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Sample records for murine experimental sparganosis

  1. [Human sparganosis].

    PubMed

    Vortel, V; Pur, J; Halberstadt, P; Valkounová, J

    1995-02-01

    Endemic subcutaneous sparganosis was described in right pectoral region of a 29-year-old male Vietnamese. It was caused by 2nd larval stadium (plerocercoid, sparganum) of a tapeworm Spirometra mansoni. Lesion was discovered during the patient's 2nd month in this country, surgery was made 7 months later. Description is the first in Czech Republic. PMID:8599848

  2. Ocular sparganosis from Assam

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Reema; Gogoi, Rajendra Nath

    2015-01-01

    Sparganosis is caused by plerocercoid larvae of the Pseudophyllidea tapeworms of the genus Spirometra. Though prevalent in East Asian and south east Asian countries like China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand; yet very few cases are reported from India. We report a case of migrating sub-conjunctival ocular sparganosis mimicking scleritis which later on developed into orbital cellulitis from Dibrugarh, Assam, North-eastern part of India. This case is reported for its rarity. PMID:25709957

  3. Human sparganosis, a neglected food borne zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan; Li, Ming-Wei; Wang, Ze-Dong; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-10-01

    Human sparganosis is a food borne zoonosis caused by the plerocercoid larvae (spargana) of various diphyllobothroid tapeworms of the genus Spirometra. Human infections are acquired by ingesting the raw or undercooked meat of snakes or frogs, drinking untreated water, or using raw flesh in traditional poultices. More than 1600 cases of sparganosis have been documented worldwide, mostly in east and southeast Asia. Sporadic cases have been reported in South America, Europe, and Africa, and several cases have been described in travellers returning from endemic regions. Epidemiological data suggest that the increased effect of sparganosis on human health is because of greater consumption of raw meat of freshwater frogs and snakes. This Review provides information about the Spirometra parasites and their lifecycles, summarises clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of human sparganosis, and describes geographical distribution and infection characteristics of Spirometra parasites in host animals. PMID:26364132

  4. Breast Sparganosis Incidentally Detected by FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seunggyun; Oh, So Won; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Yi, Ann; Ahn, Young Joon

    2013-06-01

    Sparganosis is a rare, parasitic infection that is caused by the plercercoid tapeworm larvae of the genus Spirometra. Sparganosis is transmitted by ingestion of larvae-containing water or intermediate hosts, such as raw amphibians, and usually presented with a subcutaneous nodule in the abdominal wall, extremities, and genital organs. Among the various involved organs, the breast is a seldom encountered site for sparganosis. However, breast sparganosis has clinical importance, since it is generally presented with an indolent palpable mass that mimics malignancy, even without evidence of inflammation. Herein, we report a case of breast sparganosis that was detected incidentally by FDG PET/CT during staging work ups in a patient with gall bladder cancer. PMID:24900094

  5. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  6. A seroepidemiologic survey for human sparganosis in Gangweon-do

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu-Jae; Bae, Yong-Tae; Kim, Dong-Heui; Deung, Young-Kun

    2002-01-01

    Gangweon-do is known to be highly endemic area of sparganosis more than other provinces in Korea. A seroepidmiologic examination for the detection of anti-Spirometra erinacei plerocercoid IgG in serum was carried out in normal inhabitants in Hongcheon-gun, Gangweon-do. Sere were tested by enzyme-linked immunosrobent assay (ELISA) for the anti-sparganum antibodies. Positive rate for anti-sparganum antibody in 719 adults was 3.3%. Data of the questionnaire for 24 ELISA positive inhabitants revealed that 20 had a history of eating raw meat of snakes, 24 had a history of eating frogs, and 24 had a history of drinking stream water. Two positive cases had a past history of sparganosis. Two positive cases showed current symptoms of sparganosis. The data revealed that ELISA would be useful to find infected cases among normal inhabitants at sparganosis-endemic areas. PMID:12509101

  7. Efficacy of Posaconazole in Murine Experimental Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology. PMID:22330929

  8. Cerebral sparganosis: case report and review of the European cases.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Anna; Aguirre, Daniel T; De Andrés, Pablo; Daoud, Lina; Fortes, José; Muñiz, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    Sparganosis is a severe parasitic infection caused by the larvae of Spirometra mansoni, also called "sparganum." In human hosts, the Spirometra mansoni larva commonly targets the subcutaneous tissue or muscle. Sometimes it can also migrate into the brain, resulting in cerebral sparganosis, mainly characterized by focal neurological symptoms such as seizures and radiological "wandering lesions" on magnetic resonance images (MRIs). Clinical cases of cerebral sparganosis have been reported worldwide, mainly in Asian countries, but also in North America, South America and Australia. Only two cases have been previously reported in Europe. A 29-year-old male from Bolivia, who lived in Spain, presented to our service for seizures and a multicystic brain lesion, initially suspected to be a dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET). He underwent gross total resection of the mixed solid/cystic lesion. Pathology revealed gliosis, multiple interconnected cystic cavities with fibrous walls, inflammatory cell infiltration and no necrotizing granulomatous reaction. Inside the cavities, a parasitic form was identified as the larva of the cestode Spirometra mansoni. At 1-year follow-up, the patient had no deficits and was seizure free. Clinicians should be alerted to the possible existence of this rare entity in Europe, especially in patients from endemic areas with a possible infection history as well as "wandering lesions" on the MRI. PMID:26085111

  9. Endoscopic resection of sparganosis presenting as colon submucosal tumor: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Keun; Baek, Dong Hoon; Lee, Bong Eun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2016-05-21

    Human sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by infection with the tapeworm Sparganum, the migrating plerocercoid (second stage) larva of Spirometra species. Sparganosis usually involves subcutaneous tissues and/or muscles of various parts of the body, but involvement of other sites such as the brain, eye, peritoneopleural cavity, urinary track, scrotum, and abdominal viscera has also been documented. Infections caused by sparganum have a worldwide distribution but are most common in Southeast Asia such as China, Japan, and South Korea. Rectal sparganosis is an uncommon disease but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unusual and suspicious rectal submucosal tumors. We report a case of rectal sparganosis presenting as rectal submucosal tumor. We performed endoscopic submucosal dissection of the rectal submucosal tumor. The sparganosis was confirmed based on the presence of calcospherules in the submucosal layer on histological examination. Moreover, the result of the immunoglobulin G antibody test for sparganosis was positive but became negative after endoscopic submucosal dissection. Though rare, rectal sparganosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rectal submucosal tumor-like lesions. This case suggests that physicians should make effort to exclude sparganosis through careful diagnostic approaches, including detailed history taking and serological tests for parasites. In this report, we aimed to highlight the clinical presentation of Sparganum infection as a rectal submucosal tumor. PMID:27217709

  10. Endoscopic resection of sparganosis presenting as colon submucosal tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong Keun; Baek, Dong Hoon; Lee, Bong Eun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2016-01-01

    Human sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by infection with the tapeworm Sparganum, the migrating plerocercoid (second stage) larva of Spirometra species. Sparganosis usually involves subcutaneous tissues and/or muscles of various parts of the body, but involvement of other sites such as the brain, eye, peritoneopleural cavity, urinary track, scrotum, and abdominal viscera has also been documented. Infections caused by sparganum have a worldwide distribution but are most common in Southeast Asia such as China, Japan, and South Korea. Rectal sparganosis is an uncommon disease but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unusual and suspicious rectal submucosal tumors. We report a case of rectal sparganosis presenting as rectal submucosal tumor. We performed endoscopic submucosal dissection of the rectal submucosal tumor. The sparganosis was confirmed based on the presence of calcospherules in the submucosal layer on histological examination. Moreover, the result of the immunoglobulin G antibody test for sparganosis was positive but became negative after endoscopic submucosal dissection. Though rare, rectal sparganosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rectal submucosal tumor-like lesions. This case suggests that physicians should make effort to exclude sparganosis through careful diagnostic approaches, including detailed history taking and serological tests for parasites. In this report, we aimed to highlight the clinical presentation of Sparganum infection as a rectal submucosal tumor. PMID:27217709

  11. Thoracoscopic examination of empyema in a patient with sparganosis mansoni.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Keita; Suzuki, Junko; Nagai, Hideaki; Watanabe, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Akira; Ando, Takahiro; Suzuki, Jun; Ohshima, Nobuharu; Masuda, Kimihiko; Tamura, Atsuhisa; Akagawa, Shinobu; Kitani, Masashi; Hebisawa, Akira; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Ohta, Ken

    2016-02-01

    A 27-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with right pleural effusion. He had suffered from right chest and back pain and a high fever for one week prior to the admission. He had been treated with clarithromycin without improvement. Since thoracoscopy under local anesthesia revealed purulent effusion, synechiae and fibrous septa in the thoracic cavity, synechiotomy was performed and we started antibiotic treatment with the diagnosis of acute bacterial empyema. At the same time, we also suspected parasitic infection because of massive eosinophilic infiltration in pleural effusion and his dietary history of eating raw frogs. During the course of the disease, he had an infiltration in the right lower lobe and pneumothorax. Finally, we diagnosed him with sparganosis mansoni because his serum as well as pleural effusion was positive for the binding to sparganosis mansoni plerocercoid antigen, without any positive findings in bacteriology. His pleural effusion and lung infiltration were resolved after the administration of a high-dose praziquantel. We report this rare parasitic empyema with findings by thoracoscopic examination. PMID:26603428

  12. Molecular diagnosis of sparganosis associated with pneumothorax in a dog.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Christopher; Jabbar, Abdul; Mansfield, Caroline S; Tyrrell, Dayle; Croser, Emma; Abraham, Linda A; Gasser, Robin B

    2012-02-01

    Pneumothorax was diagnosed in a dog presenting with progressive exercise intolerance and tachypnoea. Needle thoracocentesis failed to resolve the pneumothorax, and an exploratomy thoracotomy was performed. Upon inspection of the thoracic cavity, numerous white nodules (2 to 4mm) were present throughout the mediastinum, parietal pleura and the lung lobes. The owners of the dog elected intra-operative euthanasia, and a post mortem examination was performed. At necropsy, structures consistent with the plerocercoid (larval) stage of a tapeworm were identified in association with inflammation of the pleural cavity. Molecular methods were used to identify the parasite as Spirometra erinacei. Molecular diagnosis, along with the clinical presentation and pathological findings, allowed the diagnosis of proliferative sparganosis. PMID:21983346

  13. Effect of cyclosporine in a murine model of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Banić, Marko; Anić, Branimir; Brkić, Tomislav; Ljubicić, Neven; Plesko, Sanja; Dohoczky, Csaba; Erceg, Damir; Petrovecki, Mladen; Stipancić, Igor; Rotkvić, Ivo

    2002-06-01

    The use of immunosuppressive therapy may be associated with significant toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclosporine A (CsA) in murine model of experimental colitis. Experimental colitis was induced in NMRI mice using an enema of 0.2% solution of dinitrofluorobenzene, combined with skin sensitization. After inducing colitis, experimental groups of animals were treated with CsA (1, 3, 5, 10, 25, 50 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intracolonically (i.c.), and control groups were treated with phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally or intracolonically, respectively. Colonic inflammatory changes were assessed using a histopathologic score of 0-30, and pooled whole blood samples were processed with monoclonal antibodies for cyclosporine concentration. In addition, two groups of animals with experimental colitis were treated intraperitoneally or intracolonically with 3 mg/kg/day of CsA, and the colons were also taken for immunohistochemistry for CD25. CsA diminished the extent of colitis in groups treated with 3, 5, 10, or 25 mg/kg intraperitoneally or intracolonically, and in groups treated with 1 and 50 mg/kg intracolonically (P < 0.05). The effect of intracolonic application of CsA was not related to whole blood cyclosporine concentrations. In addition, the effect of CsA at 3 mg/kg, applied intraperitoneally or intracolonically was, in part, expressed in decreasing the numbers of CD25+ cells within colonic mucosa/submucosa (P < 0.05). In conclusions, the results of this study indicate the possibility of intracolonic application of cyclosporine in order to widen the therapeutic window for effective, but possibly toxic drug, such as cyclosporine. PMID:12064814

  14. Histamine and neuroinflammation: insights from murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Passani, Maria B.; Ballerini, Clara

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory, neurodegenerative disease of the CNS whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown, and available therapies are rarely successful in reversing neurological deficits or stopping disease progression. Ongoing studies on MS and the widely used murine model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are focused on the many components of this complex and heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease in the hope of providing a mechanism-based characterization of MS that will afford successful strategies to limit and repair the neuronal damage. Recently, histamine has been postulated to have a key regulatory role in EAE and MS pathogenesis. Histamine is a mediator of inflammation and immune responses, exerting its many actions through four G protein-coupled receptors (H1,2,3,4R) that signal through distinct intracellular pathways and have different therapeutic potentials as they vary in expression, isoform distribution, signaling properties, and function. Immune cells involved in MS/EAE, including dendritic cells (DCs) and T lymphocytes, express H1R, H2R and H4R, and histamine may have varying and counteracting effects on a particular cell type, depending on the receptor subtypes being activated. Here, we review evidence of the complex and controversial role of histamine in the pathogenesis of MS and EAE and evaluate the therapeutic potential of histaminergic ligands in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:22563309

  15. Changes in Scleral Collagen Organization in Murine Chronic Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pijanka, Jacek K.; Kimball, Elizabeth C.; Pease, Mary E.; Abass, Ahmed; Sorensen, Thomas; Nguyen, Thao D.; Quigley, Harry A.; Boote, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The organization of scleral collagen helps to determine the eye's biomechanical response to intraocular pressure (IOP), and may therefore be important in glaucoma. This study provides a quantitative assessment of changes in scleral collagen fibril organization in bead-induced murine experimental glaucoma. Methods. Wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to study the effect of bead-induced glaucoma on posterior scleral collagen organization in one eye of 12 CD1 mice, with untreated fellow eyes serving as controls. Three collagen parameters were measured: the local preferred fibril directions, the degree of collagen anisotropy, and the total fibrillar collagen content. Results. The mouse sclera featured a largely circumferential orientation of fibrillar collagen with respect to the optic nerve head canal. Localized alteration to fibril orientations was evident in the inferior peripapillary sclera of bead-treated eyes. Collagen anisotropy was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in bead-treated eyes in the superior peripapillary (Treated: 43 ± 8%; Control: 49 ± 6%) and midposterior (Treated: 39 ± 4%; Control: 43 ± 4%) sclera, and in the peripapillary region overall (Treated: 43 ± 6%; Control: 47 ± 3%). No significant differences in total collagen content were found between groups. Conclusions. Spatial changes in collagen fibril anisotropy occur in the posterior sclera of mice with bead-induced chronic IOP elevation and axonal damage. These results support the idea that dynamic changes in scleral form and structure play a role in the development of experimental glaucoma in mice, and potentially in human glaucoma. PMID:25228540

  16. Molecular Diagnosis of Subcutaneous Spirometra erinaceieuropaei Sparganosis in a Japanese Immigrant

    PubMed Central

    Tappe, Dennis; Berger, Luise; Haeupler, Alexandra; Muntau, Birgit; Racz, Paul; Harder, Yves; Specht, Katja; Prazeres da Costa, Clarissa; Poppert, Sven

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of subcutaneous sparganosis in a 68-year-old female Japanese immigrant in Germany. The patient complained of a painless erythema caudal of the umbilicus with a palpable subcutaneous cherry-sized lump. Polymerase chain reaction on formalin-fixed parasite tissue identified Spirometra erinaceieuropaei as the causative agent; the proliferative form of sparganosis, which is caused by the branching and disseminating Sparganum proliferum, could, thus, be excluded. From the excised sparganum, an immunofluorescence test was established and revealed an antibody response directed against the parasite's tegument. Histological key features of the plerocercoid that facilitate diagnosis with different stains are presented. PMID:23166198

  17. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  18. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Block, Darci R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Cunningham, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155–330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99–340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225–945 μmol/L and 276–687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  19. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Block, Darci R; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Cunningham, Scott A; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155-330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99-340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225-945 μmol/L and 276-687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  20. Antibiotics in neonatal life increase murine susceptibility to experimental psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Zanvit, Peter; Konkel, Joanne E.; Jiao, Xue; Kasagi, Shimpei; Zhang, Dunfang; Wu, Ruiqing; Chia, Cheryl; Ajami, Nadim J.; Smith, Daniel P.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Abbatiello, Brittany; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Chen, Qianming; Belkaid, Yasmine; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Chen, WanJun

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease affecting ∼2% of the world's population, but the aetiology remains incompletely understood. Recently, microbiota have been shown to differentially regulate the development of autoimmune diseases, but their influence on psoriasis is incompletely understood. We show here that adult mice treated with antibiotics that target Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria develop ameliorated psoriasiform dermatitis induced by imiquimod, with decreased pro-inflammatory IL-17- and IL-22-producing T cells. Surprisingly, mice treated neonatally with these antibiotics develop exacerbated psoriasis induced by imiquimod or recombinant IL-23 injection when challenged as adults, with increased IL-22-producing γδ+ T cells. 16S rRNA gene compositional analysis reveals that neonatal antibiotic-treatment dysregulates gut and skin microbiota in adults, which is associated with increased susceptibility to experimental psoriasis. This link between neonatal antibiotic-mediated imbalance in microbiota and development of experimental psoriasis provides precedence for further investigation of its specific aetiology as it relates to human psoriasis. PMID:26416167

  1. Adoptive transfer of murine relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lublin, F D

    1985-02-01

    Relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an autoimmune disorder resembling multiple sclerosis, has been produced by inoculating SJL/J mice with spinal cord or myelin basic protein in appropriate adjuvants. To determine whether initially sensitized lymphocytes or the persistence of antigen depots in the animal were responsible for the relapsing episodes of inflammatory demyelination, adoptive transfer studies were undertaken utilizing lymphocytes from relapsing EAE-immunized donors transferred directly or after in vitro culture. In direct-transfer studies donor lymphocytes produced clinical and pathological signs of relapsing EAE in 3 of 7 recipients of lymph node lymphocytes and 1 of 5 recipients of splenic lymphocytes. In vitro culture of lymphocytes in myelin basic protein or T cell growth factor prior to transfer increased both the incidence of disease and the number of animals having relapses, and allowed transfer with fewer lymphocytes. Because all animals had delayed onset of disease, this study demonstrates that the ability to develop relapsing inflammatory demyelination is transferable with lymphocytes and does not require the presence of antigen. PMID:3977301

  2. Retrospective epidemiological analysis of sparganosis in mainland China from 1959 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Lu, G; Shi, D-Z; Lu, Y-J; Wu, L-X; Li, L-H; Rao, L-Y; Yin, F-F

    2014-12-01

    In this study, epidemiological factors of sparganosis cases reported in mainland China from 1959 to December 2012 were analysed. A total of 1061 valid cases were distributed throughout most of the provinces of mainland China, with most cases occurring in Southern and Eastern China. The average age of patients was 29 years (range 0-80 years). Modes of transmission to humans were via contact (54·6%), mainly by application of frog meat as a poultice, foodborne (33·8%), mainly through ingesting frogs or snakes, and waterborne (11·5%) through drinking raw water. The tissue/organs involved were subcutaneous/muscle (43·1%), eyes (31·0%), central nervous system (CNS) (17·9%), urogenital system (3·9%) and visceral organs (3·2%). Obvious differences existed in main risk factors for different areas. Close correlation was found between tissue/organs and risk factors. Main modes of transmission changed during the past decades, from contact (83·8% pre-1979) to foodborne (63·9% post-2000). The tissue/organs involved also changed at the same time. Cases involving eyes fell from 50·0% pre-1979 to 8·3% post-2000, and cases involving CNS increased from 0% pre-1979 to 47·8% post-2000. These results illustrate that China is one of the main epidemic countries of sparganosis in the world. Consumption of frog/snake meat was the main risk factor, although application of frog flesh as a poultice was the main risk factor before 2000. Sparganosis has become one of the neglected but important foodborne/waterborne parasitic diseases in mainland China. PMID:25372227

  3. A murine experimental model for the mechanical behaviour of viable right-ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Jasso, Daniela; Simon, Marc A; Champion, Hunter C; Sacks, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Although right-ventricular function is an important determinant of cardio-pulmonary performance in health and disease, right ventricular myocardium mechanical behaviour has received relatively little attention. We present a novel experimental method for quantifying the mechanical behaviour of transmurally intact, viable right-ventricular myocardium. Seven murine right ventricular free wall (RVFW) specimens were isolated and biaxial mechanical behaviour measured, along with quantification of the local transmural myofibre and collagen fibre architecture. We developed a complementary strain energy function based method to capture the average biomechanical response. Overall, murine RVFW revealed distinct mechanical anisotropy. The preferential alignment of the myofibres and collagen fibres to the apex-to-outflow-tract direction was consistent with this also being the mechanically stiffer axis. We also observed that the myofibre and collagen fibre orientations were remarkably uniform throughout the entire RVFW thickness. Thus, our findings indicate a close correspondence between the tissue microstructure and biomechanical behaviour of the RVFW myocardium, and are a first step towards elucidating the structure–function of non-contracted murine RVFW myocardium in health and disease. PMID:22848044

  4. Sparganosis in wild boar (Sus scrofa) - Implications for veterinarians, hunters, and consumers.

    PubMed

    Kołodziej-Sobocińska, Marta; Miniuk, Mariusz; Ruczyńska, Iwona; Tokarska, Małgorzata

    2016-08-30

    From February to March 2016 we found plerocercoids of Spirometra sp. in four wild boar hunted in Białowieża Primeval Forest, north-eastern Poland. Plerocercoids were located subcutaneously and in muscle tissue. A sequence of a nuclear 18S rRNA gene was used for genetic specification of the samples. The analyzed gene fragment showed 100% identity with the Spirometra erinacei sequence. Thus, the emerge of human sparganosis due to consumption of undercooked or smoked wild boar meat is likely in the areas where wild boar is an approved food source, especially in the absence of routine guidelines for vets. It has become a priority to inform the public about possibilities and consequences of this zoonosis. PMID:27523946

  5. Induction of protection in murine experimental models against Trichinella spiralis: an up-to-date review.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Pierres, G; Vaquero-Vera, A; Fonseca-Liñán, R; Bermúdez-Cruz, R M; Argüello-García, R

    2015-09-01

    The parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis, an aetiological agent of the disease known as trichinellosis, infects wild and domestic animals through contaminated pig meat, which is the major source for Trichinella transmission. Prevention of this disease by interrupting parasite transmission includes vaccine development for livestock; however, major challenges to this strategy are the complexity of the T. spiralis life cycle, diversity of stage-specific antigens, immune-evasion strategies and the modulatory effect of host responses. Different approaches have been taken to induce protective immune responses by T. spiralis immunogens. These include the use of whole extracts or excretory-secretory antigens, as well as recombinant proteins or synthesized epitopes, using murine experimental models for trichinellosis. Here these schemes are reviewed and discussed, and new proposals envisioned to block the zoonotic transmission of this parasite. PMID:25761655

  6. G-CSF and Neutrophils Are Nonredundant Mediators of Murine Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Gabrielle L; Cornish, Ann L; Murphy, Jane; Pang, Ee Shan; Lim, Lyndell L; Campbell, Ian K; Scalzo-Inguanti, Karen; Chen, Xiangting; McMenamin, Paul G; Maraskovsky, Eugene; McKenzie, Brent S; Wicks, Ian P

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a regulator of neutrophil production, function, and survival. Herein, we investigated the role of G-CSF in a murine model of human uveitis-experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis. Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis was dramatically reduced in G-CSF-deficient mice and in anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody-treated, wild-type (WT) mice. Flow cytometric analysis of the ocular infiltrate in WT mice with experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis showed a mixed population, comprising neutrophils, macrophages, and T cells. The eyes of G-CSF-deficient and anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody-treated WT mice had minimal neutrophil infiltrate, but no change in other myeloid-derived inflammatory cells. Antigen-specific T-cell responses were maintained, but the differentiation of pathogenic type 17 helper T cells in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis was reduced with G-CSF deficiency. We show that G-CSF controls the ocular neutrophil infiltrate by modulating the expression of C-X-C chemokine receptors 2 and 4 on peripheral blood neutrophils, as well as actin polymerization and migration. These data reveal an integral role for G-CSF-driven neutrophil responses in ocular autoimmunity, operating within and outside of the bone marrow, and also identify G-CSF as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of human uveoretinitis. PMID:26718978

  7. Alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae survival during experimental murine genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Jerse, Ann E

    2006-07-01

    The addition of host-derived sialic acid to Neisseria gonorrhoeae lipooligosaccharide is hypothesized to be an important mechanism by which gonococci evade host innate defenses. This hypothesis is based primarily on in vitro assays of complement-mediated and phagocytic killing. Here we report that a nonpolar alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase (lst) mutant of N. gonorrhoeae was significantly attenuated in its capacity to colonize the lower genital tract of 17-beta estradiol-treated female BALB/c mice during competitive infection with the wild-type strain. Genetic complementation of the lst mutation restored recovery of the mutant to wild-type levels. Studies with B10.D2-HC(o)H2(d)H(2)-T18c/OSN (C5-deficient) mice showed that attenuation of the lst mutant was not due to increased sensitivity to complement-mediated bacteriolysis, a result that is consistent with recently reported host restrictions in the complement cascade. However, Lst-deficient gonococci were killed more rapidly than sialylated wild-type gonococci following intraperitoneal injection into normal mice, which is consistent with sialylation conferring protection against killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). As reported for human PMNs, sialylated gonococci were more resistant to killing by murine PMNs, and sialylation led to reduced association with and induction of a weaker respiratory burst in PMNs from estradiol-treated mice. In summary, these studies suggest sialylation confers a survival advantage to N. gonorrhoeae in mice by increasing resistance to PMN killing. This report is the first direct demonstration that alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase contributes to N. gonorrhoeae pathogenesis in an in vivo model. This study also validates the use of experimental murine infection to study certain aspects of gonococcal pathogenesis. PMID:16790783

  8. Experimental Reactivation of Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection in a Modified Cornell-Like Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hong Min; Kwon, Kee Woong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been well studied. However, there have been few studies of the latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), the most common etiological non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species next to M. tuberculosis in humans worldwide. We hypothesized that latent MAC infections can be reactivated following immunosuppression after combination chemotherapy with clarithromycin and rifampicin under experimental conditions. To this end, we employed a modified Cornell-like murine model of tuberculosis and investigated six strains consisting of two type strains and four clinical isolates of M. avium and M. intracellulare. After aerosol infection of each MAC strain, five to six mice per group were euthanized at 2, 4, 10, 18, 28 and 35 weeks post-infection, and lungs were sampled to analyze bacterial burden and histopathology. One strain of each species maintained a culture-negative state for 10 weeks after completion of 6 weeks of chemotherapy, but was reactivated after 5 weeks of immunosuppression in the lungs with dexamethasone (three out of six mice in M. avium infection) or sulfasalazine (four out of six mice in both M. avium and M. intracellulare infection). The four remaining MAC strains exhibited decreased bacterial loads in response to chemotherapy; however, they remained at detectable levels and underwent regrowth after immunosuppression. In addition, the exacerbated lung pathology demonstrated a correlation with bacterial burden after reactivation. In conclusion, our results suggest the possibility of MAC reactivation in an experimental mouse model, and experimentally demonstrate that a compromised immune status can induce reactivation and/or regrowth of MAC infection. PMID:26406237

  9. Experimental infection of Phlebotomus perniciosus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder

    PubMed Central

    Cannet, Arnaud; Akhoundi, Mohammad; Michel, Gregory; Marty, Pierre; Delaunay, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that is transmitted by sandflies and caused by obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Leishmania. In the present study, we carried out a screening on the experimental infection of Phlebotomus pernioucus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based method to determine individually the number of Leishmania promastigotes fed by infected flies. Among 1840 new emerged female sand flies, 428 were fed on the infected mice. After their death, they were analysed individually by RT-PCR. Our results demonstrated just a single Leishmania positive female at sixth day post meal. A total of 1070 female sand flies were exposed in contact with artificial feeder containing the human blood with two different quantities of Leishmania parasites: 2.106/mL and 1.107/mL. A blood meal including 1.107/mL LUC-promastigotes was proposed to 270 females and 75 (28%) flies were engorged. Among them, 44 (59%) were positive by RT-PCR analysis, with a relative average of 50551 Leishmania parasites. In case of blood feeding of females with 2.106/mL promastigotes, 57 out of 800 (7%) females succeed to feed from artificial feeder which 22 (39%) were positive with a relative average of 6487 parasites. PMID:27439032

  10. Fumigaclavine C ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine experimental colitis via NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenjie; Hu, Shasha; Elgehama, Ahmed; Shao, Fenli; Ren, Ren; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Xinlei; Tan, Renxiang; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Jiao, Ruihua

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the effect of Fumigaclavine C, a fungal metabolite, on murine experimental colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and its possible mechanism were examined in vivo and vitro. Oral administration of Fumigaclavine C dose-dependently attenuated the loss of body weight and shortening of colon length induced by DSS. The disease activity index, histopathologic scores of musco was also significantly reduced by Fumigaclavine C treatment. Protein and mRNA levels of DSS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in colon, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-17A, were markedly suppressed by Fumigaclavine C. At the same time, decreased activation of caspase-1 in peritoneal macrophages was detected in Fumigaclavine C -treated mice which suggested that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation was suppressed. Furthermore, in the LPS plus ATP cell model, we found that Fumigaclavine C dose-dependent inhibited IL-1β release and caspase-1 activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate the ability of Fumigaclavine C to inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation and give some evidence for its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26320672

  11. Murine AIDS Protects Mice Against Experimental Cerebral Malaria: Down-Regulation by Interleukin 10 a T-Helper Type 1 CD4^+ Cell-Mediated Pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckwalanga, Michel; Marussig, Myriam; Dias Tavares, Marisa; Bouanga, Jean Claude; Hulier, Elisabeth; Henriette Pavlovitch, Jana; Minoprio, Paola; Portnoi, Denis; Renia, Laurent; Mazier, Dominique

    1994-08-01

    The retrovirus LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus induces murine AIDS in C57BL/6 mice that has many similarities with human AIDS; Plasmodium berghei ANKA causes experimental cerebral malaria in the same strain of mice. The outcome of malaria infection was studied in mice concurrently infected with the two pathogens. The retrovirus significantly reduced the gravity of the neurological manifestations associated with Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection. The protection against experimental cerebral malaria induced by murine AIDS increased with duration of viral infection and, hence, with the severity of the immunodeficiency. Interleukin 10, principally from splenic T cells, was shown to play a crucial role in this protection.

  12. Macrophage activation associated with chronic murine cytomegalovirus infection results in more severe experimental choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Scott W; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G; Miller, Daniel M; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication. PMID:22570607

  13. Macrophage Activation Associated with Chronic Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection Results in More Severe Experimental Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Scott W.; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G.; Miller, Daniel M.; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P.; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication. PMID:22570607

  14. Cellular basis of the genetic susceptibility of murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, T.A.; Greiner, D.L.; Goldschneider, I.

    1986-03-01

    Murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an induced autoimmune disease that resembles human multiple sclerosis. The authors have investigated the cellular basis of the genetic predisposition and resistance of inbred strains of mice to EAE using an adoptive transfer system between two H-2 compatible, Thy 1 antigen disparate strains of mice. Genetically EAE susceptible SJL/J strain mice (H-2/sup s/, Thy 1.2) and resistant B10.S Thy 1.1 (H-2/sub s/, Thy 1.1) strain mice were lethally irradiated (700R) and reconstituted with 5-10 x 10/sup 6/ bone marrow cells from either SJL/J or congenic B10.S (Thy 1.1 or Thy 1.2) donors. After 30-45 days, more than 95% of the thymocytes and 75% of the peripheral T cells in the chimeras were of donor origin. These lymphohemopoietic chimeras were then sensitized in their hind footpads with porcine myelin basic protein in complete Freund's adjuvant containing M. tuberculosis H/sub 37/RA, followed at 24 and 72 hours by i.v. injection of B. pertussis. Clinical signs of EAE developed in unirradiated SJL/J, but not B10.S, controls, and in irradiated B10.S and SJL/J recipients of SJL/J, but not B10.S, bone marrow. These results indicate that bone marrow cells can transfer the predisposition to EAE from genetically susceptible to genetically resistant mouse strains. The cellular component in the bone marrow that is responsible for the transfer of the genetic susceptibility to EAE is under investigation.

