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Sample records for murine immune responses

  1. Effects of sodium fluoride on immune response in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Beatriz; Vázquez, Marta; Rocha, René Antonio; Devesa, Vicenta; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2016-08-01

    Excessive fluoride intake may be harmful for health, producing dental and skeletal fluorosis, and effects upon neurobehavioral development. Studies in animals have revealed effects upon the gastrointestinal, renal and reproductive systems. Some of the disorders may be a consequence of immune system alterations. In this study, an in vitro evaluation is made of fluoride immunotoxicity using the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage line over a broad range of concentrations (2.5-75mg/L). The results show that the highest fluoride concentrations used (50-75mg/L) reduce the macrophage population in part as a consequence of the generation of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species and consequent redox imbalance, which in turn is accompanied by lipid peroxidation. A decrease in the expression of the antiinflammatory cytokine Il10 is observed from the lowest concentrations (5mg/L). High concentrations (50mg/L) in turn produce a significant increase in the proinflammatory cytokines Il6 and Mip2 from 4h of exposure. In addition, cell phagocytic capacity is seen to decrease at concentrations of ≥20mg/L. These data indicate that fluoride, at high concentrations, may affect macrophages and thus immune system function - particularly with regard to the inflammation autoregulatory processes, in which macrophages play a key role. PMID:26965474

  2. Murine immune responses to oral BCG immunization in the presence or absence of prior BCG sensitization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Martin L; Lambeth, Matthew R; Aldwell, Frank E

    2010-02-01

    Oral delivery of live Mycobacterium bovis BCG in a lipid matrix invokes cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in mice and consequent protection against pulmonary challenge with virulent mycobacteria. To investigate the influence of prior BCG sensitization on oral vaccine efficacy, we assessed CMI responses and BCG colonization of the alimentary tract lymphatics 5 months after oral vaccination, in both previously naive mice and in mice that had been sensitized to BCG by injection 6 months previously. CMI responses did not differ significantly between mice that received subcutaneous BCG followed by oral BCG and those that received either injected or oral BCG alone. In vivo BCG colonization was predominant in the mesenteric lymph nodes after oral vaccination; this colonizing ability was not influenced by prior BCG sensitization. From this murine model study, we conclude that although prior parenteral-route BCG sensitization does not detrimentally affect BCG colonization after oral vaccination, there is no significant immune-boosting effect of the oral vaccine either. PMID:19918257

  3. The Murine Humoral Immune Response to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen: Idiotype Network Pathways.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Michael Roy

    Recognition of a wide spectrum in disease outcomes following Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection has led to the suggestion that individual differences may be due to characteristics of the immune response. HBV, a hepatotropic virus, is not directly cytopathic to the host hepatocytes but the cellular damage which does not occur may be due to the host's own immune response. It is this variety in immune response capabilities following natural infection or vaccination which led to the present study in which the murine humoral immune response to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was examined. Following immunization with purified HBsAg an anti-HBs response could be detected in 19 inbred strains of mice. The response, which varied among the strains, was linked to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Among high responders to HBsAg were two strains in which a poor response to a single epitope could be detected. Although quantitatively serum from these strains resembled serum from other high responders, there was a major difference in the qualitative aspects. Included within this study was the role of idotype networks within the murine anti-HBs response. By directly targeting HBsAg-specific B cells within the framework of an idiotype network by an Ab-2, it was possible to circumvent T cell-dependent regulation of an immune response. In each of five inbred strains of mice immunized with a polyclonal rabbit Ab-2 an Ab-3 population with HBsAg-specificity (Ab -1^') was induced. These mice were also immunized with HBsAg resulting in a higher anti-HBs response as compared to HBsAg immunization alone in all of the strains tested except for one. The response in this strain, normally a low responder to HBsAg, indicated that the mechanisms for genetic restriction of the anti -HBs response was still active, although it was not apparent during anti-Id immunization. The effects of an anti-Id on the murine antibody response to HBsAg may lead to insights on the presence of idiotype

  4. Effect of ammonium metavanadate on the murine immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.D.; Wei, C.I.; Tan, H.; Kao, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Female B/sub 6/C/sub 3/F/sub 1/ mice were exposed to ammonium metavanadate (NH/sub 4/VO/sub 3/) by intraperitoneal injection every 3 d at 2.5, 5.0, or 10 mg V/kg for 3, 6, or 9 w and were then assayed for alterations in immunoresponsiveness. Resistance to Escherichia coli endotoxin lethality increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 6 w of exposure, while resistance to viable gram-positive Listeria lethality was depressed in a dose-dependent manner. Comparison of LD20 values indicated a 250-fold decrease in resistance to Listeria at the lowest vanadium exposure and a 40% increase in resistance to endotoxin after the highest vanadium exposure. Peritoneal macrophage phagocytic capacities were decreased in a dose-dependent manner, but viabilities remained unaffected. Rosetting capacity of splenic lymphocytes was increased following vanadium exposure. Liver and splenic enlargement was observed, and examination of splenic tissue indicated enhanced formation of megakaryocytes and red blood cell precursors. Subchronic exposure to vanadium may thus disrupt the normal function of the immune system.

  5. Usefulness of the murine model to study the immune response against Histoplasma capsulatum infection.

    PubMed

    Sahaza, Jorge H; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Zenteno, Edgar; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2014-05-01

    The present paper is an overview of the primary events that are associated with the histoplasmosis immune response in the murine model. Valuable data that have been recorded in the scientific literature have contributed to an improved understanding of the clinical course of this systemic mycosis, which is caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Data must be analyzed carefully, given that misinterpretation could be generated because most of the available information is based on experimental host-parasite interactions that used inappropriate proceedings, i.e., the non-natural route of infection with the parasitic and virulent fungal yeast-phase, which is not the usual infective phase of the etiological agent of this mycosis. Thus, due to their versatility, complexity, and similarities with humans, several murine models have played a fundamental role in exploring the host-parasite interaction during H. capsulatum infection. PMID:24766724

  6. Peptidylarginine Deiminase Inhibition Reduces Vascular Damage and Modulates Innate Immune Responses in Murine Models of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jason S.; Luo, Wei; O’Dell, Alexander A.; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Zhao, Wenpu; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Guo, Chiao; Grenn, Robert C.; Thompson, Paul R.; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation promotes vascular damage, thrombosis, and activation of interferon-α-producing plasmacytoid dendritic cells in diseased arteries. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition is a strategy that can decrease in vivo NET formation. Objective To test whether peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition, a novel approach to targeting arterial disease, can reduce vascular damage and inhibit innate immune responses in murine models of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Apolipoprotein-E (Apoe)−/− mice demonstrated enhanced NET formation, developed autoantibodies to NETs, and expressed high levels of interferon-α in diseased arteries. Apoe−/− mice were treated for 11 weeks with daily injections of Cl-amidine, a peptidylarginine deiminase inhibitor. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition blocked NET formation, reduced atherosclerotic lesion area, and delayed time to carotid artery thrombosis in a photochemical injury model. Decreases in atherosclerosis burden were accompanied by reduced recruitment of netting neutrophils and macrophages to arteries, as well as by reduced arterial interferon-α expression. Conclusions Pharmacological interventions that block NET formation can reduce atherosclerosis burden and arterial thrombosis in murine systems. These results support a role for aberrant NET formation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis through modulation of innate immune responses. PMID:24425713

