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Sample records for murine experimental autoimmune

  1. Histamine and neuroinflammation: insights from murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Passani, Maria B.; Ballerini, Clara

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory, neurodegenerative disease of the CNS whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown, and available therapies are rarely successful in reversing neurological deficits or stopping disease progression. Ongoing studies on MS and the widely used murine model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are focused on the many components of this complex and heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease in the hope of providing a mechanism-based characterization of MS that will afford successful strategies to limit and repair the neuronal damage. Recently, histamine has been postulated to have a key regulatory role in EAE and MS pathogenesis. Histamine is a mediator of inflammation and immune responses, exerting its many actions through four G protein-coupled receptors (H1,2,3,4R) that signal through distinct intracellular pathways and have different therapeutic potentials as they vary in expression, isoform distribution, signaling properties, and function. Immune cells involved in MS/EAE, including dendritic cells (DCs) and T lymphocytes, express H1R, H2R and H4R, and histamine may have varying and counteracting effects on a particular cell type, depending on the receptor subtypes being activated. Here, we review evidence of the complex and controversial role of histamine in the pathogenesis of MS and EAE and evaluate the therapeutic potential of histaminergic ligands in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:22563309

  2. G-CSF and Neutrophils Are Nonredundant Mediators of Murine Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Gabrielle L; Cornish, Ann L; Murphy, Jane; Pang, Ee Shan; Lim, Lyndell L; Campbell, Ian K; Scalzo-Inguanti, Karen; Chen, Xiangting; McMenamin, Paul G; Maraskovsky, Eugene; McKenzie, Brent S; Wicks, Ian P

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a regulator of neutrophil production, function, and survival. Herein, we investigated the role of G-CSF in a murine model of human uveitis-experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis. Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis was dramatically reduced in G-CSF-deficient mice and in anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody-treated, wild-type (WT) mice. Flow cytometric analysis of the ocular infiltrate in WT mice with experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis showed a mixed population, comprising neutrophils, macrophages, and T cells. The eyes of G-CSF-deficient and anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody-treated WT mice had minimal neutrophil infiltrate, but no change in other myeloid-derived inflammatory cells. Antigen-specific T-cell responses were maintained, but the differentiation of pathogenic type 17 helper T cells in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis was reduced with G-CSF deficiency. We show that G-CSF controls the ocular neutrophil infiltrate by modulating the expression of C-X-C chemokine receptors 2 and 4 on peripheral blood neutrophils, as well as actin polymerization and migration. These data reveal an integral role for G-CSF-driven neutrophil responses in ocular autoimmunity, operating within and outside of the bone marrow, and also identify G-CSF as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of human uveoretinitis. PMID:26718978

  3. Assessment and In Vivo Scoring of Murine Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Colin J.; Herrmann, Philipp; Carvalho, Livia S.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Bainbridge, James W. B.; Ali, Robin R.; Dick, Andrew D.; Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in clinical imaging and grading our understanding of retinal immune responses and their morphological correlates in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU), has been hindered by the requirement for post-mortem histology. To date, monitoring changes occurring during EAU disease progression and evaluating the effect of therapeutic intervention in real time has not been possible. We wanted to establish whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) could detect intraretinal changes during inflammation and to determine its utility as a tool for accurate scoring of EAU. EAU was induced in C57BL/6J mice and animals evaluated after 15, 26, 36 and 60 days. At each time-point, contemporaneous Spectralis-OCT scanning, topical endoscopic fundal imaging (TEFI), fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) and CD45-immunolabelled histology were performed. OCT features were further characterised on retinal flat-mounts using immunohistochemistry and 3D reconstruction. Optic disc swelling and vitreous opacities detected by OCT corresponded to CD45+ cell infiltration on histology. Vasculitis identified by FFA and OCT matched perivascular myeloid and T-cell infiltrates and could be differentiated from unaffected vessels. Evolution of these changes could be followed over time in the same eye. Retinal folds were visible and found to encapsulate mixed populations of activated myeloid cells, T-cells and microglia. Using these features, an OCT-based EAU scoring system was developed, with significant correlation to validated histological (Pearson r2 = 0.6392, P<0.0001, n = 31 eyes) and TEFI based scoring systems (r2 = 0.6784, P<0.0001). OCT distinguishes the fundamental features of murine EAU in vivo, permits dynamic assessment of intraretinal changes and can be used to score disease severity. As a result, it allows tissue synchronisation with subsequent cellular and functional assessment and greater efficiency of animal usage. By relating OCT signals with

  4. Experimental Autoimmune Breast Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kesaraju, Pavani; Jaini, Ritika; Johnson, Justin M.; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Gruden, Jessica J.; Sakalar, Cagri; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2013-01-01

    Mastitis is a substantial clinical problem in lactating women that may result in severe pain and abrupt termination of breastfeeding, thereby predisposing infants to long-term health risks. Many cases of mastitis involve no known infectious agent and may fundamentally be due to autoimmune-mediated inflammation of the breast. Herein, we develop a murine model of autoimmune mastitis and provide a detailed characterization of its resulting phenotype of breast failure and lactation insufficiency. To generate breast-specific autoimmunity, we immunized SWXJ mice with recombinant mouse α-lactalbumin, a lactation-dependent, breast-specific differentiation protein critical for production of lactose. Mice immunized with α-lactalbumin showed extensive T-cell–mediated inflammation in lactating normal breast parenchyma but none in nonlactating normal breast parenchyma. This targeted autoimmune attack resulted in breast failure characterized by lactation insufficiency and decreased ability to nurture offspring. Although immunization with α-lactalbumin had no effect on fertility and birth numbers, pups nursed by α-lactalbumin–immunized mice showed significantly disrupted growth often accompanied by kwashiorkor-like nutritional abnormalities, including alopecia, liver toxicity, and runting. This experimental model of autoimmune breast failure has useful applications for prophylactic breast cancer vaccination and for addressing inflammatory complications during breastfeeding. In addition, this model is suited for investigating nutritionally based “failure-to-thrive” issues, particularly regarding the long-term implications of postnatal nutritional deprivation. PMID:22901749

  5. Prevention and Mitigation of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Murine β-Defensins via Induction of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bruhs, Anika; Schwarz, Thomas; Schwarz, Agatha

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide murine β-defensin-14 (mBD14) was found to exert, in addition to its antimicrobial activity, the capacity to induce regulatory T cells as demonstrated in the model of contact hypersensitivity. Because it is induced by ultraviolet radiation, mBD14 may contribute to the antigen-specific immunosuppression by ultraviolet radiation. To prove whether this applies also for other immunologic models and because ultraviolet radiation appears to have beneficial effects on multiple sclerosis, we utilized the model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Injection of mBD14 into mice before immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein caused amelioration of the disease with less central nervous system inflammation and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic T cells. The beneficial effect was due to Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells because it was lost on in vivo depletion of regulatory T cells. mBD14, however, also acts in a therapeutic setting, because injection of mBD14 into mice with clinical features of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis reduced the clinical score significantly. Human β-defensin-3, the human orthologue of mBD14, induced in vitro regulatory T cell-specific markers in CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, shifting these nonregulatory cells into a regulatory phenotype with suppressive features. Thus, defensins may represent candidates worth being further pursued for the therapy of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26763437

  6. A method for histopathological study of the multifocal nature of spinal cord lesions in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Boyden, Alexander W.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Lambertz, Allyn M.; Ofori-Amanfo, Georgina; Naumann, Paul W.; Goeken, J. Adam; Karandikar, Nitin J.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established mouse model for multiple sclerosis and is characterized by infiltration of mononuclear cells and demyelination within the central nervous system along with the clinical symptoms of paralysis. EAE is a multifocal and random disease, which sometimes makes histopathologic analysis of lesions difficult as it may not be possible to predict where lesions will occur, especially when evaluating cross sections of spinal cord. Consequently, lesions may be easily missed due to limited sampling in traditional approaches. To evaluate the entire length of the spinal cord while maintaining anatomic integrity, we have developed a method to section the cord within the decalcified spinal column, which allows for the study of the multifocal nature of this disease and also minimizes handling artifact. HE and Luxol fast blue staining of these spinal cord sections revealed a paucity of lesions in some areas, while others showed marked inflammation and demyelination. The percentage of spinal cord affected by EAE was evaluated at four separate areas of longitudinally sectioned cord and it varied greatly within each animal. Immunohistochemical staining of in situ spinal cords which had undergone decalcification was successful for key immuno-markers used in EAE research including CD3 for T cells, B220 for B cells and F4/80 for murine macrophages. This method will allow investigators to look at the entire spinal cord on a single slide and evaluate the spinal cord with and without classic EAE lesions. PMID:26855861

  7. Suppression of murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis development by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 with autophagy modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Chao; Feng, Xuedan; Li, Zhe; Wang, Yabo; Li, Bin; Li, Lin; Quan, Moyuan; Wang, Gaoning; Guo, Li

    2015-03-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been associated with a history of sub-optimal exposure to ultraviolet light, implicating vitamin D3 as a possible protective agent. We evaluated whether 1,25(OH)2D3 attenuates the progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and explored its potential mechanisms. EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice via immunization with MOG35-55, and some mice received 1,25(OH)2D3. 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibited EAE progression. Additionally, 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced inflammation, demyelination, and neuron loss in the spinal cord. The protective effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 was associated with significantly elevated expression of Beclin1, increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and decreased LC3-II accumulation. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D3 may represent a promising new MS treatment. PMID:25773147

  8. In silico investigation into dendritic cell regulation of CD8Treg mediated killing of Th1 cells in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis has been used extensively as an animal model of T cell mediated autoimmunity. A down-regulatory pathway through which encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells are killed by CD8 regulatory T cells (Treg) has recently been proposed. With the CD8Treg cells being primed by dendritic cells, regulation of recovery may be occuring around these antigen presenting cells. CD4Treg cells provide critical help within this process, by licensing dendritic cells to prime CD8Treg cells, however the spatial and temporal aspects of this help in the CTL response is currently unclear. Results We have previously developed a simulator of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (ARTIMMUS). We use ARTIMMUS to perform novel in silico experimentation regarding the priming of CD8Treg cells by dendritic cells, and the resulting CD8Treg mediated killing of encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells. Simulations using dendritic cells that present antigenic peptides in a mutually exclusive manner (either MBP or TCR-derived, but not both) suggest that there is no significant reliance on dendritic cells that can prime both encephalitogenic CD4Th1 and Treg cells. Further, in silico experimentation suggests that dynamics of CD8Treg priming are significantly influenced through their spatial competition with CD4Treg cells and through the timing of Qa-1 expression by dendritic cells. Conclusion There is no requirement for the encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells and cytotoxic CD8Treg cells to be primed by the same dendritic cells. We conjecture that no significant portion of CD4Th1 regulation by Qa-1 restricted CD8Treg cells occurs around individual dendritic cells, and as such, that CD8Treg mediated killing of CD4Th1 cells occurring around dendritic cells is not critical for recovery from the murine autoimmune disease. Furthermore, the timing of the CD4Treg licensing of dendritic cells and the spatial competition between CD4Treg and CD8Treg cells around the dendritic cell is

  9. Acute desipramine restores presynaptic cortical defects in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by suppressing central CCL5 overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Di Prisco, Silvia; Merega, Elisa; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Casazza, Simona; Uccelli, Antonio; Pittaluga, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Altered glutamate exocytosis and cAMP production in cortical terminals of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice occur at the early stage of disease (13 days post-immunization, d.p.i.). Neuronal defects were paralleled by overexpression of the central chemokine CCL5 (also known as RANTES), suggesting it has a role in presynaptic impairments. We propose that drugs able to restore CCL5 content to physiological levels could also restore presynaptic defects. Because of its efficacy in controlling CCL5 overexpression, desipramine (DMI) appeared to be a suitable candidate to test our hypothesis. Experimental Approach Control and EAE mice at 13 d.p.i. were acutely or chronically administered DMI and monitored for behaviour and clinical scores. Noradrenaline and glutamate release, cAMP, CCL5 and TNF-α production were quantified in cortical synaptosomes and homogenates. Peripheral cytokine production was also determined. Key Results Noradrenaline exocytosis and α2-adrenoeceptor-mediated activity were unmodified in EAE mice at 13 d.p.i. when compared with control. Acute, but not chronic, DMI reduced CCL5 levels in cortical homogenates of EAE mice at 13 d.p.i., but did not affect peripheral IL-17 and TNF-α contents or CCL5 plasma levels. Acute DMI caused a long-lasting restoration of glutamate exocytosis, restored endogenous cAMP production and impeded the shift from inhibition to facilitation of the CCL5-mediated control of glutamate exocytosis. Finally, DMI ameliorated anxiety-related behaviour but not motor activity or severity of clinical signs. Conclusions We propose DMI as an add-on therapy to normalize neuropsychiatric symptoms in multiple sclerosis patients at the early stage of the disease. PMID:24528439

  10. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C. )

    1991-09-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT.

  11. The nuclear IκB family protein IκBNS influences the susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shuhei; Hara, Akira; Isagawa, Takayuki; Manabe, Ichiro; Takeda, Kiyoshi; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear IκB family protein IκBNS is expressed in T cells and plays an important role in Interferon (IFN)-γ and Interleukin (IL)-2 production. IκB-ζ, the most similar homolog of IκBNS, plays an important role in the generation of T helper (Th)17 cells in cooperation with RORγt, a master regulator of Th17 cells. Thus, IκB-ζ deficient mice are resistant to Th17-dependent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, IκB-ζ deficient mice develop the autoimmune-like Sjögren syndrome with aging. Here we found that IκBNS-deficient (Nfkbid-/-) mice show resistance against developing Th17-dependent EAE. We found that Nfkbid-/- T cells have decreased expression of IL-17-related genes and RORγt in response to Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β1 and IL-6 stimulation. Thus, IκBNS plays a pivotal role in the generation of Th17 cells and in the control of Th17-dependent EAE. PMID:25347393

  12. Anatabine ameliorates experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Caturegli, Patrizio; De Remigis, Alessandra; Ferlito, Marcella; Landek-Salgado, Melissa A; Iwama, Shintaro; Tzou, Shey-Cherng; Ladenson, Paul W

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco smoking favorably influences the course of Hashimoto thyroiditis, possibly through the antiinflammatory proprieties of nicotine. In this study we tested anatabine, another tobacco alkaloid, in a model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis was induced by different doses of thyroglobulin, to produce a disease of low, moderate, or high severity, in 88 CBA/J female mice: 43 drank anatabine supplemented water and 45 regular water. Mice were bled after immunization and killed to assess thyroid histopathology, thyroglobulin antibodies, T(4), and thyroid RNA expression of 84 inflammatory genes. We also stimulated in vitro a macrophage cell line with interferon-γ or lipopolysaccharide plus or minus anatabine to quantitate inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. Anatabine reduced the incidence and severity of thyroiditis in the moderate disease category: only 13 of 21 mice (62%) developed thyroid infiltrates when drinking anatabine as compared with 22 of 23 (96%) controls (relative risk 0.59, P = 0.0174). The median thyroiditis severity was 0.5 and 2.0 in anatabine and controls, respectively (P = 0.0007 by Wilcoxon rank sum test). Anatabine also reduced the antibody response to thyroglobulin on d 14 (P = 0.029) and d 21 (P = 0.045) after immunization and improved the recovery of thyroid function on d 21 (P = 0.049). In the thyroid transcriptome, anatabine restored expression of IL-18 and IL-1 receptor type 2 to preimmunization levels. Finally, anatabine suppressed in a dose-dependent manner macrophage production of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2. Anatabine ameliorates disease in a model of autoimmune thyroiditis, making the delineation of its mechanisms of action and potential clinical utility worthwhile. PMID:22807490

  13. Interferon regulatory factor 5 in human autoimmunity and murine models of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Eames, Hayley L; Corbin, Alastair L; Udalova, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been demonstrated as a key transcription factor of the immune system, playing important roles in modulating inflammatory immune responses in numerous cell types including dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells. As well as driving the expression of type I interferon in antiviral responses, IRF5 is also crucial for driving macrophages toward a proinflammatory phenotype by regulating cytokine and chemokine expression and modulating B-cell maturity and antibody production. This review highlights the functional importance of IRF5 in a disease setting, by discussing polymorphic mutations at the human Irf5 locus that lead to susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In concordance with this, we also discuss lessons in IRF5 functionality learned from murine in vivo models of autoimmune disease and inflammation and hypothesize that modulation of IRF5 activity and expression could provide potential therapeutic benefits in the clinic. PMID:26207886

  14. Galectin-8 Ameliorates Murine Autoimmune Ocular Pathology and Promotes a Regulatory T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, James F.; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Mulki, Lama; Suryawanshi, Amol; Jiang, Shuhong; Chen, Wei-Sheng; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Connor, Kip M.; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-01-01

    Galectins have emerged as potent immunoregulatory agents that control chronic inflammation through distinct mechanisms. Here, we report that treatment with Galectin-8 (Gal-8), a tandem-repeat member of the galectin family, reduces retinal pathology and prevents photoreceptor cell damage in a murine model of experimental autoimmune uveitis. Gal-8 treatment increased the number of regulatory T cells (Treg) in both the draining lymph node (dLN) and the inflamed retina. Moreover, a greater percentage of Treg cells in the dLN and retina of Gal-8 treated animals expressed the inhibitory coreceptor cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4, the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, and the tissue-homing integrin CD103. Treg cells in the retina of Gal-8-treated mice were primarily inducible Treg cells that lack the expression of neuropilin-1. In addition, Gal-8 treatment blunted production of inflammatory cytokines by retinal T helper type (TH) 1 and TH17 cells. The effect of Gal-8 on T cell differentiation and/or function was specific for tissues undergoing an active immune response, as Gal-8 treatment had no effect on T cell populations in the spleen. Given the need for rational therapies for managing human uveitis, Gal-8 emerges as an attractive therapeutic candidate not only for treating retinal autoimmune diseases, but also for other TH1- and TH17-mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:26126176

  15. The Microbiota Determines Susceptibility to Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Heissigerova, Jarmila; Seidler Stangova, Petra; Klimova, Aneta; Svozilkova, Petra; Hrncir, Tomas; Stepankova, Renata; Kverka, Miloslav; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena; Forrester, John V.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota is a crucial modulator of the immune system. Here, we evaluated how its absence or reduction modifies the inflammatory response in the murine model of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). We induced EAU in germ-free (GF) or conventionally housed (CV) mice and in CV mice treated with a combination of broad-spectrum antibiotics either from the day of EAU induction or from one week prior to induction of disease. The severity of the inflammation was assessed by fundus biomicroscopy or by histology, including immunohistology. The immunophenotyping of T cells in local and distant lymph nodes was performed by flow cytometry. We found that GF mice and mice where the microbiota was reduced one week before EAU induction were protected from severe autoimmune inflammation. GF mice had lower numbers of infiltrating macrophages and significantly less T cell infiltration in the retina than CV mice with EAU. GF mice also had reduced numbers of IFN-γ and IL-17-producing T cells and increased numbers of regulatory T cells in the eye-draining lymph nodes. These data suggest that the presence of microbiota during autoantigen recognition regulates the inflammatory response by influencing the adaptive immune response. PMID:27294159

  16. Lack of Galanin 3 Receptor Aggravates Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Botz, Bálint; Kemény, Ágnes; Brunner, Susanne M; Locker, Felix; Csepregi, Janka; Mócsai, Attila; Pintér, Erika; McDougall, Jason J; Kofler, Barbara; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-06-01

    Neurogenic inflammation mediated by peptidergic sensory nerves has a crucial impact on the pathogenesis of various joint diseases. Galanin is a regulatory sensory neuropeptide, which has been shown to attenuate neurogenic inflammation, modulate neutrophil activation, and be involved in the development of adjuvant arthritis, but our current understanding about its targets and physiological importance is incomplete. Among the receptors of galanin (GAL1-3), GAL3 has been found to be the most abundantly expressed in the vasculature and on the surface of some immune cells. However, since there are minimal in vivo data on the role of GAL3 in joint diseases, we analyzed its involvement in different inflammatory mechanisms of the K/BxN serum transfer-model of autoimmune arthritis employing GAL 3 gene-deficient mice. After arthritis induction, GAL3 knockouts demonstrated increased clinical disease severity and earlier hindlimb edema than wild types. Vascular hyperpermeability determined by in vivo fluorescence imaging was also elevated compared to the wild-type controls. However, neutrophil accumulation detected by in vivo luminescence imaging or arthritic mechanical hyperalgesia was not altered by the lack of the GAL3 receptor. Our findings suggest that GAL3 has anti-inflammatory properties in joints by inhibiting vascular hyperpermeability and consequent edema formation. PMID:26941032

  17. Regulatory T Cells Control Th2-Dominant Murine Autoimmune Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Harakal, Jessica; Rival, Claudia; Qiao, Hui; Tung, Kenneth S

    2016-07-01

    Pernicious anemia and gastric carcinoma are serious sequelae of autoimmune gastritis (AIG). Our study indicates that in adult C57BL/6-DEREG mice expressing a transgenic diphtheria toxin receptor under the Foxp3 promoter, transient regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion results in long-lasting AIG associated with both H(+)K(+)ATPase and intrinsic factor autoantibody responses. Although functional Tregs emerge over time during AIG occurrence, the effector T cells rapidly become less susceptible to Treg-mediated suppression. Whereas previous studies have implicated dysregulated Th1 cell responses in AIG pathogenesis, eosinophils have been detected in gastric biopsy specimens from patients with AIG. Indeed, AIG in DEREG mice is associated with strong Th2 cell responses, including dominant IgG1 autoantibodies, elevated serum IgE, increased Th2 cytokine production, and eosinophil infiltration in the stomach-draining lymph nodes. In addition, the stomachs exhibit severe mucosal and muscular hypertrophy, parietal cell loss, mucinous epithelial cell metaplasia, and massive eosinophilic inflammation. Notably, the Th2 responses and gastritis severity are significantly ameliorated in IL-4- or eosinophil-deficient mice. Furthermore, expansion of both Th2-promoting IFN regulatory factor 4(+) programmed death ligand 2(+) dendritic cells and ILT3(+) rebounded Tregs was detected after transient Treg depletion. Collectively, these data suggest that Tregs maintain physiological tolerance to clinically relevant gastric autoantigens, and Th2 responses can be a pathogenic mechanism in AIG. PMID:27259856

  18. Specific autoantigens in experimental autoimmunity-associated atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Merched, Aksam J; Daret, Danièle; Li, Lan; Franzl, Nathalie; Sauvage-Merched, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Higher cardiovascular morbidity in patients with a wide range of autoimmune diseases highlights the importance of autoimmunity in promoting atherosclerosis. Our purpose was to investigate the mechanisms of accelerated atherosclerosis and identified vascular autoantigens targeted by autoimmunity. We created a mouse model of autoimmunity-associated atherosclerosis by transplanting bone marrow from FcγRIIB knockout (FcRIIB(-/-)) mice into LDL receptor knockout mice. We characterized the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherogenesis and identified specific aortic autoantigens using serologic proteomic studies. En face lesion area analysis showed more aggressive atherosclerosis in autoimmune mice compared with control mice (0.64 ± 0.12 vs 0.32 ± 0.05 mm(2); P < 0.05, respectively). At the cellular level, FcRIIB(-/-) macrophages showed significant reduction (46-72%) in phagocytic capabilities. Proteomic analysis revealed circulating autoantibodies in autoimmune mice that targeted 25 atherosclerotic lesion proteins, including essential components of adhesion complex, cytoskeleton, and extracellular matrix, and proteins involved in critical functions and pathways. Microscopic examination of atherosclerotic plaques revealed essential colocalization of autoantibodies with endothelial cells, their adherence to basement membranes, the internal elastica lamina, and necrotic cores. The new vascular autoimmunosome may be a useful target for diagnostic and immunotherapeutic interventions in autoimmunity-associated diseases that have accelerated atherosclerosis.-Merched, A. J., Daret, D., Li, L., Franzl, N., Sauvage-Merched, M. Specific autoantigens in experimental autoimmunity-associated atherosclerosis. PMID:26891734

  19. A disease-associated PTPN22 variant promotes systemic autoimmunity in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xuezhi; James, Richard G.; Habib, Tania; Singh, Swati; Jackson, Shaun; Khim, Socheath; Moon, Randall T.; Liggitt, Denny; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Buckner, Jane H.; Rawlings, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, Graves disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, are associated with an allelic variant of protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22), which encodes the protein LYP. To model the human disease-linked variant LYP-R620W, we generated knockin mice expressing the analogous mutation, R619W, in the murine ortholog PEST domain phosphatase (PEP). In contrast with a previous report, we found that this variant exhibits normal protein stability, but significantly alters lymphocyte function. Aged knockin mice exhibited effector T cell expansion and transitional, germinal center, and age-related B cell expansion as well as the development of autoantibodies and systemic autoimmunity. Further, PEP-R619W affected B cell selection and B lineage–restricted variant expression and was sufficient to promote autoimmunity. Consistent with these features, PEP-R619W lymphocytes were hyperresponsive to antigen-receptor engagement with a distinct profile of tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates. Thus, PEP-R619W uniquely modulates T and B cell homeostasis, leading to a loss in tolerance and autoimmunity. PMID:23619366

  20. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  1. Constitutive expression of murine c-FLIPR causes autoimmunity in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Ewald, F; Annemann, M; Pils, M C; Plaza-Sirvent, C; Neff, F; Erck, C; Reinhold, D; Schmitz, I

    2014-01-01

    Death receptor-mediated apoptosis is a key mechanism for the control of immune responses and dysregulation of this pathway may lead to autoimmunity. Cellular FLICE-inhibitory proteins (c-FLIPs) are known as inhibitors of death receptor-mediated apoptosis. The only short murine c-FLIP splice variant is c-FLIPRaji (c-FLIPR). To investigate the functional role of c-FLIPR in the immune system, we used the vavFLIPR mouse model constitutively expressing murine c-FLIPR in all hematopoietic compartments. Lymphocytes from these mice are protected against CD95-mediated apoptosis and activation-induced cell death. Young vavFLIPR mice display normal lymphocyte compartments, but the lymphocyte populations alter with age. We identified reduced levels of T cells and slightly higher levels of B cells in 1-year-old vavFLIPR mice compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Moreover, both B and T cells from aged vavFLIPR animals show activated phenotypes. Sera from 1-year-old WT and transgenic animals were analysed for anti-nuclear antibodies. Notably, elevated titres of these autoantibodies were detected in vavFLIPR sera. Furthermore, tissue damage in kidneys and lungs from aged vavFLIPR animals was observed, indicating that vavFLIPR mice develop a systemic lupus erythematosus-like phenotype with age. Taken together, these data suggest that c-FLIPR is an important modulator of apoptosis and enforced expression leads to autoimmunity. PMID:24722293

  2. Recombinant IgG2a Fc (M0451) Multimers Effectively Suppress Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Sheng, Jian Rong; Li, Liangcheng; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Meriggioli, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder caused by target-specific pathogenic antibodies directed toward postsynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) proteins, most commonly the skeletal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). In MG, high-affinity anti-AChR Abs binding to the NMJ lead to loss of functional AChRs, culminating in neuromuscular transmission failure and myasthenic symptoms. Intravenous immune globulin (IVIg) has broad therapeutic application in the treatment of a range of autoimmune diseases, including MG, although its mechanism of action is not clear. Recently, the anti-inflammatory and anti-autoimmune activities of IVIg have been attributed to the IgG Fc domains. Soluble immune aggregates bearing intact Fc fragments have been shown to be effective treatment for a number of autoimmune disorders in mice, and fully recombinant multimeric Fc molecules have been shown to be effective in treating collagen-induced arthritis, murine immune thrombocytopenic purpura, and experimental inflammatory neuritis. In this study, a murine model of MG (EAMG) was used to study the effectiveness of this novel recombinant polyvalent IgG2a Fc (M045) in treating established myasthenia, with a direct comparison to treatment with IVIg. M045 treatment had profound effects on the clinical course of EAMG, accompanied by down-modulation of pathogenic antibody responses. These effects were associated with reduced B cell activation and T cell proliferative responses to AChR, an expansion in the population of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, and enhanced production of suppressive cytokines, such as IL-10. Treatment was at least as effective as IVIg in suppressing EAMG, even at doses 25–30 fold lower. Multimeric Fc molecules offer the advantages of being recombinant, homogenous, available in unlimited quantity, free of risk from infection and effective at significantly reduced protein loads, and may represent a viable therapeutic alternative to polyclonal IVIg. PMID:24388113

  3. Successful Treatment of Murine Autoimmune Cholangitis by Parabiosis: Implications for Hematopoietic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing-Bo; Wang, Yin-Hu; Yang, Wei; Lu, Fang-Ting; Ma, Hong-Di; Zhao, Zhi-Bin; Jia, Yan-Jie; Tang, Wei; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Ridgway, William M.; Gershwin, M. Eric; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant unmet need in the treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) despite significant data on the effector pathways that lead to biliary duct damage. We focused attention on a murine model of PBC, the dominant negative transforming growth factor β receptor II (Tg) mice. To further define the pathways that lead to biliary pathology in these mice, we developed Tg mice deleted of CD4 cells (CD4−/−Tg). Interestingly, these mice developed more severe cholangitis than control Tg mice. These mice, which lack CD4 cells, manifested increased levels of IFN-γ produced by effector CD8 cells. It appears that increased cholangitis is due to the absence of CD4 Treg cells. Based on these data, we parabiosed CD4−/−Tg mice with established disease at 8–9 weeks of age with C57BL/6 control mice. Such parabiotic “twins” had a significant reduction in autoimmune cholangitis, even though they had established pathology at the time of surgery. We prepared mixed bone marrow chimera mice constructed from CD4−/−Tg and CD8−/− mice and not only was cholangitis improved, but a decrease in terminally differentiated CD8+ T effector cells in the presence of wild type CD4 cells was noted. In conclusion, “correcting” the CD4 T cell subset, even in the presence of pathogenic CD8 T cells, is effective in treating autoimmune cholangitis. PMID:26432598

  4. Co-delivery of autoantigen and b7 pathway modulators suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Northrup, Laura; Sestak, Joshua O; Sullivan, Bradley P; Thati, Sharadvi; Hartwell, Brittany L; Siahaan, Teruna J; Vines, Charlotte M; Berkland, Cory

    2014-11-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are characterized by the breakdown of immune tolerance to autoantigens. Targeting surface receptors on immune cells offers a unique strategy for reprogramming immune responses in autoimmune diseases. The B7 signaling pathway was targeted using adaptations of soluble antigen array (SAgA) technology achieved by covalently linking B7-binding peptides and disease causing autoantigen (proteolipid peptide (PLP)) to hyaluronic acid (HA). We hypothesized that co-delivery of a B7-binding peptide and autoantigen would suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of MS. Three independent B7-targeted SAgAs were created containing peptides to either inhibit or potentially stimulate the B7 signaling pathway. Surprisingly, all SAgAs were found to suppress EAE disease symptoms. Altered cytokine expression was observed in primary splenocytes isolated from SAgA-treated mice, indicating that SAgAs with different B7-binding peptides may suppress EAE through different immunological mechanisms. This antigen-specific immunotherapy using SAgAs can successfully suppress EAE through co-delivery of autoantigen and peptides targeting with the B7 signaling pathway. PMID:25297853

  5. A Tandem Repeat in Decay Accelerating Factor 1 Is Associated with Severity of Murine Mercury-Induced Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Rodney; Kono, Dwight H.; Hultman, Per; Pollard, K. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF), a complement-regulatory protein, protects cells from bystander complement-mediated lysis and negatively regulates T cells. Reduced expression of DAF occurs in several systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, and DAF deficiency exacerbates disease in several autoimmune models, including murine mercury-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA). Daf1, located within Hmr1, a chromosome 1 locus associated in DBA/2 mice with resistance to mHgIA, could be a candidate. Here we show that reduced Daf1 transcription in lupus-prone mice was not associated with a reduction in the Daf1 transcription factor SP1. Studies of NZB mice congenic for the mHgIA-resistant DBA/2 Hmr1 locus suggested that Daf1 expression was controlled by the host genome and not the Hmr1 locus. A unique pentanucleotide repeat variant in the second intron of Daf1 in DBA/2 mice was identified and shown in F2 intercrosses to be associated with less severe disease; however, analysis of Hmr1 congenics indicated that this most likely reflected the presence of autoimmunity-predisposing genetic variants within the Hmr1 locus or that Daf1 expression is mediated by the tandem repeat in epistasis with other genetic variants present in autoimmune-prone mice. These studies argue that the effect of DAF on autoimmunity is complex and may require multiple genetic elements. PMID:24818014

  6. Autoimmunity in Experimental Trypanosoma congolense Infections of Rabbits 1

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, John M.; Kreier, Julius P.

    1972-01-01

    Autoimmunity in rabbits with experimental Trypanosoma congolense infections was investigated. Complement-fixing (CF) and precipitating autoantibodies to normal allogeneic and autologous tissues were found in the sera of all infected rabbits tested; the titers of CF autoantibody occurring during infection were significantly higher than normally occurring titers of autoantibody in pre-infection serum samples. Autoantibody did not cross-react with trypanosome antigens, and Wassermann antibody was not detected in normal or infected rabbit sera. Passive transfer of autoantibody to normal rabbits did not produce observable pathology or death. Physicochemical methods of analysis revealed that the autoantibody was exclusively of the immunoglobulin M class. That cell-mediated autoimmunity to normal tissue antigens did not occur during T. congolense infections was shown by histological analyses, skin tests, migration inhibitory factor, and skin reactive factor tests. Images PMID:4629248

  7. Treatment with retinoid X receptor agonist IRX4204 ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Chandraratna, Roshantha As; Noelle, Randolph J; Nowak, Elizabeth C

    2016-01-01

    Retinoid x receptors (RXRs) are master regulators that control cell growth, differentiation, and survival and form heterodimers with many other family members. Here we show that treatment with the RXR agonist IRX4204 enhances the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells into inducible regulatory T cells (iTreg) and suppresses the development of T helper (Th) 17 cells in vitro. Furthermore in a murine model of multiple sclerosis (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)), treatment with IRX4204 profoundly attenuates both active and Th17-mediated passive disease. In the periphery, treatment with IRX4204 is associated with decreased numbers of CD4(+) T cells that produce pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, CD4(+) T cells express decreased levels of Ki-67 and increased expression of CTLA-4. Our findings demonstrate IRX4204 treatment during EAE results in immune modulation and profound attenuation of disease severity. PMID:27158387

  8. Treatment with retinoid X receptor agonist IRX4204 ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Chandraratna, Roshantha AS; Noelle, Randolph J; Nowak, Elizabeth C

    2016-01-01

    Retinoid x receptors (RXRs) are master regulators that control cell growth, differentiation, and survival and form heterodimers with many other family members. Here we show that treatment with the RXR agonist IRX4204 enhances the differentiation of CD4+ T cells into inducible regulatory T cells (iTreg) and suppresses the development of T helper (Th) 17 cells in vitro. Furthermore in a murine model of multiple sclerosis (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)), treatment with IRX4204 profoundly attenuates both active and Th17-mediated passive disease. In the periphery, treatment with IRX4204 is associated with decreased numbers of CD4+ T cells that produce pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, CD4+ T cells express decreased levels of Ki-67 and increased expression of CTLA-4. Our findings demonstrate IRX4204 treatment during EAE results in immune modulation and profound attenuation of disease severity. PMID:27158387

  9. Tolerance Induction in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Using Non-myeloablative Hematopoietic Gene Therapy With Autoantigen

    PubMed Central

    Eixarch, Herena; Espejo, Carmen; Gómez, Alba; Mansilla, María José; Castillo, Mireia; Mildner, Alexander; Vidal, Francisco; Gimeno, Ramón; Prinz, Marco; Montalban, Xavier; Barquinero, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) constitutes a paradigm of antigen (Ag)-specific T cell driven autoimmune diseases. In this study, we transferred bone marrow cells (BMCs) expressing an autoantigen (autoAg), the peptide 40–55 of the myelin oligodendrocytic glycoprotein (MOG40–55), to induce preventive and therapeutic immune tolerance in a murine EAE model. Transfer of BMC expressing MOG40–55 (IiMOG-BMC) into partially myeloablated mice resulted in molecular chimerism and in robust protection from the experimental disease. In addition, in mice with established EAE, transfer of transduced BMC with or without partial myeloablation reduced the clinical and histopathological severity of the disease. In these experiments, improvement was observed even in the absence of engraftment of the transduced hematopoietic cells, probably rejected due to the previous immunization with the autoAg. Splenocytes from mice transplanted with IiMOG-BMC produced significantly higher amounts of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 upon autoAg challenge than those of control animals, suggesting the participation of regulatory cells. Altogether, these results suggest that different tolerogenic mechanisms may be mediating the preventive and the therapeutic effects. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that a cell therapy using BMC expressing an autoAg can induce Ag-specific tolerance and ameliorate established EAE even in a nonmyeloablative setting. PMID:19277013

  10. Continued Administration of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Protects Mice from Inflammatory Pathology in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Cognet, Isabelle; Bourbonniere, Lyne; Zehntner, Simone; Guilhot, Florence; Herman, Alexandra; Guay-Giroux, Angélique; Antel, Jack P.; Owens, Trevor; Gauchat, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. We show that daily administration (days 8 to 24) of murine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a neurotrophic factor that has been described as a survival and differentiation factor for neurons and oligodendrocytes, significantly ameliorates the clinical course of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. In the acute phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide 35-55, treatment with CNTF did not change the peripheral immune response but did reduce the number of perivascular infiltrates and T cells and the level of diffuse microglial activation in spinal cord. Blood brain barrier permeability was significantly reduced in CNTF-treated animals. Beneficial effects of CNTF did not persist after it was withdrawn. After cessation of CNTF treatment, inflammation and symptoms returned to control levels. However, slight but significantly higher numbers of oligodendrocytes, NG2-positive cells, axons, and neurons were observed in mice that had been treated with high concentrations of CNTF. Our results show that CNTF inhibits inflammation in the spinal cord, resulting in amelioration of the clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis during time of treatment. PMID:16877358

  11. Autoimmune Diabetes: An Overview of Experimental Models and Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    You, Sylvaine; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from a chronic and selective destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells within the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas by autoreactive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The use of animal models of T1D was instrumental for deciphering the steps of the autoimmune process leading to T1D. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse and the bio-breeding (BB) rat spontaneously develop the disease similar to the human pathology in terms of the immune responses triggering autoimmune diabetes and of the genetic and environmental factors influencing disease susceptibility. The generation of genetically modified models allowed refining our understanding of the etiology and the pathogenesis of the disease. In the present review, we provide an overview of the experimental models generated and used to gain knowledge on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the breakdown of self-tolerance in T1D and the progression of the autoimmune response. Immunotherapeutic interventions designed in these animal models and translated into the clinical arena in T1D patients will also be discussed. PMID:26530798

  12. Glia maturation factor regulation of STAT expression: a novel mechanism in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Smita; Wu, Yanghong; Bassett, Jon; Yang, Baoli; Zaheer, Asgar

    2007-12-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are implemented in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. We previously demonstrated that glia maturation factor (GMF), a brain protein, isolated, sequenced and cloned in our laboratory, induce expression of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine in the central nervous system (CNS). We found GMF-deficient (knockout) mice relatively resistant to EAE development after immunization with encephalitogenic MOG peptide 35-55. Consistent with these findings, the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in CNS of mice with EAE differed profoundly between wild type and GMF-knockout mice. In the present study we examined the expressions of six murine signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) genes, which are known to regulate the cytokine-dependent signal transduction pathways in autoimmune inflammation. The expressions of STATs genes were evaluated in the brains and spinal cords of wild type and GMF-knockout mice at the peak of EAE by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Compared to GMF-knockout mice, the expressions of STAT1, STAT2, STAT3, STAT4, STAT5, and STAT6 genes were significantly (P < 0.001) upregulated in the wild type mice exhibiting EAE symptoms. The results are consistent with the diminished development of EAE in the GMF-knockout mice. A significant suppression of STATs expression in GMF-knockout mice suggests GMF as an upstream effector of JAK/STAT signaling. PMID:17551829

  13. Efficacy of Posaconazole in Murine Experimental Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology. PMID:22330929

  14. Inhibition of experimental autoimmune orchitis by fossil diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustuoabad, Oscar D.; Meiss, Roberto P.; Molinolo, Alfredo R.; Mayer, Alejandro M. S.

