not appear to negatively influence regulatory gene expression. Infected allograft recipients had disruption of splenocyte DTH regulation, but recipient splenocytes remained unresponsive to donor antigen even after allograft losses. These data suggest that transplantation in an environment of latent CMV infection may reactivate virus, and that intragraft responses disrupt development of allograft acceptance. PMID:18976295

  11. Murine Cytomegalovirus Exploits Olfaction To Enter New Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Lawler, Clara; Tan, Cindy S. E.; MacDonald, Kate; Bruce, Kimberley; Mach, Michael; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Viruses transmit via the environmental and social interactions of their hosts. Herpesviruses have colonized mammals since their earliest origins, suggesting that they exploit ancient, common pathways. Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) are assumed to enter new hosts orally, but no site has been identified. We show by live imaging that murine CMV (MCMV) infects nasally rather than orally, both after experimental virus uptake and during natural transmission. Replication-deficient virions revealed the primary target as olfactory neurons. Local, nasal replication by wild-type MCMV was not extensive, but there was rapid systemic spread, associated with macrophage infection. A long-term, transmissible infection was then maintained in the salivary glands. The viral m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which influences tropism, promoted salivary gland colonization after nasal entry but was not required for entry per se. The capacity of MCMV to transmit via olfaction, together with previous demonstrations of experimental olfactory infection by murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), suggest that this is a common, conserved route of mammalian herpesvirus entry. PMID:27118588

  12. A drug carrier targeting murine uPAR for photodynamic therapy and tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolei; Zheng, Ke; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhuo; Yuan, Cai; Hu, Ping; Chen, Jincan; Xue, Jinping; Huang, Mingdong

    2015-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an effective therapeutical modality for tumors. In PDT, a photosensitizer was used to capture the light of specific wavelength, leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species and cytotoxicity surrounding the photosensitizer. Modifications of photosensitizers to enhance tumor specificity are common approaches to increase the efficacy and reduce the side effects of PDT. Previously, we developed a human serum albumin (HSA)-based drug carrier fused with the human amino-terminal fragment (hATF), which binds to a tumor surface marker (urokinase receptor, uPAR). However, hATF-HSA binds to murine uPAR much weaker (79-fold) than to human uPAR, and is not optimal for applications on murine tumor models. In this study, we developed a murine version of the drug carrier (mATF-HSA). A photosensitizer (mono-substituted β-carboxy phthalocyanine zinc, CPZ) was loaded into this carrier, giving a rather stable macromolecule (mATF-HSA:CPZ) that was shown to bind to murine uPAR in vitro. In addition, we evaluated both the photodynamic therapy efficacy and tumor retention capability of the macromolecule (at a dose of 0.05mg CPZ/kg mouse body weight) on murine hepatoma-22 (H22) tumor bearing mouse model. mATF-HSA:CPZ showed more accumulation in tumors compared to its human counterpart (hATF-HSA:CPZ) measured by quantitative fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). Besides, mATF-HSA:CPZ exhibited a higher tumor killing efficacy than hATF-HSA:CPZ. Together, the macromolecule mATF-HSA is a promising tumor-specific drug carrier on murine tumor models and is an useful tool to study tumor biology on murine tumor models. PMID:26004218

  13. Chimeric constructs endow the human CFTR Cl− channel with the gating behavior of murine CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Ward, Toby S.; Cai, Zhiwei; Dawson, Elizabeth S.; Doherty, Ann; Carina Da Paula, Ana; Davidson, Heather; Porteous, David J.; Wainwright, Brandon J.; Amaral, Margarida D.; Sheppard, David N.; Boyd, A. Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a Cl− channel gated by ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) dimerization. Here we exploit species differences between human and murine CFTR to investigate CFTR channel gating. Using homologous recombination, we constructed human-murine CFTR (hmCFTR) chimeras with sequences from NBD1, NBD2, or the regulatory domain (RD) of human CFTR replaced by the equivalent regions of murine CFTR. The gating behavior of hmRD and human CFTR were indistinguishable, whereas hmNBD1 and hmNBD2 had subtle effects on channel gating, prolonging both burst duration and interburst interval. By contrast, hmNBD1+2, containing both NBDs of murine CFTR, reproduced the gating behavior of the subconductance state of murine CFTR, which has dramatically prolonged channel openings. The CFTR potentiator pyrophosphate (PPi) enhanced human, hmRD, and hmNBD1 CFTR Cl− currents, but not those of hmNBD2, hmNBD1+2, and murine CFTR. By analyzing the rate-equilibrium free-energy relationships of chimeric channels, we obtained snapshots of the conformation of the NBDs during ATP-driven dimerization. Our data demonstrate that the conformation of NBD1 changes before that of NBD2 during channel opening. This finding suggests that NBD dimerization does not proceed by a symmetric tweezer-like motion, but instead in an asymmetric fashion led by NBD1. We conclude that the NBDs of murine CFTR determine the unique gating behavior of its subconductance state, whereas NBD2 controls channel potentiation by PPi. PMID:17913891

  14. Rabies virus replication in primary murine bone marrow macrophages and in human and murine macrophage-like cell lines: implications for viral persistence.

    PubMed

    Ray, N B; Ewalt, L C; Lodmell, D L

    1995-02-01

    To determine whether rabies viruses replicate in macrophage or macrophage-like cells, several human and murine macrophage-like cell lines, as well as primary cultures of murine bone marrow macrophages, were incubated with the Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) virus and several different street rabies viruses (SRV). ERA rabies virus replicated well in human monocytic U937 and THP-1 cells and murine macrophage IC-21 cells, as well as primary cultures of murine macrophages. Minimal replication was detected in murine monocytic WEHI-3BD- and PU5-1R cells, and ERA virus did not replicate in murine monocytic P388D1 or J774A.1 cells. A tissue culture-adapted SRV of bat origin also replicated in IC-21 and U937 cells. Non-tissue culture-adapted SRV isolated from different animal species, particularly bats, replicated minimally in U937, THP-1, IC-21 cells and primary murine bone marrow macrophages. To determine whether rabies virus replication is dependent upon the state of differentiation of the macrophage-like cell, human promyelocytic HL-60 cells were differentiated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). ERA rabies virus replicated in the differentiated HL-60 cells but not in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Persistent infections were established in macrophage-like U937 cells with ERA rabies virus and SRV, and infectious SRV was isolated from adherent bone marrow cells of mice that had been infected 96 days previously. Virus harvested from persistently infected U937 cells and the adherent bone marrow cells had specifically adapted to each cell. This specificity was shown by the inability of the viruses to infect macrophages other than U937 cells and primary bone marrow macrophages, respectively. Virus titers of the persistently infected U937 cells fluctuated with extended cell passage. After 30 passages, virus released from the cells had lost virulence as shown by its inability to kill intracranially inoculated mice. However, the avirulent virus released from the

  15. Capto MMC mixed-mode chromatography of murine and rabbit antibodies.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Storms, Michael; Maruyama, Toshiaki; Okumura, C J; Kita, Yoshiko

    2016-11-01

    Murine antibodies have weak affinity for Protein-A. Here, we have tested binding of murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) to Protein-A or Protein-A/Protein-G mixture under salting-out conditions. The addition of ammonium sulfate to HEK conditioned medium (CM) expressing murine mAb resulted in complete binding, leading to its elution by low pH or neutral arginine solution. Alternatively, a mixed-mode chromatography using Capto MMC resin was developed as a capture step. Binding of murine mAb occurred at neutral pH. The bound mAb was eluted with a gradient from 0.3 M NaCl to 0.3 M arginine/0.3 M NaCl at pH 7.0. The Capto MMC-purified murine mAb was further purified by hydroxyl apatite chromatography. Similarly, rabbit mAb was processed with some modifications. Binding of rabbit mAb to Capto MMC required a lower pH. Elution of the bound rabbit mAb was achieved by a gradient to 0.3 M NaCl, pH 7.0. PMID:27444249

  16. Unstable resistance of G mouse fibroblasts to ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikura, H; Naito, Y; Moriwaki, K

    1979-01-01

    G mouse cells were resistant to N- and NB-tropic Friend leukemia viruses and to B-tropic WN 1802B. Though the cells were resistant to focus formation by the Moloney isolate of murine sarcoma virus, they were relatively sensitive to helper component murine leukemia virus. To amphotropic murine leukemia virus and to focus formation by amphotropic murine sarcoma virus, G mouse cells were fully permissive. When the cell lines were established starting from the individual embryos, most cell lines were not resistant to the murine leukemia viruses. Only one resistant line was established. Cloning of this cell line indicated that the resistant cells constantly segregated sensitive cells during the culture; i.e., the G mouse cell cultures were probably always mixtures of sensitive and resistant cells. Among the sensitive cell clones, some were devoid of Fv-1 restriction. Such dually permissive cells, and also feral mouse-derived SC-1 cells, retained glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-1 and apparently normal number 4 chromosomes. The loss of Fv-1 restriction in these mouse cells was not brought about by any gross structural changes in the vicinity of Fv-1 on number 4 chromosomes. Images PMID:221667

  17. Differential Effects of Mycobacterium bovis BCG on Macrophages and Dendritic Cells from Murine Spleen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhengzhong; Meng, Chuang; Qiang, Bin; Gu, Hongyan; Sun, Lin; Yin, Yuelan; Pan, Zhiming; Chen, Xiang; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ) and dendritic cells (DCs) are both pivotal antigen presenting cells capable of inducing specific cellular responses to inhaled mycobacteria, and thus, they may be important in the initiation of early immune responses to mycobacterial infection. In this study, we evaluated and compared the roles of murine splenic DCs and MΦs in immunity against Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (M.bovis BCG). The number of internalized rBCG-GFP observed was obviously greater in murine splenic MΦs compared with DCs, and the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) levels in MΦs were all higher than in DCs. DCs have a stronger capacity for presenting Ag85A peptide to specific T hybridoma and when the murine splenic MΦs were infected with BCG and rBCG::Ag85A, low level of antigen presenting activity was detected. These data suggest that murine splenic MΦs participate in mycobacteria uptake, killing and inducing inflammatory response, whereas the murine splenic DCs are primarily involved in specific antigen presentation and T cell activation. PMID:26473844

  18. Inhibition of murine cardiomyocyte respiration by amine local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Aburawi, Elhadi H; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2014-12-01

    The hydrophobic amino acyl amide-linked local anesthetics (e.g., lidocaine and bupivacaine) impose potent cardiac toxicity and direct mitochondrial dysfunction. To investigate these adverse events, an in vitro system was employed to measure their effects on O2 consumption (cellular respiration) by murine myocardium. Specimens were collected from the ventricular myocardium and immediately immersed in ice-cold Krebs-Henseleit buffer saturated with 95 % O2:5 % CO2. O2 concentration was determined as a function of time from the phosphorescence decay rates of Pd(II)-meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-tetrabenzoporphyrin. Myocardial O2 consumption was linear with time (zero-order kinetics); its rate (k, in μM O2 min(-1)), thus, was the negative of the slope of [O2] vs. time. Cyanide inhibited O2 consumption, confirming the oxidation occurred in the respiratory chain. Lidocaine and bupivacaine produced immediate and sustained inhibition of cellular respiration at plasma concentrations of the drugs (low micromolar range). Bupivacaine was twice as potent as lidocaine. The inhibition was dose-dependent, saturating at concentrations ≥30 μM. At saturating doses, lidocaine produced ~20 % inhibition and bupivacaine ~40 % inhibition. Cellular ATP was also decreased in the presence of 30 μM lidocaine or bupivacaine. The studied amines inhibited myocardial cellular respiration. This effect is consistent with their known adverse events on mitochondrial function. The described approach allows accurate assessments and comparisons of the toxic effects of local anesthetics on heart tissue bioenergetics. PMID:24254523

  19. Simvastatin induces osteogenic differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pagkalos, Joseph; Cha, Jae Min; Kang, Yunyi; Heliotis, Manolis; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2010-11-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis. Several statins are available with different molecular and pharmacokinetic properties. Simvastatin is more lipophilic than pravastatin and has a higher affinity to phospholipid membranes than atorvastatin, allowing its passive diffusion through the cell membrane. In vitro studies on bone marrow stromal cells, osteoblast-like cells, and embryonic stem cells have shown statins to have cholesterol-independent anabolic effects on bone metabolism; alas, statins were supplemented in osteogenic medium, which does not facilitate elucidation of their potential osteoinductive properties. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, are unique in that they enjoy perpetual self-proliferation, are pluripotent, and are able to differentiate toward all the cellular lineages composing the body, including the osteogenic lineage. Consequently, ESCs represent a potentially potent cell source for future clinical cellular therapies of various bone diseases, even though there are several hurdles that still need to be overcome. Herein we demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that simvastatin induces murine ESC (mESC) differentiation toward the osteogenic lineage in the absence of osteoinductive supplements. Specifically, we found that a simvastatin concentration in the micromolar range and higher was toxic to the cells and that an effective concentration for osteoinduction is 0.1 nM, as shown by increased alizarin red staining as well as increased osteocalcin and osetrix gene expression. These results suggest that in the future, lipophilic simvastatin may provide a novel pharmacologic agent for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:20564244

  20. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for <1% of all patients with Alzheimer's disease. The inherited form is even regarded a 'rare' disease according to the regulations for funding of the European Union (www.erare.eu). Here, we show that mice that are double-deficient for neprilysin (encoded by Mme), one major amyloid-β-degrading enzyme, and the ABC transporter ABCC1, a major contributor to amyloid-β clearance from the brain, develop various aspects of sporadic Alzheimer's disease mimicking the clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows

  1. Effect of Murine Norovirus Infection on Mouse Parvovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Paturzo, Frank X; Macy, James D

    2010-01-01

    Enzootic infection with mouse parvovirus (MPV) remains a common problem in laboratory colonies, and diagnosis of MPV infection is complicated by viral and host factors. The effect of an underlying viral infection on MPV infection has not previously been investigated. We assessed the effect of murine norovirus (MNV) infection, the most prevalent infectious agent in laboratory mice, on MPV shedding, tissue distribution and transmission. Fecal MPV shedding persisted longer in BALB/c mice infected with MNV 1 wk prior to MPV infection than in mice infected with MPV only, but transmission of MPV to soiled-bedding sentinels was not prolonged in coinfected mice. MPV DNA levels in coinfected BALB/c mice were higher in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens at 1 and 2 wk after inoculation and in small intestines at 1 wk after inoculation compared with levels in mice infected with MPV only. In C57BL/6 mice, fecal shedding was prolonged, but no difference in soiled bedding transmission or MPV DNA levels in tissues was detected between singly and coinfected mice. MPV DNA levels in singly and coinfected SW mice were similar. MPV DNA levels were highest in SW, intermediate in BALB/c and lowest in C57BL/6 mice. MPV DNA levels in mesenteric lymph nodes of BALB/c and SW mice exceeded those in small intestines and feces, whereas the inverse occurred in C57BL/6 mice. In conclusion, MNV infection increased the duration of MPV shedding and increased MPV DNA levels in tissues of BALB/c mice. PMID:20122310

  2. Comparing human norovirus surrogates: murine norovirus and Tulane virus.

    PubMed

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-01-01

    Viral surrogates are widely used by researchers to predict human norovirus behavior. Murine norovirus (MNV) is currently accepted as the best surrogate and is assumed to mimic the survival and inactivation of human noroviruses. Recently, a new calicivirus, the Tulane virus (TV), was discovered, and its potential as a human norovirus surrogate is being explored. This study aimed to compare the behavior of the two potential surrogates under varying treatments of pH (2.0 to 10.0), chlorine (0.2 to 2,000 ppm), heat (50 to 75°C), and survival in tap water at room (20°C) and refrigeration (4°C) temperatures for up to 30 days. Viral infectivity was determined by the plaque assay for both MNV and TV. There was no significant difference between the inactivation of MNV and TV in all heat treatments, and for both MNV and TV survival in tap water at 20°C over 30 days. At 4°C, MNV remained infectious over 30 days at a titer of approximately 5 log PFU/ml, whereas TV titers decreased significantly by 5 days. MNV was more pH stable, as TV titers were reduced significantly at pH 2.0, 9.0, and 10.0, as compared with pH 7.0, whereas MNV titers were only significantly reduced at pH 10.0. After chlorine treatment, there was no significant difference in virus with the exception of at 2 ppm, where TV decreased significantly compared with MNV. Compared with TV, MNV is likely a better surrogate for human noroviruses, as MNV persisted over a wider range of pH values, at 2 ppm of chlorine, and without a loss of titer at 4°C. PMID:23317870

  3. Induction and treatment of anergy in murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Juarez-Ortega, Mario; Hernandez, Víctor G; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Villanueva, Enrique B; Aguilar-Santelises, Miguel; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease consisting of a spectrum of clinical, bacteriological, histopathological and immunological manifestations. Tuberculoid leprosy is frequently recognized as the benign polar form of the disease, while lepromatous leprosy is regarded as the malignant form. The different forms of leprosy depend on the genetic and immunological characteristics of the patient and on the characteristics of the leprosy bacillus. The malignant manifestations of lepromatous leprosy result from the mycobacterial-specific anergy that develops in this form of the disease. Using murine leprosy as a model of anergy in this study, we first induced the development of anergy to Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) in mice and then attempted to reverse it by the administration of dialysable leucocyte extracts (DLE) prepared from healthy (HLT), BCG-inoculated and MLM-inoculated mice. Mice inoculated with either MLM or BCG developed a robust cell-mediated immune response (CMI) that was temporary in the MLM-inoculated group and long-lasting in the BCG-inoculated group. DLE were prepared from the spleens of MLM- and BCG-inoculated mice at the peak of CMI. Independent MLM intradermally-inoculated groups were treated every other day with HLT-DLE, BCG-DLE or MLM-DLE, and the effect was documented for 98 days. DLE administered at a dose of 1.0 U (1 × 106 splenocytes) did not affect the evolution of leprosy, while DLE given at a dose of 0.1 U showed beneficial effects regardless of the DLE source. The dose but not the specificity of DLE was the determining factor for reversing anergy. PMID:25529580

  4. Detection of human myeloid progenitor cells in a murine background.

    PubMed

    Carow, C E; Harrington, M A; Broxmeyer, H E

    1993-01-01

    Cell-mixing experiments were performed to determine whether human (hu) peripheral blood plasma would select for the growth of hu myeloid progenitor cells in vitro. Mixtures of hu male umbilical cord blood and murine (mu) female bone marrow (100% hu, 100% mu, 1.0% hu or 10% hu and 50% hu) were plated in methylcellulose cultures that contained either hu plasma or fetal bovine serum (FBS). Cultures were supplemented with recombinant (r) hu erythropoietin (Epo) alone or in combination with rhu granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rmuGM-CSF or rhu steel factor (SLF). DNA was extracted from day 14 colonies and clusters, and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the hu Y-chromosome satellite DNA sequence. Results of these studies revealed that hu plasma used in combination with hu growth factors selected for the growth of hu progenitor cells. Mu cells grew in hu plasma only at high cell-plating concentrations. This selective effect was due to a heat labile factor or factors, since mu cells grew equally well in heat-inactivated hu plasma and FBS. Cells in individual progenitor cell colonies and clusters cultured in hu plasma contained hu Y-chromosome-specific DNA sequences that were detectable after PCR-mediated amplification, thus eliminating the need for time-consuming Southern transfer. This study describes a method whereby hu/immune-deficient mice can be screened rapidly for hu myeloid engraftment. These results also indicate that the hu identity of colonies and clusters cultured in hu plasma must be genetically confirmed, especially when hu cells may represent a low percentage of the total cells plated. PMID:7678088

  5. Changes in Scleral Collagen Organization in Murine Chronic Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pijanka, Jacek K.; Kimball, Elizabeth C.; Pease, Mary E.; Abass, Ahmed; Sorensen, Thomas; Nguyen, Thao D.; Quigley, Harry A.; Boote, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The organization of scleral collagen helps to determine the eye's biomechanical response to intraocular pressure (IOP), and may therefore be important in glaucoma. This study provides a quantitative assessment of changes in scleral collagen fibril organization in bead-induced murine experimental glaucoma. Methods. Wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to study the effect of bead-induced glaucoma on posterior scleral collagen organization in one eye of 12 CD1 mice, with untreated fellow eyes serving as controls. Three collagen parameters were measured: the local preferred fibril directions, the degree of collagen anisotropy, and the total fibrillar collagen content. Results. The mouse sclera featured a largely circumferential orientation of fibrillar collagen with respect to the optic nerve head canal. Localized alteration to fibril orientations was evident in the inferior peripapillary sclera of bead-treated eyes. Collagen anisotropy was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in bead-treated eyes in the superior peripapillary (Treated: 43 ± 8%; Control: 49 ± 6%) and midposterior (Treated: 39 ± 4%; Control: 43 ± 4%) sclera, and in the peripapillary region overall (Treated: 43 ± 6%; Control: 47 ± 3%). No significant differences in total collagen content were found between groups. Conclusions. Spatial changes in collagen fibril anisotropy occur in the posterior sclera of mice with bead-induced chronic IOP elevation and axonal damage. These results support the idea that dynamic changes in scleral form and structure play a role in the development of experimental glaucoma in mice, and potentially in human glaucoma. PMID:25228540