  15. Antiinflammatory Effect of Phytosterols in Experimental Murine Colitis Model: Prevention, Induction, Remission Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldini, Rita; Micucci, Matteo; Cevenini, Monica; Fato, Romana; Bergamini, Christian; Nanni, Cristina; Cont, Massimiliano; Camborata, Cecilia; Spinozzi, Silvia; Montagnani, Marco; Roda, Giulia; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Rosini, Francesca; Roda, Aldo; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Phytosterols, besides hypocholesterolemic effect, present anti-inflammatory properties. Little information is available about their efficacy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of a mixture of phytosterols on prevention/induction/remission in a murine experimental model of colitis. Phytosterols were administered x os before, during and after colitis induction with Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) in mice. Disease Activity Index (DAI), colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress in the intestinal tissue (ileum and colon) and gallbladder ileum and colon spontaneous and carbachol (CCh) induced motility, plasma lipids and plasma, liver and biliary bile acids (BA) were evaluated. A similar longitudinal study was performed in a DSS colitis control group. Mice treated with DSS developed severe colitis as shown by DAI, colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress. Both spontaneous and induced ileal and colonic motility were severely disturbed. The same was observed with gallbladder. DSS colitis resulted in an increase in plasma cholesterol, and a modification of the BA pattern. Phytosterols feeding did not prevent colitis onset but significantly reduced the severity of the disease and improved clinical and histological remission. It had strong antioxidant effects, almost restored colon, ileal and gallbladder motility. Plasmatic levels of cholesterol were also reduced. DSS induced a modification in the BA pattern consistent with an increase in the intestinal BA deconjugating bacteria, prevented by phytosterols. Phytosterols seem a potential nutraceutical tool for gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases, combining metabolic systematic and local anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:25268769

  16. Assessment and In Vivo Scoring of Murine Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Colin J.; Herrmann, Philipp; Carvalho, Livia S.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Bainbridge, James W. B.; Ali, Robin R.; Dick, Andrew D.; Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in clinical imaging and grading our understanding of retinal immune responses and their morphological correlates in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU), has been hindered by the requirement for post-mortem histology. To date, monitoring changes occurring during EAU disease progression and evaluating the effect of therapeutic intervention in real time has not been possible. We wanted to establish whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) could detect intraretinal changes during inflammation and to determine its utility as a tool for accurate scoring of EAU. EAU was induced in C57BL/6J mice and animals evaluated after 15, 26, 36 and 60 days. At each time-point, contemporaneous Spectralis-OCT scanning, topical endoscopic fundal imaging (TEFI), fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) and CD45-immunolabelled histology were performed. OCT features were further characterised on retinal flat-mounts using immunohistochemistry and 3D reconstruction. Optic disc swelling and vitreous opacities detected by OCT corresponded to CD45+ cell infiltration on histology. Vasculitis identified by FFA and OCT matched perivascular myeloid and T-cell infiltrates and could be differentiated from unaffected vessels. Evolution of these changes could be followed over time in the same eye. Retinal folds were visible and found to encapsulate mixed populations of activated myeloid cells, T-cells and microglia. Using these features, an OCT-based EAU scoring system was developed, with significant correlation to validated histological (Pearson r2 = 0.6392, P<0.0001, n = 31 eyes) and TEFI based scoring systems (r2 = 0.6784, P<0.0001). OCT distinguishes the fundamental features of murine EAU in vivo, permits dynamic assessment of intraretinal changes and can be used to score disease severity. As a result, it allows tissue synchronisation with subsequent cellular and functional assessment and greater efficiency of animal usage. By relating OCT signals with

  17. Experimental murine chronic hepatitis: results following intrahepatic inoculation of human uveitis mycoplasma-like organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L. A.; Wirostko, E.; Wirostko, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    Mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO) are non-cultivated intracellular cell-wall deficient pathogenic bacteria with a distinctive ultrastructural appearance. Diagnosis of MLO disease depends on finding the organisms in parasitized cells using a transmission electron microscope. MLO are a well studied cause of transmissible chronic plant disease responsive to antibiotics. MLO have recently been found to cause human chronic uveitis, orbital, and retinal disease with autoimmune features. Ophthalmic leucocytes in these patients display MLO parasitization. Inoculation of human uveitis MLO into mouse eyelids produced chronic uveitis. MLO also disseminated to produce randomly distributed lethal systemic disease including chronic hepatitis. MLO parasitized leucocytes were present in all disease sites. Direct intrahepatic inoculation of human hepatic pathogens is a simple and efficient technique to produce murine hepatitis. This report describes the delayed onset widespread inflammatory liver disease produced by direct intrahepatic inoculation of human chronic uveitis MLO in 12 of 20 mice versus 0 in 40 controls (P < 0.05). The liver disease was accompanied by elevated serum SGOT levels, splenomegaly, and accelerated mortality. All 12 inflamed livers displayed MLO parasitized leucocytes versus 0 of 10 control livers. The resemblance of human chronic active hepatitis, massive hepatic necrosis, and post-necrotic cirrhosis to the MLO induced murine liver disease, the role of molecular biologic techniques in the detection and classification of those bacteria, and in therapy of MLO disease are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8398804

  18. Necroptosis is a key pathogenic event in human and experimental murine models of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Marta B; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Carvalho, Tânia; Caridade, Marta; Borralho, Paula; Cortez-Pinto, Helena; Castro, Rui E; Rodrigues, Cecília M P

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocyte cell death, inflammation and oxidative stress constitute key pathogenic mechanisms underlying non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to investigate the role of necroptosis in human and experimental NAFLD and its association with tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and oxidative stress. Serum markers of necrosis, liver receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3) and phosphorylated mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) were evaluated in control individuals and patients with NAFLD. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or RIP3-deficient (RIP3(-/-)) mice were fed a high-fat choline-deficient (HFCD) or methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet, with subsequent histological and biochemical analysis of hepatic damage. In primary murine hepatocytes, necroptosis and oxidative stress were also assessed after necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) treatment or RIP3 silencing. We show that circulating markers of necrosis and TNF-α, as well as liver RIP3 and MLKL phosphorylation were increased in NAFLD. Likewise, RIP3 and MLKL protein levels and TNF-α expression were increased in the liver of HFCD and MCD diet-fed mice. Moreover, RIP3 and MLKL sequestration in the insoluble protein fraction of NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) mice liver lysates represented an early event during stetatohepatitis progression. Functional studies in primary murine hepatocytes established the association between TNF-α-induced RIP3 expression, activation of necroptosis and oxidative stress. Strikingly, RIP3 deficiency attenuated MCD diet-induced liver injury, steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis and oxidative stress. In conclusion, necroptosis is increased in the liver of NAFLD patients and in experimental models of NASH. Further, TNF-α triggers RIP3-dependent oxidative stress during hepatocyte necroptosis. As such, targeting necroptosis appears to arrest or at least impair NAFLD progression. PMID:26201023

  19. Evaluation of therapeutic potential of nanosilver particles synthesised using aloin in experimental murine mastitis model.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya Kumar, Thota Venkata; Muralidhar, Yegireddy; Prasad, Pagadala Eswara; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara; Alpha Raj, Mekapogu

    2013-09-01

    Nanobiotechnology is an emerging biological branch of nanotechnology. Application of nanoparticles with specific size and shape in biology has already shown unforeseen and interesting results. A study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of phytogenically derived aloin mediated nanosilver particles (AAgNPs), prepared by reduction of silver nitrate with aloin, in Staphylococcus aureus induced murine mastitis. A total of 40 female mice were divided into five groups of eight animals each. Group I served as lactating control, groups II-V were inoculated with 20 μl of 24 h broth culture of S. aureus containing 4.0 × 105 cfu/quarter under ketamine anaesthesia. After 6 h post inoculation, groups III and IV received 20 μl of aloin nanosilver (AAgNPs) through intramammary and intraperitoneal routes, respectively. Group V received antibiotic cefepime at 1 mg/kg body weight through the intra-peritoneal route. After 18 h post-treatment, serum C reactive protein, weights of mammary glands, mammary gland bacterial load, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content, reduced glutathione content, superoxide dismutase activity and catalase activity and histopathology were determined. The compound showed a minimum inhibitory concentration of 21.8 ng/ml against S. aureus. Significant reduction (98%) in poly-morpho nuclear cell infiltration was observed with AAgNPs than antibiotic (50%). PMID:24028805

  20. Pathobiology of human RH strain induced experimental toxoplasmosis in murine model.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Vikrant; Tewari, A K; Singh, Harkirat; Singh, R

    2016-09-01

    Of late, toxoplasmosis has gained immense importance as an opportunist parasite in immunocompromised patients. In immunocompromised subjects, the disease is supposed to occur in acute form and causes acute toxoplasmic encephalitis. However, the exact pathogenesis of other vital organs, particularly in acute form of infection, is still a matter of debate. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the pathogenesis of acute form of toxoplasmosis using cryopreserved human RH strain of the parasite in murine models. For this, 100 tachyzoites were given to individual mice and upon the setup of acute form of infection, the mice were euthanized and the organs were processed for histopathology. Histopathology revealed tachyzoites in liver only while severe necrosis due to multiplication of tachyzoites were visible in liver, spleen, lungs and brain. Kidneys and heart appeared more or less normal. Finally, the pathology of disease in these organs is described in detail. The present research has generated some vital information regarding necrotic changes in tissues due to acute toxoplasmosis and will defiantly help the researchers in the better understanding of disease particularly in humans and putting up of suitable treatment regime for human subjects infected with acute toxoplasmosis. PMID:27605794

  1. Comparative study of the biological properties of Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in a murine experimental model.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Lissa; Vivas, Angie; Montilla, Marleny; Hernández, Carolina; Flórez, Carolina; Parra, Edgar; Ramírez, Juan David

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis in Latin America and caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This kinetoplastid displays remarkable genetic variability, allowing its classification into six Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) from TcI to TcVI. T. cruzi I presents the broadest geographical distribution in the continent and has been associated to severe forms of cardiomyopathies. Recently, a particular genotype associated to human infections has been reported and named as TcIDOM (previously named TcIa-b). This genotype shows to be clonal and adapted to the domestic cycle but so far no studies have determined the biological properties of domestic (TcIDOM) and sylvatic TcI strains (previously named TcIc-e). Hence, the aim of this study was to untangle the biological features of these genotypes in murine models. We infected ICR-CD1 mice with five TcI strains (two domestic, two sylvatic and one natural mixture) and determined the course of infection during 91 days (acute and chronic phase of the disease) in terms of parasitemia, tissue tropism, immune response (IgG titers) and tissue invasion by means of histopathology studies. Statistically significant differences were observed in terms of parasitemia curves and prepatent period between domestic (TcIDOM) and sylvatic strains. There were no differences in terms of IgG antibodies response across the mice infected with the five strains. Regarding the histopathology, our results indicate that domestic strains present higher parasitemias and low levels of histopathological damage. In contrast, sylvatic strains showed lower parasitemias and high levels of histopathological damage. These results highlight the sympatric and behavioral differences of domestic and sylvatic TcI strains; the clinical and epidemiological implications are herein discussed. PMID:25461848

  2. Toll-Like Receptor 9-Mediated Inflammation Triggers Alveolar Bone Loss in Experimental Murine Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul D; Xia-Juan, Xia; Crump, Katie E; Abe, Toshiharu; Hajishengallis, George; Sahingur, Sinem E

    2015-07-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a local inflammatory disease induced by a dysbiotic microbiota and leading to destruction of the tooth-supporting structures. Microbial nucleic acids are abundantly present in the periodontium, derived through release after phagocytic uptake of microbes and/or from biofilm-associated extracellular DNA. Binding of microbial DNA to its cognate receptors, such as Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), can trigger inflammation. In this study, we utilized TLR9 knockout (TLR9(-/-)) mice and wild-type (WT) controls in a murine model of Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced periodontitis and report the first in vivo evidence that TLR9 signaling mediates the induction of periodontal bone loss. P. gingivalis-infected WT mice exhibited significantly increased bone loss compared to that in sham-infected WT mice or P. gingivalis-infected TLR9(-/-) mice, which were resistant to bone loss. Consistent with this, the expression levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and receptor-activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) were significantly elevated in the gingival tissues of the infected WT mice but not in infected TLR9(-/-) mice compared to their levels in controls. Ex vivo studies using splenocytes and bone marrow-derived macrophages revealed significantly diminished cytokine production in TLR9(-/-) cells relative to the cytokine production in WT cells in response to P. gingivalis, thereby implicating TLR9 in inflammatory responses to this organism. Intriguingly, compared to the cytokine production in WT cells, TLR9(-/-) cells exhibited significantly decreased proinflammatory cytokine production upon challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (TLR4 agonist) or Pam3Cys (TLR2 agonist), suggesting possible cross talk between TLR9, TLR4, and TLR2. Collectively, our results provide the first proof-of-concept evidence implicating TLR9-triggered inflammation in periodontal disease pathogenesis, thereby identifying a new potential therapeutic target

  3. Toll-Like Receptor 9-Mediated Inflammation Triggers Alveolar Bone Loss in Experimental Murine Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Paul D.; Xia-Juan, Xia; Crump, Katie E.; Abe, Toshiharu; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a local inflammatory disease induced by a dysbiotic microbiota and leading to destruction of the tooth-supporting structures. Microbial nucleic acids are abundantly present in the periodontium, derived through release after phagocytic uptake of microbes and/or from biofilm-associated extracellular DNA. Binding of microbial DNA to its cognate receptors, such as Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), can trigger inflammation. In this study, we utilized TLR9 knockout (TLR9−/−) mice and wild-type (WT) controls in a murine model of Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced periodontitis and report the first in vivo evidence that TLR9 signaling mediates the induction of periodontal bone loss. P. gingivalis-infected WT mice exhibited significantly increased bone loss compared to that in sham-infected WT mice or P. gingivalis-infected TLR9−/− mice, which were resistant to bone loss. Consistent with this, the expression levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and receptor-activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) were significantly elevated in the gingival tissues of the infected WT mice but not in infected TLR9−/− mice compared to their levels in controls. Ex vivo studies using splenocytes and bone marrow-derived macrophages revealed significantly diminished cytokine production in TLR9−/− cells relative to the cytokine production in WT cells in response to P. gingivalis, thereby implicating TLR9 in inflammatory responses to this organism. Intriguingly, compared to the cytokine production in WT cells, TLR9−/− cells exhibited significantly decreased proinflammatory cytokine production upon challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (TLR4 agonist) or Pam3Cys (TLR2 agonist), suggesting possible cross talk between TLR9, TLR4, and TLR2. Collectively, our results provide the first proof-of-concept evidence implicating TLR9-triggered inflammation in periodontal disease pathogenesis, thereby identifying a new potential

  4. Efficacy of Lysophosphatidylcholine in Combination with Antimicrobial Agents against Acinetobacter baumannii in Experimental Murine Peritoneal Sepsis and Pneumonia Models.

    PubMed

    Parra Millán, R; Jiménez Mejías, M E; Sánchez Encinales, V; Ayerbe Algaba, R; Gutiérrez Valencia, A; Pachón Ibáñez, M E; Díaz, C; Pérez Del Palacio, J; López Cortés, L F; Pachón, J; Smani, Y

    2016-08-01

    Immune response stimulation to prevent infection progression may be an adjuvant to antimicrobial treatment. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is an immunomodulator involved in immune cell recruitment and activation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem in experimental murine models of peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia. We used Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab9, which is susceptible to colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem, and multidrug-resistant strain Ab186, which is susceptible to colistin and resistant to tigecycline and imipenem. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem and the 100% minimal lethal dose (MLD100) were determined for both strains. The therapeutic efficacies of LPC, colistin (60 mg/kg of body weight/day), tigecycline (10 mg/kg/day), and imipenem (180 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination, were assessed against Ab9 and Ab186 at the MLD100 in murine peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia models. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the same experimental models after inoculating mice with the MLD of both strains. LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem markedly enhanced the bacterial clearance of Ab9 and Ab186 from the spleen and lungs and reduced bacteremia and mouse mortality rates (P < 0.05) compared with those for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem monotherapies. Moreover, at 4 h post-bacterial infection, Ab9 induced higher TNF-α and lower IL-10 levels than those with Ab186 (4 μg/ml versus 3 μg/ml [P < 0.05] and 2 μg/ml versus 3.4 μg/ml [P < 0.05], respectively). LPC treatment combined with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem modestly reduced the severity of infection by A. baumannii strains with different resistance phenotypes compared to LPC monotherapy in both

  5. Prevention and Mitigation of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Murine β-Defensins via Induction of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bruhs, Anika; Schwarz, Thomas; Schwarz, Agatha

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide murine β-defensin-14 (mBD14) was found to exert, in addition to its antimicrobial activity, the capacity to induce regulatory T cells as demonstrated in the model of contact hypersensitivity. Because it is induced by ultraviolet radiation, mBD14 may contribute to the antigen-specific immunosuppression by ultraviolet radiation. To prove whether this applies also for other immunologic models and because ultraviolet radiation appears to have beneficial effects on multiple sclerosis, we utilized the model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Injection of mBD14 into mice before immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein caused amelioration of the disease with less central nervous system inflammation and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic T cells. The beneficial effect was due to Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells because it was lost on in vivo depletion of regulatory T cells. mBD14, however, also acts in a therapeutic setting, because injection of mBD14 into mice with clinical features of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis reduced the clinical score significantly. Human β-defensin-3, the human orthologue of mBD14, induced in vitro regulatory T cell-specific markers in CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, shifting these nonregulatory cells into a regulatory phenotype with suppressive features. Thus, defensins may represent candidates worth being further pursued for the therapy of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26763437

  6. Treatment of murine tumors using dual-frequency ultrasound in an experimental in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Barati, Amir H; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Mozdarani, Hossein; Bathaie, S Zahra; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2009-05-01

    Acoustic inertia cavitation is the primary mechanism underlying sonochemical reactions and has potential for use in tumor treatment. In in vitro experiments that were performed previously and are thus not included in this paper, we found that the ultrasonically-induced chemical reactions are greatly accelerated when ultrasound is simultaneously applied at frequencies of 1 MHz and 150 kHz.. In this study, the in vivo anti-tumor effect of the simultaneous dual-frequency ultrasound at low level intensity (I(SPTA) <6 W/cm(2)) was investigated in a murine model of breast adenocarcinoma in Balb/c mice. The tumor-bearing mice were divided into five groups: those treated with combined dual-frequency ultrasound in continuous mode (1 MHz(con)+150 kH(zcon)) for 30 and 15 min (C and D), those treated with dual-frequency ultrasound in which the source of 1 MHz was in pulse mode (duty cycle of 80%) and that of 150 kHz was in continuous mode for 30 min (E), and untreated control and sham groups (A and B). The tumor growth parameters evaluated to assess delay include tumor volume, relative tumor volume, and T(5) and T(2), which are the time needed for each tumor to reach 5 and 2 times its initial volume, respectively. The survival period and percent of tumor growth inhibition ratio and were measured at various times after treatment. The results show that treatment with a combined continuous mode of 1 MHz(con)+150 kHz(con) and a pulse mode of 1 MHz(pl,80%)+150 kHz(con) effectively delayed tumor growth and increased the tumor growth inhibitory ratio compared to the sham group. When the tumor volume growth and relative volume of tumors in treated groups C, D and E were examined, an anti-tumor effect was observed in groups E and C. There is a significant difference between groups E and C and the sham group 12 d after treatment for tumor volume growth and 18 d after treatment for relative tumor volume (p < 0.05). The mean survival periods for animals in groups C and E were 16% and 17

  7. Utility of the Microculture Method in Non-Invasive Samples Obtained from an Experimental Murine Model with Asymptomatic Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M.; Bagirova, Malahat; Cakir-Koc, Rabia; Elcicek, Serhat; Oztel, Olga Nehir; Canim-Ates, Sezen; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Yesilkir-Baydar, Serap

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of diagnostic methods for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) decreases because of the low number of parasites and antibody amounts in asymptomatic healthy donors who are not suitable for invasive sample acquisition procedures. Therefore, new studies are urgently needed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic approaches in non-invasive samples. In this study, the sensitivity of the microculture method (MCM) was compared with polymerase chain reaction (PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) methods in an experimental murine model with asymptomatic leishmaniasis. Results showed that the percent of positive samples in ELISA, IFAT, and peripheral blood (PB) -PCR tests were 17.64%, 8.82%, and 5.88%, respectively, whereas 100% positive results were obtained with MCM and MCM-PCR methods. Thus, this study, for the first time, showed that MCM is more sensitive, specific, and economic than other methods, and the sensitivity of PCR that was performed to samples obtained from MCM was higher than sensitivity of the PCR method sampled by PB. PMID:22764296

  8. Utility of the microculture method in non-invasive samples obtained from an experimental murine model with asymptomatic leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Malahat; Cakir-Koc, Rabia; Elcicek, Serhat; Oztel, Olga Nehir; Canim-Ates, Sezen; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Yesilkir-Baydar, Serap

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivity of diagnostic methods for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) decreases because of the low number of parasites and antibody amounts in asymptomatic healthy donors who are not suitable for invasive sample acquisition procedures. Therefore, new studies are urgently needed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic approaches in non-invasive samples. In this study, the sensitivity of the microculture method (MCM) was compared with polymerase chain reaction (PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) methods in an experimental murine model with asymptomatic leishmaniasis. Results showed that the percent of positive samples in ELISA, IFAT, and peripheral blood (PB) -PCR tests were 17.64%, 8.82%, and 5.88%, respectively, whereas 100% positive results were obtained with MCM and MCM-PCR methods. Thus, this study, for the first time, showed that MCM is more sensitive, specific, and economic than other methods, and the sensitivity of PCR that was performed to samples obtained from MCM was higher than sensitivity of the PCR method sampled by PB. PMID:22764296

  9. STAT3 supports experimental K-RasG12D–induced murine myeloproliferative neoplasms dependent on serine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Daniel J.; Marié, Isabelle J.; Lobry, Camille; Aifantis, Iannis

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and other myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are genetically heterogeneous but frequently display activating mutations in Ras GTPases and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Altered STAT3 activity is observed in up to 50% of AML correlating with poor prognosis. Activated STAT proteins, classically associated with tyrosine phosphorylation, support tumor development as transcription factors, but alternative STAT functions independent of tyrosine phosphorylation have been documented, including roles for serine-phosphorylated STAT3 in mitochondria supporting transformation by oncogenic Ras. We examined requirements for STAT3 in experimental murine K-Ras–dependent hematopoietic neoplasia. We show that STAT3 is phosphorylated on S727 but not Y705 in diseased animals. Moreover, a mouse with a point mutation abrogating STAT3 S727 phosphorylation displayed delayed onset and decreased disease severity with significantly extended survival. Activated K-Ras required STAT3 for cytokine-independent growth of myeloid progenitors in vitro, and mitochondrially restricted STAT3 and STAT3-Y705F, both transcriptionally inert mutants, supported factor-independent growth. STAT3 was dispensable for growth of normal or K-Ras–mutant myeloid progenitors in response to cytokines. However, abrogation of STAT3-S727 phosphorylation impaired factor-independent malignant growth. These data document that serine-phosphorylated mitochondrial STAT3 supports neoplastic hematopoietic cell growth induced by K-Ras. PMID:25150294

  10. A method for histopathological study of the multifocal nature of spinal cord lesions in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Boyden, Alexander W.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Lambertz, Allyn M.; Ofori-Amanfo, Georgina; Naumann, Paul W.; Goeken, J. Adam; Karandikar, Nitin J.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established mouse model for multiple sclerosis and is characterized by infiltration of mononuclear cells and demyelination within the central nervous system along with the clinical symptoms of paralysis. EAE is a multifocal and random disease, which sometimes makes histopathologic analysis of lesions difficult as it may not be possible to predict where lesions will occur, especially when evaluating cross sections of spinal cord. Consequently, lesions may be easily missed due to limited sampling in traditional approaches. To evaluate the entire length of the spinal cord while maintaining anatomic integrity, we have developed a method to section the cord within the decalcified spinal column, which allows for the study of the multifocal nature of this disease and also minimizes handling artifact. HE and Luxol fast blue staining of these spinal cord sections revealed a paucity of lesions in some areas, while others showed marked inflammation and demyelination. The percentage of spinal cord affected by EAE was evaluated at four separate areas of longitudinally sectioned cord and it varied greatly within each animal. Immunohistochemical staining of in situ spinal cords which had undergone decalcification was successful for key immuno-markers used in EAE research including CD3 for T cells, B220 for B cells and F4/80 for murine macrophages. This method will allow investigators to look at the entire spinal cord on a single slide and evaluate the spinal cord with and without classic EAE lesions. PMID:26855861

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  13. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  14. Role of CD8^+ T Cells in Murine Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Sheng-Le; Pernis, Benvenuto

    1992-05-01

    The course of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis, is affected by immunoregulatory T lymphocytes. When animals are immunized with encephalitogenic peptide of myelin basic protein and recover from the first episode of EAE, they become resistant to a second induction of this disease. Animals depleted of CD8^+ T cells by antibody-mediated clearance were used to examine the role of CD8^+ T cells in EAE. These cells were found to be major participants in the resistance to a second induction of EAE but were not essential for spontaneous recovery from the first episode of the disease.

  15. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel is effective in a murine model of experimental Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Al-Mathal, Ebtisam M; Alsalem, Afaf M

    2012-07-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a major health issue for neonatal calves, is caused by the parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, which is highly resistant to drug treatments. To date, many anti-parasitic drugs have been tested, but only a few have been shown to be partially effective in treating cryptosporidiosis. Previous studies have indicated that pomegranate (Punica granatum) possesses anti-plasmodium, anti-cestode, and anti-nematode activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of P. granatum peel on suckling mice infected with experimental C. parvum. At 4days of age, 72 neonatal albino mice were randomly divided into five groups: G1: healthy controls, G2: infected/untreated controls, G3: uninfected/distilled water-treated, G4: uninfected/P. granatum peel-treated, and G5: infected/P. granatum peel-treated. Mice were experimentally-infected by oral administration of 1×10(3)C. parvum oocysts per animal. On day 7 post-inoculation (pi), treated mice received an aqueous suspension of P. granatum peel orally (3g/kg body weight). The presence of diarrhea, oocyst shedding, and weight gain/loss, and the histopathology of ileal sections were examined. Infected mice treated with the P. granatum peel suspension showed improvement in all parameters examined. Additionally, these mice did not exhibit any clinical symptoms and no deaths occurred. Oocyst shedding was very significantly reduced in the P. granatum-treated mice by day 14 pi (P<.05), and was completely eliminated by day 28 pi. The mean weight gain of the P. granatum-treated mice was significantly higher than that of the infected/untreated controls throughout the study (P<.01). Histopathological analysis of ileal sections further supported the clinical and parasitological findings. The histological architecture of villi from the P. granatum-treated mice on day 14 pi showed visible improvement in comparison with the infected/untreated controls, including renewed brush borders, reduced numbers of C. parvum

  16. Cellular and molecular aspects of the pathomechanism and therapy of murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tabira, T

    1989-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Its immune mechanism is well understood at the cellular and molecular levels, which is herein reviewed. Susceptibility to EAE is under the control of the genes partially inside and partially outside the H-2 complex. There are two myelin constituents known to be encephalitogenic, myelin basic protein and proteolipid apoprotein. EAE is mediated by effector T cells sensitized to the encephalitogen. Effector T cells bear surface phenotypes of Lyt1+2-, L3T4+, and they are activated by the encephalitogen/self Ia complex or certain alloantigens and acquire encephalitogenic activity. By unknown homing mechanisms, the effector T cells invade the CNS and induce the target phase phenomena, which include Ia-antigen expression in the local tissue, activation of procoagulant activity, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, and excretion of lymphokines which induce inflammation and demyelination, resulting in functional alteration. Possibility of specific immune therapy is postulated as a model for human autoimmune disease. PMID:2484301

  17. Experimental Demyelination and Remyelination of Murine Spinal Cord by Focal Injection of Lysolecithin

    PubMed Central

    Keough, Michael B.; Jensen, Samuel K.; Yong, V. Wee

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by plaque formation containing lost oligodendrocytes, myelin, axons, and neurons. Remyelination is an endogenous repair mechanism whereby new myelin is produced subsequent to proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, and is necessary to protect axons from further damage. Currently, all therapeutics for the treatment of multiple sclerosis target the aberrant immune component of the disease, which reduce inflammatory relapses but do not prevent progression to irreversible neurological decline. It is therefore imperative that remyelination-promoting strategies be developed which may delay disease progression and perhaps reverse neurological symptoms. Several animal models of demyelination exist, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and curprizone; however, there are limitations in their use for studying remyelination. A more robust approach is the focal injection of toxins into the central nervous system, including the detergent lysolecithin into the spinal cord white matter of rodents. In this protocol, we demonstrate that the surgical procedure involved in injecting lysolecithin into the ventral white matter of mice is fast, cost-effective, and requires no additional materials than those commercially available. This procedure is important not only for studying the normal events involved in the remyelination process, but also as a pre-clinical tool for screening candidate remyelination-promoting therapeutics. PMID:25867716

  18. Estimating biologically relevant parameters under uncertainty for experimental within-host murine West Nile virus infection.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soumya; Guedj, Jeremie; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Moses, Melanie; Perelson, Alan S

    2016-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging pathogen that has decimated bird populations and caused severe outbreaks of viral encephalitis in humans. Currently, little is known about the within-host viral kinetics of WNV during infection. We developed mathematical models to describe viral replication, spread and host immune response in wild-type and immunocompromised mice. Our approach fits a target cell-limited model to viremia data from immunocompromised knockout mice and an adaptive immune response model to data from wild-type mice. Using this approach, we first estimate parameters governing viral production and viral spread in the host using simple models without immune responses. We then use these parameters in a more complex immune response model to characterize the dynamics of the humoral immune response. Despite substantial uncertainty in input parameters, our analysis generates relatively precise estimates of important viral characteristics that are composed of nonlinear combinations of model parameters: we estimate the mean within-host basic reproductive number,R0, to be 2.3 (95% of values in the range 1.7-2.9); the mean infectious virion burst size to be 2.9 plaque-forming units (95% of values in the range 1.7-4.7); and the average number of cells infected per infectious virion to be between 0.3 and 0.99. Our analysis gives mechanistic insights into the dynamics of WNV infection and produces estimates of viral characteristics that are difficult to measure experimentally. These models are a first step towards a quantitative understanding of the timing and effectiveness of the humoral immune response in reducing host viremia and consequently the epidemic spread of WNV. PMID:27075003

  19. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Lana, Marta de

    2016-09-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC-poly(d,l-lactide)-polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC-poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:27324760

  20. Macrophage Phenotype in the Ocular Surface of Experimental Murine Dry Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    You, In-Cheon; Coursey, Terry G; Bian, Fang; Barbosa, Flavia L; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the phenotype of macrophages in the cornea and conjunctiva of C57BL/6 mice with induced experimental dry eye. C57BL/6 mice exposed to desiccating stress (DS) were evaluated at 1, 5, and 10 days and C57BL/6 mice maintained in non-stressed environment were used as controls. Whole eyes and adnexa were excised for histology or used for gene expression analysis. Location and phenotype of macrophages infiltrating the cornea and conjunctiva was evaluated by immunofluorescence analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction evaluated macrophage markers and T cell-related and inflammatory cytokine expression in cornea and conjunctiva. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that macrophages reside in the conjunctiva of control and dry eye mice and their number did not change with DS. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that the level of M1 macrophage marker, iNOS, increased prominently in the conjunctiva at DS 10 days. In contrast, there was a non-significant decrease of the M2 marker Arg1 with DS. The levels of inflammatory cytokine, IL-12a mRNA transcript in the conjunctiva increased significantly at DS1 and decreased at DS5, while levels of IL-18 were significantly increased at DS 10. Macrophages reside in the ocular surface tissues of C57BL/6 mice. Although the number of macrophages in the conjunctiva does not change, evidence of inflammatory M1 activation after desiccating stress was observed. Better understanding of phagocyte diversity and activation in dry eye disease provide a basis for the development of phagocyte-targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:25772203