    1985-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) induced in Swiss mice could be reduced by means of the utilization of micronized frustules of fossil diatoms (DS) containing 54% of SiO2. Experimental mice were sensitized with testicular Antigen (Ag) in Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) inoculated twice, on day 0 and day 21. 100 μg of DS suspension was inoculated into sensitized mice 10 times, once every 4 days, subcutaneously, starting on day 7 after the first Ag inoculation. Mice receiving the DS treatment showed a diminution of the delayed hypersensitivity reaction, lower antibody titer and decreased incidence of testicular injury as well as reduced grade and extension of the lesions. Possible explanation of these results would suggest alteration of monocyte and/or macrophage normal behaviour as well as alteration of antibody synthesis by different mechanisms.

  15. Tanshinone IIA attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Yang, Xue; Han, Dong; Feng, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory autoimmune neurodegenerative disease, which features focal demyelination and inflammatory cell infiltration of the brain and the spinal cord. Tanshinone IIA (TSIIA), one of the major fat‑soluble components of Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen), has anti‑inflammatory, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activity; however, its efficacy in MS remains unknown. The current study was designed to investigate the potential therapeutic function of TSIIA on MS in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) rat model. In comparison to the vehicle control group, the TSIIA‑treated groups showed notably improved clinical symptoms and pathological changes, including central nervous system inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination. Following administration of TSIIA, the quantity of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and macrophages/microglia in the spinal cord were reduced to different extents. Furthermore, TSIIA was also shown to downregulate interleukin (IL)‑17 and IL‑23 levels in the brain and serum of EAE rats. The results collectively provide evidence that TSIIA alleviates EAE and support its utility as a novel therapy for MS. PMID:27357729

  16. Strategies for Treating Autoimmunity Novel Insights from Experimental Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Meriggioli, Matthew N.; Sheng, Jiarong; Li, Liangcheng; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2009-01-01

    Current treatments for myasthenia gravis (MG) rely upon the administration of immunosuppressive agents which result in global, nonspecific attenuation of the immune response. An alternative approach would be to attempt to design therapies that specifically dampen autoreactivity without affecting general immunity. Recently, dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to possess potent capabilities to tolerize T cells in an antigen-specific manner. We have observed that the selective activation of particular subsets of DCs utilizing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) had profound effects on the induction of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Specifically, treatment with GM-CSF effectively suppressed the induction of EAMG and down-modulated anti-AChR T cell and pathogenic antibody responses. These effects were associated with the activation of tolerogenic DCs, the enhanced production of suppressive cytokines, such as IL-10, and the mobilization of.CD4+ CD2S+ and FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). We have further shown that GM-CSF effectively ameliorates clinical disease severity in mice with active, ongoing EAMG. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that the selective activation of particular DC subsets in vivo using pharmacologic agents, like GM-CSF, can suppress ongoing anti-AChR immune responses by mobilizing antigen-specific Tregs capable of suppressing autoimmune MG. PMID:18567878

  17. Mononuclear cell secretome protects from experimental autoimmune myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Zimmermann, Matthias; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Schweiger, Thomas; Kollmann, Dagmar; Mildner, Michael; Hegedus, Balazs; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Hacker, Stefan; Birner, Peter; Gabriel, Christian; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Eriksson, Urs; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Supernatants of serum-free cultured mononuclear cells (MNC) contain a mix of immunomodulating factors (secretome), which have been shown to attenuate detrimental inflammatory responses following myocardial ischaemia. Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (iDCM) is a common cause of heart failure in young patients. Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a CD4+ T cell-dependent model, which mirrors important pathogenic aspects of iDCM. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of MNC secretome on myocardial inflammation in the EAM model. Methods and results BALB/c mice were immunized twice with an alpha myosin heavy chain peptide together with Complete Freund adjuvant. Supernatants from mouse mononuclear cells were collected, dialysed, and injected i.p. at Day 0, Day 7, or Day 14, respectively. Myocarditis severity, T cell responses, and autoantibody formation were assessed at Day 21. The impact of MNC secretome on CD4+ T cell function and viability was evaluated using in vitro proliferation and cell viability assays. A single high-dose application of MNC secretome, injected at Day 14 after the first immunization, effectively attenuated myocardial inflammation. Mechanistically, MNC secretome induced caspase-8-dependent apoptosis in autoreactive CD4+ T cells. Conclusion MNC secretome abrogated myocardial inflammation in a CD4+ T cell-dependent animal model of autoimmune myocarditis. This anti-inflammatory effect of MNC secretome suggests a novel and simple potential treatment concept for inflammatory heart diseases. PMID:23321350

  18. Tuftsin-driven experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis recovery requires neuropilin-1.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jillian C; Tsirka, Stella E

    2016-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of demyelinating autoimmune disease, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), which is characterized by central nervous system white matter lesions, microglial activation, and peripheral T-cell infiltration secondary to blood-brain barrier disruption. We have previously shown that treatment with tuftsin, a tetrapeptide generated from IgG proteolysis, dramatically improves disease symptoms in EAE. Here, we report that microglial expression of Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) is required for tuftsin-driven amelioration of EAE symptoms. Nrp1 ablation in microglia blocks microglial signaling and polarization to the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, and ablation in either the microglia or immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) reduces extended functional contacts between them and Treg activation, implicating a role for microglia in the activation process, and more generally, how immune surveillance is conducted in the CNS. Taken together, our findings delineate the mechanistic action of tuftsin as a candidate therapeutic against immune-mediated demyelinating lesions. GLIA 2016;64:923-936. PMID:26880314

  19. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis--achievements and prospective advances.

    PubMed

    Batoulis, Helena; Recks, Mascha S; Addicks, Klaus; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2011-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder of the CNS. Different subtypes of the disease have been noted, and characterized by distinct clinical courses and histopathologic manifestations. The most intensively studied animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), classically leads to deficits in motor functions, and is mediated by T helper cells. Recently, T(H)17 cells were ascribed an even greater pathogenic impact than T(H)1 cells, but new findings render this view controversial. Although classic EAE has been an invaluable tool, it does not cover the entire pathogenic entity of MS. Especially B-cell contribution and autoantibody-dependence are not mirrored adequately: therefore, new B-cell-dependent models, such as MP4-induced EAE, have been introduced. Furthermore, certain symptoms and the spontaneous onset of MS are not featured in classic EAE. Herein, atypical and spontaneous EAE models can be used for investigation of common symptoms, such as tremor and ataxia, as well as spontaneous disease development. MS displays a marked inter-individual heterogeneity, and no single model will be able to cover all features. Thus, depending on the objective of one's study, the appropriate EAE model has to be carefully chosen. In addition, refined models should be designed to gain a more complete understanding of MS. PMID:22085358

  20. Silencing microRNA-155 ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Murugaiyan, Gopal; Beynon, Vanessa; Mittal, Akanksha; Joller, Nicole; Weiner, Howard L

    2011-09-01

    IFN-γ-producing Th1 and IL-17-producing Th17 cells are the key participants in various autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Although both of these T cell subsets are known to be regulated by specific transcription factors and cytokines, the role of microRNAs that control these two inflammatory T cell subsets and whether targeting microRNAs can have therapeutic effects are not known. In this study, we show that microRNA-155 (Mir-155) expression is elevated in CD4(+) T cells during EAE, and Mir-155(-/-) mice had a delayed course and reduced severity of disease and less inflammation in the CNS. The attenuation of EAE in Mir-155(-/-) mice was associated with a decrease in Th1 and Th17 responses in the CNS and peripheral lymphoid organs. The T cell-intrinsic function of Mir-155(-/-) was demonstrated by the resistance of Mir-155(-/-) CD4(+) T cell-repleted Rag-1(-/-) mice to EAE. Finally, we found that anti-Mir-155 treatment reduced clinical severity of EAE when given before and after the appearance of clinical symptoms. These findings demonstrate that Mir-155 confers susceptibility to EAE by affecting inflammatory T cell responses and identify Mir-155 as a new target for therapeutic intervention in multiple sclerosis. PMID:21788439

  1. Translational utility of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Laaksonen, Hannes; Flytzani, Sevasti; N’diaye, Marie; Olsson, Tomas; Jagodic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune condition with firmly established genetic and environmental components. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed a large number of genetic polymorphisms in the vicinity of, and within, genes that associate to disease. However, the significance of these single-nucleotide polymorphisms in disease and possible mechanisms of action remain, with a few exceptions, to be established. While the animal model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), has been instrumental in understanding immunity in general and mechanisms of MS disease in particular, much of the translational information gathered from the model in terms of treatment development (glatiramer acetate and natalizumab) has been extensively summarized. In this review, we would thus like to cover the work done in EAE from a GWAS perspective, highlighting the research that has addressed the role of different GWAS genes and their pathways in EAE pathogenesis. Understanding the contribution of these pathways to disease might allow for the stratification of disease subphenotypes in patients and in turn open the possibility for new and individualized treatment approaches in the future. PMID:26622189

  2. Tanshinone IIA attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Yang, Xue; Han, Dong; Feng, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory autoimmune neurodegenerative disease, which features focal demyelination and inflammatory cell infiltration of the brain and the spinal cord. Tanshinone IIA (TSIIA), one of the major fat-soluble components of Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen), has anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activity; however, its efficacy in MS remains unknown. The current study was designed to investigate the potential therapeutic function of TSIIA on MS in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) rat model. In comparison to the vehicle control group, the TSIIA-treated groups showed notably improved clinical symptoms and pathological changes, including central nervous system inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination. Following administration of TSIIA, the quantity of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and macrophages/microglia in the spinal cord were reduced to different extents. Furthermore, TSIIA was also shown to downregulate interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 levels in the brain and serum of EAE rats. The results collectively provide evidence that TSIIA alleviates EAE and support its utility as a novel therapy for MS. PMID:27357729

  3. Curcumin ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by diverse immune cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan; Li, Heng; Zhang, Min; Yue, Long-Tao; Wang, Cong-Cong; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Ying; Duan, Rui-Sheng

    2016-07-28

    Curcumin is a traditional Asian medicine with diverse immunomodulatory properties used therapeutically in the treatment of many autoimmune diseases. However, the effects of curcumin on myasthenia gravis (MG) remain undefined. Here we investigated the effects and potential mechanisms of curcumin in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Our results demonstrated that curcumin ameliorated the clinical scores of EAMG, suppressed the expression of T cell co-stimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86) and MHC class II, down-regulated the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-17, IFN-γ and TNF-α) and up-regulated the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, shifted the balance from Th1/Th17 toward Th2/Treg, and increased the numbers of NKR-P1(+) cells (natural killer cell receptor protein 1 positive cells, including NK and NKT cells). Moreover, the administration of curcumin promoted the differentiation of B cells into a subset of B10 cells, increased the anti-R97-166 peptide IgG1 levels and decreased the relative affinity indexes of anti-R97-116 peptide IgG. In summary, curcumin effectively ameliorate EAMG, indicating that curcumin may be a potential candidate therapeutic agent for MG. PMID:27181511

  4. Combined short-term immunotherapy for experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Pestronk, A.; Drachman, D.B.; Teoh, R.; Adams, R.N.

    1983-08-01

    A therapeutic strategy was designed to eliminate the humoral immune response to acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Rats with EAMG were treated with a protocol consisting of three components: (1) A single high dose of cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) was used to produce a rapid and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels by preferential destruction of antibody-producing B-lymphocytes. ''Memory'' lymphocytes were not eliminated by cyclophosphamide. (2) Irradiation (600 rads) was used to eliminate the ''memory'' cells. It eliminated the anamnestic response to a challenge with the antigen AChR. (3) Bone marrow transplantation was used to repopulate the hematopoietic system after the otherwise lethal dose of cyclophosphamide. We used bone marrow from syngeneic rats with active EAMG to simulate an autologous transplant. Rats with EAMG treated with this combined protocol showed a prompt and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels and had no anamnestic response to a challenge with AChR. Thus, an affected animal's own marrow could be stored and used later for repopulation after cyclophosphamide-irradiation treatment. This treatment eliminates the animal's ongoing immune responses and reconstitutes the immune system in its original state. The success of this approach suggests that, if their safety could be established, similar ''curative'' strategies might be developed for the treatment of patients with severe antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders, such as myasthenia gravis.

  5. Beneficial effects of blueberries in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Junping; Feinstein, Douglas L; Hejna, Matthew J; Lorens, Stanley A; McGuire, Susan O

    2012-06-13

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of autoimmune disease that presents with pathological and clinical features similar to those of multiple sclerosis (MS) including inflammation and neurodegeneration. This study investigated whether blueberries, which possess immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties, could provide protection in EAE. Dietary supplementation with 1% whole, freeze-dried blueberries reduced disease incidence by >50% in a chronic EAE model (p < 0.01). When blueberry-fed mice with EAE were compared with control-fed mice with EAE, blueberry-fed mice had significantly lower motor disability scores (p = 0.03) as well as significantly greater myelin preservation in the lumbar spinal cord (p = 0.04). In a relapsing-remitting EAE model, blueberry-supplemented mice showed improved cumulative and final motor scores compared to control diet-fed mice (p = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively). These data demonstrate that blueberry supplementation is beneficial in multiple EAE models, suggesting that blueberries, which are easily administered orally and well-tolerated, may provide benefit to MS patients. PMID:22243431

  6. New Murine Model of Early Onset Autoimmune Thyroid Disease/Hypothyroidism and Autoimmune Exocrinopathy of the Salivary Gland.

    PubMed

    Kayes, Timothy Daniel; Weisman, Gary A; Camden, Jean M; Woods, Lucas T; Bredehoeft, Cole; Downey, Edward F; Cole, James; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2016-09-15

    Sixty to seventy percent of IFN-γ(-/-) NOD.H-2h4 mice given sodium iodide (NaI)-supplemented water develop a slow onset autoimmune thyroid disease, characterized by thyrocyte epithelial cell (TEC) hyperplasia and proliferation (H/P). TEC H/P develops much earlier in CD28(-/-) mice and nearly 100% (both sexes) have severe TEC H/P at 4 mo of age. Without NaI supplementation, 50% of 5- to 6-mo-old CD28(-/-)IFN-γ(-/-) mice develop severe TEC H/P, and 2-3 wk of NaI is sufficient for optimal development of severe TEC H/P. Mice with severe TEC H/P are hypothyroid, and normalization of serum thyroxine levels does not reduce TEC H/P. Activated CD4(+) T cells are sufficient to transfer TEC H/P to SCID recipients. Thyroids of mice with TEC H/P have infiltrating T cells and expanded numbers of proliferating thyrocytes that highly express CD40. CD40 facilitates, but is not required for, development of severe TEC H/P, as CD40(-/-)IFN-γ(-/-)CD28(-/-) mice develop severe TEC H/P. Accelerated development of TEC H/P in IFN-γ(-/-)CD28(-/-) mice is a result of reduced regulatory T cell (Treg) numbers, as CD28(-/-) mice have significantly fewer Tregs, and transfer of CD28(+) Tregs inhibits TEC H/P. Essentially all female IFN-γ(-/-)CD28(-/-) NOD.H-2h4 mice have substantial lymphocytic infiltration of salivary glands and reduced salivary flow by 6 mo of age, thereby providing an excellent new model of autoimmune exocrinopathy of the salivary gland. This is one of very few models where autoimmune thyroid disease and hypothyroidism develop in most mice by 4 mo of age. This model will be useful for studying the effects of hypothyroidism on multiple organ systems. PMID:27521344

  7. Lipocalin-2 Protein Deficiency Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Youngpyo; Kim, Jong-Heon; Seo, Minchul; Kim, Jae-Hong; Jin, Myungwon; Jeon, Sangmin; Seo, Jung-wan; Lee, Won-Ha; Bing, So Jin; Jee, Youngheun; Lee, Won Kee; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Suk, Kyoungho

    2014-01-01

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) plays an important role in cellular processes as diverse as cell growth, migration/invasion, differentiation, and death/survival. Furthermore, recent studies indicate that LCN2 expression and secretion by glial cells are induced by inflammatory stimuli in the central nervous system. The present study was undertaken to examine the regulation of LCN2 expression in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and to determine the role of LCN2 in the disease process. LCN2 expression was found to be strongly increased in spinal cord and secondary lymphoid tissues after EAE induction. In spinal cords astrocytes and microglia were the major cell types expressing LCN2 and its receptor 24p3R, respectively, whereas in spleens, LCN2 and 24p3R were highly expressed in neutrophils and dendritic cells, respectively. Furthermore, disease severity, inflammatory infiltration, demyelination, glial activation, the expression of inflammatory mediators, and the proliferation of MOG-specific T cells were significantly attenuated in Lcn2-deficient mice as compared with wild-type animals. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific T cells in culture exhibited an increased expression of Il17a, Ifng, Rorc, and Tbet after treatment with recombinant LCN2 protein. Moreover, LCN2-treated glial cells expressed higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and MMP-9. Adoptive transfer and recombinant LCN2 protein injection experiments suggested that LCN2 expression in spinal cord and peripheral immune organs contributes to EAE development. Taken together, these results imply LCN2 is a critical mediator of autoimmune inflammation and disease development in EAE and suggest that LCN2 be regarded a potential therapeutic target in multiple sclerosis. PMID:24808182

  8. Treatment of passively transferred experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis using papain

    PubMed Central

    Poulas, K; Tsouloufis, T; Tzartos, S J

    2000-01-01

    Antibody-mediated acetylcholine receptor (AChR) loss at the neuromuscular junction, the main cause of the symptoms of myasthenia gravis, is induced by bivalent or multivalent antibodies. Passive transfer of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) can be induced very efficiently in rats by administration of intact MoAbs directed against the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the AChR, but not by their monovalent Fab fragments. We tested whether papain, which has been used therapeutically in autoimmune and other diseases, is capable of preventing EAMG by in vivo cleavage of the circulating anti-AChR antibodies into Fab fragments. EAMG was induced in 4-week-old female Lewis rats by i.p. injection of anti-MIR mAb35. A total of 0·75 mg of papain was given as one or three injections 3–7 h after MoAb injection. The mAb35 + papain-treated animals developed mild weakness during the first 30 h and subsequently recovered, while all animals that received only mAb35 developed severe myasthenic symptoms and died within 24–30 h. Animals treated only with papain showed no apparent side effects for up to 2 months. Serum anti-AChR levels in mAb35 + papain-treated rats decreased within a few hours, whereas in non-papain-treated rats they remained high for at least 30 h. Muscle AChR in mAb35 + papain-treated animals was partially protected from antibody-mediated degradation. These results show that treatment of rats with papain can prevent passively transferred EAMG without any apparent harm to the animals, and suggest a potential therapeutic use for proteolytic enzymes in myasthenia gravis. PMID:10792389

  9. Development of an improved animal model of experimental autoimmune myositis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Ya; Feng, Guo-Dong; Feng, Dong-Yun; Jia, Hong-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Multiple animal models of experimental autoimmune myositis (EAM) have been developed. However, these models vary greatly in the severity of disease and reproducibility. The goal of this study was to test whether vaccination twice with increased dose of rat myosin and pertussis toxin (PT) could induce EAM with severer disease in mice. BALB/c mice were injected with 1 mg rat myosin in 50% complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) weekly for four times and one time of PT (EAM) or twice with 1.5 mg myosin in CFA and PT (M-EAM). In comparison with that in the CFA and PT injected controls, vaccination with rat myosin and injection PT significantly reduced the muscle strength and EMG duration, elevated serum creatine kinase levels, promoted inflammatory infiltration in the muscle tissues, leading to pathological changes in the muscle tissues, demonstrating to induce EAM. Interestingly, we found that vaccination twice with the high dose of myosin and PT prevented EAM-related gain in body weights and caused significantly less muscle strength in mice. More importantly, all of the mice receiving high dose of myosin and PT survived while 3 out of 16 mice with four times of low dose of myosin died. Finally, vaccination with high dose of myosin promoted CD4+ and CD8+ T cell infiltration in the muscle tissues and up-regulated MHC-I expression in the muscle tissues of mice. Hence, the new model of EAM is a time-saving, efficient and easily replicable tool for studying autoimmune myositis. PMID:26823763

  10. Activation of the adenosine A2A receptor attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and is associated with increased intracellular calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yumei; Zou, Haifeng; Zhao, Ping; Sun, Bo; Wang, Jinghua; Kong, Qingfei; Mu, Lili; Zhao, Sihan; Wang, Guangyou; Wang, Dandan; Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Jiaying; Yin, Pengqi; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Xiuli; Li, Hulun

    2016-08-25

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common autoimmune disease that inevitably causes inflammatory nerve demyelination. However, an effective approach to prevent its course is still lacking and urgently needed. Recently, the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has emerged as a novel inflammation regulator. Manipulation of A2AR activity may suppress the MS process and protect against nerve damage. To test this hypothesis, we treated murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for MS, with the selective A2AR agonist, CGS21680 (CGS). We evaluated the effects of CGS on the pathological features of EAE progression, including CNS cellular infiltration, inflammatory cytokine expression, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell surface markers. Treatment with CGS significantly suppressed specific lymphocyte proliferation, reduced infiltration of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, and attenuated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, which in turn inhibited the EAE progression. For the first time, we demonstrate that CGS can increase the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in murine lymphocytes, which may be the mechanism underlying the suppressive effects of CGS-induced A2AR activation on EAE progression. Our findings strongly suggest that A2AR is a potential therapeutic target for MS and provide insight into the mechanism of action of A2AR agonists, which may offer a therapeutic option for this disease. PMID:27217214

  11. High salt drives Th17 responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis without impacting myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Jörg, Stefanie; Kissel, Jan; Manzel, Arndt; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Haghikia, Aiden; Gold, Ralf; Müller, Dominik N; Linker, Ralf A

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that high dietary salt intake aggravates T helper cell (Th) 17 responses and neuroinflammation. Here, we employed in vitro assays for myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) maturation, DC cytokine production, T cell activation and ex vivo analyses in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) to investigate whether the salt effect on Th17 cells is further mediated through DCs in vivo. In cell culture, an excess of 40mM sodium chloride did neither affect the generation, maturation nor the function of DCs, but, in different assays, significantly increased Th17 differentiation. During the initiation phase of MOG35-55 EAE, we did not observe altered DC frequencies or co-stimulatory capacities in lymphoid organs, while IL-17A production and Th17 cells in the spleen were significantly increased. Complementary ex vivo analyses of the spinal cord during the effector phase of EAE showed increased frequencies of Th17 cells, but did not reveal differences in phenotypes of CNS invading DCs. Finally, adaption of transgenic mice harboring a MOG specific T cell receptor to a high-salt diet led to aggravated clinical disease only after active immunization. Wild-type mice adapted to a high-salt diet in the effector phase of EAE, bypassing the priming phase of T cells, only displayed mildly aggravated disease. In summary, our data argue for a direct effect of NaCl on Th17 cells in neuroinflammation rather than an effect primarily exerted via DCs. These data may further fuel our understanding on the dietary impact on different immune cell subsets in autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26976739

  12. PGE2/EP4 signaling in peripheral immune cells promotes development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Susanne; Weigert, Andreas; Männich, Julia; Eberle, Max; Birod, Kerstin; Häussler, Annett; Ferreiros, Nerea; Schreiber, Yannick; Kunkel, Hana; Grez, Manuel; Weichand, Benjamin; Brüne, Bernhard; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Nüsing, Rolf; Niederberger, Ellen; Grösch, Sabine; Scholich, Klaus; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2014-02-15

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a T cell-mediated inflammatory autoimmune disease model of multiple sclerosis (MS). The inflammatory process is initiated by activation and proliferation of T cells and monocytes and by their subsequent migration into the central nervous system (CNS), where they induce demyelination and neurodegeneration. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) - synthesized by cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) - has both pro- and anti-inflammatory potential, which is translated via four different EP receptors. We hypothesized that PGE2 synthesized in the preclinical phase by peripheral immune cells exerts pro-inflammatory properties in the EAE model. To investigate this, we used a bone marrow transplantation model, which enables PGE2 synthesis or EP receptor expression to be blocked specifically in peripheral murine immune cells. Our results reveal that deletion of COX-2 or its EP4 receptor in bone marrow-derived cells leads to a significant delay in the onset of EAE. This effect is due to an impaired preclinical inflammatory process indicated by a reduced level of the T cell activating interleukin-6 (IL-6), reduced numbers of T cells and of the T cell secreted interleukin-17 (IL-17) in the blood of mice lacking COX-2 or EP4 in peripheral immune cells. Moreover, mice lacking COX-2 or EP4 in bone marrow-derived cells show a reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), which results in decreased infiltration of monocytes and T cells into the CNS. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that PGE2 synthesized by monocytes in the early preclinical phase promotes the development of EAE in an EP4 receptor dependent manner. PMID:24355567

  13. Analysis of Neurogenesis during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Reveals Pitfalls of Bioluminescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Metzdorf, Judith; Stahlke, Sarah; Pedreitturia, Xiomara; Hunfeld, Anika; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Kleiter, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is a sensitive approach for longitudinal neuroimaging. Transgenic mice expressing luciferase under the promoter of doublecortin (DCX-luc), a specific marker of neuronal progenitor cells (NPC), allow monitoring of neurogenesis in living mice. Since the extent and time course of neurogenesis during autoimmune brain inflammation are controversial, we investigated neurogenesis in MOG-peptide induced experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) using DCX-luc reporter mice. We observed a marked, 2- to 4-fold increase of the bioluminescence signal intensity 10 days after EAE induction and a gradual decline 1–2 weeks thereafter. In contrast, immunostaining for DCX revealed no differences between EAE and control mice 2 and 4 weeks after immunization in zones of adult murine neurogenesis such as the dentate gyrus. Ex vivo bioluminescence imaging showed similar luciferase expression in brain homogenates of EAE and control animals. Apart from complete immunization including MOG-peptide also incomplete immunization with complete Freund´s adjuvant and pertussis toxin resulted in a rapid increase of the in vivo bioluminescence signal. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage was demonstrated 10 days after both complete and incomplete immunization and might explain the increased bioluminescence signal in vivo. We conclude, that acute autoimmune inflammation in EAE does not alter neurogenesis, at least at the stage of DCX-expressing NPC. Effects of immunization on the BBB integrity must be considered when luciferase is used as a reporter within the CNS during the active stage of EAE. Models with stable CNS-restricted luciferase expression could serve as technically convenient way to evaluate BBB integrity in a longitudinal manner. PMID:25780928

  14. Curcumin ameliorates autoimmune diabetes. Evidence in accelerated murine models of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Castro, C N; Barcala Tabarrozzi, A E; Winnewisser, J; Gimeno, M L; Antunica Noguerol, M; Liberman, A C; Paz, D A; Dewey, R A; Perone, M J

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that selectively destroys pancreatic β cells. The only possible cure for T1DM is to control autoimmunity against β cell-specific antigens. We explored whether the natural compound curcumin, with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might down-regulate the T cell response that destroys pancreatic β cells to improve disease outcome in autoimmune diabetes. We employed two accelerated autoimmune diabetes models: (i) cyclophosphamide (CYP) administration to non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and (ii) adoptive transfer of diabetogenic splenocytes into NODscid mice. Curcumin treatment led to significant delay of disease onset, and in some instances prevented autoimmune diabetes by inhibiting pancreatic leucocyte infiltration and preserving insulin-expressing cells. To investigate the mechanisms of protection we studied the effect of curcumin on key immune cell populations involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Curcumin modulates the T lymphocyte response impairing proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ production through modulation of T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet), a key transcription factor for proinflammatory T helper type 1 (Th1) lymphocyte differentiation, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Also, curcumin reduces nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in T cell receptor (TCR)-stimulated NOD lymphocytes. In addition, curcumin impairs the T cell stimulatory function of dendritic cells with reduced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) and low surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules, leading to an overall diminished antigen-presenting cell activity. These in-vitro effects correlated with ex-vivo analysis of cells obtained from curcumin-treated mice during the course of autoimmune diabetes. These findings reveal an effective therapeutic effect of curcumin in autoimmune diabetes by its actions on key immune cells responsible for β cell death. PMID

  15. Inhibition of the immunoproteasome ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Basler, Michael; Mundt, Sarah; Muchamuel, Tony; Moll, Carlo; Jiang, Jing; Groettrup, Marcus; Kirk, Christopher J

    2014-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating immune mediated disease of the central nervous system. The immunoproteasome is a distinct class of proteasomes found predominantly in monocytes and lymphocytes. Recently, we demonstrated a novel function of immunoproteasomes in cytokine production and T cell differentiation. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of an inhibitor of the immunoproteasome (ONX 0914) in two different mouse models of MS. ONX 0914 attenuated disease progression after active and passive induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), both in MOG₃₅-₅₅ and PLP₁₃₉₋₁₅₁-induced EAE. Isolation of lymphocytes from the brain or spinal cord revealed a strong reduction of cytokine-producing CD4(+) cells in ONX 0914 treated mice. Additionally, ONX 0914 treatment prevented disease exacerbation in a relapsing-remitting model. An analysis of draining lymph nodes after induction of EAE revealed that the differentiation to Th17 or Th1 cells was strongly impaired in ONX 0914 treated mice. These results implicate the immunoproteasome in the development of EAE and suggest that immunoproteasome inhibitors are promising drugs for the treatment of MS. PMID:24399752

  16. Inhibition of the immunoproteasome ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Michael; Mundt, Sarah; Muchamuel, Tony; Moll, Carlo; Jiang, Jing; Groettrup, Marcus; Kirk, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating immune mediated disease of the central nervous system. The immunoproteasome is a distinct class of proteasomes found predominantly in monocytes and lymphocytes. Recently, we demonstrated a novel function of immunoproteasomes in cytokine production and T cell differentiation. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of an inhibitor of the immunoproteasome (ONX 0914) in two different mouse models of MS. ONX 0914 attenuated disease progression after active and passive induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), both in MOG35–55 and PLP139–151-induced EAE. Isolation of lymphocytes from the brain or spinal cord revealed a strong reduction of cytokine-producing CD4+ cells in ONX 0914 treated mice. Additionally, ONX 0914 treatment prevented disease exacerbation in a relapsing-remitting model. An analysis of draining lymph nodes after induction of EAE revealed that the differentiation to Th17 or Th1 cells was strongly impaired in ONX 0914 treated mice. These results implicate the immunoproteasome in the development of EAE and suggest that immunoproteasome inhibitors are promising drugs for the treatment of MS. PMID:24399752

  17. Regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by natural killer (NK) cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Yamamura, T; Kondo, T; Fujiwara, M; Tabira, T

    1997-11-17

    In this report, we establish a regulatory role of natural killer (NK) cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a prototype T helper cell type 1 (Th1)-mediated disease. Active sensitization of C57BL/6 (B6) mice with the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide induces a mild form of monophasic EAE. When mice were deprived of NK cells by antibody treatment before immunization, they developed a more serious form of EAE associated with relapse. Aggravation of EAE by NK cell deletion was also seen in beta 2-microglobulin-/- (beta 2m-/-) mice, indicating that NK cells can play a regulatory role in a manner independent of CD8+ T cells or NK1.1+ T cells (NK-T cells). The disease enhancement was associated with augmentation of T cell proliferation and production of Th1 cytokines in response to MOG35-55. EAE passively induced by the MOG35-55-specific T cell line was also enhanced by NK cell deletion in B6, beta 2m-/-, and recombination activation gene 2 (RAG-2)-/- mice, indicating that the regulation by NK cells can be independent of T, B, or NK-T cells. We further showed that NK cells inhibit T cell proliferation triggered by antigen or cytokine stimulation. Taken together, we conclude that NK cells are an important regulator for EAE in both induction and effector phases. PMID:9362528

  18. Regulation of Adenosine Deaminase on Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dongchun; Zuo, Aijun; Zhao, Ronglan; Shao, Hui; Kaplan, Henry J; Sun, Deming

    2016-03-15

    Adenosine is an important regulator of the immune response, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibits this regulatory effect by converting adenosine into functionally inactive molecules. Studies showed that adenosine receptor agonists can be anti- or proinflammatory. Clarification of the mechanisms that cause these opposing effects should provide a better guide for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we investigated the effect of ADA on the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced by immunizing EAU-prone mice with a known uveitogenic peptide, IRBP1-20. Our results showed that the effective time to administer a single dose of ADA to suppress induction of EAU was 8-14 d postimmunization, shortly before EAU expression; however, ADA treatment at other time points exacerbated disease. ADA preferentially inhibited Th17 responses, and this effect was γδ T cell dependent. Our results demonstrated that the existing immune status strongly influences the anti- or proinflammatory effects of ADA. Our observations should help to improve the design of ADA- and adenosine receptor-targeted therapies. PMID:26856700

  19. R-flurbiprofen attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Katja; de Bruin, Natasja; Bishay, Philipp; Männich, Julia; Häussler, Annett; Altmann, Christine; Ferreirós, Nerea; Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred; Parnham, Michael J; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2014-01-01

    R-flurbiprofen is the non-cyclooxygenase inhibiting R-enantiomer of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen, which was assessed as a remedy for Alzheimer's disease. Because of its anti-inflammatory, endocannabinoid-modulating and antioxidative properties, combined with low toxicity, the present study assessed R-flurbiprofen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models of multiple sclerosis in mice. Oral R-flurbiprofen prevented and attenuated primary progressive EAE in C57BL6/J mice and relapsing-remitting EAE in SJL mice, even if the treatment was initiated on or after the first flare of the disease. R-flurbiprofen reduced immune cell infiltration and microglia activation and inflammation in the spinal cord, brain and optic nerve and attenuated myelin destruction and EAE-evoked hyperalgesia. R-flurbiprofen treatment increased CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, CTLA4+ inhibitory T cells and interleukin-10, whereas the EAE-evoked upregulation of pro-inflammatory genes in the spinal cord was strongly reduced. The effects were associated with an increase of plasma and cortical endocannabinoids but decreased spinal prostaglandins, the latter likely due to R to S inversion. The promising results suggest potential efficacy of R-flurbiprofen in human MS, and its low toxicity may justify a clinical trial. PMID:25269445

  20. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Activation and IFN-α Production Are Prominent Features of Murine Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Human IgG4-Related Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Kouhei; Kuriyama, Katsutoshi; Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Uchida, Kazushige; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Strober, Warren; Chiba, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    The abnormal immune response accompanying IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is presently unclear. In this study, we examined the role of plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) activation and IFN-α production in this disease as well as in a murine model of AIP (MRL/Mp mice treated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid). We found that the development of AIP in treated MRL/Mp mice occurred in parallel with pancreatic accumulation of pDCs producing IFN-α, and with pDC depletion and IFN-α-blocking studies, we showed that such accumulation was necessary for AIP induction. In addition, we found that the pancreas of treated MRL/Mp mice contained neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) shown previously to stimulate pDCs to produce IFN-α. Consistent with these findings, we found that patients with IgG4-related AIP also exhibited pancreatic tissue localization of IFN-α-expressing pDCs and had significantly higher serum IFN-α levels than healthy controls. In addition, the inflamed pancreas of these patients but not controls also contained NETs that were shown to be capable of pDC activation. More importantly, patient pDCs cultured in the presence of NETs produced greatly increased levels of IFN-α and induced control B cells to produce IgG4 (but not IgG1) as compared with control pDCs. These data suggest that pDC activation and production of IFN-α is a major cause of murine AIP; in addition, the increased pDC production of IFN-α and its relation to IgG4 production observed in IgG4-related AIP suggest that this mechanism also plays a role in the human disease. PMID:26297761

  1. Insulin promotes T cell recovery in a murine model of autoimmune myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Zhuang, R; Geng, C; Cai, X; Lei, W; Tian, N; Gao, F

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) is a useful adjunct to myocarditis. Besides its essential action in energy metabolism, insulin also exerts an anti-inflammatory effect. This study investigated the effect of insulin on myocardial inflammation in experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in mice and its potential role in T cell regulation. Mice were divided randomly into a normal control group, a saline-treated EAM group and an insulin-treated EAM group. The histopathological changes of myocardium, α-myosin heavy chain (MyHCα)(614-629) antigen-specific autoantibody titre, the serum level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members' activity and content were measured. Furthermore, the phenotype of T lymphocyte subsets in splenocytes was analysed to evaluate the immune status of mice. Insulin reduced serum cTnI of EAM mice on days 14 and 21 (P < 0·05) after immunization, with no changes in blood glucose and autoantibody production. Western blot revealed that extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) may be a determining factor in this process. Total ERK1/2 and phospho-ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) were both up-regulated in insulin-treated mice after immunization. We also found that insulin treatment promoted T cell recovery without changing the naive-to-memory T-cell ratio; in particular, CD3(+) T cells in insulin-treated mice proliferated more vigorously than in control mice (P < 0·05). We report here for the first time that insulin alleviates myocarditis in the EAM model. These data show that insulin has a direct effect on T cell proliferation in EAM. It is possible that GIK or insulin may assist T cell recovery towards normal in myocarditis, especially for diabetic or hyperglycaemic patients. PMID:23199322

  2. Relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. An autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lublin, F D

    1985-01-01

    R-EAE is a valuable model for human MS. Table 2 outlines the similarities between R-EAE and MS. The clinical course and pathologic changes seen in this model accurately reflect the pattern of MS. The immunologic changes seen in animals with R-EAE also are similar to those seen in MS. Therefore, the clinicopathologic features of MS can be duplicated with a purely autoimmune model. Although this is of considerable pathogenic significance in understanding MS, we do not know what the inciting event is in MS that would be the equivalent of immunizing an animal with neural antigen. Despite this, R-EAE has and should continue to provide experimental data of considerable importance to an understanding of the mechanisms involved in the evolution of inflammatory demyelination. Other important models of MS utilize viral-induced demyelination. Although the clinical picture of most of the chronic demyelinating viral infections does not show as clear a relapsing or remitting pattern as seen in R-EAE, viral etiologies better fit the epidemiology of MS [16]. Several studies have demonstrated development of an acute EAE-like disease with sensitization to neural antigens following viral infection [12, 30, 56]. Thus, one can hypothesize an initial viral illness causing sensitization of the host to a neural antigen (?MBP) with a subsequent immunopathogenic course similar to that seen in R-EAE. Whether this will in fact be the case remains unproven as yet. Our understanding of the immunopathogenic mechanisms underlying inflammatory demyelination has been enlarged through studies of R-EAE. It is now clear that the minimal myelin antigen necessary for production of the disease is MBP, although this may differ in some species. The relapsing nature of this disorder is mediated in part through lymphocytes, as demonstrated in transfer studies, and thus does not require persistent antigenic depots. There is a genetic susceptibility to development of the CNS autoimmune state, and we speculate

  3. Dihydrotestosterone as a Protective Agent in Chronic Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Giatti, Silvia; Rigolio, Roberta; Romano, Simone; Mitro, Nico; Viviani, Barbara; Cavaletti, Guido; Caruso, Donatella; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the central nervous system. As reported by clinical observations, variation in hormonal levels might alter disease susceptibility and progression. Specifically, decreased levels of testosterone in males are reported to be permissive for disease onset. Accordingly, testosterone seems to exert protective effects in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In this context, it is important to highlight that testosterone is further metabolized into 17β-estradiol or dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In this study, we aimed to explore the protective effects of DHT treatment in EAE Dark Agouti rats (i.e. an experimental model showing a protracted relapsing EAE). Data obtained 45 days after EAE induction showed that DHT exerts a beneficial effect on clinical scores, coupled with decreased gliosis (i.e. glial fibrillary acidic protein and major histocompatibility complex of class II staining) and inflammation (i.e. translocator protein 18 kDa, interleukin-1β, Toll-like receptor 4 and nuclear factor-κB expression) in the spinal cord. Moreover, parameters linked to oxidative stress and tissue damage, like thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels and Bcl-2-associated X protein expression, and to mitochondrial activity (i.e. content of mitochondrial DNA and proteins), were improved after DHT administration. This neuroactive steroid may be further metabolized into 3α- or 3β-diol. However, assessment of the levels of these metabolites after DHT treatment seems to suggest that the protective effects observed here are due to DHT itself. Altogether, the present results indicate that DHT was effective in reducing the severity of chronic EAE and, consequently, may represent an interesting perspective for multiple sclerosis treatment. PMID:25765436