  6. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  7. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Murine Pathobiont Helicobacter typhlonius

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Jeroen; Dingemanse, Celia; Schmitz, Arnoud M.; Vossen, Rolf H. A. M.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Robanus-Maandag, Els C.; Anvar, Seyed Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Immuno-compromised mice infected with Helicobacter typhlonius are used to model microbially inducted inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The specific mechanism through which H. typhlonius induces and promotes IBD is not fully understood. Access to the genome sequence is essential to examine emergent properties of this organism, such as its pathogenicity. To this end, we present the complete genome sequence of H. typhlonius MIT 97-6810, obtained through single-molecule real-time sequencing. Results: The genome was assembled into a single circularized contig measuring 1.92 Mbp with an average GC content of 38.8%. In total 2,117 protein-encoding genes and 43 RNA genes were identified. Numerous pathogenic features were found, including a putative pathogenicity island (PAIs) containing components of type IV secretion system, virulence-associated proteins and cag PAI protein. We compared the genome of H. typhlonius to those of the murine pathobiont H. hepaticus and human pathobiont H. pylori. H. typhlonius resembles H. hepaticus most with 1,594 (75.3%) of its genes being orthologous to genes in H. hepaticus. Determination of the global methylation state revealed eight distinct recognition motifs for adenine and cytosine methylation. H. typhlonius shares four of its recognition motifs with H. pylori. Conclusion: The complete genome sequence of H. typhlonius MIT 97-6810 enabled us to identify many pathogenic features suggesting that H. typhlonius can act as a pathogen. Follow-up studies are necessary to evaluate the true nature of its pathogenic capabilities. We found many methylated sites and a plethora of restriction-modification systems. The genome, together with the methylome, will provide an essential resource for future studies investigating gene regulation, host interaction and pathogenicity of H. typhlonius. In turn, this work can contribute to unraveling the role of Helicobacter in enteric disease. PMID:26779178

  8. Mechanisms of Antiviral Action of Plant Antimicrobials against Murine Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Damian H.; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. PMID:24907316

  9. Vascular Microarchitecture of Murine Colitis-Associated Lymphoid Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Turhan, Aslihan; Lin, Miao; Lee, Grace S.; Miele, Lino; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    In permissive tissues, such as the gut and synovium, chronic inflammation can result in the ectopic development of anatomic structures that resemble lymph nodes. These inflammation-induced structures, termed lymphoid neogenesis or tertiary lymphoid organs, may reflect differential stromal responsiveness to the process of lymphoid neogenesis. To investigate the structural reorganization of the microcirculation involved in colonic lymphoid neogenesis, we studied a murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Standard 2-dimensional histology demonstrated both submucosal and intramucosal lymphoid structures in DSS-induced colitis. A spatial frequency analysis of serial histologic sections suggested that most intramucosal lymphoid aggregates developed de novo. Intravital microscopy of intravascular tracers confirmed that the developing intramucosal aggregates were supplied by capillaries arising from the quasi-polygonal mucosal plexus. Confocal optical sections and whole mount morphometry demonstrated capillary networks (185±46um diameter) involving 6–10 capillaries with a luminal diameter of 6.8±1.1um. Microdissection and angiogenesis PCR array analysis demonstrated enhanced expression of multiple angiogenic genes including CCL2, CXCL2, CXCL5, Il-1b, MMP9 and TNF within the mucosal plexus. Intravital microscopy of tracer particle flow velocities demonstrated a marked decrease in flow velocity from 808±901um/sec within the feeding mucosal plexus to 491±155um/sec within the capillary structures. We conclude that the development of ectopic lymphoid tissue requires significant structural remodeling of the stromal microcirculation. A feature of permissive tissues may be the capacity for lymphoid angiogenesis. PMID:19382226

  10. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Ullrich, Robert L.; Petrache, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u 56Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u 28Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy 56Fe or 28Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  11. Ibrutinib treatment ameliorates murine chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Dubovsky, Jason A.; Flynn, Ryan; Du, Jing; Harrington, Bonnie K.; Zhong, Yiming; Kaffenberger, Benjamin; Yang, Carrie; Towns, William H.; Lehman, Amy; Johnson, Amy J.; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Devine, Steven M.; Jaglowski, Samantha; Serody, Jonathan S.; Murphy, William J.; Munn, David H.; Luznik, Leo; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Wong, Henry K.; MacDonald, Kelli K.P.; Maillard, Ivan; Koreth, John; Elias, Laurence; Cutler, Corey; Soiffer, Robert J.; Antin, Joseph H.; Ritz, Jerome; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Byrd, John C.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a life-threatening impediment to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and current therapies do not completely prevent and/or treat cGVHD. CD4+ T cells and B cells mediate cGVHD; therefore, targeting these populations may inhibit cGVHD pathogenesis. Ibrutinib is an FDA-approved irreversible inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) and IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) that targets Th2 cells and B cells and produces durable remissions in B cell malignancies with minimal toxicity. Here, we evaluated whether ibrutinib could reverse established cGVHD in 2 complementary murine models, a model interrogating T cell–driven sclerodermatous cGVHD and an alloantibody-driven multiorgan system cGVHD model that induces bronchiolar obliterans (BO). In the T cell–mediated sclerodermatous cGVHD model, ibrutinib treatment delayed progression, improved survival, and ameliorated clinical and pathological manifestations. In the alloantibody-driven cGVHD model, ibrutinib treatment restored pulmonary function and reduced germinal center reactions and tissue immunoglobulin deposition. Animals lacking BTK and ITK did not develop cGVHD, indicating that these molecules are critical to cGVHD development. Furthermore, ibrutinib treatment reduced activation of T and B cells from patients with active cGVHD. Our data demonstrate that B cells and T cells drive cGVHD and suggest that ibrutinib has potential as a therapeutic agent, warranting consideration for cGVHD clinical trials. PMID:25271622

  12. Induction and treatment of anergy in murine leprosy.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Ortega, Mario; Hernandez, Víctor G; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Villanueva, Enrique B; Aguilar-Santelises, Miguel; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2015-02-01

    Leprosy is a disease consisting of a spectrum of clinical, bacteriological, histopathological and immunological manifestations. Tuberculoid leprosy is frequently recognized as the benign polar form of the disease, while lepromatous leprosy is regarded as the malignant form. The different forms of leprosy depend on the genetic and immunological characteristics of the patient and on the characteristics of the leprosy bacillus. The malignant manifestations of lepromatous leprosy result from the mycobacterial-specific anergy that develops in this form of the disease. Using murine leprosy as a model of anergy in this study, we first induced the development of anergy to Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) in mice and then attempted to reverse it by the administration of dialysable leucocyte extracts (DLE) prepared from healthy (HLT), BCG-inoculated and MLM-inoculated mice. Mice inoculated with either MLM or BCG developed a robust cell-mediated immune response (CMI) that was temporary in the MLM-inoculated group and long-lasting in the BCG-inoculated group. DLE were prepared from the spleens of MLM- and BCG-inoculated mice at the peak of CMI. Independent MLM intradermally-inoculated groups were treated every other day with HLT-DLE, BCG-DLE or MLM-DLE, and the effect was documented for 98 days. DLE administered at a dose of 1.0 U (1 × 10(6) splenocytes) did not affect the evolution of leprosy, while DLE given at a dose of 0.1 U showed beneficial effects regardless of the DLE source. The dose but not the specificity of DLE was the determining factor for reversing anergy. PMID:25529580

  13. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey; Kellam, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA 'off-target' effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host-pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host-virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host-virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  14. Expression of profibrotic genes in the murine remnant kidney model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Binxia; Vohra, Pawan; Janardhanan, Rajiv; Misra, Khamal D.; Misra, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To test the hypothesis that there is increased expression of several profibrotic genes including matrix metalloproteinase–2 (MMP-2), and -9 (MMP-9), and its inhibitors (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2), a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motif -1 (ADAMTS-1), and fibroblast specific protein-1 (FSP-1) in a murine remnant kidney (RK) model. MATERIALS AND METHODS CKD was created in ten C57BL/6 male mice (20-25 g) by performing a right nephrectomy and ligation of the upper pole of the left kidney (RK). Animals were sacrificed at 42 and 56 days later. Real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, ADAMTS-1, and FSP-1 was performed in the RK. Histologic evaluation of the RK was performed using Ki-67, α-smooth muscle cell actin (α-SMA), hematoxylin and eosin, and Masson’s trichrome staining. Kidney function was assessed using serum BUN and creatinine. RESULTS The mean serum BUN and creatinine levels at day 42 and 56 were significantly higher than baseline (P <0 .05). By day 42, the mean expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, ADAMTS-1, and FSP-1 was significantly higher in the RK when compared to normal kidney (P<0.05) and by day 56, only FSP-1 expression increased significantly higher (P<0.05). There was increased fibrosis by Masson’s trichrome, increased Ki-67, with increased α-SMA staining in the RK when compared to normal kidneys. CONCLUSIONS In the RK, there was increased fibrosis with increased α -SMA and Ki-67 staining with significantly increased expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, ADAMTS-1, and FSP-1. PMID:22030458

  15. Cyclophilin D regulates necrosis, but not apoptosis, of murine eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiang; Hogan, Simon P; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Zimmermann, Nives

    2016-04-15

    Eosinophil degranulation and clusters of free extracellular granules are frequently observed in diverse diseases, including atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Whether these intact granules are released by necrosis or a biochemically mediated cytolysis remains unknown. Recently, a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase located within the mitochondrial matrix, cyclophilin D (PPIF), was shown to regulate necrotic, but not apoptotic, cell death in vitro in fibroblasts, hepatocytes, and cardiomyocytes. Whether cyclophilin D regulates necrosis in hematopoietic cells such as eosinophils remains unknown. We used PPIF-deficient (Ppif(-/-)) mice to test whether cyclophilin D is required for regulating eosinophil necrosis. PPIF deficiency did not affect eosinophil development or maturation at baseline. After in vitro ionomycin or H2O2 treatment, Ppif(-/-) eosinophils were significantly protected from Ca(2+) overload- or oxidative stress-induced necrosis. Additionally, Ppif(-/-) eosinophils demonstrated significantly decreased necrosis, but not apoptosis, in response to Siglec-F cross-linking, a stimulus associated with eosinophil-mediated processes in vitro and in vivo. When treated with apoptosis inducers, Ppif(+/+) and Ppif(-/-) eosinophils exhibited no significant difference in apoptosis or secondary necrosis. Finally, in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model, although levels of colitogenic cytokines and eosinophil-selective chemokines were comparable between Ppif(+/+) and Ppif(-/-) mice, the latter exhibited decreased clinical outcomes. This correlated with significantly reduced eosinophil cytolysis in the colon. Collectively, our present studies demonstrate that murine eosinophil necrosis is regulated in vitro and in vivo by cyclophilin D, at least in part, thus providing new insight into the mechanism of eosinophil necrosis and release of free extracellular granules in eosinophil-associated diseases. PMID:26893161

  16. Murine and human CFTR exhibit different sensitivities to CFTR potentiators.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; McCarty, Nael A

    2015-10-01

    Development of therapeutic molecules with clinical efficacy as modulators of defective CFTR includes efforts to identify potentiators that can overcome or repair the gating defect in mutant CFTR channels. This has taken a great leap forward with the identification of the potentiator VX-770, now available to patients as "Kalydeco." Other small molecules with different chemical structure also are capable of potentiating the activity of either wild-type or mutant CFTR, suggesting that there are features of the protein that may be targeted to achieve stimulation of channel activity by structurally diverse compounds. However, neither the mechanisms by which these compounds potentiate mutant CFTR nor the site(s) where these compounds bind have been identified. This knowledge gap partly reflects the lack of appropriate experimental models to provide clues toward the identification of binding sites. Here, we have compared the channel behavior and response to novel and known potentiators of human CFTR (hCFTR) and murine (mCFTR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Both hCFTR and mCFTR were blocked by GlyH-101 from the extracellular side, but mCFTR activity was increased with GlyH-101 applied directly to the cytoplasmic side. Similarly, glibenclamide only exhibited a blocking effect on hCFTR but both blocked and potentiated mCFTR in excised membrane patches and in intact oocytes. The clinically used CFTR potentiator VX-770 transiently increased hCFTR by ∼13% but potentiated mCFTR significantly more strongly. Our results suggest that mCFTR pharmacological sensitivities differ from hCFTR, which will provide a useful tool for identifying the binding sites and mechanism for these potentiators. PMID:26209275

  17. Thymopoietic and Bone Marrow Response to Murine Pneumocystis Pneumonia▿

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xin; Zhang, Ping; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a key role in host defense against Pneumocystis infection. To define the role of naïve CD4+ T cell production through the thymopoietic response in host defense against Pneumocystis infection, Pneumocystis murina infection in the lung was induced in adult male C57BL/6 mice with and without prior thymectomy. Pneumocystis infection caused a significant increase in the number of CCR9+ multipotent progenitor (MPP) cells in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation, an increase in populations of earliest thymic progenitors (ETPs) and double negative (DN) thymocytes in the thymus, and recruitment of naïve and total CD4+ T cells into the alveolar space. The level of murine signal joint T cell receptor excision circles (msjTRECs) in spleen CD4+ cells was increased at 5 weeks post-Pneumocystis infection. In thymectomized mice, the numbers of naïve, central memory, and total CD4+ T cells in all tissues examined were markedly reduced following Pneumocystis infection. This deficiency of naïve and central memory CD4+ T cells was associated with delayed pulmonary clearance of Pneumocystis. Extracts of Pneumocystis resulted in an increase in the number of CCR9+ MPPs in the cultured bone marrow cells. Stimulation of cultured bone marrow cells with ligands to Toll-like receptor 2 ([TLR-2] zymosan) and TLR-9 (ODN M362) each caused a similar increase in CCR9+ MPP cells via activation of the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway. These results demonstrate that enhanced production of naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes through the thymopoietic response and enhanced delivery of lymphopoietic precursors from the bone marrow play an important role in host defense against Pneumocystis infection. PMID:21343353

  18. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Block, Darci R; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Cunningham, Scott A; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155-330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99-340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225-945 μmol/L and 276-687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  19. A Novel Cell Line from Spontaneously Immortalized Murine Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Kulas, Joshua; Combs, Colin K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Purified microglia cultures are useful tools to study microglial behavior in vitro. Microglial cell lines serve as an attractive alternative to primary microglia culture, circumventing the costly and lengthy preparation of the latter. However, immortalization by genetic or pharmacologic manipulations may show altered physiology from primary microglia. New Method A novel microglial cell line was isolated from a primary glial culture of postnatal murine cerebral cortices. The culture contained a population of spontaneously transformed microglia that continued to divide without genetic or pharmacological manipulations. After several clones were isolated, one particular clone, SIM-A9, was analyzed for its microglial characteristics. Results SIM-A9 cells expressed macrophage/microglia-specific proteins, CD68 and Iba1. SIM-A9 cells were responsive to exogenous inflammatory stimulation with lipopolysaccharide and β-amyloid, triggering tyrosine kinase-based and NFκB signaling cascades as well as TNFα secretion. SIM-A9 cells also exhibited phagocytic uptake of fluorescent labeled β-amyloid and bacterial bioparticles. Furthermore, lipopolysaccharide increased the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, whereas IL-4 stimulation increased arginase-1 levels demonstrating that SIM-A9 cells are capable of switching their profiles to pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes, respectively. Comparison with Existing Methods The use of SIM-A9 cells avoids expensive and lengthy procedures required for the preparation of primary microglia. Spontaneously immortalized SIM-A9 cells are expected to behave more comparably to primary microglia than virally transformed or pharmacologically induced microglial cell lines. Conclusions SIM-A9 cells exhibit key characteristics of cultured primary microglia and may serve as a valuable model system for the investigation of microglial behavior in vitro. PMID:24975292

  20. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA ‘off-target’ effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host–pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host–virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host–virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  1. VEGFR-2 Targeted Chemoprevention of Murine Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Karoor, Vijaya; Le, Mysan; Merrick, Daniel; Dempsey, Edward C.; Miller, York E.

    2010-01-01

    No clinically effective chemoprevention for lung cancer has been found. Angiogenesis is an early feature of both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell lung cancer. We investigated the effects of VEGFR-2 inhibition on lung carcinogenesis in a murine model of adenocarcinoma. The VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, was administered to FVB/N mice in chow for 7 days at varying doses in order to demonstrate pharmacologic activity by inhibition of VEGF mediated VEFGR-2 and ERK phosphorylation. Plasma levels corroborated adequate dosage. For chemoprevention experiments, mice were injected i.p. with 1 mg/gm urethane, a carcinogen found in tobacco smoke. Chow containing vandetanib, 75 mg/kg/d, or control chow was given to mice, starting 7 days after urethane administration. Sixteen weeks after urethane injection, mice were sacrificed, tumors enumerated and measured. Vandetanib resulted in reductions in tumor multiplicity (6.5 +/− 0.86 vs 1.0 +/− 0.30, p = 0.001) and average tumor volume (0.85 +/− 0.10 mm3 vs. 0.15 +/− 0.09 mm3, p = 0.001), but not incidence (71% vs. 100%, p = ns), compared to control. As vandetanib has other activities besides VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibition, we administered the anti-VEGFR-2 monoclonal antibody, DC101, for weeks 11–15 of a urethane carcinogenesis protocol with an arrest in tumor volume increase, but no change in multiplicity or incidence. Further investigation of the chemopreventive effect of vandetanib and other VEGF signaling inhibitors is needed. PMID:20647338

  2. Assay of lapatinib in murine models of cigarette smoke carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Balansky, Roumen; Izzotti, Alberto; D’Agostini, Francesco; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Micale, Rosanna T.; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Camoirano, Anna; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; Steele, Vernon E.; De Flora, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Lapatinib, a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), is prescribed for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer overexpressing HER-2. Involvement of this drug in pulmonary carcinogenesis has been poorly investigated. We used murine models suitable to evaluate cigarette smoke-related molecular and histopathological alterations. A total of 481 Swiss H mice were used. The mice were exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) during the first four months of life. After 10 weeks, MCS caused an elevation of bulky DNA adducts, oxidative DNA damage and an extensive downregulation of microRNAs in lung. After four months, an increase in micronucleus frequency was observed in peripheral blood erythrocytes. After 7.5 months, histopathological alterations were detected in the lung, also including benign tumors and malignant tumors, and in the urinary tract. A subchronic toxicity study assessed the non-toxic doses of lapatinib, administered daily with the diet after weaning. After 10 weeks, lapatinib significantly attenuated the MCS-related nucleotide changes and upregulated several low-intensity microRNAs in lung. The drug poorly affected the MCS systemic genotoxicity and had modest protective effects on MCS-induced preneoplastic lesions in lung and kidney, when administered under conditions that temporarily mimicked interventions either in current smokers or ex-smokers. On the other hand, it caused some toxicity to the liver. Thus, on the whole, lapatinib appears to have a low impact in the smoke-related lung carcinogenesis models used, especially in terms of tumorigenic response. PMID:25053627

  3. Bone marrow atrophy induced by murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, A E; Price, P; Shellam, G R

    1994-01-01

    Acute, sublethal infection of mice with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) resulted in up to 80% decreases in the number of cells recoverable from the bone marrow, and a decrease in peripheral blood leucocyte counts during the first week of infection. Depopulation of the leucopoietic areas of the marrow was evident from examination of histological sections. The severity of bone marrow atrophy in MCMV-infected mice of different strains correlated with previously described genetically determined sensitivity to MCMV disease. Although the phenomenon only occurred when mice were inoculated with infectious virus preparations, fewer than one in 10(5) marrow cells were productively infected, suggesting that atrophy was not due to lytic infection of large numbers of bone marrow cells. Interestingly, increases in serum colony-stimulating activity were observed and these were proportional to the severity of bone marrow atrophy. After MCMV infection, we observed increases in the proportions of cells expressing some B-cell and myeloid cell markers and a decrease in the proportion of cells expressing an erythroid cell marker. There was no change in the frequency of marrow cells expressing mature T-cell markers. The numbers of myeloid lineage-committed progenitor cells (GM-CFU) in the marrow decreased 10- to 20-fold in BALB/c nu/+ mice, while there was a threefold decrease in their numbers in BALB/c nu/nu mice. In addition, increases in serum colony-stimulating activity were greater in BALB/c nu/+ mice than in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Our results suggest that growth factors produced after MCMV infection may accelerate the maturation and migration of cells from the marrow to sites of virus replication and inflammation, thus accounting for the depletion in numbers of marrow cells observed soon after MCMV infection. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7959876