  1. Protection Provided by an Encapsulated Live Attenuated ΔabcBA Strain of Brucella ovis against Experimental Challenge in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Patrícia C; Macêdo, Auricélio A; Silva, Teane M A; Ximenes, Luana C A; Brandão, Humberto M; Paixão, Tatiane A; Santos, Renato L

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the Brucella ovis ΔabcBA strain as a vaccine candidate in the murine model. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously or intraperitoneally immunized with a single dose or three doses of the B. ovis ΔabcBA strain and then were challenged with wild-type B. ovis. Single or multiple immunizations provided only mild protection, with significantly smaller numbers of wild-type B. ovis CFU in the livers of immunized mice but not in the spleens. Encapsulation of B. ovis ΔabcBA significantly improved protection against experimental challenges in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, immunization with encapsulated B. ovis ΔabcBA markedly prevented lesions in the spleens and livers of experimentally challenged mice. These results demonstrated that the encapsulated B. ovis ΔabcBA strain confers protection to mice; therefore, this strain has potential as a vaccine candidate for rams. PMID:25947146

  2. Protection Provided by an Encapsulated Live Attenuated ΔabcBA Strain of Brucella ovis against Experimental Challenge in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Patrícia C.; Macêdo, Auricélio A.; Silva, Teane M. A.; Ximenes, Luana C. A.; Brandão, Humberto M.; Paixão, Tatiane A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the Brucella ovis ΔabcBA strain as a vaccine candidate in the murine model. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously or intraperitoneally immunized with a single dose or three doses of the B. ovis ΔabcBA strain and then were challenged with wild-type B. ovis. Single or multiple immunizations provided only mild protection, with significantly smaller numbers of wild-type B. ovis CFU in the livers of immunized mice but not in the spleens. Encapsulation of B. ovis ΔabcBA significantly improved protection against experimental challenges in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, immunization with encapsulated B. ovis ΔabcBA markedly prevented lesions in the spleens and livers of experimentally challenged mice. These results demonstrated that the encapsulated B. ovis ΔabcBA strain confers protection to mice; therefore, this strain has potential as a vaccine candidate for rams. PMID:25947146

  3. Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract ameliorates intestinal inflammation through MAPKs/NF-κB signaling in a murine model of acute experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Medicherla, Kanakaraju; Ketkar, Avanee; Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Sudhakar, Godi; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-13

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-colitis effects of Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract (RE) by using both in vitro LPS-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental murine colitis and suggested the underlying possible mechanisms. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis was performed to identify the major components present in the RE. The clinical signs, biochemistry, immunoblot, ELISA and histology in colon tissues were assessed in order to elucidate the beneficial effect of RE. RE suppressed the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and the expressions of inflammatory proteins in macrophages. Administration of RE (50 and 100 mg kg(-1)) also significantly reduced the severity of DSS-induced murine colitis, as assessed by the clinical symptoms, colon length and histology. RE administration prevented the DSS-induced activation of p38, ERK and JNK MAPKs, attenuated IκBα phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB (p65). RE also suppressed the COX-2 and iNOS expressions, decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines and the myeloperoxidase activity in the colon tissue. Histological observation revealed that RE administration alleviated mucosal damage and inflammatory cell infiltration induced by DSS in the colon tissue. Hence, RE could be used as a new preventive and therapeutic food ingredient or as a dietary supplement for inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27349640

  4. Oral administration of Parabacteroides distasonis antigens attenuates experimental murine colitis through modulation of immunity and microbiota composition

    PubMed Central

    Kverka, M; Zakostelska, Z; Klimesova, K; Sokol, D; Hudcovic, T; Hrncir, T; Rossmann, P; Mrazek, J; Kopecny, J; Verdu, E F; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, H

    2011-01-01

    Commensal bacteria have been shown to modulate the host mucosal immune system. Here, we report that oral treatment of BALB/c mice with components from the commensal, Parabacteroides distasonis, significantly reduces the severity of intestinal inflammation in murine models of acute and chronic colitis induced by dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). The membranous fraction of P. distasonis (mPd) prevented DSS-induced increases in several proinflammatory cytokines, increased mPd-specific serum antibodies and stabilized the intestinal microbial ecology. The anti-colitic effect of oral mPd was not observed in severe combined immunodeficient mice and probably involved induction of specific antibody responses and stabilization of the intestinal microbiota. Our results suggest that specific bacterial components derived from the commensal bacterium, P. distasonis, may be useful in the development of new therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:21087444

  5. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Omodeo Salè, Fausta; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  6. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  7. Eosinophilic esophagitis: published evidences for disease subtypes, indications for patient subpopulations, and how to translate patient observations to murine experimental models.

    PubMed

    Mudde, Anne C A; Lexmond, Willem S; Blumberg, Richard S; Nurko, Samuel; Fiebiger, Edda

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the esophagus and commonly classified as a Th2-type allergy. Major advances in our understanding of the EoE pathophysiology have recently been made, but clinicians struggle with highly unpredictable therapy responses indicative of phenotypic diversity within the patient population. Here, we summarize evidences for the existence of EoE subpopulations based on diverse inflammatory characteristics of the esophageal tissue in EoE. Additionally, clinical characteristics of EoE patients support the concept of disease subtypes. We conclude that clinical and experimental evidences indicate that EoE is an umbrella term for conditions that are unified by esophageal eosinophilia but that several disease subgroups with various inflammatory esophageal patterns and/or different clinical features exist. We further discuss strategies to study the pathophysiologic differences as observed in EoE patients in murine experimental EoE. Going forward, models of EoE that faithfully mimic EoE subentities as defined in humans will be essential because mechanistic studies on triggers which regulate the onset of diverse EoE subpopulations are not feasible in patients. Understanding how and why different EoE phenotypes develop will be a first and fundamental step to establish strategies that integrate individual variations of the EoE pathology into personalized therapy. PMID:27458501

  8. Plecanatide and dolcanatide, novel guanylate cyclase-C agonists, ameliorate gastrointestinal inflammation in experimental models of murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shailubhai, Kunwar; Palejwala, Vaseem; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Saykhedkar, Sayali; Nefsky, Bradley; Foss, John A; Comiskey, Stephen; Jacob, Gary S; Plevy, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of orally administered plecanatide or dolcanatide, analogs of uroguanylin, on amelioration of colitis in murine models. METHODS: The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) stimulatory potency of plecanatide and dolcanatide was measured using a human colon carcinoma T84 cell-based assay. For animal studies all test agents were formulated in phosphate buffered saline. Sulfasalazine or 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) served as positive controls. Effect of oral treatment with test agents on amelioration of acute colitis induced either by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water or by rectal instillation of trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS) acid, was examined in BALB/c and/or BDF1 mice. Additionally, the effect of orally administered plecanatide on the spontaneous colitis in T-cell receptor alpha knockout (TCRα-/-) mice was also examined. Amelioration of colitis was assessed by monitoring severity of colitis, disease activity index and by histopathology. Frozen colon tissues were used to measure myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Plecanatide and dolcanatide are structurally related analogs of uroguanylin, which is an endogenous ligand of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C). As expected from the agonists of GC-C, both plecanatide and dolcanatide exhibited potent cGMP-stimulatory activity in T84 cells. Once-daily treatment by oral gavage with either of these analogs (0.05-0.5 mg/kg) ameliorated colitis in both DSS and TNBS-induced models of acute colitis, as assessed by body weight, reduction in colitis severity (P < 0.05) and disease activity index (P < 0.05). Amelioration of colitis by either of the drug candidates was comparable to that achieved by orally administered sulfasalazine or 5-ASA. Plecanatide also effectively ameliorated colitis in TCRα-/- mice, a model of spontaneous colitis. As dolcanatide exhibited higher resistance to proteolysis in simulated gastric and intestinal juices, it was selected for further studies. CONCLUSION: This is

  9. Does Carica papaya leaf-extract increase the platelet count? An experimental study in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarathna, Sinhalagoda Lekamlage Chandi Asoka; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Waduge, Roshitha Nilmini; Rajapakse, Rajapakse Peramune Veddikkarage Jayanthe; Kularatne, Senanayake Abeysinghe Mudiyanselage

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential role of fresh Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract on haematological and biochemical parameters and toxicological changes in a murine model. Methods In total 36 mice were used for the trial. Fresh C. papaya leaf extract [0.2 mL (2 g)/mouse] was given only to the test group (18 mice). General behavior, clinical signs and feeding patterns were recorded. Blood and tissue samples were collected at intervals. Haematological parameters including platelet, red blood cell (RBC), white blood cell (WBC), packed cell volume (PCV), serum biochemistry including serum creatinine, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) were determined. Organs for possible histopathological changes were examined. Results Neither group exhibited alteration of behavior or reduction in food and water intake. Similarly, no significant changes in SGOT, SGPT and serum creatinine levels were detected in the test group. Histopathological organ changes were not observed in either group of mice except in three liver samples of the test group which had a mild focal necrosis. The platelet count (11.33±0.35)×105/µL (P=0.000 04) and the RBC count (7.97±0.61)×106/µL (P=0.000 03) were significantly increased in the test group compared to that of the controls. However, WBC count and PCV (%) values were not changed significantly in the test group. The platelet count in the test group started to increase significantly from Day 3 (3.4±0.18×105/µL), reaching almost a fourfold higher at Day 21 (11.3×105/µL), while it was 3.8×105/µL and 5.5×105/µL at Day 3 and Day 21 respectively in the control. Likewise, the RBC count in the test group increased from 6×106/µL to 9×106/ µL at Day 21 while it remained near constant in the control group (6×106/µL). Conclusions Fresh C. papaya leaf extract significantly increased the platelet and RBC counts in the test group as compared to controls. Therefore, it is very

  10. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  11. The Effect of Phosphatidylcholine and Deoxycholate Compound Injections to the Localized Adipose Tissue: An Experimental Study with a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Yongjoon

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylcholine (PPC) and deoxycholate (DCA) compound has been recently used for the purpose of partial lipolysis and is valued for its efficacy and lower invasiveness compared to liposuction and dermolipectomy used previously. In this article, the authors discuss the efficacy of the PPC dissolved in DCA via an experimental rat study model, along with suggesting a useful animal experimental model for the study of adipose tissue and lipolysis. Methods Bilateral inguinal fat pads of an experimental rat were elevated with the deep inferior epigastric vessel as the sole vascular pedicle. Normal saline was injected on one side as a control group and a PPC and DCA compound was injected on the other side. After 4 days, the rats were euthanized for microscopic tissue examination. The pathology was scored by a semiquantitative system in 4 categories: normal fat amount, fat necrosis, inflammatory activity, and stage of fibrosis. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test powered by SPSS packet program was used for statistical analysis and to determine significance. Results Microscopic examination was performed on the obtained samples, and the experimental data of all four categories showed significant histologic differences compared to the control group. All of the data also showed statistical significance by the Wilcoxon signedrank test (P<0.01). Conclusions In the inguinal fat pad rat model, the control group and the experimental group had a differed significantly in the amount of normal fat tissue, inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis. We recommend the rat inguinal fat pad model used in this study, as it is likely to be useful in related research. PMID:23094238

  12. In vivo and in vitro studies of the prevention of proteolipid apoprotein-induced murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis by monoclonal antibody against L3T4.

    PubMed

    Satoh, J; Kunishita, T; Tabira, T

    1988-05-01

    The suppressive effect of anti-L3T4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by sensitization with proteolipid apoprotein (PLP) was examined in vivo and in vitro. This mAb inhibited the antigen-specific proliferation of the encephalitogenic T cell lines but did not block the mitogen-mediated response. Serial injections of the mAb during the pre-effector phase of EAE markedly suppressed the development and relapse of the disease but this treatment initiated after appearance of clinical signs was not effective. In treated animals, L3T4+ T cells in the spleen were profoundly decreased and the antigen-specific proliferative response of spleen cells was completely suppressed. Moreover, adoptive transfer of spleen cells from the treated mice induced resistance against EAE induction in the recipients. However, no obvious evidence for antigen-specific suppressor cells was found in vitro in the L3T4- populations of spleen cells from treated mice. PMID:2451681

  13. Studies on the mechanisms responsible for inhibition of experimental metastasis of B16-F10 murine melanoma by pentoxifylline.

    PubMed

    Gude, R P; Binda, M M; Presas, H L; Klein-Szanto, A J; Bonfil, R D

    1999-01-01

    Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine derivative widely used as a hemorheological agent in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease, was studied to unveil the mechanisms responsible for its inhibitory action on B16-F10 experimental metastasis. In vitro pretreatment of B16-F10 cells with noncytotoxic concentrations of PTX significantly inhibited their adhesion to reconstituted basement membrane Matrigel(R) and type IV collagen as well as the relative activity of secreted 92 kD metalloproteinase. However, PTX pretreatment of B16-F10 cells did not affect their in vitro invasiveness. Heterotypic organ adhesion assays carried out with B16-F10 cells and suspended organ tissues demonstrated that pretreatment with noncytotoxic concentrations of PTX of both, tumor cells or lung tissue, brought about a dose-dependent inhibition of melanoma cell adhesion to lung. Immunohistochemical studies using antibodies against CD31 adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) revealed that B16-F10 cells adhere to lung endothelial cells. Our results suggest that PTX may exert its inhibitory effect on tumor lodgment, and as a consequence of that on experimental metastases, through an inhibitory action on cell adhesion molecules. PMID:10087444

  14. The efficacy of hydro alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on experimental zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions in murine model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Fata, Abdolmajid; Khamesipour, Ali; Rakhshandeh, Hasan; Miramin Mohammadi, Akram; Salehi, Ghodratollah; Monavari, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Leishmaniasis is one of the most important parasitic infectious diseases in the world. Since last century, many efforts have been made to control and treat the disease, but appropriate vaccines, pesticides and medicines are not available or even eligible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydro-alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on the lesions of experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) in Balb/c mice. Materials and Methods: The population study was 60 Ballb/c mice which divided to 6 groups, all infected with Leishmania major [MRHO/75/IR]. Soon after the ulcer started to appear in the early stage, a dose of provided herbal extract with 5, 10 and 15% concentration applied on each lesion. The surface area of the lesions measured during an interval of 10 days. Direct Giemsa stained smears prepared two and four weeks after treatment. Results: Increasing the mean size of the lesions was statistically significant compared to those in control group (p>0.001). Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) developed in all of the mice including the control group that received Eucerine alone. Survival rate in group receiving 15% S. rosmarinus extracts showed significantly higher compared to mice in control group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Hydro-alcoholic extracts of S.rosmarinus with concentrations below15% did not show a therapeutic effect on experimental CL ulcers of Balb/c mice. Further studies with higher concentrations or nano particles are recommended. PMID:25386402

  15. Suppression of murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis development by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 with autophagy modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Chao; Feng, Xuedan; Li, Zhe; Wang, Yabo; Li, Bin; Li, Lin; Quan, Moyuan; Wang, Gaoning; Guo, Li

    2015-03-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been associated with a history of sub-optimal exposure to ultraviolet light, implicating vitamin D3 as a possible protective agent. We evaluated whether 1,25(OH)2D3 attenuates the progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and explored its potential mechanisms. EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice via immunization with MOG35-55, and some mice received 1,25(OH)2D3. 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibited EAE progression. Additionally, 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced inflammation, demyelination, and neuron loss in the spinal cord. The protective effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 was associated with significantly elevated expression of Beclin1, increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and decreased LC3-II accumulation. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D3 may represent a promising new MS treatment. PMID:25773147

  16. Acute desipramine restores presynaptic cortical defects in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by suppressing central CCL5 overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Di Prisco, Silvia; Merega, Elisa; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Casazza, Simona; Uccelli, Antonio; Pittaluga, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Altered glutamate exocytosis and cAMP production in cortical terminals of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice occur at the early stage of disease (13 days post-immunization, d.p.i.). Neuronal defects were paralleled by overexpression of the central chemokine CCL5 (also known as RANTES), suggesting it has a role in presynaptic impairments. We propose that drugs able to restore CCL5 content to physiological levels could also restore presynaptic defects. Because of its efficacy in controlling CCL5 overexpression, desipramine (DMI) appeared to be a suitable candidate to test our hypothesis. Experimental Approach Control and EAE mice at 13 d.p.i. were acutely or chronically administered DMI and monitored for behaviour and clinical scores. Noradrenaline and glutamate release, cAMP, CCL5 and TNF-α production were quantified in cortical synaptosomes and homogenates. Peripheral cytokine production was also determined. Key Results Noradrenaline exocytosis and α2-adrenoeceptor-mediated activity were unmodified in EAE mice at 13 d.p.i. when compared with control. Acute, but not chronic, DMI reduced CCL5 levels in cortical homogenates of EAE mice at 13 d.p.i., but did not affect peripheral IL-17 and TNF-α contents or CCL5 plasma levels. Acute DMI caused a long-lasting restoration of glutamate exocytosis, restored endogenous cAMP production and impeded the shift from inhibition to facilitation of the CCL5-mediated control of glutamate exocytosis. Finally, DMI ameliorated anxiety-related behaviour but not motor activity or severity of clinical signs. Conclusions We propose DMI as an add-on therapy to normalize neuropsychiatric symptoms in multiple sclerosis patients at the early stage of the disease. PMID:24528439

  17. In silico investigation into dendritic cell regulation of CD8Treg mediated killing of Th1 cells in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis has been used extensively as an animal model of T cell mediated autoimmunity. A down-regulatory pathway through which encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells are killed by CD8 regulatory T cells (Treg) has recently been proposed. With the CD8Treg cells being primed by dendritic cells, regulation of recovery may be occuring around these antigen presenting cells. CD4Treg cells provide critical help within this process, by licensing dendritic cells to prime CD8Treg cells, however the spatial and temporal aspects of this help in the CTL response is currently unclear. Results We have previously developed a simulator of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (ARTIMMUS). We use ARTIMMUS to perform novel in silico experimentation regarding the priming of CD8Treg cells by dendritic cells, and the resulting CD8Treg mediated killing of encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells. Simulations using dendritic cells that present antigenic peptides in a mutually exclusive manner (either MBP or TCR-derived, but not both) suggest that there is no significant reliance on dendritic cells that can prime both encephalitogenic CD4Th1 and Treg cells. Further, in silico experimentation suggests that dynamics of CD8Treg priming are significantly influenced through their spatial competition with CD4Treg cells and through the timing of Qa-1 expression by dendritic cells. Conclusion There is no requirement for the encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells and cytotoxic CD8Treg cells to be primed by the same dendritic cells. We conjecture that no significant portion of CD4Th1 regulation by Qa-1 restricted CD8Treg cells occurs around individual dendritic cells, and as such, that CD8Treg mediated killing of CD4Th1 cells occurring around dendritic cells is not critical for recovery from the murine autoimmune disease. Furthermore, the timing of the CD4Treg licensing of dendritic cells and the spatial competition between CD4Treg and CD8Treg cells around the dendritic cell is

  18. Murine monoclonal antibodies to Klebsiella pneumoniae protect against lethal endotoxemia and experimental infection with capsulated K. pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Mandine, E; Salles, M F; Zalisz, R; Guenounou, M; Smets, P

    1990-01-01

    To prepare monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the core-lipid A fractions of smooth lipopoly-saccharide (LPS) from Klebsiella pneumoniae O1:K2, we immunized BALB/c mice with the LPS-associated proteins plus LPS. This preparation exposed the core-lipid A moiety, which is normally hidden in the micellar structure of classical LPS preparations. Among 10 MAbs selected for their reactivity with LPS-associated proteins plus LPS from K. pneumoniae O1:K2, 6 (3A3, 3C2, 3C4, 7D2, 11C3, and 12B6) were directed against the core fraction and 2 (6C5 and 10A5) were directed against the lipid A fraction. Only one (2A4) recognized the O antigen, and one (6D5) had an undefined specificity. When injected before challenge with K. pneumoniae O1:K2 LPS in galactosamine-sensitized mice, five of the MAbs (3C4, 6D5, 7D2, 11C3, and 12B6) provided protection in this model of lethal endotoxemia. MAb 7D2 was also protective in an experimental infection with capsulated K. pneumoniae O1:K2. PMID:1696932

  19. Pioglitazone Identifies a New Target for Aneurysm Treatment: Role of Egr1 in an Experimental Murine Model of Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Charolidi, Nicoletta; Pirianov, Grisha; Torsney, Evelyn; Pearce, Stuart; Laing, Ken; Nohturfft, Axel; Cockerill, Gillian W

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor x03B3; agonists have been shown to inhibit angiotensin II (AngII)-induced experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms. Macrophage infiltration to the vascular wall is an early event in this pathology, and therefore we explored the effects of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor x03B3; agonist pioglitazone on AngII-treated macrophages. Using microarray-based expression profiling of phorbol ester-stimulated THP-1 cells, we found that a number of aneurysm-related gene changes effected by AngII were modulated following the addition of pioglitazone. Among those genes, polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) was significantly up-regulated (multiple testing corrected p < 0.05). The analysis of the PKD1 proximal promoter revealed a putative early growth response 1 (EGR1) binding site, which was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and quantitative PCR. Further analysis of publicly available ChIP-sequencing data revealed that this putative binding site overlapped with a conserved EGR1 binding peak present in 5 other cell lines. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that EGR1 suppressed PKD1, while AngII significantly up-regulated PKD1, an effect counteracted by pioglitazone. Conversely, in EGR1 short hairpin RNA lentivirally transduced THP-1 cells, reduced EGR1 led to a significant up-regulation of PKD1, especially after treatment with pioglitazone. In vivo, deficiency of Egr1 in the haematopoietic compartment of mice completely abolished the incidence of CaCl2-induced aneurysm formation. PMID:26113112

  20. Lactococcus lactis carrying the pValac DNA expression vector coding for IL-10 reduces inflammation in a murine model of experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are intestinal disorders characterized by inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. Interleukin-10 is one of the most important anti-inflammatory cytokines involved in the intestinal immune system and because of its role in downregulating inflammatory cascades, its potential for IBD therapy is under study. We previously presented the development of an invasive strain of Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) producing Fibronectin Binding Protein A (FnBPA) which was capable of delivering, directly to host cells, a eukaryotic DNA expression vector coding for IL-10 of Mus musculus (pValac:il-10) and diminish inflammation in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced mouse model of intestinal inflammation. As a new therapeutic strategy against IBD, the aim of this work was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of two L. lactis strains (the same invasive strain evaluated previously and the wild-type strain) carrying the therapeutic pValac:il-10 plasmid in the prevention of inflammation in a dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced mouse model. Results Results obtained showed that not only delivery of the pValac:il-10 plasmid by the invasive strain L. lactis MG1363 FnBPA+, but also by the wild-type strain L. lactis MG1363, was effective at diminishing intestinal inflammation (lower inflammation scores and higher IL-10 levels in the intestinal tissues, accompanied by decrease of IL-6) in the DSS-induced IBD mouse model. Conclusions Administration of both L. lactis strains carrying the pValac:il-10 plasmid was effective at diminishing inflammation in this murine model of experimental colitis, showing their potential for therapeutic intervention of IBD. PMID:25106058

  1. Evaluation of s.c. route of immunization by homologous radio attenuated live vaccine in experimental murine model of visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanchita; Khanra, Supriya; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal; Manna, Madhumita

    2016-06-01

    Our previous studies in BALB/c mice showed substantial protection against the experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis (MVL) when the animals were immunized with γ-irradiated live Leishmania donovani parasites through intra peritoneal (i.p.) and intra muscular (i.m.) routes respectively. The observations encouraged us to check the prophylactic efficacy of subcutaneous (s.c.) route as it is better alternative for human trial. The mice immunized with two subsequent doses of the radio attenuated homologous vaccine were challenged with virulent L. donovani parasites. Seventy-five days post infection, the animals were sacrificed. The extent of protection against the disease was evaluated by assessing the reduction of parasite burden in spleen and liver, the generation of free radicals (NO & ROS) and release of the cytokines from T-lymphocyte helper 1 (Th 1) and T-lymphocyte helper 2 (Th 2) along with the measurement of the serum immunoglobulins. The reductions in parasitic burden were observed up to 21 and 24 % in spleen and liver of the immunized groups with NO and ROS productions 27 and 34 % respectively. Whereas the increase in IFN gamma releases was between 19 and 34 %, the decrease in IL-10 release was not more than 22 %. This indicates the failure of the establishment of pronounced Th1 ambience which was further corroborated by the observed IgG2a and IgG1 ratio. The present study when compared with our previous observations with i.m. and i.p. routes revealed that s.c. route may not be a good choice for the use of radio attenuated vaccine. PMID:27413317

  2. Epitope specificity of murine and human bactericidal antibodies against PorA P1.7,16 induced with experimental meningococcal group B vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rouppe van der Voort, E M; Kuipers, B; Brugghe, H F; van Unen, L M; Timmermans, H A; Hoogerhout, P; Poolman, J T

    1997-03-01

    Synthetic peptides derived from the predicted loops 1 and 4 of meningococcal PorA, sero-subtype P1.7,16, were used to study the epitope specificity of murine and human PorA P1.7,16 bactericidal antibodies. The predicted loops 1 and 4 are surface exposed and carry in their apices the sero-subtype epitopes P1.7 (loop 1) or P1.16 (loop 4), respectively. Peptides were synthesized as mono- and multimeric peptides. Murine monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were induced with meningococcal whole cell preparations. Polyclonal antibodies were evoked in volunteers after one immunization with 50 micrograms or 100 micrograms protein of a hexavalent meningococcal PorA vesicle vaccine. The induction of PorA antibodies was determined in ELISA using purified PorA P1.7,16. The epitope specificity of anti-PorA antibodies for both murine and human antibodies could be demonstrated by direct peptide ELISA using overlapping multimeric peptides almost spanning the entire loops 1 or 4 of the protein. The capacity of peptides to inhibit the bactericidal activity of murine and human antibodies was investigated using meningococcal strain H44/76 (B:15:P1.7,16) as a target strain. Bactericidal activities could be inhibited with both monomeric and multimeric peptides derived from epitopes P1.7 and P1.16. PMID:9093834

  3. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of experimental murine tumours and human tumour xenografts: effects of blood flow modification.

    PubMed Central

    Bremner, J. C.; Counsell, C. J.; Adams, G. E.; Stratford, I. J.; Wood, P. J.; Dunn, J. F.; Radda, G. K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of hydralazine on tumours appears to vary depending on tumour type. Blood flow and radiation sensitivity decrease more in murine tumours than human tumour xenografts. In this study a comparison between various tumour types has been made using in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS) to follow the metabolic responses occurring after clamping or intravenous administration of hydralazine (5 mg kg-1). Large increases in the Pi/total phosphate ratio were found with the murine sarcomas, KHT and RIF-1 implanted into C3H/He mice. However little or no effect was seen for the two human xenografted tumours, HX118 and HT29 implanted in MFI nu/nu/01a mice. An intermediate response was observed for KHT tumours grown in nu/nu mice. All tumours showed a large response to clamping. The anaesthetic Hypnorm/Hypnovel has a great influence on the response of the tumour metabolism to hydralazine appearing to both prolong and increase the changes induced. There is evidence to support the theory that the changes in 31P spectra are related to the oxygen status of the tumours. PMID:1931606

  4. Dimethyl fumarate ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine experimental colitis by activating Nrf2 and suppressing NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuting; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Ping; Du, Qianming; Tao, Lei; Ding, Yang; Wang, Yajing; Hu, Rong

    2016-07-15

    In the present study, we examined the effects of dimethyl fumarate (DMF) on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced murine colitis, an animal model which mimics human IBD. Oral administration of DMF dose-dependently attenuated body weight loss, colon length shortening and colonic pathological damage including decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activities in DSS-treated mice. Increased glutathione (GSH) induced by DMF demonstrated its potential antioxidant capacity. In addition, Nrf2 and its downstream genes were markedly activated by DMF. Furthermore, protein and mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 were markedly suppressed by DMF. At the same time, decreased activation of caspase-1 was detected in DMF-treated mice, indicating that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation was suppressed. The in vitro study verified a negative regulation of DMF and its intestinal metabolite on NLRP3 inflammasome. Moreover, the inhibitory effect was found to be mostly dependent on Nrf2 which decreased mitochondrial ROS (mROS) generation and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release. Taken together, our results demonstrated the ability of DMF to inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation and its potential use in the treatment of NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:27184504

  5. Cloning of murine ferrochelatase.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D A; Frasier, F

    1991-01-01

    Ferrochelatase (protoheme ferro-lyase, EC 4.99.1.1) catalyzes the last step in the heme biosynthetic pathway, the chelation of ferrous iron and protoporphyrin to form heme. The activity of ferrochelatase is deficient in the inherited disease protoporphyria. In this study, murine ferrochelatase cDNAs were obtained by screening cDNA libraries with an oligonucleotide probe. The derived amino acid sequence of murine ferrochelatase has 47% identity with the recently cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae ferrochelatase, but it is not significantly similar to other published sequences. Results of Southern blotting are consistent with a single murine ferrochelatase gene, while Northern blotting demonstrates two ferrochelatase transcripts in all tissues examined. The ferrochelatase protein and mRNAs have different relative concentrations in different tissues. The cloning of murine ferrochelatase cDNAs provides the basis for future studies on ferrochelatase gene expression and on the identification of the molecular defect in protoporphyria. Images PMID:1704134

  6. Experimental murine myopia induces collagen type Iα1 (COL1A1) DNA methylation and altered COL1A1 messenger RNA expression in sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangtian; Ji, Fengtao; An, Jianhong; Zhao, Fuxin; Shi, Fanjun; Huang, Furong; Li, Yuan; Jiao, Shiming; Yan, Dongsheng; Chen, Xiaoyan; Chen, JiangFan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether myopia development is associated with changes of scleral DNA methylation in cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites in the collagen 1A1 (COL1A1) promoter and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels following murine form deprivation myopia. Methods Fifty-seven C57BL/6 mice (postnatal day 23) were randomly assigned to four groups: (1) monocular form deprivation (MD) in which a diffuser lens was placed over one eye for 28 days; (2) normal controls without MD; (3) MD recovery in which the diffuser lens was removed for seven days; and (4) MD recovery normal controls. The DNA methylation pattern in COL1A1 promoter and exon 1 was determined by bisulfite DNA sequencing, and the COL1A1 mRNA level in sclera was determined by quantitative PCR. Results MD was found to induce myopia in the treated eyes. Six CpG sites in the promoter and exon 1 region of COL1A1 were methylated with significantly higher frequency in the treated eyes than normal control eyes (p<0.05), with CpG island methylation in MD-contralateral eyes being intermediate. Consistent with the CpG methylation, scleral COL1A1 mRNA was reduced by 57% in the MD-treated eyes compared to normal controls (p<0.05). After seven days of MD recovery, CpG methylation was significantly reduced (p=0.01). The methylation patterns returned to near normal level in five CpG sites, but the sixth was hypomethylated compared to normal controls. Conclusions In parallel with the development of myopia and the reduced COL1A1 mRNA, the frequency of methylation in CpG sites of the COL1A1 promoter/exon 1 increased during MD and returned to near normal during recovery. Thus, hypermethylation of CpG sites in the promoter/exon 1 of COL1A1 may underlie reduced collagen synthesis at the transcriptional level in myopic scleras. PMID:22690110

  7. A range finding protocol to support design for transcriptomics experimentation: examples of in-vitro and in-vivo murine UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Bruning, Oskar; Rodenburg, Wendy; van Oostrom, Conny T; Jonker, Martijs J; de Jong, Mark; Dekker, Rob J; Rauwerda, Han; Ensink, Wim A; de Vries, Annemieke; Breit, Timo M

    2014-01-01

    In transcriptomics research, design for experimentation by carefully considering biological, technological, practical and statistical aspects is very important, because the experimental design space is essentially limitless. Usually, the ranges of variable biological parameters of the design space are based on common practices and in turn on phenotypic endpoints. However, specific sub-cellular processes might only be partially reflected by phenotypic endpoints or outside the associated parameter range. Here, we provide a generic protocol for range finding in design for transcriptomics experimentation based on small-scale gene-expression experiments to help in the search for the right location in the design space by analyzing the activity of already known genes of relevant molecular mechanisms. Two examples illustrate the applicability: in-vitro UV-C exposure of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and in-vivo UV-B exposure of mouse skin. Our pragmatic approach is based on: framing a specific biological question and associated gene-set, performing a wide-ranged experiment without replication, eliminating potentially non-relevant genes, and determining the experimental 'sweet spot' by gene-set enrichment plus dose-response correlation analysis. Examination of many cellular processes that are related to UV response, such as DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest, revealed that basically each cellular (sub-) process is active at its own specific spot(s) in the experimental design space. Hence, the use of range finding, based on an affordable protocol like this, enables researchers to conveniently identify the 'sweet spot' for their cellular process of interest in an experimental design space and might have far-reaching implications for experimental standardization. PMID:24823911

  8. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C. )

    1991-09-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT.