  7. Analysis of the Murine Immune Response to Pulmonary Delivery of Precisely Fabricated Nano- and Microscale Particles

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Reid A.; Shen, Tammy; Allen, Irving C.; Hasan, Warefta; DeSimone, Joseph M.; Ting, Jenny P. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Nanomedicine has the potential to transform clinical care in the 21st century. However, a precise understanding of how nanomaterial design parameters such as size, shape and composition affect the mammalian immune system is a prerequisite for the realization of nanomedicine's translational promise. Herein, we make use of the recently developed Particle Replication in Non-wetting Template (PRINT) fabrication process to precisely fabricate particles across and the nano- and micro-scale with defined shapes and compositions to address the role of particle design parameters on the murine innate immune response in both in vitro and in vivo settings. We find that particles composed of either the biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) or the biocompatible polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) do not cause release of pro-inflammatory cytokines nor inflammasome activation in bone marrow-derived macrophages. When instilled into the lungs of mice, particle composition and size can augment the number and type of innate immune cells recruited to the lungs without triggering inflammatory responses as assayed by cytokine release and histopathology. Smaller particles (80×320 nm) are more readily taken up in vivo by monocytes and macrophages than larger particles (6 µm diameter), yet particles of all tested sizes remained in the lungs for up to 7 days without clearance or triggering of host immunity. These results suggest rational design of nanoparticle physical parameters can be used for sustained and localized delivery of therapeutics to the lungs. PMID:23593509

  8. Murine macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and immune activation in response to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of bacterial seafood-related illness in the United States. Currently, there is a dearth of literature regarding immunity to infection with this pathogen. Here we studied V. parahaemolyticus-infected RAW 264.7 murine macrophage detecting both pro- and...

  9. Photodynamic Therapy Can Induce a Protective Innate Immune Response against Murine Bacterial Arthritis via Neutrophil Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Mroz, Pawel; Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Liyi; Morimoto, Yuji; Kinoshita, Manabu; Yoshihara, Yasuo; Nemoto, Koichi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Seki, Suhji; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Local microbial infections induced by multiple-drug-resistant bacteria in the orthopedic field can be intractable, therefore development of new therapeutic modalities is needed. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative modality to antibiotics for intractable microbial infections, and we recently reported that PDT has the potential to accumulate neutrophils into the infected site which leads to resolution of the infection. PDT for cancer has long been known to be able to stimulate the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, a murine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) arthritis model using bioluminescent MRSA and polystyrene microparticles was established, and both the therapeutic (Th-PDT) and preventive (Pre-PDT) effects of PDT using methylene blue as photosensitizer were examined. Although Th-PDT could not demonstrate direct bacterial killing, neutrophils were accumulated into the infectious joint space after PDT and MRSA arthritis was reduced. With the preconditioning Pre-PDT regimen, neutrophils were quickly accumulated into the joint immediately after bacterial inoculation and bacterial growth was suppressed and the establishment of infection was inhibited. Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration of a protective innate immune response against a bacterial pathogen produced by PDT. PMID:22761911

  10. Toll-Like Receptor-4 Dependent Small Intestinal Immune Responses Following Murine Arcobacter Butzleri Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heimesaat, Markus M.; Karadas, Gül; Fischer, André; Göbel, Ulf B.; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Gölz, Greta

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic cases of gastroenteritis have been attributed to Arcobacter butzleri infection, but information about the underlying immunopathological mechanisms is scarce. We have recently shown that experimental A. butzleri infection induces intestinal, extraintestinal and systemic immune responses in gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the immunopathological role of Toll-like Receptor-4, the receptor for lipopolysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide of Gram-negative bacteria, during murine A. butzleri infection. To address this, gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice lacking TLR-4 were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and perorally infected with two different A. butzleri strains isolated from a patient (CCUG 30485) or fresh chicken meat (C1), respectively. Bacteria of either strain stably colonized the ilea of mice irrespective of their genotype at days 6 and 16 postinfection. As compared to IL-10–/– control animals, TLR-4–/– IL-10–/– mice were protected from A. butzleri-induced ileal apoptosis, from ileal influx of adaptive immune cells including T lymphocytes, regulatory T-cells and B lymphocytes, and from increased ileal IFN-γ secretion. Given that TLR-4-signaling is essential for A. butzleri-induced intestinal inflammation, we conclude that bacterial lipooligosaccharide or lipopolysaccharide compounds aggravate intestinal inflammation and may thus represent major virulence factors of Arcobacter. Future studies need to further unravel the molecular mechanisms of TLR-4-mediated A. butzleri-host interactions. PMID:26716022

  11. Non-thermal Nanoelectroablation of UV-induced Murine Melanomas Stimulates an Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Lui, Kaying; Huynh, Joanne; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; De Fabo, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Non-thermal nanoelectroablation therapy completely ablates UV-induced murine melanomas. C57/BL6-HGF/SF transgenic mice were exposed to UV radiation as pups and began to develop visible melanomas 5–6 months later. We have treated 27 of these melanomas in 14 mice with nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) therapy delivering 2000 electric pulses each 100 ns long and 30 kV/cm at a rate of 5–7 pulses per second. All nanoelectroablated melanoma tumors began to shrink within a day after treatment and gradually disappeared over a period of 12–29 days. Pyknosis of nuclei was evident within 1 h of nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected by TUNEL staining was evident by 6 h after nsPEF treatment. In a melanoma allograft system, nsPEF treatment was superior to tumor excision at accelerating secondary tumor rejection in immune-competent mice, suggesting enhanced stimulation of a protective immune response by nsPEF-treated melanomas. This is supported by the presence of CD4+-T cells within treated tumors as well as within untreated tumors located in mice with other melanomas that had been treated with nanoelectroablation at least 19 days earlier. PMID:22686288

  12. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    Innate immunity; Humoral immunity; Cellular immunity; Immunity; Inflammatory response; Acquired (adaptive) immunity ... and usually does not react against them. INNATE IMMUNITY Innate, or nonspecific, immunity is the defense system ...

  13. Immunodominant Liver-Specific Expression Suppresses Transgene-Directed Immune Responses in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Sun, Baodong; Osada, Takuya; Rodriguiz, Ramona; Yang, Xiao Yi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Kemper, Alex R.; Clay, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression

  14. Immunodominant liver-specific expression suppresses transgene-directed immune responses in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Sun, Baodong; Osada, Takuya; Rodriguiz, Ramona; Yang, Xiao Yi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Kemper, Alex R; Clay, Timothy M; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2012-05-01

    Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression might best

  15. Weight loss and lipolysis promote a dynamic immune response in murine adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kosteli, Aliki; Sugaru, Eiji; Haemmerle, Guenter; Martin, Jayne F.; Lei, Jason; Zechner, Rudolf; Ferrante, Anthony W.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity elicits an immune response characterized by myeloid cell recruitment to key metabolic organs, including adipose tissue. However, the response of immune cells to nonpathologic metabolic stimuli has been less well studied, and the factors that regulate the metabolic-dependent accumulation of immune cells are incompletely understood. Here we characterized the response of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) to weight loss and fasting in mice and identified a role for lipolysis in ATM recruitment and accumulation. We found that the immune response to weight loss was dynamic; caloric restriction of high-fat diet–fed mice led to an initial increase in ATM recruitment, whereas ATM content decreased following an extended period of weight loss. The peak in ATM number coincided with the peak in the circulating concentrations of FFA and adipose tissue lipolysis, suggesting that lipolysis drives ATM accumulation. Indeed, fasting or pharmacologically induced lipolysis rapidly increased ATM accumulation, adipose tissue chemoattractant activity, and lipid uptake by ATMs. Conversely, dietary and genetic manipulations that reduced lipolysis decreased ATM accumulation. Depletion of macrophages in adipose tissue cultures increased expression of adipose triglyceride lipase and genes regulated by FFA, and increased lipolysis. These data suggest that local lipid fluxes are central regulators of ATM recruitment and that once recruited, ATMs form lipid-laden macrophages that can buffer local increases in lipid concentration. PMID:20877011