  4. Molecular cloning and physical mapping of murine cytomegalovirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, A; Keil, G M; Knust, E; Koszinowski, U H

    1983-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) Smith strain DNA is cleaved by restriction endonuclease HindIII into 16 fragments, ranging in size from 0.64 to 22.25 megadaltons. Of the 16 HindIII fragments, 15 were cloned in plasmid pACYC177 in Escherichia coli HB101 (recA). The recombinant plasmid clones were characterized by cleavage with the enzymes XbaI and EcoRI. In addition, fragments generated by double digestion of cloned fragments with HindIII and XbaI were inserted into the plasmid vector pACYC184. The results obtained after hybridization of 32P-labeled cloned fragments to Southern blots of MCMV DNA cleaved with HindIII, XbaI, EcoRI, BamHI, ApaI, ClaI, EcoRV, or KpnI allowed us to construct complete physical maps of the viral DNA for the restriction endonucleases HindIII, XbaI, and EcoRI. On the basis of the cloning and mapping experiments, it was calculated that the MCMV genome spans about 235 kilobase pairs, corresponding to a molecular weight of 155,000,000. All fragments were found to be present in equimolar concentrations, and no cross-hybridization between any of the fragments was seen. We conclude that the MCMV DNA molecule consists of a long unique sequence without large terminal or internal repeat regions. Thus, the structural organization of the MCMV genome is fundamentally different from that of the human cytomegalovirus or herpes simplex virus genome. Images PMID:6312075

  5. Murine monoclonal antibodies specific for virulent Treponema pallidum (Nichols).

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, S M; Kettman, J R; Miller, J N; Norgard, M V

    1982-01-01

    Murine anti-Treponema pallidum (Nichols) lymphocyte hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies against a variety of treponemal antigens have been generated. Hybridomas isolated were of three major types: those that were directed specifically against T. pallidum antigens, those that were directed against treponemal group antigens (as evidenced by their cross-reactivity with T. phagedenis biotype Reiter antigens), and those that cross-reacted with both treponemal as well as rabbit host testicular tissue antigens. The majority (31 of 39 clones) of these anti-T. pallidum hybridomas, which produced monoclonal antibodies of mouse isotypes immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG3 or IgM, were directed specifically against T. pallidum and not other treponemal or rabbit antigens tested by radioimmunoassay. Four of these T. pallidum-specific hybridomas secreted monoclonal antibodies with greater binding affinity for "aged" rather than freshly isolated intact T. pallidum cells, suggesting a possible specificity for "unmasked" surface antigens of T. pallidum. Six anti-T. pallidum hybridomas produced complement-fixing monoclonal antibodies (IgG2a, IgG2b, or IgM) that were capable of immobilizing virulent treponemes in the T. pallidum immobilization (TPI) test; these may represent biologically active monoclonal antibodies against treponemal surface antigens. Three other hybridomas secreted monoclonal antibodies which bound to both T. pallidum and T. phagedenis biotype Reiter antigens, thus demonstrating a possible specificity for treponemal group antigens. Five hybridoma cell lines were also isolated which produced IgM monoclonal antibodies that cross-reacted with all treponemal and rabbit host testicular tissue antigens employed in the radioimmunoassays. This report describes the construction and characteristics of these hybridoma cell lines. The potential applications of the anti-T. pallidum monoclonal antibodies are discussed. PMID:7047388

  6. Retinoic acid biosynthesis is impaired in human and murine endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Pierzchalski, Keely; Taylor, Robert N; Nezhat, Ceana; Jones, Jace W; Napoli, Joseph L; Yang, Guixiang; Kane, Maureen A; Sidell, Neil

    2014-10-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma in extrauterine sites. Our objective was to determine whether endometriotic lesions (ELs) from women with endometriosis have altered retinoid levels compared with their eutopic endometrium, and to test the hypothesis that defects in all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) biosynthesis in EL is related to reduced expression of cellular retinol-binding protein type 1 (RBP1). Retinoids were evaluated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography in eutopic endometrial biopsies (EBs) and ELs from 42 patients with pathologically confirmed endometriosis. The ATRA levels were reduced, whereas the retinol and retinyl ester concentrations were elevated in EL compared with EB tissue. Similar results were found in a mouse model of endometriosis that used green fluorescent protein-positive endometrial tissue injected into the peritoneum of syngeneic hosts to mimic retrograde menses. The ATRA biosynthesis in vitro in retinol-treated primary human endometrial stromal cell (ESC) cultures derived from ELs was reduced compared with that of ESCs derived from patient-matched EBs. Correspondingly, RBP1 expression was reduced in tissue and ESCs derived from EL versus EB. Rbp1(-/-) mice showed reduced endometrial ATRA concentrations compared with wild type, associated with loss of tissue organization and hypercellularity. These findings provide the first quantitative measurements of ATRA in human endometrium and endometriosis, demonstrating reduced ATRA in ectopic tissue and corresponding ESC cultures. Quantitation of retinoids in murine endometriosis and in Rbp1(-/-) mice supports the contention that impaired ATRA synthesis caused by reduced RBP1 promotes an "endometriosis phenotype" that enables cells to implant and grow at ectopic sites. PMID:25143356

  7. Effect of cyclosporine in a murine model of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Banić, Marko; Anić, Branimir; Brkić, Tomislav; Ljubicić, Neven; Plesko, Sanja; Dohoczky, Csaba; Erceg, Damir; Petrovecki, Mladen; Stipancić, Igor; Rotkvić, Ivo

    2002-06-01

    The use of immunosuppressive therapy may be associated with significant toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclosporine A (CsA) in murine model of experimental colitis. Experimental colitis was induced in NMRI mice using an enema of 0.2% solution of dinitrofluorobenzene, combined with skin sensitization. After inducing colitis, experimental groups of animals were treated with CsA (1, 3, 5, 10, 25, 50 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intracolonically (i.c.), and control groups were treated with phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally or intracolonically, respectively. Colonic inflammatory changes were assessed using a histopathologic score of 0-30, and pooled whole blood samples were processed with monoclonal antibodies for cyclosporine concentration. In addition, two groups of animals with experimental colitis were treated intraperitoneally or intracolonically with 3 mg/kg/day of CsA, and the colons were also taken for immunohistochemistry for CD25. CsA diminished the extent of colitis in groups treated with 3, 5, 10, or 25 mg/kg intraperitoneally or intracolonically, and in groups treated with 1 and 50 mg/kg intracolonically (P < 0.05). The effect of intracolonic application of CsA was not related to whole blood cyclosporine concentrations. In addition, the effect of CsA at 3 mg/kg, applied intraperitoneally or intracolonically was, in part, expressed in decreasing the numbers of CD25+ cells within colonic mucosa/submucosa (P < 0.05). In conclusions, the results of this study indicate the possibility of intracolonic application of cyclosporine in order to widen the therapeutic window for effective, but possibly toxic drug, such as cyclosporine. PMID:12064814

  8. Transcriptome Profiling of Developing Murine Lens Through RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid Y.; Hackett, Sean F.; Lee, Mei-Chong W.; Pourmand, Nader; Talbot, C. Conover; Riazuddin, S. Amer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transcriptome is the entire repertoire of transcripts present in a cell at any particular time. We undertook a next-generation whole transcriptome sequencing approach to gain insight into the transcriptional landscape of the developing mouse lens. Methods We ascertained mouse lenses at six developmental time points including two embryonic (E15 and E18) and four postnatal stages (P0, P3, P6, and P9). The ocular tissue at each time point was maintained as two distinct pools serving as biological replicates for each developmental stage. The mRNA and small RNA libraries were paired-end sequenced on Illumina HiSeq 2000 and subsequently analyzed using bioinformatics tools. Results Mapping of mRNA and small RNA libraries generated 187.56 and 154.22 million paired-end reads, respectively. We detected a total of 14,465 genes in the mouse ocular lens at the above-mentioned six developmental stages. Of these, 46 genes exhibited a 40-fold differential (higher or lower) expression at one the five developmental stages (E18, P0, P3, P6, and P9) compared with their expression level at E15. Likewise, small RNA profiling identified 379 microRNAs (miRNAs) expressed in mouse lens at six developmental time points. Of these, 49 miRNAs manifested an 8-fold differential (higher or lower) expression at one the five developmental stages, as mentioned above compared with their expression level at E15. Conclusions We report a comprehensive profile of developing murine lens transcriptome including both mRNA and miRNA through next-generation RNA sequencing. A complete repository of the lens transcriptome of six developmental time points will be monumental in elucidating processes essential for the development of the ocular lens and maintenance of its transparency. PMID:26225632

  9. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Block, Darci R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Cunningham, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155–330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99–340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225–945 μmol/L and 276–687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  10. Interferon-alpha inhibits murine macrophage transforming growth factor-beta mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Dhanani, S; Huang, M; Wang, J; Dubinett, S M

    1994-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional polypeptide is produced by a wide variety of cells and regulates a broad array of physiological and pathological functions. TGF-beta appears to play a central role in pulmonary fibrosis and may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. Alveolar macrophages are a rich source of TGF-beta and are intimately involved in lung inflammation. We therefore chose to study TGF-beta regulation in murine alveolar macrophages as well as an immortalized peritoneal macrophage cell line (IC-21). Murine macrophages were incubated with cytokines to evaluate their role in regulating TGF-beta mRNA expression. We conclude that IFN-alpha downregulates TGF-beta mRNA expression in murine macrophages. PMID:8088926

  11. Shared idiotypes and restricted immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain genes characterize murine autoantibodies of various specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Monestier, M; Manheimer-Lory, A; Bellon, B; Painter, C; Dang, H; Talal, N; Zanetti, M; Schwartz, R; Pisetsky, D; Kuppers, R

    1986-01-01

    The study of the Ig variable region heavy chain (VH) genes used to encode antibodies specific for self-epitopes from murine hybridomas showed that three VH families are primarily utilized: VH J558, the largest family, and VH QPC52 and VH 7183, the families most proximal to the Ig joining region heavy chain genes. These monoclonal autoantibodies express cross-reactive idiotopes shared by rheumatoid factors and antibodies specific for Sm. The expression of these idiotypes is independent of major histocompatibility complex and Ig constant region heavy chain haplotypes, self-antigen specificity, and even the VH gene family utilized. Though the experiments described here are limited to murine autoantibodies, similarities exist between murine and human autoimmune diseases. Studies that aim to investigate the relationship between VH gene expression and the presence of cross-reactive idiotypes among human autoantibodies should enable us to better understand the mechanisms of autoimmunity and self-tolerance. Images PMID:2427543

  12. Murine model of otitis media with effusion: immunohistochemical demonstration of IL-1 alpha antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M D; Contrino, A; Contrino, J; Maxwell, K; Leonard, G; Kreutzer, D

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that cytokines likely play a central role in the formation and maintenance of otitis media with effusion (OME). Currently, there is no immunologically defined animal model for the study of cytokines as they contribute to the formation of OME. In the present study, a murine model of OME, using eustachian tube blockage via an external surgical approach, was developed. The murine model temporal bone histology appears to mimic the histology found in chronic otitis media with effusion in humans. Additionally, using this murine model, interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) expression was detected in the middle ear using standard immunohistochemical techniques. IL-1 alpha seemed localized to the epithelial lining of the middle ear as well as 5% to 10% of inflammatory cells. This model should provide the necessary tool to further study the immunologic aspects of OME. PMID:8072363

  13. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  14. Murine Typhus in Returned Travelers: A Report of Thirty-Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Gaëlle; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Socolovschi, Cristina; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Murine typhus, caused by Rickettsia typhi and transmitted mainly by the rat fleas, Xenopsylla cheopis, has emerged in the field of travel medicine. We analyzed retrospectively the epidemiological, clinical, and biological characteristics of the 32 murine typhus cases that were diagnosed during the past 3 years at the World Health Organization Collaborative Center for Rickettsial diseases, Marseille, France. All of the cases occurred in travelers and most of them had returned from Africa (N = 13 of 32) and South-east Asia (N = 12 of 32). Exposure to rats was reported only in a few (N = 2 of 32) patients. Almost half of the cases were diagnosed in August and September. Only four patients presented the classic triad: fever, rash, and headache. Moreover, we report the first known cases of a hemophagocytic syndrome associated with this disease. Murine typhus must be considered as an etiologic agent of febrile illness in returning travelers, particularly in those with unspecific symptoms. PMID:22665617

  15. Immunotherapy of murine sarcomas with interleukin 2. I. Local administration of human recombinant IL-2 preparations.

    PubMed

    Bubeník, J; Indrová, M; Toulcová, A

    1986-01-01

    The immunotherapeutic effect of human recombinant interleukin 2 was examined with a panel of MC-induced murine sarcomas carrying individual tumour-specific transplantation antigens. Repeated peritumoral injections of RIL-2 inhibited growth of five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) out of six sarcomas in syngeneic mice. The sixth murine sarcoma (MC12) was resistant to the tumour-inhibitory effect of human recombinant IL-2 as well as to the tumour-inhibitory effect of murine and rat lymphoid IL-2 preparations. Since the IL-2-sensitive and IL-2-resistant sarcomas were induced with MC in mice of identical genotype and share most of their characteristics, they represent a useful model for investigation of structural target cell determinants and functional target cell properties responsible for the sensitivity of tumours to the immunotherapeutic effects of IL-2. PMID:3492396

  16. Species- and infective stage-specific monoclonal antibodies to Leishmania major produced by an in vitro immunization method.

    PubMed

    Wu, S J; Rowton, E D; Ma, M; Andre, R G

    1990-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific to the infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major are needed for developing rapid diagnostic assays of infected sand flies. An in vitro immunization protocol was applied for the production of monoclonal antibodies using small amounts of L. major. Infective-stage promastigotes were isolated from sand flies (Phlebotomus papatasi) 7-10 days after infection and used as antigen for immunization. Two weeks after a primary immunization, murine splenocytes were removed and immunized in vitro with antigen in murine EL-4 thymoma cell conditioned medium. Three fusions were performed using X63-Ag.653 myeloma cells as fusion partners and two fusions were performed using FOX-NY cells. Antibodies specific to promastigotes were detected using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initially 56 monoclonal antibodies were selected, and their species and stage specificity were determined using both an ELISA and an indirect fluorescent antibody assay (IFA). Twelve monoclonal antibodies showed species specificity to L. major when tested against four sympatric species of Leishmania. Four other monoclonal antibodies showed species and infective-stage specificity to L. major promastigotes. When tested in immunoblots, all four species- and stage-specific monoclonal antibodies bound to five protein bands that were unique to the infective-stage promastigotes. PMID:2087235

  17. Variable Genome Sequences of the Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Regulatory Region Isolated from an Infected Mouse Tissue Viral Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Libbey, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome, isolated from an infected murine tissue homogenate, was sequenced to completion. The lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys were the source of the tissue homogenate in order to mirror the heterogeneity of the virus population in vivo. The regulatory region sequence was found to be highly variable. PMID:27231357

  18. Variable Genome Sequences of the Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Regulatory Region Isolated from an Infected Mouse Tissue Viral Suspension.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Fujinami, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome, isolated from an infected murine tissue homogenate, was sequenced to completion. The lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys were the source of the tissue homogenate in order to mirror the heterogeneity of the virus population in vivo The regulatory region sequence was found to be highly variable. PMID:27231357

  19. Cloning of the murine counterpart of the tumor-associated antigen H-L6: Epitope mapping of the human and murine L6 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.P.; Farr, A.G.; Marken, J.S. |

    1995-10-03

    The murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) L6 was raised against human lung carcinoma cells and found to recognize an antigen which is highly expressed on lung, breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas. Promising results in phase 1 clinical studies with this antibody or its chimerized counterpart suggest the antigen recognized by mAb L6 (H-L6) is an attractive target for monoclonal antibody-based cancer therapy. Further development of L6 as an anti-tumor-targeting agent would benefit from the development of a murine model. However, initial attempts to develop such a model were hampered by our inability to generate antibodies against the murine homologue of the L6 antigen, M-L6. Here we describe the preparation of the mAb 12A8, which was raised against murine thymic epithelial cells, the tissue distribution of the murine antigen recognized by 12A8, the cloning of a cDNA encoding the 12A8 target antigen, and the demonstration that this antigen is M-L6. Using H-L6/M-L6 chimeric proteins, we show that the region of the M-L6 protein recognized by mAb 12A8 corresponds to the region of H-L6 recognized by mAb L6. There are five amino acid differences in the regions of the H-L6 and M-L6 proteins recognized by L6 and 12A8, respectively. We further mapped the protein epitope recognized by L6 by individually exchanging each of these residues in H-L6 with the corresponding residue found in M-L6. Substitution of the single H-L6 residue Leu122 with Ser resulted in the H-L6 mutant HL6-L122S which failed to bind L6. The HL6-L122S mutant also failed to bind 12A8. Substituting residue Ser122 in M-L6 with Leu did not prevent 12A8 binding and did not result in L6 binding. The availability of mAb 12A8 and the finding that it recognizes the same region of M-L6 that is recognized by L6 on H-L6 might allow the development of a murine tumor model in which the L6 antigen can be further evaluated as a therapeutic target. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms regulate murine thymidine kinase gene expression in serum-stimulated cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, H B; Lin, P F; Yeh, D B; Ruddle, F H

    1988-01-01

    We previously isolated and characterized the structure of murine thymidine kinase (tk) genomic and cDNA sequences to begin a study designed to identify regions of the tk gene important for regulated expression during the transition of cells from G0 to a proliferating state. In this report, we describe the stable transfection of the cloned gene into L-M(TK-) cells and show that both thymidine kinase (TK) enzyme activity and DNA synthesis increase in parallel when transfectants in G0 arrest are stimulated by serum. To define promoter and regulatory regions more precisely, we have constructed a series of tk minigenes and have examined their expression in stable transfectants after serum stimulation. We have identified a 291-base-pair DNA fragment at the 5' end of the tk gene that has promoter function, and we have determined its sequence. In addition, we have found that DNA sequences which mediate serum-induced expression of TK are transcribed, since expression of the murine tk cDNA, fused to a promoter from either the murine tk gene, the simian virus 40 early region, or the herpes simplex virus tk gene, is stimulated by serum. Our constructs also reveal that the murine tk polyadenylation signal is not required for regulation, nor is most of the 3' untranslated region. RNA dot blot analysis indicates that murine cytoplasmic tk mRNA levels always parallel TK enzyme activity. Nuclear runon transcription assays show less than a 2-fold increase in transcription from the cloned tk gene in serum-stimulated transfectants, but an 11-fold increase in mouse L929 cells, which are inherently TK+. These results taken together suggest that the murine tk gene is controlled in serum-stimulated cells by a transcriptional mechanism influenced by DNA sequences that flank tk and also by a posttranscriptional system linked to gene sequences that are transcribed. Images PMID:3244356

  1. Structure, distribution, and expression of an ancient murine endogenous retroviruslike DNA family.

    PubMed Central

    Obata, M M; Khan, A S

    1988-01-01

    An endogenous retroviruslike DNA, B-26, was cloned from a BALB/c mouse embryo gene library by using a generalized murine leukemia virus DNA probe. Southern blot hybridization and nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that B-26 DNA might be a novel member of the GLN DNA family (A. Itin and E. Keshet, J. Virol. 59:301-307, 1986) which contains murine leukemia virus-related pol and env sequences. Northern analysis indicated that B-26-related RNAs of 8.4 and 3.0 kilobases were transcribed in thymus, spleen, brain, and liver tissues of 6-week-old BALB/c mice. Images PMID:3172346

  2. Multispectral Imaging of T and B Cells in Murine Spleen and Tumor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zipei; Jensen, Shawn M; Messenheimer, David J; Farhad, Mohammed; Neuberger, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo B; Fox, Bernard A

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in multiplex immunohistochemistry techniques allow for quantitative, spatial identification of multiple immune parameters for enhanced diagnostic and prognostic insight. However, applying such techniques to murine fixed tissues, particularly sensitive epitopes, such as CD4, CD8α, and CD19, has been difficult. We compared different fixation protocols and Ag-retrieval techniques and validated the use of multiplex immunohistochemistry for detection of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell subsets in murine spleen and tumor. This allows for enumeration of these T cell subsets within immune environments, as well as the study of their spatial distribution. PMID:26994219

  3. Induction of macrophage procoagulant activity by murine hepatitis virus strain 3: role of tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Dackiw, A P; Zakrzewski, K; Nathens, A B; Cheung, P Y; Fingerote, R; Levy, G A; Rotstein, O D

    1995-01-01

    The induction of a unique macrophage procoagulant molecule by murine hepatitis virus strain 3 correlates with the severity of viral hepatitis. The role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the signalling pathway leading to procoagulant expression was studied. Murine hepatitis virus strain 3 initiated a rapid increase in phosphotyrosine accumulation. Tyrosine kinase inhibition precluded this increase and abrogated expression of the virus-induced procoagulant mouse fibrinogen-like protein (musfiblp) gene. These findings suggest that manipulation of this signalling pathway in vivo might represent a novel approach to treating this disease. PMID:7543590

  4. Physeal reconstruction using tissue donated from early postnatal limbs in a murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Cundy, P.J.; Jofe, M.; Zaleske, D.J.; Ehrlich, M.G.; Mankin, H.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Physeal reconstruction was performed in a murine model by transplanting corresponding postnatal tissue from 4-day-old C57B mice to resection defects. The site of the reconstruction, the murine distal femoral epiphysis, is completely cartilaginous and avascular at this stage of development. The tissue transplanted into the defect was demonstrated to have high kinetic activity by its incorporation of tritiated thymidine. The physeal reconstruction as performed restored only 25% of normal growth. While transplanting cell populations is feasible, the method will require a great deal of work before clinical application.