  4. CCR5 knockout suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Sun Mi; Park, Mi Hee; Yun, Hyung Mun; Han, Sang Bae; Oh, Ki Wan; Son, Dong Ju; Yun, Jae Suk; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-29

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease in which myelin in the spinal cord is damaged. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is implicated in immune cell migration and cytokine release in central nervous system (CNS). We investigated whether CCR5 plays a role in MS progression using a murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), in CCR5 deficient (CCR5-/-) mice. CCR5-/- and CCR5+/+ (wild-type) mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 (MOG35-55) followed by pertussis toxin, after which EAE paralysis was scored for 28 days. We found that clinical scoring and EAE neuropathology were lower in CCR5-/- mice than CCR5+/+ mice. Immune cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, B cell, NK cell and macrophages) infiltration and astrocytes/microglial activation were attenuated in CCR5-/- mice. Moreover, levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ and MCP-1 cytokine levels were decreased in CCR5-/- mice spinal cord. Myelin basic protein (MBP) and CNPase were increased while NG2 and O4 were decreased in CCR5-/- mice, indicating that demyelination was suppressed by CCR5 gene deletion. These findings suggest that CCR5 is likely participating in demyelination in the spinal cord the MS development, and that it could serve as an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of MS. PMID:26985768

  5. CCR5 knockout suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung Mun; Han, Sang Bae; Oh, Ki Wan; Son, Dong Ju; Yun, Jae Suk; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease in which myelin in the spinal cord is damaged. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is implicated in immune cell migration and cytokine release in central nervous system (CNS). We investigated whether CCR5 plays a role in MS progression using a murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), in CCR5 deficient (CCR5−/−) mice. CCR5−/− and CCR5+/+ (wild-type) mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 (MOG35-55) followed by pertussis toxin, after which EAE paralysis was scored for 28 days. We found that clinical scoring and EAE neuropathology were lower in CCR5−/− mice than CCR5+/+ mice. Immune cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, B cell, NK cell and macrophages) infiltration and astrocytes/microglial activation were attenuated in CCR5−/− mice. Moreover, levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ and MCP-1 cytokine levels were decreased in CCR5−/− mice spinal cord. Myelin basic protein (MBP) and CNPase were increased while NG2 and O4 were decreased in CCR5−/− mice, indicating that demyelination was suppressed by CCR5 gene deletion. These findings suggest that CCR5 is likely participating in demyelination in the spinal cord the MS development, and that it could serve as an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of MS. PMID:26985768

  6. A Cannabigerol Derivative Suppresses Immune Responses and Protects Mice from Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Salinas, Francisco J.; Navarrete, Carmen; Mecha, Miriam; Feliú, Ana; Collado, Juan A.; Cantarero, Irene; Bellido, María L.; Muñoz, Eduardo; Guaza, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Phytocannabinoids that do not produce psychotropic effects are considered of special interest as novel therapeutic agents in CNS diseases. A cannabigerol quinone, the compound VCE-003, has been shown to alleviate symptoms in a viral model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Hence, we studied T cells and macrophages as targets for VCE-003 and its efficacy in an autoimmune model of MS. Proliferation, cell cycle, expression of activation markers was assessed by FACs in human primary T cells, and cytokine and chemokine production was evaluated. Transcription was studied in Jurkat cells and RAW264.7 cells were used to study the effects of VCE-003 on IL-17-induced macrophage polarization to a M1 phenotype. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35–55) immunization and spinal cord pathology was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Neurological impairment was evaluated using disease scores. We show here that VCE-003 inhibits CD3/CD28-induced proliferation, cell cycle progression and the expression of the IL-2Rα and ICAM-1 activation markers in human primary T cells. VCE-003 inhibits the secretion of Th1/Th17 cytokines and chemokines in primary murine T cells, and it reduces the transcriptional activity of the IL-2, IL-17 and TNFα promoters induced by CD3/CD28. In addition, VCE-003 and JWH-133, a selective CB2 agonist, dampened the IL-17-induced polarization of macrophages to a pro-inflammatory M1 profile. VCE-003 also prevented LPS-induced iNOS expression in microglia. VCE-003 ameliorates the neurological defects and the severity of MOG-induced EAE in mice through CB2 and PPARγ receptor activation. A reduction in cell infiltrates, mainly CD4+ T cells, was observed, and Th1 and Th17 responses were inhibited in the spinal cord of VCE-003-treated mice, accompanied by weaker microglial activation, structural preservation of myelin sheets and reduced axonal damage. This study highlights the therapeutic potential of VCE

  7. Role of orexin-A in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Iman; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Ayoobi, Fatemeh; Taghipour, Zahra; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Motevalian, Manijeh

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of orexin-A (OX-A) on behavioral and pathological parameters and on gene expression of some multiple sclerosis-related peptides in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE was induced by subcutaneous administration of MOG 35-55. Following immunization, the treatment was initiated by using SB.334867 (orexin-1 receptor antagonist) and/or OX-A. Locomotor activity and exploratory behaviors were monitored using open field and T-maze continuous alternation task (T-CAT) respectively. Pain sensitivity was assessed by hot-plate test. Histopathological assessments were performed by H&E staining. The expression of TGF-β, MBP, MMP-9, IL-12, iNOS and MCP-1 were measured using real-time PCR method in lumbar spinal cord. OX-A administration in EAE mice remarkably attenuated the clinical symptoms, increased latency response in hot plate test, inhibited infiltration of inflammatory cells, up-regulated mRNA expression of TGF-β as well as MBP and down-regulated mRNA expression of iNOS, MMP-9 and IL-12. In contrast SB.334867 administration in EAE mice deteriorated the clinical symptoms, decreased the alternation in T-CAT, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, down-regulated mRNA expression of TGF-β and MBP and up-regulated mRNA expression of iNOS. Results of this study suggest that the orexinergic system might be involved in pathological development of EAE. These findings suggest orexinergic system as a potential target for treatment of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26857503

  8. Neuroendothelial NMDA receptors as therapeutic targets in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Macrez, Richard; Ortega, Maria C; Bardou, Isabelle; Mehra, Anupriya; Fournier, Antoine; Van der Pol, Susanne M A; Haelewyn, Benoit; Maubert, Eric; Lesept, Flavie; Chevilley, Arnaud; de Castro, Fernando; De Vries, Helga E; Vivien, Denis; Clemente, Diego; Docagne, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is among the most common causes of neurological disability in young adults. Here we provide the preclinical proof of concept of the benefit of a novel strategy of treatment for multiple sclerosis targeting neuroendothelial N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors. We designed a monoclonal antibody against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, which targets a regulatory site of the GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor sensitive to the protease tissue plasminogen activator. This antibody reverted the effect of tissue plasminogen activator on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function without affecting basal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity (n = 21, P < 0.01). This antibody bound N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors on the luminal surface of neurovascular endothelium in human tissues and in mouse, at the vicinity of tight junctions of the blood-spinal cord barrier. Noteworthy, it reduced human leucocyte transmigration in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (n = 12, P < 0.05). When injected during the effector phase of MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (n = 24), it blocked the progression of neurological impairments, reducing cumulative clinical score (P < 0.001) and mean peak score (P < 0.001). This effect was observed in wild-type animals but not in tissue plasminogen activator knock-out animals (n = 10). This therapeutic effect was associated to a preservation of the blood-spinal cord barrier (n = 6, P < 0.001), leading to reduced leucocyte infiltration (n = 6, P < 0.001). Overall, this study unveils a critical function of endothelial N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in multiple sclerosis, and highlights the therapeutic potential of strategies targeting the protease-regulated site of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. PMID:27435092

  9. Estrogen treatment prevents gray matter atrophy in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie-Graham, Allan J; Rinek, Gilda A; Avedisian, Andrea; Morales, Laurie B; Umeda, Elizabeth; Boulat, Benoit; Jacobs, Russell E; Toga, Arthur W; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2012-07-01

    Gray matter atrophy is an important correlate to clinical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS), and many treatment trials include atrophy as an outcome measure. Atrophy has been shown to occur in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the most commonly used animal model of MS. The clinical severity of EAE is reduced in estrogen-reated mice, but it remains unknown whether estrogen treatment can reduce gray matter atrophy in EAE. In this study, mice with EAE were treated with either estrogen receptor (ER)-α ligand or ER-β ligand, and diffusion tensor images (DTI) were collected and neuropathology was performed. DTI showed atrophy in the cerebellar gray matter of vehicle-treated EAE mice compared with healthy controls but not in ER-α or ER-β ligand-treated EAE mice. Neuropathology demonstrated that Purkinje cell numbers were decreased in vehicle-treated EAE mice, whereas neither ER ligand-treated EAE groups showed a decrease. This is the first report of a neuroprotective therapy in EAE that unambiguously prevents gray matter atrophy while sparing a major neuronal cell type. Fractional anisotropy (FA) in the cerebellar white matter was decreased in vehicle- and ER-β ligand-treated but not in ER-α ligand-treated EAE mice. Inflammatory cell infiltration was increased in vehicle- and ER-β ligand-treated but not in ER-α ligand-treated EAE mice. Myelin staining was decreased in vehicle-treated EAE mice and was spared in both ER ligand-treated groups. This is consistent with decreased FA as a potential biomarker for inflammation rather than myelination or axonal damage in the cerebellum in EAE. PMID:22411609

  10. HCELL Expression on Murine MSC Licenses Pancreatotropism and Confers Durable Reversal of Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Reza; Moore, Robert; Sakai, Shinobu; Donnelly, Conor B.; Mounayar, Marwan; Sackstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an immune-mediated disease resulting in destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory properties, garnering increasing attention as cellular therapy for T1D and other immunologic diseases. However, MSCs generally lack homing molecules, hindering their colonization at inflammatory sites following intravenous (IV) administration. Here we analyzed whether enforced E-selectin ligand expression on murine MSCs could impact their effect in reversing hyperglycemia in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Though murine MSCs natively do not express the E-selectin binding determinant sialyl Lewisx (sLex), we found that fucosyltransferase-mediated α(1,3)-exofucosylation of murine MSCs resulted in sLex display uniquely on cell surface CD44 thereby creating HCELL, the E-selectin-binding glycoform of CD44. Following IV infusion into diabetic NOD mice, allogeneic HCELL+ MSCs showed 3-fold greater peri-islet infiltrates compared to buffer-treated (i.e., HCELL−) MSCs, with distribution in proximity to E-selectin-expressing microvessels. Exofucosylation had no effect on MSC immunosuppressive capacity in in vitro assays, however, though engraftment was temporary for both HCELL+ and HCELL− MSCs, administration of HCELL+ MSCs resulted in durable reversal of hyperglycemia, whereas only transient reversal was observed following administration of HCELL− MSCs. Notably, exofucosylation of MSCs generated from CD44−/− mice induced prominent membrane expression of sLex, but IV administration of these MSCs into hyperglycemic NOD mice showed no enhanced pancreatotropism or reversal of hyperglycemia. These findings provide evidence that glycan engineering to enforce HCELL expression boosts trafficking of infused MSCs to pancreatic islets of NOD mice and substantially improves their efficacy in reversing autoimmune diabetes. PMID:25641589

  11. Current Views on the Roles of Th1 and Th17 Cells in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    El-behi, Mohamed; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), are autoimmune demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). Interferon-γ-producing Th1 and interleukin-17-producing Th17 CD4+ T helper (Th) cells mediate disease pathogenesis in EAE and likely in MS as well. However, the relative contribution of each Th subset to autoimmune processes in the CNS remains unclear. Emerging data suggest that both Th1 and Th17 cells contribute to CNS autoimmunity, albeit through different mechanisms. A better understanding of the roles that Th1 and Th17 cells play in autoimmune inflammation will be helpful in developing new therapeutic approaches. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the roles of Th1 and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of EAE. PMID:20107924

  12. Fibroblast Cell-Based Therapy for Experimental Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Reza B.; Zhang, Yun; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Kilani, Ruhangiz T.; Khosravi Maharlooei, Mohsen; Li, Yunyuan; Salimi Elizei, Sanam; Warnock, Garth L.; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of insulin producing β cells of the pancreatic islets. Curbing autoimmunity at the initiation of T1D can result in recovery of residual β cells and consequently remission of diabetes. Here we report a cell-based therapy for autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using dermal fibroblasts. This was achieved by a single injection of fibroblasts, expressing the immunoregulatory molecule indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), into peritoneal cavity of NOD mice shortly after the onset of overt hyperglycemia. Mice were then monitored for reversal of hyperglycemia and changes in inflammatory / regulatory T cell profiles. Blood glucose levels dropped into the normal range in 82% of NOD mice after receiving IDO-expressing fibroblasts while all control mice remained diabetic. We found significantly reduced islet inflammation, increased regulatory T cells, and decreased T helper 17 cells and β cell specific autoreactive CD8+ T cells following IDO cell therapy. We further showed that some of intraperitoneal injected fibroblasts migrated to local lymph nodes and expressed co-inhibitory molecules. These findings suggest that IDO fibroblasts therapy can reinstate self-tolerance and alleviate β cell autoreactivity in NOD mice, resulting in remission of autoimmune diabetes. PMID:26765526

  13. Fibroblast Cell-Based Therapy for Experimental Autoimmune Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Reza B; Zhang, Yun; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Khosravi Maharlooei, Mohsen; Li, Yunyuan; Salimi Elizei, Sanam; Warnock, Garth L; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of insulin producing β cells of the pancreatic islets. Curbing autoimmunity at the initiation of T1D can result in recovery of residual β cells and consequently remission of diabetes. Here we report a cell-based therapy for autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using dermal fibroblasts. This was achieved by a single injection of fibroblasts, expressing the immunoregulatory molecule indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), into peritoneal cavity of NOD mice shortly after the onset of overt hyperglycemia. Mice were then monitored for reversal of hyperglycemia and changes in inflammatory/regulatory T cell profiles. Blood glucose levels dropped into the normal range in 82% of NOD mice after receiving IDO-expressing fibroblasts while all control mice remained diabetic. We found significantly reduced islet inflammation, increased regulatory T cells, and decreased T helper 17 cells and β cell specific autoreactive CD8+ T cells following IDO cell therapy. We further showed that some of intraperitoneal injected fibroblasts migrated to local lymph nodes and expressed co-inhibitory molecules. These findings suggest that IDO fibroblasts therapy can reinstate self-tolerance and alleviate β cell autoreactivity in NOD mice, resulting in remission of autoimmune diabetes. PMID:26765526

  14. Treatment of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis with different natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Chen, Xiaoming; Liu, Juanjuan; Wang, Dongmei; Gan, Lu; Lv, Xin; Qiao, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Uveitis is an important eye disease that potentially causes loss of sight. Although extensive studies have been conducted on uveitis, the exact pathogenesis remains to be determined. The effects of treatment with natural compounds on an experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) rat model were examined in the present study. A total of 25 rats were divided into 5 groups: Alkaloids (n=5), saponins (n=5), flavonoids (n=5), phenols (n=5), and the normal saline group (n=5). The rats in each group were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of proper alkaloids (berberine hydrochloride), saponins (steroidal saponins), flavonoids (baicalein), or phenols (chlorogenic acid) or physiological saline, respectively. The rats' aqueous humour and crystalline lens was then observed under the slit lamp periodically, looking for signs of inflammation. After 2 weeks, the rats were sacrificed and the degree of pathological changes on their eyeballs under different treatment methods were determined using an optical microscope. The expression of the interleukin (IL)‑17 gene in the ocular tissues of the rats was assessed via RT‑PCR and western blot analysis. Apoptosis on the rats' retinal tissues was detected using flow cytometry. The results showed that rats injected with phenols (chlorogenic acid) had serious ocular vascular dilatation, iris hemorrhage and purulent exudation; those injected with alkaloids (berberine hydrochloride) and flavonoids (baicalein) had a more mild form of inflammation; and those administered saponins (steroidal saponins) had only mild inflammation signs. Following detection of IL‑17 mRNA and protein expression levels in the ocular tissues of rats of the five groups, it was found that their expression was lowest in the saponin‑treated group and the other differences in expression were all statistically significant (P<0.05). A comparison with other groups revealed that cell apoptosis in the eyes of rats in the saponin group was the most prominent

  15. Treatment of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis with different natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    LI, MAN; CHEN, XIAOMING; LIU, JUANJUAN; WANG, DONGMEI; GAN, LU; LV, XIN; QIAO, YU

    2016-01-01

    Uveitis is an important eye disease that potentially causes loss of sight. Although extensive studies have been conducted on uveitis, the exact pathogenesis remains to be determined. The effects of treatment with natural compounds on an experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) rat model were examined in the present study. A total of 25 rats were divided into 5 groups: Alkaloids (n=5), saponins (n=5), flavonoids (n=5), phenols (n=5), and the normal saline group (n=5). The rats in each group were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of proper alkaloids (berberine hydrochloride), saponins (steroidal saponins), flavonoids (baicalein), or phenols (chlorogenic acid) or physiological saline, respectively. The rats' aqueous humour and crystalline lens was then observed under the slit lamp periodically, looking for signs of inflammation. After 2 weeks, the rats were sacrificed and the degree of pathological changes on their eyeballs under different treatment methods were determined using an optical microscope. The expression of the interleukin (IL)-17 gene in the ocular tissues of the rats was assessed via RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Apoptosis on the rats' retinal tissues was detected using flow cytometry. The results showed that rats injected with phenols (chlorogenic acid) had serious ocular vascular dilatation, iris hemorrhage and purulent exudation; those injected with alkaloids (berberine hydrochloride) and flavonoids (baicalein) had a more mild form of inflammation; and those administered saponins (steroidal saponins) had only mild inflammation signs. Following detection of IL-17 mRNA and protein expression levels in the ocular tissues of rats of the five groups, it was found that their expression was lowest in the saponin-treated group and the other differences in expression were all statistically significant (P<0.05). A comparison with other groups revealed that cell apoptosis in the eyes of rats in the saponin group was the most prominent, reflecting

  16. Polymerase I pathway inhibitor ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Achiron, Anat; Mashiach, Roi; Zilkha-Falb, Rina; Meijler, Michael M; Gurevich, Michael

    2013-10-15

    Applying high throughput gene expression microarrays we identified that the suppression of polymerase 1 (POL1) pathway is associated with benign course of multiple sclerosis (MS). This finding supports the rationale for direct targeting of the POL1 transcription machinery as an innovative strategy to suppress MS. To evaluate the effects of a specific polymerase I inhibitor (POL1-I) on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we immunized female C57BL/6J mice (8 weeks) with MOG35-55/CFA. A new POL1-I was administered at a daily dose of 12.5mg/kg body weight by oral gavage either from the day of immunization until disease onset (EAE score 1.0, immunization model), at disease onset (EAE score=1.0) for the following 14 days (treatment model), or by alternate daily dose of 25.0mg/kg body weight, by oral gavage from the day of immunization for the following 25 days (combined model). POL1-I remarkably suppressed EAE in the immunization model; while in the Vehicle group the onset of EAE occurred on day 10.0±0.4 with maximal clinical score of 3.2±0.2, in the POL1-I treated mice onset was significantly delayed and occurred on day 16.9±1.1 (p=0.001), and maximal disease score 2.0±0.1 was reduced (p=0.004). In the treatment model POL1-I treatment significantly reduced disease activity; maximal score was 2.0±0.5 while in the Vehicle group it reached a mean maximal score of 3.9±0.1, (p=0.0008). In the combined model, POL1-I treatment completely inhibited disease activity. The effect of POL1-I treatment was modulated through decreased expression of POL1 pathway key-related genes LRPPRC, pre-RNA, POLR1D and RRN3 together with activation of P53 dependent apoptosis of CD4+ splenocytes. Our findings demonstrate that POL1 pathway inhibition delayed and suppressed the development of EAE and ameliorated the disease in mice with persistent clinical signs. PMID:23998422

  17. Hyperactivation of nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) in T cells attenuates severity of murine autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Srimoyee; Koralov, Sergei B.; Stevanovic, Irena; Sundrud, Mark S.; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Rajewsky, Klaus; Rao, Anjana; Müller, Martin R.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) proteins are a group of Ca2+-regulated transcription factors residing in the cytoplasm of resting cells. Dephosphorylation by calcineurin results in nuclear translocation of NFAT and subsequent expression of target genes; rephosphorylation by kinases, including casein kinase 1 (CK1), restores NFAT to its latent state in the cytoplasm. We engineered a hyperactivable version of NFAT1 with increased affinity for calcineurin and decreased affinity for casein kinase 1. Mice expressing hyperactivable NFAT1 in their T-cell compartment exhibited a dramatically increased frequency of both IL-17– and IL-10–producing cells after differentiation under Th17 conditions—this was associated with direct binding of NFAT1 to distal regulatory regions of Il-17 and Il-10 gene loci in Th17 cells. Despite higher IL-17 production in culture, the mice were significantly less prone to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis than controls, correlating with increased production of the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10 and enhanced accumulation of regulatory T cells within the CNS. Thus, NFAT hyperactivation paradoxically leads to decreased susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, supporting previous observations linking defects in Ca2+/NFAT signaling to lymphoproliferation and autoimmune disease. PMID:20696888

  18. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Keller, Kresten Krarup; Zhang, Xianwei; Laustsen, Julie Kristine; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Hetland, Merete Lund; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Junker, Peter; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Hvid, Malene; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Deleuran, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18) in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1) plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort), 2) plasma from chronic RA patients, 3) serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4) supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab. Results Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab. Conclusions The plasma sCD18 levels were altered

  19. CD27 natural killer cell subsets play different roles during the pre-onset stage of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Yang, Yan; Li, Daling; Ming, Bingxia; Chen, Huoying; Sun, Yan; Xiao, Yifan; Lai, Lin; Zou, Huijuan; Xu, Yong; Xiong, Ping; Tan, Zheng; Gong, Feili; Zheng, Fang

    2016-08-01

    NK cells participate in the development of human multiple sclerosis (MS) and mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), but the roles of different NK cell subsets in disease onset remain poorly understood. In this study, murine NK cells were divided into CD27(high) and CD27(low/-) subsets. The CD27(high) subset was decreased and the CD27(low/-) subset was increased in lymphoid organs during the pre-onset stage of EAE. Compared with the counterpart in naïve mice, the CD27(high) subset showed lower expression of Ly49D, Ly49H and NKG2D, and less production of IFN-γ, whereas the CD27(low/-) subset showed similar expression of the above mentioned surface receptors but higher cytotoxic activity in EAE mice. Compared with the CD27(high) subset, the CD27(low/-) subset exhibited increased promotion of DC maturation and no significant inhibition of T cells proliferation and Th17 cells differentiation in vitro Additionally, adoptive transfer of the CD27(low/-) subset, but not the CD27(high) subset, exacerbated the severity of EAE. Collectively, our data suggest the CD27 NK cell subsets play different roles in controlling EAE onset, which provide a new understanding for the regulation of NK cell subsets in early autoimmune disease. PMID:27368310

  20. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide is an intrinsic regulator of Treg abundance and protects against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yossan-Var; Abad, Catalina; Lopez, Robert; Dong, Hongmei; Liu, Shen; Lee, Alice; Gomariz, Rosa P; Leceta, Javier; Waschek, James A

    2009-02-10

    Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a widely expressed neuropeptide originally discovered in the hypothalamus. It closely resembles vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide well known to inhibit macrophage activity, promote Th2-type responses, and enhance regulatory T cell (Treg) production. Recent studies have shown that administration of PACAP, like VIP, can attenuate dramatically the clinical and pathological features of murine models of autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and collagen-induced arthritis. However, specific roles (if any) of endogenous VIP and PACAP in the protection against autoimmune diseases have not been explored. Here, we subjected PACAP-deficient mice to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(35-55))-induced EAE. MOG immunization of PACAP-deficient mice triggered heightened clinical and pathological manifestations of EAE compared to wild-type mice. The increased sensitivity was accompanied by enhanced mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-6, IFN-gamma, IL-12p35, IL-23p19, and IL-17), chemokines (MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1alpha/CCL3, and RANTES/CCL5), and chemotactic factor receptors (CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5), but downregulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-beta) in the spinal cord. Moreover, the abundance of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in lymph nodes and levels of FoxP3 mRNA in the spinal cord were also diminished. The reduction in Tregs was associated with increased proliferation and decreased TGF-beta secretion in lymph node cultures stimulated with MOG. These results demonstrate that endogenous PACAP provides protection in EAE and identify PACAP as an intrinsic regulator of Treg abundance after inflammation. PMID:19190179

  1. IFNAR signaling directly modulates T lymphocyte activity, resulting in milder experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis development.

    PubMed

    Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Evangelidou, Maria; Markogiannaki, Melina; Tovey, Michael; Thyphronitis, George; Haralambous, Sylva

    2016-01-01

    Although interferon-β is used as first-line therapy for multiple sclerosis, the cell type-specific activity of type I interferons in multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, remains obscure. In this study, we have elucidated the in vivo immunomodulatory role of type I interferon signaling in T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by use of a novel transgenic mouse, carrying a cd2-ifnar1 transgene on a interferon-α/β receptor 1 null genetic background, thus allowing expression of the interferon-α/β receptor 1 and hence, a functional type I interferon receptor exclusively on T cells. These transgenic mice exhibited milder experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with reduced T cell infiltration, demyelination, and axonal damage in the central nervous system. It is noteworthy that interferon-β administration in transgenic mice generated a more pronounced, protective effect against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis compared with untreated littermates. In vivo studies demonstrated that before experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis onset, endogenous type I interferon receptor signaling in T cells led to impaired T-helper 17 responses, with a reduced fraction of CCR6(+) CD4(+) T cells in the periphery. At the acute phase, an increased proportion of interleukin-10- and interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells was detected in the periphery of the transgenic mice, accompanied by up-regulation of the interferon-γ-induced gene Irgm1 in peripheral T cells. Together, these results reveal a hitherto unknown T cell-associated protective role of type I interferon in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis that may provide valuable clues for designing novel therapeutic strategies for multiple sclerosis. PMID:26232452

  2. IL-12p40 Homodimer Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kang, Chang-Min; Moon, Young-Mee; Heo, Yu-Jung; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Park, Seong-Jeong; Yang, Se-Hwan; Kwok, Seung Ki; Ju, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    IL-23 is the key cytokine that induces the expansion of Th17 cells. It is composed of p19 and p40 subunits of IL-12. The p40 subunit binds competitively to the receptor of IL-23 and blocks its activity. Our aim was to assess the preventive and therapeutic effect of the IL-12p40 homodimer (p40)2 subunit in autoimmune arthritis animal models. In the current study, using IL-1R antagonist–knockout mice and a collagen-induced arthritis model, we investigated the suppressive effect of (p40)2 on inflammatory arthritis. We demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus-expressing mouse (p40)2 model prevented the development of arthritis when given before the onset of arthritis. It also decreased the arthritis index and joint erosions in the mouse model if transferred after arthritis was established. (p40)2 inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and Ag-specific T cell proliferation. It also induced CD4+CD25+Foxp3 regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas the generation of retinoic acid receptor–related organ receptor γt and Th17 cells was suppressed. The induction of Treg cells and the suppression of Th17 cells were mediated via activated STAT5 and suppressed STAT3. Our data suggest that (p40)2 suppressed inflammatory arthritis successfully. This could be a useful therapeutic approach in autoimmune arthritis to regulate the Th17/Treg balance and IL-23 signaling. PMID:26324771

  3. IL-12p40 Homodimer Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kang, Chang-Min; Moon, Young-Mee; Heo, Yu-Jung; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Park, Seong-Jeong; Yang, Se-Hwan; Kwok, Seung Ki; Ju, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young Chul; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2015-10-01

    IL-23 is the key cytokine that induces the expansion of Th17 cells. It is composed of p19 and p40 subunits of IL-12. The p40 subunit binds competitively to the receptor of IL-23 and blocks its activity. Our aim was to assess the preventive and therapeutic effect of the IL-12p40 homodimer (p40)2 subunit in autoimmune arthritis animal models. In the current study, using IL-1R antagonist-knockout mice and a collagen-induced arthritis model, we investigated the suppressive effect of (p40)2 on inflammatory arthritis. We demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus-expressing mouse (p40)2 model prevented the development of arthritis when given before the onset of arthritis. It also decreased the arthritis index and joint erosions in the mouse model if transferred after arthritis was established. (p40)2 inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and Ag-specific T cell proliferation. It also induced CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3 regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas the generation of retinoic acid receptor-related organ receptor γt and Th17 cells was suppressed. The induction of Treg cells and the suppression of Th17 cells were mediated via activated STAT5 and suppressed STAT3. Our data suggest that (p40)2 suppressed inflammatory arthritis successfully. This could be a useful therapeutic approach in autoimmune arthritis to regulate the Th17/Treg balance and IL-23 signaling. PMID:26324771

  4. Antibiotics in neonatal life increase murine susceptibility to experimental psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Zanvit, Peter; Konkel, Joanne E.; Jiao, Xue; Kasagi, Shimpei; Zhang, Dunfang; Wu, Ruiqing; Chia, Cheryl; Ajami, Nadim J.; Smith, Daniel P.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Abbatiello, Brittany; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Chen, Qianming; Belkaid, Yasmine; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Chen, WanJun

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease affecting ∼2% of the world's population, but the aetiology remains incompletely understood. Recently, microbiota have been shown to differentially regulate the development of autoimmune diseases, but their influence on psoriasis is incompletely understood. We show here that adult mice treated with antibiotics that target Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria develop ameliorated psoriasiform dermatitis induced by imiquimod, with decreased pro-inflammatory IL-17- and IL-22-producing T cells. Surprisingly, mice treated neonatally with these antibiotics develop exacerbated psoriasis induced by imiquimod or recombinant IL-23 injection when challenged as adults, with increased IL-22-producing γδ+ T cells. 16S rRNA gene compositional analysis reveals that neonatal antibiotic-treatment dysregulates gut and skin microbiota in adults, which is associated with increased susceptibility to experimental psoriasis. This link between neonatal antibiotic-mediated imbalance in microbiota and development of experimental psoriasis provides precedence for further investigation of its specific aetiology as it relates to human psoriasis. PMID:26416167

  5. Effect of cyclosporine in a murine model of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Banić, Marko; Anić, Branimir; Brkić, Tomislav; Ljubicić, Neven; Plesko, Sanja; Dohoczky, Csaba; Erceg, Damir; Petrovecki, Mladen; Stipancić, Igor; Rotkvić, Ivo

    2002-06-01

    The use of immunosuppressive therapy may be associated with significant toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclosporine A (CsA) in murine model of experimental colitis. Experimental colitis was induced in NMRI mice using an enema of 0.2% solution of dinitrofluorobenzene, combined with skin sensitization. After inducing colitis, experimental groups of animals were treated with CsA (1, 3, 5, 10, 25, 50 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intracolonically (i.c.), and control groups were treated with phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally or intracolonically, respectively. Colonic inflammatory changes were assessed using a histopathologic score of 0-30, and pooled whole blood samples were processed with monoclonal antibodies for cyclosporine concentration. In addition, two groups of animals with experimental colitis were treated intraperitoneally or intracolonically with 3 mg/kg/day of CsA, and the colons were also taken for immunohistochemistry for CD25. CsA diminished the extent of colitis in groups treated with 3, 5, 10, or 25 mg/kg intraperitoneally or intracolonically, and in groups treated with 1 and 50 mg/kg intracolonically (P < 0.05). The effect of intracolonic application of CsA was not related to whole blood cyclosporine concentrations. In addition, the effect of CsA at 3 mg/kg, applied intraperitoneally or intracolonically was, in part, expressed in decreasing the numbers of CD25+ cells within colonic mucosa/submucosa (P < 0.05). In conclusions, the results of this study indicate the possibility of intracolonic application of cyclosporine in order to widen the therapeutic window for effective, but possibly toxic drug, such as cyclosporine. PMID:12064814

  6. Effects of exercise in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (an animal model of multiple sclerosis)

    PubMed Central

    Klaren, Rachel E.; Motl, Robert W.; Woods, Jeffrey A.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training has improved many outcomes in “clinical” research involving persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), but there is limited understanding of the underlying “basic” pathophysiological mechanisms. The animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), seems ideal for examining the effects of exercise training on MS-disease pathophysiology. EAE is an autoimmune T-helper cell-mediated disease characterized by T-cell and monocyte infiltration and inflammation in the CNS. To that end, this paper briefly describes common models of EAE, reviews existing research on exercise and EAE, and then identifies future research directions for understanding the consequences of exercise training using EAE. PMID:24999244

  7. Effects of exercise in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (an animal model of multiple sclerosis).

    PubMed

    Klaren, Rachel E; Motl, Robert W; Woods, Jeffrey A; Miller, Stephen D

    2014-09-15

    Exercise training has improved many outcomes in "clinical" research involving persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), but there is limited understanding of the underlying "basic" pathophysiological mechanisms. The animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), seems ideal for examining the effects of exercise training on MS-disease pathophysiology. EAE is an autoimmune T-helper cell-mediated disease characterized by T-cell and monocyte infiltration and inflammation in the CNS. To that end, this paper briefly describes common models of EAE, reviews existing research on exercise and EAE, and then identifies future research directions for understanding the consequences of exercise training using EAE. PMID:24999244

  8. Adoptive transfer of murine relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lublin, F D

    1985-02-01

    Relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an autoimmune disorder resembling multiple sclerosis, has been produced by inoculating SJL/J mice with spinal cord or myelin basic protein in appropriate adjuvants. To determine whether initially sensitized lymphocytes or the persistence of antigen depots in the animal were responsible for the relapsing episodes of inflammatory demyelination, adoptive transfer studies were undertaken utilizing lymphocytes from relapsing EAE-immunized donors transferred directly or after in vitro culture. In direct-transfer studies donor lymphocytes produced clinical and pathological signs of relapsing EAE in 3 of 7 recipients of lymph node lymphocytes and 1 of 5 recipients of splenic lymphocytes. In vitro culture of lymphocytes in myelin basic protein or T cell growth factor prior to transfer increased both the incidence of disease and the number of animals having relapses, and allowed transfer with fewer lymphocytes. Because all animals had delayed onset of disease, this study demonstrates that the ability to develop relapsing inflammatory demyelination is transferable with lymphocytes and does not require the presence of antigen. PMID:3977301

  9. ROCK inhibitor abolishes the antibody response in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Zhang, Min; Wang, Cong-Cong; Li, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Peng; Yue, Long-Tao; Miao, Shuai; Dou, Ying-Chun; Li, Yan-Bin; Duan, Rui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    The Rho/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway serves as molecular switches in many biological processes including the immune response. ROCK inhibitors lead to amelioration of some autoimmune diseases. The present study was designed to define whether a selective ROCK inhibitor, fasudil, was effective in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and investigate the underlying mechanisms. Here we found fasudil effectively attenuated the development of ongoing EAMG. Fasudil abolished the antibody production and function by decreasing follicular helper T cells and CD19(+) B cells, especially germinal center B cells. Moreover, fasudil reduced the expression of CD80 on lymph node mononuclear cells. These findings suggest the inhibition of ROCK might be a potential therapeutic strategy for antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:27168379

  10. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: evidence for a graft-versus-autoimmunity effect.

    PubMed

    Van Wijmeersch, Bart; Sprangers, Ben; Rutgeerts, Omer; Lenaerts, Caroline; Landuyt, Willy; Waer, Mark; Billiau, An D; Dubois, Bénédicte

    2007-06-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is being explored in the treatment of severe multiple sclerosis (MS), and is based on the concept of "resetting" the immune system. The use of allogeneic HSCT may offer additional advantages, such as the replacement of the autoreactive immune compartment by healthy allogeneic cells and development of a graft-versus-autoimmunity (GVA) effect. However, in clinical practice, the genetic susceptibility to MS of allogeneic stem cell donors is generally unknown, and GVA may therefore be an important mechanism of action. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains were used to determine the roles of genetic susceptibility, level of donor-chimerism, and alloreactivity in the therapeutic potential of syngeneic versus allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) for EAE. After transplantation and EAE induction, animals were evaluated for clinical EAE and ex vivo myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific proliferation. Early after BMT, both syngeneic and allogeneic chimeras were protected from EAE development. On the longer term, allogeneic but not syngeneic BMT conferred protection, but this required high-level donor-chimerism from EAE-resistant donors. Importantly, when EAE-susceptible donors were used, robust protection from EAE was obtained when active alloreactivity, induced by donor lymphocyte infusions, was provided. Our findings indicate the requirement of a sufficient level of donor-chimerism from a nonsusceptible donor in the therapeutic effect of allogeneic BMT. Importantly, the data indicate that, independently of genetic susceptibility, active alloreactivity is associated with a GVA effect, thereby providing new evidence to support the potential role of allogeneic BMT in the treatment of MS. PMID:17531772

  11. Changes in Scleral Collagen Organization in Murine Chronic Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pijanka, Jacek K.; Kimball, Elizabeth C.; Pease, Mary E.; Abass, Ahmed; Sorensen, Thomas; Nguyen, Thao D.; Quigley, Harry A.; Boote, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The organization of scleral collagen helps to determine the eye's biomechanical response to intraocular pressure (IOP), and may therefore be important in glaucoma. This study provides a quantitative assessment of changes in scleral collagen fibril organization in bead-induced murine experimental glaucoma. Methods. Wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to study the effect of bead-induced glaucoma on posterior scleral collagen organization in one eye of 12 CD1 mice, with untreated fellow eyes serving as controls. Three collagen parameters were measured: the local preferred fibril directions, the degree of collagen anisotropy, and the total fibrillar collagen content. Results. The mouse sclera featured a largely circumferential orientation of fibrillar collagen with respect to the optic nerve head canal. Localized alteration to fibril orientations was evident in the inferior peripapillary sclera of bead-treated eyes. Collagen anisotropy was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in bead-treated eyes in the superior peripapillary (Treated: 43 ± 8%; Control: 49 ± 6%) and midposterior (Treated: 39 ± 4%; Control: 43 ± 4%) sclera, and in the peripapillary region overall (Treated: 43 ± 6%; Control: 47 ± 3%). No significant differences in total collagen content were found between groups. Conclusions. Spatial changes in collagen fibril anisotropy occur in the posterior sclera of mice with bead-induced chronic IOP elevation and axonal damage. These results support the idea that dynamic changes in scleral form and structure play a role in the development of experimental glaucoma in mice, and potentially in human glaucoma. PMID:25228540

  12. Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells Do Not Ameliorate Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Are Not Detectable in the Central Nervous System of Transplanted Mice.