  9. Induction of a Specific Strong Polyantigenic Cellular Immune Response after Short-Term Chemotherapy Controls Bacillary Reactivation in Murine and Guinea Pig Experimental Models of Tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Guirado, Evelyn; Gil, Olga; Cáceres, Neus; Singh, Mahavir; Vilaplana, Cristina; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2008-01-01

    RUTI is a therapeutic vaccine that is generated from detoxified and liposomed Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell fragments that has demonstrated its efficacy in the control of bacillus reactivation after short-term chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to characterize the cellular immune response generated after the therapeutic administration of RUTI and to corroborate the lack of toxicity of the vaccine. Mouse and guinea pig experimental models were infected with a low-dose M. tuberculosis aerosol. RUTI-treated animals showed the lowest bacillary load in both experimental models. RUTI also decreased the percentage of pulmonary granulomatous infiltration in the mouse and guinea pig models. This was not the case after Mycobacterium bovis BCG treatment. Cellular immunity was studied through the characterization of the intracellular gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells after the splenocytes' stimulation with M. tuberculosis-specific structural and growth-related antigens. Our data show that the difference between the therapeutic administration of BCG and RUTI resides mainly in the stronger activation of IFN-γ+ CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells against tuberculin purified protein derivative, ESAT-6, and Ag85B that RUTI generates. Both vaccines also triggered a specific immune response against the M. tuberculosis structural antigens Ag16kDa and Ag38kDa and a marked mRNA expression of IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-12, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and RANTES in the lung. The results show that RUTI's therapeutic effect is linked not only to the induction of a Th1 response but also to the stimulation of a quicker and stronger specific immunity against structural and growth-related antigens that reduces both the bacillary load and the pulmonary pathology. PMID:18524883

  10. Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages is responsible for the amelioration of experimental murine colitis by the natural compound fraxinellone

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Ouyang, Zi-Jun; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Gong; Guo, Wen-Jie; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xu-Dong; Sun, Yang Xu, Qiang

    2014-11-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects millions of people worldwide. Although the etiology of this disease is uncertain, accumulating evidence indicates a key role for the activated mucosal immune system. In the present study, we examined the effects of the natural compound fraxinellone on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, an animal model that mimics IBD. Treatment with fraxinellone significantly reduced weight loss and diarrhea in mice and alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic signs of the disease. In addition, the activities of myeloperoxidase and alkaline phosphatase were markedly suppressed, while the levels of glutathione were increased in colitis tissues following fraxinellone treatment. This compound also decreased the colonic levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects of fraxinellone in mice with experimental colitis were attributed to its inhibition of CD11b{sup +} macrophage infiltration. The mRNA levels of macrophage-related molecules in the colon, including intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), were also markedly inhibited following fraxinellone treatment. The results from in vitro assays showed that fraxinellone significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), IL-1β and IL-18 as well as the activity of iNOS in both THP-1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. The mechanisms responsible for these effects were attributed to the inhibitory role of fraxinellone in NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Overall, our results support fraxinellone as a novel drug candidate in the treatment of colonic inflammation. - Highlights: • Fraxinellone, a lactone compound, alleviated DSS induced colitis. • The effects of fraxinellone were attributed to its inhibition on

  11. The nuclear IκB family protein IκBNS influences the susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shuhei; Hara, Akira; Isagawa, Takayuki; Manabe, Ichiro; Takeda, Kiyoshi; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear IκB family protein IκBNS is expressed in T cells and plays an important role in Interferon (IFN)-γ and Interleukin (IL)-2 production. IκB-ζ, the most similar homolog of IκBNS, plays an important role in the generation of T helper (Th)17 cells in cooperation with RORγt, a master regulator of Th17 cells. Thus, IκB-ζ deficient mice are resistant to Th17-dependent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, IκB-ζ deficient mice develop the autoimmune-like Sjögren syndrome with aging. Here we found that IκBNS-deficient (Nfkbid-/-) mice show resistance against developing Th17-dependent EAE. We found that Nfkbid-/- T cells have decreased expression of IL-17-related genes and RORγt in response to Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β1 and IL-6 stimulation. Thus, IκBNS plays a pivotal role in the generation of Th17 cells and in the control of Th17-dependent EAE. PMID:25347393

  12. Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Production of Prostaglandin E2 and Nitric Oxide during Experimental Murine Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Sargi, S. C.; Dalalio, M. M. O.; Moraes, A. G.; Visentainer, J. E. L.; Morais, D. R.; Visentainer, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the potential health effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the immune system. Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most important endemic mycosis in Latin America. Macrophages have a fundamental role and act as first line of organism defense. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of n-3 fatty acids on the production of PGE2 and NO by mice infected with Pb18 and fed a diet enriched with LNA for 8 weeks. To study the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on macrophage activity during experimental paracoccidioidomycosis, mice were infected with Pb18 and fed a diet supplemented with LNA. PGE2 in the serum of animals was analyzed and NO in the supernatants of macrophages cultured and challenged in vitro with Pb18 was measured. Omega-3 fatty acids seemed to decrease the production of PGE2 in vivo in the infected group fed an LNA-supplemented diet during the 4th and 8th weeks of the experiment. At the same time, we observed an increase in synthesis of NO by peritoneal macrophages in this group. Omega-3 fatty acids thus appear to have an immunomodulatory effect in paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:24455741

  13. A dual-labeled Annexin A5 is not suited for SPECT imaging of brain cell death in experimental murine stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zille, Marietta; Harhausen, Denise; De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Michel, Roger; Reutelingsperger, Chris P; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Wunder, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is one of the pathophysiological hallmarks after stroke. Markers to image cell death pathways in vivo are highly desirable. We previously showed that fluorescently labeled Annexin A5 (AnxA5), which binds specifically to phosphatidylserine (PS) on dead/dying cells, can be used in experimental stroke for monitoring cell death with optical imaging. Here we investigated whether dual-labeled AnxA5 (technetium and fluorescence label) can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of cell death in the same model. C57Bl6/N mice were subjected to 60-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and underwent SPECT imaging at 24, 48, and 72 hours afterwards. They were injected intravenously with either PS-binding AnxA5 or the nonfunctional AnxA5 (negative control), labeled with 99mTc and Alexa Fluor 568, respectively. After SPECT imaging, brain sections were cut for autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. Ethanol-induced cell death in the femur muscle was used as positive control. We detected dual-labeled AnxA5 in the model of ethanol-induced cell death in the femur muscle, but not after MCAO at any time point, either with SPECT or with ex vivo autoradiography or fluorescence microscopy. Dual-labeled AnxA5 appears to be unsuited for visualizing death of brain cells in this MCAO model. PMID:24984896

  14. Maladjusted host immune responses induce experimental cerebral malaria-like pathology in a murine Borrelia and Plasmodium co-infection model.

    PubMed

    Normark, Johan; Nelson, Maria; Engström, Patrik; Andersson, Marie; Björk, Rafael; Moritz, Thomas; Fahlgren, Anna; Bergström, Sven

    2014-01-01

    In the Plasmodium infected host, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is required to clear the parasites without inducing major host pathology. Clinical reports suggest that bacterial infection in conjunction with malaria aggravates disease and raises both mortality and morbidity in these patients. In this study, we investigated the immune responses in BALB/c mice, co-infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 parasites and the relapsing fever bacterium Borrelia duttonii. In contrast to single infections, we identified in the co-infected mice a reduction of L-Arginine levels in the serum. It indicated diminished bioavailability of NO, which argued for a dysfunctional endothelium. Consistent with this, we observed increased sequestration of CD8+ cells in the brain as well over expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM by brain endothelial cells. Co-infected mice further showed an increased inflammatory response through IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as inability to down regulate the same through IL-10. In addition we found loss of synchronicity of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals seen in dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as increased numbers of regulatory T-cells. Our study shows that a situation mimicking experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is induced in co-infected mice due to loss of timing and control over regulatory mechanisms in antigen presenting cells. PMID:25075973

  15. Maladjusted Host Immune Responses Induce Experimental Cerebral Malaria-Like Pathology in a Murine Borrelia and Plasmodium Co-Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Normark, Johan; Nelson, Maria; Engström, Patrik; Andersson, Marie; Björk, Rafael; Moritz, Thomas; Fahlgren, Anna; Bergström, Sven

    2014-01-01

    In the Plasmodium infected host, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is required to clear the parasites without inducing major host pathology. Clinical reports suggest that bacterial infection in conjunction with malaria aggravates disease and raises both mortality and morbidity in these patients. In this study, we investigated the immune responses in BALB/c mice, co-infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 parasites and the relapsing fever bacterium Borrelia duttonii. In contrast to single infections, we identified in the co-infected mice a reduction of L-Arginine levels in the serum. It indicated diminished bioavailability of NO, which argued for a dysfunctional endothelium. Consistent with this, we observed increased sequestration of CD8+ cells in the brain as well over expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM by brain endothelial cells. Co-infected mice further showed an increased inflammatory response through IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as inability to down regulate the same through IL-10. In addition we found loss of synchronicity of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals seen in dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as increased numbers of regulatory T-cells. Our study shows that a situation mimicking experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is induced in co-infected mice due to loss of timing and control over regulatory mechanisms in antigen presenting cells. PMID:25075973

  16. Human and murine erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    An, Xiuli; Schulz, Vincent P.; Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Research into the fundamental mechanisms of erythropoiesis has provided critical insights into inherited and acquired disorders of the erythrocyte. Studies of human erythropoiesis have primarily utilized in-vitro systems, whereas murine models have provided insights from in-vivo studies. This report reviews recent insights into human and murine erythropoiesis gained from transcriptome-based analyses. Recent findings The availability of high-throughput genomic methodologies has allowed attainment of detailed gene expression data from cells at varying developmental and differentiation stages of erythropoiesis. Transcriptome analyses of human and murine reveal both stage and species-specific similarities and differences across terminal erythroid differentiation. Erythroid-specific long noncoding RNAs exhibit poor sequence conservation between human and mouse. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing reveal that complex, dynamic, stage-specific programs of alternative splicing program are utilized during terminal erythroid differentiation. Transcriptome data provide a significant resource for understanding mechanisms of normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. Understanding these processes will provide innovative strategies to detect, diagnose, prevent, and treat hematologic disease. Summary Understanding the shared and different mechanisms controlling human and murine erythropoiesis will allow investigators to leverage the best model system to provide insights in normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. PMID:25719574

  17. Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages is responsible for the amelioration of experimental murine colitis by the natural compound fraxinellone.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Ouyang, Zi-Jun; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Gong; Guo, Wen-Jie; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xu-Dong; Sun, Yang; Xu, Qiang

    2014-10-13

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects millions of people worldwide. Although the etiology of this disease is uncertain, accumulating evidence indicates a key role for the activated mucosal immune system. In the present study, we examined the effects of the natural compound fraxinellone on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, an animal model that mimics IBD. Treatment with fraxinellone significantly reduced weight loss and diarrhea in mice and alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic signs of the disease. In addition, the activities of myeloperoxidase and alkaline phosphatase were markedly suppressed, while the levels of glutathione were increased in colitis tissues following fraxinellone treatment. This compound also decreased the colonic levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects of fraxinellone in mice with experimental colitis were attributed to its inhibition of CD11b(+) macrophage infiltration. The mRNA levels of macrophage-related molecules in the colon, including intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), were also markedly inhibited following fraxinellone treatment. The results from in vitro assays showed that fraxinellone significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), IL-1β and IL-18 as well as the activity of iNOS in both THP-1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. The mechanisms responsible for these effects were attributed to the inhibitory role of fraxinellone in NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Overall, our results support fraxinellone as a novel drug candidate in the treatment of colonic inflammation. PMID:25448682

  18. Preclinical Murine Models for Lung Cancer: Clinical Trial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kellar, Amelia; Egan, Cay; Morris, Don

    2015-01-01

    Murine models for the study of lung cancer have historically been the backbone of preliminary preclinical data to support early human clinical trials. However, the availability of multiple experimental systems leads to debate concerning which model, if any, is best suited for a particular therapeutic strategy. It is imperative that these models accurately predict clinical benefit of therapy. This review provides an overview of the current murine models used to study lung cancer and the advantages and limitations of each model, as well as a retrospective evaluation of the uses of each model with respect to accuracy in predicting clinical benefit of therapy. A better understanding of murine models and their uses, as well as their limitations may aid future research concerning the development and implementation of new targeted therapies and chemotherapeutic agents for lung cancer. PMID:26064932

  19. Experimental pretargeting studies of cancer with a humanized anti-CEA x murine anti-[In-DTPA] bispecific antibody construct and a (99m)Tc-/(188)Re-labeled peptide.

    PubMed

    Karacay, H; McBride, W J; Griffiths, G L; Sharkey, R M; Barbet, J; Hansen, H J; Goldenberg, D M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to localize (99m)Tc and (188)Re radionuclides to tumors, using a bispecific antibody (bsMAb) in a two-step approach where the radionuclides are attached to novel peptides incorporating moieties recognized by one arm of the bsMAb. A chemically cross-linked human/murine bsMAb, hMN-14 x 734 (Fab' x Fab'), anti-carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA] x anti-indium-DTPA was prepared as a prelude to constructing a fully humanized bsMAb for future clinical application. N,N'-o-Phenylenedimaleimide was used to cross-link the Fab' fragments of the two antibodies at their hinge regions. This construct was shown to be >92% pure and fully reactive with CEA and a divalent (indium)DTPA-peptide. For pretargeting purposes, a peptide, IMP-192 [Ac-Lys(In-DTPA)-Tyr-Lys(In-DTPA)-Lys(TscG-Cys-)-NH(2) ¿TscG = 3-thiosemicarbazonylglyoxyl¿], with two indium-DTPAs and a chelate for selectively binding (99m)Tc or (188)Re, was synthesized. IMP-192 was formulated in a "single dose" kit and later radiolabeled with (99m)Tc (94-99%) at up to 1836 Ci/mmol and with (188)Re (97%) at 459-945 Ci/mmol of peptide. [(99m)Tc]IMP-192 was shown to be stable by extensive in vitro and in vivo testing and had no specific uptake in the tumor with minimal renal uptake. The biodistribution of the hMN-14 x murine 734 bsMAb was compared alone and in a pretargeting setting to a fully murine anti-CEA (F6) x 734 bsMAb that was reported previously [Gautherot, E., Bouhou, J., LeDoussal, J.-M., Manetti, C., Martin, M., Rouvier, E., and Barbet, J. (1997) Therapy for colon carcinoma xenografts with bispecific antibody-targeted, iodine-131-labeled bivalent hapten. Cancer 80 (Suppl.), 2618-2623]. Both bsMAbs maintained their integrity and dual binding specificity in vivo, but the hMN-14 x m734 was cleared more rapidly from the blood. This coincided with an increased uptake of the hMN-14 x m734 bsMAb in the liver and spleen, suggesting an active reticuloendothelial cell recognition mechanism of this mixed

  20. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Parola, P.; Vogelaers, D.; Roure, C.; Janbon, F.; Raoult, D.

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers. PMID:9866749

  1. Antibacterial activity of recombinant murine beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, T; Tanaka, A

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant murine beta interferon was protective and therapeutic for mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection in vivo. The recombinant murine beta interferon caused enhanced H2O2 release by macrophages in vivo, but not in vitro. PMID:3343048

  2. Immunosuppressive effect of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Loh, L; Hudson, J B

    1980-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus suppressed the ability of spleen cells to respond to mitogens in vitro. The degree of suppression was proportional to the multiplicity of infection. This effect could not be explained by cytolysis of lymphocytes, an alteration in the kinetics of the response to mitogen, or a direct competition between virions and mitogen molecules for cell-surface receptors. Nor was it due to simple contact between cell and virus, since ultraviolet-inactivated murine cytomegalovirus failed to suppress the response to mitogens. Reconstitution experiments were performed which involved mixing various combinations of infected and uninfected macrophages and lymphocytes. Under these conditions, it was found that the infected macrophages and lymphocytes. Under these conditions, it was found that the infected macrophages had an impaired capacity to mediate the response ot T lymphocytes to concanavalin A. This suggests that murine cytomegalovirus may cause immunosuppression indirectly by interfering with macrophage function. PMID:6244228

  3. Antimicrobial proteins of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, P S; Eisenhauer, P B; Harwig, S S; van den Barselaar, M T; van Furth, R; Lehrer, R I

    1993-01-01

    Three murine microbicidal proteins (MUMPs) were purified from cells of the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 that had been activated by gamma interferon. Similar proteins were also present in nonactivated RAW264.7 cells, in cells of the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, and in resident and activated murine peritoneal macrophages. MUMP-1, MUMP-2, and MUMP-3 killed Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. MUMP-1 resembled an H1 histone but was unusual because its N-terminal residue (serine) was not N acetylated. Although MUMP-2 was N terminally blocked, its high lysine/arginine ratio and its reactivity with an antibody to H1 histones suggested that it also belonged to the H1 histone family. MUMP-3 was identical to histone H2B in 30 of 30 amino-terminal residues. Although the antimicrobial properties of histones have been recognized for decades, this is the first evidence that such proteins may endow the lysosomal apparatus of macrophages with nonoxidative antimicrobial potential. Other MUMPs, including some with a more restricted antimicrobial spectrum and one that appeared to be induced in RAW264.7 cells after gamma interferon stimulation, were noted but remain to be characterized. Images PMID:8514411

  4. Measurement and interpretation of electrocardiographic QT intervals in murine hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Wu, JingJing; King, James H; Huang, Christopher L-H; Fraser, James A

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in ECG QT intervals correlate with the risk of potentially fatal arrhythmias, for which transgenic murine hearts are becoming increasingly useful experimental models. However, QT intervals are poorly defined in murine ECGs. As a consequence, several different techniques have been used to measure murine QT intervals. The present work develops a consistent measure of the murine QT interval that correlates with changes in the duration of ventricular myocyte action potentials (APs). Volume-conducted ECGs were compared with simultaneously recorded APs, obtained using floating intracellular microelectrodes in Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts. QT intervals were measured from the onset of the QRS complex. The interval, Q-APR90, measured to the time at 90% AP recovery, was compared with two measures of the QT interval. QT1 was measured to the recovery of the ECG trace to the isoelectric baseline for entirely positive T-waves or to the trough of any negative T-wave undershoot. QT2-used extensively in previous studies-was measured to the return of any ECG trough to the isoelectric baseline. QT1, but not QT2, closely correlated with changes in Q-APR90. These findings were confirmed over a range of pacing rates, in low K(+) concentration solutions, and in Scn5a+/ΔKPQ hearts used to model human long QT syndrome. Application of this method in whole anesthetized mice similarly demonstrated a prolonged corrected QT (QTc) in Scn5a+/ΔKPQ hearts. We therefore describe a robust method for the determination of QT and QTc intervals that correlate with the duration of ventricular myocyte APs in murine hearts. PMID:24705556

  5. Cross-reactivity of autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with murine collagen VII.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Kinga; Sesarman, Alina; Oswald, Eva; Feldrihan, Vasile; Fritsch, Anja; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sitaru, Cassian

    2010-04-01

    The pathomechanism of antibody-mediated tissue damage in autoimmune diseases can be best studied in experimental models by passively transferring specific autoantibodies into animals. The reproduction of the disease in animals depends on several factors, including the cross-reactivity of patient autoantibodies with the animal tissue. Here, we show that autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease, recognize multiple epitopes on murine collagen VII. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that EBA patients' IgG cross-reacts with mouse skin. Overlapping, recombinant fragments of murine collagen VII were used to characterize the reactivity of EBA sera and to map the epitopes on the murine antigen by ELISA and immunoblotting. The patients' autoantibody binding to murine collagen VII triggered pathogenic events as demonstrated by a complement fixing and an ex vivo granulocyte-dependent dermal-epidermal separation assay. These findings should greatly facilitate the development of improved disease models and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20084423

  6. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  7. Differential effects of processing time and duration of collagenase digestion on human and murine fat grafts

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, SA; Tannan, ST; Cao, Y; Peirce, SM; Lin, KY

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous fat graft retention is unpredictable and mechanisms of optimization are poorly understood. Attempts at improving retention utilize collagenase experimentally and clinically to isolate the stromal vascular fraction to “enhance” fat grafts. However, no standardized duration for collagenase digestion or time following fat graft harvest has been established. This study investigates the effect of 1.) time after fat graft harvest and 2.) collagenase digestion time on interstitial cell and adipocyte viability in murine fat and human lipoaspirate. Methods Murine fat and human lipoaspirate were incubated ex vivo after harvest at room temperature for 120 minutes. Additional groups were incubated with collagenase for increasing five minute intervals from 30-60 minutes. Samples from each group were stained with BODIPY to quantify intact adipocytes and LIVE/DEAD kit to quantify interstitial cell viability. Results With increased time post-harvest, the number of intact adipocytes in murine fat and human lipoaspirate remained unchanged. Human interstitial cells were resistant to the effect of increased time ex vivo, while murine interstitial cells decreased in viability. In both populations, increased collagenase digestion time significantly decreased the number of viable adipocytes (murine: p-value ≤ 0.001, human: p-value ≤ 0.001) and interstitial cells (murine: p-value ≤ 0.001, human: p-value ≤ 0.001). Conclusions Human and murine adipocytes and human interstitial cells appear resistant to deleterious effects of increasing time following harvest. However, murine interstitial cells including are sensitive to increased time and prolonged collagenase digestion. These studies highlight the complex cellular components of fat grafts and how they respond differentially to time and collagenase digestion. PMID:26218393

  8. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD. PMID:26811642

  9. Murine leukemia virus envelope gp70 is a shared biomarker for the high-sensitivity quantification of murine tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Scrimieri, Francesca; Askew, David; Corn, David J; Eid, Saada; Bobanga, Iuliana D; Bjelac, Jaclyn A; Tsao, Matthew L; Allen, Frederick; Othman, Youmna S; Wang, Shih-Chung G; Huang, Alex Y

    2013-01-01

    The preclinical development of anticancer drugs including immunotherapeutics and targeted agents relies on the ability to detect minimal residual tumor burden as a measure of therapeutic efficacy. Real-time quantitative (qPCR) represents an exquisitely sensitive method to perform such an assessment. However, qPCR-based applications are limited by the availability of a genetic defect associated with each tumor model under investigation. Here, we describe an off-the-shelf qPCR-based approach to detect a broad array of commonly used preclinical murine tumor models. In particular, we report that the mRNA coding for the envelope glycoprotein 70 (gp70) encoded by the endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is universally expressed in 22 murine cancer cell lines of disparate histological origin but is silent in 20 out of 22 normal mouse tissues. Further, we detected the presence of as few as 100 tumor cells in whole lung extracts using qPCR specific for gp70, supporting the notion that this detection approach has a higher sensitivity as compared with traditional tissue histology methods. Although gp70 is expressed in a wide variety of tumor cell lines, it was absent in inflamed tissues, non-transformed cell lines, or pre-cancerous lesions. Having a high-sensitivity biomarker for the detection of a wide range of murine tumor cells that does not require additional genetic manipulations or the knowledge of specific genetic alterations present in a given neoplasm represents a unique experimental tool for investigating metastasis, assessing antitumor therapeutic interventions, and further determining tumor recurrence or minimal residual disease. PMID:24482753

  10. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jennifer S; Gritz, Emily C; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Hirschi, Karen K

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  11. Eliminating Murine Norovirus by Cross-Fostering

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Laurence U.; DeRitis, Pierina C.; Chu, Niansheng; Conti, Pierre A.

    2011-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a newly discovered and extremely prevalent pathogen of laboratory mouse colonies. MNV causes severe disease in some immunocompromised mouse strains and can cause persistent infections even in immunocompetent mice. Despite the fact that immunocompetent mice are generally asymptomatic, the possibility that MNV infection might alter immune responses makes its eradication a potentially useful goal for many facilities. Initial attempts by others to use a strategy of testing and culling were unsuccessful, whereas complete depopulation and facility decontamination was successful. However, these measures may be impractical, and finding less drastic approaches seemed prudent. Based on a report that cross-fostering of pups from MNV-positive mothers to MNV-negative ones could be successful in experimental MNV infection, we undertook a comprehensive fostering program using Swiss Webster mothers, careful sanitary measures, and fecal PCR testing to eradicate the virus from a mouse colony recently infected with MNV. We successfully decontaminated 17 of 18 (94%) litters and managed to prevent spread when a new MNV-infected mouse strain entered quarantine at our facility. These results suggest that cross-fostering, when performed in a setting of excellent sanitary procedures, may be practical for the large number of mouse facilities in which MNV is endemic. PMID:21838978

  12. Intestinal permeability and contractility in murine colitis.

    PubMed Central

    van Meeteren, M E; van Bergeijk, J D; van Dijk, A P; Tak, C J; Meijssen, M A; Zijlstra, F J

    1998-01-01

    We developed an in vitro organ bath method to measure permeability and contractility simultaneously in murine intestinal segments. To investigate whether permeability and contractility are correlated and influenced by mucosal damage owing to inflammation, BALB/c mice were exposed to a 10% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) solution for 8 days to induce colitis. The effect of pharmacologically induced smooth muscle relaxation and contraction on permeability was tested in vitro. Regional permeability differences were observed in both control and 10% DSS-treated mice. Distal colon segments were less permeable to 3H-mannitol and 14C-PEG 400 molecules compared with proximal colon and ileum. Intestinal permeability in control vs. 10% DSS mice was not altered, although histologic inflammation score and IFN-gamma pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were significantly increased in proximal and distal colon. IL-1beta levels were enhanced in these proximal and distal segments, but not significantly different from controls. Any effect of pharmacologically induced contractility on intestinal permeability could not be observed. In conclusion, intestinal permeability and contractility are not correlated in this model of experimentally induced colitis in mice. Although simultaneous measurement in a physiological set-up is possible, this method has to be further validated. PMID:9705603

  13. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  14. Protective role of murine norovirus against Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Thépaut, Marion; Grandjean, Teddy; Hober, Didier; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bortolotti, Perrine; Faure, Karine; Dessein, Rodrigue; Kipnis, Eric; Guery, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered mouse pathogen, representing the most common contaminant in laboratory mouse colonies. Nevertheless, the effects of MNV infection on biomedical research are still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that MNV infection could alter immune response in mice with acute lung infection. Here we report that co-infection with MNV increases survival of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute lung injury and decreases in vivo production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that MNV infection can deeply modify the parameters studied in conventional models of infection and lead to false conclusions in experimental models. PMID:26338794

  15. IL-10 regulates murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhinan; Bahtiyar, Gul; Zhang, Na; Liu, Lanzhen; Zhu, Ping; Robert, Marie E; McNiff, Jennifer; Madaio, Michael P; Craft, Joe

    2002-08-15

    MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6(lpr) (MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr); MRL-Fas(lpr)) mice develop a spontaneous lupus syndrome closely resembling human systemic lupus erythematosus. To define the role of IL-10 in the regulation of murine lupus, IL-10 gene-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) MRL-Fas(lpr) (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-)) mice were generated and their disease phenotype was compared with littermates with one or two copies of an intact IL-10 locus (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/-) and MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/+) mice, respectively). MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice developed severe lupus, with earlier appearance of skin lesions, increased lymphadenopathy, more severe glomerulonephritis, and higher mortality than their IL-10-intact littermate controls. The increased severity of lupus in MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice was closely associated with enhanced IFN-gamma production by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells and increased serum concentration of IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibodies. The protective effect of IL-10 in this lupus model was further supported by the observation that administration of rIL-10 reduced IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibody production in wild-type MRL-Fas(lpr) animals. In summary, our results provide evidence that IL-10 can down-modulate murine lupus through inhibition of pathogenic Th1 cytokine responses. Modulation of the level of IL-10 may be of potential therapeutic benefit for human lupus. PMID:12165544

  16. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIFFERENT EMISSION PARTICLES IN MURINE PULMONARY EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative Toxicity of Different Emission Particles in Murine Pulmonary Epithelial Cells and Macrophages. T Stevens1, M Daniels2, P Singh2, M I Gilmour2. 1 UNC, Chapel Hill 27599 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    Epidemiological studies have shown ...

  17. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  18. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  19. Chemoimmunotherapy of murine bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Stogdill, B J; Lamm, D L; Livingston, R B

    1981-11-01

    The lethality of invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) has prompted a search for effective, minimally toxic, adjuvant therapy. Such agents were evaluated in a murine bladder cancer (MBT2) model which parallels the clinical disease. One hundred C3H/He mice were inoculated i.d. with 2.5 x 10(4) viable MBT2 tumor cells and randomized to receive either normal saline (control), cis-Platinum (CPT), cyclophosphamide (CY), methotrexate (MTX), BCG, (CY + MTX), or (CY + MTX + BCG). Chemotherapy was given intraperitoneally weekly starting on day 7 after inoculation. Immunotherapy was given intralesionally on days 1 and 10 only. All mice were treated for 5 weeks followed by 5 weeks of observation. At 5 weeks, tumors of mice receiving cyclophosphamide alone or either of the combinations of therapy were smaller (P less than 0.01) than tumors of controls or other single agents alone. Each regimen increased survival, but only the combination regimen increase survival significantly (P less than 0.01). In the doses and schedule used in this model. Combination chemotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy significantly delay tumor growth and increase duration of survival (P less than 0.01) when compared with controls or single agent groups. PMID:7298287

  20. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY TO PARATHION POISONING FOLLOWING MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased Susceptibility to Parathion Poisoning Following Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection. Fifty to 100 percent mortality occurred in mice treated with ordinarily sublethal doses of parathion 2 to 5 days post infection with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). These mortalities appear...