  5. Comparative efficacies of amphotericin B lipid complex and amphotericin B deoxycholate suspension against murine blastomycosis.

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, K V; Stevens, D A

    1991-01-01

    Amphotericin B as a lipid complex and as a deoxycholate suspension (Fungizone) was tested against murine blastomycosis. All doses of each form prolonged survival (P less than 0.05 to 0.001). Fungizone was more effective than lipid complex at doses of 0.8 mg/kg of body weight. However, lipid complex at 12.8 mg/kg was not toxic and superior in efficacy (P less than 0.001) to 2.0 mg of Fungizone per kg (a toxic dose), and it cleared all animals of infection. Lipid complex is an effective therapy for murine blastomycosis. PMID:1759840

  6. Multispectral Imaging of T and B Cells in Murine Spleen and Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zipei; Jensen, Shawn M.; Messenheimer, David J.; Farhad, Mohammed; Neuberger, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multiplex immunohistochemistry techniques allow for quantitative, spatial identification of multiple immune parameters for enhanced diagnostic and prognostic insight. However, applying such techniques to murine fixed tissues, particularly sensitive epitopes, such as CD4, CD8α, and CD19, has been difficult. We compared different fixation protocols and Ag-retrieval techniques and validated the use of multiplex immunohistochemistry for detection of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T cell subsets in murine spleen and tumor. This allows for enumeration of these T cell subsets within immune environments, as well as the study of their spatial distribution. PMID:26994219

  7. A Multicenter Blinded Analysis Indicates No Association between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and either Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus or Polytropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Harvey J.; Mikovits, Judy A.; Switzer, William M.; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Lo, Shyh-Ching; Klimas, Nancy; Komaroff, Anthony L.; Montoya, Jose G.; Bateman, Lucinda; Levine, Susan; Peterson, Daniel; Levin, Bruce; Hanson, Maureen R.; Genfi, Afia; Bhat, Meera; Zheng, HaoQiang; Wang, Richard; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lee, Li Ling; Sameroff, Stephen; Heneine, Walid; Coffin, John; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disabling disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) has been linked in two independent studies to infection with xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and polytropic murine leukemia virus (pMLV). Although the associations were not confirmed in subsequent studies by other investigators, patients continue to question the consensus of the scientific community in rejecting the validity of the association. Here we report blinded analysis of peripheral blood from a rigorously characterized, geographically diverse population of 147 patients with CFS/ME and 146 healthy subjects by the investigators describing the original association. This analysis reveals no evidence of either XMRV or pMLV infection. PMID:22991430

  8. Sleep and fatigue in mice infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Olivadoti, Melissa D; Weinberg, Jason B; Toth, Linda A; Opp, Mark R

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue, a common symptom of many acute and chronic medical conditions, reduces both quality of life and workplace productivity and can be disabling. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that underlie fatigue can be difficult to study in human populations due to the patient heterogeneity, the variety of underlying causes and potential triggering events, and an inability to collect samples that may be essential to elucidation of mechanisms (e.g., brain). Although the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains elusive, some studies have implicated viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gammaherpesvirus, as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of CFS. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (γHV68) is a mouse pathogen that shares many similarities with human γHVs, including EBV. In this study, we use γHV68-infected C57BL/6J mice as a model system for studying the impact of chronic viral infection on sleep-wake behavior, activity patterns, and body temperature profiles. Our data show that γHV68 alters sleep, activity, and temperature in a manner suggestive of fatigue. In mice infected with the highest dose used in this study (40,000plaque forming units), food intake, body weight, wheel running, body temperature, and sleep were normal until approximately 7days after infection. These parameters were significantly altered during days 7 through 11, returned to baseline levels at day 12 after infection, and remained within the normal range for the remainder of the 30-day period after inoculation. At that time, both infected and uninfected mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and their responses monitored. Uninfected mice given LPS developed a modest and transient febrile response during the initial light phase (hours 12 through 24) after injection. In contrast, infected mice developed changes in core body temperatures that persisted for at least 5days. Infected mice showed an initial hypothermia that lasted for approximately 12h

  9. Characterization of iron uptake from transferrin by murine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, R; Savigni, D L; Morgan, E H; Baker, E

    2000-01-01

    Iron is required by the brain for normal function, however, the mechanisms by which it crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are poorly understood. The uptake and efflux of transferrin (Tf) and Fe by murine brain-derived (bEND3) and lymph node-derived (m1END1) endothelial cell lines was compared. The effects of iron chelators, metabolic inhibitors and the cellular activators, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), on Tf and Fe uptake were investigated. Cells were incubated with 59Fe-125I-Tf; Fe uptake was shown to increase linearly over time for both cell lines, while Tf uptake reached a plateau within 2 h. Both Tf and Fe uptake were saturable. bEND3 cells were shown to have half as many Tf receptors as m1END1 cells, but the mean cycling times of a Tf molecule were the same. Tf and Fe efflux from the cells were measured over time, revealing that after 2 h only 25% of the Tf but 80% of the Fe remained associated with the cells. Of 7 iron chelators, only deferriprone (L1) markedly decreased Tf uptake. However, Fe uptake was reduced by more than 50% by L1, pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH) and desferrithiocin (DFT). The cellular activators TNF-alpha or LPS had little effect on Tf turnover, but they accelerated Fe uptake in both endothelial cell types. Phenylarsenoxide (PhAsO) and N-ethyl maleimide (NEM), inhibitors of Tf endocytosis, reduced both Tf and Fe uptake in both cell lines, while bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, reduced Fe uptake but did not affect Tf uptake. The results suggest that Tf and Fe uptake by both bEND3 and m1END1 is via receptor-mediated endocytosis with release of Fe from Tf within the cell and recycling of apo-Tf. On the basis of Tf- and Fe-metabolism both cell lines are similar and therefore well suited for use in in vitro models for Fe transport across the BBB. PMID:10865941

  10. The catalytic properties of murine carbonic anhydrase VII.

    PubMed

    Earnhardt, J N; Qian, M; Tu, C; Lakkis, M M; Bergenhem, N C; Laipis, P J; Tashian, R E; Silverman, D N

    1998-07-28

    Carbonic anhydrase VII (CA VII) appears to be the most highly conserved of the active mammalian carbonic anhydrases. We have characterized the catalytic activity and inhibition properties of a recombinant murine CA VII. CA VII has steady-state constants similar to two of the most active isozymes of carbonic anhydrase, CA II and IV; also, it is very strongly inhibited by the sulfonamides ethoxzolamide and acetazolamide, yielding the lowest Ki values measured by the exchange of 18O between CO2 and water for any of the mammalian isozymes of carbonic anhydrase. The catalytic measurements of the hydration of CO2 and the dehydration of HCO3- were made by stopped-flow spectrophotometry and the exchange of 18O using mass spectrometry. Unlike the other isozymes of this class of CA, for which Kcat/K(m) is described by the single ionization of zinc-bound water, CA VII exhibits a pH profile for Kcat/K(m) for CO2 hydration described by two ionizations at pKa 6.2 and 7.5, with a maximum approaching 8 x 10(7) M-1 s-1. The pH dependence of kcat/K(m) for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl acetate could also be described by these two ionizations, yielding a maximum of 71 M-1 s-1 at pH > 9. Using a novel method that compares rates of 18O exchange and dehydration of HCO3-, we assigned values for the apparent pKa at 6.2 to the zinc-bound water and the pKa of 7.5 to His 64. The magnitude of Kcat, its pH profile, 18O-exchange data for both wild-type and a H64A mutant, and inhibition by CuSO4 and acrolein suggest that the histidine at position 64 is functioning as a proton-transfer group and is responsible for one of the observed ionizations. A truncation mutant of CA VII, in which 23 residues from the amino-terminal end were deleted, has its rate constant for intramolecular proton transfer decreased by an order of magnitude with no change in Kcat/K(m). This suggests a role for the amino-terminal end in enhancing proton transfer in catalysis by carbonic anhydrase. PMID:9692974

  11. Histone deacetylase expression patterns in developing murine optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in glial cell development and in disease states within multiple regions of the central nervous system. However, little is known about HDAC expression or function within the optic nerve. As a first step in understanding the role of HDACs in optic nerve, this study examines the spatio-temporal expression patterns of methylated histone 3 (K9), acetylated histone 3 (K18), and HDACs 1–6 and 8–11 in the developing murine optic nerve head. Results Using RT-qPCR, western blot and immunofluorescence, three stages were analyzed: embryonic day 16 (E16), when astrocyte precursors are found in the optic stalk, postnatal day 5 (P5), when immature astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are found throughout the optic nerve, and P30, when optic nerve astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are mature. Acetylated and methylated histone H3 immunoreactivity was co-localized in the nuclei of most SOX2 positive glia within the optic nerve head and adjacent optic nerve at all developmental stages. HDACs 1–11 were expressed in the optic nerve glial cells at all three stages of optic nerve development in the mouse, but showed temporal differences in overall levels and subcellular localization. HDACs 1 and 2 were predominantly nuclear throughout optic nerve development and glial cell maturation. HDACs 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11 were predominantly cytoplasmic, but showed nuclear localization in at least one stage of optic nerve development. HDACs 4, 9 and10 were predominantly cytoplasmic, with little to no nuclear expression at any time during the developmental stages examined. Conclusions Our results showing that HDACs 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11 were each localized to the nuclei of SOX2 positive glia at some stages of optic nerve development and maturation and extend previous reports of HDAC expression in the aging optic nerve. These HDACs are candidates for further research to understand how chromatin remodeling through acetylation, deacetylation

  12. Purified murine granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells express a high-affinity receptor for recombinant murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.E.; Bicknell, D.C.; Park, L.S.; Straneva, J.E.; Cooper, S.; Broxmeyer, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    Purified recombinant murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was labeled with /sup 125/I and used to examine the GM-CSF receptor on unfractionated normal murine bone marrow cells, casein-induced peritoneal exudate cells, and highly purified murine granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM). CFU-GM were isolated from cyclophosphamide-treated mice by Ficoll-Hypaque density centrifugation followed by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. The resulting population had a cloning efficiency of 62-99% in cultures containing conditioned medium from pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cells and 55-86% in the presence of a plateau concentration of purified recombinant murine GM-CSF. Equilibrium binding studies with /sup 125/I-labeled GM-CSF showed that normal bone marrow cells, casein-induced peritoneal exudate cells, and purified CFU-GM had a single class of high-affinity receptor. Affinity crosslinking studies demonstrated that /sup 125/I-labeled GM-CSF bound specifically to two species of M/sub r/ 180,000 and 70,000 on CFU-GM, normal bone marrow cells, and peritoneal exudate cells. The M/sub r/ 70,000 species is thought to be a proteolytic fragment of the intact M/sub r/ 180,000 receptor. The present studies indicate that the GM-CSF receptor expressed on CFU-GM and mature myeloid cells are structurally similar. In addition, the number of GM-CSF receptors on CFU-GM is twice the average number of receptors on casein-induced mature myeloid cells, suggesting that receptor number may decrease as CFU-GM mature.

  13. HUMORAL ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO INDIVIDUAL VIRAL PROTEINS AFTER MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to identify viral proteins that played an important role in the humoral immune response to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Viral proteins were separated from a purified virus preparation on polyacrylamide gels, were blotted onto nitrocellulose strips,...

  14. Genome Sequences of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Detected in Wild House Mice (Mus musculus)

    PubMed Central

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Moens, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Using generic PCR, we identified a variant of murine pneumotropic virus (MptV) (family Polyomaviridae) in 3 wild house mice (Mus musculus). The fully amplified and sequenced genomes display considerable differences from the MptV genomes published previously and enlighten us on the natural diversity of rodent polyomaviruses. PMID:26798094

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Clone pKV(37-1)

    PubMed Central

    Libbey, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome encoded by the pKV(37-1) clone was sequenced to completion. The regulatory region harbored a mutation not previously reported. The protein coding regions (large and small T antigens, viral proteins 1 to 3) showed multiple regions of high amino acid identity to the human, simian, and bovine polyomaviruses. PMID:27198030

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Clone pKV(37-1).

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Fujinami, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome encoded by the pKV(37-1) clone was sequenced to completion. The regulatory region harbored a mutation not previously reported. The protein coding regions (large and small T antigens, viral proteins 1 to 3) showed multiple regions of high amino acid identity to the human, simian, and bovine polyomaviruses. PMID:27198030

  17. Murine macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and immune activation in response to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of bacterial seafood-related illness in the United States. Currently, there is a dearth of literature regarding immunity to infection with this pathogen. Here we studied V. parahaemolyticus-infected RAW 264.7 murine macrophage detecting both pro- and...

  18. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIFFERENT EMISSION PARTICLES IN MURINE PULMONARY EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative Toxicity of Different Emission Particles in Murine Pulmonary Epithelial Cells and Macrophages. T Stevens1, M Daniels2, P Singh2, M I Gilmour2. 1 UNC, Chapel Hill 27599 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    Epidemiological studies have shown ...

  19. IκBNS regulates murine Th17 differentiation during gut inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Annemann, Michaela; Wang, Zuobai; Plaza-Sirvent, Carlos; Glauben, Rainer; Schuster, Marc; Ewald Sander, Frida; Mamareli, Panagiota; Kühl, Anja A; Siegmund, Britta; Lochner, Matthias; Schmitz, Ingo

    2015-03-15

    IL-17-producing Th17 cells mediate immune responses against a variety of fungal and bacterial infections. Signaling via NF-κB has been linked to the development and maintenance of Th17 cells. We analyzed the role of the unusual inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBNS, in the proliferation and effector cytokine production of murine Th17 cells. Our study demonstrates that nuclear IκBNS is crucial for murine Th17 cell generation. IκBNS is highly expressed in Th17 cells; in the absence of IκBNS, the frequencies of IL-17A-producing cells are drastically reduced. This was measured in vitro under Th17-polarizing conditions and confirmed in two colitis models. Mechanistically, murine IκBNS (-/-) Th17 cells were less proliferative and expressed markedly reduced levels of IL-2, IL-10, MIP-1α, and GM-CSF. Citrobacter rodentium was used as a Th17-inducing infection model, in which IκBNS (-/-) mice displayed an increased bacterial burden and diminished tissue damage. These results demonstrate the important function of Th17 cells in pathogen clearance, as well as in inflammation-associated pathology. We identified IκBNS to be crucial for the generation and function of murine Th17 cells upon inflammation and infection. Our findings may have implications for the therapy of autoimmune conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, and for the treatment of gut-tropic infections. PMID:25694610

  20. Systematic Characterization of the Murine Mitochondrial Proteome Using Functionally Validated Cardiac Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Xiaohai; Mueller, Michael; Wang, Yueju; Zong, Chenggong; Deng, Ning; Vondriska, Thomas M.; Liem, David A.; Yang, Jeong-In; Korge, Paavo; Honda, Henry; Weiss, James N.; Apweiler, Rolf; Ping, Peipei

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play essential roles in cardiac pathophysiology and the murine model has been extensively used to investigate cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we characterized murine cardiac mitochondria using an LC/MS/MS approach. We extracted and purified cardiac mitochondria; validated their functionality to ensure the final preparation contains necessary components to sustain their normal function; and subjected these validated organelles to LC/MS/MS-based protein identification. A total of 940 distinct proteins were identified from murine cardiac mitochondria, among which, 480 proteins were not previously identified by major proteomic profiling studies. The 940 proteins consist of functional clusters known to support oxidative phosphorylation, metabolism and biogenesis. In addition, there are several other clusters--including proteolysis, protein folding, and reduction/oxidation signaling-which ostensibly represent previously under-appreciated tasks of cardiac mitochondria. Moreover, many identified proteins were found to occupy other subcellular locations, including cytoplasm, ER, and golgi, in addition to their presence in the mitochondria. These results provide a comprehensive picture of the murine cardiac mitochondrial proteome and underscore tissue- and species-specification. Moreover, the use of functionally intact mitochondria insures that the proteomic observations in this organelle are relevant to its normal biology and facilitates decoding the interplay between mitochondria and other organelles. PMID:18348319

  1. Heterologous murine and bovine IVF using bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Calabuig, M J; de la Fuente, J; Laguna-Barraza, R; Beltrán-Breña, P; Martínez-Nevado, E; Johnston, S D; Rizos, D; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Pérez-Gutiérrez, J F

    2015-10-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies are of great importance for increasing the genetic diversity in captive animals. The use of bovine or murine oocytes in heterologous IVF provides advantages compared to homologous IVF in nondomestic animals, such as the accessibility to oocytes and the availability of well-developed in vitro maturation systems. The aim of this study was to determine the heterologous IVF parameters using cryopreserved dolphin spermatozoa and zona-intact bovine or murine oocytes and to examine the nuclear chromatin status of the dolphin spermatozoa. All the processes involved in the fertilization including embryo cleavage were observed by confocal microscopy and hybrid embryo formation was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Heterologous bovine IVF showed no polyspermy, lower percentages of pronuclear formation, and a lower cleavage rate compared to homologous IVF group (34.8% vs. 89.3%). Heterologous murine IVF showed a lower cleavage rate than homologous IVF (9.6% vs. 77.1%). With respect to dolphin sperm chromatin, it was more stable, i.e. more resistant to EDTA-SDS decondensation than the bovine sperm chromatin. This study revealed the stability of the dolphin sperm chromatin and the ability of the dolphin spermatozoa to penetrate zona-intact bovine and murine oocytes, leading to hybrid embryo formation. PMID:26149074

  2. Long terminal repeat of murine retroviral DNAs: sequence analysis, host-proviral junctions, and preintegration site.

    PubMed Central

    Van Beveren, C; Rands, E; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lowy, D R; Verma, I M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of three murine retroviral DNAs has been determined. The data indicate that the U5 region (sequences originating from the 5' end of the genome) of various LTRs is more conserved than the U3 region (sequences from the 3' end of the genome). The location and sequence of the control elements such as the 5' cap, "TATA-like" sequences, "CCAAT-box," and presumptive polyadenylic acid addition signal AATAAA in the various LTRs are nearly identical. Some murine retroviral DNAs contain a duplication of sequences within the LTR ranging in size from 58 to 100 base pairs. A variant of molecularly cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus DNA in which one of the two LTRs integrated into the viral DNA was also analyzed. A 4-base-pair duplication was generated at the site of integration of LTR in the viral DNA. The host-viral junction of two molecularly cloned AKR-murine leukemia virus DNAs (clones 623 and 614) was determined. In the case of AKR-623 DNA, a 3- or 4-base-pair direct repeat of cellular sequences flanking the viral DNA was observed. However, AKR-614 DNA contained a 5-base-pair repeat of cellular sequences. The nucleotide sequence of the preintegration site of AKR-623 DNA revealed that the cellular sequences duplicated during integration are present only once. Finally, a striking homology between the sequences flanking the preintegration site and viral LTRs was observed. Images PMID:6281466

  3. Altered Innate and Lymphocytic Immunity in Murine Splenocytes Following Short-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Quiriarte, Heather; Sams, Clarence F.

    2011-01-01

    Immune dysregulation has been demonstrated following spaceflight of varying durations and limited in-flight studies indicate this phenomenon may persist during spaceflight. Causes may include microgravity, physiological stress, isolation, confinement and disrupted circadian rhythms. To further investigate the mechanisms associated with flight-associated immune changes, murine splenocytes immune parameters were assessed following 14 day space flight on Space Shuttle mission STS-135.