  16. A protective role of murine langerin+ cells in immune responses to cutaneous vaccination with microneedle patches

    PubMed Central

    Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A.; Esser, E. Stein; Vassilieva, Elena V.; Lee, Jeong Woo; Taherbhai, Misha T.; Pollack, Brian P.; Prausnitz, Mark R.; Compans, Richard W.; Skountzou, Ioanna

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous vaccination with microneedle patches offers several advantages over more frequently used approaches for vaccine delivery, including improved protective immunity. However, the involvement of specific APC subsets and their contribution to the induction of immunity following cutaneous vaccine delivery is not well understood. A better understanding of the functions of individual APC subsets in the skin will allow us to target specific skin cell populations in order to further enhance vaccine efficacy. Here we use a Langerin-EGFP-DTR knock-in mouse model to determine the contribution of langerin+ subsets of skin APCs in the induction of adaptive immune responses following cutaneous microneedle delivery of influenza vaccine. Depletion of langerin+ cells prior to vaccination resulted in substantial impairment of both Th1 and Th2 responses, and decreased post-challenge survival rates, in mice vaccinated cutaneously but not in those vaccinated via the intramuscular route or in non-depleted control mice. Our results indicate that langerin+ cells contribute significantly to the induction of protective immune responses following cutaneous vaccination with a subunit influenza vaccine. PMID:25130187

  17. Augmentation of T helper type 1 immune response through intestinal immunity in murine cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 infection by probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum strain 06CC2.

    PubMed

    Matsusaki, Tatsuya; Takeda, Shiro; Takeshita, Masahiko; Arima, Yuo; Tsend-Ayush, Chuluunbat; Oyunsuren, Tsendesuren; Sugita, Chihiro; Yoshida, Hiroki; Watanabe, Wataru; Kurokawa, Masahiko

    2016-10-01

    We previously found that Lactobacillus plantarum strain 06CC2 showed probiotic potential, and its oral administration effectively induced Th1 cytokine production and activated the Th1 immune response associated with intestinal immunity in mice. In this study, to evaluate its potential as a versatile oral adjuvant for treatment of viral infection, we assessed the immunomodulatory activity of 06CC2 on murine cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, in which a major immune defense system is a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction based on activation of the Th1 immune response, in relation to its oral efficacy for alleviation of herpetic symptoms. In the HSV-1 infection model, oral administration of 06CC2 (20mg/mouse) twice daily for seven days starting two days before infection was significantly effective in delaying the development of skin lesions in the early phase of infection and reducing virus yields in the brain on day 4 after infection. In addition, 06CC2 significantly augmented the DTH reaction to inactivated HSV-1 antigen and elevated interferon (IFN)-γ production by HSV-1 antigen from splenocytes. On day 2, natural killer (NK) cell activity was significantly elevated, and the elevation was still observed on day 4. Furthermore, gene expressions of interleukin-12 receptor β2 and IFN-γ in Peyer's patches were augmented on day 4 by 06CC2 administration. Thus, 06CC2 was suggested to alleviate herpetic symptoms in mice in correlation with augmentation of the Th1 immune responses associated with NK cell activity through intestinal immunity. Strain 06CC2 may be a versatile oral adjuvant to activate Th1 immune response. PMID:27517518

  18. Nutritional status and immune response in murine experimental Jorge Lobo's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Adriana Sierra Assencio Almeida; Diório, Suzana Madeira; Pedrini, Silvia Cristina Barboza; Silva, Sônia Maria Uso Ruiz; Sartori, Beatriz Gomes Carreira; Calvi, Sueli Aparecida; Pereira, Paulo Câmara Marques; Vilani-Moreno, Fátima Regina

    2015-09-01

    There are no studies investigating the role of nutritional status and immunity associated with Jorge Lobo's disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of protein-calorie malnutrition on the immune response of BALB/c mice inoculated with Lacazia loboi. In this study,the animals were divided into four groups: G1: inoculated with restricted diet, G2: not inoculated with restricted diet, G3: inoculated with regular diet, G4: not inoculated with regular diet. The animals of groups G1 and G2 were submitted to malnutrition for 20 days and once installed the animals were inoculated intradermally into the footpad. After 4 months, they were euthanised for the isolation of peritoneal lavage cells and removal of the footpad. The production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α, H2 O2 and nitric oxide (NO) was evaluated in the peritoneal lavage cells. The footpad was evaluated regarding the size of macroscopic lesions, number of fungi and viability index. The results showed that the infection did not exert great influence on the body weight of the mice and previous malnutrition was an unfavourable factor for viability index, number of fungi, macroscopic lesion size in the footpad and production of H2 O2 , NO, IL-12, IL-10 and IFN-γ, suggesting that malnutrition significantly altered fungal activity and peritoneal cells. The results suggest considerable interaction between nutrition and immunity in Jorge Lobo's disease. PMID:26156007

  19. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cells. T cells are responsible for cell-mediated immunity. This type of immunity becomes deficient in persons with HIV, the virus ... blood. B lymphocytes provide the body with humoral immunity as they circulate in the fluids in search ...

  20. Evaluation of the Murine Immune Response to Xenopsylla cheopis Flea Saliva and Its Effect on Transmission of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Bosio, Christopher F.; Viall, Austin K.; Jarrett, Clayton O.; Gardner, Donald; Rood, Michael P.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Arthropod-borne pathogens are transmitted into a unique intradermal microenvironment that includes the saliva of their vectors. Immunomodulatory factors in the saliva can enhance infectivity; however, in some cases the immune response that develops to saliva from prior uninfected bites can inhibit infectivity. Most rodent reservoirs of Yersinia pestis experience fleabites regularly, but the effect this has on the dynamics of flea-borne transmission of plague has never been investigated. We examined the innate and acquired immune response of mice to bites of Xenopsylla cheopis and its effects on Y. pestis transmission and disease progression in both naïve mice and mice chronically exposed to flea bites. Methods/Principal Findings The immune response of C57BL/6 mice to uninfected flea bites was characterized by flow cytometry, histology, and antibody detection methods. In naïve mice, flea bites induced mild inflammation with limited recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages to the bite site. Infectivity and host response in naïve mice exposed to flea bites followed immediately by intradermal injection of Y. pestis did not differ from that of mice infected with Y. pestis without prior flea feeding. With prolonged exposure, an IgG1 antibody response primarily directed to the predominant component of flea saliva, a family of 36–45 kDa phosphatase-like proteins, occurred in both laboratory mice and wild rats naturally exposed to X. cheopis, but a hypersensitivity response never developed. The incidence and progression of terminal plague following challenge by infective blocked fleas were equivalent in naïve mice and mice sensitized to flea saliva by repeated exposure to flea bites over a 10-week period. Conclusions Unlike what is observed with many other blood-feeding arthropods, the murine immune response to X. cheopis saliva is mild and continued exposure to flea bites leads more to tolerance than to hypersensitivity. The immune response to flea

  1. Immunity to leprosy. II. Genetic control of murine T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Douglas-Jones, A G; Watson, J D

    1985-10-01

    T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae were measured after immunization of mice at the base of the tail with antigen and challenging lymphocytes from draining lymph nodes in culture with M. leprae. This T cell response to M. leprae has been compared in 18 inbred strains of mice. C57BL/10J mice were identified as low responder mice. The congenic strains B10.M and B10.Q were found to be high responders, whereas B10.BR and B10.P were low responders. F1 (B10.M X C57BL/10J) and F1 (B10.Q X C57BL/10J) hybrid mice were found to be low responders, similar to the C57BL/10J parent, indicating that the low responsive trait is dominant. Whereas B10.BR mice were shown to be low responders to M. leprae, B10.AKM and B10.A(2R) were clearly high responders, indicating that the H-2D region influences the magnitude of the T cell proliferative response. Gene complementation within the H-2 region was evident. Genes outside the H-2 region were also shown to influence the response to M. leprae. C3H/HeN were shown to be high responder mice, whereas other H-2k strains, BALB.K, CBA/N, and B10.BR, were low responders. Gene loci that influence the T cell proliferation assay have been discussed and were compared to known background genes which may be important for the growth of intracellular parasites. Because mycobacteria are intracellular parasites for antigen-presenting cells, genes that affect bacterial growth in these cells will also influence subsequent immune responses of the host. PMID:3928757