  1. Murine typhus in Kuwait in 1978

    PubMed Central

    Al-Awadi, Abdul Rahman; Al-Kazemi, Nouri; Ezzat, Gaafar; Saah, Alfred J.; Shepard, Charles; Zaghloul, Talaat; Gherdian, Beatriz

    1982-01-01

    Murine typhus occurred in 254 individuals in Kuwait between April and August 1978; 81% of patients were aged between 15 and 44 years, and 63% were male. The highest attack rate occurred among people in the lowest socioeconomic class. The outbreak coincided with a period of high rat and flea density. A study of the first 104 cases suggested that infection was acquired in the home, but a case — control study revealed no significant differences between patients and control subjects in terms of exposure to rats or domestic animals, and other factors. This suggests that murine typhus is hyperendemic rather than epidemic in Kuwait. The disease is being controlled through reduction of both flea and rat populations. Murine typhus may be much more common in many areas than is generally realized, and its status should be re-evaluated regularly in all known and potential foci. PMID:6980739

  2. Murine Norovirus: Propagation, Quantification and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seungmin; Alhatlani, Bader; Arias, Armando; Caddy, Sarah L; Christodoulou, Constantina; Cunha, Juliana; Emmott, Ed; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta; Kolawole, Abimbola; Lu, Jia; Rippinger, Christine; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Thorne, Lucy; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a positive-sense, plus-stranded RNA virus in the Caliciviridae family. It is the most common pathogen in biomedical research colonies. MNV is also related to the human noroviruses, which cause the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Like the human noroviruses, MNV is an enteric virus that replicates in the intestine and is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. MNV replicates in murine macrophages and dendritic cells in cells in culture and in the murine host. This virus is often used to study mechanisms in norovirus biology, because the human noroviruses are refractory to growth in cell culture. MNV combines the availability of a cell culture and reverse genetics system with the ability to study infection in the native host. Herein, we describe a panel of techniques that are commonly used to study MNV biology. PMID:24789596

  3. Fluorescence tomography in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Kumar, Anand T. N.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.

    2007-02-01

    Noninvasive molecular imaging of amyloid plaques in murine Alzheimer's disease models would accelerate drug development and basic Alzheimer's research. Amyloid plaques differ from traditional fluorescent targets in size and spatial distribution and therefore present a unique challenge for biomarker development and tomography. To study imaging feasibility and establish biomarker criteria, we developed a digital mouse head model from a 100 μm-resolution, digital, segmented mouse atlas1. The cortical region of the brain was filled with a spatially uniform distribution of plaques that had different fluorescent properties from the surrounding brain tissue, similar to current transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence was simulated with a Monte Carlo algorithm using different plaque densities, detection geometries, and background fluorescence. Our preliminary results demonstrated that shielding effects might require nonlinear reconstruction algorithms and that background fluorescence would seriously hinder quantitative burden estimation. The Monte Carlo based approach presented here offers a powerful way to study the feasibility of non-invasive imaging in murine Alzheimer's models and to optimize experimental conditions.

  4. Murine Models of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elshafa Hassan; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B-lymphotropic gamma herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies. Most EBV-related cancers present complex medical management challenges; thus it has been essential to develop preclinical in vivo models allowing for the study of pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Early in vivo models used nonhuman primates; however, such models were limited by the inability of EBV to achieve viral latency, availability, and cost. Immunodeficient mouse strains emerged as efficient models that allow for engraftment of human mononuclear cells and controlled evaluation of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). By using highly immunodeficient strains of mice such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid ILrg(-/-)(NOG) mice, investigators have developed efficient platforms for evaluating pathogenesis of benign (HLH) and malignant (EBV-LPD) diseases associated with EBV. Humanized murine chimeric models have been essential tools for evaluating preventive strategies with vaccine and adoptive cellular approaches, as well as development of experimental therapeutic strategies. Manipulation of the human immune cells before engraftment or mutation of viral lytic and latent genes has enhanced our understanding of the oncogenic nature of EBV and the complexity of human immune responses to EBV. In this review, we discuss how the EBV murine models have evolved to become essential tools for studying the virology of EBV as it relates to human EBV-LPD pathogenesis, the immunobiology of innate and adaptive responses, and limitations of these models. PMID:27034395

  5. Murine neonatal intravascular injections: Modeling newborn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to perform murine neonatal intravascular injections likely will prove useful in studying many newborn-specific disease states that are modeled in mice. Unfortunately, effective intravascular injection in the neonatal mouse has been limited by developmental immaturity and small size. To e...

  6. Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa Extract Attenuates DSS-Induced Murine Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kang Min

    2016-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa (AAK) extract on a murine model of acute experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water of male C57BL/6 mice, for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of AAK extract (500 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated DSS-induced symptoms such as anorexia, weight loss, events of diarrhea or bloody stools, and colon shortening. Histological damage was also ameliorated, as evidenced by the architectural preservation and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in colonic samples. Treatment improved the colonic mRNA expression of different inflammatory markers: cytokines, inducible enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases, and tight junction-related proteins. In the isolated serum, IgE levels were downregulated. Collectively, these findings indicate the therapeutic potentials of AAK as an effective complementary or alternative modality for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. PMID:27293323

  7. Multiphoton Imaging of Ultrasound Bioeffects in the Murine Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott; Skoch, Jesse; Bacskai, Brian; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of multiphoton imaging in the murine brain during exposure to ultrasound. Our experimental setup coupled ultrasound through the ventral surface of the mouse while allowing imaging through a cranial window from the dorsal surface. Field attenuation was estimated by scanning the field after insertion of a freshly sacrificed mouse; beam profile and peak position were preserved, suggesting adequate targeting for imaging experiments. C57 mice were imaged with a Biorad multiphoton microscope while being exposed to ultrasound (f = 1.029 MHz, peak pressure ˜ 200 kPa, average power ˜ 0.18 W) with IV injection of Optison. We observed strong vasoconstriction coincident with US and Optison, as well as permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier.

  8. Murine granulated metrial gland cells are susceptible to Chlamydia psittaci infection in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, J; Buendía, A J; Salinas, J; Bernabé, A; Rodolakis, A; Stewart, I J

    1996-01-01

    Granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells are the most numerous lymphoid cells in the uteroplacental unit in rodent pregnancy. In an experimental murine model of abortion-causing infection, we have studied the responses of GMG cells to Chlamydia psittaci. Chlamydial inclusions have been found within GMG cells, both in apparently healthy cells and in cells with degenerative changes. Establishing the existence of GMG cells infected by C. psittaci opens a new and interesting chapter in the study of these cells. PMID:8751945

  9. Hyperlipidemia affects multiscale structure and strength of murine femur

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Lutz, Andre; Du, Xia; Klimecky, Laureen; Kawas, Neal; Hourany, Talia; Jahng, Joelle; Chin, Jesse; Tintut, Yin; Nackenhors, Udo; Keyak, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    To improve bone strength prediction beyond limitations of assessment founded solely on the bone mineral component, we investigated the effect of hyperlipidemia, present in more than 40% of osteoporotic patients, on multiscale structure of murine bone. Our overarching purpose is to estimate bone strength accurately, to facilitate mitigating fracture morbidity and mortality in patients. Because i) orientation of collagen type I affects, independently of degree of mineralization, cortical bone’s micro-structural strength; and, ii) hyperlipidemia affects collagen orientation and µCT volumetric tissue mineral density (vTMD) in murine cortical bone, we have constructed the first multiscale finite element (mFE), mouse-specific femoral model to study the effect of collagen orientation and vTMD on strength in Ldlr−/−, a mouse model of hyperlipidemia, and its control wild type, on either high fat diet or normal diet. Each µCT scan-based mFE model included either element-specific elastic orthotropic properties calculated from collagen orientation and vTMD (collagen-density model) by experimentally validated formulation, or usual element-specific elastic isotropic material properties dependent on vTMD-only (density-only model). We found that collagen orientation, assessed by circularly polarized light and confocal microscopies, and vTMD, differed among groups; and that microindentation results strongly correlate with elastic modulus of collagen-density models (r2=0.85, p=10−5). Collagen-density models yielded 1) larger strains, and therefore lower strength, in simulations of 3-point bending and physiological loading; and 2) higher correlation between mFE-predicted strength and 3-point bending experimental strength, than density-only models. This novel method supports ongoing translational research to achieve the as yet elusive goal of accurate bone strength prediction. PMID:24795172

  10. Hyperlipidemia affects multiscale structure and strength of murine femur.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Lutz, Andre; Du, Xia; Klimecky, Laureen; Kawas, Neal; Hourany, Talia; Jahng, Joelle; Chin, Jesse; Tintut, Yin; Nackenhors, Udo; Keyak, Joyce

    2014-07-18

    To improve bone strength prediction beyond limitations of assessment founded solely on the bone mineral component, we investigated the effect of hyperlipidemia, present in more than 40% of osteoporotic patients, on multiscale structure of murine bone. Our overarching purpose is to estimate bone strength accurately, to facilitate mitigating fracture morbidity and mortality in patients. Because (i) orientation of collagen type I affects, independently of degree of mineralization, cortical bone׳s micro-structural strength; and, (ii) hyperlipidemia affects collagen orientation and μCT volumetric tissue mineral density (vTMD) in murine cortical bone, we have constructed the first multiscale finite element (mFE), mouse-specific femoral model to study the effect of collagen orientation and vTMD on strength in Ldlr(-/-), a mouse model of hyperlipidemia, and its control wild type, on either high fat diet or normal diet. Each µCT scan-based mFE model included either element-specific elastic orthotropic properties calculated from collagen orientation and vTMD (collagen-density model) by experimentally validated formulation, or usual element-specific elastic isotropic material properties dependent on vTMD-only (density-only model). We found that collagen orientation, assessed by circularly polarized light and confocal microscopies, and vTMD, differed among groups and that microindentation results strongly correlate with elastic modulus of collagen-density models (r(2)=0.85, p=10(-5)). Collagen-density models yielded (1) larger strains, and therefore lower strength, in simulations of 3-point bending and physiological loading; and (2) higher correlation between mFE-predicted strength and 3-point bending experimental strength, than density-only models. This novel method supports ongoing translational research to achieve the as yet elusive goal of accurate bone strength prediction. PMID:24795172

  11. Caspase deficiency alters the murine gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, B M; Hildebrand, F; Kubica, M; Goosens, D; Del Favero, J; Declercq, W; Raes, J; Vandenabeele, P

    2011-01-01

    Caspases are aspartate-specific cysteine proteases that have an essential role in apoptosis and inflammation, and contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis in the intestine. These facts, together with the knowledge that caspases are implicated in host-microbe crosstalk, prompted us to investigate the effect of caspase (Casp)1, -3 and -7 deficiency on the composition of the murine gut microbiota. We observed significant changes in the abundance of the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla, in particular the Lachnospiraceae, Porphyromonodaceae and Prevotellacea families, when comparing Casp-1, -7 and -3 knockout mice with wild-type mice. Our data point toward an intricate relationship between these caspases and the composition of the murine gut microflora. PMID:22012254

  12. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  13. Myositis in a Child with Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Sheshashree; Fergie, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with fever, lower extremity pain and weakness. Examination revealed paraparesis, thigh and calf tenderness. Labs showed high creatinine phosphokinase and Rickettsia typhi titers. This case illustrates endemic typhus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of myositis especially in areas with high prevalence of the disease. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of myositis and paraparesis associated with a case of murine typhus. PMID:24757508

  14. Cone inputs to murine striate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ekesten, Björn; Gouras, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background We have recorded responses from single neurons in murine visual cortex to determine the effectiveness of the input from the two murine cone photoreceptor mechanisms and whether there is any unique selectivity for cone inputs at this higher region of the visual system that would support the possibility of colour vision in mice. Each eye was stimulated by diffuse light, either 370 (strong stimulus for the ultra-violet (UV) cone opsin) or 505 nm (exclusively stimulating the middle wavelength sensitive (M) cone opsin), obtained from light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the presence of a strong adapting light that suppressed the responses of rods. Results Single cells responded to these diffuse stimuli in all areas of striate cortex. Two types of responsive cells were encountered. One type (135/323 – 42%) had little to no spontaneous activity and responded at either the on and/or the off phase of the light stimulus with a few impulses often of relatively large amplitude. A second type (166/323 – 51%) had spontaneous activity and responded tonically to light stimuli with impulses often of small amplitude. Most of the cells responded similarly to both spectral stimuli. A few (18/323 – 6%) responded strongly or exclusively to one or the other spectral stimulus and rarely in a spectrally opponent manner. Conclusion Most cells in murine striate cortex receive excitatory inputs from both UV- and M-cones. A small fraction shows either strong selectivity for one or the other cone mechanism and occasionally cone opponent responses. Cells that could underlie chromatic contrast detection are present but extremely rare in murine striate cortex. PMID:19014590

  15. Force-Induced Craniosynostosis in the Murine Sagittal Suture

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Rhee, Samuel T.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The etiology of non-syndromic craniosynostosis remains elusive. While compressive forces have been implicated in premature suture fusion, conclusive evidence of force-induced craniosynostosis is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if cyclical loading of the murine calvarium could induce suture fusion. METHODS Calvarial coupons from post-natal day 21, B6CBA wild-type mice (n = 18) were harvested and cultured. A custom appliance capable of delivering controlled, cyclical, compressive loads was applied perpendicular to the sagittal suture within the coupon in vitro. Nine coupons were subjected to 0.3g of force for 30 minutes each day for a total of 14 days. A control group of nine coupons was clamped in the appliance without loading. Analysis of suture phenotype was performed using alkaline phosphatase and H&E staining techniques, as well as in situ hybridization analysis using Bone Sialoprotein (BSP). RESULTS Control group sagittal sutures—which normally remain patent in mice—showed their customary histological appearance. In contradistinction, sagittal sutures subjected to cyclic loading showed histological evidence of premature fusion (craniosynostosis). In addition, alkaline phosphatase activity and BSP expression was observed to be increased in the experimental group when compared to matched controls. CONCLUSIONS An in vitro model of forced-induced craniosynostosis has been devised. Premature fusion of the murine sagittal suture was induced with the application of controlled, cyclical, compressive loads. These results implicate abnormal forces in the development of non-syndromic craniosynostosis, which supports our global hypothesis that epigenetic phenomena have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. PMID:19952640

  16. Murine fundus fluorescein angiography: An alternative approach using a handheld camera.

    PubMed

    Ehrenberg, Moshe; Ehrenberg, Scott; Schwob, Ouri; Benny, Ofra

    2016-07-01

    In today's modern pharmacologic approach to treating sight-threatening retinal vascular disorders, there is an increasing demand for a compact, mobile, lightweight and cost-effective fluorescein fundus camera to document the effects of antiangiogenic drugs on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in mice and other experimental animals. We have adapted the use of the Kowa Genesis Df Camera to perform Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA) in mice. The 1 kg, 28 cm high camera has built-in barrier and exciter filters to allow digital FFA recording to a Compact Flash memory card. Furthermore, this handheld unit has a steady Indirect Lens Holder that firmly attaches to the main unit, that securely holds a 90 diopter lens in position, in order to facilitate appropriate focus and stability, for photographing the delicate central murine fundus. This easily portable fundus fluorescein camera can effectively record exceptional central retinal vascular detail in murine laser-induced CNV, while readily allowing the investigator to adjust the camera's position according to the variable head and eye movements that can randomly occur while the mouse is optimally anesthetized. This movable image recording device, with efficiencies of space, time, cost, energy and personnel, has enabled us to accurately document the alterations in the central choroidal and retinal vasculature following induction of CNV, implemented by argon-green laser photocoagulation and disruption of Bruch's Membrane, in the experimental murine model of exudative macular degeneration. PMID:27260483

  17. Usefulness of the murine model to study the immune response against Histoplasma capsulatum infection.

    PubMed

    Sahaza, Jorge H; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Zenteno, Edgar; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2014-05-01

    The present paper is an overview of the primary events that are associated with the histoplasmosis immune response in the murine model. Valuable data that have been recorded in the scientific literature have contributed to an improved understanding of the clinical course of this systemic mycosis, which is caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Data must be analyzed carefully, given that misinterpretation could be generated because most of the available information is based on experimental host-parasite interactions that used inappropriate proceedings, i.e., the non-natural route of infection with the parasitic and virulent fungal yeast-phase, which is not the usual infective phase of the etiological agent of this mycosis. Thus, due to their versatility, complexity, and similarities with humans, several murine models have played a fundamental role in exploring the host-parasite interaction during H. capsulatum infection. PMID:24766724

  18. A pre-clinical murine model of oral implant osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Mouraret, S.; Hunter, D.J.; Bardet, C.; Brunski, J.B.; Bouchard, P.; Helms, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Many of our assumptions concerning oral implant osseointegration are extrapolated from experimental models studying skeletal tissue repair in long bones. This disconnect between clinical practice and experimental research hampers our understanding of bone formation around oral implants and how this process can be improved. We postulated that oral implant osseointegration would be fundamentally equivalent to implant osseointegration elsewhere in the body. Mice underwent implant placement in the edentulous ridge anterior to the first molar and peri-implant tissues were evaluated at various timepoints after surgery. Our hypothesis was disproven; oral implant osseointegration is substantially different from osseointegration in long bones. For example, in the maxilla peri-implant pre-osteoblasts are derived from cranial neural crest whereas in the tibia peri-implant osteoblasts are derived from mesoderm. In the maxilla, new osteoid arises from periostea of the maxillary bone but in the tibia the new osteoid arises from the marrow space. Cellular and molecular analyses indicate that osteoblast activity and mineralization proceeds from the surfaces of the native bone and osteoclastic activity is responsible for extensive remodeling of the new peri-implant bone. In addition to histologic features of implant osseointegration, molecular and cellular assays conducted in a murine model provide new insights into the sequelae of implant placement and the process by which bone is generated around implants. PMID:23886841

  19. Murine Cytomegalovirus Exploits Olfaction To Enter New Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Lawler, Clara; Tan, Cindy S. E.; MacDonald, Kate; Bruce, Kimberley; Mach, Michael; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Viruses transmit via the environmental and social interactions of their hosts. Herpesviruses have colonized mammals since their earliest origins, suggesting that they exploit ancient, common pathways. Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) are assumed to enter new hosts orally, but no site has been identified. We show by live imaging that murine CMV (MCMV) infects nasally rather than orally, both after experimental virus uptake and during natural transmission. Replication-deficient virions revealed the primary target as olfactory neurons. Local, nasal replication by wild-type MCMV was not extensive, but there was rapid systemic spread, associated with macrophage infection. A long-term, transmissible infection was then maintained in the salivary glands. The viral m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which influences tropism, promoted salivary gland colonization after nasal entry but was not required for entry per se. The capacity of MCMV to transmit via olfaction, together with previous demonstrations of experimental olfactory infection by murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), suggest that this is a common, conserved route of mammalian herpesvirus entry. PMID:27118588

  20. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Rahat F.; Bouyer, Donald H.; Walker, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials. PMID:25695758

  1. Sexual dimorphism of Murine Masticatory Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, David W.; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2008-01-01

    (1) Objective To determine if gender distinctions of force generating capacity existed in murine masticatory muscles. (2) Design In order to investigate the effect of sex on force generating capacity in this muscle group, an isolated muscle preparation was developed utilizing the murine anterior deep masseter. Age-matched male and female mice were utilized to assess function, muscle fiber type and size in this muscle. (3) Results Maximum isometric force production was not different between age-matched male and female mice. However, the rate of force generation and relaxation was slower in female masseter muscles. Assessment of fiber type distribution by immunohistochemistry revealed a threefold decrease in the proportion of myosin heavy chain 2b positive fibers in female masseters, which correlated with the differences in contraction kinetics. (4) Conclusions These results provide evidence that masticatory muscle strength in mice is not affected by sex, but there are significant distinctions in kinetics associated with force production between males and females. PMID:18028868

  2. Immunocompetent murine models for the study of glioblastoma immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains a lethal diagnosis with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. (NEJM 352:987-96, 2005) Although immunotherapy-based approaches are capable of inducing detectable immune responses against tumor-specific antigens, improvements in clinical outcomes are modest, in no small part due to tumor-induced immunosuppressive mechanisms that promote immune escape and immuno-resistance. Immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at bolstering the immune response while neutralizing immunosuppression will play a critical role in improving treatment outcomes for glioblastoma patients. In vivo murine models of glioma provide an invaluable resource to achieving that end, and their use is an essential part of the preclinical workup for novel therapeutics that need to be tested in animal models prior to testing experimental therapies in patients. In this article, we review five contemporary immunocompetent mouse models, GL261 (C57BL/6), GL26 (C57BL/6) CT-2A (C57BL/6), SMA-560 (VM/Dk), and 4C8 (B6D2F1), each of which offer a suitable platform for testing novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:24779345

  3. Naturally occurring murine norovirus infection in a large research institution.

    PubMed

    Perdue, Kathy A; Green, Kim Y; Copeland, Michelle; Barron, Elyssa; Mandel, Myrna; Faucette, Lawrence J; Williams, Elizabeth M; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Elkins, William R; Ward, Jerrold M

    2007-07-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered infectious agent in mice and may be the most common naturally occurring infection of laboratory mice in North America. In 2005, we surveyed the Swiss Webster female sentinel mice in our institute's research facilities. Of the 4 facilities surveyed, 3 had sentinel mice that were positive for MNV antibodies, whereas our largest facility (which only receives mice directly from select vendors or by embryo rederivation directly into the facility) was apparently MNV-free. However, testing of sentinel mice in this large facility 1 y later found that 2% of the animals had developed MNV-specific antibodies. In a recently opened fifth facility, a serologic survey in 2006 identified MNV-antibody-positive Tac:SW sentinel mice that had received bedding from experimental mice on the same rack quadrant. Reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction analysis of feces from the cages of these mice showed evidence for shedding of MNV. These sentinel mice were used to study the fecal excretion, antibody development, gross lesions upon necropsy, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry of the viral infection. None of the MNV-antibody-positive sentinel mice exhibited clinical signs or gross lesions, but these mice excreted virus in feces and developed antibodies to MNV. Histopathologic lesions consisted only of a few hepatic inflammatory foci in each liver section, some of which were immunoreactive with antibodies to MNV. MNV viral antigens also were present in the mesenteric lymph nodes. PMID:17645294

  4. Role of Cytosolic Calcium Diffusion in Murine Cardiac Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Limbu, Bijay; Shah, Kushal; Weinberg, Seth H.; Deo, Makarand

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Purkinje cells (PCs) are morphologically and electrophysiologically different from ventricular myocytes and, importantly, exhibit distinct calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that PCs are more susceptible to action potential (AP) abnormalities than ventricular myocytes; however, the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we utilized a detailed biophysical mathematical model of a murine PC to systematically examine the role of cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion in shaping the AP in PCs. A biphasic spatiotemporal Ca2+ diffusion process, as recorded experimentally, was implemented in the model. In this study, we investigated the role of cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics on AP and ionic current properties by varying the effective Ca2+ diffusion rate. It was observed that AP morphology, specifically the plateau, was affected due to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. Elevated Ca2+ concentration in the sarcolemmal region activated inward sodium–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) current, resulting in a prolongation of the AP plateau at faster diffusion rates. Artificially clamping the NCX current to control values completely reversed the alterations in the AP plateau, thus confirming the role of NCX in modifying the AP morphology. Our results demonstrate that cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion waves play a significant role in shaping APs of PCs and could provide mechanistic insights in the increased arrhythmogeneity of PCs. PMID:27478391

  5. A novel postoperative immobilization model for murine Achilles tendon sutures.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Yoichiro; Takayama, Yuzo; Kushige, Hiroko; Jacinto, Sandra; Sekido, Mitsuru; Kida, Yasuyuki S

    2016-08-01

    The body's motion and function are all in part effected by a vital tissue, the tendon. Tendon injury often results in limited functioning after postoperative procedures and even for a long time after rehabilitation. Although numerous studies have reported surgical procedures using animal models which have contributed to both basic and clinical research, modeling of tendon sutures or postoperative immobilizations has not been performed on small experimental animals, such as mice. In this study we have developed an easy Achilles tendon suture and postoperative ankle fixation model in a mouse. Right Achilles tendons were incised and 10-0 nylons were passed through the proximal and distal ends using a modified Kessler method. Subsequently, the right ankle was immobilized in a plantarflexed position with novel splints, which were made from readily available extension tubes. Restriction of the tendon using handmade splints reduced swelling, as opposed to fixating with the usual plaster of Paris. Using this method, the usage of the right Achilles tendons began on postoperative days 13.5 ± 4.6, which indicated healing within two weeks. Therefore our simple short-term murine Achilles tendon suture procedure is useful for studying immediate tendon repair mechanisms in various models, including genetically-modified mice. PMID:26678297

  6. Current advances of murine models for food allergy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiange; Navarro, Severine; Lopata, Andreas L

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy affects an increasing population in Western world but also developing countries. Researchers have been taking great efforts in identifying and characterising food allergens using molecular tools. However, there are still many mechanistic hypotheses that need to be tested using an appropriate in vivo experimental platform. To date, a number of mouse models for food allergy have been established and provided valuable insights into food allergenicity, development of therapies and allergic inflammation mechanisms. Nevertheless, a large diversity of protocols have been developed for the establishment of relevant mouse models. As a result, comparisons of outcomes between different models are very difficult to be conducted. The phenotypes of mouse models are greatly influenced by genetic background, gender, route of allergen exposure, the nature and concentration of food allergens, as well as the usage of adjuvants. This review focuses on IgE-mediated food allergy, compares the differential approaches in developing appropriate murine models for food allergy and details specific findings for three major food allergens, peanut, milk and shellfish. PMID:26759987

  7. Stabilization of the murine gut microbiome following weaning

    PubMed Central

    Schloss, Patrick D.; Schubert, Alyxandria M.; Zackular, Joseph P.; Iverson, Kathryn D.; Young, Vincent B.; Petrosino, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Ecologists hypothesize that community structure and stability affect productivity, sensitivity to invasion and extinction, and resilience and resistance to perturbations. Viewed in the context of the gut microbiome, the stability of the gut community is important for understanding the effects of antibiotics, diet change and other perturbations on host health and colonization resistance. Here we describe the dynamics of a self-contained community, the murine gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing of fecal samples collected daily from individual mice, we characterized the community membership and structure to determine whether there were significant changes in the gut community during the first year of life. Based on analysis of molecular variance, we observed two community states. The first was observed in the 10 days following weaning and the second was observed by 15 days following weaning. Interestingly, these two states had the same bacterial populations, but those populations had different relative abundances in the two states. By calculating the root mean squared distances between samples collected in the early and late states for each mouse, we observed that the late state was more stable than the early state. This increase in stability was not correlated with increased taxonomic richness, taxonomic diversity, or phylogenetic diversity. In the absence of an experimentally induced perturbation, the second community state was relatively constant through 364 days post weaning. These results suggest a high degree of stability in the microbiome once the community reached the second state. PMID:22688727

  8. Murine and epidemic typhus rickettsiae: how close is their relationship?

    PubMed

    Woodward, T E

    1982-01-01

    Typhus fever has occurred globally as epidemic and endemic disorders. In 1910, Brill reported a typhus-like illness which Zinsser and others determined to be recurrent epidemic typhus fever. Maxcy, in 1926, proposed rodents and fleas as reservoir and vector, respectively, of endemic typhus, which Dyer confirmed in 1930. Animals experimentally infected with epidemic typhus (Rickettsia prowazeki) are immune to murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi) and vice versa. Similar solid cross-immunity exists for humans. The two diseases are clinically similar in pathologic and serologic reactions. Human epidemic typhus presumably involved a man-louse-man cycle without an animal reservoir. This concept is now questioned. Antibodies to R. prowazeki have been reported in livestock in Africa, rats in Manila, and from flying squirrels and humans in the United States. R. prowazeki was recovered from blood specimens of goats, sheep, from ixodid ticks, louse, and flea-ectoparasites of flying squirrels, and tissues of flying squirrels. More than 20 cases of squirrel-related acute epidemic typhus have been reported in the United States. R. prowazeki has not been recovered from human cases. Chemical studies of R. prowazeki and R. typhi show genetic similarities but differences in genome size and degree of hybridization suggest that interconversions between the two agents do not occur rapidly in nature. It is proposed that, with time, their relatedness will become even closer. PMID:6817526

  9. A returned traveller with persistent fever due to murine typhus.

    PubMed

    Ng, C P; Lo, C B; Wong, K K; Chung, C H

    2002-12-01

    Murine (endemic) typhus is a notifiable disease in Hong Kong, but its diagnosis can be difficult. We report a case of murine typhus in a middle-aged man who presented with persistent fever, headache, and skin rash 2 weeks after returning from a visit to China. The diagnosis of murine typhus requires a high index of suspicion for a febrile patient with a history of potential exposure to the disease vector (rat flea) in an endemic area. The importance of early recognition lies in the potential for early therapeutic intervention, leading to decreases in morbidity and duration of stay in hospital. PMID:12459604

  10. Glucocorticoid receptors in murine erythroleukaemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, K.D.; Torrance, J.M.; DiDomenico, M.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors in murine erythroleukaemic cells were studied in relation to hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) induced differentiation. Specific binding of dexamethasone was measured. A single class of saturable, high affinity binding sites was demonstrated in intact cells; with cell homogenates or fractions binding was low and could not be reliably quantified. Receptor binding in whole cell suspensions was lower in cells which had been treated with HMBA (36.5 +/- 8.2 pmol/g protein) than in untreated controls (87.9 +/- 23.6 pmol/g protein); dissociation constants were similar in treated (2.7 nM) and untreated cells (2.5 nM). Dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, corticosterone and progesterone competed with tritium-labelled dexamethasone for receptor binding sites; cortisone, deoxycorticosterone and oestradiol had little effect.

  11. Exploring the translational disconnect between the murine and human inflammatory response: analysis of LPS dose–response relationship in murine versus human cell lines and implications for translation into murine models of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    McCarron, Eamon P; Williams, Dominic P; Antoine, Daniel J; Kipar, Anja; Lemm, Jana; Stehr, Sebastian; Welters, Ingeborg D

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation forms an important part of the human innate immune system and is largely dependent on the activation of the “classical” NF-κB pathway through Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Understanding this has allowed researchers to explore roles of therapeutic targets in managing conditions such as sepsis. Recapitulating an inflammatory response using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a “sterile” technique, can provide information that is dissimilar to the clinical condition. By examining NF-κB activation (through immunoblotting of the p65 subunit) in two separate cell lines (murine and human) and analyzing two murine models of sepsis (intraperitoneal [IP] LPS and IP stool inoculation), an evaluation of the translational disconnect between experimental and clinical sepsis can be made. Methods THP-1 (human) cells and RAW 264.7 (murine) cells were dosed with concentrations of LPS (human, 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL; murine, 30 pg/mL to 1,000 ng/mL) and nuclear actin and p65 were immunoblotted to measure changes in nuclear density. In vivo, C57BL/6 mice received either IP injection of stool suspension (5 µL/g) or LPS (25 mg/kg) or saline (1 mL/kg). Animals were culled at 6 hours and tissues were analyzed. Results An increase in basal p65:actin density in THP-1 cells (mean 0.214, standard error of the mean 0.024) was seen at doses as small as 0.1 ng/mL (0.519±0.064). In contrast to RAW 264.7 cells, basal increases (0.170±0.025) were only seen when a dose of 3 ng/mL (0.387±0.078) was used. Dose–response analysis of p65:actin ratio showed that THP-1 cells respond to lower doses of LPS than RAW 264.7 cells and lower doses produce a greater fold increase in the nuclear p65 density. Both in vivo models showed evidence of neutrophil (NL) recruitment into tissues (which was more intense after LPS treatment). IP stool inoculation resulted in an acute suppurative peritonitis and more substantial evidence of NL recruitment into adipose tissue and skeletal muscle

  12. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R.; Hoffman, Michael D.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-01-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing. PMID:26203392

  13. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    PubMed

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing. PMID:26203392

  14. Novel Microbial Virulence Factor Triggers Murine Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiuli; Qin, Jinhong; Promnares, Kamoltip; Kariu, Toru; Anderson, John F.; Pal, Utpal

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi bba57 is a conserved gene encoding a potential lipoprotein of unknown function. Here we show that bba57 is up-regulated in vivo and is required for early murine infection and potential spirochete transmission process. Although BBA57 is dispensable for late murine infection, the mutants were unable to induce disease. We show that BBA57, an outer membrane and surface-exposed antigen, is a major trigger of murine Lyme arthritis; even in cases of larger challenge inocula, which allow their persistence in joints at a level similar to wild-type spirochetes, bba57 mutants are unable to induce joint inflammation. We further showed that BBA57 deficiency reduces the expression of selected “neutrophil-recruiting” chemokines and associated receptors, causing significant impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis. New approaches to combat Lyme disease may include strategies to interfere with BBA57, a novel virulence factor and a trigger of murine Lyme arthritis. PMID:23303811

  15. Partial characterization of murine migration inhibitory factor (MIF).

    PubMed

    Kühner, A L; David, J R

    1976-01-01

    These studies describe the production of murine migration inhibitory factor (MIF)3 in sufficient quantities to allow its partial characterization by physiochemical and enzymatic methods. MIF was obtained from murine spleen cell cultures (C57BL/6 strain) stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A). Characterization of murine MIF was performed using Sephadex G-100 gel chromatography, isopycnic centrifugation in a CsCl density gradient, polyacrylamide disc electrophoresis, heat stability, and enzymatic treatment. MIF-containing and control fractions were assayed on normal C57BL/6 peritoneal exudate cells by using a microcapillary tube assay. Peak MIF activity was found in a Sephadex G-100 fraction containing molecules the size of albumin and slightly smaller, molecular weight 67,000 to 48,000. Murine MIF was stable to heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min but lost its activity at 80 degrees C for 30 min. Incubation of G-100 fractions containing MIF with water insoluble chymotrypsin destroyed the activity of MIF, indicating its protein nature. CsCl density gradient centrifugation revealed that murine MIF had a buoyand density greater than protein, consistent with its being a glycoprotein. Further, when subjected to disc electrophoresis on polyacylamide gels, murine MIF migrated in a region cathodal to albumin. Thus, mitogen stimulation of murine spleen cells produced MIF in quantities which allowed its partial characterization and purification, and its comparison with human and guinea pig MIF; this makes it feasible to analyze the role of murine MIF in cellular immunity and in its relationship to lymphocyte mediators which regulate humoral immune responses. PMID:1107423

  16. microRNA-222 modulates liver fibrosis in a murine model of biliary atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wen-jun; Dong, Rui; Chen, Gong Zheng, Shan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • The RRV infected group showed cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. • miR-222 was highly expressed, and PPP2R2A was inhibited in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 might represent a potential target for improving biliary atresia prognosis. - Abstract: microRNA-222 (miR-222) has been shown to initiate the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of miR-22 in a mouse model of biliary atresia (BA) induced by Rhesus Rotavirus (RRV) infection. New-born Balb/c mice were randomized into control and RRV infected groups. The extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. The experimental group was divided into BA group and negative group based on histology. The expression of miR-222, protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B alpha (PPP2R2A), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phospho-Akt were detected. We found that the experimental group showed signs of cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. No abnormalities were found in the control group. In the BA group, miR-222, PCNA and Akt were highly expressed, and PPP2R2A expression was significantly inhibited. Our findings suggest that miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine BA model, which might represent a potential target for improving BA prognosis.