    PubMed

    Abramowski, Pierre; Krasemann, Susanne; Ernst, Thomas; Lange, Claudia; Ittrich, Harald; Schweizer, Michaela; Zander, Axel R; Martin, Roland; Fehse, Boris

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) constitute progenitor cells that can be isolated from different tissues. Based on their immunomodulatory and neuroprotective functions, MSC-based cell-therapy approaches have been suggested to antagonize inflammatory activity and neuronal damage associated with autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), for example, multiple sclerosis (MS). Intravenous MSC transplantation was reported to ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the murine model of MS, within days after transplantation. However, systemic distribution patterns and fate of MSCs after administration, especially their potential to migrate into inflammatory lesions within the CNS, remain to be elucidated. This question has of recent become particularly important, since therapeutic infusion of MSCs is now being tested in clinical trials with MS-affected patients. Here, we made use of the established EAE mouse model to investigate migration and therapeutic efficacy of murine bone marrow-derived MSCs. Applying a variety of techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in-situ hybridization, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction we found no evidence for immediate migration of infused MSC into the CNS of treated mice. Moreover, in contrast to other studies, transplanted MSCs did not ameliorate EAE. In conclusion, our data does not provide substantiation for a relevant migration of infused MSCs into the CNS of EAE mice supporting the hypothesis that potential therapeutic efficacy could be based on systemic effects. Evaluation of possible mechanisms underlying the observed discrepancies in MSC treatment outcomes between different EAE models demands further studies. PMID:27250994

  13. Dimethyl Fumarate Ameliorates Lewis Rat Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis and Mediates Axonal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Pitarokoili, Kalliopi; Ambrosius, Björn; Meyer, Daniela; Schrewe, Lisa; Gold, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Dimethyl fumarate is an immunomodulatory and neuroprotective drug, approved recently for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. In view of the limited therapeutic options for human acute and chronic polyneuritis, we used the animal model of experimental autoimmune neuritis in the Lewis rat to study the effects of dimethyl fumarate on autoimmune inflammation and neuroprotection in the peripheral nervous system. Methods and Findings Experimental autoimmune neuritis was induced by immunization with the neuritogenic peptide (amino acids 53–78) of P2 myelin protein. Preventive treatment with dimethyl fumarate given at 45 mg/kg twice daily by oral gavage significantly ameliorated clinical neuritis by reducing demyelination and axonal degeneration in the nerve conduction studies. Histology revealed a significantly lower degree of inflammatory infiltrates in the sciatic nerves. In addition, we detected a reduction of early signs of axonal degeneration through a reduction of amyloid precursor protein expressed in axons of the peripheral nerves. This reduction correlated with an increase of nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2)-related factor 2 positive axons, supporting the neuroprotective potential of dimethyl fumarate. Furthermore, nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2)-related factor 2 expression in Schwann cells was only rarely detected and there was no increase of Schwann cells death during EAN. Conclusions We conclude that immunmodulatory and neuroprotective dimethyl fumarate may represent an innovative therapeutic option in human autoimmune neuropathies. PMID:26618510

  14. Neonatal dexamethasone treatment increases susceptibility to experimental autoimmune disease in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J M; Kavelaars, A; Kamphuis, P J; Cobelens, P M; van Vugt, H H; van Bel, F; Heijnen, C J

    2000-11-15

    Major concern has emerged about the possible long term adverse effects of glucocorticoid treatment, which is frequently used for the prevention of chronic lung disease in preterm infants. Here we show that neonatal glucocorticoid treatment of rats increases the severity (p< or = 0.01) and incidence (p< or =0.01) of the inflammatory autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in adult life. In search of possible mechanisms responsible for the increased susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we investigated the reactivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and of immune cells in adult rats after neonatal glucocorticoid treatment. We observed that neonatal glucocorticoid treatment reduces the corticosterone response after an LPS challenge in adult rats (p< or =0.001). Interestingly, LPS-stimulated macrophages of glucocorticoid-treated rats produce less TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in adult life than control rats (p<0.05). In addition, splenocytes obtained from adult rats express increased mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-gamma (p<0.01) and TNF-beta (p<0.05) after neonatal glucocorticoid treatment. Apparently, neonatal glucocorticoid treatment has permanent programming effects on endocrine as well as immune functioning in adult life. In view of the frequent clinical application of glucocorticoids to preterm infants, our data demonstrate that neonatal glucocorticoid treatment may be a risk factor for the development of (auto)immune disease in man. PMID:11067955

  15. Codelivery of antigen and an immune cell adhesion inhibitor is necessary for efficacy of soluble antigen arrays in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sestak, Joshua O; Sullivan, Bradley P; Thati, Sharadvi; Northrup, Laura; Hartwell, Brittany; Antunez, Lorena; Forrest, M Laird; Vines, Charlotte M; Siahaan, Teruna J; Berkland, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are typified by the misrecognition of self-antigen and the clonal expansion of autoreactive T cells. Antigen-specific immunotherapies (antigen-SITs) have long been explored as a means to desensitize patients to offending self-antigen(s) with the potential to retolerize the immune response. Soluble antigen arrays (SAgAs) are composed of hyaluronic acid (HA) cografted with disease-specific autoantigen (proteolipid protein peptide) and an ICAM-1 inhibitor peptide (LABL). SAgAs were designed as an antigen-SIT that codeliver peptides to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of MS. Codelivery of antigen and cell adhesion inhibitor (LABL) conjugated to HA was essential for SAgA treatment of EAE. Individual SAgA components or mixtures thereof reduced proinflammatory cytokines in cultured splenocytes from EAE mice; however, these treatments showed minimal to no in vivo therapeutic effect in EAE mice. Thus, carriers that codeliver antigen and a secondary “context” signal (e.g., LABL) in vivo may be an important design criteria to consider when designing antigen-SIT for autoimmune therapy. PMID:26015953

  16. What transgenic and knockout mouse models teach us about experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fazekas, G; Tabira, T

    2000-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system with presumed autoimmune etiology. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inducible autoimmune disease in laboratory animals, is a widely accepted animal model of MS. Although it is well known that EAE is induced by autoreactive CD4+ T cells specific for myelin antigens, the demyelination process is manifested as a result of complex interactions among encephalitogenic, regulatory and accessory cell populations and factors produced by these cells. The outcome of the disease depends on which components become dominant. Examination of these components using genetically manipulated transgenic or gene-disrupted animal models has proved to be very useful. Here we examine the main processes leading to the development of EAE. The participation of different lymphocyte populations such as T, B cells or NK cells, as well as regulatory molecules and cytokines in the induction and regulation of EAE is discussed in the light of transgenic and knockout animal experiments. These animal models clearly show that autoimmune processes are regulated in a complex way, and that a given factor in this regulation can have very different effects according to the given microenvironment in which it acts. PMID:11324684

  17. Multimerized T cell epitopes protect from experimental autoimmune diabetes by inducing dominant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, Eliane; Mars, Lennart T; Cassan, Cécile; Cabarrocas, Julie; Hofstätter, Maria; Desbois, Sabine; Bergereau, Emilie; Rötzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Liblau, Roland S

    2007-05-29

    Immunotherapy by using multimerized self-peptides has demonstrated a clear protective effect on experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms involved remain ill-defined. Here we have evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of multimerized self-peptides at the effector phase of autoimmune diabetes and examined their mechanisms of action. Diabetes was induced in rat insulin promoter-hemagglutinin (HA) mice expressing HA in pancreatic beta-cells by adoptive transfer of HA(110-119)-specific T helper 1 cells. Complete protection was provided by low doses of the HA 4-mer consisting of four covalently linked linear HA(107-119) peptides. In vivo, the 4-mer appeared to act directly on the pathogenic HA-specific T helper 1 cells and indirectly by activation/recruitment of lymphocytes with regulatory properties so that mice became resistant to a second transfer of diabetogenic T cells. This effect was associated with a recruitment of Foxp3(+) CD4 T cells around islets. Moreover, we show that dominant protection from autoimmunity was transferable by spleen cells, and that development of this regulatory population was crucially dependent on the lymphocytes from treated rat insulin promoter-HA mice. Thus, immunotherapy using multimerized epitopes emerges as a promising strategy in view of the current identification of self-epitopes that are major targets of the pathogenic CD4 T cell response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:17517665

  18. Multimerized T cell epitopes protect from experimental autoimmune diabetes by inducing dominant tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Piaggio, Eliane; Mars, Lennart T.; Cassan, Cécile; Cabarrocas, Julie; Hofstätter, Maria; Desbois, Sabine; Bergereau, Emilie; Rötzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Liblau, Roland S.

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy by using multimerized self-peptides has demonstrated a clear protective effect on experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms involved remain ill-defined. Here we have evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of multimerized self-peptides at the effector phase of autoimmune diabetes and examined their mechanisms of action. Diabetes was induced in rat insulin promoter-hemagglutinin (HA) mice expressing HA in pancreatic β-cells by adoptive transfer of HA110–119-specific T helper 1 cells. Complete protection was provided by low doses of the HA 4-mer consisting of four covalently linked linear HA107–119 peptides. In vivo, the 4-mer appeared to act directly on the pathogenic HA-specific T helper 1 cells and indirectly by activation/recruitment of lymphocytes with regulatory properties so that mice became resistant to a second transfer of diabetogenic T cells. This effect was associated with a recruitment of Foxp3+ CD4 T cells around islets. Moreover, we show that dominant protection from autoimmunity was transferable by spleen cells, and that development of this regulatory population was crucially dependent on the lymphocytes from treated rat insulin promoter-HA mice. Thus, immunotherapy using multimerized epitopes emerges as a promising strategy in view of the current identification of self-epitopes that are major targets of the pathogenic CD4 T cell response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:17517665

  19. Regulatory T cells control strain specific resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Breser, Maria L; Lino, Andreia C; Motrich, Ruben D; Godoy, Gloria J; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Rivero, Virginia E

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to autoimmune diseases results from the encounter of a complex and long evolved genetic context with a no less complex and changing environment. Major actors in maintaining health are regulatory T cells (Treg) that primarily dampen a large subset of autoreactive lymphocytes escaping thymic negative selection. Here, we directly asked whether Treg participate in defining susceptibility and resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP). We analyzed three common laboratory strains of mice presenting with different susceptibility to autoimmune prostatitis upon immunization with prostate proteins. The NOD, the C57BL/6 and the BALB/c mice that can be classified along a disease score ranging from severe, mild and to undetectable, respectively. Upon mild and transient depletion of Treg at the induction phase of EAP, each model showed an increment along this score, most remarkably with the BALB/c mice switching from a resistant to a susceptible phenotype. We further show that disease associates with the upregulation of CXCR3 expression on effector T cells, a process requiring IFNγ. Together with recent advances on environmental factors affecting Treg, these findings provide a likely cellular and molecular explanation to the recent rise in autoimmune diseases incidence. PMID:27624792

  20. The idiotypic network in the regulation of autoimmunity: Theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Menshikov, Igor; Beduleva, Liubov; Frolov, Maksim; Abisheva, Nadezhda; Khramova, Tatyana; Stolyarova, Elena; Fomina, Kseniya

    2015-06-21

    The regulation of autoimmunity is a key issue in fundamental immunology. Despite outstanding achievements on this front, we currently have more questions than answers. The idea of an immune network as a regulatory mechanism is quite attractive, since it enables us to explain the selectivity (specificity), and moreover the clonality, of the regulation. Nevertheless it remains unclear how this mysterious network of immune cells is organized, how it operates, and how it exerts control over autoimmunity. This article presents an attempt to understand how the immune network functions and how it controls autoreactivity. We present a mathematical model of the immune network that is based on principles of immune network organization and function that we arrived at from a survey of the available literature. To test the principles on which the mathematical model is based, we studied the model and compared the different responses to antigen that it generated with the results obtained from experimental studies of immune response. The modeled kinetics of idiotype and anti-idiotype in response to the administration of antigen are in good agreement with the experimental kinetics of idiotypic and anti-idiotypic antibodies. To obtain evidence of the existence of idiotypic mechanisms for regulating autoimmunity, we studied a mathematical model containing autoclones and compared the model results with data from experimental studies in a model of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in mice. Because the results from the theoretical and the experimental studies coincide, there is justification to conclude that autoreactive lymphocytes are normal components of the immune network within which they are regulated. We discuss a possible molecular/cellular mechanism for negative control of autoreactive cells as affected by anti-idiotypic antibodies. PMID:25445185

  1. Cellular basis of the genetic susceptibility of murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, T.A.; Greiner, D.L.; Goldschneider, I.

    1986-03-01

    Murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an induced autoimmune disease that resembles human multiple sclerosis. The authors have investigated the cellular basis of the genetic predisposition and resistance of inbred strains of mice to EAE using an adoptive transfer system between two H-2 compatible, Thy 1 antigen disparate strains of mice. Genetically EAE susceptible SJL/J strain mice (H-2/sup s/, Thy 1.2) and resistant B10.S Thy 1.1 (H-2/sub s/, Thy 1.1) strain mice were lethally irradiated (700R) and reconstituted with 5-10 x 10/sup 6/ bone marrow cells from either SJL/J or congenic B10.S (Thy 1.1 or Thy 1.2) donors. After 30-45 days, more than 95% of the thymocytes and 75% of the peripheral T cells in the chimeras were of donor origin. These lymphohemopoietic chimeras were then sensitized in their hind footpads with porcine myelin basic protein in complete Freund's adjuvant containing M. tuberculosis H/sub 37/RA, followed at 24 and 72 hours by i.v. injection of B. pertussis. Clinical signs of EAE developed in unirradiated SJL/J, but not B10.S, controls, and in irradiated B10.S and SJL/J recipients of SJL/J, but not B10.S, bone marrow. These results indicate that bone marrow cells can transfer the predisposition to EAE from genetically susceptible to genetically resistant mouse strains. The cellular component in the bone marrow that is responsible for the transfer of the genetic susceptibility to EAE is under investigation.

  2. Gilt required for RTL550-CYS-MOG to treat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Gregory G; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Huan, Jianya; Sinha, Sushmita; Mooney, Jeffrey L; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2012-06-01

    MHC class II-derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs) modulate the behavior of pathogenic T cells and can reverse clinical and histological signs of autoimmune disease in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), and are currently in clinical trials for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). To expand the utility of these rationally-designed biologics and explore their mechanism(s) of activity in vivo, we have engineered RTL constructs bearing cysteine-tethered antigenic peptides and demonstrate that the appropriate cysteine-tethered RTLs effectively treat EAE. The data presented here suggests that the mechanism by which antigen-specific tolerance induction by RTLs bearing cysteine-tethered antigenic peptides in vivo involves delivery of RTL/antigen to endosomal compartments for processing and re-presentation by full-length MHC class II, with RTLs bearing cysteine-tethered antigenic peptides requiring gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol-reductase (GILT) for therapeutic activity. PMID:22392628

  3. GILT REQUIRED FOR RTL550-CYS-MOG TO TREAT EXPERIMENTAL AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Gregory G.; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Huan, Jianya; Sinha, Sushmita; Mooney, Jeffrey L.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Offner, Halina

    2012-01-01

    MHC class II-derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs) modulate the behavior of pathogenic T cells and can reverse clinical and histological signs of autoimmune disease in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), and are currently in clinical trials for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). To expand the utility of these rationally-designed biologics and explore their mechanism(s) of activity in vivo, we have engineered RTL constructs bearing cysteine-tethered antigenic peptides and demonstrate that the appropriate cysteine-tethered RTLs effectively treat EAE. The data presented here suggests that the mechanism by which antigen-specific tolerance induction by RTLs bearing cysteine-tethered antigenic peptides in vivo involves delivery of RTL/antigen to endosomal compartments for processing and re-presentation by full-length MHC class II, with RTLs bearing cysteine-tethered antigenic peptides requiring gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol-reductase (GILT) for therapeutic activity. PMID:22392628

  4. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  5. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination.

    PubMed

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  6. Galectin isolated from parasite inhibits remission of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by up-regulating autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Bing, S J; Ha, D; Ahn, G; Cho, J; Kim, A; Park, S K; Yu, H S; Jee, Y

    2015-01-01

    Recently, parasite infections or parasite-derived products have been suggested as a therapeutic strategy with suppression of immunopathology, which involves the induction of regulatory T cells or/and T helper type 2 (Th2) responses. In a recent study, researchers reported that constructed recombinant galectin (rTl-gal) isolated from an adult worm of the gastrointestinal nematode parasite Toxascaris leonina attenuated clinical symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease in mice treated with dextran sulphate sodium. Noting the role of rTl-gal in inflammatory disease, we attempted to investigate the effect of the parasite via its rTl-gal on neuronal autoimmune disease using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse inflammatory and demyelinating autoimmune disease model of human multiple sclerosis. In this model, rTl-gal-treated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice failed to recover after the peak of the disease, leading to persistent central nervous system (CNS) damage, such as demyelination, gliosis and axonal damage. Further, rTl-gal-treated EAE mice markedly increased the number of CD45R/B220+ B cells in both infiltrated inflammation and the periphery, along with the increased production of autoantibody [anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35–55] in serum at chronic stage. Upon antigen restimulation, rTl-gal treatment affected the release of overall cytokines, especially interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Our results suggest that galectin isolated from a gastrointestinal parasite can deliver a harmful effect to EAE contrary to its beneficial effect on inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25619397

  7. Intracerebral recruitment and maturation of dendritic cells in the onset and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Serafini, B; Columba-Cabezas, S; Di Rosa, F; Aloisi, F

    2000-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are thought to be key elements in the initiation and maintenance of autoimmune diseases. In this study, we sought evidence that DCs recruited to the central nervous system (CNS), a site that is primarily devoid of resident DCs, play a role in the effector phase and propagation of the immune response in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). After immunization of SJL mice with proteolipid protein 139-151 peptide, process-bearing cells expressing the DC markers DEC-205 and CD11c appeared early in the spinal cord. During acute, chronic, and relapsing EAE, DEC-205(+) DCs expressing a lymphostimulatory phenotype (including the mature DC marker MIDC-8, major histocompatibility complex class II, CD40, and CD86 molecules) accumulated within the CNS inflammatory cell infiltrates. More prominent infiltration of the spinal cord parenchyma by mature DCs was observed in mice with relapsing disease. Macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha, a chemokine active on DCs and lymphocytes, and its receptor CCR6 were up-regulated in the CNS during EAE. These findings suggest that intracerebral recruitment and maturation of DCs may be crucial in the local stimulation and maintenance of autoreactive immune responses, and that therapeutic strategies aimed at manipulating DC migration could be useful in the treatment of CNS autoimmune disorders. PMID:11106572

  8. Diversification and senescence of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tauro, Sharyn; Nguyen, Phuong; Li, Bofeng; Geiger, Terrence L

    2013-05-01

    The fate of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells responding during autoimmunity is not well defined. We observed a marked elevation in KLRG1(+) (where KLRG1 stands for killer cell lectin-like receptor G1) CNS-infiltrating Treg cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and assessed their origin and properties. KLRG1(+) Treg cells showed increased activation marker expression, Foxp3 and CD25 levels, and more rapid cell cycling than KLRG1(-) cells. KLRG1(-) Treg cells converted into KLRG1(+) cells and this was increased in autoimmune inflammation. Conversion was unidirectional; KLRG1(+) Treg cells did not revert to a KLRG1(-) state. KLRG1(+) but notKLRG1(-) Treg cells survived poorly, indicative of terminal differentiation. This was associated with diminished BCL2 and increased apoptosis of isolated cells. KLRG1 was also upregulated on iTreg cells after transfer and EAE induction or on iTreg cells developing spontaneously during EAE. KLRG1(+) Treg cells produced more IL-10 and had altered effector cytokine production compared with their KLRG1(-) counterparts. Despite their differences, KLRG1(+) and KLRG1(-) Treg cells proved similarly potent in suppressing EAE. KLRG1(+) and KLRG1(-) populations were phenotypically heterogeneous, with the extent and pattern of activation marker expression dependent both on cellular location and inflammation. Our results support an extensive diversification of Treg cells during EAE, and associate KLRG1 with altered Treg-cell function and senescence. PMID:23436224

  9. CXCR7 suppression modulates microglial chemotaxis to ameliorate experimentally-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianhong; Zhu, Jinying; Luo, Sheng; Cheng, Ying; Zhou, Saijun

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the prototypical inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), widely used as an animal model of MS, classically manifests as an ascending paralysis that is characterized by extensive infiltration of the CNS by inflammatory cells. Although several studies uncover the significant role of microglia in the development of EAE, the cellular mechanisms of microglia that govern EAE pathogenesis remain unknown. In the current study, we report that CXCR7 expression is dynamic regulated in activated microglia during CNS autoimmunity and positively correlates with the clinical severity of EAE. In addition, microglial chemotaxis is mediated by CXCR7 during CNS autoimmunity, signaling through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activation, whereas p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) JNK are not involved. Most importantly, CXCR7 neutralizing treatment ameliorates the clinical severity of EAE along with ERK1/2 phosphorylation reduction. Collectively, our data demonstrate that CXCR7 suppression modulates microglial chemotaxis to ameliorate EAE. PMID:26607112

  10. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester lessens disease symptoms in an experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Oh, Hana; Park, Sol-Ji; Ha, Sung-Min; Kang, Mi Seon; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jung, So Young; Song, Hyunkeun; Yang, Jae Wook; Park, SaeGwang

    2015-05-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) is an autoimmune disease that models human uveitis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a phenolic compound isolated from propolis, possesses anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. CAPE demonstrates therapeutic potential in several animal disease models through its ability to inhibit NF-κB activity. To evaluate these therapeutic effects in EAU, we administered CAPE in a model of EAU that develops after immunization with interphotoreceptor retinal-binding protein (IRBP) in B10.RIII and C57BL/6 mice. Importantly, we found that CAPE lessened the severity of EAU symptoms in both mouse strains. Notably, treated mice exhibited a decrease in the ocular infiltration of immune cell populations into the retina; reduced TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ serum levels: and inhibited TNF-α mRNA expression in retinal tissues. Although CAPE failed to inhibit IRBP-specific T cell proliferation, it was sufficient to suppress cytokine, chemokine, and IRBP-specific antibody production. In addition, retinal tissues isolated from CAPE-treated EAU mice revealed a decrease in NF-κB p65 and phospho-IκBα. The data identify CAPE as a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune uveitis that acts by inhibiting cellular infiltration into the retina, reducing the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokine, and IRBP-specific antibody and blocking NF-κB pathway activation. PMID:25795054

  11. Differing roles for members of the phospholipase A2 superfamily in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kalyvas, Athena; Baskakis, Constantinos; Magrioti, Victoria; Constantinou-Kokotou, Violetta; Stephens, Daren; López-Vales, Rubèn; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Yong, V. Wee; Dennis, Edward A.; Kokotos, George

    2009-01-01

    The phospholipase A2 (PLA2) superfamily hydrolyzes phospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids, some of which can mediate inflammation and demyelination, hallmarks of the CNS autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis. The expression of two of the intracellular PLA2s (cPLA2 GIVA and iPLA2 GVIA) and two of the secreted PLA2s (sPLA2 GIIA and sPLA2 GV) are increased in different stages of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. We show using small molecule inhibitors, that cPLA2 GIVA plays a role in the onset, and iPLA2 GVIA in the onset and progression of EAE. We also show a potential role for sPLA2 in the later remission phase. These studies demonstrate that selective inhibition of iPLA2 can ameliorate disease progression when treatment is started before or after the onset of symptoms. The effects of these inhibitors on lesion burden, chemokine and cytokine expression as well as on the lipid profile provide insights into their potential modes of action. iPLA2 is also expressed by macrophages and other immune cells in multiple sclerosis lesions. Our results therefore suggest that iPLA2 might be an excellent target to block for the treatment of CNS autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:19218359

  12. Blockade of Extracellular ATP Effect by Oxidized ATP Effectively Mitigated Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ronglan; Liang, Dongchun; Sun, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Various pathological conditions are accompanied by ATP release from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Extracellular ATP (eATP) functions as a signaling molecule by activating purinergic P2 purine receptors. The key P2 receptor involved in inflammation was identified as P2X7R. Recent studies have shown that P2X7R signaling is required to trigger the Th1/Th17 immune response, and oxidized ATP (oxATP) effectively blocks P2X7R activation. In this study we investigated the effect of oxATP on mouse experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Our results demonstrated that induced EAU in B6 mice was almost completely abolished by the administration of small doses of oxATP, and the Th17 response, but not the Th1 response, was significantly weakened in the treated mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the therapeutic effects involve the functional change of a number of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and regulatory T cells. OxATP not only directly inhibits the T cell response; it also suppresses T cell activation by altering the function of DCs and Foxp3+ T cell. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of P2X7R activation effectively exempts excessive autoimmune inflammation, which may indicate a possible therapeutic use in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27196432

  13. The Adaptor Protein Rai/ShcC Promotes Astrocyte-Dependent Inflammation during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, Cristina; Savino, Maria Teresa; Luccarini, Ilaria; Fanigliulo, Emanuela; Aldinucci, Alessandra; Bonechi, Elena; Benagiano, Marisa; Ortensi, Barbara; Pelicci, Giuliana; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Ballerini, Clara; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana

    2016-07-15

    Th17 cells have been casually associated to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. We have previously demonstrated that Rai/ShcC, a member of the Shc family of adaptor proteins, negatively regulates Th17 cell differentiation and lupus autoimmunity. In this study, we have investigated the pathogenic outcome of the Th17 bias associated with Rai deficiency on multiple sclerosis development, using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model. We found that, unexpectedly, EAE was less severe in Rai(-/-) mice compared with their wild-type counterparts despite an enhanced generation of myelin-specific Th17 cells that infiltrated into the CNS. Nevertheless, when adoptively transferred into immunodeficient Rai(+/+) mice, these cells promoted a more severe disease compared with wild-type encephalitogenic Th17 cells. This paradoxical phenotype was caused by a dampened inflammatory response of astrocytes, which were found to express Rai, to IL-17. The results provide evidence that Rai plays opposite roles in Th17 cell differentiation and astrocyte activation, with the latter dominant over the former in EAE, highlighting this adaptor as a potential novel target for the therapy of multiple sclerosis. PMID:27288534

  14. Activation of the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) adaptor attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Henrique; Huang, Lei; Chandler, Phillip R.; Mohamed, Eslam; Souza, Guilherme R.; Li, Lingqian; Pacholczyk, Gabriela; Barber, Glen N.; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Munn, David H.; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic DNA sensing activates the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) adaptor to induce interferon type I (IFNαβ) production. Constitutive DNA sensing to induce sustained STING activation incites tolerance breakdown leading to autoimmunity. Here we show that systemic treatments with DNA nanoparticles (DNPs) induced potent immune regulatory responses via STING signaling that suppressed experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) when administered to mice after immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), at EAE onset, or at peak disease severity. DNP treatments attenuated infiltration of effector T cells into the central nervous system (CNS) and suppressed innate and adaptive immune responses to MOG immunization in spleen. Therapeutic responses were not observed in mice treated with cargo DNA or cationic polymers alone, indicating that DNP uptake and cargo DNA sensing by cells with regulatory functions was essential for therapeutic responses to manifest. Intact STING and IFNαβ receptor genes, but not IFNγ receptor genes, were essential for therapeutic responses to DNPs to manifest. Treatments with cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-diGMP) to activate STING also delayed EAE onset and reduced disease severity. Therapeutic responses to DNPs were critically dependent on indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme activity in hematopoietic cells. Thus DNPs and c-diGMP attenuate EAE by inducing dominant T cell regulatory responses via the STING-IFNαβ-IDO pathway that suppress CNS-specific autoimmunity. These findings reveal dichotomous roles for the STING-IFNαβ pathway in either stimulating or suppressing autoimmunity and identify STING activating reagents as a novel class of immune modulatory drugs. PMID:24799564

  15. Neuroprotection in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Progressive Multiple Sclerosis by Cannabis-Based Cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Gareth; Riddall, Dieter R; Selwood, David L; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major immune-mediated, demyelinating, neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system. Compounds within cannabis, notably Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) can limit the inappropriate neurotransmissions that cause MS-related problems and medicinal cannabis is now licenced for the treatment of MS symptoms. However, the biology indicates that the endocannabinoid system may offer the potential to control other aspects of disease. Although there is limited evidence that the cannabinoids from cannabis are having significant immunosuppressive activities that will influence relapsing autoimmunity, we and others can experimentally demonstrate that they may limit neurodegeneration that drives progressive disability. Here we show that synthetic cannabidiol can slow down the accumulation of disability from the inflammatory penumbra during relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in ABH mice, possibly via blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels. In addition, whilst non-sedating doses of Δ9-THC do not inhibit relapsing autoimmunity, they dose-dependently inhibit the accumulation of disability during EAE. They also appear to slow down clinical progression during MS in humans. Although a 3 year, phase III clinical trial did not detect a beneficial effect of oral Δ9-THC in progressive MS, a planned subgroup analysis of people with less disability who progressed more rapidly, demonstrated a significant slowing of progression by oral Δ9-THC compared to placebo. Whilst this may support the experimental and biological evidence for a neuroprotective effect by the endocannabinoid system in MS, it remains to be established whether this will be formally demonstrated in further trials of Δ9-THC/cannabis in progressive MS. PMID:25537576

  16. PROGESTERONE TREATMENT REDUCES DISEASE SEVERITY AND INCREASES IL-10 IN EXPERIMENTAL AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS

    PubMed Central

    Yates, M.A; Li, Y.; Chlebeck, P.; Proctor, T.; Vandenbark, A.A.; Offner, H.

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian hormones, including progesterone, are known to have immunomodulatory and neuroprotective effects which may alter the disease course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In the current study, we examined the treatment potential of progesterone beginning at the onset of EAE symptoms. Progesterone treated animals showed reduced peak disease scores and cumulative disease indices, and decreased inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-2 and IL-17). In addition, increased production of IL-10 was accompanied by increased numbers of CD19+ cells and an increase in CD8+ cells. Decreased chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in the spinal cord also contributed to decreased lesions in the spinal cord. PMID:20153059

  17. Chrysin suppresses human CD14(+) monocyte-derived dendritic cells and ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Ge, Zhenzhen; Xue, Zhenyi; Huang, Wenjing; Mei, Mei; Zhang, Qi; Li, Yan; Li, Wen; Zhang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zimu; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Huafeng; Cai, Jinzhen; Yao, Zhi; Zhang, Rongxin; Da, Yurong

    2015-11-15

    Chrysin, a naturally flavonoid of plant, has various biological activities. However, the effects of chrysin on dendritic cells (DCs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that chrysin inhibited human DC differentiation, maturation, function and the expression of the Th1 cells polarizing cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12p35 form DCs. In addition, chrysin ameliorated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, by reducing CNS inflammation and demyelination. Furthermore, chrysin suppressed DCs and Th1 cells in the EAE mice. Taken together, chrysin exerts anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effects, and suggests a possible therapeutic application of chrysin in MS. PMID:26531689

  18. Effects of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor sitagliptin on immunological parameters of lymphocytes in intact animals and animals with experimental autoimmune process.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M V; Mel'nikova, E V; Trufakin, V A

    2014-11-01

    The effects of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor sitagliptin on immunological parameters were studied in animals with experimental autoimmune process. The effects of the drug administered in preventive (before manifestation of autoimmune processes) and therapeutic (after manifestation of autoimmune process) modes were studied. PMID:25408522

  19. Lipoic Acid Decreases Inflammation and Confers Neuroprotection in Experimental Autoimmune Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Priya; Marracci, Gail; Yu, Xiaolin; Galipeau, Danielle; Morris, Brooke; Bourdette, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Lipoic acid (LA) is an antioxidant that is effective in treating experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for multiple sclerosis (MS). C57BL/6 mice with EAE develop experimental autoimmune optic neuritis (EAON), which models acute optic neuritis in humans. Here we determined whether LA is therapeutically effective in EAON. We immunized C57BL/6 mice with MOG 35–55 peptide. Mice received either daily subcutaneous injections of LA (100 mg/kg) or saline in early or late suppression paradigms. In the early suppression paradigm, optic nerve cross sections showed 14.9 ± 3.8% (mean ± SEM) damage in mice receiving saline (n = 7) and 2.0 ± 0.4 % damage in mice given LA (n = 7, p = 0.001). In the late suppression paradigm, optic nerve sections showed 24.6 ± 3.5% damage in mice treated with saline (n = 7) and 8.4 ± 2.5% in mice treated with LA (n = 7, p = 0.004). Thus a dramatic reduction in axonal injury was seen after LA administration in both experimental paradigms. Compared with saline treated mice with EAON, optic nerves from mice receiving LA had significantly fewer CD4+ and CD11b+ cells in both paradigms. This study provides a rationale for investigating the therapeutic efficacy of LA in acute optic neuritis in humans. PMID:21215462

  20. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Stormanns, Eva R.; Recks, Mascha S.; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP) fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Limited availability of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS. Methods Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE) and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE). The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT) of the spinal cord. Results B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. In addition, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation. Conclusions Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute

  1. IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells contribute to the loss of B-cell tolerance in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Schaffert, Hanne; Pelz, Andreas; Saxena, Abhishek; Losen, Mario; Meisel, Andreas; Thiel, Andreas; Kohler, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    The role of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoantibody-mediated diseases is unclear. Here, we assessed the contribution of Th17 cells to the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), which is induced by repetitive immunizations with Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (tAChR). We show that a significant fraction of tAChR-specific CD4(+) T cells is producing IL-17. IL-17(ko) mice developed fewer or no EAMG symptoms, although the frequencies of tAChR-specific CD4(+) T cells secreting IL-2, IFN-γ, or IL-21, and the percentage of FoxP3(+) Treg cells were similar to WT mice. Even though the total anti-tAChR antibody levels were equal, the complement fixating IgG2b subtype was reduced in IL-17(ko) as compared to WT mice. Most importantly, pathogenic anti-murine AChR antibodies were significantly lower in IL-17(ko) mice. Furthermore, we confirmed the role of Th17 cells in EAMG pathogenesis by the reconstitution of TCR β/δ(ko) mice with WT or IL-17(ko) CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, we show that the level of IgG2b and the loss of B-cell tolerance, which results in pathogenic anti-murine AChR-specific antibodies, are dependent on IL-17 production by CD4(+) T cells. Thus, we describe here for the first time how Th17 cells are involved in the induction of classical antibody-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:25676041

  2. Evaluation of AD-MSC (adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells) as a vehicle for IFN-β delivery in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Adel; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Shahrokhi, Somayeh; Fallah, Ali; Tahoori, Mohammad Taher; Amari, Afshin; Forouzandeh, Mahdi; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-08-01

    Interferon-β (IFN-β) is commonly used as a disease modifying drug for the treatment of relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS). However, the underlying mechanism by which IFN-β mediate this immunosuppressive effect is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the effects of genetically modified adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) expressing murine interferon beta (MSCs-VP/IFN-β) on the animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Lymph node mononuclear cells and serum were examined by using RT-PCR and ELISA methods to measure the production of IL-10 and IL-17 gene and protein expression, respectively. Our results indicated that in the MSCs-VP/IFN-β treated group induction of Tregs and IL-10 and reduction of IL-17 were significant. Taken together, we showed that using AD-MSCs expressing IFN-β as an anti-inflammatory agent, offer evidence supporting that the stem cell therapies in EAE conceivably will improve the valuable effects of IFN-β in this autoimmune disease. PMID:27373971

  3. Protective effect of transforming growth factor beta 1 on experimental autoimmune diseases in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, A P; Shah, R; Hochwald, G M; Liggitt, H D; Palladino, M A; Thorbecke, G J

    1991-04-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha are thought to contribute to the inflammatory response associated with autoimmune diseases. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) counteracts many effects of these cytokines and has various immunosuppressive properties. In the present study, it is shown that microgram amounts of TGF-beta 1, injected daily for 1-2 weeks, protect against collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (REAE), the animal models for rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, respectively. When administered during induction of the disease, TGF-beta 1 prevents CIA but only delays the onset of REAE by 2-3 days. However, when administered during a remission. TGF-beta 1 prevents the occurrence of relapses in REAE. The results suggest that TGF-beta 1 has powerful anti-inflammatory effects, mimicking in some respects the beneficial effects of immunosuppressive drugs in these experimental models of autoimmune disease, but without discernable adverse effects. PMID:2011600

  4. Therapeutic efficacy of suppressing the Jak/STAT pathway in multiple models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yudong; Holdbrooks, Andrew T; De Sarno, Patrizia; Rowse, Amber L; Yanagisawa, Lora L; McFarland, Braden C; Harrington, Laurie E; Raman, Chander; Sabbaj, Steffanie; Benveniste, Etty N; Qin, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic Th cells and myeloid cells are involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. The JAK/STAT pathway is used by numerous cytokines for signaling and is critical for development, regulation, and termination of immune responses. Dysregulation of the JAK/STAT pathway has pathological implications in autoimmune and neuroinflammatory diseases. Many of the cytokines involved in MS/EAE, including IL-6, IL-12, IL-23, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF, use the JAK/STAT pathway to induce biological responses. Thus, targeting JAKs has implications for treating autoimmune inflammation of the brain. We have used AZD1480, a JAK1/2 inhibitor, to investigate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting the JAK/STAT pathway in models of EAE. AZD1480 treatment inhibits disease severity in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced classical and atypical EAE models by preventing entry of immune cells into the brain, suppressing differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells, deactivating myeloid cells, inhibiting STAT activation in the brain, and reducing expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Treatment of SJL/J mice with AZD1480 delays disease onset of PLP-induced relapsing-remitting disease, reduces relapses and diminishes clinical severity. AZD1480 treatment was also effective in reducing ongoing paralysis induced by adoptive transfer of either pathogenic Th1 or Th17 cells. In vivo AZD1480 treatment impairs both the priming and expansion of T cells and attenuates Ag presentation functions of myeloid cells. Inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway has clinical efficacy in multiple preclinical models of MS, suggesting the feasibility of the JAK/STAT pathway as a target for neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:24323580

  5. Silencing miR-146a influences B cells and ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, JunMei; Jia, Ge; Liu, Qun; Hu, Jue; Yan, Mei; Yang, BaiFeng; Yang, Huan; Zhou, WenBin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been shown to be important regulators of immune homeostasis as patients with aberrant microRNA expression appeared to be more susceptible to autoimmune diseases. We recently found that miR-146a was up-regulated in activated B cells in response to rat acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α-subunit 97-116 peptide, and this up-regulation was significantly attenuated by AntagomiR-146a. Our data also demonstrated that silencing miR-146a with its inhibitor AntagomiR-146a effectively ameliorated clinical myasthenic symptoms in mice with ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. Furthermore, multiple defects were observed after miR-146a was knocked down in B cells, including decreased anti-R97-116 antibody production and class switching, reduced numbers of plasma cells, memory B cells and B-1 cells, and weakened activation of B cells. Previously, miR-146a has been identified as a nuclear factor-κB-dependent gene and predicted to base pair with the tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) genes to regulate the immune response. However, our study proved that miR-146a inhibition had no effect on the expression of TRAF6 and IRAK1 in B cells. This result suggests that the function of miR-146a in B cells does not involve these two target molecules. We conclude that silencing miR-146a exerts its therapeutic effects by influencing the B-cell functions that contribute to the autoimmune pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. PMID:24962817

  6. Role of passive T-cell death in chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Issazadeh, Shohreh; Abdallah, Kald; Chitnis, Tanuja; Chandraker, Anil; Wells, Andrew D.; Turka, Laurence A.; Sayegh, Mohamed H.; Khoury, Samia J.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms of chronic disease and recovery from relapses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis, are unknown. Deletion of myelin-specific lymphocytes by apoptosis may play a role in termination of the inflammatory response. One pathway of apoptosis is the passive cell death or “cell death by neglect” pathway, which is under the control of the Bcl family of genes. To investigate the role of passive cell death pathway in EAE, we used mice with transgenic expression of the long form of the bcl-x gene (Bcl-xL) targeted to the T-cell lineage. We found that mice transgenic for Bcl-xL have an earlier onset and a more chronic form of EAE induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide 35–55 compared with wild-type littermate mice. This was not due to an expanded autoreactive cell repertoire. Primed peripheral lymphocytes from Bcl-xL transgenic mice showed increased proliferation and cytokine production to MOG peptide in vitro compared with lymphocytes from wild-type animals. Immunohistologic studies demonstrated increased cellular infiltrates, immunoglobulin precipitation, and demyelination in the Bcl-xL transgenic central nervous system (CNS) compared with controls. There was also a decreased number of apoptotic cells in the CNS of Bcl-xL transgenic mice when compared with littermates at all time points tested. This is the first report of an autoimmune disease model in Bcl-xL transgenic mice. Our data indicate that the passive cell death pathway is important in the pathogenesis of chronic EAE. These findings have implications for understanding the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:10772655

  7. Disparate Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Cuprizone-Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Justin D.; Smith, Matthew D.; Kirby, Leslie A.; Baxi, Emily G.; Whartenby, Katharine A