  2. Dynamics of the Murine Humoral Immune Response to Neisseria meningitidis Group B Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Colino, Jesús; Outschoorn, Ingrid

    1998-01-01

    Immunization with Neisseria meningitidis group B capsular polysaccharide (CpsB) elicited responses in adult mice that showed the typical dynamic characteristics of the response to a thymus-independent antigen, in contrast to the thymus-dependent behavior of antibody responses to CpsC. The former had a short latent period and showed a rapid increase in serum antibodies that peaked at day 5, and immunoglobulin M (IgM) was the major isotype even though IgG (mainly IgG2a and IgG2b) was also detectable. This response was of short duration, and the specific antibodies were rapidly cleared from the circulation. The secondary responses were similar in magnitude, kinetics, IgM predominance, and IgG distribution. Nevertheless, a threefold IgG increase, a correlation between IgM and IgG levels, and dose-dependent secondary responses were observed. Hyperimmunization considerably reinforced these responses: 10-fold for IgM and 300-fold for IgG. This favored isotype switch was accompanied by a progressive change in the subclass distribution to IgG3 (62%) and IgG1 (28%), along with the possible generation of B-cell memory. The results indicate that CpsB is being strictly thymus independent and suggest that unresponsiveness to purified CpsB is due to tolerance. PMID:9453603

  3. Comparative dynamics and phenotype of the murine immune response to Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella pseudospiralis.

    PubMed

    Furze, R C; Selkirk, M E

    2005-05-01

    Infection of NIH mice with Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella pseudospiralis results in qualitatively comparable immune responses. Antigen-specific proliferation by mesenteric lymph node cells was transient and temporally associated with intestinal infection, but in contrast was sustained throughout infection by splenocytes. Early cytokine production by mesenteric lymph node cells was dominated by interleukin 10, but also IL-5 and IL-4, with rapid resolution following parasite expulsion from the gut. Splenocytes showed a mixed profile of cytokine production, although again dominated by IL-10 and sustained over 60 days of infection. All antibody classes were evident, with early production of IgA and IgG1, and subsequent secretion of other subclasses including IgG2a. Granulocytic infiltration of the spleen was significantly greater in T. spiralis infection. The concentration of serum corticosterone generally remained within normal boundaries, although was raised by day 60 in T. spiralis-infected mice. We conclude that the systemic suppression of inflammation reported for T. pseudospiralis does not result from selective induction of regulatory cytokines, or a major difference in the immune response to infection with T. spiralis. PMID:15987341

  4. Intratumoral mediated immunosuppression is prognostic in genetically engineered murine models of glioma and correlates to immune therapeutic responses

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ling-Yuan; Wu, Adam S.; Doucette, Tiffany; Wei, Jun; Priebe, Waldemar; Fuller, Gregory N.; Qiao, Wei; Sawaya, Raymond; Rao, Ganesh; Heimberger, Amy B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pre-clinical murine model systems used for the assessment of therapeutics have not been predictive of human clinical responses, primarily because their clonotypic nature does not recapitulate the heterogeneous biology and immunosuppressive mechanisms of humans. Relevant model systems with mice that are immunologically competent are needed to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic agents, especially immunotherapeutics. Experimental Design Using the RCAS/Ntv-a system, mice were engineered to co-express platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF)-B + B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 under the control of the glioneuronal-specific Nestin promoter. The degree and type of tumor-mediated immunosuppression was determined in these endogenously arising gliomas based upon the presence of macrophages and regulatory T cells (Tregs). The immunotherapeutic agent, WP1066, was tested in vivo to assess therapeutic efficacy and immune modulation. Results N-tva mice were injected with RCAS vectors to express PDGF-B + Bcl-2, resulting in both low- and high-grade gliomas. Consistent with observations in human high-grade gliomas, mice with high-grade gliomas also developed a marked intratumoral influx of macrophages that was influenced by tumor signal transducer and activator of transduction (STAT) 3 expression. The presence of intratumoral F4/80 macrophages was a negative prognosticator for long-term survival. In mice expressing both PDGF-B + Bcl-2 that were treated with WP1066, there was 55.5% increase in median survival time (P< 0.01), with an associated inhibition of intratumoral STAT3 and macrophages. Conclusions Although randomization is necessary for including mice in a therapeutic trial, these murine model systems are more suitable for testing therapeutics, and especially immune therapeutics, in the context of translational studies. PMID:20921210

  5. Human anti-murine immune response following administration of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.C.; Carrasquillo, J.C.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    The author's purpose is to measure circulating anti-murine immunoglobulin antibodies (HAMA) in patients who previously received radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) for tumor imaging and therapy. Because the presence of HAMA may negate further use of MoAb in patients, it is important to determine the frequency and rate of HAMA development. Patients received radiolabeled MoAb Fab 96.5 (IgG2a), Fab 48.7 (IgG1), T101 (IgG2a), B72.3 (IgG1), 9.2.27 (IgG2a) and 791T/36 (IgG2b). HAMA was measured by incubating I-125 labeled 96.5, 48.7 or B72.3 with serum and isolating human IgG with Staphyloccocal protein A cells by centrifugation. The assays were capable of detecting HAMA concentrations which bound 20 ng/ml of monoclonal antibody. 12 of 37 patients who received IgG developed HAMA within 4 months of a single injection. For one patient this occurred as early as 1 week post injection. 2 of 18 patients who received Fab developed HAMA. One of these patients received multiple injections of MoAb. 2 of 3 patients who received IgG2B were positive for HAMA. There was no apparent difference in the positive HAMA when antibody or fragment was given SubQ or IV. The authors conclude that the use of IgG MoAb are more likely to lead to the development of antimurine immunoglobulin antibodies.

  6. Murine immune responses to a Plasmodium vivax-derived chimeric recombinant protein expressed in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To develop a plant-based vaccine against Plasmodium vivax, two P. vivax candidate proteins were chosen. First, the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1), a major asexual blood stage antigen that is currently considered a strong vaccine candidate. Second, the circumsporozoite protein (CSP), a component of sporozoites that contains a B-cell epitope. Methods A synthetic chimeric recombinant 516 bp gene encoding containing PvMSP-1, a Pro-Gly linker motif, and PvCSP was synthesized; the gene, named MLC, encoded a total of 172 amino acids. The recombinant gene was modified with regard to codon usage to optimize gene expression in Brassica napus. The Ti plasmid inducible gene transfer system was used for MLC chimeric recombinant gene expression in B. napus. Gene expression was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), beta-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS) assay, and Western blot. Results The MLC chimeric recombinant protein expressed in B. napus had a molecular weight of approximately 25 kDa. It exhibited a clinical sensitivity of 84.21% (n = 38) and a clinical specificity of 100% (n = 24) as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Oral immunization of BALB/c mice with MLC chimeric recombinant protein successfully induced antigen-specific IgG1 production. Additionally, the Th1-related cytokines IL-12 (p40), TNF, and IFN-γ were significantly increased in the spleens of the BALB/c mice. Conclusions The chimeric MLC recombinant protein produced in B. napus has potential as both as an antigen for diagnosis and as a valuable vaccine candidate for oral immunization against vivax malaria. PMID:21529346

  7. Murine Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Whole Tumor Lysates Mediate Potent Antitumor Immune Responses in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, R. C.; Shimizu, K.; Mule, J. J.