  17. Human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes express a distinct RNA profile compared to human control and murine samples.

    PubMed

    Szulzewsky, Frank; Arora, Sonali; de Witte, Lot; Ulas, Thomas; Markovic, Darko; Schultze, Joachim L; Holland, Eric C; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults. It is strongly infiltrated by microglia and peripheral monocytes that support tumor growth. In the present study we used RNA sequencing to compare the expression profile of CD11b(+) human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes (hGAMs) to CD11b(+) microglia isolated from non-tumor samples. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis showed a clear separation of the two sample groups and we identified 334 significantly regulated genes in hGAMs. In comparison to human control microglia hGAMs upregulated genes associated with mitotic cell cycle, cell migration, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix organization. We validated the expression of several genes associated with extracellular matrix organization in samples of human control microglia, hGAMs, and the hGAMs-depleted fraction via qPCR. The comparison to murine GAMs (mGAMs) showed that both cell populations share a significant fraction of upregulated transcripts compared with their respective controls. These genes were mostly related to mitotic cell cycle. However, in contrast to murine cells, human GAMs did not upregulate genes associated to immune activation. Comparison of human and murine GAMs expression data to several data sets of in vitro-activated human macrophages and murine microglia showed that, in contrast to mGAMs, hGAMs share a smaller overlap to these data sets in general and in particular to cells activated by proinflammatory stimulation with LPS + INFγ or TNFα. Our findings provide new insights into the biology of human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes and give detailed information about the validity of murine experimental models. GLIA 2016 GLIA 2016;64:1416-1436. PMID:27312099

  18. Diphtheria toxin-based recombinant murine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting murine regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Marino, Jose; Trowell, Aaron; Zhang, Huiping; Stromp Peraino, Jaclyn; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Benichou, Gilles; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells which suppress immune responses of effector cells and are known to play a very important role in protection against autoimmune disease development, induction of transplantation tolerance and suppression of effective immune response against tumor cells. An effective in vivo Treg depletion agent would facilitate Treg-associated studies across many research areas. In this study, we have developed diphtheria toxin-based monovalent and bivalent murine IL-2 fusion toxins for depleting murine IL-2 receptor positive cells including CD25(+) Treg in vivo. Their potencies were assessed by in vitro protein synthesis inhibition and cell proliferation inhibition assays using a murine CD25(+) CTLL-2 cell line. Surprisingly, in contrast to our previously developed recombinant fusion toxins, the monovalent isoform (DT390-mIL-2) was approximately 4-fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart (DT390-bi-mIL-2). Binding analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that the monovalent isoform bound stronger than the bivalent version. In vivo Treg depletion with the monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin was performed using C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Spleen Treg were significantly depleted with a maximum reduction of ∼70% and detectable as early as 12 h after the last injection. The spleen Treg numbers were reduced until Day 3 and returned to control levels by Day 7. We believe that this monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin will be an effective in vivo murine Treg depleter. PMID:25147093

  19. Tetrapyrrole binding affinity of the murine and human p22HBP heme-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Micaelo, Nuno M; Macedo, Anjos L; Goodfellow, Brian J; Félix, Vítor

    2010-11-01

    We present the first systematic molecular modeling study of the binding properties of murine (mHBP) and human (hHBP) p22HBP protein (heme-binding protein) with four tetrapyrrole ring systems belonging to the heme biosynthetic pathway: iron protoporphyrin IX (HEMIN), protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), coproporphyrin III (CPIII), coproporphyrin I (CPI). The relative binding affinities predicted by our computational study were found to be similar to those observed experimentally, providing a first rational structural analysis of the molecular recognition mechanism, by p22HBP, toward a number of different tetrapyrrole ligands. To probe the structure of these p22HBP protein complexes, docking, molecular dynamics and MM-PBSA methodologies supported by experimental NMR ring current shift data have been employed. The tetrapyrroles studied were found to bind murine p22HBP with the following binding affinity order: HEMIN> PPIX> CPIII> CPI, which ranged from -22.2 to -6.1 kcal/mol. In general, the protein-tetrapyrrole complexes are stabilized by non-bonded interactions between the tetrapyrrole propionate groups and basic residues of the protein, and by the preferential solvation of the complex compared to the unbound components. PMID:20800521

  20. Murine Endoscopy for In Vivo Multimodal Imaging of Carcinogenesis and Assessment of Intestinal Wound Healing and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Tobias M.; Pott, Friederike; Foell, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models are widely used to study pathogenesis of human diseases and to evaluate diagnostic procedures as well as therapeutic interventions preclinically. However, valid assessment of pathological alterations often requires histological analysis, and when performed ex vivo, necessitates death of the animal. Therefore in conventional experimental settings, intra-individual follow-up examinations are rarely possible. Thus, development of murine endoscopy in live mice enables investigators for the first time to both directly visualize the gastrointestinal mucosa and also repeat the procedure to monitor for alterations. Numerous applications for in vivo murine endoscopy exist, including studying intestinal inflammation or wound healing, obtaining mucosal biopsies repeatedly, and to locally administer diagnostic or therapeutic agents using miniature injection catheters. Most recently, molecular imaging has extended diagnostic imaging modalities allowing specific detection of distinct target molecules using specific photoprobes. In conclusion, murine endoscopy has emerged as a novel cutting-edge technology for diagnostic experimental in vivo imaging and may significantly impact on preclinical research in various fields. PMID:25226434

  1. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  2. A murine model of urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chia-Suei; Dodson, Karen W; Hultgren, Scott J

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) inflict extreme pain and discomfort to those affected and have profound medical and socioeconomic impact. Although acute UTIs are often treatable with antibiotics, a large proportion of patients suffer from multiple recurrent infections. Here, we describe and provide a protocol for a robust murine UTI model that allows for the study of uropathogens in an ideal setting. The infections in the urinary tract can be monitored quantitatively by determining the bacterial loads at different times post-infection. In addition, the simple bladder architecture allows observation of disease progression and the uropathogenic virulence cascade using a variety of microscopic techniques. This mouse UTI model is extremely flexible, allowing the study of different bacterial strains and species of uropathogens in a broad range of mouse genetic backgrounds. We have used this protocol to identify important aspects of the host-pathogen interaction that determine the outcome of infection. The time required to complete the entire procedure will depend on the number of bacterial strains and mice included in the study. Nevertheless, one should expect 4 h of hands-on time, including inoculum preparation on the day of infection, transurethral inoculation, tissue harvest and post-harvest processing for a small group of mice (e.g., 5 mice). PMID:19644462

  3. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release.

    PubMed

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  4. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy. PMID:21874492

  5. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  6. A murine model of smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Matthew, E; Warden, G; Dedman, J

    2001-04-01

    The United States has one of the world's largest per capita fire death rates. House fires alone kill >9,000 Americans annually, and smoke inhalation is the leading cause of mortality from structural fires. Animal models are needed to develop therapies to combat this problem. We have developed a murine model of smoke inhalation through the design, construction, and use of a controlled-environment smoke chamber. There is a direct relationship between the quantity of wood combusted and mortality in mice. As with human victims, the primary cause of death from smoke inhalation is an elevated blood carboxyhemoglobin level. Lethal (78%) and sublethal (50%) carboxyhemoglobin levels were obtained in mice subjected to varying amounts of smoke. Mice exposed to wood smoke demonstrated more dramatic pathology than mice exposed to cotton or polyurethane smoke. A CD-1 model of wood smoke exposure was developed, demonstrating type II cell hypertrophy, cytoplasmic blebbing, cytoplasmic vacuolization, sloughing, hemorrhage, edema, macrophage infiltration, and lymphocyte infiltration. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of smoke-exposed mice demonstrated a significant increase in total cell counts compared with those in control mice. These findings are comparable to the lung tissue response observed in human victims of smoke inhalation. PMID:11238012

  7. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  8. Cortactin is implicated in murine zygotic development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan; Zhang, Helin; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Smith, Elizabeth; Zhan, Xi

    2009-01-01

    Cortactin is a cortex-enriched protein implicated in Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. However, the physiological role of cortactin remains unknown. We have generated a mouse strain in which the allele of murine cortactin was disrupted by a gene trapping vector. The resulting heterozygous mice developed normally and were fertile, but embryonic fibroblasts derived from heterozygous animals displayed partial impairment in PDGF-induced membrane ruffling. No homozygous offspring or early embryos even at the two-cell stage were detected. Analysis of oocytes revealed a gradual decrease in the detection of homozygous zygotes after fertilization. In normal oocytes arrested at meiotic metaphase II (MII), cortactin immunoreactivity was detected in an apical layer that overlies the maternal chromosome and overlaps with a polarized cortex enriched with actin. The formation of the polarized cortactin layer was diminished upon treatment with latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor. After resumption of meiosis II, the majority of cortactin protein was accumulated into the second polar body. Microinjection of MII-arrested eggs with either cortactin antibody or RNA encoding a cortactin mutant deficient in Arp2/3 complex binding disrupted the integrity of the actin cap and inhibited emission of the second polar body triggered by parthenogenesis. Our data suggest that cortactin plays an important role in the mechanics of asymmetric division in oocytes. PMID:20004659

  9. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  10. Murine and human CFTR exhibit different sensitivities to CFTR potentiators.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; McCarty, Nael A

    2015-10-01

    Development of therapeutic molecules with clinical efficacy as modulators of defective CFTR includes efforts to identify potentiators that can overcome or repair the gating defect in mutant CFTR channels. This has taken a great leap forward with the identification of the potentiator VX-770, now available to patients as "Kalydeco." Other small molecules with different chemical structure also are capable of potentiating the activity of either wild-type or mutant CFTR, suggesting that there are features of the protein that may be targeted to achieve stimulation of channel activity by structurally diverse compounds. However, neither the mechanisms by which these compounds potentiate mutant CFTR nor the site(s) where these compounds bind have been identified. This knowledge gap partly reflects the lack of appropriate experimental models to provide clues toward the identification of binding sites. Here, we have compared the channel behavior and response to novel and known potentiators of human CFTR (hCFTR) and murine (mCFTR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Both hCFTR and mCFTR were blocked by GlyH-101 from the extracellular side, but mCFTR activity was increased with GlyH-101 applied directly to the cytoplasmic side. Similarly, glibenclamide only exhibited a blocking effect on hCFTR but both blocked and potentiated mCFTR in excised membrane patches and in intact oocytes. The clinically used CFTR potentiator VX-770 transiently increased hCFTR by ∼13% but potentiated mCFTR significantly more strongly. Our results suggest that mCFTR pharmacological sensitivities differ from hCFTR, which will provide a useful tool for identifying the binding sites and mechanism for these potentiators. PMID:26209275

  11. A murine model of stress controllability attenuates Th2-dominant airway inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Aniket; Kim, Byung-Jin; Gonzales, Xavier; Caffrey, James; Vishwanatha, Jamboor; Jones, Harlan P.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest a positive correlation between chronic respiratory inflammatory disease and the ability to cope with adverse stress. Interactions between neuroendocrine and immune systems are believed to provide insight toward the biological mechanisms of action. The utility of an experimental murine model was employed to investigate the immunological consequences of stress-controllability and ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. Pre-conditioned uncontrollable stress exacerbated OVA-induced lung histopathological changes that were typical of Th2-predominant inflammatory response along respiratory tissues. Importantly, mice given the ability to exert control over aversive stress attenuated inflammatory responses and reduced lung pathology. This model represents a means of investigating the neuro-immune axis in defining mechanisms of stress and respiratory disease. PMID:20462642

  12. Integrating Murine Gene Expression Studies to Understand Obstructive Lung Disease Due to Chronic Inhaled Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Hofmann, Oliver; Baron, Rebecca M.; Cernadas, Manuela; Meng, Quanxin Ryan; Bresler, Herbert S.; Brass, David M.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Christiani, David C.; Hide, Winston

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Endotoxin is a near ubiquitous environmental exposure that that has been associated with both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These obstructive lung diseases have a complex pathophysiology, making them difficult to study comprehensively in the context of endotoxin. Genome-wide gene expression studies have been used to identify a molecular snapshot of the response to environmental exposures. Identification of differentially expressed genes shared across all published murine models of chronic inhaled endotoxin will provide insight into the biology underlying endotoxin-associated lung disease. Methods We identified three published murine models with gene expression profiling after repeated low-dose inhaled endotoxin. All array data from these experiments were re-analyzed, annotated consistently, and tested for shared genes found to be differentially expressed. Additional functional comparison was conducted by testing for significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes in known pathways. The importance of this gene signature in smoking-related lung disease was assessed using hierarchical clustering in an independent experiment where mice were exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and endotoxin plus smoke. Results A 101-gene signature was detected in three murine models, more than expected by chance. The three model systems exhibit additional similarity beyond shared genes when compared at the pathway level, with increasing enrichment of inflammatory pathways associated with longer duration of endotoxin exposure. Genes and pathways important in both asthma and COPD were shared across all endotoxin models. Mice exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and smoke plus endotoxin were accurately classified with the endotoxin gene signature. Conclusions Despite the differences in laboratory, duration of exposure, and strain of mouse used in three experimental models of chronic inhaled endotoxin, surprising similarities in gene expression were observed

  13. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  14. Murine models of cardiovascular comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Khedoe, P Padmini S J; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Currently, COPD patients with atherosclerosis (i.e., the most important underlying cause of CVD) receive COPD therapy complemented with standard CVD therapy. This may, however, not be the most optimal treatment. To investigate the link between COPD and atherosclerosis and to develop specific therapeutic strategies for COPD patients with atherosclerosis, a substantial number of preclinical studies using murine models have been performed. In this review, we summarize the currently used murine models of COPD and atherosclerosis, both individually and combined, and discuss the relevance of these models for studying the pathogenesis and development of new treatments for COPD patients with atherosclerosis. Murine and clinical studies have provided complementary information showing a prominent role for systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in the link between COPD and atherosclerosis. These and other studies showed that murine models for COPD and atherosclerosis are useful tools and can provide important insights relevant to understanding the link between COPD and CVD. More importantly, murine studies provide good platforms for studying the potential of promising (new) therapeutic strategies for COPD patients with CVD. PMID:26993520

  15. Development of a non-invasive murine infection model for acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Stol, K; van Selm, S; van den Berg, S; Bootsma, H J; Blokx, W A M; Graamans, K; Tonnaer, E L G M; Hermans, P W M

    2009-12-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most frequent diseases in childhood, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is among the main causative bacterial agents. Since current experimental models used to study the bacterial pathogenesis of OM have several limitations, such as the invasiveness of the experimental procedures, we developed a non-invasive murine OM model. In our model, adapted from a previously developed rat OM model, a pressure cabin is used in which a 40 kPa pressure increase is applied to translocate pneumococci from the nasopharyngeal cavity into both mouse middle ears. Wild-type pneumococci were found to persist in the middle ear cavity for 144 h after infection, with a maximum bacterial load at 96 h. Inflammation was confirmed at 96 and 144 h post-infection by IL-1beta and TNF-alpha cytokine analysis and histopathology. Subsequently, we investigated the contribution of two surface-associated pneumococcal proteins, the streptococcal lipoprotein rotamase A (SlrA) and the putative proteinase maturation protein A (PpmA), to experimental OM in our model. Pneumococci lacking the slrA gene, but not those lacking the ppmA gene, were significantly reduced in virulence in the OM model. Importantly, pneumococci lacking both genes were significantly more attenuated than the DeltaslrA single mutant. This additive effect suggests that SlrA and PpmA exert complementary functions during experimental OM. In conclusion, we have developed a highly reproducible and non-invasive murine infection model for pneumococcal OM using a pressure cabin, which is very suitable to study pneumococcal pathogenesis and virulence in vivo. PMID:19762437

  16. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S; Epstein, Ervin H; Tang, Jean Y

    2012-08-01

    When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1(+/-)K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology [2,20] and in response to drug therapy [19]. We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 ± 5 (SEM) mm(3) shrunk by 76 ± 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses. PMID:22771794

  17. Fetal outcome in murine Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Silver, R M; Yang, L; Daynes, R A; Branch, D W; Salafia, C M; Weis, J J

    1995-01-01

    Lyme disease is an inflammatory syndrome caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Although this syndrome has important implications for human pregnancy, little is known about gestational infection with B. burgdorferi. Fetal death occurred in 33 of 280 gestational sacs (12%) in 39 C3H/HeN female mice infected by intradermal injection of B. burgdorferi 4 days after mating (acute infection), compared with 0 of 191 sacs in 25 control mice (P = 0.0001). Forty-six percent of acutely infected mice suffered at least one fetal death, compared with none of the control animals (P = 0.0002). There were no fetal deaths in 18 C3H/HeN mice infected 3 weeks prior to mating (chronic infection). A sensitive PCR technique detected B. burgdorferi DNA in the uteri of acutely infected mice but did not detect DNA in the uteri of controls or chronically infected mice. Spirochete DNA was only rarely detected in fetal tissues, and its presence was not required for fetal death. The inclusion of an internal competitive PCR target indicated that the lack of B. burgdorferi sequences in fetal DNA was not due to the presence of a PCR inhibitor. Histologic analysis of gestational tissues from infected animals demonstrated nonspecific pathology consistent with fetal death. These findings indicate an association between murine fetal death and acute infection with B. burgdorferi early in gestation but not with chronic infection. Our data suggest that fetal death is due to a maternal response to infection rather than fetal infection. These findings could provide an explanation for observations in humans in which sporadic cases of fetal death in women infected with B. burgdorferi during pregnancy have been reported, while previous infection has not been associated with fetal death. PMID:7806385

  18. Lymph Node Macrophages Restrict Murine Cytomegalovirus Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Davis-Poynter, Nick; Bruce, Kimberley; Lawler, Clara; Dolken, Lars; Mach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) establish chronic infections that spread from a primary entry site to secondary vascular sites, such as the spleen, and then to tertiary shedding sites, such as the salivary glands. Human CMV (HCMV) is difficult to analyze, because its spread precedes clinical presentation. Murine CMV (MCMV) offers a tractable model. It is hypothesized to spread from peripheral sites via vascular endothelial cells and associated monocytes. However, viral luciferase imaging showed footpad-inoculated MCMV first reaching the popliteal lymph nodes (PLN). PLN colonization was rapid and further spread was slow, implying that LN infection can be a significant bottleneck. Most acutely infected PLN cells were CD169+ subcapsular sinus macrophages (SSM). Replication-deficient MCMV also reached them, indicating direct infection. Many SSM expressed viral reporter genes, but few expressed lytic genes. SSM expressed CD11c, and MCMV with a cre-sensitive fluorochrome switch showed switched infected cells in PLN of CD11c-cre mice but yielded little switched virus. SSM depletion with liposomal clodronate or via a CD169-diphtheria toxin receptor transgene shifted infection to ER-TR7+ stromal cells, increased virus production, and accelerated its spread to the spleen. Therefore, MCMV disseminated via LN, and SSM slowed this spread by shielding permissive fibroblasts and poorly supporting viral lytic replication. IMPORTANCE HCMV chronically infects most people, and it can cause congenital disability and harm the immunocompromised. A major goal of vaccination is to prevent systemic infection. How this is established is unclear. Restriction to humans makes HCMV difficult to analyze. We show that peripheral MCMV infection spreads via lymph nodes. Here, MCMV infected filtering macrophages, which supported virus replication poorly. When these macrophages were depleted, MCMV infected susceptible fibroblasts and spread faster. The capacity of filtering macrophages to limit

  19. Nanoelectroablation Therapy for Murine Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-01-01

    When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally as effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1+/−K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology [2;20] and in response to drug therapy [19]. We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5–7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 ± 5 (SEM) mm3 shrunk by 76 ± 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 minute-long treatment of 2700 pulses. PMID:22771794

  20. Follicular dendritic cell function and murine AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, A; Burton, G F; Fuchs, B A; Bhogal, B S; Rupper, R; Szakal, A K; Tew, J G

    1994-01-01

    Infection of mice with LP-BM5 elicits an immunodeficiency state referred to as murine acquired immune deficiency syndrome (MAIDS). Shortly after infection, retrovirus particles become associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and this study was undertaken to determine whether retroviruses alter FDC functions. The FDC functions examined included the ability to: (1) retain antigen (Ag) trapped prior to infection; (2) trap new Ag after infection; (3) maintain specific IgG responses; and (4) provide co-stimulatory signals to B cells. Mice were infected with LP-BM5 and the ability of their FDC to trap and retain 125I-Ag (HSA) was assessed. Serum anti-HSA levels were monitored and FDC co-stimulatory activity was indicated by increased B-cell proliferation. HSA trapped on FDC prior to infection began to disappear by 3 weeks and was practically gone by 6 weeks. Serum anti-HSA titres were maintained normally for about 3 weeks after infection and then declined precipitously. The ability of FDC to trap new Ag began to disappear around the second and third week of infection and was markedly depressed by the fourth week. However, FDC recovered from infected mice retained their ability to co-stimulate anti-mu- and interleukin-4 (IL-4)-activated B cells throughout a 5-week period. In short, the ability of FDC to trap and retain specific Ag and maintain specific antibody levels was markedly depressed after retrovirus infection. However, FDC from infected mice continued to provide co-stimulatory signals and these signals may contribute to the lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly characteristic of MAIDS. Images Figure 4 PMID:8132218

  1. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Ysasi, Alexandra B; Wagner, Willi L; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-06-15

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends ("E"). Septal retraction, observed in 20-30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  2. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  3. Telomere sister chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.

  4. Cloning and mapping of murine Nfe2L1

    SciTech Connect

    McKie, J.; Johnstone, K.; Scambler, P.

    1995-02-10

    The murine homologue of the human NFE2L1 basic leucine-zipper gene was isolated from an early embryo library. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 97% identity between the two proteins. Significant sequence similarity is also seen with the p45 subunit of NF-E2 and with the Drosophila CNC protein. Murine Nfe2l1 maps to chromosome 11DE with similar sequences at 7D1-7F1 and 2E4-2G. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Femur Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Cell Tracking in the Murine Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghong; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; DaCosta, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow is a complex organ that contains various hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. These cells are involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, immune regulation and tumor regulation. Commonly used methods for understanding cellular actions in the bone marrow, such as histology and blood counts, provide static information rather than capturing the dynamic action of multiple cellular components in vivo. To complement the standard methods, a window chamber (WC)-based model was developed to enable serial in vivo imaging of cells and structures in the murine bone marrow. This protocol describes a surgical procedure for installing the WC in the femur, in order to facilitate long-term optical access to the femoral bone marrow. In particular, to demonstrate its experimental utility, this WC approach was used to image and track neutrophils within the vascular network of the femur, thereby providing a novel method to visualize and quantify immune cell trafficking and regulation in the bone marrow. This method can be applied to study various biological processes in the murine bone marrow, such as hematopoiesis, stem cell transplantation, and immune responses in pathological conditions, including cancer. PMID:27500928

  6. Murine Models to Evaluate Novel and Conventional Therapeutic Strategies for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Talmadge, James E.; Singh, Rakesh K.; Fidler, Isaiah J.; Raz, Avraham

    2007-01-01

    Animal models, by definition, are an approximation of reality, and their use in developing anti-cancer drugs is controversial. Positive retrospective clinical correlations have been identified with several animal models, in addition to limitations and a need for improvement. Model inadequacies include experimental designs that do not incorporate biological concepts, drug pharmacology, or toxicity. Ascites models have been found to identify drugs active against rapidly dividing tumors; however, neither ascitic nor transplantable subcutaneous tumors are predictive of activity for solid tumors. In contrast, primary human tumor xenografts have identified responsive tumor histiotypes if relevant pharmacodynamic and toxicological parameters were considered. Murine toxicology studies are also fundamental because they identify safe starting doses for phase I protocols. We recommend that future studies incorporate orthotopic and spontaneous metastasis models (syngeneic and xenogenic) because they incorporate microenvironmental interactions, in addition to confirmatory autochthonous models and/or genetically engineered models, for molecular therapeutics. Collectively, murine models are critical in drug development, but require a rational and hierarchical approach beginning with toxicology and pharmacology studies, progressing to human primary tumors to identify therapeutic targets and models of metastatic disease from resected orthotopic, primary tumors to compare drugs using rigorous, clinically relevant outcome parameters. PMID:17322365

  7. Anatomy of the Murine Hepatobiliary System: A Whole-Organ-Level Analysis Using a Transparency Method.

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Hiroki; Sumitomo, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Aisa; Igarashi, Hitomi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Kanai, Yoshiakira

    2016-02-01

    The biliary tract is a well-branched ductal structure that exhibits great variation in morphology among vertebrates. Its function is maintained by complex constructions of blood vessels, nerves, and smooth muscles, the so-called hepatobiliary system. Although the mouse (Mus musculus) has been used as a model organism for humans, the morphology of its hepatobiliary system has not been well documented at the topographical level, mostly because of its small size and complexity. To reconcile this, we conducted whole-mount anatomical descriptions of the murine extrahepatic biliary tracts with related blood vessels, nerves, and smooth muscles using a recently developed transparentizing method, CUBIC. Several major differences from humans were found in mice: (1) among the biliary arteries, the arteria gastrica sinistra accessoria was commonly found, which rarely appears in humans; (2) the sphincter muscle in the choledochoduodenal junction is unseparated from the duodenal muscle; (3) the pancreatic duct opens to the bile duct without any sphincter muscles because of its distance from the duodenum. This state is identical to a human congenital malformation, an anomalous arrangement of pancreaticobiliary ducts. However, other parts of the murine hepatobiliary system (such as the branching patterns of the biliary tract, blood vessels, and nerves) presented the same patterns as humans and other mammals topologically. Thus, the mouse is useful as an experimental model for studying the human hepatobiliary system. PMID:26559382

  8. Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccination in Cancer: Therapeutic Implications Emerging from Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Mac Keon, Soledad; Ruiz, María Sol; Gazzaniga, Silvina; Wainstok, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel-T), there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts toward an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment. PMID:26042126

  9. A Simplified Murine Intimal Hyperplasia Model Founded on a Focal Carotid Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ming; Mauro, Christine R.; Yu, Peng; Favreau, John T.; Nguyen, Binh; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ozaki, C. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Murine models offer a powerful tool for unraveling the mechanisms of intimal hyperplasia and vascular remodeling, although their technical complexity increases experimental variability and limits widespread application. We describe a simple and clinically relevant mouse model of arterial intimal hyperplasia and remodeling. Focal left carotid artery (LCA) stenosis was created by placing 9-0 nylon suture around the artery using an external 35-gauge mandrel needle (middle or distal location), which was then removed. The effect of adjunctive diet-induced obesity was defined. Flowmetry, wall strain analyses, biomicroscopy, and histology were completed. LCA blood flow sharply decreased by ∼85%, followed by a responsive right carotid artery increase of ∼71%. Circumferential strain decreased by ∼2.1% proximal to the stenosis in both dietary groups. At 28 days, morphologic adaptations included proximal LCA intimal hyperplasia, which was exacerbated by diet-induced obesity. The proximal and distal LCA underwent outward and negative inward remodeling, respectively, in the mid-focal stenosis (remodeling indexes, 1.10 and 0.53). A simple, defined common carotid focal stenosis yields reproducible murine intimal hyperplasia and substantial differentials in arterial wall adaptations. This model offers a tool for investigating mechanisms of hemodynamically driven intimal hyperplasia and arterial wall remodeling. PMID:23159527

  10. Membrane configuration optimization for a murine in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Wuest, Diane M; Wing, Allison M; Lee, Kelvin H

    2013-01-30

    A powerful experimental tool used to study the dynamic functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an in vitro cellular based system utilizing cell culture inserts in multi-well plates. Currently, usage of divergent model configurations without explanation of selected variable set points renders data comparisons difficult and limits widespread understanding. This work presents for the first time in literature a comprehensive screening study to optimize membrane configuration, with aims to unveil influential membrane effects on the ability of cerebral endothelial cells to form a tight monolayer. First, primary murine brain endothelial cells and astrocytes were co-cultured in contact and non-contact orientations on membranes of pore diameter sizes ranging from 0.4 μm to 8.0 μm, and the non-contact orientation and smallest pore diameter size were shown to support a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Then, membranes made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) purchased from three different commercial sources were compared, and PET membranes purchased from two manufacturers facilitated a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Models were characterized by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), sodium fluorescein permeability, and immunocytochemical labeling of tight junction proteins. Finally, a murine brain endothelial cell line, bEnd.3, was grown on the different membranes, and similar results were obtained with respect to optimal membrane configuration selection. The results and methodology presented here on high throughput 24-well plate inserts can be translated to other BBB systems to advance model understanding. PMID:23131353

  11. A Rapid Murine Coma and Behavior Scale for Quantitative Assessment of Murine Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Ryan W.; Wainwright, Mark S.; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Kidambi, Trilokesh; Gómez, Noé D.; Taylor, Terrie; Haldar, Kasturi

    2010-01-01

    Background Cerebral malaria (CM) is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM) models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. Methodology/Principal Findings A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS) comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA). Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. Conclusions/Significance Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field). The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed. PMID:20957049

  12. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  13. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  14. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  15. The cannabinoid TRPA1 agonist cannabichromene inhibits nitric oxide production in macrophages and ameliorates murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Romano, B; Borrelli, F; Fasolino, I; Capasso, R; Piscitelli, F; Cascio, MG; Pertwee, RG; Coppola, D; Vassallo, L; Orlando, P; Di Marzo, V; Izzo, AA

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The non-psychotropic cannabinoid cannabichromene is known to activate the transient receptor potential ankyrin-type1 (TRPA1) and to inhibit endocannabinoid inactivation, both of which are involved in inflammatory processes. We examined here the effects of this phytocannabinoid on peritoneal macrophages and its efficacy in an experimental model of colitis. Experimental Approach Murine peritoneal macrophages were activated in vitro by LPS. Nitrite levels were measured using a fluorescent assay; inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) receptors were analysed by RT-PCR (and/or Western blot analysis); colitis was induced by dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS). Endocannabinoid (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol), palmitoylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide levels were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Colonic inflammation was assessed by evaluating the myeloperoxidase activity as well as by histology and immunohistochemistry. Key Results LPS caused a significant production of nitrites, associated to up-regulation of anandamide, iNOS, COX-2, CB1 receptors and down-regulation of CB2 receptors mRNA expression. Cannabichromene significantly reduced LPS-stimulated nitrite levels, and its effect was mimicked by cannabinoid receptor and TRPA1 agonists (carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde) and enhanced by CB1 receptor antagonists. LPS-induced anandamide, iNOS, COX-2 and cannabinoid receptor changes were not significantly modified by cannabichromene, which, however, increased oleoylethanolamide levels. In vivo, cannabichromene ameliorated DNBS-induced colonic inflammation, as revealed by histology, immunohistochemistry and myeloperoxidase activity. Conclusion and Implications Cannabichromene exerts anti-inflammatory actions in activated macrophages – with tonic CB1 cannabinoid signalling being negatively coupled to this effect – and ameliorates experimental murine colitis. PMID:23373571

  16. Cloning and expression analysis of murine phospholipase D1.

    PubMed Central

    Colley, W C; Altshuller, Y M; Sue-Ling, C K; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Branch, K D; Tsirka, S E; Bollag, R J; Bollag, W B; Frohman, M A

    1997-01-01

    Activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D(PLD) occurs as part of the complex signal-transduction cascade initiated by agonist stimulation of tyrosine kinase and G-protein-coupled receptors. A variety of mammalian PLD activities have been described, and cDNAs for two PLDs recently reported (human PLD1 and murine PLD2). We describe here the cloning and chromosomal localization of murine PLD1. Northern-blot hybridization and RNase protection analyses were used to examine the expression of murine PLD1 and PLD2 ina variety of cell lines and tissues. PLD1 and PLD2 were expressed in all RNA samples examined, although the absolute expression of each isoform varied, as well as the ratio of PLD1 to PLD2. Moreover, in situ hybridization of adult brain and murine embryo sections revealed high levels of expression of individual PLDs in some cell types and no detectable expression in others. Thus the two PLDs probably carry out distinct roles in restricted subsets of cells rather than ubiquitous roles in all cells. PMID:9307024

  17. Murine myocardium OCT imaging with a blood substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeehyun; Villard, Joseph W.; Lee, Ho; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Imaging of the in vivo murine myocardium using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. Application of conventional techniques (e.g. MRI, Ultrasound imaging) for imaging the murine myocardium is problematic because the wall thickness is less than 1.5mm (20g mouse), and the heart rate can be as high as six-hundred beats per minute. To acquire a real-time image of the murine myocardium, OCT can provide sufficient spatial resolution (10 micrometers ) and imaging speed (1000 A-Scans/s). Strong light scattering by blood in the heart causes significant light attenuation making delineation of the endocardium-chamber boundary problematic. By replacing whole blood in the mouse with an artificial blood substitute we demonstrate significant reduction of light scattering in the murine myocardium. The results indicate a significant reduction in light scattering as whole blood hematocrit is diminished below 5%. To measure thickness change of the myocardium during one cycle, a myocardium edge detection algorithm is developed and demonstrated.