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are pleiotropic cells with potential therapeutic benefits for a wide range of diseases. Because of their immunomodulatory properties they have been utilized to treat autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), which is characterized by demyelination. The microenvironment surrounding MSCs is thought to affect their differentiation and phenotype, which could in turn affect the efficacy. We thus sought to dissect the potential for differential impact of MSCs on central nervous system (CNS) disease in T cell mediated and non-T cell mediated settings using the MOG35–55 experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and cuprizone-mediated demyelination models, respectively. As the pathogeneses of MS and EAE are thought to be mediated by IFNγ-producing (TH1) and IL-17A-producing (TH17) effector CD4+ T cells, we investigated the effect of MSCs on the development of these two key pathogenic cell groups. Although MSCs suppressed the activation and effector function of TH17 cells, they did not affect TH1 activation, but enhanced TH1 effector function and ultimately produced no effect on EAE. In the non- T cell mediated cuprizone model of demyelination, MSC administration had a positive effect, with an overall increase in myelin abundance in the brain of MSC-treated mice compared to controls. These results highlight the potential variability of MSCs as a biologic therapeutic tool in the treatment of autoimmune disease and the need for further investigation into the multifaceted functions of MSCs in diverse microenvironments and the mechanisms behind the diversity. PMID:26407166

  8. Alpha-tocopherol ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through the regulation of Th1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Haikuo; Ren, Huijun; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xiaoxu; Wang, Wanhai; Zhang, Shijie; Zhao, Junwei; Ming, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious neurological autoimmune disease, it commonly affects young adults. Vitamin E (Vit E) is an important component of human diet with antioxidant activity, which protects the body’s biological systems. In order to assess the effect of Vit E treatment on this autoimmune disease, we established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS, and treated EAE with α-tocopherol (AT) which is the main content of Vit E. Materials and Methods: Twenty C57BL/6 adult female mice were used and divided into two groups randomly. EAE was induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and one group was treated with AT, at a dose of 100 mg/kg on the 3th day post-immunization with MOG, the other group was treated with 1% alcohol. Mice were euthanized on day 14, post-immunization, spleens were removed for assessing splenocytes proliferation and cytokine profile, and spinal cords were dissected to assess the infiltration of inflammatory cells in spinal cord. Results: AT was able to attenuate the severity of EAE and delay the disease progression. H&E staining and fast blue staining indicated that AT reduced the inflammation and the demyelination reaction in the spinal cord. Treatment with AT significantly decreased the proliferation of splenocytes. AT also inhibited the production of IFN-γ (Th1 cytokine), though the other cytokines were only affected slightly. Conclusion: According to the results, AT ameliorated EAE, through suppressing the proliferation of T cells and the Th1 response. AT may be used as a potential treatment for MS. PMID:27403263

  9. Characterization of immune response to neurofilament light in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autoimmunity to neuronal proteins occurs in several neurological syndromes, where cellular and humoral responses are directed to surface as well as intracellular antigens. Similar to myelin autoimmunity, pathogenic immune response to neuroaxonal components such as neurofilaments may contribute to neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis. Methods We studied the immune response to the axonal protein neurofilament light (NF-L) in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis animal model of multiple sclerosis. To examine the association between T cells and axonal damage, pathology studies were performed on NF-L immunized mice. The interaction of T cells and axons was analyzed by confocal microscopy of central nervous system tissues and T-cell and antibody responses to immunodominant epitopes identified in ABH (H2-Ag7) and SJL/J (H2-As) mice. These epitopes, algorithm-predicted peptides and encephalitogenic motifs within NF-L were screened for encephalitogenicity. Results Confocal microscopy revealed both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells alongside damaged axons in the lesions of NF-L immunized mice. CD4+ T cells dominated the areas of axonal injury in the dorsal column of spastic mice in which the expression of granzyme B and perforin was detected. Identified NF-L epitopes induced mild neurological signs similar to the observed with the NF-L protein, yet distinct from those characteristic of neurological disease induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. Conclusions Our data suggest that CD4+ T cells are associated with spasticity, axonal damage and neurodegeneration in NF-L immunized mice. In addition, defined T-cell epitopes in the NF-L protein might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24053384

  10. Control of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by CD4+ Suppressor T Cells: Peripheral versus in situ Immunoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Bynoe, Margaret S.; Bonorino, Paula; Viret, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) can be efficiently kept under control by specialized subsets of CD4+ T lymphocytes able to negatively regulate the function of T cells with encephalitogenic potential. A number of observations support a role for such suppressor T cells in controlling early phases of disease development at the level of peripheral lymphoid organs but there is also evidence suggesting immunoregulation within the central nervous system (CNS) microenvironment itself. This review evaluates the sites of regulation based on available data from distinct experimental models. We then discuss these aspects with reference to suppressor CD4+ T cells induced through the epicutaneous application of pure CNS antigens that confer long term protection against EAE. Finally, we give an overview of genes recently discovered to be important in regulation of the immune system that may also prove to be key players in the modulation of EAE and MS. PMID:17900707

  11. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  12. Suppression of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by autologous T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Aricha, Revital; Reuveni, Debby; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of regulatory T (Treg) cells have been employed effectively for suppression of several animal models for autoimmune diseases. In order to employ Treg cell therapy in patients, it is necessary to generate Treg cells from the patient's own cells (autologous) that would be able to suppress effectively the disease in vivo, upon their reintroduction to the patient. Towards this objective, we report in the present study on a protocol for a successful immune-regulation of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) by ex vivo--generated autologous Treg cells. For this protocol bone marrow (BM) cells, are first cultured in the presence of GM-CSF, giving rise to a population of CD11c(+)MHCII(+)CD45RA(+)CD8(-) DCs (BMDCs). Splenic CD4(+) T cells are then co-cultured with the differentiated BM cells and expand to 90% of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. In vitro assay exhibits a similar dose dependent manner in the suppression of T effector cells proliferation between Treg cells obtained from either healthy or sick donors. In addition, both Treg cells inhibit similarly the secretion of IFN-γ from activated splenocytes. Administration of 1 × 10(6) ex-vivo generated Treg cells, I.V, to EAMG rats, modulates the disease following a single treatment, given 3 days or 3 weeks after disease induction. Similar disease inhibition was achieved when CD4 cells were taken from either healthy or sick donors. The disease suppression was accompanied by reduced levels of total AChR specific antibodies in the serum. Moreover, due to the polyclonality of the described Treg cell, we have examined whether this treatment approach could be also employed for the treatment of other autoimmune diseases involving Treg cells. Indeed, we demonstrated that the ex-vivo generated autologous Treg cells suppress Adjuvant Arthritis (AA) in rats. This study opens the way for the application of induced autologous Treg cell therapy for myasthenia gravis, as well as for other human autoimmune diseases

  13. T cell-intrinsic ASC critically promotes TH17-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bradley N; Wang, Chenhui; Zhang, Cun-Jin; Kang, Zizhen; Gulen, Muhammet Fatih; Zepp, Jarod A; Zhao, Junjie; Bian, Guanglin; Do, Jeong-Su; Min, Booki; Pavicic, Paul G; El-Sanadi, Caroline; Fox, Paul L; Akitsu, Aoi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Sarkar, Anasuya; Wewers, Mark D; Kaiser, William J; Mocarski, Edward S; Rothenberg, Marc E; Hise, Amy G; Dubyak, George R; Ransohoff, Richard M; Li, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) is critical for the in vivo survival, expansion and effector function of IL-17-producing helper T (TH17) cells during autoimmune responses, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the spatiotemporal role and cellular source of IL-1β during EAE pathogenesis are poorly defined. In the present study, we uncovered a T cell-intrinsic inflammasome that drives IL-1β production during TH17-mediated EAE pathogenesis. Activation of T cell antigen receptors induced expression of pro-IL-1β, whereas ATP stimulation triggered T cell production of IL-1β via ASC-NLRP3-dependent caspase-8 activation. IL-1R was detected on TH17 cells but not on type 1 helper T (TH1) cells, and ATP-treated TH17 cells showed enhanced survival compared with ATP-treated TH1 cells, suggesting autocrine action of TH17-derived IL-1β. Together these data reveal a critical role for IL-1β produced by a TH17 cell-intrinsic ASC-NLRP3-caspase-8 inflammasome during inflammation of the central nervous system. PMID:26998763

  14. Eriocalyxin B ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by suppressing Th1 and Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying; Chen, Bing; Song, Jun-Hong; Zhen, Tao; Wang, Bai-Yan; Li, Xin; Liu, Ping; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Qun-Ling; Xi, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Sheng-Di; Zuo, Jian-Ping; Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Eriocalyxin B (EriB), a diterpenoid isolated from Isodon eriocalyx, was previously reported to have antitumor effects via multiple pathways, and these pathways are related to immune responses. In this study, we demonstrated that EriB was efficacious in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis. Treatment with EriB led to amelioration of EAE, which correlated with reduced spinal cord inflammation and demyelination. EriB treatment abolished encephalitogenic T-cell responses to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in an adoptive transfer EAE model. The underlying mechanism of EriB-induced effects involved inhibition of T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 cell differentiation through Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator Of Transcription and Nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways as well as elevation of reactive oxygen species. These findings indicate that EriB exerts potent antiinflammatory effects through selective modulation of pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells by targeting critical signaling pathways. The study provides insights into the role of EriB as a unique therapeutic agent for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23345445

  15. Complement C5 in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) Facilitates Remyelination and Prevents Gliosis

    PubMed Central

    Weerth, Susanna H.; Rus, Horea; Shin, Moon L.; Raine, Cedric S.

    2003-01-01

    Activation of the classical complement system is known to play a central role in autoimmune demyelination. We have analyzed the role of complement component C5 in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) using C5-deficient (C5-d) and C5-sufficient (C5-s) mice. Both groups of mice displayed early onset EAE, a short recovery phase, and similar stable chronic courses. However, in contrast to the clinical similarities, marked differences were apparent by histopathology. During acute EAE in C5-d, a delay in inflammatory cell infiltration and tissue damage was observed along with restricted lesion areas, which in C5-s mice were more extensive and diffuse. More striking were the differences in chronic lesions. In C5-d mice, inflammatory demyelination and Wallerian degeneration were followed by axonal depletion and severe gliosis, while in C5-s, the same initial signs were followed by axonal sparing and extensive remyelination. In C5-d, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting showed an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein and a decrease in neurofilament protein, proteolipid protein, and several pro-inflammatory markers. These results in the EAE model indicate that absence of C5 resulted in fiber loss and extensive scarring, whereas presence of C5-favored axonal survival and more efficient remyelination. PMID:12937147

  16. Critical role of activation induced cytidine deaminase in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yonglian; Peng, Ivan; Senger, Kate; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Reichelt, Mike; Baca, Miriam; Yeh, Ronald; Lorenzo, Maria N; Sebrell, Andrew; Dela Cruz, Christopher; Tam, Lucinda; Corpuz, Racquel; Wu, Jiansheng; Sai, Tao; Roose-Girma, Merone; Warming, Søren; Balazs, Mercedesz; Gonzalez, Lino C; Caplazi, Patrick; Martin, Flavius; Devoss, Jason; Zarrin, Ali A

    2013-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative autoimmune disorder caused by chronic inflammation and demyelination within the central nervous system (CNS). Clinical studies in MS patients have demonstrated efficacy with B cell targeted therapies such as anti-CD20. However, the exact role that B cells play in the disease process is unclear. Activation Induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an essential enzyme for the processes of antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. To evaluate the impact of affinity maturation and isotype switching, we have interrogated the effect of AID-deficiency in an animal model of MS. Here, we show that the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by the extracellular domain of human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG1-125) is significantly reduced in Aicda deficient mice, which, unlike wild-type mice, lack serum IgG to myelin associated antigens. MOG specific T cell responses are comparable between wild-type and Aicda knockout mice suggesting an active role for antigen experienced B cells. Thus affinity maturation and/or class switching are critical processes in the pathogenesis of EAE. PMID:23167594

  17. Critical role of activation induced cytidine deaminase in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative autoimmune disorder caused by chronic inflammation and demyelination within the central nervous system (CNS). Clinical studies in MS patients have demonstrated efficacy with B cell targeted therapies such as anti-CD20. However, the exact role that B cells play in the disease process is unclear. Activation Induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an essential enzyme for the processes of antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. To evaluate the impact of affinity maturation and isotype switching, we have interrogated the effect of AID-deficiency in an animal model of MS. Here, we show that the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by the extracellular domain of human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG1-125) is significantly reduced in Aicda deficient mice, which, unlike wild-type mice, lack serum IgG to myelin associated antigens. MOG specific T cell responses are comparable between wild-type and Aicda knockout mice suggesting an active role for antigen experienced B cells. Thus affinity maturation and/or class switching are critical processes in the pathogenesis of EAE. PMID:23167594

  18. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue, gut microbes and susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Stanisavljević, S; Lukić, J; Momčilović, M; Miljković, M; Jevtić, B; Kojić, M; Golić, N; Mostarica Stojković, M; Miljković, D

    2016-06-01

    Gut microbiota and gut-associated lymphoid tissue have been increasingly appreciated as important players in pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of multiple sclerosis that can be induced with an injection of spinal cord homogenate emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant in Dark Agouti (DA) rats, but not in Albino Oxford (AO) rats. In this study, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), Peyer's patches (PP) and gut microbiota were analysed in these two rat strains. There was higher proportion of CD4(+) T cells and regulatory T cells in non-immunised DA rats in comparison to AO rats. Also, DA rat MLN and PP cells were higher producers of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ and interleukin-17. Finally, microbial analyses showed that uncultivated species of Turicibacter and Atopostipes genus were exclusively present in AO rats, in faeces and intestinal tissue, respectively. Thus, it is clear that in comparison of an EAE-susceptible with an EAE-resistant strain of rats, various discrepancies at the level of gut associated lymphoid tissue, as well as at the level of gut microbiota can be observed. Future studies should determine if the differences have functional significance for EAE pathogenesis. PMID:26839070

  19. Maternal deprivation of rat pups increases clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis at adult age.

    PubMed

    Teunis, Marc A T; Heijnen, Cobi J; Sluyter, Frans; Bakker, Joost M; Van Dam, Anne-Marie M W; Hof, Maleen; Cools, Alexander R; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2002-12-01

    Maternal deprivation of neonatal animals has been shown to induce long-lasting changes in the reactivity of the neuroendocrine system. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether maternal deprivation also affects susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in adult life. To this end, 9-day-old rat pups were subjected to a short-lasting maternal deprivation for a period of 24 h. At the age of 8 weeks, we induced EAE in these rats by immunization with myelin basic protein (MBP) in complete Freund's adjuvant. Our data demonstrate that short-lasting maternal deprivation induces a marked increase in the severity of EAE in the animals in later life. The histopathological evaluation of spinal cord and cerebellum corresponded with the observed differences in clinical symptoms of EAE. Moreover, neonatal maternal deprivation affects macrophage functioning at adult age. In contrast, no differences were observed in in vitro mitogen- and MBP-induced cytokine production by splenocytes. LPS-induced corticosterone release did not differ either between maternally deprived and control animals. We conclude that short-lasting neonatal maternal deprivation of rat pups has long-lasting consequences for macrophage activity and for susceptibility to the inflammatory autoimmune disease EAE. PMID:12446005

  20. Therapeutic effect of baicalin on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is mediated by SOCS3 regulatory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Li, Xing; Ciric, Bogoljub; Ma, Cun-Gen; Gran, Bruno; Rostami, Abdolmohamad; Zhang, Guang-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Natural compounds derived from medicinal plants have long been considered a rich source of novel therapeutic agents. Baicalin (Ba) is a bioactive flavonoid compound derived from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis, an herb widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigate the effects and mechanism of action of Ba in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Ba treatment effectively ameliorated clinical disease severity in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35–55 peptide-induced EAE, and reduced inflammation and demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS). Ba reduced infiltration of immune cells into the CNS, inhibited expression of proinflammatory molecules and chemokines, and prevented Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation via STAT/NFκB signaling pathways. Further, we showed that SOCS3 induction is essential to the effects of Ba, given that the inhibitory effect of Ba on pathogenic Th17 responses was largely abolished when SOCS3 signaling was knocked down. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Ba has significant potential as a novel anti-inflammatory agent for therapy of autoimmune diseases such as MS. PMID:26616302

  1. Fas-mediated apoptosis in clinical remissions of relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Suvannavejh, Graig C.; Dal Canto, Mauro C.; Matis, Louis A.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2000-01-01

    PLP139-51–induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (R-EAE) displays a relapsing-remitting paralytic course in female SJL mice. We investigated the role of apoptosis/activation-induced cell death (AICD) in the spontaneous recovery from acute disease. Clinical EAE was significantly enhanced in Fas (CD95/APO-1)–deficient SJL lpr/lpr mice, which displayed significantly increased mean peak clinical scores, reduced remission rates, and increased mortality when compared with their SJL +/lpr littermates. PLP139-151–specific proliferative responses were fairly equivalent in the 2 groups, but draining lymph node T cells from SJL lpr/lpr mice produced dramatically increased levels of IFN-γ. Central nervous system (CNS) Fas and FasL mRNA levels in wild-type SJL (H-2s) mice peaked just before spontaneous disease remission and gradually declined as disease remitted. We applied the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay to detect apoptosis in situ in spinal cords of mice at various clinical stages of EAE. Most TUNEL+ cells were found during active periods of inflammation: the acute, peak, and relapse time points. Significantly fewer apoptotic cells were observed at preclinical and remission time points. Collectively, these findings indicate that Fas-mediated apoptosis/AICD plays a major role in the spontaneous remission after the initial acute inflammatory episode and represents an important intrinsic mechanism in regulation of autoimmune responses. PMID:10642601

  2. Conditioned Medium from the Stem Cells of Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Chiaki; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Jin, Shijie; Parajuli, Bijay; Hattori, Hisashi; Suzumura, Akio; Hibi, Hideharu; Ueda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2016-05-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a major neuroinflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS. Current MS treatments, including immunomodulators and immunosuppressants, do not result in complete remission. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) are mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp. Both SHED and SHED-conditioned medium (SHED-CM) exhibit immunomodulatory and regenerative activities and have the potential to treat various diseases. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of SHED-CM in treating experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of MS. EAE mice treated with a single injection of SHED-CM exhibited significantly improved disease scores, reduced demyelination and axonal injury, and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression in the spinal cord, which was associated with a shift in the microglia/macrophage phenotype from M1 to M2. SHED-CM also inhibited the proliferation of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific CD4(+) T cells, as well as their production of proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. Treatment of EAE mice with the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9, a major component of SHED-CM, recapitulated the effects of SHED-CM treatment. Our data suggest that SHED-CM and secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 may be novel therapeutic treatments for autoimmune diseases, such as MS. PMID:27053763

  3. Carboxypeptidase N-deficient mice present with polymorphic disease phenotypes on induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Wetsel, Rick A; Ramos, Theresa N; Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L; Schoeb, Trenton R; Barnum, Scott R

    2014-02-01

    Carboxypeptidase N (CPN) is a member of the carboxypeptidase family of enzymes that cleave carboxy-terminal lysine and arginine residues from a large number of biologically active peptides and proteins. These enzymes are best known for their roles in modulating the activity of kinins, complement anaphylatoxins and coagulation proteins. Although CPN makes important contributions to acute inflammatory events, little is known about its role in autoimmune disease. In this study we used CPN(-/-) mice in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. Unexpectedly, we observed several EAE disease phenotypes in CPN(-/-) mice compared to wild type mice. The majority of CPN(-/-) mice died within five to seven days after disease induction, before displaying clinical signs of disease. The remaining mice presented with either mild EAE or did not develop EAE. In addition, CPN(-/-) mice injected with complete or incomplete Freund's adjuvant died within the same time frame and in similar numbers as those induced for EAE. Overall, the course of EAE in CPN(-/-) mice was significantly delayed and attenuated compared to wild type mice. Spinal cord histopathology in CPN(-/-) mice revealed meningeal, but not parenchymal leukocyte infiltration, and minimal demyelination. Our results indicate that CPN plays an important role in EAE development and progression and suggests that multiple CPN ligands contribute to the disease phenotypes we observed. PMID:24028840

  4. C-Kit plays a critical role in induction of intravenous tolerance in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Farinaz; Li, Hongmei; Gonnella, Patricia; Mari, Elisabeth Rose; Rasouli, Javad; Zhang, Guang Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2015-01-01

    c-Kit (CD117) is a tyrosine kinase receptor found in various types of immune cells. It has been shown that c-Kit plays a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, an inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the CNS. Recent data have suggested an immunoregulatory effect of c-Kit. We therefore examined the role of c-Kit in autoantigen-induced i.v. tolerance in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Our results show that induction of intravenous tolerance against EAE in B6 mice is characterized by increased numbers of CD117+ cells and altered mast-cell associated molecules in the periphery and in the CNS. W−sh (c-Kit deficient) mice were resistant to i.v autoantigen-induced tolerance, with increased proinflammatory cytokine production in the periphery. I.v. autoantigen in WT mice suppressed production of proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and IL-6 and up-regulated expression of FoxP3, a transcription factor of Tregs; however, in W−sh mice IFN-γ and IL-6 were increased with a failure of FoxP3 induction upon i.v. autoantigen injection, and is thus a mechanism for resistance to i.v. tolerance induction in these mice. We conclude that c-kit signaling has a regulatory role in i.v. tolerance and could be a target for potential immunotherapy in autoimmune disorders. PMID:25588867

  5. Erythropoietin is a hypoxia inducible factor-induced protective molecule in experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bangwei; Jiang, Man; Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Xiong, Jian; Schluesener, Hermann J; Zhang, Zhiren; Wu, Yuzhang

    2013-08-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN), an autoantigen-specific T-cell-mediated disease model for human demyelinating inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system, is characterized by self-limitation. Here we investigated the regulation and contribution of erythropoietin (EPO) in EAN self-limitation. In EAN sciatic nerves, hypoxia, and protein and mRNA levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), HIF-2α, EPO and EPO receptor (EPOR) were induced in parallel at disease peak phase but reduced at recovery periods. Further, the deactivation of HIF reduced EAN-induced EPO/EPOR upregulation in EAN, suggesting the central contribution of HIF to EPO/EPOR induction. The deactivation of EPOR signalling exacerbated EAN progression, implying that endogenous EPO contributed to EAN recovery. Exogenous EPO treatment greatly improved EAN recovery. In addition, EPO was shown to promote Schwann cell survival and myelin production. In EAN, EPO treatment inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and altered helper T cell differentiation by inducing increase of Foxp3(+)/CD4(+) regulatory T cells and decrease of IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) Th1 cells. Furthermore, EPO inhibited inflammatory macrophage activation and promoted its phagocytic activity. In summary, our data demonstrated that EPO was induced in EAN by HIF and contributed to EAN recovery, and endogenous and exogenous EPO could effectively suppress EAN by attenuating inflammation and exerting direct cell protection, indicating that EPO contributes to the self-recovery of EAN and could be a potent candidate for treatment of autoimmune neuropathies. PMID:23603807

  6. Reprogrammed quiescent B cells provide an effective cellular therapy against chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Gómez, Elisabeth; Lampropoulou, Vicky; Shen, Ping; Neves, Patricia; Roch, Toralf; Stervbo, Ulrik; Rutz, Sascha; Kühl, Anja A.; Heppner, Frank L.; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Anderton, Stephen M.; Kanellopoulos, Jean M.; Charneau, Pierre; Fillatreau, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Activated B cells can regulate immunity, and have been envisaged as potential cell-based therapy for treating autoimmune diseases. However, activated human B cells can also propagate immune responses, and the effects resulting from their infusion into patients cannot be predicted. This led us to consider resting B cells, which in contrast are poorly immunogenic, as an alternative cellular platform for the suppression of unwanted immunity. Here, we report that resting B cells can be directly engineered to express antigens in a remarkably simple, rapid, and effective way with lentiviral vectors. Notably, this neither required nor induced activation of the B cells. With that approach we were able to produce reprogrammed resting B cells that inhibited antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and B cells upon adoptive transfer in mice. Furthermore, resting B cells engineered to ectopically express myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antigen protected recipient mice from severe disability and demyelination in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and even induced complete remission from disease in mice lacking functional natural regulatory T cells, which otherwise developed a chronic paralysis. In conclusion, our study introduces reprogrammed quiescent B cells as a novel tool for suppressing undesirable immunity. PMID:21469107

  7. Hydrogen-rich water improves neurological functional recovery in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Liu, Ming-Dong; Pu, Ying-Yan; Wang, Dan; Xie, Yu; Xue, Gai-Ci; Jiang, Yong; Yang, Qian-Qian; Sun, Xue-Jun; Cao, Li

    2016-05-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The high costs, inconvenient administration, and side effects of current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs often lead to poor adherence to the long-term treatment of MS. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been reported to exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, and anti-cancer effects. In the present study, we explored the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) on the progress of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for MS. We found that prophylactic administration of both 0.36mM and 0.89mM HRW was able to delay EAE onset and reduce maximum clinical scores. Moreover, 0.89mM HRW also reduced disease severity, CNS infiltration, and demyelination when administered after the onset of disease. Furthermore, HRW treatment prevented infiltration of CD4(+) T lymphocytes into the CNS and inhibited Th17 cell development without affecting Th1 cell populations. Because HRW is non-toxic, inexpensive, easily administered, and can readily cross the blood-brain barrier, our experiments suggest that HRW may have great potential in the treatment of MS. PMID:27138092

  8. Attenuation of Experimental Autoimmune Hepatitis by Exogenous and Endogenous Cannabinoids: Involvement of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Venkatesh L.; Hegde, Shweta; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated liver diseases including autoimmune and viral hepatitis are a major health problem worldwide. Natural cannabinoids such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) effectively modulate immune cell function, and they have shown therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effects of THC in a murine model of concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis. Intraperitoneal administration of THC after ConA challenge inhibited hepatitis as shown by significant decrease in liver enzymes and reduced liver tissue injury. Furthermore, THC treatment resulted in significant suppression of crucial inflammatory cytokines in ConA-induced hepatitis. It is noteworthy that THC treatment in ConA-injected mice led to significant increase in absolute number of Forkhead helix transcription factor p3+ T regulatory cells in liver. We were surprised to find that select cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) agonists were not able to block hepatitis either independently or in combination. However, CB1/CB2 mixed agonists were able to efficiently attenuate hepatitis similar to THC. The modulatory effect of THC in ConA-induced hepatitis was reversed by both CB1 and CB2 antagonists. We also observed that endogenous cannabinoid anandamide was able to reduce hepatitis by suppressing cytokine levels. In addition, deficiency or inhibition of endocannabinoid hydrolyzing enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which leads to increased levels of endogenous cannabinoids, resulted in decreased liver injury upon ConA challenge. Our data demonstrate that targeting cannabinoid receptors using exogenous or endogenous cannabinoids and use of FAAH inhibitors may constitute novel therapeutic modalities to treat immune-mediated liver inflammation. PMID:18388242

  9. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Block, Darci R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Cunningham, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155–330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99–340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225–945 μmol/L and 276–687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  10. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Block, Darci R; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Cunningham, Scott A; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155-330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99-340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225-945 μmol/L and 276-687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  11. Combining genetic mapping with genome-wide expression in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis highlights a gene network enriched for T cell functions and candidate genes regulating autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Thessen Hedreul, Melanie; Möller, Steffen; Stridh, Pernilla; Gupta, Yask; Gillett, Alan; Daniel Beyeen, Amennai; Öckinger, Johan; Flytzani, Sevasti; Diez, Margarita; Olsson, Tomas; Jagodic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    The experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system commonly used to study multiple sclerosis (MS). We combined clinical EAE phenotypes with genome-wide expression profiling in spleens from 150 backcross rats between susceptible DA and resistant PVG rat strains during the chronic EAE phase. This enabled correlation of transcripts with genotypes, other transcripts and clinical EAE phenotypes and implicated potential genetic causes and pathways in EAE. We detected 2285 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). Sixty out of 599 cis-eQTLs overlapped well-known EAE QTLs and constitute positional candidate genes, including Ifit1 (Eae7), Atg7 (Eae20-22), Klrc3 (eEae22) and Mfsd4 (Eae17). A trans-eQTL that overlaps Eae23a regulated a large number of small RNAs and implicates a master regulator of transcription. We defined several disease-correlated networks enriched for pathways involved in cell-mediated immunity. They include C-type lectins, G protein coupled receptors, mitogen-activated protein kinases, transmembrane proteins, suppressors of transcription (Jundp2 and Nr1d1) and STAT transcription factors (Stat4) involved in interferon signaling. The most significant network was enriched for T cell functions, similar to genetic findings in MS, and revealed both established and novel gene interactions. Transcripts in the network have been associated with T cell proliferation and differentiation, the TCR signaling and regulation of regulatory T cells. A number of network genes and their family members have been associated with MS and/or other autoimmune diseases. Combining disease and genome-wide expression phenotypes provides a link between disease risk genes and distinct molecular pathways that are dysregulated during chronic autoimmune inflammation. PMID:23900079

  12. Experimental murine chronic hepatitis: results following intrahepatic inoculation of human uveitis mycoplasma-like organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L. A.; Wirostko, E.; Wirostko, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    Mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO) are non-cultivated intracellular cell-wall deficient pathogenic bacteria with a distinctive ultrastructural appearance. Diagnosis of MLO disease depends on finding the organisms in parasitized cells using a transmission electron microscope. MLO are a well studied cause of transmissible chronic plant disease responsive to antibiotics. MLO have recently been found to cause human chronic uveitis, orbital, and retinal disease with autoimmune features. Ophthalmic leucocytes in these patients display MLO parasitization. Inoculation of human uveitis MLO into mouse eyelids produced chronic uveitis. MLO also disseminated to produce randomly distributed lethal systemic disease including chronic hepatitis. MLO parasitized leucocytes were present in all disease sites. Direct intrahepatic inoculation of human hepatic pathogens is a simple and efficient technique to produce murine hepatitis. This report describes the delayed onset widespread inflammatory liver disease produced by direct intrahepatic inoculation of human chronic uveitis MLO in 12 of 20 mice versus 0 in 40 controls (P < 0.05). The liver disease was accompanied by elevated serum SGOT levels, splenomegaly, and accelerated mortality. All 12 inflamed livers displayed MLO parasitized leucocytes versus 0 of 10 control livers. The resemblance of human chronic active hepatitis, massive hepatic necrosis, and post-necrotic cirrhosis to the MLO induced murine liver disease, the role of molecular biologic techniques in the detection and classification of those bacteria, and in therapy of MLO disease are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8398804

  13. IL-12Rβ2 has a protective role in relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chong; Ciric, Bogoljub; Yu, Shuo; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-01-01

    IL-12Rβ2 participates in the receptors of IL-12 and IL-35, two cytokines that are involved in a variety of immune responses. In this study we evaluate the role of IL-12Rβ2 in relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (RR-EAE). We found that the IL-12Rβ2 deficient SJL/J EAE mice presented more severe symptoms and had more frequent, more severe relapses compared with wild type controls. IL-12Rβ2 deficient EAE mice also had more infiltrating mononuclear cells in the central nervous system, as well as higher splenic proliferative capacity and decreased IFN-γ production at the periphery. These findings suggest a protective role of IL-12Rβ2 in RR-EAE, an animal model of RR-MS, the most prevalent form of MS. PMID:26857496

  14. Microglia response in retina and optic nerve in chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Lioba; Kuehn, Sandra; Pedreiturria, Xiomara; Haak, Kathrin; Pfarrer, Christiane; Dick, H Burkhard; Kleiter, Ingo; Joachim, Stephanie C

    2016-09-15

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a common rodent model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet, the long-term consequences for retina and optic nerve (ON) are unknown. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with an encephalitogenic peptide (MOG35-55) and the controls received the carriers or PBS. Clinical symptoms started at day 8, peaked at day 14, and were prevalent until day 60. They correlated with infiltration and demyelination of the ON. In MOG-immunized animals more microglia cells in the ONs and retinas were detected at day 60. Additionally, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss was combined with an increased macroglia response. At this late stage, an increased number of microglia was associated with axonal damage in the ON and in the retina with RGC loss. Whether glial activation contributes to repair mechanisms or adversely affects the number of RGCs is currently unclear. PMID:27609273

  15. Prazosin, an alpha 1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the Lewis rat.

    PubMed Central

    Brosnan, C F; Goldmuntz, E A; Cammer, W; Factor, S M; Bloom, B R; Norton, W T

    1985-01-01

    Prazosin, an antagonist of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, has been found to suppress the clinical and histological expression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the Lewis rat. Suppression was more significant in females than in males and was a dose-dependent phenomenon. Analysis of the effect of other adrenergic receptor antagonists supports the conclusion that the suppressive effect of prazosin is a consequence of blockade of the alpha 1-receptor since treatment with either the alpha 2-antagonist yohimbine or the beta-antagonist propranolol exacerbated the disease, whereas treatment with the long-acting mixed alpha 1/alpha 2-antagonist phenoxybenzamine had some suppressive activity. Treatment with prazosin was also able to suppress clinical and histological signs of EAE in animals sensitized by adoptive transfer with activated spleen or lymph node cells. Whether prazosin acts through altering vascular permeability or the immune response, or both, remains to be determined. Images PMID:2994053

  16. Experimental autoimmune neuritis induces differential microglia activation in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Beiter, Thomas; Artelt, Matthias R; Trautmann, Katrin; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2005-03-01

    The reactive spatial and temporal activation pattern of parenchymal spinal cord microglia was analyzed in rat experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN). We observed a differential activation of spinal cord microglial cells. A significant increase in ED1(+) microglia predominantly located in the dorsal horn grey matter of lumbar and thoracic spinal cord levels was observed on Day 12. As revealed by morphological criteria and by staining with further activation markers [allograft inflammatory factor 1 (AIF-1), EMAPII, OX6, P2X(4)R], reactive microglia did not reach a macrophage-like state of full activation. On Day 12, a significant proliferative response could be observed, affecting all spinal cord areas and including ED1(+) microglial cells and a wide range of putative progenitor cells. Thus, in rat EAN, a reactive localized and distinct microglial activation correlating with a generalized proliferative response could be observed. PMID:15710454

  17. Pertussis toxin promotes relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Mohajeri, Maryam; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Javan, Mohammad

    2015-12-15

    Animal models simulate different aspects of human diseases and are essential to get a better understanding of the disease, studying treatments and producing new drugs. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a preferred model in multiple sclerosis research. Common EAE model in Lewis rats is induced using MBP peptide as a myelin antigen which results in a monophasic disease course. In the present study, EAE was induced in Lewis rats by homogenized guinea pig spinal cord along with or without pertussis toxin (PT). When PT was used, EAE turned into remitting-relapsing form and worsen the clinical symptoms. Higher inflammation and oxidative stress marker gene expression was observed when PT was administrated. PMID:26616879

  18. C-C chemokine receptor type 4 antagonist Compound 22 ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Kota; Miyamoto, Katsuichi; Tanaka, Noriko; Ueno, Rino; Nakayama, Takashi; Yoshie, Osamu; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2016-02-15

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune response. We previously reported the pathogenic role of C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CCR4) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here, we examined whether CCR4 antagonism modulates the disease course of EAE. Wild-type and CCR4-knockout mice were induced EAE and were administered Compound 22, an antagonist of CCR4. Compound 22 significantly ameliorated the severity of EAE in wild-type mice, but not in the CCR4-knockout mice. Compound 22 inhibited Th1 and Th17 polarization of antigen-induced T-cell responses. Therefore, CCR4 antagonists might be potential therapeutic agents for multiple sclerosis. PMID:26857495

  19. Damage to the Optic Chiasm in Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein–Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mice

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Sheryl L; Palmer, Vanessa L; Whittaker, Heather; Smith, Blair Cardigan; Kim, Annie; Schellenberg, Angela E; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Buist, Richard; Del Bigio, Marc R; Martin, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Optic chiasm lesions in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)–experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice were characterized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and validated using electron microscopy (EM). MR images were collected from 3 days after induction to remission, approximately 20 days after induction. Hematoxylin and eosin, solochrome cyanin–stained sections, and EM images were obtained from the optic chiasms of some mice approximately 4 days after disease onset when their scores were thought to be the highest. T2-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient map hyperintensities corresponded to abnormalities in the optic chiasms of EAE mice. Mixed inflammation was concentrated at the lateral surface. Degeneration of oligodendrocytes, myelin, and early axonal damage were also apparent. A marked increase in chiasm thickness was observed. T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI can detect abnormalities in the optic chiasms of MOG-EAE mice. MRI is an important method in the study of this model toward understanding optic neuritis. PMID:25520558

  20. Damage to the optic chiasm in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Sheryl L; Palmer, Vanessa L; Whittaker, Heather; Smith, Blair Cardigan; Kim, Annie; Schellenberg, Angela E; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Buist, Richard; Del Bigio, Marc R; Martin, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Optic chiasm lesions in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice were characterized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and validated using electron microscopy (EM). MR images were collected from 3 days after induction to remission, approximately 20 days after induction. Hematoxylin and eosin, solochrome cyanin-stained sections, and EM images were obtained from the optic chiasms of some mice approximately 4 days after disease onset when their scores were thought to be the highest. T2-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient map hyperintensities corresponded to abnormalities in the optic chiasms of EAE mice. Mixed inflammation was concentrated at the lateral surface. Degeneration of oligodendrocytes, myelin, and early axonal damage were also apparent. A marked increase in chiasm thickness was observed. T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI can detect abnormalities in the optic chiasms of MOG-EAE mice. MRI is an important method in the study of this model toward understanding optic neuritis. PMID:25520558

  1. The influence of cyclosporin A on experimental autoimmune thyroid disease in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, A.M.; Rennie, D.P.; Weetman, A.P.; Hassman, R.A.; Foord, S.M.; Dieguez, C.; Hall, R.

    1983-01-01

    Female PVG/c rats, thymectomised on weaning and given 4 courses of whole body irradiation to a total dose of 1000 rads, developed experimental autoimmune thyroid disease (EAITD) as assessed by histological evidence of thyroiditis and circulating levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies. Hypothyroidism resulted. Induction of the disease was associated with a highly significant fall in T lymphocyte numbers. Eight weeks after their last dose of irradiation the animals commenced treatment with cyclosporin A (10 mg/kg rat/day, intragastrically) and were treated for varying time intervals thereafter. The reversal of the T lymphocyte helper: suppressor ratio on cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a significant improvement in the disease process. The alterations in the T cell subsets and in the disease lasted only as long as the drug was administered and thereafter reverted towards that seen in the control groups of animals receiving no treatment.