    1998-08-01

    The highly efficient nature of dendritic cells (DC) as antigen-presenting cells raises the possibility of uncovering in tumor-bearing hosts very low levels of T cell reactivity to poorly immunogenic tumors that are virtually undetectable by other means. Here, we demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo capacities of murine bone marrow-derived, cytokine-driven DC to elicit potent and specific anti-tumor responses when pulsed with whole tumor lysates. Stimulation of naive spleen-derived T cells by tumor lysate-pulsed DC generated tumor-specific proliferative cytokine release and cytolytic reactivities in vitro. In addition, in two separate strains of mice with histologically distinct tumors, s.c. injections of DC pulsed with whole tumor lysates effectively primed these animals to reject subsequent lethal challenges with viable parental tumor cells and, important to note, also mediated significant reductions in the number of metastases established in the lungs. Tumor rejection depended on host-derived CD8+ T cells and, to a lesser extent, CD4+ T cells. Spleens from mice that had rejected their tumors contained specific precursor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The use of whole tumor lysates as a source of tumor-associated antigen(s) for pulsing of DC circumvents several limitations encountered with other methods as well as provides certain distinct advantages, which are discussed. These data serve as rationale for our recent initiation of a phase I clinical trial of immunization with autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC in adult and pediatric cancer patients.

  8. T-2 toxin impairs murine immune response to respiratory reovirus and exacerbates viral bronchiolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Maoxiang; Harkema, Jack R.; Islam, Zahidul; Cuff, Chistopher F.; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: Pestka@msu.edu

    2006-11-15

    Exposure to immunosuppressive environmental contaminants is a possible contributing factor to increased occurrence of viral respiratory diseases. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the trichothecene mycotoxin T-2 toxin (T-2), a frequent food contaminant, alters host resistance to lung infection by reovirus, a model respiratory virus. Balb/c mice (4 week old) were treated intraperitoneally with T-2 toxin (1.75 mg/kg bw) or saline vehicle and then intranasally instilled 2 h later with 10{sup 7} plaque forming unit (PFU) of reovirus, strain Lang (T1/L) or saline vehicle. At 10 days post-instillation (PI), both virus plaque-forming responses and reovirus L2 gene expression were 10-fold higher in lungs of T-2-treated mice compared to controls. No-effect and lowest-effect levels for T-2-induced suppression of reovirus clearance were 20 and 200 {mu}g/kg bw, respectively. Respiratory reovirus infection resulted in a mild bronchiolitis with minimal alveolitis, which was markedly exacerbated by T-2 pretreatment. Reovirus exposure induced marked increases in total cells, neutrophils and lymphocytes at 3 and 7 days PI in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) whereas macrophages were increased only at 7 days PI. Although prior T-2 exposure attenuated total cell and macrophage counts in BALF of control and infected mice at 3 days PI, the toxin potentiated total cell, macrophage, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in infected mice at 7 days PI. At 3 days PI, T-2 suppressed reovirus-induced IFN-{gamma} elevation in BALF, but enhanced production of IL-6 and MCP-1. T-2 pretreatment also suppressed reovirus-specific mucosal IgA responses in lung and enteric tract, but potentiated serum IgA and IgG responses. Taken together, T-2 increased lung viral burden, bronchopneumonia and pulmonary cellular infiltration in reovirus-infected mice. These effects might be attributable to reduced alveolar macrophage levels as well as modulated cytokine and mucosal Ig

  9. Probing the immune and healing response of murine intestinal mucosa by time-lapse 2-photon microscopy of laser-induced lesions with real-time dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Klinger, Antje; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Eckert, Sebastian; Hüttmann, Gereon; Gebert, Andreas; Vogel, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Gut mucosa is an important interface between body and environment. Immune response and healing processes of murine small intestinal mucosa were investigated by intravital time-lapse two-photon excited autofluorescence microscopy of the response to localized laser-induced damage. Epithelial lesions were created by 355-nm, 500-ps pulses from a microchip laser that produced minute cavitation bubbles. Size and dynamics of these bubbles were monitored using a novel interferometric backscattering technique with 80 nm resolution. Small bubbles (< 2.5 µm maximum radius) merely resulted in autofluorescence loss of the target cell. Larger bubbles (7-25 µm) affected several cells and provoked immigration of immune cells (polymorphonuclear leucocytes). Damaged cells were expelled into the lumen, and the epithelium healed within 2 hours by stretching and migration of adjacent epithelial cells. PMID:25360369

  10. Murine Immune Responses to Neisseria meningitidis Group C Capsular Polysaccharide and a Thymus-Dependent Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Leonard J.; García-Ojeda, Pablo A.; Michon, Francis; Jennings, Harold J.; Stein, Kathryn E.

    1998-01-01

    The polysaccharide (PS) capsules of many pathogenic bacteria are poor immunogens in infants and young children as a result of the delayed response to PS antigens during ontogeny. The development of polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines for Haemophilus influenzae type b, which have proven to be efficacious in this age group, has led to active development by a number of investigators of conjugate vaccines for other diseases. We describe here the response of several mouse strains to the capsular PS of Neisseria meningitidis group C (MCPS) conjugated to tetanus toxoid (MCPS-TT) and the same response in BALB/c mice as a model of the immune consequences of conjugate vaccine immunization. The use of a conjugate vaccine results in a shift in the isotype elicited in response to the MCPS, from immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG3 to primarily IgG1. A response to MCPS-TT is seen even among mouse strains which respond poorly to MCPS itself, emphasizing the importance of a strain survey when choosing a mouse model for a vaccine. The marked increase in IgG1 antibody titer was accompanied by a large increase in bactericidal activity of sera from these animals. Animals primed with the conjugate vaccine demonstrated a booster response after secondary immunization with either the MCPS or the conjugate. The ability to produce a boosted IgG1 anti-MCPS response to the MCPS can be transferred to adoptive recipients by B cells alone from mice primed with MCPS-TT but not mice primed with MCPS alone. These data indicate that in BALB/c mice a single immunization with MCPS-TT is sufficient to induce a shift to IgG1 and generate a memory B-cell population that does not require T cells for boosting. PMID:9784556

  11. Strain variations in the murine cellular immune response to the phenolic glycolipid I antigen of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Koster, F T; Teuscher, C; Matzner, P; Umland, E; Yanagihara, D; Brennan, P J; Tung, K S

    1986-01-01

    The cellular immune response to the Mycobacterium leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid I was examined in inbred mice immunized with M. leprae by in vivo delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity and in vitro lymphocyte proliferation. Whereas all mouse strains responded to M.leprae-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity and lymphocyte proliferation, only BALB.K was responsive in both assays to the glycolipid. Responsiveness was determined in part by non-H-2 genes, while the influence of H-2 genes was not apparent. Among congenic BALB/c mice differing only at Igh-C allotype loci, variations in responsiveness were found in both delayed-type hypersensitivity and lymphocytes proliferation assays, indicating a possible role for Igh-C loci-linked genes. Unresponsiveness in the lymphocyte proliferation assay to the glycolipid was inherited as a dominant trait in one set of responder X nonresponder F1 progeny. We conclude that after immunization with M. leprae organisms, the cell-mediated responses to the glycolipid, endowed with a single carbohydrate epitope, are under polygenic control, predominantly non-H-2-linked genes. PMID:3510979

  12. Mesenchymal stromal cells inhibit murine syngeneic anti-tumor immune responses by attenuating inflammation and reorganizing the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Modiano, Jaime F; Lindborg, Beth A; McElmurry, Ron T; Lewellen, Mitzi; Forster, Colleen L; Zamora, Edward A; Schaack, Jerome; Bellgrau, Donald; O'Brien, Timothy D; Tolar, Jakub