  4. Characterization of murine SIRT3 transcript variants and corresponding protein products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT3 is one of the seven mammalian sirtuin homologs of the yeast SIR2 gene. SIRT3 possesses NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase activity. Recent studies indicate that the murine SIRT3 gene expresses different transcript variants, resulting in three possible SIRT3 protein isoforms with various leng...

  5. STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS
    M S Miller, J E Moore, M Xu, G B Nelson, S T Dance, N D Kock, J A Ross Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC and USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Previously, our laboratory demonstrated...

  6. Verapamil potentiation of melphalan cytotoxicity and cellular uptake in murine fibrosarcoma and bone marrow.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, B. A.; Clutterbuck, R. D.; Millar, J. L.; McElwain, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Growth delay by melphalan of two fibrosarcomas in CBA mice was prolonged by intraperitoneal (i.p.) verapamil, 10 mg kg-1. Verapamil also increased the area under the blood concentration time curve and the gastrointestinal toxicity of melphalan. Verapamil promoted melphalan cytotoxicity to murine bone marrow both in vivo, by CFU-S assay, and in vitro, by CFU-GM assay. In 1 microgram ml-1 [14C]-melphalan, verapamil (10 micrograms ml-1) increased by 1.5 times the [14C]-melphalan accumulation by murine bone marrow, reversibly and independently of external calcium. Efflux of [14C]-melphalan from murine bone marrow was retarded by verapamil. Verapamil increased [14C]-melphalan uptake by disaggregated fibrosarcoma cells but had no effect on melphalan accumulation and cytotoxicity in human bone marrow. Although verapamil affected melphalan pharmacokinetics, enhancement of cellular melphalan uptake by verapamil in murine fibrosarcoma and bone marrow appeared to account for much of the increase in melphalan cytotoxicity. The lack of potentiation of melphalan by verapamil in human marrow suggests differences in melphalan transport or in verapamil membrane interactions in mouse and man. PMID:4074636

  7. TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILIA IN A MURINE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILIA IN A MURINE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA. J F Regal, ME Mohrman, E Boykin and D Sailstad. Dept. of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN, USA and NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is a small m...

  8. Monitoring the accumulation of lipofuscin in aging murine eyes by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integrated fluorescence of murine eyes is collected as a function of age. This fluorescence is attributed to pigments generally referred to as lipofuscin and is observed to increase with age. No difference in fluorescence intensity is observed between the eyes of males or females. This work p...

  9. Murine but not human mesenchymal stem cells generate osteosarcoma-like lesions in the lung.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Susana; Nye, Emma; Chan, Jerry; Loebinger, Michael; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Fisk, Nick; Stamp, Gordon; Bonnet, Dominique; Janes, Sam M

    2007-06-01

    Murine mesenchymal stem cells are capable of differentiation into multiple cell types both in vitro and in vivo and may be good candidates to use as cell therapy for diseased or damaged organs. We have previously reported a method of enriching a population of murine MSCs that demonstrated a diverse differentiation potential both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that this enriched population of murine mesenchymal stem cells embolize within lung capillaries following systemic injection and then rapidly expand within, and invade into, the lung parenchyma, forming tumor nodules. These lesions rarely contain cells bearing the immunohistochemical characteristics of lung epithelium, but they do show the characteristics of immature bone and cartilage that resembles exuberant fracture callus or well-differentiated osteosarcoma. Our findings indicate that murine mesenchymal stem cells can behave in a manner similar to tumor cells, with dysregulated growth and aberrant differentiation within the alveolar microenvironment after four passages. We demonstrate that unlike human MSCs, MSCs from different mouse strains can acquire chromosomal abnormalities after only a few in vitro passages. Moreover, other parameters, such as mouse strain used, might also play a role in the induction of these tumors. These findings might be clinically relevant for future stem cell therapy studies. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:17363552

  10. A Comparative Analysis of the Porcine, Murine, and Human Immune Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A literature and laboratory-based analysis compared selected features of genotype, phenotype, and functional expression of the porcine, murine, and human immune systems. A total of 147 parameters were examined. Post-genomic analysis found about 300 unique mRNA coding sequences between mice and hum...

  11. COMPARISON OF THE PATHOGENESIS OF MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS IN LUNG AND LIVER FOLLOWING INTRAPERITONEAL OR INTRATRACHEAL INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compares the pathogenesis of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infections following intraperitoneal (I.P.) and intratracheal (I.T.) inoculation. No deaths were seen in mice given 1,000,000 pfu MCMV I.T., whereas 52% mortality occurred among animals given this dose I.P. Thi...

  12. ROLE OF COPPER,ZINC-SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE IN CATALYZING NITROTYROSINE FORMATION IN MURINE LIVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solely known function of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is to catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anion into hydrogen peroxide. Our objective was to determine if SOD1 catalyzed murine liver protein nitration induced by acetaminophen (APAP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Liver and plasma ...

  13. Viral Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expression on Murine and Human T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammill, Joanne A; Afsahi, Arya; Bramson, Jonathan L; Helsen, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of a bolus of tumor-specific T lymphocytes into cancer patients is a promising therapeutic strategy. In one approach, tumor specificity is conferred upon T cells via engineering expression of exogenous receptors, such as chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we describe the generation and production of both murine and human CAR-engineered T lymphocytes using retroviruses. PMID:27581020

  14. Phenotypic, Morphological and Adhesive Differences of Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Cultured on Murine versus Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Doreen; Friedrichs, Jens; Ritter, Steffi; Käubler, Theresa; Werner, Carsten; Bornhäuser, Martin; Corbeil, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Xenogenic transplantation models have been developed to study human hematopoiesis in immunocompromised murine recipients. They still have limitations and therefore it is important to delineate all players within the bone marrow that could account for species-specific differences. Here, we evaluated the proliferative capacity, morphological and physical characteristics of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) after co-culture on murine or human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). After seven days, human CD34+CD133– HSPCs expanded to similar extents on both feeder layers while cellular subsets comprising primitive CD34+CD133+ and CD133+CD34– phenotypes are reduced fivefold on murine MSCs. The number of migrating HSPCs was also reduced on murine cells suggesting that MSC adhesion influences cellular polarization of HSPC. We used atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy to quantify their adhesive interactions. We found threefold higher detachment forces of human HSPCs from murine MSCs compared to human ones. This difference is related to the N-cadherin expression level on murine MSCs since its knockdown abolished their differential adhesion properties with human HSPCs. Our observations highlight phenotypic, morphological and adhesive differences of human HSPCs when cultured on murine or human MSCs, which raise some caution in data interpretation when xenogenic transplantation models are used. PMID:26498381

  15. Exploring the translational disconnect between the murine and human inflammatory response: analysis of LPS dose–response relationship in murine versus human cell lines and implications for translation into murine models of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    McCarron, Eamon P; Williams, Dominic P; Antoine, Daniel J; Kipar, Anja; Lemm, Jana; Stehr, Sebastian; Welters, Ingeborg D

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation forms an important part of the human innate immune system and is largely dependent on the activation of the “classical” NF-κB pathway through Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Understanding this has allowed researchers to explore roles of therapeutic targets in managing conditions such as sepsis. Recapitulating an inflammatory response using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a “sterile” technique, can provide information that is dissimilar to the clinical condition. By examining NF-κB activation (through immunoblotting of the p65 subunit) in two separate cell lines (murine and human) and analyzing two murine models of sepsis (intraperitoneal [IP] LPS and IP stool inoculation), an evaluation of the translational disconnect between experimental and clinical sepsis can be made. Methods THP-1 (human) cells and RAW 264.7 (murine) cells were dosed with concentrations of LPS (human, 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL; murine, 30 pg/mL to 1,000 ng/mL) and nuclear actin and p65 were immunoblotted to measure changes in nuclear density. In vivo, C57BL/6 mice received either IP injection of stool suspension (5 µL/g) or LPS (25 mg/kg) or saline (1 mL/kg). Animals were culled at 6 hours and tissues were analyzed. Results An increase in basal p65:actin density in THP-1 cells (mean 0.214, standard error of the mean 0.024) was seen at doses as small as 0.1 ng/mL (0.519±0.064). In contrast to RAW 264.7 cells, basal increases (0.170±0.025) were only seen when a dose of 3 ng/mL (0.387±0.078) was used. Dose–response analysis of p65:actin ratio showed that THP-1 cells respond to lower doses of LPS than RAW 264.7 cells and lower doses produce a greater fold increase in the nuclear p65 density. Both in vivo models showed evidence of neutrophil (NL) recruitment into tissues (which was more intense after LPS treatment). IP stool inoculation resulted in an acute suppurative peritonitis and more substantial evidence of NL recruitment into adipose tissue and skeletal muscle

  16. Complete sequence and genomic analysis of murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed Central

    Virgin, H W; Latreille, P; Wamsley, P; Hallsworth, K; Weck, K E; Dal Canto, A J; Speck, S H

    1997-01-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68) infects mice, thus providing a tractable small-animal model for analysis of the acute and chronic pathogenesis of gammaherpesviruses. To facilitate molecular analysis of gammaHV68 pathogenesis, we have sequenced the gammaHV68 genome. The genome contains 118,237 bp of unique sequence flanked by multiple copies of a 1,213-bp terminal repeat. The GC content of the unique portion of the genome is 46%, while the GC content of the terminal repeat is 78%. The unique portion of the genome is estimated to encode at least 80 genes and is largely colinear with the genomes of Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8), herpesvirus saimiri (HVS), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We detected 63 open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to HVS and KSHV ORFs and used the HVS/KSHV numbering system to designate these ORFs. gammaHV68 shares with HVS and KSHV ORFs homologous to a complement regulatory protein (ORF 4), a D-type cyclin (ORF 72), and a G-protein-coupled receptor with close homology to the interleukin-8 receptor (ORF 74). One ORF (K3) was identified in gammaHV68 as homologous to both ORFs K3 and K5 of KSHV and contains a domain found in a bovine herpesvirus 4 major immediate-early protein. We also detected 16 methionine-initiated ORFs predicted to encode proteins at least 100 amino acids in length that are unique to gammaHV68 (ORFs M1 to 14). ORF M1 has striking homology to poxvirus serpins, while ORF M11 encodes a potential homolog of Bcl-2-like molecules encoded by other gammaherpesviruses (gene 16 of HVS and KSHV and the BHRF1 gene of EBV). In addition, clustered at the left end of the unique region are eight sequences with significant homology to bacterial tRNAs. The unique region of the genome contains two internal repeats: a 40-bp repeat located between bp 26778 and 28191 in the genome and a 100-bp repeat located between bp 98981 and 101170. Analysis of the gammaHV68, HVS, EBV, and KSHV genomes demonstrated

  17. MHC class II antigen presentation pathway in murine tumours: tumour evasion from immunosurveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Walter, W; Lingnau, K; Schmitt, E; Loos, M; Maeurer, M J

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative differences in the MHC class II antigen processing and presentation pathway may be instrumental in shaping the CD4+ T cell response directed against tumour cells. Efficient loading of many MHC class II alleles with peptides requires the assistance of H2-M, a heterodimeric MHC class II-like molecule. In contrast to the HLA-DM region in humans, the β-chain locus is duplicated in mouse, with the H2-Mb1 (Mb1β-chain distal to H2-Mb2 (Mb2) and the H2-Ma (Ma) α-chain gene). Here, we show that murine MHC class II and H2-M genes are coordinately regulated in murine tumour cell lines by T helper cell 1 (IFN-γ) and T helper cell 2 (IL-4 or IL-10) cytokines in the presence of the MHC class II-specific transactivator CIITA as determined by mRNA expression and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, Mαβ1 and Mαβ2 heterodimers are differentially expressed in murine tumour cell lines of different histology. Both H2-M isoforms promote equally processing and presentation of native protein antigens to H2-Ad- and H2-Ed-restricted CD4+ T cells. Murine tumour cell lines could be divided into three groups: constitutive MHC class II and CIITA expression; inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression upon IFN-γ-treatment; and lack of constitutive and IFN-γ-inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression. These differences may impact on CD4+ T cell recognition of cancer cells in murine tumour models. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027433

  18. Characterization of the murine 5T4 oncofoetal antigen: a target for immunotherapy in cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Andrew M; Wang, Who W; Shaw, David M; Ward, Christopher M; Carroll, Miles W; Rees, Buddug R; Stern, Peter L

    2002-01-01

    Human 5T4 oncofoetal antigen defined by the murine 5T4 monoclonal antibody is a highly glycosylated protein expressed by trophoblast and a few specialized adult epithelia. Up-regulation of 5T4 expression in some cancers is associated with poor clinical outcome; overexpression of human 5T4 cDNA in epithelial cells can alter their morphology and motility, supporting a role for such functions in cancer and development. A murine model to study 5T4 biology and tumour immunology would be useful. The production of m5T4-specific antibodies, their use in establishing transfected cells and documenting their biological properties in vitro are described. A rat monoclonal antibody specific for mouse 5T4 molecules by ELISA, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and immunoprecipitation was isolated and epitope mapped. Similar to its human counterpart, murine 5T4 antigen is a 72 kDa glycoprotein (immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis) and exhibits punctate cell surface expression, dependent upon the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton. Likewise, overexpression of autologous murine 5T4 by B16 F10 melanoma cells and A9 L fibroblasts accentuates the 5T4 phenotype, which is characterized by a spindle-like morphology, increased motility, and reduced adhesion and proliferation rate. Immunohistochemical analysis of adult mouse tissues shows a restricted pattern of expression similar to that of human 5T4 antigen. The murine 5T4 antigen-expressing cell lines and antibody reagents are now being used to explore novel immunotherapies in pre-clinical models and the biology of 5T4 in development. PMID:12003637

  19. Characterization of the murine 5T4 oncofoetal antigen: a target for immunotherapy in cancer.

    PubMed

    Woods, Andrew M; Wang, Who W; Shaw, David M; Ward, Christopher M; Carroll, Miles W; Rees, Buddug R; Stern, Peter L

    2002-08-15

    Human 5T4 oncofoetal antigen defined by the murine 5T4 monoclonal antibody is a highly glycosylated protein expressed by trophoblast and a few specialized adult epithelia. Up-regulation of 5T4 expression in some cancers is associated with poor clinical outcome; overexpression of human 5T4 cDNA in epithelial cells can alter their morphology and motility, supporting a role for such functions in cancer and development. A murine model to study 5T4 biology and tumour immunology would be useful. The production of m5T4-specific antibodies, their use in establishing transfected cells and documenting their biological properties in vitro are described. A rat monoclonal antibody specific for mouse 5T4 molecules by ELISA, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and immunoprecipitation was isolated and epitope mapped. Similar to its human counterpart, murine 5T4 antigen is a 72 kDa glycoprotein (immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis) and exhibits punctate cell surface expression, dependent upon the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton. Likewise, overexpression of autologous murine 5T4 by B16 F10 melanoma cells and A9 L fibroblasts accentuates the 5T4 phenotype, which is characterized by a spindle-like morphology, increased motility, and reduced adhesion and proliferation rate. Immunohistochemical analysis of adult mouse tissues shows a restricted pattern of expression similar to that of human 5T4 antigen. The murine 5T4 antigen-expressing cell lines and antibody reagents are now being used to explore novel immunotherapies in pre-clinical models and the biology of 5T4 in development. PMID:12003637

  20. Expression, purification and biochemical characterization of recombinant murine secretory component: a novel tool in mucosal immunology.

    PubMed Central

    Crottet, P; Cottet, S; Corthésy, B

    1999-01-01

    Reconstitution of secretory IgA (S-IgA) by the association in vitro of secretory component (SC) and polymeric IgA (pIgA) obtained from hybridomas is a valuable tool in the study of the structure-function relationship in this particular class of antibody. Although dimeric IgA (dIgA) can be obtained and purified from hybridoma clones, SC remains tedious to isolate in sufficient amounts from colostral milk. Several murine models for the study of mucosal immunity are available, which could potentially benefit from the use of cognate IgA antibodies in various molecular forms, including dIgA and S-IgA. We report here on the establishment of two expression systems allowing the production of milligram amounts of pure recombinant murine SC (rmSC) with preserved murine pIgA-binding capability. The first system relies on the use of recombinant vaccinia virus to prompt infected HeLa cells to express the murine SC protein, whereas the second system is based on a stably transfected cell clone exhibiting murine glycosylation. The second source of rmSC will permit the study of the role of its sugar moieties in pathogen-host interactions, and the evaluation of its function in passive protection without risking adverse immune responses. The extensive biochemical characterization conducted in this study demonstrates that rmSC is a dependable and convenient alternative to the natural product, and indicates that the J chain is dispensable in the recognition of pIgA and SC in vitro, whereas it is required for proper pIgA-polymeric Ig receptor interaction in vivo. PMID:10393086

  1. Comparison of the Masaoka-Koga staging and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group proposal for the TNM staging systems based on the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas retrospective database

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guanghui; Gu, Zhitao; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare the predictive effect of the Masaoka-Koga staging system and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group (ITMIG) proposal for the new TNM staging on prognosis of thymic malignancies using the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) retrospective database. Methods From 1992 to 2012, 2,370 patients in ChART database were retrospectively reviewed. Of these, 1,198 patients with complete information on TNM stage, Masaoka-Koga stage, and survival were used for analysis. Cumulative incidence of recurrence (CIR) was assessed in R0 patients. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated both in an R0 resected cohort, as well as in all patients (any R status). CIR and OS were first analyzed according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system. Then, they were compared using the new TNM staging proposal. Results Based on Masaoka-Koga staging system, significant difference was detected in CIR among all stages. However, no survival difference was revealed between stage I and II, or between stage II and III. Stage IV carried the highest risk of recurrence and worst survival. According to the new TNM staging proposal, CIR in T1a was significantly lower comparing to all other T categories (P<0.05) and there is a significant difference in OS between T1a and T1b (P=0.004). T4 had the worst OS comparing to all other T categories. CIR and OS were significantly worse in N (+) than in N0 patients. Significant difference in CIR and OS was detected between M0 and M1b, but not between M0 and M1a. OS was almost always statistically different when comparison was made between stages I–IIIa and stages IIIb–IVb. However, no statistical difference could be detected among stages IIIb to IVb. Conclusions Compared with Masaoka-Koga staging, the IASLC/ITMIG TNM staging proposal not only describes the extent of tumor invasion but also provides information on lymphatic involvement and tumor dissemination

  2. Structural and functional characterization of human and murine C5a anaphylatoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Janus Asbjørn; Yatime, Laure Larsen, Casper; Petersen, Steen Vang; Klos, Andreas; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2014-06-01

    The structure of the human C5aR antagonist, C5a-A8, reveals a three-helix bundle conformation similar to that observed for human C5a-desArg, whereas murine C5a and C5a-desArg both form the canonical four-helix bundle. These conformational differences are discussed in light of the differential C5aR activation properties observed for the human and murine complement anaphylatoxins across species. Complement is an ancient part of the innate immune system that plays a pivotal role in protection against invading pathogens and helps to clear apoptotic and necrotic cells. Upon complement activation, a cascade of proteolytic events generates the complement effectors, including the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Signalling through their cognate G-protein coupled receptors, C3aR and C5aR, leads to a wide range of biological events promoting inflammation at the site of complement activation. The function of anaphylatoxins is regulated by circulating carboxypeptidases that remove their C-terminal arginine residue, yielding C3a-desArg and C5a-desArg. Whereas human C3a and C3a-desArg adopt a canonical four-helix bundle fold, the conformation of human C5a-desArg has recently been described as a three-helix bundle. Here, the crystal structures of an antagonist version of human C5a, A8{sup Δ71–73}, and of murine C5a and C5a-desArg are reported. Whereas A8{sup Δ71–73} adopts a three-helix bundle conformation similar to human C5a-desArg, the two murine proteins form a four-helix bundle. A cell-based functional assay reveals that murine C5a-desArg, in contrast to its human counterpart, exerts the same level of activition as murine C5a on its cognate receptor. The role of the different C5a conformations is discussed in relation to the differential activation of C5a receptors across species.

  3. EFFECTS OF IMMUNOSUPPRESSION WITH CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE ON ACUTE MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION AND VIRUS-AUGMENTED NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment on acute murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection were studied to explore the potential usefulness of MCMV as a means of detecting immune dysfunction and to identify host defense mechanisms important for protection against MCMV.