  2. Prior regular exercise improves clinical outcome and reduces demyelination and axonal injury in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Danielle; Brambilla, Roberta; Bracchi-Ricard, Valerie; Karmally, Shaffiat; Dellarole, Anna; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Bethea, John R

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown that forced exercise modulates inflammation and is therapeutic acutely for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the long-term benefits have not been evaluated. In this study, we investigated the effects of preconditioning exercise on the clinical and pathological progression of EAE. Female C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to either an exercised (Ex) or unexercised (UEx) group and all of them were induced for EAE. Mice in the Ex group had an attenuated clinical score relative to UEx mice throughout the study. At 42 dpi, flow cytometry analysis showed a significant reduction in B cells, CD4(+) T cells, and CD8(+) T cells infiltrating into the spinal cord in the Ex group compared to UEx. Ex mice also had a significant reduction in myelin damage with a corresponding increase in proteolipid protein expression. Finally, Ex mice had a significant reduction in axonal damage. Collectively, our study demonstrates for the first time that a prolonged and forced preconditioning protocol of exercise improves clinical outcome and attenuates pathological hallmarks of EAE at chronic disease. In this study, we show that a program of 6 weeks of preconditioning exercise promoted a significant reduction of cells infiltrating into the spinal cord, a significant reduction in myelin damage and a significant reduction in axonal damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice at 42 dpi. Collectively, our study demonstrates for the first time that a preconditioning protocol of exercise improves clinical outcome and attenuates pathological hallmarks of EAE at chronic disease. PMID:26364732

  3. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a model for multiple sclerosis (MS)

    PubMed Central

    Constantinescu, Cris S; Farooqi, Nasr; O'Brien, Kate; Gran, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the most commonly used experimental model for the human inflammatory demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis (MS). EAE is a complex condition in which the interaction between a variety of immunopathological and neuropathological mechanisms leads to an approximation of the key pathological features of MS: inflammation, demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis. The counter-regulatory mechanisms of resolution of inflammation and remyelination also occur in EAE, which, therefore can also serve as a model for these processes. Moreover, EAE is often used as a model of cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune conditions in general. EAE has a complex neuropharmacology, and many of the drugs that are in current or imminent use in MS have been developed, tested or validated on the basis of EAE studies. There is great heterogeneity in the susceptibility to the induction, the method of induction and the response to various immunological or neuropharmacological interventions, many of which are reviewed here. This makes EAE a very versatile system to use in translational neuro- and immunopharmacology, but the model needs to be tailored to the scientific question being asked. While creating difficulties and underscoring the inherent weaknesses of this model of MS in straightforward translation from EAE to the human disease, this variability also creates an opportunity to explore multiple facets of the immune and neural mechanisms of immune-mediated neuroinflammation and demyelination as well as intrinsic protective mechanisms. This allows the eventual development and preclinical testing of a wide range of potential therapeutic interventions. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21371012

  4. Effect and Mechanism of QiShenYiQi Pill on Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Shichao; Wu, Meifang; Li, Meng; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Ling; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Background To observe the effect of QiShenYiQi pill (QSYQ) on experimental autoimmune myocarditis rats, and to explore its mechanism of action. Material/methods Lewis rats underwent the injection of myocardial myosin mixed with Freund’s complete adjuvant were randomized into 3 groups: model, valsartan, and QSYQ groups. Rats injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) mixed with Freund’s complete adjuvant were used as the control group. Rats were euthanized at 4 and 8 weeks, and we weighed rat body mass, heart mass, and left ventricular mass. Myocardium sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson trichrome. Myocardial TGF-β1 and CTGF protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry, and myocardial TGF-β1 and CTGF mRNA expression was detected by real-time qPCR. Results QSYQ reduced HMI and LVMI, as well as the histological score of hearts and CVF, which further decreased over time, and its effect was significantly greater than that of valsartan at 4 and 8 weeks. After 4 weeks, QSYQ inhibited the protein and mRNA expression of TGF-β1 and CTGF, and its effect on lowering CTGF was significantly greater than that of valsartan. In addition, after 8 weeks, QSYQ also inhibited the protein and mRNA expression of CTGF, whereas there was no significant difference in the expression of myocardial TGF-β1. Conclusions This study provides evidence that QSYQ can improve cardiac remodeling of experimental autoimmune myocarditis rats. It also effectively improved the degree of myocardial fibrosis, which is related to the mechanism of regulation of TGF-β1 CTGF. PMID:26946470

  5. Age-associated changes in rat immune system: lessons learned from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Djikić, Jasmina; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Pilipović, Ivan; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Bufan, Biljana; Kosec, Duško; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2014-10-01

    Aging is associated with the decline in immune response to infectious agents and tumors and increasing risk of autoimmunity, but the incidence of autoimmune diseases does not increase in the elderly. To elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms influencing clinical expression of autoimmunity in aged animals, the phenotypic and functional characteristics of mononuclear cells isolated from the spinal cords of 3-month-old (young) and 26-month-old (aged) Dark Agouti rats immunized to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) - the model of multiple sclerosis, the most common autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, were examined. Aged rats were less susceptible to EAE induction, and the neurological and histological picture was milder in those rats which developed the clinically manifested disease. At the peak of the disease, several times fewer mononuclear cells and T lymphocytes were isolated from the spinal cords of aged rats compared with the young ones. The frequency of CD4+ cells among TCRαβ+ lymphocytes, as well as that of reactivated CD134(OX40)+ cells within its CD4+ T-lymphocyte subpopulation, was less in spinal cords of aged compared with young rats. Additionally, CD134 surface density on CD4+ lymphocytes was decreased in the spinal cord of aged rats. The changes in CD134 expression most likely reflected in part age-related intrinsic changes in CD4+ lymphocytes as the expression of this molecule was also impaired on in vitro stimulated naïve CD4+ splenocytes from aged rats compared with young animals. In addition, greater frequency of CD8+ lymphocytes with regulatory phenotypes could also contribute to impaired CD4+ cell reactivation in aged rats. The increased apoptosis of CD4+ cells from aged rats was consistent with their impaired reactivation and it was accompanied by the greater frequency of CD4+CD11b+CD45(int/high) cells, which are supposed to be actively engaged in apoptotic cell phagocytosis and to have immunoregulatory

  6. Thymoquinone inhibits the activation of NF-kappaB in the brain and spinal cord of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, A; Afridi, D M; Garani, O; Tucci, M

    2005-01-01

    The present study was done to investigate the possible effects of thymoquinone on the inhibition of activation of NF-kappaB in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the rat model of multiple sclerosis. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in Lewis rats by injecting myelin basic protein emulsified in complete freund's adjuvant. Several parameters including clinical signs, perivascular cuffing and infiltration of mononuclear cells in the brain and spinal cord, glutathione levels in the red blood cells and inhibition of the activation of NF-kappaB were determined to assess the degree of protection. The study showed that treatment of rats with thymoquinone 1 mg/kg/day concomitant to myelin basic protein and after the appearance of clinical signs resulted in preventing and ameliorating experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thymoquinone was able to counter perivascular cuffing and infiltration of mononuclear cells in the brain and spinal cord, increase the red blood cell glutathione, and inhibit the activation of NF-kappaB in the brain and spinal cord. These results were consistent with the clinical signs and suggest a beneficial effect of thymoquinone against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the rat model of multiple sclerosis. PMID:15850137

  7. Intermittent feeding attenuates clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Kafami, Laya; Raza, Mohsin; Razavi, Alireza; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Movahedian, Mansooreh; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory, demyelinating disease of human central nervous system. Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the commonly used animal model of MS. Calorie restriction has been found to reduce inflammation and autoimmune responses and promote neuroprotection. In this study we evaluated the effects of intermittent feeding protocol of the calorie restriction in a mouse model of EAE. Fifty four female mice (C57BL/6) were used in this study. The animals were divided into two dietary groups: ad libitum (AL) (n = 29) with free access to food and water and intermittent feeding (IF) (n = 25) with access to food on alternate days. After 8 weeks, EAE was induced in animals by immunization with MOG antigen (Hooke labs, Lawrence, MA, USA) subcutaneously. AL and IF groups were then further divided into two groups each: AA (ad libitum until the end of study) (n = 16) and AI (subjected to intermittent feeding regimen after immunization day) (n = 13). The IF group was divided into II (continued intermittent feeding regimen until the end of study) (n = 13) and IA (changed to AL regimen after immunization day) (n = 12). All the animals were behaviorally monitored for 35 days after immunization and observed daily for the signs and severity of disease with EAE scoring scale [0-5] and cumulative disease index (CDI) score. Intermittent feeding significantly reduced the incidence of EAE in IF groups (AI 0%, II 18.5%, IA 22.2%, p < 0.05). In addition, intermittent feeding significantly delayed the onset of EAE in AI group (p < 0.05) and also, intermittent feeding significantly reduced the severity of disease in II and IA groups (AA vs. II, p < 0.05 & AA vs. IA p < 0.05) groups. The CDI was also significantly reduced in intermittent feeding fed groups [AI, II and IA compared to AA group (P < 0.05, <0.01, <0.05 respectively)]. Intermittent feeding regimen protocol of the calorie restriction significantly suppressed EAE incidence, induction

  8. Glatiramer acetate guards against rapid memory decline during relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    LoPresti, Patrizia

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive decline presents a therapeutic challenge for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease characterized by recurrent autoimmune demyelination and by progressive CNS degeneration. Glatiramer acetate (GA, also known as Copolymer 1, Cop-1, or Copaxone), commonly used to treat MS, reduces the frequency of relapses; it has both anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. However, clinical trials have not definitively shown that GA improves cognitive impairment during MS. Using an in vivo animal model of autoimmune demyelination, i.e., relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we tested short-term memory in EAE mice (EAE), in EAE mice treated with GA for 10 days starting at the time of immunization (EAE + GA), and in age-matched healthy, naïve mice (Naïve). Short-term memory was assessed using the cross-maze test at 10, 20, and 30 days post-immunization (d.p.i.); data were analyzed at each time point and over time. At 10 d.p.i., EAE and EAE + GA mice had better memory function than Naïve mice. However, at the later time points, EAE mice had a steep negative slope of memory function (indicating decline), whereas EAE + GA mice had a flatter, less-negative slope of memory function. Notably, the memory function of EAE mice significantly decreased over time compared with that of Naïve mice, indicating that EAE had a negative impact on cognitive ability. In contrast, there was no statistically significant difference between the slopes of memory function in mice with EAE treated with GA versus Naïve mice, which revealed effective, albeit partial, protection by GA treatment against progressive memory decline during EAE disease. Of particular interest, although EAE mice had memory decline over 30 d.p.i., their clinical disease scores improved during that time. Thus, our results suggest that EAE mice had a significant progressive memory decline and that GA, administered at the time of immunization, partially guards against rapid

  9. NKT cells can help mediate the protective effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Amanda; Zhao, Jun; Cantorna, Margherita T

    2015-05-01

    Active vitamin D [1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3)] blocks the development of experimental autoimmune diseases. However, the molecular and immunobiological mechanisms underlying 1,25D3's anti-inflammatory properties are not fully understood. We employed a murine model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in order to determine the role of NKT cells in 1,25D3-mediated protection from EAE. Wild-type (WT) mice or mice lacking all NKT cells (CD1d(-/-)) or invariant NKT cells (Jα18(-/-)) were fed control or 1,25D3-supplemented diets. All mice fed with the control diet developed severe EAE. 1,25D3 treatment of WT mice protected them from developing EAE. CD1d(-/-) and Jα18(-/-) mice treated with 1,25D3 were not protected to the same extent as WT mice. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific IL-17 and IFN-γ production was significantly reduced in 1,25D3 WT mice compared with WT but was not decreased in 1,25D3 CD1d(-/-) mice compared with CD1d(-/-) mice. IL-4(-/-) mice were utilized to determine how IL-4 deficiency affects susceptibility to EAE. IL-4(-/-) mice were not protected from developing EAE by α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) or 1,25D3 treatment. Furthermore, 1,25D3 treatment of splenocytes in vitro decreased α-GalCer-induced IL-17 and increased IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 production. 1,25D3 alters the cytokine profile of invariant NKT cells in vitro. These studies demonstrate that NKT cells are important mediators of 1,25D3-induced protection from EAE in mice and NKT cell-derived IL-4 may be an important factor in providing this protection. PMID:25574039

  10. Therapeutic effect of recombinant lentiviral vector containing succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein on the treatment of experimental autoimmunity myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Han, Lina; Wang, Chunxi; Guo, Shuli; Liu, Siyu; Yang, Liming

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac autoimmune reaction takes part in myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Existing literature has confirmed that the occurrence of cardiomyopathy belongs to mitochondrial diseases and is related to the oxidative respiratory chain subunit. The special structure of iron-sulfur protein (ISP) is responsible for the oxidative stress in oxidative phosphorylation, which is also a target that is easily attacked by various damage factors. Using gene therapy technology to restore succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein (SDISP) function- and thus resume myocardial mitochondria function and myocardial function is hypothesized to alleviate the experimental autoimmunity myocarditis (EAM). PMID:27372865

  11. P2Y2R Deficiency Attenuates Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis Development

    PubMed Central

    Relvas, Lia Judice M.; Makhoul, Maya; Dewispelaere, Remi; Caspers, Laure; Communi, Didier; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie; Robaye, Bernard; Bruyns, Catherine; Willermain, François

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to study the role of the nucleotide receptor P2Y2R in the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). EAU was induced in P2Y2+/+ and P2Y2-/- mice by immunization with IRBP peptide or by adoptive transfer of in vitro restimulated semi-purified IRBP-specific enriched T lymphocytes from spleens and lymph nodes isolated from native C57Bl/6 or P2Y2+/+ and P2Y2-/- immunized mice. Clinical and histological scores were used to grade disease severity. Splenocytes and lymph node cell phenotypes were analyzed using flow cytometry. Semi-purified lymphocytes and MACS-purified CD4+ T lymphocytes from P2Y2+/+ and P2Y2-/- immunized mice were tested for proliferation and cytokine secretion. Our data show that clinical and histological scores were significantly decreased in IRBP-immunized P2Y2-/- mice as in P2Y2-/- mice adoptively transfered with enriched T lymphocytes from C57Bl/6 IRBP-immunized mice. In parallel, naïve C57Bl/6 mice adoptively transferred with T lymphocytes from P2Y2-/- IRBP-immunized mice also showed significantly less disease. No differences in term of spleen and lymph node cell recruitment or phenotype appeared between P2Y2-/- and P2Y2+/+ immunized mice. However, once restimulated in vitro with IRBP, P2Y2-/- T cells proliferate less and secrete less cytokines than the P2Y2+/+ one. We further found that antigen-presenting cells of P2Y2-/- immunized mice were responsible for this proliferation defect. Together our data show that P2Y2-/- mice are less susceptible to mount an autoimmune response against IRBP. Those results are in accordance with the danger model, which makes a link between autoreactive lymphocyte activation, cell migration and the release of danger signals such as extracellular nucleotides. PMID:25692550

  12. IgG1 deficiency exacerbates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Ruksana; Strait, Richard T.; Tüzün, Erdem; Finkelman, Fred D.; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to neuromuscular junction (NMJ) damage by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) auto-antibodies and complement. In experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), which is induced by immunization with Torpedo AChR in CFA, anti-AChR IgG2b and IgG1 are the predominant isotypes in the circulation. Complement activation by isotypes such as IgG2b plays a crucial role in EAMG pathogenesis; this suggested the possibility that IgG1, which does not activate complement through the classical pathway, may suppress EAMG. In this study, we show that AChR-immunized BALB/c mice genetically deficient for IgG1 produce higher levels of complement-activating isotypes of anti-AChR, especially IgG3 and IgG2a, and develop increased IgG3/IgG2a deposits at the NMJ, as compared to wild type (WT) BALB/c mice. Consistent with this, AChR-immunized IgG1−/− BALB/c mice lose muscle strength and muscle AChR to a greater extent than AChR-immunized WT mice. These observations demonstrate that IgG1 deficiency leads to increased severity of EAMG associated with an increase in complement activating IgG isotypes. Further studies are needed to dissect the specific role or mechanism of IgG1 in limiting EAMG and that of EAMG exacerbating role of complement activating IgG3 and IgG2a in IgG1 deficiency. PMID:25867470

  13. Intrinsic and induced regulation of the age-associated onset of spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Podojil, Joseph R; Luo, Xunrong; Miller, Stephen D

    2008-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is characterized by perivascular CNS infiltration of myelin-specific CD4(+) T cells and activated mononuclear cells. TCR transgenic mice on the SJL background specific for proteolipid protein (PLP)(139-151) develop a high incidence of spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (sEAE). We examined the intrinsic mechanisms regulating onset and severity of sEAE. CD4(+) T cells isolated from the cervical lymph nodes, but not spleens, of diseased 5B6 transgenic mice are hyperactivated when compared with age-matched healthy mice and produce both IFN-gamma and IL-17, indicating that the cervical lymph node is the initial peripheral activation site. The age-associated development of sEAE correlates with a decline in both the functional capacity of natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) and in PLP(139-151)-induced IL-10 production and a concomitant increase in IL-17 production. Anti-CD25-induced inactivation of nTregs increased the incidence and severity of sEAE. Conversely, induction of peripheral tolerance via the i.v. injection of PLP(139-151)-pulsed, ethylcarbodiimide-fixed APCs (PLP(139-151)-SP) inhibited the development of clinical disease concomitant with increased production of IL-10 and conversion of Foxp3(+) Tregs from CD4(+)CD25(-) progenitors. These data indicate that heterogeneous populations of Tregs regulate onset of sEAE, and that induction of peripheral tolerance can be exploited to prevent/treat spontaneous autoimmune disease. PMID:18802066

  14. Fluctuation of lysosomal phospholipase A2 in experimental autoimmune uveitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Ei; Hiraoka, Miki; Abe, Akira; Murata, Masaki; Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Intraocular inflammation leads to oxidative stress and may generate lipid oxidation products. The present study was conducted to elucidate the pathophysiological roles of the lysosomal phospholipase A2 (LPLA2), a phospholipid-degrading enzyme, and the production of oxidized phospholipids (oxPLs) in autoimmune uveitis using a rat model. Lewis rats were immunized with a bovine interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (bIRBP) peptide with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to induce experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). The aqueous humor (AH) and serum were collected every week for 4 weeks from the immunized rats. The LPLA2 activity of the AH and serum was detected using liposomes consisting of 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol/N-acetylsphingosine as the substrate under acidic conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using antibodies against LPLA2 and oxPLs. The ocular inflammation was exacerbated at 2 weeks after immunization. The LPLA2 activity in the rat AH was increased by EAU induction, and was concomitant with the extent of inflammation in the anterior chamber (AC). In contrast, the LPLA2 activity in the rat serum was not influenced by EAU induction. At 2 weeks after immunization, immunoreactivity of LPLA2 was observed in infiltrated macrophages in the AC and vitreous cavity of the EAU rats. Furthermore, immunoreactivity of oxPLs was observed in the infiltrated macrophages of EAU rat eyes. These results demonstrated that the LPLA2 activity of the AH is augmented with the inflammation in the AC. The high expression of LPLA2 and production of oxPLs are found in the infiltrated macrophages in the acute inflammation of EAU rats. The present findings suggest the connection between LPLA2 activity and oxPL metabolism in the inflammation sites in the eye. PMID:27344956

  15. Euphol prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice: evidence for the underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Rafael Cypriano; de Souza, Paula Roberta de Cezaro; Bento, Allisson Freire; Marcon, Rodrigo; Bicca, Maíra Assunção; Pianowski, Luiz Francisco; Calixto, João B

    2012-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe chronic T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), the existing therapy of which is only partially effective and is associated with undesirable side effects. Euphol, an alcohol tetracyclic triterpene, has a wide range of pharmacological properties and is considered to have anti-inflammatory action. However there are no reports about the effects and mechanisms of euphol in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an established model of MS. Here we report the effects and the underlying mechanisms of action of euphol in EAE. Euphol (1-10mg/kg) was administered orally at different time-points of EAE. Immunological and inflammatory responses were evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blot and flow cytometry assays. We provide evidence that euphol significantly attenuates neurological signs of EAE. These beneficial effects of euphol seem to be associated with the down-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of some pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the CNS. Furthermore, in vitro, euphol consistently inhibited the T cell-mediated immune response including the production of T(H)1 and T(H)17 cytokines in spleen cells of untreated EAE animals. Likewise, oral euphol treatment inhibited the infiltration of T(H)17 myelin-specific cells into the CNS through the adhesion molecule, lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1). Our findings reveal that oral administration of euphol consistently reduces and limits the severity and development of EAE. Therefore, euphol might represent a potential molecule of interest for the treatment of MS and other T(H)17 cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:22155310

  16. Role of tolerogen conformation in induction of oral tolerance in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Souroujon, M C; Fuchs, S

    2000-10-01

    We recently demonstrated that oral or nasal administration of recombinant fragments of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) prevents the induction of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and suppresses ongoing EAMG in rats. We have now studied the role of spatial conformation of these recombinant fragments in determining their tolerogenicity. Two fragments corresponding to the extracellular domain of the human AChR alpha-subunit and differing in conformation were tested: Halpha1-205 expressed with no fusion partner and Halpha1-210 fused to thioredoxin (Trx), and designated Trx-Halpha1-210. The conformational similarity of the fragments to intact AChR was assessed by their reactivity with alpha-bungarotoxin and with anti-AChR mAbs, specific for conformation-dependent epitopes. Oral administration of the more native fragment, Trx-Halpha1-210, at the acute phase of disease led to exacerbation of EAMG, accompanied by an elevation of AChR-specific humoral and cellular reactivity, increased levels of Th1-type cytokines (IL-2, IL-12), decreased levels of Th2 (IL-10)- or Th3 (TGF-beta)-type cytokines, and higher expression of costimulatory factors (CD28, CTLA4, B7-1, B7-2, CD40L, and CD40). On the other hand, oral administration of the less native fragments Halpha1-205 or denatured Trx-Halpha1-210 suppressed ongoing EAMG and led to opposite changes in the immunological parameters. It thus seems that native conformation of AChR-derived fragments renders them immunogenic and immunopathogenic and therefore not suitable for treatment of myasthenia gravis. Conformation of tolerogens should therefore be given careful attention when considering oral tolerance for treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:11034361

  17. Synthetic retinoid AM80 inhibits Th17 cells and ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Klemann, Christian; Raveney, Benjamin J E; Klemann, Anna K; Ozawa, Tomoko; von Hörsten, Stephan; Shudo, Koichi; Oki, Shinji; Yamamura, Takashi

    2009-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that interleukin-17-producing CD4(+) T cells (Th17 cells) are the dominant pathogenic cellular component in autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis. It has recently been demonstrated that all-trans retinoic acid can suppress Th17 differentiation and promote the generation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells via retinoic acid receptor signals. Here, we investigated the effects of AM80, a synthetic retinoid with enhanced biological properties to all-trans retinoic acid, on Th17 differentiation and function and evaluated its therapeutic potential in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. AM80 treatment was more effective than all-trans retinoic acid in inhibiting Th17 differentiation in vitro. Oral administration of AM80 was protective for the early development of EAE and the down-modulation of Th17 differentiation and effector functions in vivo. Moreover, AM80 inhibited interleukin-17 production by splenic memory T cells, in vitro-differentiated Th17 cells, and central nervous system-infiltrating effector T cells. Accordingly, AM80 was effective when administered therapeutically after the onset of EAE. Continuous AM80 treatment, however, was ineffective at inhibiting late EAE symptoms despite the maintained suppression of RORgammat and interleukin-17 expression levels by central nervous system-infiltrating T cells. We reveal that continuous AM80 treatment also led to the suppression of interleukin-10 production by a distinct T cell subset that expressed both Foxp3 and RORgammat. These findings suggest that retinoid signaling regulates both inflammatory Th17 cells and Th17-like regulatory cells. PMID:19389933

  18. Synthetic Retinoid AM80 Inhibits Th17 Cells and Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Klemann, Christian; Raveney, Benjamin J.E.; Klemann, Anna K.; Ozawa, Tomoko; von Hörsten, Stephan; Shudo, Koichi; Oki, Shinji; Yamamura, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that interleukin-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells) are the dominant pathogenic cellular component in autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis. It has recently been demonstrated that all-trans retinoic acid can suppress Th17 differentiation and promote the generation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells via retinoic acid receptor signals. Here, we investigated the effects of AM80, a synthetic retinoid with enhanced biological properties to all-trans retinoic acid, on Th17 differentiation and function and evaluated its therapeutic potential in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. AM80 treatment was more effective than all-trans retinoic acid in inhibiting Th17 differentiation in vitro. Oral administration of AM80 was protective for the early development of EAE and the down-modulation of Th17 differentiation and effector functions in vivo. Moreover, AM80 inhibited interleukin-17 production by splenic memory T cells, in vitro-differentiated Th17 cells, and central nervous system-infiltrating effector T cells. Accordingly, AM80 was effective when administered therapeutically after the onset of EAE. Continuous AM80 treatment, however, was ineffective at inhibiting late EAE symptoms despite the maintained suppression of RORγt and interleukin-17 expression levels by central nervous system-infiltrating T cells. We reveal that continuous AM80 treatment also led to the suppression of interleukin-10 production by a distinct T cell subset that expressed both Foxp3 and RORγt. These findings suggest that retinoid signaling regulates both inflammatory Th17 cells and Th17-like regulatory cells. PMID:19389933

  19. Forced Exercise Preconditioning Attenuates Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis by Altering Th1 Lymphocyte Composition and Egress.

    PubMed

    Calik, Michael W; Shankarappa, Sahadev A; Langert, Kelly A; Stubbs, Evan B

    2015-01-01

    A short-term exposure to moderately intense physical exercise affords a novel measure of protection against autoimmune-mediated peripheral nerve injury. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which forced exercise attenuates the development and progression of experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN), an established animal model of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Adult male Lewis rats remained sedentary (control) or were preconditioned with forced exercise (1.2 km/day × 3 weeks) prior to P2-antigen induction of EAN. Sedentary rats developed a monophasic course of EAN beginning on postimmunization day 12.3 ± 0.2 and reaching peak severity on day 17.0 ± 0.3 (N = 12). By comparison, forced-exercise preconditioned rats exhibited a similar monophasic course but with significant (p < .05) reduction of disease severity. Analysis of popliteal lymph nodes revealed a protective effect of exercise preconditioning on leukocyte composition and egress. Compared with sedentary controls, forced exercise preconditioning promoted a sustained twofold retention of P2-antigen responsive leukocytes. The percentage distribution of pro-inflammatory (Th1) lymphocytes retained in the nodes from sedentary EAN rats (5.1 ± 0.9%) was significantly greater than that present in nodes from forced-exercise preconditioned EAN rats (2.9 ± 0.6%) or from adjuvant controls (2.0 ± 0.3%). In contrast, the percentage of anti-inflammatory (Th2) lymphocytes (7-10%) and that of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (∼20%) remained unaltered by forced exercise preconditioning. These data do not support an exercise-inducible shift in Th1:Th2 cell bias. Rather, preconditioning with forced exercise elicits a sustained attenuation of EAN severity, in part, by altering the composition and egress of autoreactive proinflammatory (Th1) lymphocytes from draining lymph nodes. PMID:26186926

  20. Vorinostat Modulates the Imbalance of T Cell Subsets, Suppresses Macrophage Activity, and Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sijie; Meng, Xiangda; Zhang, Zhuhong; Wang, Yang; Liu, Yuanyuan; You, Caiyun; Yan, Hua

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory efficiency of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). EAU was induced in female C57BL/6J mice immunized with interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein peptide. Vorinostat or the control treatment, phosphate-buffered saline, was administrated orally from 3 days before immunization until euthanasia at day 21 after immunization. The clinical and histopathological scores of mice were graded, and the integrity of the blood-retinal barrier was examined by Evans blue staining. T helper cell subsets were measured by flow cytometry, and the macrophage functions were evaluated with immunohistochemistry staining and immunofluorescence assays. The mRNA levels of tight junction proteins were measured by qRT-PCR. The expression levels of intraocular cytokines and transcription factors were examined by western blotting. Vorinostat relieved both clinical and histopathological manifestations of EAU in our mouse model, and the BRB integrity was maintained in vorinostat-treated mice, which had less vasculature leakage and higher mRNA and protein expressions of tight junction proteins than controls. Moreover, vorinostat repressed Th1 and Th17 cells and increased Th0 and Treg cells. Additionally, the INF-γ and IL-17A expression levels were significantly decreased, while the IL-10 level was increased by vorinostat treatment. Furthermore, due to the reduced TNF-α level, the macrophage activity was considerably inhibited in EAU mice. Finally, transcription factors, including STAT1, STAT3, and p65, were greatly suppressed by vorinostat treatment. Our data suggest that vorinostat might be a potential anti-inflammatory agent in the management of uveitis and other autoimmune inflammatory diseases. PMID:26798022

  1. Treatment of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Miho; Kuroyanagi, Kana; Kohno, Hideo; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist has been approved for treating hypercholesterolemia and lipid abnormalities. Researchers have recently discovered that an anti-inflammatory effect of PPAR agonist may have the potential to treat autoimmune disease. This study aims to investigate the therapeutic effects of fenofibrate on experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Methods EAU was induced in Lewis rats using bovine S-antigen (S-Ag) peptide. Fenofibrate was suspended in 3% arabic gum and administered orally at a high dose of 100 mg/kg and at a low dose of 20 mg/kg every day. Fenofibrate treatment was initiated after the clinical onset once daily for 14 days. The rats were examined every other day for clinical signs of EAU. The histological scores and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) were evaluated on day 28 post-immunization. Morphologic and immunohistochemical examinations were performed with light and confocal microscopy, respectively. Lymphocyte proliferation was measured with [3H] thymidine incorporation into antigen-stimulated T cells from inguinal lymph nodes. Results Clinical and histological scores of EAU were decreased in the fenofibrate-treated groups. The expression of inflammatory cytokines and Müller cell proliferation were inhibited in the fenofibrate-treated groups. DTH was significantly inhibited in the fenofibrate-treated groups, compared with the vehicle-treated groups (controls). Lymphocyte proliferation assay demonstrated decreased proliferation in the presence of 25 mg/ml S-Ag peptide in the fenofibrate-treated groups compared with controls. Conclusions The current results indicate that fenofibrate administered orally following clinical onset has therapeutic effect in EAU. Fenofibrate may be useful for treating intraocular inflammation. PMID:25489225

  2. GCN2 kinase plays an important role triggering the remission phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Heloisa; Araujo, Leandro P; Maricato, Juliana T; Guereschi, Marcia G; Mariano, Mario; Castilho, Beatriz A; Basso, Alexandre S

    2014-03-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has been widely employed as a model to study multiple sclerosis (MS) and indeed has allowed some important advances in our comprehension of MS pathogenesis. Several pieces of evidence suggest that infiltrating Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes are important players leading to CNS demyelination and lesion during the peak of murine EAE. Subsequently, effector T cell responses rapidly decline and the recovery phase of the disease strongly correlates with the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and the enrichment of Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells within the target organ. However, the mechanisms leading to the increased presence of Treg cells and to the remission phase of the disease are still poorly understood. Recent researches demonstrated that chemically induced amino-acid starvation response might suppress CNS immune activity. Here we verified an important participation of the general control nonrepressible 2 (GCN2), a key regulator kinase of the amino-acid starvation response, in the development of the remission phase of EAE in C57BL/6 mice. By immunizing wild type C57BL/6 (WT) and GCN2 knock-out mice (GCN2 KO) with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55), it was noticed that GCN2 KO mice did not develop the remission phase of the disease and this was associated with higher levels of CNS inflammation and increased presence of effector T cells (Th1/Th17). These animals also showed lower frequency of Treg cells within the CNS as compared to WT animals. Higher expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and higher frequency of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were found at the peak of the disease in the CNS of WT animals. Our results suggest that the GCN2 kinase-dependent sensing of IDO activity represents an important trigger to the EAE remission phase. The IDO-mediated immunoregulatory events may include the arresting of effector T cell responses and the differentiation/expansion of Treg cells

  3. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by altering balance among CD4+ T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junpeng; Ren, Zhihong; Xu, Yanmei; Xiao, Sheng; Meydani, Simin N; Wu, Dayong

    2012-01-01

    The green tea component epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) may be beneficial in autoimmune diseases; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we determined the effect of EGCG on the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model for human multiple sclerosis, and the underlying mechanisms. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed EGCG (0%, 0.15%, 0.3%, and 0.6% in diet) for 30 days and then immunized with specific antigen myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55. EGCG dose dependently attenuated clinical symptoms and pathological features (leukocyte infiltration and demyelination) in the central nervous system and inhibited antigen-specific T-cell proliferation and delayed-type hypersensitivity skin response. We further showed that EGCG reduced production of interferon-γ, IL-17, IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α; decreased types 1 and 17 helper T cells (Th1 and Th17, respectively); and increased regulatory T-cell populations in lymph nodes, the spleen, and the central nervous system. Moreover, EGCG inhibited expression of transcription factors T-box expressed in T cells and retinoid-related orphan receptor-γt, the specific transcription factor for Th1 and Th17 differentiation, respectively; the plasma levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1; and CCR6 expression in CD4(+) T cells. These results indicate that EGCG may attenuate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis autoimmune response by inhibiting immune cell infiltration and modulating the balance among pro- and anti-autoimmune CD4(+) T-cell subsets. Thus, we identified a novel mechanism that underlies EGCG's beneficial effect in autoimmune disease. PMID:22056360

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rats with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Reveals Brain Cortex Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tambalo, Stefano; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rigolio, Roberta; Fiorini, Silvia; Bontempi, Pietro; Mallucci, Giulia; Balzarotti, Beatrice; Marmiroli, Paola; Sbarbati, Andrea; Cavaletti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Cortical reorganization occurring in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is thought to play a key role in limiting the effect of structural tissue damage. Conversely, its exhaustion may contribute to the irreversible disability that accumulates with disease progression. Several aspects of MS-related cortical reorganization, including the overall functional effect and likely modulation by therapies, still remain to be elucidated. The aim of this work was to assess the extent of functional cortical reorganization and its brain structural/pathological correlates in Dark Agouti rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a widely accepted preclinical model of chronic MS. Morphological and functional MRI (fMRI) were performed before disease induction and during the relapsing and chronic phases of EAE. During somatosensory stimulation of the right forepaw, fMRI demonstrated that cortical reorganization occurs in both relapsing and chronic phases of EAE with increased activated volume and decreased laterality index versus baseline values. Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated gray matter (GM) atrophy in the cerebral cortex, and both GM and white matter atrophy were assessed by ex vivo pathology of the sensorimotor cortex and corpus callosum. Neuroinflammation persisted in the relapsing and chronic phases, with dendritic spine density in the layer IV sensory neurons inversely correlating with the number of cluster of differentiation 45-positive inflammatory lesions. Our work provides an innovative experimental platform that may be pivotal for the comprehension of key mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of irreversible brain damage and for the development of innovative therapies to reduce disability in EAE/MS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Since the early 2000s, functional MRI (fMRI) has demonstrated profound modifications in the recruitment of cortical areas during motor, cognitive, and sensory tasks in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Experimental autoimmune

  5. A New Targeted Model of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in the Common Marmoset.

    PubMed

    Stassart, Ruth Martha; Helms, Gunther; Garea-Rodríguez, Enrique; Nessler, Stefan; Hayardeny, Liat; Wegner, Christiane; Schlumbohm, Christina; Fuchs, Eberhard; Brück, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause for sustained disability in young adults, yet treatment options remain very limited. Although numerous therapeutic approaches have been effective in rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), only few proved to be beneficial in patients with MS. Hence, there is a strong need for more predictive animal models. Within the past decade, EAE in the common marmoset evolved as a potent, alternative model for MS, with immunological and pathological features resembling more closely the human disease. However, an often very rapid and severe disease course hampers its implementation for systematic testing of new treatment strategies. We here developed a new focal model of EAE in the common marmoset, induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization and stereotactic injections of proinflammatory cytokines. At the injection site of cytokines, confluent inflammatory demyelinating lesions developed that strongly resembled human MS lesions. In a proof-of-principle treatment study with the immunomodulatory compound laquinimod, we demonstrate that targeted EAE in marmosets provides a promising and valid tool for preclinical experimental treatment trials in MS research. PMID:26207848

  6. Antagonism of histamine H4 receptors exacerbates clinical and pathological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, C; Aldinucci, A; Luccarini, I; Galante, A; Manuelli, C; Blandina, P; Katebe, M; Chazot, P L; Masini, E; Passani, M B

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The histamine H4 receptor has a primary role in inflammatory functions, making it an attractive target for the treatment of asthma and refractory inflammation. These observations suggested a facilitating action on autoimmune diseases. Here we have assessed the role of H4 receptors in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) a model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Experimental Approach We induced EAE with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35–55) in C57BL/6 female mice as a model of MS. The histamine H4 receptor antagonist 5-chloro-2-[(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)carbonyl]-1H-indole (JNJ7777120) was injected i.p. daily starting at day 10 post-immunization (D10 p.i.). Disease severity was monitored by clinical and histopathological evaluation of inflammatory cells infiltrating into the spinal cord, anti-MOG35–55 antibody production, assay of T-cell proliferation by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, mononucleate cell phenotype by flow cytometry, cytokine production by elisa assay and transcription factor quantification of mRNA expression. Key Results Treatment with JNJ7777120 exacerbated EAE, increased inflammation and demyelination in the spinal cord of EAE mice and increased IFN-γ expression in lymph nodes, whereas it suppressed IL-4 and IL-10, and augmented expression of the transcription factors Tbet, FOXP3 and IL-17 mRNA in lymphocytes. JNJ7777120 did not affect proliferation of anti-MOG35–55 T-cells, anti-MOG35–55 antibody production or mononucleate cell phenotype. Conclusions and Implications H4 receptor blockade was detrimental in EAE. Given the interest in the development of H4 receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory compounds, it is important to understand the role of H4 receptors in immune diseases to anticipate clinical benefits and also predict possible detrimental effects. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http

  7. An intrinsic B cell defect is required for the production of autoantibodies in the lpr model of murine systemic autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, E.S.; Katagiri, T.; Katagiri, K.; Morris, S.C.; Cohen, P.L.; Eisenberg, R.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Mice homozygous for the gene lpr develop marked lymphadenopathy and a spectrum of autoantibodies closely resembling that of human systemic lupus erythematosus. The unusual T cell phenotype of the expanded lymphocyte population and the T-dependence of several antibodies in this strain have suggested that primary T cell abnormalities underlie the autoimmune syndrome. Using double chimeras, we now show that expression of the lpr gene in B cells is absolutely necessary for autoantibody production. Combinations of anti-Thy 1.2 + C' treated bone marrow from congenic strains of C57BL/6 mice, differing only at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) and lpr loci, were transferred into lethally irradiated B6/lpr mice. Double chimerism was documented by allotype-specific surface IgD and IgM immunofluorescence assay of peripheral blood and by allotype-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for total IgM in serum. Despite the presence of both +/+ and lpr B cells, IgM and IgG2a anti-chromatin as well as IgM anti-IgG were entirely the products of lpr B cells. Total serum IgG2a and IgG1 were also dominated by the lpr phenotype but not to the same extent. A similar experiment using B6/lpr-Igha recipients confirmed these findings. Additional experiments in which B6/lpr recipients were infused with ratios of donor bone marrow favoring B6.C20 +/+ over B6/lpr showed that even though +/+ B cells were overrepresented, autoantibodies were only of the lpr allotype. In addition, in the presence of lpr B cells, normal B cells showed little response to an exogenous, T cell-dependent antigen. The data thus indicate that lpr B cells manifest an intrinsic abnormality which is essential for autoantibody production in the lpr model.