    2015-11-01

    The potential of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to inhibit anti-tumor immunity is becoming increasingly well recognized, but the precise steps affected by these cells during the development of an anti-tumor immune response remain incompletely understood. Here, we examined how MSCs affect the steps required to mount an effective anti-tumor immune response following administration of adenovirus Fas ligand (Ad-FasL) in the Lewis lung carcinoma (LL3) model. Administration of bone marrow-derived MSCs with LL3 cells accelerated tumor growth significantly. MSCs inhibited the inflammation induced by Ad-FasL in the primary tumors, precluding their rejection; MSCs also reduced the consequent expansion of tumor-specific T cells in the treated hosts. When immune T cells were transferred to adoptive recipients, MSCs impaired, but did not completely abrogate the ability of these T cells to promote elimination of secondary tumors. This impairment was associated with a modest reduction in tumor-infiltrating T cells, with a significant reduction in tumor-infiltrating macrophages, and with a reorganization of the stromal environment. Our data indicate that MSCs in the tumor environment reduce the efficacy of immunotherapy by creating a functional and anatomic barrier that impairs inflammation, T cell priming and expansion, and T cell function-including recruitment of effector cells. PMID:26250807

  13. Trichosanthin enhances anti-tumor immune response in a murine Lewis lung cancer model by boosting the interaction between TSLC1 and CRTAM.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuchan; Xiong, Shudao; Zheng, Yijie; Luo, Feifei; Jiang, Pei; Chu, Yiwei

    2011-07-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS), extracted from the Chinese medicinal herb Trichosanthes kirilowi, has shown promise for the inhibition of tumor growth. However, its immunomodulatory effect on tumor-host interaction remains unknown. In this study, we focused on the effect of TCS on murine anti-tumor immune response in the 3LL Lewis lung carcinoma tumor model and explored the possible molecular pathways involved. In addition to inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in the 3LL tumor, TCS retarded tumor growth and prolonged mouse survival more significantly in C57BL/6 immunocompetent mice than in nude mice. This reflected the fact that the host immune system was involved in tumor eradication. Using FACS analysis, we found that TCS increased the percentage of effector T cells, particularly Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from tumor-bearing mice. TCS also promoted the vigorous proliferation of antigen-specific effector T cells, markedly increased Th1 cytokine secretion and elicited more memory T cells in tumor-bearing mice, consequently enhancing the anti-tumor response and inducing immune protection. Furthermore, we found that TCS upregulated the expression of tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1) in 3LL tumor cells and the expression of its ligand, class I-restricted T cell-associated molecule (CRTAM), in effector T cells. Blocking TSLC1 expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly eliminated the effects of TCS on the proliferation and cytokine secretion of effector T cells, suggesting that TCS enhances anti-tumor immune response at least partially by boosting the interaction between TSLC1 and CRTAM. Collectively, our data demonstrate that TCS not only affects tumor cells directly, but also enhances anti-tumor immunity via the interaction between TSLC1 and CRTAM. These findings may lead to the development of a novel approach for tumor regression. PMID:21572449

  14. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C.; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D.; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L.; Perera, Liyanage P.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)–based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold) and IgG2b (80 fold) higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies. PMID:26505634

  15. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D; Waldmann, Thomas A; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L; Perera, Liyanage P

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold) and IgG2b (80 fold) higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies. PMID:26505634

  16. Impairment of the cellular immune response in acute murine toxoplasmosis: regulation of interleukin 2 production and macrophage-mediated inhibitory effects.

    PubMed Central

    Haque, S; Khan, I; Haque, A; Kasper, L

    1994-01-01

    Depression of the cellular immune response to Toxoplasma gondii has been reported in both mice and humans. The present study was undertaken to determine the kinetics and mechanism of the observed downregulation of interleukin 2 (IL-2) production during experimental murine toxoplasmosis. For these investigations, the cell-mediated immune response to the wild type (PTg) was compared with that to the less-virulent mutant parasite (PTgB), which is deficient in the major surface antigen, p30 (SAG-1). Spleen cells from infected A/J mice failed to proliferate in response to Toxoplasma antigens during the first week of infection. Both PTg- and PTgB-infected A/J mice exhibited a significant reduction in the concanavalin A (Con A)-induced lymphoproliferative response. Further, the response of splenocytes from mice infected with the wild-type parasite was significantly diminished compared with that of mice infected with PTgB. The lymphoproliferative response to Con A reached its nadir at day 7 and remained below control levels for at least 14 days postinfection. By day 21 postinfection, the response to Con A and to Toxoplasma antigens was restored to the level observed prior to day 7. Con A-stimulated culture supernatants of spleen cells from mice on day 7 postinfection contained significantly less IL-2 than normal mice. There was no significant difference in the numbers of binding sites or capacity of high-affinity IL-2 receptors between infected and normal mouse splenocytes as determined by Scatchard analysis. Exogenous IL-2 at different concentrations failed to restore the proliferative response of lymphocytes from infected mice to Con A. Adherent macrophages from 7-day-infected mice were able to suppress IL-2 production by normal splenocytes following stimulation with Con A. The inhibitory activity mediated by infected cells was reversed by the antibody to IL-10 but not transforming growth factor beta. There were insignificant levels of nitric oxide production in both

  17. Differential requirements of MyD88 and TRIF pathways in TLR4-mediated immune responses in murine B cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Nagai, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yasuharu; Ikutani, Masashi; Hirai, Yoshikatsu; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    LPS stimulates the TLR4/Myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) complex and promotes a variety of immune responses in B cells. TLR4 has two main signaling pathways, MyD88 and Toll/IL-1R (TIR)-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) pathways, but relatively few studies have examined these pathways in B cells. In this study, we investigated MyD88- or TRIF-dependent LPS responses in B cells by utilizing their knockout mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) B cells, MyD88(-/-) B cells were markedly impaired in up-regulation of CD86 and proliferation induced by lipid A moiety of LPS. TRIF(-/-) B cells were also impaired in these responses compared with WT B cells, but showed better responses than MyD88(-/-) B cells. Regarding class switch recombination (CSR) elicited by lipid A plus IL-4, MyD88(-/-) B cells showed similar patterns of CSR to WT B cells. However, TRIF(-/-) B cells showed the impaired in the CSR. Compared with WT and MyD88(-/-) B cells, TRIF(-/-) B cells exhibited reduced cell division, fewer IgG1(+) cells per division, and decreased activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aicda) mRNA expression in response to lipid A plus IL-4. Finally, IgG1 production to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-LPS immunization was impaired in TRIF(-/-) mice, while MyD88(-/-) mice exhibited increased IgG1 production. Thus, MyD88 and TRIF pathways differently regulate TLR4-induced immune responses in B cells. PMID:25448706

  18. Recombinant ESAT-6-Like Proteins Provoke Protective Immune Responses against Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Disease in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao Zhong; Hua, Yan Hong; Yu, Bin; Lau, Candy Choi Yi; Cai, Jian Piao; Zheng, Song Yue; Yam, Wing Cheong; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun; Sze, Kong Hung; Zheng, Bo Jian

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen found in the community and in hospitals. Most notably, methicillin-resistant S. aureus is resistant to many antibiotics, which is a growing public health concern. The emergence of drug-resistant strains has prompted the search for alternative treatments, such as immunotherapeutic approaches. To date, most clinical trials of vaccines or of passive immunization against S. aureus have ended in failure. In this study, we investigated two ESAT-6-like proteins secreted by S. aureus, S. aureus EsxA (SaEsxA) and SaEsxB, as possible targets for a vaccine. Mice vaccinated with these purified proteins elicited high titers of anti-SaEsxA and anti-SaEsxB antibodies, but these antibodies could not prevent S. aureus infection. On the other hand, recombinant SaEsxA (rSaEsxA) and rSaEsxB could induce Th1- and Th17-biased immune responses in mice. Mice immunized with rSaEsxA and rSaEsxB had significantly improved survival rates when challenged with S. aureus compared with the controls. These findings indicate that SaEsxA and SaEsxB are two promising Th1 and Th17 candidate antigens which could be developed into multivalent and serotype-independent vaccines against S. aureus infection. PMID:25368117