  18. Manipulations of cholinesterase gene expression modulate murine megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Patinkin, D; Seidman, S; Eckstein, F; Benseler, F; Zakut, H; Soreq, H

    1990-01-01

    Megakaryocytopoiesis was selectively inhibited in cultured murine bone marrow cells by a 15-mer oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to the initiator AUG region in butyrylcholinesterase mRNA. Furthermore, conditioned medium from Xenopus oocytes producing recombinant butyrylcholinesterase stimulated megakaryocytopoiesis. These observations implicate butyrylcholinesterase in megakaryocytopoiesis and suggest application of oligodeoxynucleotides for modulating bone marrow development. Images PMID:2233731

  19. Analysis of murine HOXA-2 activity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Percival-Smith, A; Bondy, J A

    1999-01-01

    The murine HOXA-2 protein shares amino acid sequence similarity with Drosophila Proboscipedia (PB). In this paper, we test whether HOXA-2 and PB are functionally equivalent in Drosophila. In Drosophila, PB inhibits SCR activity required for larval T1 beard formation and adult tarsus formation and is required for maxillary palp and proboscis formation. HOXA-2 expressed from a heat-shock promoter weakly suppressed SCR activity required for T1 beard formation. But interestingly neither PB nor HOXA-2 expressed from a heat-shock promoter suppressed murine HOXA-5 activity, the murine SCR homologue, from inducing ectopic T1 beards in T2 and T3, indicating that HOXA-5 does not interact with PB. HOXA-2 activity expressed from the Tubulin alpha 1 promoter modified the pb null phenotype resulting in a proboscis-to-arista transformation, indicating that HOXA-2 was able to suppress SCR activity required for tarsus formation. However, HOXA-2 expressed from a Tubulin alpha 1 promoter was unable to direct maxillary palp determination when either ectopically expressed in the antenna or in the maxillary palp primordia of a pb null mutant. HOXA-2 was also unable to rescue pseudotrachea formation in a pb null mutant. These results indicate that the only activity that PB and HOXA-2 weakly share is the inhibition of SCR activity, and that murine HOXA-5 and Drosophila SCR do not share inhibition by PB activity. PMID:10322642

  20. Topical Apigenin Alleviates Cutaneous Inflammation in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Hupe, Melanie; Sun, Richard; Man, George; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used in preventing and treating skin disorders for centuries. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration of chrysanthemum extract exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether topical applications of apigenin, a constituent of chrysanthemum extract, influence cutaneous inflammation is still unclear. In the present study, we first tested whether topical applications of apigenin alleviate cutaneous inflammation in murine models of acute dermatitis. The murine models of acute allergic contact dermatitis and acute irritant contact dermatitis were established by topical application of oxazolone and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), respectively. Inflammation was assessed in both dermatitis models by measuring ear thickness. Additionally, the effect of apigenin on stratum corneum function in a murine subacute allergic contact dermatitis model was assessed with an MPA5 physiology monitor. Our results demonstrate that topical applications of apigenin exhibit therapeutic effects in both acute irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis models. Moreover, in comparison with the vehicle treatment, topical apigenin treatment significantly reduced transepidermal water loss, lowered skin surface pH, and increased stratum corneum hydration in a subacute murine allergic contact dermatitis model. Together, these results suggest that topical application of apigenin could provide an alternative regimen for the treatment of dermatitis. PMID:23304222

  1. Isolation of Cortical Microglia with Preserved Immunophenotype and Functionality From Murine Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Stefano G.; Edwards, Amanda A.; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of microglia from CNS tissue is a powerful investigative tool used to study microglial biology ex vivo. The present method details a procedure for isolation of microglia from neonatal murine cortices by mechanical agitation with a rotary shaker. This microglia isolation method yields highly pure cortical microglia that exhibit morphological and functional characteristics indicative of quiescent microglia in normal, nonpathological conditions in vivo. This procedure also preserves the microglial immunophenotype and biochemical functionality as demonstrated by the induction of morphological changes, nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB (p65), and secretion of the hallmark proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Pam3CSK4 (Pam) challenges. Therefore, the present isolation procedure preserves the immunophenotype of both quiescent and activated microglia, providing an experimental method of investigating microglia biology in ex vivo conditions. PMID:24513797

  2. Characterization of the murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator system.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Van Hoef, B; Collen, D

    1996-11-01

    The murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator (u-PA) system was studied using purified proteins, plasma and endothelioma cells. Recombinant murine u-PA was obtained as a single-chain molecule of 45 kDa which was converted to two-chain u-PA with plasmin by cleavage of the Lys159-Ile160 peptide bond. Murine plasminogen, purified from plasma as a single-chain protein of 95 kDa, was resistant to quantitative activation with murine recombinant two-chain u-PA: only 15% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C was obtained in mixtures of 1 microM plasminogen and 5 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas quantitative activation was observed in the autologous human system. Addition of 6-aminohexanoic acid to native murine plasminogen resulted in quantitative activation within 1 h. In murine plasma in vitro, plasminogen was also resistant to quantitative activation with u-PA (50% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C with 50 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas in the human system nearly quantitative activation was obtained). Murine plasma clots submerged in murine plasma were resistant to lysis with u-PA; < or = 2% clot lysis in 2 h was obtained with 80 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous murine system whereas 50% clot lysis in 2 h required only 15 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous human system. Saturable binding of murine recombinant two-chain u-PA was observed to murine endothelioma cells that are genetically deficient in u-PA (u-PA-/- End cells). Binding was characterized by a Kd of 5.5 nM and 800000 binding sites/cell. However, u-PA-/- End cells did not significantly stimulate the activation rate of murine plasminogen by murine recombinant two-chain u-PA and did not enhance the plasmin-mediated conversion rate of murine recombinant single-chain u-PA to its two-chain derivative. Murine recombinant two-chain u-PA bound to murine endothelioma cells was quantitatively inhibited by murine plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Thus

  3. Experimental Autoimmune Breast Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kesaraju, Pavani; Jaini, Ritika; Johnson, Justin M.; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Gruden, Jessica J.; Sakalar, Cagri; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2013-01-01

    Mastitis is a substantial clinical problem in lactating women that may result in severe pain and abrupt termination of breastfeeding, thereby predisposing infants to long-term health risks. Many cases of mastitis involve no known infectious agent and may fundamentally be due to autoimmune-mediated inflammation of the breast. Herein, we develop a murine model of autoimmune mastitis and provide a detailed characterization of its resulting phenotype of breast failure and lactation insufficiency. To generate breast-specific autoimmunity, we immunized SWXJ mice with recombinant mouse α-lactalbumin, a lactation-dependent, breast-specific differentiation protein critical for production of lactose. Mice immunized with α-lactalbumin showed extensive T-cell–mediated inflammation in lactating normal breast parenchyma but none in nonlactating normal breast parenchyma. This targeted autoimmune attack resulted in breast failure characterized by lactation insufficiency and decreased ability to nurture offspring. Although immunization with α-lactalbumin had no effect on fertility and birth numbers, pups nursed by α-lactalbumin–immunized mice showed significantly disrupted growth often accompanied by kwashiorkor-like nutritional abnormalities, including alopecia, liver toxicity, and runting. This experimental model of autoimmune breast failure has useful applications for prophylactic breast cancer vaccination and for addressing inflammatory complications during breastfeeding. In addition, this model is suited for investigating nutritionally based “failure-to-thrive” issues, particularly regarding the long-term implications of postnatal nutritional deprivation. PMID:22901749

  4. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  5. Practical Murine Hematopathology: A Comparative Review and Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Karyn E; Mikkola, Amy M; Stepanek, Aaron M; Vernet, Andyna; Hall, Christopher D; Sun, Chia C; Yildirim, Eda; Staropoli, John F; Lee, Jeannie T; Brown, Diane E

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic parameters are important markers of disease in human and veterinary medicine. Biomedical research has benefited from mouse models that recapitulate such disease, thus expanding knowledge of pathogenetic mechanisms and investigative therapies that translate across species. Mice in health have many notable hematologic differences from humans and other veterinary species, including smaller erythrocytes, higher percentage of circulating reticulocytes or polychromasia, lower peripheral blood neutrophil and higher peripheral blood and bone marrow lymphocyte percentages, variable leukocyte morphologies, physiologic splenic hematopoiesis and iron storage, and more numerous and shorter-lived erythrocytes and platelets. For accurate and complete hematologic analyses of disease and response to investigative therapeutic interventions, these differences and the unique features of murine hematopathology must be understood. Here we review murine hematology and hematopathology for practical application to translational investigation. PMID:25926395

  6. Genomic organization of the murine CTL lipase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.H.; Boyer, S.N.; Grusby, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    Murine cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lipase was originally identified as an IL-4-inducible gene in CD8-positive T cells. To further our understanding of both the function and the regulation of CTL lipase in T cells, we have cloned and characterized the murine gene. Two overlapping phage clones spanning 29 kb contain the entire CTL lipase gene. The exon structure in similar to those characterized for the human and canine pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 genes, with notable differences in the 5{prime} end. Transcripts initiate from a site that matches a consensus for an initiator sequence. Potential cis-regulatory elements in the CTL lipase 5{prime} regulatory region that would confer dual tissue specificity in exocrine pancreas and cytotoxic T lymphocytes are identified. The implications of this promoter organization are discussed. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Increased photosensitivity to near-ultraviolet light in murine SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, D.T.; Borel, Y.

    1984-02-01

    The authors investigated whether there is increased susceptibility to near-UVL in murine SLE. Cultured spleen cells from either strain of mice with lupus disease or conventional strains of mice were exposed to different UVL fractions in vitro. The effect of DNA synthesis, release, and repair was examined. DNA synthesis and release was measured as percent of (/sup 3/H)thymidine (dT) uptake into either total acid-precipitable radioactive material of cell sediment plus supernatant, or that of the medium alone, whereas hydroxyurea-resistant dT incorporation represented DNA repair. The data indicate that all SLE strains, in contrast to all non-SLE strains, show increased DNA synthesis and release after UV-A exposure. In addition, all murine SLE strains demonstrate increased susceptibility to induction of DNA damage by UV-A. The significance of these observations in relation to the clinical activity of SLE after sunlight exposure is discussed.

  8. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells Within Murine Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gjurich, Breanne N; Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the modulation of atherogenesis at all stages of the disease. However, there are many technical difficulties when studying the immune system within murine aortas. Common techniques such as PCR and immunohistochemistry have answered many questions about the presence of immune cells and mediators of inflammation within the aorta yet many questions remain unanswered due to the limitations of these techniques. On the other hand, cumulatively the flow cytometry approach has propelled the immunology field forward but it has been challenging to apply this technique to aortic tissues. Here, we describe the methodology to isolate and characterize the immune cells within the murine aorta and provide examples of functional assays for aortic leukocytes using flow cytometry. The method involves the harvesting and enzymatic digestion of the aorta, extracellular and intracellular protein staining, and a subsequent flow cytometric analysis. PMID:26445788

  9. A generalized transducing phage for the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Toribio, Ana L.; Goulding, David; Foulds, Ian; Thomson, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Salmond, George P. C.

    2008-01-01

    A virulent phage (φCR1) capable of generalized transduction in Citrobacter rodentium was isolated from the environment and characterized. C. rodentium is a natural pathogen of mice, causing transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia. Sequencing of its genome has recently been completed and will soon be fully annotated and published. C. rodentium is an important model organism for infections caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC). φCR1 uses a lipopolysaccharide receptor, has a genome size of approximately 300 kb, and is able to transduce a variety of markers. φCR1 is the first reported transducing phage for C. rodentium and will be a useful tool for functional genomic analysis of this important natural murine pathogen. PMID:17768241

  10. Resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carletto, Bruna; Berton, Juliana; Ferreira, Tamara Nascimento; Dalmolin, Luciana Facco; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Favero, Giovani Marino

    2016-08-01

    In this study, resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were developed and its antitumor activity tested on a melanoma mice model. These nanocapsules were spherically-shaped and presented suitable size, negative charge and high encapsulation efficiency for their use as a modified-release system of resveratrol. Nanoencapsulation leads to the drug amorphization. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles reduced cell viability of murine melanoma cells. There was a decrease in tumor volume, an increase in the necrotic area and inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma when resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were compared to free resveratrol in treated mice. Nanoencapsulation of resveratrol also prevented metastasis and pulmonary hemorrhage. This modified-release technology containing resveratrol can be used as a feasible approach in order to inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth. PMID:27070053

  11. Phase dispersion X-ray imaging of murine soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingal, V. N.; Ingal, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of phase-contrast (PC) images in the phase-dispersion introscopy (PDI) technique is the subject of this paper. Conditions for extreme sensitivity to murine soft-tissue anatomy are discussed. The unique information content and good contrast of the minutest details of anatomy, together with the high brilliance of X-ray optics, give the authors confidence that the PDI method can be successfully applied for medical diagnostics.

  12. Miniature Microwave Applicator for Murine Bladder Hyperthermia Studies

    PubMed Central

    Salahi, Sara; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Rodrigues, Dario B.; Etienne, Wiguins; Landon, Chelsea D.; Inman, Brant A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Novel combinations of heat with chemotherapeutic agents are often studied in murine tumor models. Currently, no device exists to selectively heat small tumors at depth in mice. In this project, we modelled, built and tested a miniature microwave heat applicator, the physical dimensions of which can be scaled to adjust the volume and depth of heating to focus on the tumor volume. Of particular interest is a device that can selectively heat murine bladder. Materials and Methods Using Avizo® segmentation software, we created a numerical mouse model based on micro-MRI scan data. The model was imported into HFSS™ simulation software and parametric studies were performed to optimize the dimensions of a water-loaded circular waveguide for selective power deposition inside a 0.15ml bladder. A working prototype was constructed operating at 2.45GHz. Heating performance was characterized by mapping fiber-optic temperature sensors along catheters inserted at depths of 0-1mm (subcutaneous), 2-3mm (vaginal), and 4-5mm (rectal) below the abdominal wall, with the mid-depth catheter adjacent to the bladder. Core temperature was monitored orally. Results Thermal measurements confirm the simulations which demonstrate that this applicator can provide local heating at depth in small animals. Measured temperatures in murine pelvis show well-localized bladder heating to 42-43°C while maintaining normothermic skin and core temperatures. Conclusions Simulation techniques facilitate the design optimization of microwave antennas for use in pre-clinical applications such as localized tumor heating in small animals. Laboratory measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of a new miniature water-coupled microwave applicator for localized heating of murine bladder. PMID:22690856

  13. Morphology and growth of murine cell lines on model biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Godek, Marisha L; Duchsherer, Nichole L; McElwee, Quinn; Grainger, David W

    2004-01-01

    All biomaterial implants are assaulted by the host "foreign body" immune response. Understanding the complex, dynamic relationship between cells, biomaterials and milieu is an important first step towards controlling this reaction. Material surface chemistry dictates protein adsorption, and thus subsequent cell interactions. The cell-implant is a microenvironment involving 1) proteins that coat the surface and 2) cells that interact with these proteins. Macrophages and fibroblasts are two cell types that interact with proteins on biomaterials surfaces and play different related, but equally important, roles in biomaterials rejection and implant failure. Growth characteristics of four murine cell lines on model biomaterials surfaces were examined. Murine monocyte-macrophages (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1), murine macrophage (IC-21) and murine fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines were tested to determine whether differences exist in adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, spreading, and fusion (macrophage lineages only) on these surfaces. Differences were observed in the ability of cells to adhere to and subsequently proliferate on polymer surfaces. (Monocyte-) macrophages grew well on all surfaces tested and growth rates were measured on three representative polymer biomaterials surfaces: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polystyrene, and Teflon-AF. J774A.1 cultures grown on TCPS and treated with exogenous cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF were observed to contain multinucleate cells with unusual morphologies. Thus, (monocyte-) macrophage cell lines were found to effectively attach to and interrogate each surface presented, with evidence of extensive spreading on Teflon-AF surfaces, particularly in the IC-21 cultures. The J774A.1 line was able to proliferate and/or differentiate to more specialized cell types (multinucleate/dendritic-like cells) in the presence of soluble chemokine cues. PMID:15133927

  14. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  15. A chronic scheme of cranial window preparation to study pial vascular reactivity in murine cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Peng Kai; Meays, Diana; Frangos, John A.; Carvalho, Leonardo J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The acute implantation of a cranial window for studying cerebroarteriolar reactivity in living animals involves a highly surgically-invasive craniotomy procedure at the time of experimentation, which limits its application in severely ill animals such as in the experimental murine model of cerebral malaria (ECM). To overcome this problem, a chronic window implantation scheme was designed and implemented. Methods A partial craniotomy is first performed by creating a skull bone flap in the healthy mice, which are then left to recover for 1–2 weeks, followed by infection to induce ECM. Uninfected animals are utilized as control. When cranial superfusion is needed, the bone flap is retracted and window implantation completed by assembling a perfusion chamber for compound delivery to the exposed brain surface. The presurgical step is intended to minimize surgical trauma on the day of experimentation. Results Chronic preparations in uninfected mice exhibited remarkably improved stability over acute ones by significantly reducing periarteriolar tissue damage and enhancing cerebroarteriolar dilator responses. The chronic scheme was successfully implemented in ECM mice which unveiled novel preliminary insights on impaired cerebroarteriolar reactivity and eNOS dysfunction. Conclusion The chronic scheme presents an innovative approach for advancing our mechanistic understanding on cerebrovascular dysfunction in ECM. PMID:23279271

  16. Adjuvant and anti-inflammatory properties of cigarette smoke in murine allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Nancy J; Botelho, Fernando M; Bauer, Carla M T; Fattouh, Ramzi; Stämpfli, Martin R

    2009-01-01

    The impact of cigarette smoke on allergic asthma remains controversial both clinically and experimentally. The objective of this study was to investigate, in a murine model, how cigarette smoke affects immune inflammatory processes elicited by a surrogate allergen. In our experimental design, mice were concurrently exposed to cigarette smoke and ovalbumin (OVA), an innocuous antigen that, unless introduced in the context of an adjuvant, induces inhalation tolerance. We show that cigarette smoke exposure has adjuvant properties, allowing for allergic mucosal sensitization to OVA. Specifically, concurrent exposure to cigarette smoke and OVA for 2 weeks led to airway eosinophilia and goblet cell hyperplasia. In vivo OVA recall challenge 1 month after the last smoke exposure showed that concurrent exposure to OVA and cigarette smoke induced antigen-specific memory. Robust eosinophilia and OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE characterized the ensuing inflammatory response. Mechanistically, allergic sensitization was, in part, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) dependent, as a significant reduction in BAL eosinophilia was observed in mice treated with an anti-GM-CSF antibody. Of note, continuous smoke exposure attenuated the OVA recall response; decreased airway eosinophilia was observed in mice continuously exposed to cigarette smoke compared with mice that ceased the smoke exposure protocol. In conclusion, we demonstrate experimentally that while cigarette smoke acts as an adjuvant allowing for allergic sensitization, it also attenuates the ensuing eosinophilic inflammatory response. PMID:18635815

  17. Utilization of Murine Colonoscopy for Orthotopic Implantation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zigmond, Ehud; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Brazowski, Eli; Jung, Steffen; Varol, Chen

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal-cancer (CRC) research has greatly benefited from the availability of small animal tumor models. Spontaneous and chemically-induced CRC models are widely used yet limited in their resemblance to human disease and are often prolonged, not accurately repetitive, and associated with inflammatory side effects. In-situ murine or human tumor implantation in the gastrointestinal tract of mice is extremely challenging, and limited by inter-animal variability and procedure-related complications and mortality. As a result, in frequent studies CRC is implanted in distal sites, most commonly the subcutaneous region, an approach that is greatly limited by the absence of normal gastrointestinal tumor milieu and has substantial effects on tumor development. Aims In this study we aimed to develop a well-tolerated repetitive tool to study CRC in small animals by adapting the murine colonoscopy system to serve as a platform for colonic sub-mucosal orthotopic implantation of human and murine CRC tumor cells. Results We report the establishment of a novel small-animal CRC model that is minimally invasive, rapid, well-tolerated, highly reproducible, and confers precise control of tumor number, location and growth rate. Moreover, we show that this model uniquely allows the side-by-side induction of distinct genetically manipulated tumors, enabling the mechanistic study of tumor interaction and cross-talk within the native intestinal microenvironment. Conclusions Employment of this new approach may represent a major technical advance for the in-vivo study of CRC. PMID:22174916

  18. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D.

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Evaluation of a Murine Single-Blood-Injection SAH Model

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Clemens; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Schneider, Toni; Hänggi, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) are poorly understood and continue to be a matter of debate. A valid murine SAH injection model is not yet available but would be the prerequisite for further transgenic studies assessing the mechanisms following SAH. Using the murine single injection model, we examined the effects of SAH on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the somatosensory (S1) and cerebellar cortex, neuro-behavioural and morphological integrity and changes in quantitative electrocorticographic and electrocardiographic parameters. Micro CT imaging verified successful blood delivery into the cisterna magna. An acute impairment of rCBF was observed immediately after injection in the SAH and after 6, 12 and 24 hours in the S1 and 6 and 12 hours after SAH in the cerebellum. Injection of blood into the foramen magnum reduced telemetric recorded total ECoG power by an average of 65%. Spectral analysis of ECoGs revealed significantly increased absolute delta power, i.e., slowing, cortical depolarisations and changes in ripples and fast ripple oscillations 12 hours and 24 hours after SAH. Therefore, murine single-blood-injection SAH model is suitable for pathophysiological and further molecular analysis following SAH. PMID:25545775

  20. Dual function of pneumolysin in the early pathogenesis of murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Rubins, J B; Charboneau, D; Paton, J C; Mitchell, T J; Andrew, P W; Janoff, E N

    1995-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common etiologic agents of community-acquired pneumonia, particularly bacteremic pneumonia. Pneumolysin, a multifunctional cytotoxin, is a putative virulence factor for S. pneumoniae; however, a direct role for pneumolysin in the early pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia has not been confirmed in vivo. We compared the growth of a pneumolysin-deficient (PLY[-]) type 2 S. pneumoniae strain with its isogenic wild-type strain (PLY[+]) after direct endotracheal instillation of bacteria into murine lungs. Compared with PLY(-) bacteria, infection with PLY(+) bacteria produced greater injury to the alveolar-capillary barrier, as assayed by albumin concentrations in alveolar lavage, and substantially greater numbers of PLY(+) bacteria were recovered in alveolar lavages and lung homogenates at 3 and 6 h after infection. The presence of pneumolysin also contributed to the development of bacteremia, which was detected at 3 h after intratracheal instillation of PLY(+) bacteria. The direct effects of pneumolysin on lung injury and on the ability of pneumococci to evade local lung defenses was confirmed by addition of purified recombinant pneumolysin to inocula of PLY(-) pneumococci, which promoted growth of PLY(-) bacteria in the lung to levels comparable to those seen with the PLY(+) strain. We further demonstrated the contributions of both the cytolytic and the complement-activating properties of pneumolysin on enhanced bacterial growth in murine lungs using genetically modified pneumolysin congeners and genetically complement-deficient mice. Thus, pneumolysin facilitates intraalveolar replication of pneumococci, penetration of bacteria from alveoli into the interstitium of the lung, and dissemination of pneumococci into the bloodstream during experimental pneumonia. Moreover, both the cytotoxic and the complement-activating activities of pneumolysin may contribute independently to the acute pulmonary injury and the high rates of

  1. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for visualization of tissue morphology and cellular dynamics in murine and human airways.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Sarah; Pieper, Mario; Hüttmann, Gereon; Bölke, Torsten; Wollenberg, Barbara; Marsh, Leigh M; Garn, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The basic understanding of inflammatory airway diseases greatly benefits from imaging the cellular dynamics of immune cells. Current imaging approaches focus on labeling specific cells to follow their dynamics but fail to visualize the surrounding tissue. To overcome this problem, we evaluated autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for following the motion and interaction of cells in the airways in the context of tissue morphology. Freshly isolated murine tracheae from healthy mice and mice with experimental allergic airway inflammation were examined by autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy. In addition, fluorescently labeled ovalbumin and fluorophore-labeled antibodies were applied to visualize antigen uptake and to identify specific cell populations, respectively. The trachea in living mice was imaged to verify that the ex vivo preparation reflects the in vivo situation. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy was also tested to examine human tissue from patients in short-term tissue culture. Using autofluorescence, the epithelium, underlying cells, and fibers of the connective tissue, as well as blood vessels, were identified in isolated tracheae. Similar structures were visualized in living mice and in the human airway tissue. In explanted murine airways, mobile cells were localized within the tissue and we could follow their migration, interactions between individual cells, and their phagocytic activity. During allergic airway inflammation, increased number of eosinophil and neutrophil granulocytes were detected that moved within the connective tissue and immediately below the epithelium without damaging the epithelial cells or connective tissues. Contacts between granulocytes were transient lasting 3 min on average. Unexpectedly, prolonged interactions between granulocytes and antigen-uptaking cells were observed lasting for an average of 13 min. Our results indicate that autofluorescence-based imaging can detect previously unknown immune cell

  2. Efficacy of the Mineral Oil and Hyaluronic Acid Mixture Eye Drops in Murine Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Han; Kim, Jung Han; Li, Zhengri; Oh, Han Jin; Ahn, Kyu Youn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the therapeutic effects of mineral oil (MO) and hyaluronic acid (HA) mixture eye drops on the tear film and ocular surface in a mouse model of experimental dry eye (EDE). Methods Eye drops consisting of 0.1% HA alone or mixed with 0.1%, 0.5%, or 5.0% MO were applied to desiccating stress-induced murine dry eyes. Tear volume, corneal irregularity score, tear film break-up time (TBUT), and corneal fluorescein staining scores were measured at 5 and 10 days after treatment. Ten days after treatment, goblet cells in the conjunctiva were counted after Periodic acid-Schiff staining. Results There was no significant difference in the tear volume between desiccating stress-induced groups. The corneal irregularity score was lower in the 0.5% MO group compared with the EDE and HA groups. The 0.5% and 5.0% MO groups showed a significant improvement in TBUT compared with the EDE group. Mice treated with 0.1% and 0.5% MO mixture eye drops showed a significant improvement in fluorescein staining scores compared with the EDE group and the HA group. The conjunctival goblet cell count was higher in the 0.5% MO group compared with the EDE group and HA group. Conclusions The MO and HA mixture eye drops had a beneficial effect on the tear films and ocular surface of murine dry eye. The application of 0.5% MO and 0.1% HA mixture eye drops could improve corneal irregularity, the corneal fluorescein staining score, and conjunctival goblet cell count compared with 0.1% HA eye drops in the treatment of EDE. PMID:25829831

  3. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for visualization of tissue morphology and cellular dynamics in murine and human airways

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Sarah; Pieper, Mario; Hüttmann, Gereon; Bölke, Torsten; Wollenberg, Barbara; Marsh, Leigh M; Garn, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The basic understanding of inflammatory airway diseases greatly benefits from imaging the cellular dynamics of immune cells. Current imaging approaches focus on labeling specific cells to follow their dynamics but fail to visualize the surrounding tissue. To overcome this problem, we evaluated autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for following the motion and interaction of cells in the airways in the context of tissue morphology. Freshly isolated murine tracheae from healthy mice and mice with experimental allergic airway inflammation were examined by autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy. In addition, fluorescently labeled ovalbumin and fluorophore-labeled antibodies were applied to visualize antigen uptake and to identify specific cell populations, respectively. The trachea in living mice was imaged to verify that the ex vivo preparation reflects the in vivo situation. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy was also tested to examine human tissue from patients in short-term tissue culture. Using autofluorescence, the epithelium, underlying cells, and fibers of the connective tissue, as well as blood vessels, were identified in isolated tracheae. Similar structures were visualized in living mice and in the human airway tissue. In explanted murine airways, mobile cells were localized within the tissue and we could follow their migration, interactions between individual cells, and their phagocytic activity. During allergic airway inflammation, increased number of eosinophil and neutrophil granulocytes were detected that moved within the connective tissue and immediately below the epithelium without damaging the epithelial cells or connective tissues. Contacts between granulocytes were transient lasting 3 min on average. Unexpectedly, prolonged interactions between granulocytes and antigen-uptaking cells were observed lasting for an average of 13 min. Our results indicate that autofluorescence-based imaging can detect previously unknown immune cell