  8. Endogenous Erythropoietin as Part of the Cytokine Network in the Pathogenesis of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Mengozzi, Manuela; Cervellini, Ilaria; Bigini, Paolo; Martone, Sara; Biondi, Antonella; Pedotti, Rosetta; Gallo, Barbara; Barbera, Sara; Mennini, Tiziana; Boraso, Mariaserena; Marinovich, Marina; Petit, Edwige; Bernaudin, Myriam; Bianchi, Roberto; Viviani, Barbara; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is of great interest as a therapy for many of the central nervous system (CNS) diseases and its administration is protective in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Endogenous EPO is induced by hypoxic/ischemic injury, but little is known about its expression in other CNS diseases. We report here that EPO expression in the spinal cord is induced in mouse models of chronic or relapsing-remitting EAE, and is prominently localized to motoneurons. We found a parallel increase of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α, but not HIF-2α, at the mRNA level, suggesting a possible role of non-hypoxic factors in EPO induction. EPO mRNA in the spinal cord was co-expressed with interferon (IFN)–γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and these cytokines inhibited EPO production in vitro in both neuronal and glial cells. Given the known inhibitory effect of EPO on neuroinflammation, our study indicates that EPO should be viewed as part of the inflammatory/anti-inflammatory network in MS. PMID:18670620

  9. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and receptor component protein in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Claudia; Zambusi, Laura; Finardi, Annamaria; Ruffini, Francesca; Tolun, Adviye A.; Dickerson, Ian M.; Righi, Marco; Zacchetti, Daniele; Grohovaz, Fabio; Provini, Luciano; Furlan, Roberto; Morara, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) inhibits microglia inflammatory activation in vitro. We here analyzed the involvement of CGRP and Receptor Component Protein (RCP) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Alpha-CGRP deficiency increased EAE scores which followed the scale alpha-CGRP null > heterozygote > wild type. In wild type mice, CGRP delivery into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 1) reduced chronic EAE (C-EAE) signs, 2) inhibited microglia activation (revealed by quantitative shape analysis), and 3) did not alter GFAP expression, cell density, lymphocyte infiltration, and peripheral lymphocyte production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-17, IL-2, and IL-4. RCP (probe for receptor involvement) was expressed in white matter microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and vascular-endothelial cells: in EAE, also in infiltrating lymphocytes. In relapsing–remitting EAE (R-EAE) RCP increased during relapse, without correlation with lymphocyte density. RCP nuclear localization (stimulated by CGRP in vitro) was I) increased in microglia and decreased in astrocytes (R-EAE), and II) increased in microglia by CGRP CSF delivery (C-EAE). Calcitonin like receptor was rarely localized in nuclei of control and relapse mice. CGRP increased in motoneurons. In conclusion, CGRP can inhibit microglia activation in vivo in EAE. CGRP and its receptor may represent novel protective factors in EAE, apparently acting through the differential cell-specific intracellular translocationof RCP. PMID:24746422

  10. [Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in rats].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing-Xia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Jun; Wang, Ji-Ming; Zhao, Qin-Jun; Ren, Xin-Jun; Ma, Feng-Xia; Yang, Shao-Guang; Han, Zhi-Bo; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2011-06-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (UCMSC) transplantation has been widely used in the treatment of a variety of diseases due to their advantages such as abundant resources, low immunogenicity and large ex vivo expansion capacity. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of UCMSC on experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) rats. The distribution of human-derived cells was observed by immunofluorescence method, the effect of MSC on B-cell in situ-secreted antibodies was assayed by ELISPOT, the secreted IFN-γ level was detected by using Transwell test. The results showed that UCMSC were able to migrate to inflammation region and lymph nudes, moreover human-derived cells could be detected in medulla zone of lymph nudes. In vitro in situ detection of AchR specific antibody secretion revealed that the full contact of MSC with lymphnode-derived lymphocytes could effectively inhibit production of AchR antibody. Transwell test indicated that the direct contact of UCMSC with CD4 T cells could effectively decrease production of IFN-γ, which modulated the unbalance between Th1/Th2 to a certain extent. It is concluded that UCMSC can regulate the immune system by direct cell-cell contact or/and release of cytokines, which bring a new insight into knowledge about MSC-based therapy for EAMG. PMID:21729563

  11. Immune mechanisms in the transfer of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis without adjuvant

    SciTech Connect

    Silberg, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) can be induced in Lewis rats without the use of adjuvant. Spleen cells of naive rats were sensitized to myelin basic protein (MBP) in vitro. Transfer of these cells did not result in the development of EAE. However, spleen cells from primary recipients, taken 10 days post transfer, and cultured with MBP (secondary culture, transferred EAE to secondary recipients. EAE can be induced in primary recipients by the transfer of secondary cultured cells or cultured cells or challenge with MBP in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) 10 days after injection of naive cultured cells. The finding that MBP-CFA challenged 1' recipients developed EAE, suggests that the rats have been primed to MBP through the naive cultured cell transfer. The cells from naive culture that sensitize the primary recipient were radioresistant (1500 R), probably macrophages. This is in contrast to the cells transferring EAE to the secondary recipient, which were radiosensitive. Unlike the spleen cells which transfer EAE from MBP-CFA sensitized rats, the cells in the secondary transfer could not be activated to transfer EAE when cultured with concanavalin A. Clinical EAE in the secondary recipient was more severe when these rats were irradiated (200 R) prior to transfer. There is evidence that low dose irradiation eliminates naturally occurring suppressor cells. EAE also developed in lethally irradiated (850 R) recipients of secondary cultured cells, suggesting that the transferred cells can induce EAE alone or by recruiting radioresistant cells in the secondary host.

  12. Mechanism of natural killer (NK) cell regulatory role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Fazekas, Gyorgy; Hara, Hideo; Tabira, Takeshi

    2005-06-01

    The mechanism of natural killer (NK) cell regulatory role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was studied in SJL/J mice. In vivo experiments showed that NK cell depletion by anti-NK1.1 monoclonal antibody treatment enhanced EAE in mice. To investigate the mechanism, we cultured proteolipid protein (PLP)136-150 peptide-specific, encephalitogenic T cell lines, which were used as the NK cell target. Our results show that NK cells exert a direct cytotoxic effect on autoantigen-specific, encephalitogenic T cells. Furthermore, cytotoxicity to PLP-specific, encephalitogenic T line cells was enhanced by using enriched NK cells as effector cells. However, the cytotoxic effect of NK cells to ovalbumin-specific T line cells and ConA-stimulated T cells could also be detected with a lesser efficiency. Our studies indicate that NK cells play a regulatory role in EAE through killing of syngeneic T cells which include myelin antigen-specific, encephalitogenic T cells, and thus ameliorate EAE. PMID:15885305

  13. Autonomic regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in IL-4 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Pál, E; Yamamura, T; Tabira, T

    1999-12-01

    The effect of chemical sympathectomy induced with 6-hydroxydopamine (OHDA) on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was studied in wild type and IL-4-/- C57BL/6 (B6) mice. When actively sensitized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide, control B6 mice developed a mild form of EAE with full recovery. The sympathectomized mice developed paralysis with higher maximum disease score and did not recover completely, indicating that the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) down-modulates the process of EAE. Unexpectedly, however, sympathectomy resulted in suppression of EAE in IL-4-/- mice, implying that control of actively induced EAE by the SNS depends on the genetic background of mice. We also induced EAE by passive transfer of MOG35-55-reactive lymph node cells, and this disease was augmented by sympathectomy in both wild type and knockout animals. Further experiments showed that changes in T cell populations and the activity of antigen presenting cells might be responsible for the altered immune response and clinical course after sympathetic ablation. Our studies indicate that the absence of a single cytokine can severely alter nervous-immune system interactions. PMID:10695725

  14. Amelioration of chronic relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (cr-eae) using thymoquinone - biomed 2009.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Adel; Waris, H M; Ramadan, H; Quereshi, M; Kalra, J

    2009-01-01

    Axonal damage, demylination and inflammation of the central nervous system are the major pathological features of the human multiple sclerosis (MS). MS is thought to be due to abnormal T cell mediated immune response. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the advancement of MS. The management of oxidative stress by outlining central role of reduced glutathione. In our experiment we used Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model that mimic human MS and tested the effect of Thymoquinone (TQ), an oil constituent of Nigella Sativa also known as black seed. Thirty female mice of strain C57BL/6J and aged between 6 to 12 weeks were placed into 3 groups of 10 and were given Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG) subcutaneously (SC) to induce EAE. Group A was the control group. Group B received MOG (SC) and TQ intraperiotoneally (IP) from day 1 till day 50. Group C received MOG (SC) and TQ (IP) on the appearance of first sign and symptoms of chronic relapsing EAE (CR-EAE). All Mice were examined daily for behavioral deficits and all euthanized and sacrificed on day 50. Preliminary result showed that TQ due to its antioxidant effect is almost 90% preventive and 50% curative in CR-EAE. This result could assist further studies on the mechanism of action of TQ in CR-EAE and explore the possibility of treating the human chronic relapsing multiple sclerosis phase. PMID:19369775

  15. Chitosan Oligosaccharides Attenuate Ocular Inflammation in Rats with Experimental Autoimmune Anterior Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, I-Mo; Yang, Chang-Hao; Yang, Chung-May

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects and mechanisms of chitosan oligosaccharides (COS) on experimental autoimmune anterior uveitis (EAAU) in rats. EAAU was induced in Lewis rats by footpad and intraperitoneal injections of melanin-associated antigen. The rats received intraperitoneal injections of low-dose (5 mg/kg) or high-dose (10 mg/kg) COS or PBS daily after the immunization. The effects of COS were evaluated by determining the clinical scores and the morphology of the iris/ciliary body (ICB). The expression of inflammatory mediators was evaluated using western blot, immunofluorescence, and ELISA. Treatment with COS significantly attenuated the clinical scores and the leukocyte infiltration in the ICB in a dose-dependent manner. COS effectively reduced the expression of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, iNOS, MCP-1, RANTES, fractalkine, and ICAM-1). Moreover, COS decreased the IκB degradation and p65 presence in the ICB, which resulted in the inhibition of NF-κB/DNA binding activity. In an in vitro study, sensitized spleen-derived lymphocytes of the COS-treated group showed less chemotaxis toward their aqueous humor and decreased secretion of the above inflammatory mediators in the culture media. COS treated EAAU by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and reducing the expression of inflammatory mediators. COS might be a potential treatment for acute anterior uveitis. PMID:25147441

  16. The extent of ultrastructural spinal cord pathology reflects disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gruppe, Traugott L; Recks, Mascha S; Addicks, Klaus; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2012-09-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has been studied for decades as an animal model for human multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we performed ultrastructural analysis of corticospinal tract (CST) and motor neuron pathology in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide 35-55- and MP4-induced EAE of C57BL/6 mice. Both models were clinically characterized by ascending paralysis. Our data show that CST and motor neuron pathology differentially contributed to the disease. In both MOG peptide- and MP4-induced EAE pathological changes in the CST were evident. While the MP4 model also encompassed severe motor neuron degeneration in terms of rough endoplasmic reticulum alterations, the presence of intracytoplasmic vacuoles and nuclear dissolution, both models showed motor neuron atrophy. Features of axonal damage covered mitochondrial swelling, a decrease in nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) and an increase of the oligodendroglial cytoplasm inner tongue. The extent of CST and motor neuron pathology was reflective of the severity of clinical EAE in MOG peptide- and MP4-elicited EAE. Differential targeting of CNS gray and white matter are typical features of MS pathology. The MOG peptide and MP4 model may thus be valuable tools for downstream studies of the mechanisms underlying these morphological disease correlates. PMID:22806903

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 in experimental autoimmune neuritis. Cellular localization and time course.

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, R.; Funa, K.; Schweitzer, T.; Jung, S.; Bourde, O.; Toyka, K. V.; Hartung, H. P.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a monophasic inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system that resolves spontaneously by molecular mechanisms as yet unknown. We have investigated whether the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) might be endogenously expressed in the peripheral nervous system of Lewis rats with actively induced and adoptive transfer EAN. TGF-beta 1 mRNA was upregulated to high levels in sensory and motor roots, spinal ganglia, and sciatic nerve as revealed by quantitative Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization histochemistry, with peak levels just preceding the first signs of clinical recovery. TGF-beta 1 mRNA was localized to scattered round cells and dense cellular infiltrates, but only rarely to Schwann cell profiles. Double labeling studies revealed macrophages and subpopulations of T cells as the major cellular source of TGF-beta 1 mRNA. TGF-beta 1 protein was visualized immunocytochemically and localized to infiltrating mononuclear cells with peak expression around the same time as mRNA, in addition to some constitutive expression in axons and Schwann cells. Our studies suggest that the spontaneous recovery observed in Lewis rat EAN might be mediated by the endogenous elaboration of TGF-beta 1 within the peripheral nerve, and that macrophages might control their own cytotoxicity by expressing TGF-beta 1. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8546208

  18. Prevention of Axonal Injury using Calpain Inhibitor in Chronic Progressive Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Hassen, Getaw Worku; Feliberti, Jason; Kesner, Leo; Stracher, Alfred; Mokhtarian, Foroozan

    2011-01-01

    Axonal injury is the major correlate of permanent disability in neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), especially in secondary-progressive MS following relapsing-remitting disease course. Proteolytic enzyme, calpain, is a potential candidate for causing axonal injury. Most current treatment options only target the inflammatory component of MS. Previous work using calpain inhibitor CYLA in our laboratory showed significant reduction in clinical sign, demyelination and tissue calpain content in acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here we evaluated markers of axonal injury (amyloid precursor protein, Nav1.6 channels), neuronal calpain content and the effect of CYLA on axonal protection using histological methods in chronic EAE [myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) – induced disease model of MS]. Intraperitoneal application of CYLA (2mg/mouse/day) significantly reduced the clinical signs, tissue calpain content, demyelination and inflammatory infiltration of EAE. Similarly, markers for axonal injury were barely detectable in the treated mice. Thus, this novel drug, which markedly suppresses the disease course, axonal injury and its progression, is a candidate for the treatment of a neurodegenerative disease such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:18725211

  19. Dopaminergic dysfunction is associated with IL-1β-dependent mood alterations in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Antonietta; Fresegna, Diego; Federici, Mauro; Musella, Alessandra; Rizzo, Francesca Romana; Sepman, Helena; Bullitta, Silvia; De Vito, Francesca; Haji, Nabila; Rossi, Silvia; Mercuri, Nicola B; Usiello, Alessandro; Mandolesi, Georgia; Centonze, Diego

    2015-02-01

    Mood disturbances are frequent in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), even in non-disabled patients and in the remitting stages of the disease. It is still largely unknown how the pathophysiological process on MS causes anxiety and depression, but the dopaminergic system is likely involved. Aim of the present study was to investigate depressive-like behavior in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of MS, and its possible link to dopaminergic neurotransmission. Behavioral, amperometric and biochemical experiments were performed to determine the role of inflammation in mood control in EAE. First, we assessed the independence of mood alterations from motor disability during the acute phase of the disease, by showing a depressive-like behavior in EAE mice with mild clinical score and preserved motor skills (mild-EAE). Second, we linked such behavioral changes to the selective increased striatal expression of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in a context of mild inflammation and to dopaminergic system alterations. Indeed, in the striatum of EAE mice, we observed an impairment of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, since DA release was reduced and signaling through DA D1- and D2-like receptors was unbalanced. In conclusion, the present study provides first evidence of the link between the depressive-like behavior and the alteration of dopaminergic system in EAE mice, raising the possibility that IL-1β driven dysfunction of dopaminergic signaling might play a role in mood disturbances also in MS patients. PMID:25511803

  20. Significant Contribution of Mouse Mast Cell Protease 4 in Early Phases of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Desbiens, Louisane; Lapointe, Catherine; Gharagozloo, Marjan; Mahmoud, Shaimaa; Pejler, Gunnar; Gris, Denis; D'Orléans-Juste, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a mouse model that reproduces cardinal signs of clinical, histopathological, and immunological features found in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Mast cells are suggested to be involved in the main inflammatory phases occurring during EAE development, possibly by secreting several autacoids and proteases. Among the latter, the chymase mouse mast cell protease 4 (mMCP-4) can contribute to the inflammatory response by producing endothelin-1 (ET-1). The aim of this study was to determine the impact of mMCP-4 on acute inflammatory stages in EAE. C57BL/6 wild type (WT) or mMCP-4 knockout (KO) mice were immunized with MOG35-55 plus complete Freund's adjuvant followed by pertussis toxin. Immunized WT mice presented an initial acute phase characterized by progressive increases in clinical score, which were significantly reduced in mMCP-4 KO mice. In addition, higher levels of spinal myelin were found in mMCP-4 KO as compared with WT mice. Finally, whereas EAE triggered significant increases in brain levels of mMCP-4 mRNA and immunoreactive ET-1 in WT mice, the latter peptide was reduced to basal levels in mMCP-4 KO congeners. Together, the present study supports a role for mMCP-4 in the early inflammatory phases of the disease in a mouse model of MS. PMID:27610007

  1. Significant Contribution of Mouse Mast Cell Protease 4 in Early Phases of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Gharagozloo, Marjan; Mahmoud, Shaimaa; Gris, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a mouse model that reproduces cardinal signs of clinical, histopathological, and immunological features found in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Mast cells are suggested to be involved in the main inflammatory phases occurring during EAE development, possibly by secreting several autacoids and proteases. Among the latter, the chymase mouse mast cell protease 4 (mMCP-4) can contribute to the inflammatory response by producing endothelin-1 (ET-1). The aim of this study was to determine the impact of mMCP-4 on acute inflammatory stages in EAE. C57BL/6 wild type (WT) or mMCP-4 knockout (KO) mice were immunized with MOG35–55 plus complete Freund's adjuvant followed by pertussis toxin. Immunized WT mice presented an initial acute phase characterized by progressive increases in clinical score, which were significantly reduced in mMCP-4 KO mice. In addition, higher levels of spinal myelin were found in mMCP-4 KO as compared with WT mice. Finally, whereas EAE triggered significant increases in brain levels of mMCP-4 mRNA and immunoreactive ET-1 in WT mice, the latter peptide was reduced to basal levels in mMCP-4 KO congeners. Together, the present study supports a role for mMCP-4 in the early inflammatory phases of the disease in a mouse model of MS. PMID:27610007

  2. Nigella sativa amliorates inflammation and demyelination in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Neveen A; Fahmy, Heba M; Mohammed, Faten F; Elsayed, Anwar A; Radwan, Nasr M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major, immune-mediated, demyelinating neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established animal model of MS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective and ameliorative effects of N. sativa seeds (2.8 g/kg body weight) in EAE-induced Wistar rats. EAE-induced rats were divided into: 1- EAE-induced rats (“EAE” group). 2- “N. sativa + EAE” group received daily oral administration of N. sativa 2 weeks prior EAE induction until the end of the experiment. 3- “EAE + N. sativa” group received daily oral administration of N. sativa after the appearance of first clinical signs until the end of the experiment. All animals were decapitated at the 28th day post EAE-induction. EAE was investigated using histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examinations in addition to determination of some oxidative stress parameters in the cerebellum and medulla. N. sativa suppressed inflammation observed in EAE-induced rats. In addition, N. sativa enhanced remyelination in the cerebellum. Moreover, N. sativa reduced the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β1). N. sativa seeds could provide a promising agent effective in both the protection and treatment of EAE. PMID:26261504

  3. Alternative Splicing and Transcriptome Profiling of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Using Genome-Wide Exon Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, Alan; Maratou, Klio; Fewings, Chris; Harris, Robert A.; Jagodic, Maja; Aitman, Tim; Olsson, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease causing demyelination and nerve loss in the central nervous system. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of MS that is widely used to investigate complex pathogenic mechanisms. Transcriptional control through isoform selection and mRNA levels determines pathway activation and ultimately susceptibility to disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We have studied the role of alternative splicing and differential expression in lymph node cells from EAE-susceptible Dark Agouti (DA) and EAE-resistant Piebald Virol Glaxo.AV1 (PVG) inbred rat strains using Affymetrix Gene Chip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Comparing the two strains, we identified 11 differentially spliced and 206 differentially expressed genes at day 7 post-immunization, as well as 9 differentially spliced and 144 differentially expressed genes upon autoantigen re-stimulation. Functional clustering and pathway analysis implicate genes for glycosylation, lymphocyte activation, potassium channel activity and cellular differentiation in EAE susceptibility. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that alternative splicing occurs during complex disease and may govern EAE susceptibility. Additionally, transcriptome analysis not only identified previously defined EAE pathways regulating the immune system, but also novel mechanisms. Furthermore, several identified genes overlap known quantitative trait loci, providing novel causative candidate targets governing EAE. PMID:19915720

  4. Chaperone Activity of Small Heat Shock Proteins Underlies Therapeutic Efficacy in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis*

    PubMed Central

    Kurnellas, Michael P.; Brownell, Sara E.; Su, Leon; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Dolganov, Gregory; Chopra, Sidharth; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Webster, Jonathan; Ousman, Shalina S.; Becker, Rachel A.; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the therapeutic activity of αB crystallin, small heat shock protein B5 (HspB5), was shared with other human sHsps, a set of seven human family members, a mutant of HspB5 G120 known to exhibit reduced chaperone activity, and a mycobacterial sHsp were expressed and purified from bacteria. Each of the recombinant proteins was shown to be a functional chaperone, capable of inhibiting aggregation of denatured insulin with varying efficiency. When injected into mice at the peak of disease, they were all effective in reducing the paralysis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additional structure activity correlations between chaperone activity and therapeutic function were established when linear regions within HspB5 were examined. A single region, corresponding to residues 73–92 of HspB5, forms amyloid fibrils, exhibited chaperone activity, and was an effective therapeutic for encephalomyelitis. The linkage of the three activities was further established by demonstrating individual substitutions of critical hydrophobic amino acids in the peptide resulted in the loss of all of the functions. PMID:22955287

  5. Absence of nonhematopoietic MHC class II expression protects mice from experimental autoimmune myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Thelemann, Christoph; Haller, Sergio; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Kania, Gabriela; Rosa, Muriel; Eriksson, Urs; Rotman, Samuel; Reith, Walter; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a CD4(+) T-cell-mediated model of human inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathies. Heart-specific CD4(+) T-cell activation is dependent on autoantigens presented by MHC class II (MHCII) molecules expressed on professional APCs. In this study, we addressed the role of inflammation-induced MHCII expression by cardiac nonhematopoietic cells on EAM development. EAM was induced in susceptible mice lacking inducible expression of MHCII molecules on all nonhematopoietic cells (pIV-/- K14 class II transactivator (CIITA) transgenic (Tg) mice) by immunization with α-myosin heavy chain peptide in CFA. Lack of inducible nonhematopoietic MHCII expression in pIV-/- K14 CIITA Tg mice conferred EAM resistance. In contrast, cardiac pathology was induced in WT and heterozygous mice, and correlated with elevated cardiac endothelial MHCII expression. Control mice with myocarditis displayed an increase in infiltrating CD4(+) T cells and in expression of IFN-γ, which is the major driver of nonhematopoietic MHCII expression. Mechanistically, IFN-γ neutralization in WT mice shortly before disease onset resulted in reduced cardiac MHCII expression and pathology. These findings reveal a previously overlooked contribution of IFN-γ to induce endothelial MHCII expression in the heart and to progress cardiac pathology during myocarditis. PMID:26621778

  6. The experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS: utility for understanding disease pathophysiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    ROBINSON, ANDREW P.; HARP, CHRISTOPHER T.; NORONHA, AVERTANO; MILLER, STEPHEN D.

    2014-01-01

    While no single model can exactly recapitulate all aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS), animal models are essential in understanding the induction and pathogenesis of the disease and to develop therapeutic strategies that limit disease progression and eventually lead to effective treatments for the human disease. Several different models of MS exist, but by far the best understood and most commonly used is the rodent model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This model is typically induced by either active immunization with myelin-derived proteins or peptides in adjuvant or by passive transfer of activated myelin-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes. Mouse models are most frequently used because of the inbred genotype of laboratory mice, their rapid breeding capacity, the ease of genetic manipulation, and availability of transgenic and knockout mice to facilitate mechanistic studies. Although not all therapeutic strategies for MS have been developed in EAE, all of the current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved immunomodulatory drugs are effective to some degree in treating EAE, a strong indicator that EAE is an extremely useful model to study potential treatments for MS. Several therapies, such as glatiramer acetate (GA: Copaxone), and natalizumab (Tysabri), were tested first in the mouse model of EAE and then went on to clinical trials. Here we discuss the usefulness of the EAE model in understanding basic disease pathophysiology and developing treatments for MS as well as the potential drawbacks of this model. PMID:24507518

  7. Microglia and astrocyte activation in the frontal cortex of rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Chanaday, N L; Roth, G A

    2016-02-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a widely used animal model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS), a demyelinating and neurodegenerative pathology of the central nervous system. Both diseases share physiopathological and clinical characteristics, mainly associated with a neuroinflammatory process that leads to a set of motor, sensory, and cognitive symptoms. In MS, gray matter atrophy is related to the emergence of cognitive deficits and contributes to clinical progression. In particular, injury and dysfunction in certain areas of the frontal cortex (FrCx) have been related to the development of cognitive impairments with high incidence, like central fatigue and executive dysfunction. In the present work we show the presence of region-specific microglia and astrocyte activation in the FrCx, during the first hours of acute EAE onset. It is accompanied by the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, in the absence of detectable leukocyte infiltration. These findings expand previous studies showing presynaptic neural dysfunction occurring at the FrCx and might contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the genesis and prevalence of common MS symptoms. PMID:26679600

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy in a Mouse Model of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE)

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Annie C.; Scruggs, Brittni A.; Bunnell, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurodegenerative disease that presents after an auto-reactive immune response against constituents of the central nervous system. Demyelination, inflammation, and white matter lesions are all hallmarks of this disease. Clinical research supports the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as therapy for MS to ameliorate symptoms and pathology. MSCs can be isolated from multiple tissues, including adipose and bone marrow, and are able to migrate to sites of pathology, release anti-inflammatory factors, and provide immunomodulatory and neuroprotective effects once administered. Numerous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of MSCs in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an induced model of MS. EAE can be induced in several species; however, the mouse is commonly used for therapeutic testing. In the following chapter, scientists will be able to learn how to prepare reagents and MSCs (e.g., isolate, culture, and expand) as well as skillfully execute induction of EAE in mice and administer stem cell-based treatments. Standard methods used to evaluate the disease progression and analyze postmortem tissues are also included. PMID:25173393

  9. Treatment with Anti-EGF Ab Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis via Induction of Neurogenesis and Oligodendrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amir-Levy, Yifat; Mausner-Fainberg, Karin; Karni, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Background. The neural stem cells (NSCs) migrate to the damaged sites in multiple sclerosis (MS) and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the differentiation into neurons or oligodendrocytes is blocked. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates NSC proliferation and mobilization to demyelinated lesions but also induces astrogenesis and glial scar. Objective. To examine the clinical and histopathological effects of EGF neutralization on EAE. Methods. EAE-induced SJL mice were intravenously treated with either anti-EGF neutralizing antibody (Ab) or isotype control or PBS. On day 9 after immunization, 3 mice of each group were daily treated for 9 days with BrdU and then sacrificed for immunohistochemical analysis. Results. Treatment with anti-EGF Ab significantly ameliorated EAE symptoms during the second relapse. Anti-EGF Ab induced a shift from BrdU(+)GFAP(+) NSCs to BrdU(+)DCX(+) neuroblasts in the subventricular zone (SVZ), increased BrdU(+)NeuN(+) neurons in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, and increased BrdU(+)O4(+) oligodendrocytes in the SVZ. There was no change in the inflammatory infiltrates in response to anti-EGF Ab. Conclusions. Therapy with anti-EGF Ab ameliorates EAE via induction of neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis. No immunosuppressive effect was found. Further investigation is needed to support these notions of beneficial effect of anti-EGF Ab in MS. PMID:25610650

  10. Treatment with Anti-EGF Ab Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis via Induction of Neurogenesis and Oligodendrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Amir-Levy, Yifat; Mausner-Fainberg, Karin; Karni, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Background. The neural stem cells (NSCs) migrate to the damaged sites in multiple sclerosis (MS) and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the differentiation into neurons or oligodendrocytes is blocked. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates NSC proliferation and mobilization to demyelinated lesions but also induces astrogenesis and glial scar. Objective. To examine the clinical and histopathological effects of EGF neutralization on EAE. Methods. EAE-induced SJL mice were intravenously treated with either anti-EGF neutralizing antibody (Ab) or isotype control or PBS. On day 9 after immunization, 3 mice of each group were daily treated for 9 days with BrdU and then sacrificed for immunohistochemical analysis. Results. Treatment with anti-EGF Ab significantly ameliorated EAE symptoms during the second relapse. Anti-EGF Ab induced a shift from BrdU+GFAP+ NSCs to BrdU+DCX+ neuroblasts in the subventricular zone (SVZ), increased BrdU+NeuN+ neurons in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, and increased BrdU+O4+ oligodendrocytes in the SVZ. There was no change in the inflammatory infiltrates in response to anti-EGF Ab. Conclusions. Therapy with anti-EGF Ab ameliorates EAE via induction of neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis. No immunosuppressive effect was found. Further investigation is needed to support these notions of beneficial effect of anti-EGF Ab in MS. PMID:25610650

  11. Stage-Specific Role of Interferon-Gamma in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Gabriel; Ottum, Payton A.; Reyes, Lilian I.; Burgos, Paula I.; Naves, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    The role of interferon (IFN)-γ in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), has remained as an enigmatic paradox for more than 30 years. Several studies attribute this cytokine a prominent proinflammatory and pathogenic function in these pathologies. However, accumulating evidence shows that IFN-γ also plays a protective role inducing regulatory cell activity and modulating the effector T cell response. Several innate and adaptive immune cells also develop opposite functions strongly associated with the production of IFN-γ in EAE. Even the suppressive activity of different types of regulatory cells is dependent on IFN-γ. Interestingly, recent data supports a stage-specific participation of IFN-γ in EAE providing a plausible explanation for previous conflicting results. In this review, we will summarize and discuss such literature, emphasizing the protective role of IFN-γ on immune cells. These findings are fundamental to understand the complex role of IFN-γ in the pathogenesis of these diseases and can provide basis for potential stage-specific therapy for MS targeting IFN-γ-signaling or IFN-γ-producing immune cells. PMID:26483787

  12. Mice lacking Axl and Mer tyrosine kinase receptors are susceptible to experimental autoimmune orchitis induction.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Liu, Peng; Cheng, C Yan; Lee, Will M; Chen, Yongmei; Han, Daishu

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian testis is an immunoprivileged organ where male germ cell autoantigens are immunologically ignored. Both systemic immune tolerance to autoantigens and local immunosuppressive milieu contribute to the testicular immune privilege. Testicular immunosuppression has been intensively studied, but information on systemic immune tolerance to autoantigens is lacking. In the present study, we aimed to determine the role of Axl and Mer receptor tyrosine kinases in maintaining the systemic tolerance to male germ cell antigens using the experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) model. Axl and Mer double-knockout (Axl(-/-)Mer(-/-)) mice developed evident EAO after a single immunization with germ cell homogenates emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant. EAO was characterized by the accumulation of macrophages and T lymphocytes in the testis. Damage to the seminiferous epithelium was also observed. EAO induction was associated with pro-inflammatory cytokine upregulation in the testes, impaired permeability of the blood-testis barrier and generation of autoantibodies against germ cell antigens in Axl(-/-)Mer(-/-) mice. Immunization also induced mild EAO in Axl or Mer single-gene-knockout mice. By contrast, a single immunization failed to induce EAO in wild-type mice. The results indicate that Axl and Mer receptors cooperatively regulate the systemic immune tolerance to male germ cell antigens. PMID:25403570

  13. Thiamine deficiency promotes T cell infiltration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: the involvement of CCL2.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhe; Fan, Zhiqin; Zhang, Ying; Yu, Ronghuan; Yang, Haihua; Zhou, Chenghua; Luo, Jia; Ke, Zun-Ji

    2014-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease that results from the interplay between environmental factors and a susceptible genetic background. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has been widely used to investigate the mechanisms underlying MS pathogenesis. Chemokines, such as CCL2, are involved in the development of EAE. We have previously shown that thiamine deficiency (TD) induced CCL2 in neurons. We hypothesized that TD may affect the pathogenesis of EAE. In this study, EAE was induced in C57BL/6J mice by the injection of myelin oligodendroglial glycoprotein (MOG) peptides 35-55 with or without TD. TD aggravated the development of EAE, which was indicated by clinical scores and pathologic alterations in the spinal cord. TD also accelerated the development of EAE in an adoptive transfer EAE model. TD caused microglial activation and a drastic increase (up 140%) in leukocyte infiltration in the spinal cord of the EAE mice; specifically, TD increased Th1 and Th17 cells. TD upregulated the expression of CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Cells in peripheral lymph node and spleen isolated from MOG-primed TD mice showed much stronger proliferative responses to MOG. CCL2 stimulated the proliferation and migration of T lymphocytes in vitro. Our results suggested that TD exacerbated the development of EAE through activating CCL2 and inducing pathologic inflammation. PMID:25063874

  14. Routes of Administration and Dose Optimization of Soluble Antigen Arrays in Mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Thati, Shara; Kuehl, Christopher; Hartwell, Brittany; Sestak, Joshua; Siahaan, Teruna; Forrest, Laird; Berkland, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Soluble Antigen Arrays (SAgAs) were developed for treating mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. SAgAs are composed of hyaluronan with grafted EAE antigen and LABL peptide (a ligand of ICAM-1). SAgA dose was tested by varying injection volume, SAgA concentration, and administration schedule. Routes of administration were explored to determine the efficacy of SAgAs when injected intramuscularly, subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, intravenously, or instilled into lungs. Injections proximal to the central nervous system (CNS) were compared to distal injection sites. Intravenous dosing was included to determine if SAgA efficiency results from systemic exposure. Pulmonary instillation was included since reports suggest T cells are licensed in the lungs before moving onto the CNS1,2. Decreasing the volume of injection or SAgA dose reduced treatment efficacy. Treating mice with a single injection on day 4, 7, or 10 also reduced efficacy compared to injecting on all three days. Surprisingly, changing the injection site did not lead to a significant difference in efficacy. Intravenous administration showed efficacy similar to other routes, suggesting SAgAs act systemically. When SAgAs were delivered via pulmonary instillation, however, EAE mice failed to develop any symptoms, suggesting a unique lung mechanism to ameliorate EAE in mice. PMID:25447242

  15. A role for surface lymphotoxin in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis independent of LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Gommerman, Jennifer L.; Giza, Keith; Perper, Stuart; Sizing, Irene; Ngam-ek, Apinya; Nickerson-Nutter, Cheryl; Browning, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    In studies using genetically deficient mice, a role for the lymphotoxin (LT) system in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has remained controversial. Here, we have reassessed this conclusion by using a fusion protein decoy that blocks the LT pathway in vivo without evoking the developmental defects inherent in LT-deficient mice. We have found that inhibition of the LT pathway prevented disease in two models of EAE that do not rely on the administration of pertussis toxin. Surprisingly, disease attenuation was due to specific blockade of LTαβ binding rather than the binding of LIGHT to its receptors. In a third system that requires pertussis toxin, LT inhibition did not affect disease, as was observed when the same model was used with LT-deficient mice. Disease prevention in pertussis toxin–free models was associated with defects in T cell responses and migration. When the DO11.10 T cell transgenic system was used, inhibition of the LT pathway was shown to uncouple T cell priming from T cell recall responses. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the LT pathway and its ability to maintain lymphoid microenvironments is critical for sustaining late-phase T cell responses in multiple sclerosis. PMID:12952924

  16. Prevention of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by antibodies against α4βl integrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yednock, Ted A.; Cannon, Catherine; Fritz, Lawrence C.; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; Steinman, Lawrence; Karin, Nathan

    1992-03-01

    EXPERIMENTAL autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an inflammatory condition of the central nervous system with similarities to multiple sclerosis1,2. In both diseases, circulating leukocytes penetrate the blood-brain barrier and damage myelin, resulting in impaired nerve conduction and paralysis3-5. We sought to identify the adhesion receptors that mediate the attachment of circulating leukocytes to inflamed brain endothelium in EAE, because this interaction is the first step in leukocyte entry into the central nervous system. Using an in vitro adhesion assay on tissue sections, we found that lymphocytes and monocytes bound selectively to inflamed EAE brain vessels. Binding was inhibited by antibodies against the integrin molecule α4βl, but not by antibodies against numerous other adhesion receptors. When tested in vivo, anti-α4 integrin effectively prevented the accumulation of leukocytes in the central nervous system and the development of EAE. Thus, therapies designed to interfere with α4βl integrin may be useful in treating inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.