  19. Generation of an attenuated Salmonella-delivery strains expressing adhesin and toxin antigens for progressive atrophic rhinitis, and evaluation of its immune responses in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Hoyeon; Hur, Jin; Kim, Bo Ram; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-09-01

    An expression/secretion plasmid containing genes encoding the FimA, CP39, PtfA, ToxA and F1P2 antigens associated with porcine pneumonic pasteurellosis and progressive atrophic rhinitis (PAR) was constructed and harbored in an attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium, which was used as the vaccine candidate. The immune responses induced by this delivery strain were investigated in a murine model. Each antigen secreted from the delivery strain was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Thirty BALB/c mice were divided equally into two groups; group A were intranasally inoculated with the mixture of the five delivery strains, and group B were inoculated with sterile PBS. In group A, all antigen-specific serum IgG were significantly increased compared to those of group B from the 2nd week post-inoculation (WPI) till the 8th WPI. All antigen-specific mucosal IgA in group A were also significantly greater than those of group B. In addition, the significant splenic lymphocyte proliferative responses, the elevations of CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+) and B-cell populations, and the induction of IFN-γ expression in group A were observed. In conclusion, the mixture of five delivery strains expressing specific antigen for these diseases was found to be capable of inducing significant humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:25045826

  20. Therapeutic administration of IL-15 superagonist complex ALT-803 leads to long-term survival and durable antitumor immune response in a murine glioblastoma model.

    PubMed

    Mathios, Dimitrios; Park, Chul-Kee; Marcus, Warren D; Alter, Sarah; Rhode, Peter R; Jeng, Emily K; Wong, Hing C; Pardoll, Drew M; Lim, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary central nervous system malignancy with a poor prognosis in patients. Despite the need for better treatments against glioblastoma, very little progress has been made in discovering new therapies that exhibit superior survival benefit than the standard of care. Immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising treatment modality that could help improve clinical outcomes of glioblastoma patients by assisting the immune system to overcome the immunosuppressive tumor environment. Interleukin-15 (IL-15), a cytokine shown to activate several effector components of the immune system, may serve as an excellent immunotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of glioblastoma. Thus, we evaluated the efficacy of an IL-15 superagonist complex (IL-15N72D:IL-15RαSu-Fc; also known as ALT-803) in a murine GL261-luc glioblastoma model. We show that ALT-803, as a single treatment as well as in combination with anti-PD-1 antibody or stereotactic radiosurgery, exhibits a robust antitumor immune response resulting in a prolonged survival including complete remission in tumor bearing mice. In addition, ALT-803 treatment results in long-term immune memory against glioblastoma tumor rechallenge. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor infiltrating immune cells shows that ALT-803 leads to increased percentage of CD8+-cell infiltration, but not the NK cells, and IFN-γ production into the tumor microenvironment. Cell depletion studies, in accordance with the flow cytometric results, show that the ALT-803 therapeutic effect is dependent on CD4+ and CD8+ cells. These results provide a rationale for evaluating the therapeutic activity of ALT-803 against glioblastoma in the clinical setting. PMID:26174883

  1. Differences in virulence and immune response induced in a murine model by isolates of Mycobacterium ulcerans from different geographic areas

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, R Hurtado; Leon, D Aguilar; Estevez, H Orozco; Martin, A; Herrera, J Luna; Romo, L Flores; Portaels, F; Pando, R Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is the third most common mycobacterial disease in immunocompetent hosts. BU is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which produces skin ulcers and necrosis at the site of infection. The principal virulence factor of M. ulcerans is a polyketide-derived macrolide named mycolactone, which has cytotoxic and immunosuppresive activities. We determined the severity of inflammation, histopathology and bacillary loads in the subcutaneous footpad tissue of BALB/c mice infected with 11 different M. ulcerans isolates from diverse geographical areas. Strains from Africa (Benin, Ghana, Ivory Coast) induced the highest inflammation, necrosis and bacillary loads, whereas the strains collected from Australia, Asia (Japan, Malaysia, New Guinea), Europe (France) and America (Mexico) induced mild inflammation. Subsequently, animals were infected with the strain that exhibited the highest (Benin) or lowest (Mexico) level of virulence in order to analyse the local immune response generated. The Mexican strain, which does not produce mycolactone, induced a predominantly T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokine profile with constant high expression of the anti-microbial peptides beta defensins 3 and 4, in co-existence with low expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The highly virulent strain from Benin which produces mycolactone A/B induced the opposite pattern. Thus, different local immune responses were found depending on the infecting M. ulcerans strain. PMID:19604267

  2. Gliadin stimulation of murine macrophage inflammatory gene expression and intestinal permeability are MyD88-dependent: role of the innate immune response in Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Karen E; Sapone, Anna; Fasano, Alessio; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2006-02-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of TLR signaling in intestinal homeostasis. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered in susceptible individuals by the ingestion of gliadin-containing grains. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that gliadin initiates this response by stimulating the innate immune response to increase intestinal permeability and by up-regulating macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine production. To this end, intestinal permeability and the release of zonulin (an endogenous mediator of gut permeability) in vitro, as well as proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine release by primary murine macrophage cultures, were measured. Gliadin and its peptide derivatives, 33-mer and p31-43, were found to be potent inducers of both a zonulin-dependent increase in intestinal permeability and macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion. Gliadin-induced zonulin release, increased intestinal permeability, and cytokine production were dependent on myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule in the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathways, but were neither TLR2- nor TLR4-dependent. Our data support the following model for the innate immune response to gliadin in the initiation of CD. Gliadin interaction with the intestinal epithelium increases intestinal permeability through the MyD88-dependent release of zonulin that, in turn, enables paracellular translocation of gliadin and its subsequent interaction with macrophages within the intestinal submucosa. There, the interaction of gliadin with macrophages elicits a MyD88-dependent proinflammatory cytokine milieu that facilitates the interaction of T cells with APCs, leading ultimately to the Ag-specific adaptive immune response seen in patients with CD. PMID:16456012

  3. Tick Salivary Sialostatin L Represses the Initiation of Immune Responses by Targeting IRF4-Dependent Transcription in Murine Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias; Brühl, Till-Julius; Staudt, Valérie; Reuter, Sebastian; Grebe, Nadine; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Hoffmann, Markus; Bohn, Toszka; Ulges, Alexander; Stergiou, Natascha; de Graaf, Jos; Löwer, Martin; Taube, Christian; Becker, Marc; Hain, Tobias; Dietzen, Sarah; Stassen, Michael; Huber, Magdalena; Lohoff, Michael; Campos Chagas, Andrezza; Andersen, John; Kotál, Jan; Langhansová, Helena; Kopecký, Jan; Schild, Hansjörg; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Schmitt, Edgar; Bopp, Tobias

    2015-07-15

    Coevolution of ticks and the vertebrate immune system has led to the development of immunosuppressive molecules that prevent immediate response of skin-resident immune cells to quickly fend off the parasite. In this article, we demonstrate that the tick-derived immunosuppressor sialostatin L restrains IL-9 production by mast cells, whereas degranulation and IL-6 expression are both unaffected. In addition, the expression of IL-1β and IRF4 is strongly reduced in the presence of sialostatin L. Correspondingly, IRF4- or IL-1R-deficient mast cells exhibit a strong impairment in IL-9 production, demonstrating the importance of IRF4 and IL-1 in the regulation of the Il9 locus in mast cells. Furthermore, IRF4 binds to the promoters of Il1b and Il9, suggesting that sialostatin L suppresses mast cell-derived IL-9 preferentially by inhibiting IRF4. In an experimental asthma model, mast cell-specific deficiency in IRF4 or administration of sialostatin L results in a strong reduction in asthma symptoms, demonstrating the immunosuppressive potency of tick-derived molecules. PMID:26078269