  4. Detection of adulterated murine components in meat products by TaqMan© real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Zhang, Chi

    2016-02-01

    Using murine meat to substitute mutton has been identified as a new type of meat fraud in China, yet no detection method for murine species has been reported. Here, three kinds of rodent were used as target species to establish a murine-specific real-time PCR method of detection. The mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (cytb) of each target was sequenced and a TaqMan probe was designed based on the cytb. Simultaneously, an internal positive control (IPC) plasmid along with its respective probe were designed to monitor the PCR reaction. As a result, the duplex real-time PCR system was verified to be specific. The limit of detection (LOD) was lower than 1 pg of DNA per reaction and 0.1% murine contamination in meat mixtures. Standard curves were generated for a quantitative analysis. Thus, this study provided a new tool to control the quality of meat products for official and third-party laboratories. PMID:26304376

  5. Cloning of murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA: expression in human cells mediates high-affinity binding but is not sufficient to confer sensitivity to murine interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Hemmi, S; Peghini, P; Metzler, M; Merlin, G; Dembic, Z; Aguet, M

    1989-01-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) receptor was isolated from a lambda gt11 library using a human IFN-gamma receptor cDNA probe. The deduced amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows approximately 53% homology to its human counterpart but no homology to other known proteins. Murine IFN-gamma receptor cDNA was expressed in human HEp-2 cells, which do not bind murine IFN-gamma and are insensitive to its action. Transfectants displayed the same binding properties as mouse cells. The biological responsiveness of such transfectants to various biological effects of both human and murine IFN-gamma was investigated, including modulation of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigen expression, inhibition of cell growth, and antiviral activity. Like parental HEp-2 cells, these transfectants responded only to human, but not to murine, IFN-gamma. Inversely, mouse L929 cells transfected with human IFN-gamma receptor cDNA were insensitive to human IFN-gamma. These results confirm and extend previous findings, suggesting that species-specific cofactors are needed for IFN-gamma-mediated signal transduction. Images PMID:2532365

  6. Murine and Human Myogenic Cells Identified by Elevated Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity: Implications for Muscle Regeneration and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Joseph B.; Thompson, Seth D.; Bucsek, Mark J.; Song, Minjung; Huard, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the initial promise of myoblast transfer therapy to restore dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, clinical efficacy has been limited, primarily by poor cell survival post-transplantation. Murine muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) isolated from slowly adhering cells (SACs) via the preplate technique, induce greater muscle regeneration than murine myoblasts, primarily due to improved post-transplantation survival, which is conferred by their increased stress resistance capacity. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) represents a family of enzymes with important morphogenic as well as oxidative damage mitigating roles and has been found to be a marker of stem cells in both normal and malignant tissue. In this study, we hypothesized that elevated ALDH levels could identify murine and human muscle derived cell (hMDC) progenitors, endowed with enhanced stress resistance and muscle regeneration capacity. Methodology/Principal Findings Skeletal muscle progenitors were isolated from murine and human skeletal muscle by a modified preplate technique and unfractionated enzymatic digestion, respectively. ALDHhi subpopulations isolated by fluorescence activate cell sorting demonstrated increased proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacities compared to their ALDHlo counterparts when cultivated in oxidative and inflammatory stress media conditions. This behavior correlated with increased intracellular levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase. ALDHhi murine myoblasts were observed to exhibit an increased muscle regenerative potential compared to ALDHlo myoblasts, undergo multipotent differentiation (osteogenic and chondrogenic), and were found predominately in the SAC fraction, characteristics that are also observed in murine MDSCs. Likewise, human ALDHhi hMDCs demonstrated superior muscle regenerative capacity compared to ALDHlo hMDCs. Conclusions The methodology of isolating myogenic cells on the basis of elevated ALDH activity

  7. 1.8 Astroms Structure of Murine GITR Ligand Dimer Expressed in Drosophila Melanogaster S2 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, K.; Ramagopal, U; Nathenson, S; Almo, S

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand (GITRL), a prominent member of the TNF superfamily, activates its receptor on both effector and regulatory T cells to generate critical costimulatory signals that have been implicated in a wide range of T-cell immune functions. The crystal structures of murine and human orthologs of GITRL recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have previously been determined. In contrast to all classical TNF structures, including the human GITRL structure, murine GITRL demonstrated a unique 'strand-exchanged' dimeric organization. Such a novel assembly behavior indicated a dramatic impact on receptor activation as well as on the signaling mechanism associated with the murine GITRL costimulatory system. In this present work, the 1.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of murine GITRL expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells is reported. The eukaryotic protein-expression system allows transport of the recombinant protein into the extracellular culture medium, thus maximizing the possibility of obtaining correctly folded material devoid of any folding/assembly artifacts that are often suspected with E. coli-expressed proteins. The S2 cell-expressed murine GITRL adopts an identical 'strand-exchanged' dimeric structure to that observed for the E. coli-expressed protein, thus conclusively demonstrating the novel quaternary structure assembly behavior of murine GITRL.

  8. Genomic complexities of murine leukemia and sarcoma, reticuloendotheliosis, and visna viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Beemon, K L; Faras, A J; Hasse, A T; Duesberg, P H; Maisel, J E

    1976-01-01

    The genetic complexities of several ribodeoxyviruses were measured by quantitative analysis of unique RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides from 60-70S viral RNAs. Moloney murine leukemia virus was found to have an RNA complexity of 3.5 x 10(6) daltons, whereas Moloney murine sarcoma virus had a significantly smaller genome size of 2.3 x 10(6). Reticuleondotheliosis and visna virus RNAs had complexities of 3.9 x 10(6), respectively. Analysis of RNase A-resistant oligonucleotides of Rous sarcoma virus RNA gave a complexity of 3.6 x 10(6), similar to that previously obtained with RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides. Since each of these viruses was found to have a unique sequence genomic complexity near the molecular weight of a single 30-40S viral RNA subunit, it was concluded that ribodeoxyvirus genomes are at least largely polyploid. Images PMID:176429

  9. [Secretory acid phosphatase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits the autophagy of murine macrophages].

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong; Wang, Wan; Zhao, Runpeng; Xu, Xuewei; Xing, Yingru; Xu, Congjing; Zhang, Rongbo; Wu, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of secretory acid phosphatase as a virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (SapM) on the autophagy of murine macrophages. Methods GFP-LC3-Raw264.7 cells were treated with SapM, wortmannin, or starvation. Then the formation of autophagosomes was observed under a fluorescence microscope. The level of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) II was detected using Western blotting. After chloroquine was added in the SapM-treated cells, LC3II level was again tested by Western blotting. Results Both starvation and SapM increased the number of GFP-LC3 puncta and the level of LC3 II. There was no further increase of LC3 II level in SapM-treated cells after chloroquine addition. Conclusion SapM can block autophagosome-lysosome fusion and inhibit autophagy of murine macrophages. PMID:27371835

  10. Mechano-rheological properties of the murine thrombus determined via nanoindentation and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Slaboch, Constance L; Alber, Mark S; Rosen, Elliot D; Ovaert, Timothy C

    2012-06-01

    Deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and abdominal aortic aneurysms are blood-related diseases that represent a major public health problem. These diseases are characterized by the formation of a thrombus (i.e., blood clot) that either blocks a major artery or causes an aortic rupture. Identifying the mechanical properties of thrombi can help determine when these incidents will occur. In this investigation, a murine thrombus, formed from platelet-rich plasma, calcium, and thrombin, was nanoindented and the elastic modulus was estimated via elastic contact theory. This information was used as input to an inverse finite element simulation, which determined optimal values for the elastic modulus and viscosity of the thrombus using a viscoelastic material model. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to determine which material parameters have the greatest affect on the simulation. Results from this investigation demonstrate the feasibility of the mechanical characterization of a murine thrombus using nanoindentation. PMID:22520420

  11. Survivin suppressor (YM155) enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy against canine histiocytic sarcoma in murine transplantation models.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroki; Takagi, Satoshi; Hosoya, Kenji; Okumura, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) in dogs exhibits aggressive clinical and biological behavior. Currently, no effective treatments are available for dogs with HS. Survivin, a member of a family of apoptosis protein inhibitors, could serve as a potential therapeutic target in several canine cancers. Sepantronium bromide (YM155) has recently been established as a novel survivin-targeting agent. The aim of this study was to use YM155 as a tool for evaluating survivin-targeted therapies against dogs with HS, and to investigate how YM155 treatment affects antitumor and chemotherapeutic efficacies in murine xenograft models using canine HS cells. The results showed that in HS cells with lomustine (CCNU) resistance, YM155 treatment suppressed both the cell-growth potential and cell resistance to CCNU, which essentially increases the chemotherapy efficacy in the murine models. The evidence presented here supports the favorable preclinical evaluation that survivin-targeted therapies might be effective against HS in dogs. PMID:25744435

  12. Human malignant mesothelioma is recapitulated in immunocompetent BALB/c mice injected with murine AB cells

    PubMed Central

    Mezzapelle, Rosanna; Rrapaj, Eltjona; Gatti, Elena; Ceriotti, Chiara; Marchis, Francesco De; Preti, Alessandro; Spinelli, Antonello E.; Perani, Laura; Venturini, Massimo; Valtorta, Silvia; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Frenquelli, Michela; Crippa, Luca; Recordati, Camilla; Scanziani, Eugenio; de Vries, Hilda; Berns, Anton; Frapolli, Roberta; Boldorini, Renzo; D’Incalci, Maurizio; Bianchi, Marco E.; Crippa, Massimo P.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma is a highly aggressive cancer, which is difficult to diagnose and treat. Here we describe the molecular, cellular and morphological characterization of a syngeneic system consisting of murine AB1, AB12 and AB22 mesothelioma cells injected in immunocompetent BALB/c mice, which allows the study of the interplay of tumor cells with the immune system. Murine mesothelioma cells, like human ones, respond to exogenous High Mobility Group Box 1 protein, a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern that acts as a chemoattractant for leukocytes and as a proinflammatory mediator. The tumors derived from AB cells are morphologically and histologically similar to human MM tumors, and respond to treatments used for MM patients. Our system largely recapitulates human mesothelioma, and we advocate its use for the study of MM development and treatment. PMID:26961782

  13. Murine Mueller cells are progenitor cells for neuronal cells and fibrous tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Florian, Christian; Langmann, Thomas; Weber, Bernhard H.F.; Morsczeck, Christian

    2008-09-19

    Mammalian Mueller cells have been reported to possess retinal progenitor cell properties and generate new neurons after injury. This study investigates murine Mueller cells under in vitro conditions for their capability of dedifferentiation into retinal progenitor cells. Mueller cells were isolated from mouse retina, and proliferating cells were expanded in serum-containing medium. For dedifferentiation, the cultured cells were transferred to serum-replacement medium (SRM) at different points in time after their isolation. Interestingly, early cell passages produced fibrous tissue in which extracellular matrix proteins and connective tissue markers were differentially expressed. In contrast, aged Mueller cell cultures formed neurospheres in SRM that are characteristic for neuronal progenitor cells. These neurospheres differentiated into neuron-like cells after cultivation on laminin/ornithine cell culture substrate. Here, we report for the first time that murine Mueller cells can be progenitors for both, fibrous tissue cells and neuronal cells, depending on the age of the cell culture.

  14. Structure and regulation of the murine Clara cell secretory protein gene.

    PubMed

    Stripp, B R; Huffman, J A; Bohinski, R J

    1994-03-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CC10 or CCSP) is an abundant component of airway secretions and has the ability to bind small hydrophobic molecules. Genomic clones were isolated for the murine gene coding for Clara cell secretory protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the gene was composed of three exons that span 4316 bp. Organization of the murine CCSP gene was very similar to that of the rabbit gene that codes for the biochemically related uteroglobin protein. Messenger RNAs for both genes were coded for by three exons, counterparts of which encode similar structural and functional protein domains. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the 5' flanking DNA were conserved between species, as were the functional properties of these elements when characterized in assays of promoter function. These data support the notion that Clara cell secretory protein genes from the rat and mouse, and the uteroglobin gene in rabbit, represent interspecies homologues. PMID:8020953

  15. Comparative study of artificial chromosome centromeres in human and murine cells

    PubMed Central

    Moralli, Daniela; Jefferson, Andrew; Valeria Volpi, Emanuela; Larin Monaco, Zoia

    2013-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are a valuable tool in the analysis of complex chromatin structures such as the human centromere because of their small size and relative simplicity compared with normal human chromosomes. This report includes a comprehensive study of the centromere and chromatin composition of HAC, expressing human genes, generated in human cells and transferred to murine cells. The analysis involved chromatin immuno-precipitation and immuno-FISH on metaphase chromosomes and chromatin fibres. In both the cell types, the HAC consisted of alphoid and non-alphoid DNA and were mainly euchromatic in composition, although a pericentromeric heterochromatic region was present on all the HAC. Fibre-FISH and chromatin immuno-precipitation data indicated that the position of the centromere differed between HAC in human cells and in murine cells. Our work highlights the importance and utilisation of HAC for understanding the epigenetic aspects of chromosome biology. PMID:23403904

  16. Targeting of a Nuclease to Murine Leukemia Virus Capsids Inhibits Viral Multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsoulis, Georges; Seshaiah, Partha; Federspiel, Mark J.; Rein, Alan; Hughes, Stephen H.; Boeke, Jef D.

    1995-01-01

    Capsid-targeted viral inactivation is an antiviral strategy in which toxic fusion proteins are targeted to virions, where they inhibit viral multiplication by destroying viral components. These fusion proteins consist of a virion structural protein moiety and an enzymatic moiety such as a nuclease. Such fusion proteins can severely inhibit transposition of yeast retrotransposon Ty1, an element whose transposition mechanistically resembles retroviral multiplication. We demonstrate that expression of a murine retrovirus capsid-staphylococcal nuclease fusion protein inhibits multiplication of the corresponding murine leukemia virus by 30- to 100-fold. Staphylococcal nuclease is apparently inactive intracellularly and hence nontoxic to the host cell, but it is active extracellularly because of its requirement for high concentrations of Ca2+ ions. Virions assembled in and shed from cells expressing the fusion protein contain very small amounts of intact viral RNA, as would be predicted for nuclease-mediated inhibition of viral multiplication.

  17. Human malignant mesothelioma is recapitulated in immunocompetent BALB/c mice injected with murine AB cells.

    PubMed

    Mezzapelle, Rosanna; Rrapaj, Eltjona; Gatti, Elena; Ceriotti, Chiara; Marchis, Francesco De; Preti, Alessandro; Spinelli, Antonello E; Perani, Laura; Venturini, Massimo; Valtorta, Silvia; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Frenquelli, Michela; Crippa, Luca; Recordati, Camilla; Scanziani, Eugenio; de Vries, Hilda; Berns, Anton; Frapolli, Roberta; Boldorini, Renzo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Bianchi, Marco E; Crippa, Massimo P

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma is a highly aggressive cancer, which is difficult to diagnose and treat. Here we describe the molecular, cellular and morphological characterization of a syngeneic system consisting of murine AB1, AB12 and AB22 mesothelioma cells injected in immunocompetent BALB/c mice, which allows the study of the interplay of tumor cells with the immune system. Murine mesothelioma cells, like human ones, respond to exogenous High Mobility Group Box 1 protein, a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern that acts as a chemoattractant for leukocytes and as a proinflammatory mediator. The tumors derived from AB cells are morphologically and histologically similar to human MM tumors, and respond to treatments used for MM patients. Our system largely recapitulates human mesothelioma, and we advocate its use for the study of MM development and treatment. PMID:26961782

  18. Eukaryotic expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of murine Manic Fringe

    SciTech Connect

    Jinek, Martin; Conti, Elena

    2006-08-01

    The catalytic domain of the murine glycosyltransferase Manic Fringe was expressed in insect cells. Removal by site-directed mutagenesis of two N-glycosylation sites present in the protein was essential to obtain crystals that diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. Fringe proteins are Golgi-resident β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that regulate development in metazoa through glycosylation of the Notch receptor and its ligands. The catalytic domain of murine Manic Fringe was expressed in the baculovirus/insect-cell system as a secreted protein. Mass-spectrometric analysis of the purified protein indicated the presence of two N-linked glycans. Abolishing the glycosylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis was necessary in order to obtain orthorhombic crystals that diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. For phasing, a highly redundant data set was collected using a crystal soaked with halide salts.

  19. Diet and specific microbial exposure trigger features of environmental enteropathy in a novel murine model

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric M.; Wlodarska, Marta; Willing, Benjamin P.; Vonaesch, Pascale; Han, Jun; Reynolds, Lisa A.; Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Uhrig, Marco; Scholz, Roland; Partida, Oswaldo; Borchers, Christoph H.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a subclinical chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine and has a profound impact on the persistence of childhood malnutrition worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease remains unknown and no animal model exists to date, the creation of which would aid in understanding this complex disease. Here we demonstrate that early-life consumption of a moderately malnourished diet, in combination with iterative oral exposure to commensal Bacteroidales species and Escherichia coli, remodels the murine small intestine to resemble features of EE observed in humans. We further report the profound changes that malnutrition imparts on the small intestinal microbiota, metabolite and intraepithelial lymphocyte composition, along with the susceptibility to enteric infection. Our findings provide evidence indicating that both diet and microbes combine to contribute to the aetiology of EE, and describe a novel murine model that can be used to elucidate the mechanisms behind this understudied disease. PMID:26241678

  20. Absence of hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in murine Dunn osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, H.T.; Gorka, C.

    1983-09-01

    The transplantable murine Dunn osteosarcoma has no detectable hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity. This was established from the tumors directly and from tissue culture cell lines derived from the tumor using a variety of assays: e.g., no (3H)hypoxanthine uptake into tumor or tissue culture cells, no conversion of (3H)hypoxanthine to (3H)IMP by cell extracts from tumors or tissue culture cells, no growth of tissue culture cells in hypoxanthine:aminopterin:thymidine medium, and normal growth of these cells in 10 microM 6-mercaptopurine. Ten human osteosarcomas have been assayed, and two have no apparent hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activity. After high-dose methotrexate treatment in vivo, murine tumors could be selectively killed and normal tissues could be spared by using a rescue regimen of hypoxanthine-thymidine-allopurinol.

  1. Structure and chromosomal localization of the murine coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Wen; Ghosh, Ruma; Finberg, Robert W; Bergelson, Jeffrey M

    2003-04-01

    We analyzed BAC genomic clones encoding the murine coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (mCAR). The mCAR gene is situated on the distal portion of murine chromosome 16, and is composed of at least eight exons, with intron-exon boundaries similar to those reported for the human CAR gene. We previously described two cDNAs encoding mCAR isoforms: the extracellular and transmembrane portions of both are encoded by exons 1-6; the cytoplasmic domain of mCAR 1 is encoded by exon 7, whereas mCAR 2 results from an RNA splice linking the proximal portion of exon 7 to an alternative exon 8. RT-PCR analysis of the mCAR RNA 5'-terminus suggests that transcription may begin 141-161 nucleotides upstream of the ATG translational start site. PMID:12823902

  2. Diet and specific microbial exposure trigger features of environmental enteropathy in a novel murine model.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric M; Wlodarska, Marta; Willing, Benjamin P; Vonaesch, Pascale; Han, Jun; Reynolds, Lisa A; Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Uhrig, Marco; Scholz, Roland; Partida, Oswaldo; Borchers, Christoph H; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Finlay, B Brett

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a subclinical chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine and has a profound impact on the persistence of childhood malnutrition worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease remains unknown and no animal model exists to date, the creation of which would aid in understanding this complex disease. Here we demonstrate that early-life consumption of a moderately malnourished diet, in combination with iterative oral exposure to commensal Bacteroidales species and Escherichia coli, remodels the murine small intestine to resemble features of EE observed in humans. We further report the profound changes that malnutrition imparts on the small intestinal microbiota, metabolite and intraepithelial lymphocyte composition, along with the susceptibility to enteric infection. Our findings provide evidence indicating that both diet and microbes combine to contribute to the aetiology of EE, and describe a novel murine model that can be used to elucidate the mechanisms behind this understudied disease. PMID:26241678

  3. Sequence heterogeneity of murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome virus: the role of endogenous virus.