  17. Ninjurin1 Deficiency Attenuates Susceptibility of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Bum Ju; Le, Hoang; Shin, Min Wook; Bae, Sung-Jin; Lee, Eun Ji; Wee, Hee-Jun; Cha, Jong-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Lee, Hye Shin; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Seo, Ji Hae; Lo, Eng H.; Jeon, Sejin; Lee, Mi-Ni; Oh, Goo Taeg; Yin, Guo Nan; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Suh, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2014-01-01

    Ninjurin1 is a homotypic adhesion molecule that contributes to leukocyte trafficking in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. However, in vivo gene deficiency animal studies have not yet been done. Here, we constructed Ninjurin1 knock-out (KO) mice and investigated the role of Ninjurin1 on leukocyte trafficking under inflammation conditions such as EAE and endotoxin-induced uveitis. Ninjurin1 KO mice attenuated EAE susceptibility by reducing leukocyte recruitment into the injury regions of the spinal cord and showed less adhesion of leukocytes on inflamed retinal vessels in endotoxin-induced uveitis mice. Moreover, the administration of a custom-made antibody (Ab26–37) targeting the Ninjurin1 binding domain ameliorated the EAE symptoms, showing the contribution of its adhesion activity to leukocyte trafficking. In addition, we addressed the transendothelial migration (TEM) activity of bone marrow-derived macrophages and Raw264.7 cells according to the expression level of Ninjurin1. TEM activity was decreased in Ninjurin1 KO bone marrow-derived macrophages and siNinj1 Raw264.7 cells. Consistent with this, GFP-tagged mNinj1-overexpressing Raw264.7 cells increased their TEM activity. Taken together, we have clarified the contribution of Ninjurin1 to leukocyte trafficking in vivo and delineated its direct functions to TEM, emphasizing Ninjurin1 as a beneficial therapeutic target against inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:24347169

  18. Effects of exercise in a relapsing-remitting model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Klaren, Rachel E; Stasula, Ulana; Steelman, Andrew J; Hernandez, Jessica; Pence, Brandt D; Woods, Jeffrey A; Motl, Robert W

    2016-10-01

    Previous research has examined the effects of exercise in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis. However, all previous studies have utilized a chronic model of EAE, with exercise delivered prior to or immediately after induction of EAE. To our knowledge, no study has examined the effects of exercise delivered during a remission period after initial disease onset in a relapsing-remitting model of EAE (RR-EAE). The current study examines the effects of both voluntary wheel running and forced treadmill exercise on clinical disability and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in SJL mice with RR-EAE. The results demonstrate no significant effects of exercise delivered during remission after initial disease onset on clinical disability scores or levels of hippocampal BDNF in mice with RR-EAE. Furthermore, our results demonstrate no significant increase in citrate synthase activity in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of mice in the running wheel or treadmill conditions compared with the sedentary condition. These results suggest that the exercise stimuli might have been insufficient to elicit differences in clinical disability or hippocampal BDNF among treatment conditions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27312674

  19. T-Cell Properties Determine Disease Site, Clinical Presentation, and Cellular Pathology of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Abromson-Leeman, Sara; Bronson, Rod; Luo, Yi; Berman, Michael; Leeman, Rebecca; Leeman, Joshua; Dorf, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Two distinct clinical phenotypes of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are observed in BALB interferon-γ knockout mice immunized with encephalitogenic peptides of myelin basic protein. Conventional disease, characterized by ascending weakness and paralysis, occurs with greater frequency after immunizing with a peptide comprising residues 59 to 76. Axial-rotatory disease, characterized by uncontrolled axial rotation, occurs with greater frequency in mice immunized with a peptide corresponding to exon 2 of the full length 21.5-kd protein. The two clinical phenotypes are histologically distinguishable. Conventional disease is characterized by inflammation and demyelination primarily in spinal cord, whereas axial-rotatory disease involves inflammation and demyelination of lateral medullary areas of brain. Both types have infiltrates in which neutrophils are a predominating component. By isolating T cells and transferring disease to naïve recipients, we show here that the type of disease is determined entirely by the inducing T cell. Furthermore, studies using CXCR2 knockout recipients, unable to recruit neutrophils to inflammatory sites, show that although neutrophils are critical for some of these T cells to effect disease, there are also interferon-γ-deficient T cells that induce disease in the absence of both interferon-γ and neutrophils. These results highlight the multiplicity of T-cell-initiated effector pathways available for inflammation and demyelination. PMID:15509523

  20. Combined Medication of Lovastatin with Rolipram Suppresses Severity of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Paintlia, Ajaib S; Paintlia, Manjeet K; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar K

    2008-01-01

    Combinations of new medications or existing therapies are gaining momentum over monotherapy to treat central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent studies established that statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) are effective in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an MS model and are promising candidates for future MS medication. Another drug, rolipram (phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor) ameliorates the clinical severity of EAE via induction of various anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this study, we tested whether combining the suboptimal doses of these drugs can suppress the severity of EAE. Prophylactic studies revealed that combined treatment with suboptimal doses of statins perform better than their individually administered optimal doses in EAE as evidenced by delayed clinical scores, reduced disease severity, and rapid recovery. Importantly, combination therapy suppressed the progression of disease in an established EAE case via attenuation of inflammation, axonal loss and demyelination. Combination treatment attenuated inflammatory TH1 and TH17 immune responses and induced TH2-biased immunity in the peripheral and CNS as revealed by serological, quantitative, and immunosorbant assay-based analyses. Moreover, the expansion of T regulatory (CD25+/Foxp3+) cells and self-immune tolerance was apparent in the CNS. These effects of combined drugs were reduced or minimal with either drug alone in this setting. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the combination of these drugs suppresses EAE severity and provides neuroprotection thereby suggesting that this pharmacological approach could be a better future therapeutic strategy to treat MS patients. PMID:18775426

  1. The Emerging Roles of Gamma–Delta T Cells in Tissue Inflammation in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sakshi; Want, Muzamil Yaqub; Awasthi, Amit

    2016-01-01

    γδ (gamma–delta) T cells, a small population of unconventional T cells, have been found in central nervous system lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, but their function in disease activity is not clearly understood. Previous studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) were inconsistent in identifying their specific roles in suppressing or promoting disease pathogenesis. Emerging advancements in the biology of γδ T cells especially in the context of their being the major initial producers of IL-17, suggested their crucial role in pathogenesis of EAE. In addition, γδ T cells express high levels of IL-23R and IL-1R, which further enhance their effector functions in the pathogenesis of EAE. Nonetheless, activated heterogeneous γδ T cells display functional dichotomy, which is crucial in determining the outcomes of tissue inflammation in EAE. In this review, we discussed recent advances in understanding the biology of γδ T cells in tissue inflammation as well as their roles in suppressing or promoting the development of EAE. PMID:26858718

  2. Nigella sativa amliorates inflammation and demyelination in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Noor, Neveen A; Fahmy, Heba M; Mohammed, Faten F; Elsayed, Anwar A; Radwan, Nasr M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major, immune-mediated, demyelinating neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established animal model of MS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective and ameliorative effects of N. sativa seeds (2.8 g/kg body weight) in EAE-induced Wistar rats. EAE-induced rats were divided into: 1- EAE-induced rats ("EAE" group). 2- "N. sativa + EAE" group received daily oral administration of N. sativa 2 weeks prior EAE induction until the end of the experiment. 3- "EAE + N. sativa" group received daily oral administration of N. sativa after the appearance of first clinical signs until the end of the experiment. All animals were decapitated at the 28th day post EAE-induction. EAE was investigated using histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examinations in addition to determination of some oxidative stress parameters in the cerebellum and medulla. N. sativa suppressed inflammation observed in EAE-induced rats. In addition, N. sativa enhanced remyelination in the cerebellum. Moreover, N. sativa reduced the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β1). N. sativa seeds could provide a promising agent effective in both the protection and treatment of EAE. PMID:26261504

  3. Ncx3 gene ablation impairs oligodendrocyte precursor response and increases susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Casamassa, Antonella; La Rocca, Claudia; Sokolow, Sophie; Herchuelz, Andre; Matarese, Giuseppe; Annunziato, Lucio; Boscia, Francesca

    2016-07-01

    The Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger NCX3, recently identified as a myelin membrane component, is involved in the regulation of [Ca(2+) ]i during oligodendrocyte maturation. Here NCX3 involvement was studied in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Western blotting and quantitative colocalization studies performed in wild-type ncx3(+/+) mice at different stages of EAE disease showed that NCX3 protein was intensely upregulated during the chronic stage, where it was intensely coexpressed with the oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) marker NG2 and the premyelinating marker CNPase. Moreover, MOG35-55 -immunized mice lacking the ncx3 gene displayed not only a reduced diameter of axons and an intact myelin ring number but also a dramatic decrease in OPC and pre-myelinating cells in the white matter of the spinal cord when compared with ncx3(+/+) . Accordingly, ncx3(-/-) and ncx3(+/-) mutants developed early onset of EAE and more severe clinical symptoms. Interestingly, cytofluorimetric analysis revealed that during the peak stage of the disease, the number of immune T-cell subsets in ncx3(-/-) mice, was not statistically different from that measured in ncx3(+/+) . Our findings demonstrate that knocking-out NCX3 impairs oligodendrocyte response and worsens clinical symptoms in EAE without altering the immune T-cell population. GLIA 2016;64:1124-1137. PMID:27120265

  4. Gene-based intramuscular interferon-beta therapy for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Jaini, Ritika; Hannaman, Drew; Johnson, Justin M; Bernard, Robert M; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Delasalas, Maida M; Kesaraju, Pavani; Luxembourg, Alain; Evans, Claire F; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2006-09-01

    In contrast to serial injections of recombinant interferon-beta (IFN-beta) for long-term therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS), prolonged systemic delivery of proteins derived through in vivo gene transfer may provide a more clinically relevant alternative. Here we compare the therapeutic efficacies of electroporation (EP)-mediated intramuscular IFN-beta gene transfer with repeated alternate-day injections of recombinant IFN-beta after the onset of relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model widely used in MS research. We show for the first time that a single EP-mediated intramuscular administration of 20 microg of an IFN-beta-expressing plasmid provides long-term expression of interferon-inducible genes and is therapeutic in ongoing established EAE. The achieved therapeutic effects of IFN-beta gene delivery were comparable to an 8-week regimen of 10,000 IU rIFN-beta injected every other day and involved a significant inhibition of disease progression and a significant reduction of EAE relapses compared to untreated or null-vector-treated mice. Our results indicate the viability of a convenient and effective gene-based alternative for long-term IFN-beta protein therapy in MS. PMID:16782409

  5. Facial hypersensitivity and trigeminal pathology in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Thorburn, Kevin C; Paylor, John W; Webber, Christine A; Winship, Ian R; Kerr, Bradley J

    2016-03-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain is a well-recognized complication of the demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanisms underlying MS-related trigeminal neuropathic pain are poorly understood. This can be attributed, at least in part, to the lack of an animal model that exhibits trigeminal pathology similar to that described in MS. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model that is commonly used to study the pathophysiology of MS. We show here that mice with EAE exhibit increased sensitivity to air puffs applied to the whisker pad. The increased sensitivity to air puff stimulation is accompanied by T cell infiltration and glial activation at several points along the trigeminal primary afferent pathway. We also observe demyelination of the intra- and extra-pontine aspects of the trigeminal sensory root and the spinal trigeminal tract. This is the first study to show orofacial sensory disturbances and trigeminal demyelination in EAE. Collectively, our data suggest that EAE may be a useful model for understanding MS-related trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions such as trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26545087

  6. Functional and Pathogenic Differences of Th1 and Th17 Cells in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Helena S.; Mues, Marsilius; Lassmann, Hans; Wekerle, Hartmut; Krishnamoorthy, Gurumoorthy

    2010-01-01

    Background There is consensus that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) can be mediated by myelin specific T cells of Th1 as well as of Th17 phenotype, but the contribution of either subset to the pathogenic process has remained controversial. In this report, we compare functional differences and pathogenic potential of “monoclonal” T cell lines that recognize myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) with the same transgenic TCR but are distinguished by an IFN-γ producing Th1-like and IL-17 producing Th17-like cytokine signature. Methods and Findings CD4+ T cell lines were derived from the transgenic mouse strain 2D2, which expresses a TCR recognizing MOG peptide 35–55 in the context of I-Ab. Adoptive transfer of Th1 cells into lymphopenic (Rag2−/−) recipients, predominantly induced “classic” paralytic EAE, whereas Th17 cells mediated “atypical” ataxic EAE in approximately 50% of the recipient animals. Combination of Th1 and Th17 cells potentiated the encephalitogenicity inducing classical EAE exclusively. Th1 and Th17 mediated EAE lesions differed in their composition but not in their localization within the CNS. While Th1 lesions contained IFN-γ, but no IL-17 producing T cells, the T cells in Th17 lesions showed plasticity, substantially converting to IFN-γ producing Th1-like cells. Th1 and Th17 cells differed drastically by their lytic potential. Th1 but not Th17 cells lysed autoantigen presenting astrocytes and fibroblasts in vitro in a contact-dependent manner. In contrast, Th17 cells acquired cytotoxic potential only after antigenic stimulation and conversion to IFN-γ producing Th1 phenotype. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that both Th1 and Th17 lineages possess the ability to induce CNS autoimmunity but can function with complementary as well as differential pathogenic mechanisms. We propose that Th17-like cells producing IL-17 are required for the generation of atypical EAE whereas IFN-γ producing Th1 cells induce

  7. Platelet-Activating Factor Receptors Mediate Excitatory Postsynaptic Hippocampal Injury in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Geathers, Jasmine S.; Allan, Kevin C.; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2016-01-01

    Gray matter degeneration contributes to progressive disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and can occur out of proportion to measures of white matter disease. Although white matter pathology, including demyelination and axon injury, can lead to secondary gray matter changes, we hypothesized that neurons can undergo direct excitatory injury within the gray matter independent of these. We tested this using a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) with hippocampal degeneration in C57BL/6 mice, in which immunofluorescent staining showed a 28% loss of PSD95-positive excitatory postsynaptic puncta in hippocampal area CA1 compared with sham-immunized controls, despite preservation of myelin and VGLUT1-positive excitatory axon terminals. Loss of postsynaptic structures was accompanied by appearance of PSD95-positive debris that colocalized with the processes of activated microglia at 25 d after immunization, and clearance of debris was followed by persistently reduced synaptic density at 55 d. In vitro, addition of activated BV2 microglial cells to hippocampal cultures increased neuronal vulnerability to excitotoxic dendritic damage following a burst of synaptic activity in a manner dependent on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) signaling. In vivo treatment with PAFR antagonist BN52021 prevented PSD95-positive synapse loss in hippocampi of mice with EAE but did not affect development of EAE or local microglial activation. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic structures can be a primary target of injury within the gray matter in autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease, and suggest that this may occur via PAFR-mediated modulation of activity-dependent synaptic physiology downstream of microglial activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Unraveling gray matter degeneration is critical for developing treatments for progressive disability and cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS). In a mouse model of MS, we show that neurons can undergo injury

  8. A murine experimental model for the mechanical behaviour of viable right-ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Jasso, Daniela; Simon, Marc A; Champion, Hunter C; Sacks, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Although right-ventricular function is an important determinant of cardio-pulmonary performance in health and disease, right ventricular myocardium mechanical behaviour has received relatively little attention. We present a novel experimental method for quantifying the mechanical behaviour of transmurally intact, viable right-ventricular myocardium. Seven murine right ventricular free wall (RVFW) specimens were isolated and biaxial mechanical behaviour measured, along with quantification of the local transmural myofibre and collagen fibre architecture. We developed a complementary strain energy function based method to capture the average biomechanical response. Overall, murine RVFW revealed distinct mechanical anisotropy. The preferential alignment of the myofibres and collagen fibres to the apex-to-outflow-tract direction was consistent with this also being the mechanically stiffer axis. We also observed that the myofibre and collagen fibre orientations were remarkably uniform throughout the entire RVFW thickness. Thus, our findings indicate a close correspondence between the tissue microstructure and biomechanical behaviour of the RVFW myocardium, and are a first step towards elucidating the structure–function of non-contracted murine RVFW myocardium in health and disease. PMID:22848044

  9. High-affinity σ1 protein agonist reduces clinical and pathological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Oxombre, B; Lee-Chang, C; Duhamel, A; Toussaint, M; Giroux, M; Donnier-Maréchal, M; Carato, P; Lefranc, D; Zéphir, H; Prin, L; Melnyk, P; Vermersch, P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Selective agonists of the sigma-1 receptor (σ1 protein) are generally reported to protect against neuronal damage and modulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Human and rodent lymphocytes possess saturable, high-affinity binding sites for compounds binding to the σ1 protein and potential immunomodulatory properties have been described for σ1 protein ligands. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is recognized as a valuable model of the inflammatory aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we have assessed the role of a σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, in EAE. Experimental Approach EAE was induced in SJL/J female mice by active immunization with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139–151 peptide. The σ1 protein agonist was injected i.p. at the time of immunization (day 0). Disease severity was assessed clinically and by histopathological evaluation of the CNS. Phenotyping of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells were performed by flow cytometry in spleen and cervical lymph nodes. Key Results Prophylactic treatment of EAE mice with the σ1 protein agonist prevented mononuclear cell accumulation and demyelination in brain and spinal cord and increased T2 B-cells and regulatory T-cells, resulting in an overall reduction in the clinical progression of EAE. Conclusions and Implications This σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, decreased the magnitude of inflammation in EAE. This effect was associated with increased proportions of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells with potential immunoregulatory functions. Targeting of the σ1 protein might thus provide new therapeutic opportunities in MS. PMID:25521311

  10. Melatonin controls experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by altering the T effector/regulatory balance.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Cruz-Chamorro, Ivan; López-González, Antonio; Utrilla, José C; Fernández-Santos, José M; Martínez-López, Alicia; Lardone, Patricia J; Guerrero, Juan M; Carrillo-Vico, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the experimental model for multiple sclerosis (MS), is triggered by myelin-specific Th1 and Th17 cells. The immunomodulatory activities of melatonin have been shown to be beneficial under several conditions in which the immune system is exacerbated. Here, we sought to elucidate the basis of the melatonin protective effect on EAE by characterizing the T effector/regulatory responses, particularly those of the memory cell subsets. Melatonin was tested for its effect on Th1, Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells in the lymph nodes and CNS of immunodominant peptide of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (pMOG)-immunized and EAE mice, respectively. The capacity of melatonin to ameliorate EAE as well as modifying both T cell response and effector/regulatory balance was surveyed. T cell memory subsets and CD44, a key activation marker involved in the EAE pathogenesis, were also examined. Melatonin protected from EAE by decreasing peripheral and central Th1/Th17 responses and enhancing both the Treg frequency and IL-10 synthesis in the CNS. Melatonin reduced the T effector memory population and its pro-inflammatory response and regulated CD44 expression, which was decreased in T effector cells and increased in Tregs. The alterations in the T cell subpopulations were associated with a reduced mononuclear infiltration (CD4 and CD11b cells) of the melatonin-treated mice CNS. For the first time, we report that melatonin protects against EAE by controlling peripheral and central T effector/regulatory responses, effects that might be partially mediated by CD44. This immunomodulatory effect on EAE suggests that melatonin may represent an effective treatment option for MS. PMID:26130320

  11. A leading role for NADPH oxidase in an in-vitro study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Eun; Hasan, Mahbub; Rahaman, Khandoker Asiqur; Kang, Min-Jung; Jung, Byung-Hwa; Kwon, Oh-Seung

    2016-04-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide fragment 35-55 (MOG35-55) is a major autoantigen inducing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis that is characterized by blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Various experimental approaches have employed MOG35-55 in vivo; however, in vitro BBB models using MOG35-55 are rarely reported. We investigated MOG35-55 exposure effects with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and pertussis toxin (PTX) on brain endothelial cells and elucidated the relationships among NADPH oxidase, MMP-9, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. These 4 factors significantly increased in MOG35-55+CFA+PTX-exposed endothelial cells compared with the control cells. NADPH oxidase inhibition using apocynin reduced MMP-9 activity, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. MMP-9 inhibitor I decreased expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and both anti-ICAM-1 and anti-VCAM-1 inhibited MMP-9 activity. Inhibitions of MMP-9, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 did not change NADPH oxidase activity. Although inhibition of these 4 factors decreased BBB permeability in cells, inhibition of NADPH oxidase exhibited the highest decrease among these. NADPH oxidase directly influenced MMP-9, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1, but not vice versa. MMP-9 and the cell adhesion molecules reversibly affected each other. In conclusion, NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide elevated expression of MMP-9, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1, and these interactions can finally result in increases of BBB permeability in MOG35-55+CFA+PTX-exposed endothelial cells. PMID:26928315

  12. NFATc1 deficiency in T cells protects mice from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Sarah; Zinser, Elisabeth; Holzinger, Corinna; Sandrock, Lena; Koch, Sonja; Finotto, Susetta

    2015-05-01

    NFATc1 is a member of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors. NFAT is activated upon T-cell receptor activation followed by intracytoplasmatic calcium influx where calmodulin, a calcium sensor protein, activates the phosphatase calcineurin that dephosphorylates NFAT proteins and results in NFAT nuclear import. Here, we show the analysis of conditional NFATc1-deficient mice bearing a deletion of NFATc1 in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. NFATc1-deficient CD4(+) T cells polarized under Th17 conditions express reduced levels of the Th17-associated transcription factor RORγT (where ROR is RAR-related orphan receptor) as well as the Th17-associated cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-10. In the murine model of experimental EAE, we found a strong reduction of the disease outcome in conditional NFATc1-deficient mice, as compared with control littermates. This was accompanied by a diminished inflammation in the brain and spinal cord and reduced IL-17A and IFN-γ expression by antigen-specific spleen, spinal cord, and brain cells. Altogether, these results reveal an important role of NFATc1 in inducing Th17-cell responses and IFN-γ, both being relevant for the EAE development. PMID:25689841

  13. Herbal medicine Gamgungtang down-regulates autoimmunity through induction of TH2 cytokine production by lymphocytes in experimental thyroiditis model.

    PubMed

    Sa, Eun-Ho; Jin, Un-Ho; Kim, Dong-Soo; Kang, Bong-Seok; Ha, Ki-Tae; Kim, June-Ki; Park, Won-Hwan; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2007-02-12

    The crude herbal formulation, Gamgungtang (GGT), has been shown to protect animals against a wide range of spontaneously developing or induced autoimmune diseases. We have previously reported that GGT shows marked down-regulation of several experimental autoimmune diseases. Although very effective at preventing thyroid infiltrates in mice immunized with mouse deglycosylated thyroglobulin and complete Freund's adjuvant and in spontaneous models of thyroiditis, it completely failed to modify experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) induced in mice immunized with mouse thyroglobulin and lipopolysaccharide. In this study, in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms by which GGT suppresses EAT, and autoimmunity in general, we investigated the in vivo effects of this drug on the Th1/Th2 lymphocyte balance, which is important for the induction or inhibition of autoreactivity. Naive SJL/J mice were treated orally for 5 days with GGT (80 mg/(kg day)). Spleen cells were obtained at various time points during the treatment period and were stimulated in vitro with concanavalin A. Interleukins IL-4, IL-10 and IL-12, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) cytokine production was evaluated at the protein levels of the cytokines in the medium and mRNA expressions. A significant upregulation of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-beta was observed following treatment with GGT, which peaked at day 5 (IL-10) or day 10 (IL-4). On the other hand, IL-12 and IFN-gamma production were either unchanged or decreased. It seems therefore that GGT induces in vivo a shift towards Th2 lymphocytes which may be one of the mechanisms of down-regulation of the autoimmune reactivity in EAT. Our observations indicate that down-regulation of TH1 cytokines (especially IL-12) and enhancement of Th2 cytokine production may play an important role in the control of T-cell-mediated autoimmunity. These data may contribute to the design of new immunomodulating treatments for a group of

  14. T cell factor-1 negatively regulates expression of IL-17 family of cytokines and protects mice from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing; Sharma, Archna; Ghosh, Amalendu; Sen, Jyoti Misra

    2011-04-01

    Activated CD4 T cells are associated with protective immunity and autoimmunity. The manner in which the inflammatory potential of T cells and resultant autoimmunity is restrained is poorly understood. In this article, we demonstrate that T cell factor-1 (TCF1) negatively regulates the expression of IL-17 and related cytokines in activated CD4 T cells. We show that TCF1 does not affect cytokine signals and expression of transcription factors that have been shown to regulate Th17 differentiation. Instead, TCF1 regulates IL-17 expression, in part, by binding to the regulatory regions of the Il17 gene. Moreover, TCF1-deficient Th17 CD4 T cells express higher levels of IL-7Rα, which potentially promotes their survival and expansion in vivo. Accordingly, TCF1-deficient mice are hyperresponsive to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, TCF1, a constitutively expressed T cell-specific transcription factor, is a critical negative regulator of the inflammatory potential of TCR-activated T cells and autoimmunity. PMID:21339363

  15. Suppression of experimental myasthenia gravis, a B cell-mediated autoimmune disease, by blockade of IL-18.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Maiti, P K; Raveh, L; Souroujon, M C; Fuchs, S

    2001-10-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production and IL-12-driven Th1 phenotype polarization. Increased expression of IL-18 has been observed in several autoimmune diseases. In this study we have analyzed the role of IL-18 in an antibody-mediated autoimmune disease and elucidated the mechanisms involved in disease suppression mediated by blockade of IL-18, using experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) as a model. EAMG is a T cell-regulated, antibody-mediated autoimmune disease in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. Th1- and Th2-type responses are both implicated in EAMG development. We show that treatment by anti-IL-18 during ongoing EAMG suppresses disease progression. The protective effect can be adoptively transferred to naive recipients and is mediated by increased levels of the immunosuppressive Th3-type cytokine TGF-beta and decreased AChR-specific Th1-type cellular responses. Suppression of EAMG is accompanied by down-regulation of the costimulatory factor CD40L and up-regulation of CTLA-4, a key negative immunomodulator. Our results suggest that IL-18 blockade may potentially be applied for immunointervention in myasthenia gravis. PMID:11641240

  16. OGR1/GPR68 Modulates the Severity of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Regulates Nitric Oxide Production by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Cheryl A.; Zhao, Fei Linda; Li, Xujian; Xu, Yan; Dunn, Shannon E.; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) is a proton-sensing molecule that can detect decreases in extracellular pH that occur during inflammation. Although OGR1 has been shown to have pro-inflammatory functions in various diseases, its role in autoimmunity has not been examined. We therefore sought to determine whether OGR1 has a role in the development of T cell autoimmunity by contrasting the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis between wild type and OGR1-knockout mice. OGR1-knockout mice showed a drastically attenuated clinical course of disease that was associated with a profound reduction in the expansion of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55-reactive T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in the periphery and a reduced accumulation of Th1 and Th17 effectors in the central nervous system. We determined that these impaired T cell responses in OGR1-knockout mice associated with a reduced frequency and number of dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes during EAE and a higher production of nitric oxide by macrophages. Our studies suggest that OGR1 plays a key role in regulating T cell responses during autoimmunity. PMID:26828924

  17. Autoimmune synaptopathies.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Sarah J; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Vincent, Angela

    2016-02-01

    Autoantibodies targeting proteins at the neuromuscular junction are known to cause several distinct myasthenic syndromes. Recently, autoantibodies targeting neurotransmitter receptors and associated proteins have also emerged as a cause of severe, but potentially treatable, diseases of the CNS. Here, we review the clinical evidence as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence that autoantibodies account for myasthenic syndromes and autoimmune disorders of the CNS by disrupting the functional or structural integrity of synapses. Studying neurological and psychiatric diseases of autoimmune origin may provide new insights into the cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying a broad range of CNS disorders. PMID:26806629

  18. Carbon nanospheres mediated delivery of nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 to direct experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chemmannur, Sijo V; Bhagat, Prasad; Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Paknikar, Kishore M; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the suppression of immune responses and associated side effects, steroid based treatments for inflammatory encephalitis disease can be detrimental. Here, we demonstrate a novel carbon nanosphere (CNP) based treatment regime for encephalomyelitis in mice by exploiting the functional property of the nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1. A truncated part of SMAR1 ie, the DNA binding domain was conjugated with hydrothermally synthesized CNPs. When administered intravenously, the conjugate suppressed experimental animal encephalomyelitis in T cell specific conditional SMAR1 knockout mice (SMAR−/−). Further, CNP-SMAR1 conjugate delayed the onset of the disease and reduced the demyelination significantly. There was a significant decrease in the production of IL-17 after re-stimulation with MOG. Altogether, our findings suggest a potential carbon nanomaterial based therapeutic intervention to combat Th17 mediated autoimmune diseases including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. PMID:27274234

  19. Activation of Cannabinoid CB2 receptors Reduces Hyperalgesia in an Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Weisi; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials investigating the analgesic efficacy of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis have yielded mixed results, possibly due to psychotropic side effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. We hypothesized that a CB2-specific agonist (JWH-133) would decrease hyperalgesia in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis. 4 weeks after induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we found that intrathecal administration of JWH-133 (10–100 μg) dose-dependently reduced both mechanical and cold hypersensitivity without producing signs of sedation or ataxia. The anti-hyperalgesic effects of JWH-133 could be dose-dependently prevented by intrathecal co-administration of the CB2 antagonist, AM-630 (1–3 μg). Our results suggest that JWH-133 acts at CB2 receptors, most likely within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, to suppress the hypersensitivity associated with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These are the first pre-clinical studies to directly promote CB2 as a promising target for the treatment of central pain in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. PMID:25849525

  20. A new modified animal model of myosin-induced experimental autoimmune myositis enhanced by defibrase

    PubMed Central

    Wen-Jing, Luo; Hong-Hua, Li; Xiang-Hui, Lu; Jie-Xiao, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the effect of defibrase (a proteolytic enzyme extraction of Agkistrodon halys venom) on experimental autoimmune myositis (EAM) in guinea pigs and explored the option of using a modified pig model of EAM to enhance the study of this disease. Material and methods Guinea pigs were divided into 3 groups: group A (control group) was immunized with complete Freund adjuvant (CFA), then received 6 injections of saline weekly; group B (EAM group) was immunized with partially purified rabbit myosin emulsified with CFA, then received an injection of saline; group C (EAM + defibrase group) was immunized with purified rabbit myosin emulsified with CFA, then received an injection of defibrase. The animals were observed for their general health condition and the body weight was measured daily. Plasma levels of fibrinogen and creatine kinase (CK) were determined. Muscle tissues were examined histologically. Results After immunizations for 6 weeks, incidence of EAM in groups A, B and C was 0 (0/7), 83.3% (10/12) and 100% (15/15), respectively. Guinea pigs with EAM presented angeitis symptoms of muscle weakness. Histological analysis revealed a significant difference. Muscles with EAM had scattered or diffuse inflammatory manifestations, which are also common pathological features of human idiopathic polymyositis (IPM). Defibrase-treated animals displayed extensive inflammation and fiber necrosis compared with the EAM group (histological score: 2.80 ±1.15 vs. 1.88 ±1.32, p < 0.05). Severity of inflammation of group B was mainly mild to moderate; 16.7% (2/12) of animals developed severe inflammation. Incidence of severe inflammation with a score up to 4 in group C was 40% (6/15). Conclusions Defibrase can exacerbate myosin-induced EAM; thus a new modified model was generated. PMID:26788090

  1. Hyperinducibility of Ia antigen on astrocytes correlates with strain-specific susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, P.T.; ter Meulen, V.; Fontana, A.

    1987-06-01

    In search of a phenotypic marker determining genetically controlled susceptibility to delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in the brain-in particular, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)- the authors have compared the ..gamma..-interferon (IFN-..gamma..) induction of Ia molecules on astrocytes and macrophages from rat and mouse strains that are susceptible or resistant to this disease. They focused on Ia expression because DTH reactions to self or foreign antigens are largely mediated by lymphocytes restricted by class II (Ia) antigens of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The data demonstrate that Lewis (fully susceptible) and Brown Norway (BN) (fully resistant) rats are very different in that Lewis astrocytes express much higher levels of Ia than BN astrocytes. Similar data were obtained from an analysis of EAE-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains (SJL and BALB/c, respectively), which suggest that this phenomenon may be universal and not limited to only one mammalian species. At least one gene responsible for Ia hyperinduction is located outside the rat RT-1 or the mouse MHC locus. Animals congenic at the RT-1 or MHC locus of the resistant strain but with background genes of the susceptible strain exhibit intermediate levels of Ia compared to fully resistant and susceptible rodents, which fits well with the reduced EAE susceptibility of these congenic animals. Furthermore, hyperinduction of Ia is astrocyte specific, since peritoneal macrophages of susceptible and resistant strains exhibit identical profiles of Ia induction. Thus, astrocyte Ia hyperinducibility may be a major strain- and tissue-specific factor that contributes to Ia-restricted DTH reactions in the brain.

  2. Altered cognitive-emotional behavior in early experimental autoimmune encephalitis--cytokine and hormonal correlates.

    PubMed

    Acharjee, Shaona; Nayani, Nausheen; Tsutsui, Mio; Hill, Matthew N; Ousman, Shalina S; Pittman, Quentin J

    2013-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is often associated with co-morbid behavioural and cognitive impairments; however the presence of these symptoms does not necessarily correlate with neurological damage. This suggests that an alternate mechanism may subserve these impairments relative to motor deficits. We investigated whether these abnormalities could be studied in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. In myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55)-induced EAE mice, no motor deficits were observed until d9 after immunization. This enabled us to carry out a series of neurobehavioral tests during the presymptomatic stage, between d6 and d8 post-immunization. EAE mice spent more time in the outer zone in an open field test and in the closed arms of an elevated plus maze and, showed decreased latency for immobility in the tail suspension and forced swim tests and reduced social interaction compared with controls. These results are indicative of anxiety- and depression- like behavior. In addition, EAE mice appeared to exhibit memory impairment compared to controls based on their reduced time spent in the target quadrant in the Morris water maze and their faster memory extinction in the fear conditioning test. No demyelination, microglial activation or astrogliosis was observed in the brain at this early stage. Transcript analysis by RT-PCR from d6 to d8 brain revealed elevated interleukin (IL)-1β and TNF-α in the hypothalamus but not in the amygdala or hippocampus of EAE mice. Lastly, plasma corticosterone levels increased in EAE mice compared to controls. In conclusion, emotional and cognitive deficits are observed in EAE prior to demyelination and are associated with elevated IL-1β and TNF-α in the hypothalamus and changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. PMID:23886782

  3. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Peggy P; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-02-01

    Bile acids are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The bile acid-FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, bile acid-FXR regulation has been reported to play an integral role in both hepatic and intestinal inflammation, and in atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that FXR knockout mice had more disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Obeticholic acid (6α-ethyl-chenodeoxycholic acid, 6-ECDCA), a synthetic FXR agonist, is an orally available drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as alcoholic hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. When we treated mice exhibiting established EAE with 6-ECDCA, or the natural FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), clinical disease was ameliorated by (i) suppressing lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production; (ii) reducing CD4(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cell populations and their expression of negative checkpoint regulators programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA); (iii) increasing CD8(+) T cells and PD1, PDl-1, and BTLA expression; and (iv) reducing VLA-4 expression in both the T- and B-cell populations. Moreover, adoptive transfer of 6-ECDCA- or CDCA-treated donor cells failed to transfer disease in naive recipients. Thus, we show that FXR functions as a negative regulator in neuroinflammation and we highlight that FXR agonists represent a potential previously unidentified therapy for MS. PMID:26811456

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells differentially modulate effector CD8+ T cell subsets and exacerbate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Justin D; Smith, Matthew D; Calabresi, Peter A; Whartenby, Katharine A

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have emerged as a promising candidate for inflammatory suppression and disease amelioration, especially of neuro-inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Auto-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells acquire pathogenic IFNγ-producing- (Type I) and IL-17A-producing- (Type 17) effector phenotypes in MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Although MSC have been extensively demonstrated to suppress pathogenic effector CD4+ T cells and CD4+ T cell-mediated EAE, surprisingly few studies have addressed their modulation of effector CD8+ T cells represented in MS or their impact on CD8+ T cell-mediated EAE. We find that MSC differentially modulate CD8+ T cell development depending on effector T cell subtype. MSC drive activated low-IFNγ producers toward an enhanced high-IFNγ Tc1-like phenotype but strongly inhibit the production of IL-17A and Tc17 polarization in vitro. These observations are underscored by differential MSC modulation of T cell activation, proliferation, and signature transcription factor up-regulation. In addition, effector CD8+ T cells co-cultured with MSC exhibited increased production of IL-2, a molecule known to enhance IFNγ, yet suppress IL-17A, production. Based on these in vitro effects on CD8+ T cells, we next evaluated their impact on the severity of EAE. To better evaluate CD8+ T cells, we immunized mice with MOG37-50 , which is a CD8-targeted epitope. Our results revealed a worsening of disease, consistent with their in vitro stimulation of Tc1 cells. These findings highlight the emerging duality of MSC in immune modulation and provide implications for their future use in immune-related diseases. PMID:24911892

  5. Prevention of passively transferred experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by a phage library-derived cyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Natarajan; Im, Sin-Heyog; Balass, Moshe; Fuchs, Sara; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim

    2000-01-01

    Many pathogenic antibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG), are directed against the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). These antibodies are highly conformation dependent; hence, linear peptides derived from native receptor sequences are poor candidates for their immunoneutralization. We employed a phage-epitope library to identify peptide-mimotopes capable of preventing the pathogenicity of the anti-MIR mAb 198. We identified a 15-mer peptide (PMTLPENYFSERPYH) that binds specifically to mAb 198 and inhibits its binding to AcChoR. A 10-fold increase in the affinity of this peptide was achieved by incorporating flanking amino acid residues from the coat protein as present in the original phage library. This extended peptide (AEPMTLPENYFSERPYHPPPP) was constrained by the addition of cysteine residues on both ends of the peptide, thus generating a cyclic peptide that inhibited the binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR with a potency that is three orders of magnitude higher when compared with the parent library peptide. This cyclic peptide inhibited the in vitro binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR and prevented the antigenic modulation of AcChoR caused by mAb 198 in human muscle cell cultures. The cyclic peptide also reacted with several other anti-MIR mAbs and the sera of EAMG rats. In addition, this peptide blocked the ability of mAb 198 to passively transfer EAMG in rats. Further derivatization of the cyclic peptide may aid in the design of suitable synthetic mimotopes for modulation of MG. PMID:10639153

  6. Voluntary wheel running delays disease onset and reduces pain hypersensitivity in early experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    PubMed

    Benson, Curtis; Paylor, John W; Tenorio, Gustavo; Winship, Ian; Baker, Glen; Kerr, Bradley J

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is classically defined by motor deficits, but it is also associated with the secondary symptoms of pain, depression, and anxiety. Up to this point modifying these secondary symptoms has been difficult. There is evidence that both MS and the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), commonly used to study the pathophysiology of the disease, can be modulated by exercise. To examine whether limited voluntary wheel running could modulate EAE disease progression and the co-morbid symptoms of pain, mice with EAE were allowed access to running wheels for 1h every day. Allowing only 1h every day of voluntary running led to a significant delay in the onset of clinical signs of the disease. The development of mechanical allodynia was assessed using Von Frey hairs and indicated that wheel running had a modest positive effect on the pain hypersensitivity associated with EAE. These behavioral changes were associated with reduced numbers of cFOS and phosphorylated NR1 positive cells in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord compared to no-run EAE controls. In addition, within the dorsal horn, voluntary wheel running reduced the number of infiltrating CD3(+) T-cells and reduced the overall levels of Iba1 immunoreactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we observed that wheel-running lead to significant changes in the spinal cord levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Oxidative stress has separately been shown to contribute to EAE disease progression and neuropathic pain. Together these results indicate that in mice with EAE, voluntary motor activity can delay the onset of clinical signs and reduce pain symptoms associated with the disease. PMID:26033473

  7. Protective mechanisms of berberine against experimental autoimmune myocarditis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuefei; Zhang, Xinghua; Ye, Lin; Yuan, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    Berberine, an alkaloid derivative extracted from numerous plants of the general Berberis and Coptis, has been reported to have immunomodulatory effects against immune-mediated disorders in emerging studies. In this study, the effects of berberine and its underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated from the myosin-induced myocardial injury in rats. Lewis rats were immunized with porcine cardiac myosin to induce experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM), treated with berberine and specific JAK inhibitor AG490 as a positive control. Our data showed that both berberine and AG490 significantly reduced the impaired cardiac function and the pathophysiological severity, impeded high levels of anti-cardiac myosin antibody of EAM rats. Th17 and Th1 cells as well as their cytokines IL-17 and IFN-γ were up-regulated in EAM. However, the excessive increase of Th17/Th1 responses was restored by berberine and AG490. We also examined the expression level of phosphorylated proteins of JAK-STAT pathway which has a key role in the Th17 and Th1 lineage commitment. The phosphorylated (p)-STAT1,STAT3 and STAT4 increased significantly in EAM, while berberine notably attenuated their excessive expression. This effect of berberine was equivalent to that of AG490 blockade. Our current study demonstrated that berberine could ameliorate EAM and the underling mechanisms may be due to the fact that berberine differentially modulates the activities of p-STAT1, p-STAT3 and p-STAT4 to suppress Th17 and Th1 cell differentiation. PMID:27044832

  8. Moesin is activated in cardiomyocytes in experimental autoimmune myocarditis and mediates cytoskeletal reorganization with protrusion formation.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Akimitsu; Mitsuhara, Yusuke; Orimoto, Aya; Nakayasu, Yusuke; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Obana, Masanori; Maeda, Makiko; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Fujio, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    Acute myocarditis is a self-limiting disease. Most patients with myocarditis recover without cardiac dysfunction in spite of limited capacity of myocardial regeneration. Therefore, to address intrinsic reparative machinery of inflamed hearts, we investigated the cellular dynamics of cardiomyocytes in response to inflammation using experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model. EAM was induced by immunization of BALB/c mice with α-myosin heavy chain peptides twice. The inflammatory reaction was evoked with myocardial damage with the peak at 3 wk after the first immunization (EAM3w). Morphological and functional restoration started from EAM3w, when active protrusion formation, a critical process of myocardial healing, was observed in cardiomyocytes. Shotgun proteomics revealed that cytoskeletal proteins were preferentially increased in cardiomyocytes at EAM3w, compared with preimmunized (EAM0w) hearts, and that moesin was the most remarkably upregulated among them. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the expression of both total and phosphorylated moesin was upregulated in isolated cardiomyocytes from EAM3w hearts. Immunofluorescence staining showed that moesin was localized at cardiomyocyte protrusions at EAM3w. Adenoviral vectors expressing wild-type, constitutively active and inactive form of moesin (wtMoesin, caMoesin, and iaMoesin, respectively) were transfected in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. The overexpression of wtMoesin and caMoesin resulted in protrusion formation, while not iaMoesin. Finally, we found that cardiomyocyte protrusions were accompanied by cell-cell contact formation. The expression of moesin was upregulated in cardiomyocytes under inflammation, inducing protrusion formation in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Moesin signal could be a novel therapeutic target that stimulates myocardial repair by promoting contact formation of cardiomyocytes. PMID:27342875

  9. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Peggy P.; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The bile acid–FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, bile acid–FXR regulation has been reported to play an integral role in both hepatic and intestinal inflammation, and in atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that FXR knockout mice had more disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Obeticholic acid (6α-ethyl-chenodeoxycholic acid, 6-ECDCA), a synthetic FXR agonist, is an orally available drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as alcoholic hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. When we treated mice exhibiting established EAE with 6-ECDCA, or the natural FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), clinical disease was ameliorated by (i) suppressing lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production; (ii) reducing CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cell populations and their expression of negative checkpoint regulators programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA); (iii) increasing CD8+ T cells and PD1, PDl-1, and BTLA expression; and (iv) reducing VLA-4 expression in both the T- and B-cell populations. Moreover, adoptive transfer of 6-ECDCA– or CDCA-treated donor cells failed to transfer disease in naive recipients. Thus, we show that FXR functions as a negative regulator in neuroinflammation and we highlight that FXR agonists represent a potential previously unidentified therapy for MS. PMID:26811456

  10. Induction and clinical scoring of chronic-relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Beeton, Christine; Garcia, Adriana; Chandy, K George

    2007-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that commonly affects young adults. It is characterized by demyelination and glial scaring in areas disseminated in the brain and spinal cord. These lesions alter nerve conduction and induce the disabling neurological deficits that vary with the location of the demyelinated plaques in the CNS (e.g. paraparesis, paralysis, blindness, incontinence). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a model for MS. EAE was first induced accidentally in humans during vaccination against rabies, using viruses grown on rabbit spinal cords. Residues of spinal injected with the inactivated virus induced the CNS disease. Following these observations, a first model of EAE was described in non-human primates immunized with a CNS homogenate by Rivers and Schwenther in 1935. EAE has since been generated in a variety of species and can follow different courses depending on the species/strain and immunizing antigen used. For example, immunizing Lewis rats with myelin basic protein in emulsion with adjuvant induces an acute model of EAE, while the same antigen induces a chronic disease in guinea pigs. The EAE model described here is induced by immunizing DA rats against DA rat spinal cord in emulsion in complete Freund's adjuvant. Rats develop an ascending flaccid paralysis within 7-14 days post-immunization. Clinical signs follow a relapsing-remitting course over several weeks. Pathology shows large immune infiltrates in the CNS and demyelination plaques. Special considerations for taking care for animals with EAE are described at the end of the video. PMID:18979022