  4. CTGF/CCN2 Postconditioning Increases Tolerance of Murine Hearts towards Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kaasbøll, Ole Jørgen; Moe, Ingvild Tronstad; Ahmed, Mohammad Shakil; Stang, Espen; Hagelin, Else Marie Valbjørn; Attramadal, Håvard

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Previous studies of ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in hearts from mice with cardiac-restricted overexpression of CCN2 have shown that CCN2 increases tolerance towards IRI. The objectives of this study were to investigate to what extent post-ischemic administration of recombinant human CCN2 (rhCCN2) would limit infarct size and improve functional recovery and what signaling pathways are involved. Experimental Approach Isolated mice hearts were perfused ad modum Langendorff, subjected to no-flow, global ischemia, and subsequently, exposed to mammalian cell derived, full-length (38-40kDa) rhCCN2 (250 nM) or vehicle during the first 15 min of a 60 min reperfusion period. Key Results Post-ischemic administration of rhCCN2 resulted in attenuation of infarct size from 58 ± 4% to 34 ± 2% (p < 0.001) which was abrogated by concomitant administration of the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 (45 ± 3% vs. 50 ± 3%, ns). In congruence with reduction of infarct size rhCCN2 also improved recovery of left ventricular developed pressure (p < 0.05). Western blot analyses of extracts of ex vivo-perfused murine hearts also revealed that rhCCN2 evoked concentration-dependent increase of cardiac phospho-GSK3β (serine-9) contents. Conclusions and Implications We demonstrate that post-ischemic administration of rhCCN2 increases the tolerance of ex vivo-perfused murine hearts to IRI. Mechanistically, this postconditioning effect of rhCCN2 appeared to be mediated by activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinase pathway as demonstrated by sensitivity to PI3 kinase inhibition and increased CCN2-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β (Ser-9). Thus, the rationale for testing rhCCN2-mediated post-ischemic conditioning of the heart in more complex models is established. PMID:26872261

  5. Pathway analysis of Candida albicans survival and virulence determinants in a murine infection model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jeffrey M; Kauffman, Sarah J; Hauser, Melinda; Huang, Liyin; Lin, Molly; Sillaots, Susan; Jiang, Bo; Xu, Deming; Roemer, Terry

    2010-12-21

    One potentially rich source of possible targets for antifungal therapy are those Candida albicans genes deemed essential for growth under the standard culture (i.e., in vitro) conditions; however, these genes are largely unexplored as drug targets because essential genes are not experimentally amenable to conventional gene deletion and virulence studies. Using tetracycline-regulatable promoter-based conditional mutants, we investigated a murine model of candidiasis in which repressing essential genes in the host was achieved. By adding doxycycline to the drinking water starting 3 days prior to (dox - 3D) or 2 days post (dox + 2D) infection, the phenotypic consequences of temporal gene inactivation were assessed by monitoring animal survival and fungal burden in prophylaxis and acute infection settings. Of 177 selected conditional shut-off strains tested, the virulence of 102 was blocked under both repressing conditions, suggesting that the corresponding genes are essential for growth and survival in a murine host across early and established infection periods. Among these genes were those previously identified as antifungal drug targets (i.e., FKS1, ERG1, and ERG11), verifying that this methodology can be used to validate potential new targets. We also identify genes either conditionally essential or dispensable for in vitro growth but required for survival and virulence, including those in late stage ergosterol synthesis, or early steps in fatty acid or riboflavin biosynthesis. This study evaluates the role of essential genes with respect to pathogen virulence in a large-scale, systems biology context, and provides a general method for gene target validation and for uncovering unexpected antimicrobial targets. PMID:21135205

  6. Differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells in skeletal muscles of mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chai; Lu, Yifan; Gilbert, Rénald; Karpati, George

    2008-01-01

    Possible myogenic differentiation of SSEA-1- and OCT-4-positive murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and embryoid bodies (EBs) was studied in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ESC- or EB-derived ESCs (EBs/ESCs) showed only traces of Pax 3 and 7 expression by immunocytochemistry and Pax 3 expression by immunoblot. By RT-PCR, myogenic determinant molecules (myf5, myoD, and myogenin) were expressed by EBs/ESCs but not by ESCs. However, in such cultures, very rare contracting myotubes were still present. Suspensions of LacZ-labeled ESCs or EBs were injected into anterior tibialis muscles (ATM) of different cohorts of mice for the study of their survival and possible myogenic differentiation. The different cohorts of mice included isogenic adult 129/Sv, nonisogenic CD1 and mdx, as well as mdx immunosuppressed with 2.5 mg/kg daily injections of tacrolimus. Ten to 90 days postinjections, the injected ATM of nonisogenic mice did not contain cells positive for LacZ, SSEA-1, OCT-4, or embryonic myosin heavy chain. The ATM of intact mdx mice contained very rare examples of muscle fibers positive for dystrophin and/or embryonic myosin heavy chain. In the ATM of the isogenic normal and the immunosuppressed mdx mice, as expected, large teratomas developed containing the usual diverse cell types. In some teratomas of immunosuppressed mdx mice, small pockets of muscle fibers expressed dystrophin and myosin heavy chain. Our studies indicated that in muscles of animals nonisogenic with the used ESCs, only very rare ESCs survived with myogenic differentiation. These studies also indicated that ESCs will not undergo significant, selective, and preferential myogenic differentiation in vitro or in vivo in any of the models studied. It is probable that this strain of murine ESC requires some experimentally induced alteration of its gene expression profile to secure significant myogenicity and suppress tumorogenicity. PMID:18522235

  7. Expression and modulation of IL-1 alpha in murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ansel, J.C.; Luger, T.A.; Lowry, D.; Perry, P.; Roop, D.R.; Mountz, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    Murine and human keratinocytes produce an IL-1-like factor that appears to be similar if not identical to monocyte-derived IL-1. IL-1 may be an important mediator in cutaneous inflammatory responses, however, little is currently known concerning factors that may modulate IL-1 expression in keratinocytes. To address this issue we examined the effect of LPS, UV, and the cell differentiation state on murine keratinocyte IL-1 mRNA expression. Our results indicated that as with the murine P388D1 monocyte cell line, PAM 212 keratinocytes constitutively express abundant amounts of IL-1 alpha mRNA. On exposure to LPS (100 micrograms/ml) for 8 h there was more than 10 times the increase in PAM 212 IL-1 alpha mRNA which was accompanied by a sixfold increase in supernatant IL-1 activity. Similarly UV irradiation had a significant effect on keratinocyte IL-1 alpha expression. High dose UV (300 mJ/cm2) inhibited PAM 212 IL-1 alpha expression at 4, 8, 24, 48 h post-UV whereas a lower dose of UV (100 mJ/cm2) inhibited UV at 4 and 8 h post-UV, but induced IL-1 expression at 24 and 48 h post-UV. The expression of IL-1 alpha varied with the differentiation state of the keratinocytes. Freshly removed newborn murine keratinocytes were found to constitutively express IL-1 alpha mRNA. Keratinocytes grown in low (Ca2+) tissue culture media (0.05 mM) for 6 days, functionally and phenotypically become undifferentiated and express increased quantities of IL-1 alpha mRNA, whereas cells grown in high (Ca2+) media (1.2 mM) for 6 days become terminally differentiated and IL-1 expression ceased. Keratinocytes cultured for 3 days in low (Ca2+) conditions expressed an intermediate level of IL-1 alpha. In contrast, little or no IL-1 beta mRNA was detected in either the PAM 212 cells or newborn murine keratinocytes.

  8. Murine Norovirus Transcytosis across an In Vitro Polarized Murine Intestinal Epithelial Monolayer Is Mediated by M-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B.; Liu, Thomas; Blanco, Luz P.; Auble, Heather; Payne, Hilary C.

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the causative agent of the vast majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the inability to culture human NoVs and the inability to orally infect a small animal model, little is known about the initial steps of viral entry. One particular step that is not understood is how NoVs breach the intestinal epithelial barrier. Murine NoV (MNV) is the only NoV that can be propagated in vitro by infecting murine macrophages and dendritic cells, making this virus an attractive model for studies of different aspects of NoV biology. Polarized murine intestinal epithelial mICcl2 cells were used to investigate how MNV interacts with and crosses the intestinal epithelium. In this in vitro model of the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), MNV is transported across the polarized cell monolayer in the absence of viral replication or disruption of tight junctions by a distinct epithelial cell with microfold (M) cell properties. In addition to transporting MNV, these M-like cells also transcytose microbeads and express an IgA receptor. Interestingly, B myeloma cells cultured in the basolateral compartment underlying the epithelial monolayer did not alter the number of M-like cells but increased their transcytotic activity. Our data demonstrate that MNV can cross an intact intestinal epithelial monolayer in vitro by hijacking the M-like cells' intrinsic transcytotic pathway and suggest a potential mechanism for MNV entry into the host. PMID:24049163

  9. Murine norovirus transcytosis across an in vitro polarized murine intestinal epithelial monolayer is mediated by M-like cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B; Liu, Thomas; Blanco, Luz P; Auble, Heather; Payne, Hilary C; Wobus, Christiane E

    2013-12-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the causative agent of the vast majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the inability to culture human NoVs and the inability to orally infect a small animal model, little is known about the initial steps of viral entry. One particular step that is not understood is how NoVs breach the intestinal epithelial barrier. Murine NoV (MNV) is the only NoV that can be propagated in vitro by infecting murine macrophages and dendritic cells, making this virus an attractive model for studies of different aspects of NoV biology. Polarized murine intestinal epithelial mICcl2 cells were used to investigate how MNV interacts with and crosses the intestinal epithelium. In this in vitro model of the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), MNV is transported across the polarized cell monolayer in the absence of viral replication or disruption of tight junctions by a distinct epithelial cell with microfold (M) cell properties. In addition to transporting MNV, these M-like cells also transcytose microbeads and express an IgA receptor. Interestingly, B myeloma cells cultured in the basolateral compartment underlying the epithelial monolayer did not alter the number of M-like cells but increased their transcytotic activity. Our data demonstrate that MNV can cross an intact intestinal epithelial monolayer in vitro by hijacking the M-like cells' intrinsic transcytotic pathway and suggest a potential mechanism for MNV entry into the host. PMID:24049163

  10. Microbiome and Asthma: What Have Experimental Models Already Taught Us?

    PubMed

    Bonamichi-Santos, R; Aun, M V; Agondi, R C; Kalil, J; Giavina-Bianchi, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that imposes a substantial burden on patients, their families, and the community. Although many aspects of the pathogenesis of classical allergic asthma are well known by the scientific community, other points are not yet understood. Experimental asthma models, particularly murine models, have been used for over 100 years in order to better understand the immunopathology of asthma. It has been shown that human microbiome is an important component in the development of the immune system. Furthermore, the occurrence of many inflammatory diseases is influenced by the presence of microbes. Again, experimental models of asthma have helped researchers to understand the relationship between the microbiome and respiratory inflammation. In this review, we discuss the evolution of murine models of asthma and approach the major studies involving the microbiome and asthma. PMID:26266269

  11. Blackwater fever like in murine malaria.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Norma; Romero, Samanta E; Menchaca, Angeles; Zepeda, Armando; García, Luis E; Salas, Gerardo; Romero, Laura; Malagón, Filiberto

    2013-03-01

    Blackwater fever (BWF) is the term used to designate the occurrence of hemoglobin pigments in the urine of patients infected with malaria parasites. BWF is more often associated with Plasmodium falciparum infection in man. The pathogenesis of BWF has not been explained satisfactorily. In the present study, the clinical and pathological observations made upon CD1 mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii yoelii lethal strain with clinical signs of hemoglobinuria and acute renal failure were evaluated. From the 40 P. yoelii yoelii-infected mice, 14 presented hemoglobinuria. In the observations, it was emphasized that hemoglobinuria occurred in the animals 1-2 days before they die. At 6 days post-infection, infected hemoglobinuric mice (HM) exhibited clinical signs such as dark red urine, apnea, and evident oliguria and hematuria; urine microscopical examination showed very few red blood cells. The entire non hemoglobinuric infected mice had a high parasitemia preceding the time of death, while the HM parasitemia was just detectable. In HM, marked hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, and renal and hepatic dysfunction were observed with the blood chemistry analysis at 6 days post-infection. Severe renal lesions were demonstrated in histopathological and scanning electron microscopy samples. Occlusion and necrosis of convoluted tubules were the main lesions found. The conditions required for the experimental production of hemoglobinuria in CD1 mouse infected by P. yoelii yoelii is still unknown. The clinical picture of a BWF, like in our rodents, was produced exclusively by the interaction between the parasite and its host. Results showed that hemoglobinuria in CD1 mice infected with P. yoelii yoelii and BWF in man infected with P. falciparum are similar in their pathogenesis. PMID:23254588

  12. Short-term hyperoxia does not exert immunologic effects during experimental murine and human endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Kiers, Dorien; Gerretsen, Jelle; Janssen, Emmy; John, Aaron; Groeneveld, R.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; Scheffer, Gert-Jan; Pickkers, Peter; Kox, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen therapy to maintain tissue oxygenation is one of the cornerstones of critical care. Therefore, hyperoxia is often encountered in critically ill patients. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that hyperoxia may affect outcome, although mechanisms are unclear. Immunologic effects might be involved, as hyperoxia was shown to attenuate inflammation and organ damage in preclinical models. However, it remains unclear whether these observations can be ascribed to direct immunosuppressive effects of hyperoxia or to preserved tissue oxygenation. In contrast to these putative anti-inflammatory effects, hyperoxia may elicit an inflammatory response and organ damage in itself, known as oxygen toxicity. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of systemic inflammation, short-term hyperoxia (100% O2 for 2.5 hours in mice and 3.5 hours in humans) does not result in increased levels of inflammatory cytokines in both mice and healthy volunteers. Furthermore, we show that, compared with room air, hyperoxia does not affect the systemic inflammatory response elicited by administration of bacterial endotoxin in mice and man. Finally, neutrophil phagocytosis and ROS generation are unaffected by short-term hyperoxia. Our results indicate that hyperoxia does not exert direct anti-inflammatory effects and temper expectations of using it as an immunomodulatory treatment strategy. PMID:26616217

  13. Therapeutic effect of hydroxychloroquine on colorectal carcinogenesis in experimental murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junlin; Xie, Jiansheng; Xie, Binbin; Li, Yiran; Jiang, Liming; Sui, Xinbing; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Pan, Hongming; Han, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation in the intestine is a strong risk factor for colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is widely used as an anti-inflammatory drug in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory disorders and various tumors. However, little is known regarding the effects of HCQ on colitis-associated tumorigenesis. In this study, mice treated with HCQ showed a significant reduction in early-stage colitis following azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) administration, as well as a remarkable inhibition of colonic tumorigenesis and tumor growth at late stages of CAC. Mechanistically, the therapeutic effects of HCQ were attributed to inhibition of inflammatory responses and production of mutagenic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in immune cells and subsequent promotion of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, we found that HCQ inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and ROS in response to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in macrophages. Our data presented herein may help guide the clinical use of HCQ as a prevention and treatment strategy for CAC. PMID:27288548

  14. Evaluation of potential antidepressant-like activity of chalcone-1203 in various murine experimental depressant models.

    PubMed

    Guan, Li-Ping; Tang, Li-Ming; Pan, Cheng-Yan; Zhao, Shui-Lian; Wang, Si-Hong

    2014-02-01

    Two classic animal behavior despair tests-the forced swimming test (FST) and the tail suspension test (TST) were used to evaluate antidepressant-like activity of a new chalcone compound, chalcone-1203 in mice. It was observed that chalcone-1203 at dose of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg significantly reduced the immobility time in the FST and TST in mice 30 min after treatment. In addition, chalcone-1203 was found to exhibit significant oral activity in the FST in mice. It also produced a reduction in the ambulation in the open-field test in mice not previously habituated to the arena, but no effect in the locomotor activity in mice previously habituated to the open-field. The main monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in mouse brain regions were also simultaneously determined by HPLC-ECD. It was found that chalcone-1203 significantly increased the concentrations of the main neurotransmitters 5-HT and NE in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and cortex. Chalcone-1203 also significantly reduced the ratio of 5-HIAA/5-HT in the hippocampus and cortex, shown down 5-HT metabolism compared with mice treated with stress vehicle. In conclusion, chalcone-1203 produced significant antidepressant-like activity, and the mechanism of action may be due to increased 5-HT and NE in the mouse hippocampus and cortex. PMID:24343532

  15. [Effects of Buthus occitanus tunetanus envenomation on an experimental murine model of gestation].

    PubMed

    Ben Nasr, Hmed; Hammami, Serria; Mion, Georges; Sahnoun, Zoheir; Chouaiekh, Fakher; Rebaï, Tarek; Kassis, Mondher; Goyffon, Max; Zeghal, Khaled

    2007-12-01

    Scorpion envenoming is less studied in pregnant victims. In this work, the effect of Buthus occitanus tunetanus on parturition in late pregnancy was studied in an animal model. Four groups of six primigravid female rats, each one at the 22nd day of pregnancy, were used. The first two groups had received an intra-peritoneal injection of 500 microg/kg of Buthus occitanus tunetanus crude venom or a physiological saline solution and left until foetal delivery. Then, the time elapsed until the first pup delivery and that separating the first and latest ones were measured. The other two groups served for the uterine electrophysiological activity exploration. Rats were anaesthetized, artificially ventilated and had received an intraperitoneal injection of 500 microg/kg of Buthus occitanus tunetanus crude venom or a physiological saline solution. Our results showed a significant increase of the latency to foetal delivery, labour time, and uterine contractile activity in envenomed rats compared to controls. Such signs are usually seen in dynamic dystocia. It was concluded that Buthus occitanus tunetanus envenoming might induce a dynamic dystocia, when it occurred in late pregnancy. PMID:18068647

  16. ORI2 inhibits coxsackievirus replication and myocardial inflammation in experimental murine myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung-Kwan; Kim, Jin Hee

    2014-01-01

    We purified ORI2 [3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acrylic acid 1-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-methoxycarbonylethyl ester] from an extract of the plant Isodon excisus. We tested the antiviral effect of ORI2 in a coxsackievirus-induced myocarditis model. Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common cause of myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt signaling in virus-infected cells is essential for CVB3 replication. Antiviral compounds were screened by HeLa cell survival assay. Several purified natural compounds were added to HeLa cells cultured in 96-well plates for 30 min after 1 multiplicity of infection (m.o.i) CVB3 infection. ORI2 significantly improved HeLa cell survival in a dose-dependent manner. For in vivo studies, BALB/c mice (n=20) were infected with CVB3, then 10 of the mice were treated by daily intraperitoneal injections of ORI2 (100 mM) for 3 consecutive days. ORI2 treatment significantly improved early survival in the treated mice compared to untreated mice (85% vs. 50%, respectively). Organ virus titers and myocardial damage were significantly lower in the ORI2-treated mice than in untreated mice. These results demonstrate that ORI2, delivered by intraperitoneal injection after CVB3 infection, has a significant antiviral effect by markedly inhibiting virus replication, resulting in a decrease in organ virus titer and myocardial damage. ORI2 may be developed as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of CVB3 infections. PMID:25273388

  17. Nutritional status and immune response in murine experimental Jorge Lobo's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Adriana Sierra Assencio Almeida; Diório, Suzana Madeira; Pedrini, Silvia Cristina Barboza; Silva, Sônia Maria Uso Ruiz; Sartori, Beatriz Gomes Carreira; Calvi, Sueli Aparecida; Pereira, Paulo Câmara Marques; Vilani-Moreno, Fátima Regina

    2015-09-01

    There are no studies investigating the role of nutritional status and immunity associated with Jorge Lobo's disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of protein-calorie malnutrition on the immune response of BALB/c mice inoculated with Lacazia loboi. In this study,the animals were divided into four groups: G1: inoculated with restricted diet, G2: not inoculated with restricted diet, G3: inoculated with regular diet, G4: not inoculated with regular diet. The animals of groups G1 and G2 were submitted to malnutrition for 20 days and once installed the animals were inoculated intradermally into the footpad. After 4 months, they were euthanised for the isolation of peritoneal lavage cells and removal of the footpad. The production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α, H2 O2 and nitric oxide (NO) was evaluated in the peritoneal lavage cells. The footpad was evaluated regarding the size of macroscopic lesions, number of fungi and viability index. The results showed that the infection did not exert great influence on the body weight of the mice and previous malnutrition was an unfavourable factor for viability index, number of fungi, macroscopic lesion size in the footpad and production of H2 O2 , NO, IL-12, IL-10 and IFN-γ, suggesting that malnutrition significantly altered fungal activity and peritoneal cells. The results suggest considerable interaction between nutrition and immunity in Jorge Lobo's disease. PMID:26156007

  18. Experimental pathogenicity of a clinical isolate of Trichosporon dermatis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Ping; Yang, Yan-Ping; Huang, Wen-Ming; Chen, Yong-Hua; Li, Shun-Fan; Fan, Yi-Ming

    2011-11-01

    The pathogenicity of Trichosporon dermatis isolated from skin lesions of a patient has been examined in mice. Balb/c mice were treated with two intraperitoneal injections of 100 mg/kg cyclophosphamide on days 4 and 1 and one subcutaneous injection of 10 mg/kg dexamethasone on day 1 pre-inoculation, and then challenged with 0.2 ml T. dermatis inoculum (1 × 10(8) CFU/ml) by topical application on an abrasive wound in the dermabrasive group and by hypodermic injection in the subcutaneous group. In the intravenous group, 0.2 ml of high (1 × 10(8) CFU/ml) or low (1 × 10(7 )CFU/ml) inoculum was injected into the tail vein. Histopathology and inverse fungal culture were performed on the skin lesion and viscera, and renal fungal burden was also determined. Inoculated sites developed localized infections after dermabrasive and subcutaneous challenge in all mice, but the maximum area of skin lesions, and number of positive cultures from the lesions, were higher for immunocompromised mice. In the intravenous group, all immunocompetent animals survived during the four-week period, whereas 100 and 70% of immunocompromised animals died by 3 and 5 days in the high and low-inoculum groups, respectively. The incidence of disseminated infection and the renal fungal burden of immunocompromised mice were higher than those of immunocompetent mice. Our results demonstrate that subcutaneous and intravenous injection of T. dermatis can successfully establish cutaneous and systemic infection models in immunocompromised mice, with the kidney and lung being most susceptible. PMID:21750940

  19. Short-term hyperoxia does not exert immunologic effects during experimental murine and human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Kiers, Dorien; Gerretsen, Jelle; Janssen, Emmy; John, Aaron; Groeneveld, R; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Scheffer, Gert-Jan; Pickkers, Peter; Kox, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen therapy to maintain tissue oxygenation is one of the cornerstones of critical care. Therefore, hyperoxia is often encountered in critically ill patients. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that hyperoxia may affect outcome, although mechanisms are unclear. Immunologic effects might be involved, as hyperoxia was shown to attenuate inflammation and organ damage in preclinical models. However, it remains unclear whether these observations can be ascribed to direct immunosuppressive effects of hyperoxia or to preserved tissue oxygenation. In contrast to these putative anti-inflammatory effects, hyperoxia may elicit an inflammatory response and organ damage in itself, known as oxygen toxicity. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of systemic inflammation, short-term hyperoxia (100% O2 for 2.5 hours in mice and 3.5 hours in humans) does not result in increased levels of inflammatory cytokines in both mice and healthy volunteers. Furthermore, we show that, compared with room air, hyperoxia does not affect the systemic inflammatory response elicited by administration of bacterial endotoxin in mice and man. Finally, neutrophil phagocytosis and ROS generation are unaffected by short-term hyperoxia. Our results indicate that hyperoxia does not exert direct anti-inflammatory effects and temper expectations of using it as an immunomodulatory treatment strategy. PMID:26616217

  20. Control of murine macrophage H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ metabolism by amphotericin B

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, S.H.; Wolf, J.E.; Little, J.R.

    1986-03-05

    The authors investigated the ability of amphotericin B (AmB) to modulate H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ metabolism in murine macrophages (M theta). Following a single 0.5 mg intraperitoneal dose of AmB, AKR peritoneal M theta showed greater chemiluminescence (CL) after triggering with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than C57BL/6 M theta. The capacity for enhanced M theta CL was sustained for at least 2 weeks after AmB injection in AKR mice but less in C57BL/6 M theta. In other experiments, intracellular H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ metabolism was evaluated by a fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) assay described by Bass et al. A comparison of FACS histograms of peritoneal M theta from AmB treated and control AKR mice revealed 25-28% stimulation in the experimental group; M theta from AmB treated C57BL/6 mice showed a significant reduction of the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ metabolism compared with resident M theta. These results are in accord with the effects of AmB on survival from experimental infection with Listeria monocytogenes. AmB enhanced survival in AKR mice while it reduced the survival of C57BL/6 mice infected with this facultative intracellular bacterium. Thus, AmB-induced resistance to infection correlates with stimulation of the M theta respiratory burst.

  1. Optical projection tomography permits efficient assessment of infarct volume in the murine heart postmyocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X.; Wu, J.; Gray, C. D.; McGregor, K.; Rossi, A. G.; Morrison, H.; Jansen, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The extent of infarct injury is a key determinant of structural and functional remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI). Infarct volume in experimental models of MI can be determined accurately by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but this is costly and not widely available. Experimental studies therefore commonly assess injury by histological analysis of sections sampled from the infarcted heart, an approach that is labor intensive, can be subjective, and does not fully assess the extent of injury. The present study aimed to assess the suitability of optical projection tomography (OPT) for identification of injured myocardium and for accurate and efficient assessment of infarct volume. Intact, perfusion-fixed, optically cleared hearts, collected from mice 7 days after induction of MI by coronary artery occlusion, were scanned by a tomograph for autofluorescence emission after UV excitation, generating >400 transaxial sections for reconstruction. Differential autofluorescence permitted discrimination between viable and injured myocardium and highlighted the heterogeneity within the infarct zone. Two-dimensional infarct areas derived from OPT imaging and Masson's trichrome staining of slices from the same heart were highly correlated (r2 = 0.99, P < 0.0001). Infarct volume derived from reconstructed OPT sections correlated with volume derived from in vivo late gadolinium enhancement MRI (r2 = 0.7608, P < 0.005). Tissue processing for OPT did not compromise subsequent immunohistochemical detection of endothelial cell and inflammatory cell markers. OPT is thus a nondestructive, efficient, and accurate approach for routine in vitro assessment of murine myocardial infarct volume. PMID:26071543

  2. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Evelyn E.; Peters, Brian M.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation. PMID:26807975

  3. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response.

    PubMed

    Nash, Evelyn E; Peters, Brian M; Lilly, Elizabeth A; Noverr, Mairi C; Fidel, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation. PMID:26807975

  4. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  5. Nanomechanical phenotype of chondroadherin-null murine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Batista, Michael A; Nia, Hadi T; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Cox, Karen A; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Heinegård, Dick; Han, Lin

    2014-09-01

    Chondroadherin (CHAD), a class IV small leucine rich proteoglycan/protein (SLRP), was hypothesized to play important roles in regulating chondrocyte signaling and cartilage homeostasis. However, its roles in cartilage development and function are not well understood, and no major osteoarthritis-like phenotype was found in the murine model with CHAD genetically deleted (CHAD(-/-)). In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation to quantify the effects of CHAD deletion on changes in the biomechanical function of murine cartilage. In comparison to wild-type (WT) mice, CHAD-deletion resulted in a significant ≈70-80% reduction in the indentation modulus, Eind, of the superficial zone knee cartilage of 11 weeks, 4 months and 1 year old animals. This mechanical phenotype correlates well with observed increases in the heterogeneity collagen fibril diameters in the surface zone. The results suggest that CHAD mainly plays a major role in regulating the formation of the collagen fibrillar network during the early skeletal development. In contrast, CHAD-deletion had no appreciable effects on the indentation mechanics of middle/deep zone cartilage, likely due to the dominating role of aggrecan in the middle/deep zone. The presence of significant rate dependence of the indentation stiffness in both WT and CHAD(-/-) knee cartilage suggested the importance of both fluid flow induced poroelasticity and intrinsic viscoelasticity in murine cartilage biomechanical properties. Furthermore, the marked differences in the nanomechanical behavior of WT versus CHAD(-/-) cartilage contrasted sharply with the relative absence of overt differences in histological appearance. These observations highlight the sensitivity of nanomechanical tools in evaluating structural and mechanical phenotypes in transgenic mice. PMID:24892719

  6. Erdr1 Suppresses Murine Melanoma Growth via Regulation of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyun; Jung, Min Kyung; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma, one of the aggressive cancers, is known to be resistant to chemotherapy. Because of its aggressive nature, effectively inducing apoptosis is necessary to treat melanoma. Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be a stress-related survival factor exhibiting anti-cancer effects in several cancers. However, little is known about the functions and underlying mechanisms of Erdr1 so far. To demonstrate the effect of Erdr1 in melanoma apoptosis, recombinant murine Erdr1 was injected into mice implanted with B16F10 melanoma cells. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited in mice injected with Erdr1 compared to the control. In addition, the tumor from Erdr1-injected mice showed an increased level of apoptosis. Accordingly, apoptosis-regulating factors including anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic marker Bax in the tumor tissues were examined. As expected, the decreased level of Bcl-2 and increased level of Bax were detected in tumors within the mice injected with Erdr1. Based on the in vivo study, the role of Erdr1 in tumor apoptosis was further tested by incubating it with cells of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10. Erdr1-induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells was observed. Additionally, Erdr1 downregulated STAT3 activity, inhibiting apoptosis via regulation of the Bcl-2 family. Overall, data demonstrate that Erdr1 induced murine melanoma apoptosis through the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax. These findings suggest that Erdr1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in melanoma. PMID:26784177

  7. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  8. Lipoxygenation of arachidonic acid by subcellular preparations from murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ziboh, V.A.; Casebolt, T.L.; Marcelo, C.L.; Voorhees, J.J.

    1984-10-01

    In these studies, we examined the possibility that cell-free preparations from murine keratinocytes possess 5-lipoxygenase activity in addition to the well-established cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid (AA) in these cells. Our data demonstrated that the high-speed (105,000 g) supernatant preparations of the murine keratinocytes metabolized (14C)AA into labeled lipoxygenase products. Portions of these radioactive metabolites cochromatographed and comigrated with 12-HETE (a marker for 12-lipoxygenase pathway) and with authentic LTB4 (a marker for 5-lipoxygenase pathway) on silicic acid column chromatography and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) in two solvent systems respectively. Identity of the novel 14C which comigrated with LTB4 on both TLC and column chromatography was verified further by cochromatography of the free acid with authentic LTB4 on a reverse phase (RP) and the methyl esters on a straight phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Incubation of the cell-free preparations with (14C)AA in the presence of ETYA, NDGA (inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways) as well as with 15-HETE (an inhibitor of lipoxygenase pathway) resulted in decreased formation of (14C) 12-HETE and the (14C)LTB4-like metabolite. On the contrary, incubations of the cell-free extracts with (14C) AA in the presence of indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor) resulted in increased biosynthesis of the labeled lipoxygenase metabolites. These data indicate the existence of enzymes in soluble fraction of murine keratinocyte which can catalyze the transformation of (14C) AA into products of both the 12- and 5-lipoxygenase pathways.

  9. Inhibition of angiogenesis and murine tumour growth by laminarin sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, R.; Paper, D. H.; Donaldson, J.; Vogl, H.

    1996-01-01

    LAM S5 is a polysulphated derivative of the glucan laminarian that inhibits basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) binding and the bFGF-stimulated proliferation of fetal bovine heart endothelial (FBHE) cells. This report demonstrates that LAM S5 has anti-angiogenic activity, as shown by inhibition of tubule formation by endothelial cells cultured on Matrigel and inhibition of vascularisation of the chick chorioallantoic membrane. In addition, LAM S5 caused a tumour growth delay of the murine RIF-1 tumour of 2.6 days (P = 0.01). Images Figure 2 PMID:8630276

  10. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.