    PubMed

    Gayama, S; Vaupel, B A; Kanagawa, O

    1995-05-01

    A defective murine leukemia virus is the causative agent of murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS). We have cloned cDNAs from both virus infected and non-infected cells using the PCR methods with primers corresponding to the franking sequence of the unique p12 gag gene. Sequence analysis of these cDNA clones revealed: (i) the presence of endogenous virus related to MAIDS virus in C57BL/6 mice, (ii) B cell lineage specific expression of endogenous virus and (iii) extensive heterogeneity of MAIDS virus recovered from virus infected cells due to the recombination of the related viruses (defective pathogenic virus, ecotropic virus and endogenous virus). These findings suggest that the creation of virus variants in infected cells may play an important role in virus pathogenesis and escape from immune attack during the development of MAIDS. PMID:7547712

  4. Different expression patterns of TRP genes in murine B and T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Hitoshi; Iida, Tohko; Tominaga, Makoto . E-mail: tominaga@nips.ac.jp

    2006-11-24

    A prolonged increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is essential for lymphocyte activation that includes cell proliferation and differentiation. This increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} results from Ca{sup 2+} release from the intracellular store and the subsequent Ca{sup 2+} influx from the extracellular environment via calcium channels located on the plasma membrane. Although transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been reported to play important roles in the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in lymphocytes, the function of these channels in lymphocyte activation remains unknown. Here, we report the comprehensive expression profile of TRP channel gene families including TRPC, TRPV, and TRPM in the murine immune system. RT-PCR analysis revealed different expression patterns of the TRP channel genes in B and T lymphocytes isolated from the spleen. Therefore, our results provide an appropriate reference of TRP gene expression in murine lymphocytes.

  5. Tumors in murine brains studied by grating-based phase contrast microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Dominietto, Marco; Kovacs, Zsofia; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Hieber, Simone E.; Thalmann, Peter; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of vessels, is one of the key processes during tumor development. The newly formed vessels transport oxygen and nutrients from the healthy tissue to the tumor and gives tumor cells the possibility to replicate. The principle of anti-angiogenic therapy is to block angiogenic process in order to stop tumor growth. The aim of the present study is the investigation of murine glioma vascular architecture at early (7 days), intermediate (10 and 15 days) and late (23 days) stage of growth by means of grating-based phase contrast microtomography. We demonstrate that this technique yields premium contrast between healthy and cancerous parts of murine brain tissues.

  6. Usefulness of the murine model to study the immune response against Histoplasma capsulatum infection.

    PubMed

    Sahaza, Jorge H; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Zenteno, Edgar; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2014-05-01

    The present paper is an overview of the primary events that are associated with the histoplasmosis immune response in the murine model. Valuable data that have been recorded in the scientific literature have contributed to an improved understanding of the clinical course of this systemic mycosis, which is caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Data must be analyzed carefully, given that misinterpretation could be generated because most of the available information is based on experimental host-parasite interactions that used inappropriate proceedings, i.e., the non-natural route of infection with the parasitic and virulent fungal yeast-phase, which is not the usual infective phase of the etiological agent of this mycosis. Thus, due to their versatility, complexity, and similarities with humans, several murine models have played a fundamental role in exploring the host-parasite interaction during H. capsulatum infection. PMID:24766724

  7. Iron limitation and the gamma interferon-mediated antihistoplasma state of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T E; Wu-Hsieh, B A; Howard, D H

    1991-01-01

    The zoopathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum requires iron for growth. Intracellular growth of the fungus within mouse peritoneal macrophages is inhibited by recombinant murine gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). Such treatment of mouse peritoneal macrophages induces a marked downshift in transferrin receptors. We tested whether the antihistoplasma effect of IFN-gamma-treated macrophages is the result of iron deprivation. Treatment of mouse peritoneal macrophages with the intracellular iron chelator deferoxamine inhibits the intracellular growth of H. capsulatum. Exposure of macrophages to holotransferrin antagonizes the effect of both recombinant murine IFN-gamma and deferoxamine treatments. These results suggest that iron restriction may be one of the bases for the IFN-gamma-induced antihistoplasma effect of mouse macrophages. PMID:1904840

  8. Generation of Murine Sympathoadrenergic Progenitor-Like Cells from Embryonic Stem Cells and Postnatal Adrenal Glands

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Shobhit; Wahl, Joachim; Huber-Lang, Markus S.; Stadel, Dominic; Braubach, Peter; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Sympathoadrenergic progenitor cells (SAPs) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are important for normal development of the sympathetic PNS and for the genesis of neuroblastoma, the most common and often lethal extracranial solid tumor in childhood. However, it remains difficult to isolate sufficient numbers of SAPs for investigations. We therefore set out to improve generation of SAPs by using two complementary approaches, differentiation from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolation from postnatal murine adrenal glands. We provide evidence that selecting for GD2 expression enriches for ESC-derived SAP-like cells and that proliferating SAP-like cells can be isolated from postnatal adrenal glands of mice. These advances may facilitate investigations about the development and malignant transformation of the sympathetic PNS. PMID:23675538

  9. Infectivity of a recombinant murine norovirus (RecMNV) in Balb/cByJ mice.

    PubMed

    Mathijs, Elisabeth; Oliveira-Filho, Edmilson F de; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Mauroy, Axel; Thiry, Damien; Massart, François; Saegerman, Claude; Thiry, Etienne

    2016-08-30

    The infectivity of a recombinant murine norovirus (RecMNV) strain, previously isolated following in vitro coinfections, was evaluated in vivo in comparison with its parental strains (MNV-1-CW1 and WU20) in Balb/cByJ mice via measurement of weight loss and estimation of viral loads in faeces, tissues and organs 48 and 72h post-infection. The presence of infectious virus in all analysed tissues and organs suggests that, similarly to its parental viruses, RecMNV can disseminate beyond organs associated with the digestive tract. Our results also suggest that recombination occurring in vitro between two homologous murine norovirus strains can give rise to a chimeric strain which, despite slight differences, shows similar biological properties to its parental strains. This study provides the first report on in vivo replication of a recombinant norovirus strain isolated following in vitro coinfection. These results have great significance for norovirus genetic evolution and future vaccine development. PMID:27527773

  10. Opossums and Cat Fleas: New Insights in the Ecology of Murine Typhus in Galveston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Idowu, Boluwatife M; Tatsch, Tyler N; Henderson, Joshua M; Bouyer, Donald H; Walker, David H

    2016-08-01

    Murine typhus is an acute undifferentiated febrile illness caused by Rickettsia typhi The classic reservoir (Rattus spp.) and flea vector (Xenopsylla cheopis) were once culprits of murine typhus in the United States. Vector and rodent control efforts have drastically decreased the prevalence of disease, except in a few endemic foci where opossums and cat fleas play a role in transmission. Since 2012, there has been a reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston, TX. We hypothesize that opossums and cat fleas are involved in the transmission of R. typhi in Galveston. To explore this, we sought to find the seroprevalence of typhus group antibodies from opossums. We also sought to find the prevalence of R. typhi in fleas parasitizing these animals. We collected blood from 12 opossums and found that eight (66.7%) had the presence of anti-R. typhi antibodies. All opossums were infested with fleas; a total of 250 Ctenocephalides felis fleas were collected from these animals. Seven opossums (53.8%) were infested with fleas that had molecular evidence of R. typhi infection, while six (46.2%) were infested with fleas that contained Candidatus Rickettsia senegalensis, an organism closely related to R. felis The minimum flea infection rate for R. typhi was 7.0%. The minimum infection rate for Candidatus R. senegalensis was 6.1%. Our study demonstrates that fleas infected with R. typhi parasitize opossums in Galveston. It is therefore likely that opossums and their fleas play a role in the city's recent reemergence of murine typhus. PMID:27273642

  11. Biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface via AFM-based nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Doyran, Basak; Gamer, Laura W; Lu, X Lucas; Qin, Ling; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Rosen, Vicki; Han, Lin

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to quantify the biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation was performed on the central region, proximal side of menisci from 6- to 24-week old male C57BL/6 mice using microspherical tips (Rtip≈5µm) in PBS. A unique, linear correlation between indentation depth, D, and response force, F, was found on menisci from all age groups. This non-Hertzian behavior is likely due to the dominance of tensile resistance by the collagen fibril bundles on meniscus surface that are mostly aligned along the circumferential direction. The indentation resistance was calculated as both the effective modulus, Eind, via the isotropic Hertz model, and the effective stiffness, Sind = dF/dD. Values of Sind and Eind were found to depend on indentation rate, suggesting the existence of poro-viscoelasticity. These values do not significantly vary with anatomical sites, lateral versus medial compartments, or mouse age. In addition, Eind of meniscus surface (e.g., 6.1±0.8MPa for 12 weeks of age, mean±SEM, n=13) was found to be significantly higher than those of meniscus surfaces in other species, and of murine articular cartilage surface (1.4±0.1MPa, n=6). In summary, these results provided the first direct mechanical knowledge of murine knee meniscus tissues. We expect this understanding to serve as a mechanics-based benchmark for further probing the developmental biology and osteoarthritis symptoms of meniscus in various murine models. PMID:25817332

  12. Biomechanical Properties of Murine Meniscus Surface via AFM-based Nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Doyran, Basak; Gamer, Laura W.; Lu, X. Lucas; Qin, Ling; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Rosen, Vicki; Han, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation was performed on the central region, proximal side of menisci from 6- to 24-week old male C57BL/6 mice using microspherical tips (Rtip ≈ 5 μm) in PBS. A unique, linear correlation between indentation depth, D, and response force, F, was found on menisci from all age groups. This non-Hertzian behavior is likely due to the dominance of tensile resistance by the collagen fibril bundles on meniscus surface that are mostly aligned along the circumferential direction observed on 12-week old menisci. The indentation resistance was calculated as both the effective stiffness, Sind = dF/dD, and the effective modulus, Eind, via the isotropic Hertz model. Values of Sind and Eind were found to depend on indentation rate, suggesting the existence of poro-viscoelasticity. These values do not significantly vary with anatomical sites, lateral versus medial compartments, or mouse age. In addition, Eind of meniscus surface (e.g., 6.1 ± 0.8 MPa for 12 weeks of age, mean ± SEM, n = 13) was found to be significantly higher than those of meniscus surfaces in other species, and of murine articular cartilage surface (1.4 ± 0.1 MPa, n = 6). In summary, these results provided the first direct mechanical knowledge of murine knee meniscus tissues. We expect this understanding to serve as a mechanics-based benchmark for further probing the developmental biology and osteoarthritis symptoms of meniscus in various murine models. PMID:25817332

  13. SMADs and FOXL2 synergistically regulate murine FSHbeta transcription via a conserved proximal promoter element.

    PubMed

    Tran, Stella; Lamba, Pankaj; Wang, Ying; Bernard, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Pituitary FSH regulates ovarian and testicular function. Activins stimulate FSHβ subunit (Fshb) gene transcription in gonadotrope cells, the rate-limiting step in mature FSH synthesis. Activin A-induced murine Fshb gene transcription in immortalized gonadotropes is dependent on homolog of Drosophila mothers against decapentaplegic (SMAD) proteins as well as the forkhead transcription factor FOXL2 (FOXL2). Here, we demonstrate that FOXL2 synergizes with SMAD2, SMAD3, and SMAD4 to stimulate murine Fshb promoter-reporter activity in heterologous cells. Moreover, SMAD3-induction of Fshb promoter activity or endogenous mRNA expression is dependent upon endogenous FOXL2 in homologous cells. FOXL2/SMAD synergy requires binding of both FOXL2 and SMAD3 or SMAD4 to DNA. Of three putative forkhead-binding elements identified in the murine Fshb promoter, only the most proximal is absolutely required for activin A induction of reporter activity in homologous cells. Additionally, mutations to the minimal SMAD-binding element adjacent to the proximal forkhead-binding element abrogate activin A or FOXL2/SMAD3 induction of reporter activity. In contrast, a mutation that impairs an adjacent PBX1/PREP1 (pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor 1-PBX/knotted-1 homeobox-1) binding site does not alter activin A-stimulated promoter activity in homologous cells. Collectively, these and previous data suggest a model in which activins stimulate formation of FOXL2-SMAD2/3/4 complexes, which bind to the proximal murine Fshb promoter to stimulate its transcription. Within these complexes, FOXL2 and SMAD3 or SMAD4 bind to adjacent cis-elements, with SMAD3 brokering the physical interaction with FOXL2. Because this composite response element is highly conserved, this suggests a general mechanism whereby activins may regulate and/or modulate Fshb transcription in mammals. PMID:21622537

  14. Murine granulated metrial gland cells are susceptible to Chlamydia psittaci infection in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, J; Buendía, A J; Salinas, J; Bernabé, A; Rodolakis, A; Stewart, I J

    1996-01-01

    Granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells are the most numerous lymphoid cells in the uteroplacental unit in rodent pregnancy. In an experimental murine model of abortion-causing infection, we have studied the responses of GMG cells to Chlamydia psittaci. Chlamydial inclusions have been found within GMG cells, both in apparently healthy cells and in cells with degenerative changes. Establishing the existence of GMG cells infected by C. psittaci opens a new and interesting chapter in the study of these cells. PMID:8751945

  15. Suppression of Chondrogenesis by Id Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins in Murine Embryonic Orofacial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Rezzoug, Francine; Webb, Cynthia L.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of differentiation (Id) proteins are helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factors lacking a DNA binding domain. Id proteins modulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation in embryonic/fetal tissue. Perturbation of any of these processes in cells of the developing orofacial region results in orofacial anomalies. Chondrogenesis, a process integral to normal orofacial ontogenesis, is known to be modulated, in part, by Id proteins. In the present study, the mRNA and protein expression patterns of Id1, Id2, Id3 and Id4 were examined in developing murine orofacial tissue in vivo, as well as in murine embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells in vitro. The functional role of Ids during chondrogenesis was also explored in vitro. Results reveal that cells derived from developing murine orofacial tissue: (1) express Id1, Id2, Id3 and Id4 mRNAs and proteins on each of gestational days 12-14, (2) express all four Id proteins in a developmentally regulated manner, (3) undergo chondrogenesis and express genes encoding various chondrogenic marker proteins (e.g. Runx2, Type X collagen, Sox9) when cultured under micromass conditions, and (4) can have their chondrogenic potential regulated via alteration of Id protein function through overexpression of a basic HLH factor. In summary, results from the current report reveal for the first time, the expression of all four Id proteins in cells derived from developing murine orofacial tissue, and demonstrate a functional role for the Ids in regulating the ability of these cells to undergo chondrogenesis. PMID:19349107

  16. Murine Monoclonal Antibodies against Escherichia coli O4 Lipopolysaccharide and H5 Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Betancourt, Mildred; Keen, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Two murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb), 2C5-F10 and 8D1-H10, reactive with Escherichia coli O4 and H5 antigens, respectively, were generated and characterized. Enzyme immunoassays and immunoblots demonstrated that MAb 2C5-F10 reacted specifically with lipopolysaccharide O antigen of E. coli O4 isolates, while MAb 8D1-H10 reacted with E. coli strains expressing H5 flagella. PMID:11526192

  17. Ibuprofen Potentiates the In Vivo Antifungal Activity of Fluconazole against Candida albicans Murine Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Isabel M.; Silva-Dias, Ana; Silva, Ana P.; Rodrigues, Acácio G.; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent cause of fungemia worldwide. Its ability to develop resistance in patients receiving azole antifungal therapy is well documented. In a murine model of systemic infection, we show that ibuprofen potentiates fluconazole antifungal activity against a fluconazole-resistant strain, drastically reducing the fungal burden and morbidity. The therapeutic combination of fluconazole with ibuprofen may constitute a new approach for the management of antifungal therapeutics to reverse the resistance conferred by efflux pump overexpression. PMID:25845879

  18. Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in a murine model of Aspergillus fumigatus keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jing; Hu, Li-Ting; Che, Cheng-Ye; Li, Cui; Wang, Qian; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Peng, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To observe the presence and expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) during the corneal immunity to Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) in the murine models. METHODS The murine model of fungal keratitis was established by smearing with colonies of A. fumigatus after scraping central epithelium of cornea and covering with contact lenses in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were randomly divided into control group, sham group and A. fumigatus keratitis group. The cornea was monitored daily using a slit lamp and recorded disease score after infection. Corneal lesion was detected by immunofluorescence staining. IDO mRNA and protein were also detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. RESULTS The disease score and slit lamp photography indicated that disease severity was consistent with corneal inflammation in the murine models, and the disease scores in A. fumigatus keratitis group were obviously higher than those in the sham group. By immunofluorescence staining, IDO was mainly localized in corneal epithelium and stroma in the murine corneal tissues with A. fumigatus keratitis. Compared with the sham group, IDO mRNA expression was significantly enhanced in corneal epithelium infected by A. fumigatus. Furthermore, IDO protein expression detected by Western blot was in accord with transcript levels of IDO mRNA measured by qRT-PCR. IDO protein expression was enhanced after A. fumigatus infection compared with the sham group. CONCLUSION IDO is detected in corneal epithelium and stroma locally, which indicates IDO takes part in the pathogenesis of A. fumigatus keratitis and plays a key role in immune regulation at the early stage. PMID:27162718

  19. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium--Effects of Prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  20. Structural and functional characterization of human and murine C5a anaphylatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Janus Asbjørn; Yatime, Laure; Larsen, Casper; Petersen, Steen Vang; Klos, Andreas; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2014-01-01

    Complement is an ancient part of the innate immune system that plays a pivotal role in protection against invading pathogens and helps to clear apoptotic and necrotic cells. Upon complement activation, a cascade of proteolytic events generates the complement effectors, including the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Signalling through their cognate G-protein coupled receptors, C3aR and C5aR, leads to a wide range of biological events promoting inflammation at the site of complement activation. The function of anaphylatoxins is regulated by circulating carboxypeptidases that remove their C-terminal arginine residue, yielding C3a-desArg and C5a-desArg. Whereas human C3a and C3a-desArg adopt a canonical four-helix bundle fold, the conformation of human C5a-desArg has recently been described as a three-helix bundle. Here, the crystal structures of an antagonist version of human C5a, A8Δ71–73, and of murine C5a and C5a-desArg are reported. Whereas A8Δ71–73 adopts a three-helix bundle conformation similar to human C5a-desArg, the two murine proteins form a four-helix bundle. A cell-based functional assay reveals that murine C5a-desArg, in contrast to its human counterpart, exerts the same level of activition as murine C5a on its cognate receptor. The role of the different C5a conformations is discussed in relation to the differential activation of C5a receptors across species. PMID:24914981

  1. Development of a radiofrequency ablation platform in a clinically relevant murine model of hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoqiang; Li, Guangfu; Liu, Dai; Motamarry, Anjan; Huang, Xiangwei; Wolfe, A Marissa; Helke, Kristi L; Haemmerich, Dieter; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F; Kimchi, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    RFA is used in treatment of patients with hepatocellular cancer (HCC); however, tumor location and size often limit therapeutic efficacy. The absence of a realistic animal model and a radiofrequency ablation (RFA) suitable for small animals presents significant obstacles in developing new strategies. To establish a realistic RFA platform that allows the development of effective RFA-integrated treatment in an orthotopic murine model of HCC, a human cardiac radiofrequency generator was modified for murine use. Parameters were optimized and RFA was then performed in normal murine livers and HCCs. The effects of RFA were monitored by measuring the ablation zone and transaminases. The survival of tumor-bearing mice with and without RFA was monitored, ablated normal liver and HCCs were evaluated macroscopically and histologically. We demonstrated that tissue-mimicking media was able to optimize RFA parameters. Utilizing this information we performed RFA in normal and HCC-bearing mice. RFA was applied to hepatic parenchyma and completely destroyed small tumors and part of large tumors. Localized healing of the ablation and normalization of transaminases occurred within 7 days post RFA. RFA treatment extended the survival of small tumor-bearing mice. They survived at least 5 months longer than the controls; however, mice with larger tumors only had a slight therapeutic effect after RFA. Collectively, we performed RFA in murine HCCs and observed a significant therapeutic effect in small tumor-bearing mice. The quick recovery of tumor-bearing mice receiving RFA mimics observations in human subjects. This platform provides us a unique opportunity to study RFA in HCC treatment. PMID:26537481

  2. Characterization of Chromosomal Instability in Murine Colitis-Associated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Marco; Glauben, Rainer; Habermann, Jens K.; Kühl, Anja A.; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Zeitz, Martin; Siegmund, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC) bear an increased risk for colorectal cancer. Due to the sparsity of colitis-associated cancer (CAC) and the long duration between UC initiation and overt carcinoma, elucidating mechanisms of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis in the gut is particularly challenging. Adequate murine models are thus highly desirable. For human CACs a high frequency of chromosomal instability (CIN) reflected by aneuploidy could be shown, exceeding that of sporadic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to analyze mouse models of CAC with regard to CIN. Additionally, protein expression of p53, beta-catenin and Ki67 was measured to further characterize murine tumor development in comparison to UC-associated carcinogenesis in men. Methods The AOM/DSS model (n = 23) and IL-10−/− mice (n = 8) were applied to monitor malignancy development via endoscopy and to analyze premalignant and malignant stages of CACs. CIN was assessed using DNA-image cytometry. Protein expression of p53, beta-catenin and Ki67 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The degree of inflammation was analyzed by histology and paralleled to local interferon-γ release. Results CIN was detected in 81.25% of all murine CACs induced by AOM/DSS, while all carcinomas that arose in IL-10−/− mice were chromosomally stable. Beta-catenin expression was strongly membranous in IL-10−/− mice, while 87.50% of AOM/DSS-induced tumors showed cytoplasmatic and/or nuclear translocation of beta-catenin. p53 expression was high in both models and Ki67 staining revealed higher proliferation of IL-10−/−-induced CACs. Conclusions AOM/DSS-colitis, but not IL-10−/− mice, could provide a powerful murine model to mechanistically investigate CIN in colitis-associated carcinogenesis. PMID:21799775

  3. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium - Effects of Prochloraz

    PubMed Central

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H.; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  4. Pharmacokinetics and Pulmonary Disposition of Tedizolid and Linezolid in a Murine Pneumonia Model under Variable Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Keel, Rebecca A.; Crandon, Jared L.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo pharmacokinetics are often evaluated in only one variation of an infection model, and the resulting exposures are assumed to be similar in each model. We evaluated and compared the effect of lung infection and immune status on the murine pharmacokinetics and pulmonary disposition of tedizolid and linezolid. Both factors resulted in differing blood and pulmonary exposure profiles, with similar trends for tedizolid and linezolid. These data highlight the importance of pharmacokinetic confirmation in each model. PMID:22430966

  5. Noncanonical MicroRNAs and Endogenous siRNAs in Lytic Infection of Murine Gammaherpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Zhang, Weixiong

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) and endogenous small interfering RNA (endo-siRNA) are two essential classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) in eukaryotes. The class of miRNA is diverse and there exist noncanonical miRNAs that bypass the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway. In order to identify noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs responding to virus infection and study their potential function, we sequenced small-RNA species from cells lytically infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68). In addition to three novel canonical miRNAs in mouse, two antisense miRNAs in virus and 25 novel noncanonical miRNAs, including miRNAs derived from transfer RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs and introns, in the host were identified. These noncanonical miRNAs exhibited features distinct from that of canonical miRNAs in lengths of hairpins, base pairings and first nucleotide preference. Many of the novel miRNAs are conserved in mammals. Besides several known murine endo-siRNAs detected by the sequencing profiling, a novel locus in the mouse genome was identified to produce endo-siRNAs. This novel endo-siRNA locus is comprised of two tandem inverted B4 short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs). Unexpectedly, the SINE-derived endo-siRNAs were found in a variety of sequencing data and virus-infected cells. Moreover, a murine miRNA was up-regulated more than 35 fold in infected than in mock-treated cells. The putative targets of the viral and the up-regulated murine miRNAs were potentially involved in processes of gene transcription and protein phosphorylation, and localized to membranes, suggesting their potential role in manipulating the host basal immune system during lytic infection. Our results extended the number of noncanonical miRNAs in mammals and shed new light on their potential functions of lytic infection of MHV68. PMID:23110115

  6. Homocysteine enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via ERK and Akt signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Yi Sle; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Kim, Gyu Hee; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2012-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) at elevated levels is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hcy on the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in murine macrophages. Among the MMP known to regulate the activities of collagenase and gelatinase, Hcy exclusively increased the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 in J774A.1 cells as well as in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, this activity was found to be correlated with Western blot findings in J774A.1 cells, which showed that MMP-9 expression was concentration- and time-dependently increased by Hcy. Inhibition of the ERK and Akt pathways led to a significant decrease in Hcy-induced MMP-9 expression, and combined treatment with inhibitors of the ERK and Akt pathways showed an additive effects. Activity assays for ERK and Akt showed that Hcy increased the phosphorylation of both, but these phosphorylation were not affected by inhibitors of the Akt and ERK pathways. In line with these findings, the molecular inhibition of ERK and Akt using siRNA did not affect the Hcy-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages by separately activating the ERK and Akt signaling pathways. -- Highlights: ► Homocysteine (Hcy) induced MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. ► Hcy induced MMP-9 production through ERK and Akt signaling pathways. ► ERK and Akt signaling pathways were activated by Hcy in murine macrophages. ► ERK and Akt pathways were additively act on Hcy-induced MMP-9 production. ► Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in macrophages via activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways in an independent manner.

  7. The genomic sequence of the murine major vault protein and its promoter.

    PubMed

    Mossink, Marieke; van Zon, Arend; Fränzel-Luiten, Erna; Schoester, Martijn; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2002-07-10

    Vaults are ribonucleoproteins of unknown function, consisting of three different proteins and multiple copies of small untranslated RNA molecules. One of the protein subunits has been identified as TEP1, a protein that is also associated with the telomerase complex. Another protein appears to contain a functional PARP domain and is hence called VPARP. The third protein, major vault protein (MVP), is believed to make up 70% of the total mass of the vault complex and to be responsible for the typical barrel-shaped structure of vaults. We have isolated the murine MVP cDNA and compared the amino acid sequence with MVP from other species. Over 90% of sequence identity was found between mouse, human and rat, and a considerable degree of identity between mouse and MVPs from lower eukaryotes. We also found that the genomic structure of the murine MVP gene closely resembles the organization of the human MVP gene, both consisting of 15 exons of which most have exactly the same size. Finally we have isolated a genomic region upstream (and partially overlapping) the first untranslated exon, that displayed promoter activity in a luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, we showed that the sequences from the first exon together with the 5'-end of the first intron enhance the promoter activity, implying the presence of essential promoter elements in this region. Alignment of the murine promoter region with the homologous sequences of the human gene revealed an identity of 58%. The apparent presence of conserved promoter elements suggests a similar regulation of human and murine MVP expression. PMID:12234684

  8. Osmotic characteristics and fertility of murine spermatozoa collected in different solutions.

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; Men, Hongsheng; Benson, James D; Critser, John K

    2009-02-01

    Osmotic stress is an important factor that can result in cell damage during cryopreservation. Before ejaculation or collection for cryopreservation, murine spermatozoa are stored in epididymal fluid, a physiologically hyperosmotic environment (approximately 415 mmol/kg). The objectives of this study were to determine the osmotic tolerance limits of sperm motion parameters of ICR and C57BL/6 mouse spermatozoa collected in isosmotic (290 mmol/kg) and hyperosmotic (415 mmol/kg) media, and the effect of the osmolality of sperm collection media on sperm fertility after cryopreservation. Our results indicate that murine spermatozoa collected in media with different osmolalities (290 and 415 mmol/kg Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (DPBS)) appeared to have different osmotic tolerances for the maintenance of sperm motility and other motion parameters in both mouse strains. The hypo- and hyperosmotic treatments decreased motility and affected other motion parameters of spermatozoa collected in 290 mmol/kg DPBS. The extent of the change of motion parameters after treatments corresponded with the levels of osmotic stress. However, for spermatozoa collected in 415 mmol/kg DPBS, exposure to 290 mmol/kg DPBS tended to increase sperm motility and the quality of their motion parameters. The osmolality of sperm collection medium can affect murine sperm fertility. Spermatozoa collected in 415 mmol/kg medium showed higher fertility compared with spermatozoa collected in 290 mmol/kg as assessed by IVF. Results characterizing murine sperm osmotic tolerance collected in media with different osmolalities from different strains and the effect of collection media osmolality on sperm fertility after cryopreservation will be useful in designing cryopreservation protocols. PMID:19028924

  9. Cloning and expression of murine enzymes involved in the salvage pathway of GDP-L-fucose.

    PubMed

    Niittymäki, Jaana; Mattila, Pirkko; Roos, Christophe; Huopaniemi, Laura; Sjöblom, Solveig; Renkonen, Risto

    2004-01-01

    In the salvage pathway of GDP-L-fucose, free cytosolic fucose is phosphorylated by L-fucokinase to form L-fucose-L-phosphate, which is then further converted to GDP-L-fucose in the reaction catalyzed by GDP-L-fucose pyrophosphorylase. We report here the cloning and expression of murine L-fucokinase and GDP-L-fucose pyrophosphorylase. Murine L-fucokinase is expressed as two transcripts of 3057 and 3270 base pairs, encoding proteins of 1019 and 1090 amino acids with predicted molecular masses of 111 kDa and 120 kDa respectively. Only the longer splice variant of L-fucokinase was enzymatically active when expressed in COS-7 cells. Murine GDP-L-fucose pyrophosphorylase has an open reading frame of 1773 base pairs encoding a protein of 591 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 65.5 kDa. GDP-L-fucose, the reaction product of GDP-L-pyrophosphorylase, was identified by HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The tissue distribution of murine L-fucokinase and GDP-L-fucose pyrophosphorylase was investigated by quantitative real time PCR, which revealed high expression of L-fucokinase and GDP-L-fucose pyrophosphorylase in various tissues. The wide expression of both enzymes can also be observed from the large amount of data collected from a number of expressed sequence tag libraries, which indicate that not only the de novo pathway alone, but also the salvage pathway, could have a significant role in the synthesis of GDP-L-fucose in the cytosol. PMID:14686921

  10. Generating Primary Cultures of Murine Cardiac Myocytes and Cardiac Fibroblasts to Study Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Viruses can induce direct damage to cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts resulting in myocarditis and impaired cardiac function. Cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts display different capacities to support viral infection and generate a protective antiviral response. This chapter provides detailed protocols for generation and characterization of primary cultures of murine cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, offering a powerful tool to probe cell type-specific responses that determine protection against viral myocarditis. PMID:25836571

  11. Adapting Human Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study Methods to Detect and Characterize Dysphagia in Murine Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Teresa E.; Braun, Sabrina M.; Brooks, Ryan T.; Harris, Rebecca A.; Littrell, Loren L.; Neff, Ryan M.; Hinkel, Cameron J.; Allen, Mitchell J.; Ulsas, Mollie A.

    2015-01-01

    This study adapted human videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) methods for use with murine disease models for the purpose of facilitating translational dysphagia research. Successful outcomes are dependent upon three critical components: test chambers that permit self-feeding while standing unrestrained in a confined space, recipes that mask the aversive taste/odor of commercially-available oral contrast agents, and a step-by-step test protocol that permits quantification of swallow physiology. Elimination of one or more of these components will have a detrimental impact on the study results. Moreover, the energy level capability of the fluoroscopy system will determine which swallow parameters can be investigated. Most research centers have high energy fluoroscopes designed for use with people and larger animals, which results in exceptionally poor image quality when testing mice and other small rodents. Despite this limitation, we have identified seven VFSS parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice when using a high energy fluoroscope in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol. We recently obtained a low energy fluoroscopy system with exceptionally high imaging resolution and magnification capabilities that was designed for use with mice and other small rodents. Preliminary work using this new system, in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol, has identified 13 swallow parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice, which is nearly double the number obtained using conventional (i.e., high energy) fluoroscopes. Identification of additional swallow parameters is expected as we optimize the capabilities of this new system. Results thus far demonstrate the utility of using a low energy fluoroscopy system to detect and quantify subtle changes in swallow physiology that may otherwise be overlooked when using high energy fluoroscopes to investigate murine disease models. PMID:25866882

  12. In Situ Friction Measurement on Murine Cartilage by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Jeffrey M.; Blum, Jason J.; Jay, Gregory D.; Darling, Eric M.; Guilak, Farshid; Zauscher, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Articular cartilage provides a low-friction, wear resistant surface for the motion of diarthrodial joints. The objective of this study was to develop a method for in situ friction measurement of murine cartilage using a colloidal probe attached to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope. Sliding friction was measured between a chemically functionalized microsphere and the cartilage of the murine femoral head. Friction was measured at normal loads ranging incrementally from 20 nN to 100 nN with a sliding speed of 40 μm/s and sliding distance of 64 μm. Under these test conditions, hydrostatic pressurization and biphasic load support in the cartilage were minimized, providing frictional measurements that predominantly reflect boundary lubrication properties. Friction coefficients measured on murine tissue (0.25±0.11) were similar to those measured on porcine tissue (0.23±0.09) and were in general agreement with measurements of boundary friction on cartilage by other researchers. Using the colloidal probe as an indenter, the elastic mechanical properties and surface roughness were measured in the same configuration. Interfacial shear was found to be the principal mechanism of friction generation, with little to no friction resulting from plowing forces, collision forces, or energy losses due to normal deformation. This measurement technique can be applied to future studies of cartilage friction and mechanical properties on genetically altered mice or other small animals. PMID:18054362

  13. Magnetic field-magnetic nanoparticle culture system used to grow in vitro murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Erika Regina Leal; Soares, Paula Roberta Otaviano; de Santos, Rachel Paula; dos Santos, Regiane Lopes; Porfírio, Elaine Paulucio; Báo, Sônia N; Lima, Emília Celma Oliveira; Guillo, Lídia Andreu

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro growth of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is usually obtained in the presence of murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), but new methods for in vitro expansion of ESCs should be developed due to their potential clinical use. This study aims to establish a culture system to expand and maintain ESCs in the absence of MEF by using murine embryonic stem cells (mECS) as a model of embryonic stem cell. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were used for growing mESCs in the presence of an external magnetic field, creating the magnetic field-magnetic nanoparticle (MF-MNP) culture system. The growth characteristics were evaluated showing a doubling time slightly higher for mESCs cultivated in the presence of the system than in the presence of the MEF. The undifferentiated state was characterized by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, alkaline phosphatase activity and electron microscopy. Murine embryonic stem cells cultivated in presence of the MF-MNP culture system exhibited Oct-4 and Nanog expression and high alkaline phosphatase activity. Ultrastructural morphology showed that the MF-MNP culture system did not interfere with processes that cause structural changes in the cytoplasm or nucleus. The MF-MNP culture system provides a tool for in vitro expansion of mESCs and could contribute to studies that aim the therapeutic use of embryonic stem cells. PMID:21446404

  14. Hemeoxygenase 1 partly mediates the anti-inflammatory effect of dieckol in lipopolysaccharide stimulated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yayeh, Taddesse; Im, Eun Ju; Kwon, Tae-Hyung; Roh, Seong-Soo; Kim, Suk; Kim, Ji Hye; Hong, Seung-Bok; Cho, Jae Youl; Park, Nyun-Ho; Rhee, Man Hee

    2014-09-01

    Eisenia bicyclis is edible brown algae recognized as a rich source of bioactive derivatives mainly phlorotannins reported for their anti-oxidant properties. Of all phlorotannins identified so far, dieckol has shown the most potent effect in anti-inflammatory, radical scavenging and neuroprotective functions. However, whether dieckol up-regulates hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1) and this mediates its anti-inflammatory effect in murine macrophages remains poorly understood. Dieckol (12.5-50 μM) inhibited nitric oxide production and attenuated inducible nitric oxide synthase, phospho (p)-PI-3K, p-Akt, p-IKK-α/β, p-IκB-α and nuclear p-NF-κBp65 protein expressions, and NF-κB transcriptional activity in LPS (0.1 μg/ml) stimulated murine macrophages. On the other hand, dieckol up-regulated HO-1 which partly mediated its anti-inflammatory effect in murine macrophages. Thus, dieckol appeared to be a potential therapeutic agent against inflammation through HO-1 up-regulation. PMID:24953853

  15. Antioxidative effects in vivo and colonization of Lactobacillus plantarum MA2 in the murine intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Xing, Zhuqing; Hu, Wei; Li, Chao; Wang, Jinju; Wang, Yanping

    2016-08-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum MA2 was isolated from traditional Chinese Tibet kefir grains, which possess several excellent properties and functions. We previously demonstrated the antioxidant activities of this bacterium in vitro. However, the maintenance and survival of L. plantarum MA2 inside the murine intestinal tract, where it exerts its probiotic properties, and whether its effects are elicited directly on the host remain unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the mechanisms of L. plantarum MA2 in aging mice following D-galactose administration. The levels of malondialdehyde decreased significantly in the L. plantarum MA2 groups after oral ingestion compared to the D-galactose model group, and total antioxidant capacity and glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities increased significantly in the serum and liver. We combined fluorescein isothiocyanate labeling and green fluorescent protein expression to dynamically monitor the colonization and distribution of L. plantarum MA2 in the murine intestinal tract. The results indicated that L. plantarum MA2 was detected in the ileum, colon, and feces after single and continuous oral administration at day 21 and was maintained at 10(4)-10(5) CFU/g. These results suggest that L. plantarum MA2 colonizes and survives in the murine intestinal tract to exert its antioxidative effects. PMID:27178180

  16. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  17. Interplay of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 with NF-kappaB Signaling of the Host

    PubMed Central

    Cieniewicz, Brandon; Santana, Alexis L.; Minkah, Nana; Krug, Laurie T.

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses establish a chronic infection in the host characterized by intervals of lytic replication, quiescent latency, and reactivation from latency. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) naturally infects small rodents and has genetic and biologic parallels with the human gammaherpesviruses (gHVs), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein–Barr virus. The murine gammaherpesvirus model pathogen system provides a platform to apply cutting-edge approaches to dissect the interplay of gammaherpesvirus and host determinants that enable colonization of the host, and that shape the latent or lytic fate of an infected cell. This knowledge is critical for the development of novel therapeutic interventions against the oncogenic gHVs. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway is well-known for its role in the promotion of inflammation and many aspects of B cell biology. Here, we review key aspects of the virus lifecycle in the host, with an emphasis on the route that the virus takes to gain access to the B cell latency reservoir. We highlight how the murine gammaherpesvirus requires components of the NF-κB signaling pathway to promote replication, latency establishment, and maintenance of latency. These studies emphasize the complexity of gammaherpesvirus interactions with NF-κB signaling components that direct innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Importantly, multiple facets of NF-κB signaling have been identified that might be targeted to reduce the burden of gammaherpesvirus-associated diseases. PMID:27582728

  18. Murine fundus fluorescein angiography: An alternative approach using a handheld camera.

    PubMed

    Ehrenberg, Moshe; Ehrenberg, Scott; Schwob, Ouri; Benny, Ofra

    2016-07-01

    In today's modern pharmacologic approach to treating sight-threatening retinal vascular disorders, there is an increasing demand for a compact, mobile, lightweight and cost-effective fluorescein fundus camera to document the effects of antiangiogenic drugs on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in mice and other experimental animals. We have adapted the use of the Kowa Genesis Df Camera to perform Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA) in mice. The 1 kg, 28 cm high camera has built-in barrier and exciter filters to allow digital FFA recording to a Compact Flash memory card. Furthermore, this handheld unit has a steady Indirect Lens Holder that firmly attaches to the main unit, that securely holds a 90 diopter lens in position, in order to facilitate appropriate focus and stability, for photographing the delicate central murine fundus. This easily portable fundus fluorescein camera can effectively record exceptional central retinal vascular detail in murine laser-induced CNV, while readily allowing the investigator to adjust the camera's position according to the variable head and eye movements that can randomly occur while the mouse is optimally anesthetized. This movable image recording device, with efficiencies of space, time, cost, energy and personnel, has enabled us to accurately document the alterations in the central choroidal and retinal vasculature following induction of CNV, implemented by argon-green laser photocoagulation and disruption of Bruch's Membrane, in the experimental murine model of exudative macular degeneration. PMID:27260483

  19. Murine isolated lymphoid follicles contain follicular B lymphocytes with a mucosal phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caihong; McDonald, Keely G.; McDonough, Jacquelyn S.; Newberry, Rodney D.

    2006-01-01

    Isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs) are organized intestinal lymphoid structures whose formation can be induced by luminal stimuli. ILFs have been demonstrated to act as inductive sites for the generation of immune responses directed toward luminal stimuli; however, the phenotype of the immune response initiated within ILFs has largely been uninvestigated. To gain a better understanding of the immune responses initiated within ILFs, we examined phenotypic and functional aspects of the largest cellular component of the murine ILF lymphocyte population, B lymphocytes. We observed that murine ILF B lymphocytes are composed of a relatively homogenous population of follicular B-2 B lymphocytes. Consistent with their proximity to multiple stimuli, ILF B lymphocytes displayed a more activated phenotype compared with their counterparts in the spleen and Peyer’s patch (PP). ILF B lymphocytes also expressed higher levels of immunomodulatory B7 and CD28 family members B7X and programmed death-1 compared with their counterparts in the spleen and PP. ILF B lymphocytes preferentially differentiate into IgA-producing plasma cells and produce more IL-4 and IL-10 and less interferon-γ compared with their counterparts in the spleen. Immunoglobulin repertoire analysis from individual ILFs demonstrated that ILFs contain a polyclonal population of B lymphocytes. These findings indicate that murine ILFs contain a polyclonal population of follicular B-2 B lymphocytes with a phenotype similar to PP B lymphocytes and that, in unchallenged animals, ILFs promote immune responses with a homeostatic phenotype. PMID:16782693

  20. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865