  4. Tick salivary Sialostatin L represses the initiation of immune responses by targeting IRF4-dependent transcription in murine mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Brühl, Till-Julius; Staudt, Valérie; Reuter, Sebastian; Grebe, Nadine; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Hoffmann, Markus; Bohn, Toszka; Ulges, Alexander; Stergiou, Natascha; de Graaf, Jos; Löwer, Martin; Taube, Christian; Becker, Marc; Hain, Tobias; Dietzen, Sarah; Stassen, Michael; Huber, Magdalena; Lohoff, Michael; Chagas, Andrezza Campos; Andersen, John; Kotál, Jan; Langhansová, Helena; Kopecký, Jan; Schild, Hansjörg; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Schmitt, Edgar; Bopp, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Co-evolution of ticks and the vertebrate immune system has led to the development of immunosuppressive molecules that prevent immediate response of skin-resident immune cells to quickly fend off the parasite. Herein, we demonstrate that the tick-derived immunosuppressor sialostatin L restrains IL-9 production by mast cells while degranulation and IL-6 expression are both unaffected. In addition, the expression of IL-1β and IRF4 is strongly reduced in the presence of sialostatin L. Correspondingly, IRF4- or IL-1 receptor-deficient mast cells exhibit strong impairment in IL-9 production demonstrating the importance of IRF4 and IL-1 in the regulation of the Il9 locus in mast cells. Furthermore, IRF4 binds to the promoters of Il1b and Il9 suggesting that sialostatin L suppresses mast cell-derived IL-9 preferentially by inhibiting IRF4. In an experimental asthma model, mast cell-specific deficiency in IRF4 or administration of sialostatin L results in a strong reduction of asthma symptoms demonstrating the immunosuppressive potency of tick-derived molecules. PMID:26078269

  5. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation and tissue repair. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... and adaptive immune systems. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  6. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The immune system includes specialized white blood cells, called lymphocytes that adapt themselves to fight specific foreign invaders. These cells develop into two groups in the bone marrow. From the bone ...

  7. Limited Role of Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases Sap1 to Sap6 in Candida albicans Virulence and Host Immune Response in Murine Hematogenously Disseminated Candidiasis▿

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Alexandra; Lermann, Ulrich; Teixeira, Luzia; Cerca, Filipe; Botelho, Sofia; Gil da Costa, Rui M.; Sampaio, Paula; Gärtner, Fátima; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Vilanova, Manuel; Pais, Célia

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps) are considered virulence-associated factors. Several members of the Sap family were claimed to play a significant role in the progression of candidiasis established by the hematogenous route. This assumption was based on the observed attenuated virulence of sap-null mutant strains. However, the exclusive contribution of SAP genes to their attenuated phenotype was not unequivocally confirmed, as the Ura status of these mutant strains could also have contributed to the attenuation. In this study, we have reassessed the importance of SAP1 to SAP6 in a murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis using sap-null mutant strains not affected in their URA3 gene expression and compared their virulence phenotypes with those of Ura-blaster sap mutants. The median survival time of BALB/c mice intravenously infected with a mutant strain lacking SAP1 to SAP3 was equivalent to that of mice infected with wild-type strain SC5314, while those infected with mutant strains lacking SAP5 showed slightly extended survival times. Nevertheless, no differences could be observed between the wild type and a Δsap456 mutant in their abilities to invade mouse kidneys. Likewise, a deficiency in SAP4 to SAP6 had no noticeable impact on the immune response elicited in the spleens and kidneys of C. albicans-infected mice. These results contrast with the behavior of equivalent Ura-blaster mutants, which presented a significant reduction in virulence. Our results suggest that Sap1 to Sap6 do not play a significant role in C. albicans virulence in a murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis and that, in this model, Sap1 to Sap3 are not necessary for successful C. albicans infection. PMID:20679440

  8. Murine lung immunity to a soluble antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, D.N.; Bice, D.E.; Siegel, D.W.; Schuyler, M.R. Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM )

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that soluble antigen triggers antigen-specific immunity in the respiratory tract in a fashion similar to that reported for particulate antigen, the authors examined the development of local and systemic immunity in C57BL/6 mice after intratracheal (i.t.) instillation of a soluble, large molecular weight protein neoantigen, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Specific anti-KLH IgG and IgM first appeared in the sera of mice on day 7 after primary immunization by i.t. instillation of KLH, with specific serum antibody concentrations remaining elevated at day 11. Cultured spleen cells obtained from mice after primary immunization released only low levels of specific IgM, and no specific IgG. No specific antibody was released by cell populations derived from the lungs of animals undergoing primary immunization. When presensitized mice were given an i.t. challenge with KLH, responses differed markedly from those following primary immunization. Lung-associated lymph node cell populations from challenged mice released greater amounts of specific antibody earlier than did cell populations, which after primary immunization had not released detectable amounts of specific antibody in vitro, released easily detectable amounts of specific antibody after challenge. Thus, i.t. instillation of soluble KLH generates specific immunity in mice in a fashion similar to that reported for particulate antigen. Specific responses following primary immunization occur largely within draining lung-associated lymph nodes. In contrast, presensitized animals challenged i.t. with soluble KLH mount secondary antibody responses in both lung and lung-associated lymph nodes.

  9. p-Cresyl sulfate suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced anti-bacterial immune responses in murine macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Takahiro; Makino, Ikuyo; Kawakami, Koji; Kato, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kaneko, Kimiyuki

    2016-03-14

    p-Cresyl sulfate (pCS) is a known uremic toxin that is metabolized from p-cresol produced by intestinal bacteria. Abnormal accumulation of pCS in the blood is a characteristic of chronic kidney disease (CKD). pCS is suggested to cause immune dysfunction and increase the risk of infectious diseases in CKD patients. In this study, we focused on the effects of pCS on macrophage functions related to host defense. We evaluated the effects of pCS on cytokine production, nitric oxide (NO) production, arginase activity, expression of cell-surface molecules, and phagocytosis in the macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7. pCS significantly decreased interleukin (IL)-12 p40 production and increased IL-10 production. pCS also decreased NO production, but did not influence arginase activity. pCS suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced CD40 expression on the cell surface, but did not influence phagocytosis. We further assessed whether the effects of pCS observed in the macrophage-like cell line were consistent in primary macrophages. Similar to RAW264.7 cells, pCS decreased IL-12 p40 and p70 production and increased IL-10 production in primary peritoneal macrophages. These data indicate that pCS suppresses certain macrophage functions that contribute to host defense, and may play a role in CKD-related immune dysfunction. PMID:26784855

  10. Oral Administration of MBG to Modulate Immune Responses and Suppress OVA-Sensitized Allergy in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Sherwin; Wang, William; Lu, Chung-Lun; Liu, Chi-Feng; Chen, Shiu-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Recently studies performed on mushroom isolated polysaccharides demonstrated that β-(1,3)-glucan may affect the balance of Th1/Th2 cell response. Using ovalbumin (OVA) as a hypersensitivity inducer, we evaluated the ability of mushroom beta-glucan (MBG) in modulating Th1/Th2 cell responses in B6 mice. As compared to the control group, administration of MBG resulted in an increase of phagocytic activities, Th1 cytokine productions, immunoglobulins including IgG2A and IgA, and a significant expression of the splenic surface markers including CD3, CD4, CD8, and F4/80. In contrast, administration of MBG has significantly suppressed IgE and IgG1 levels and Th2 cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6. Histopathological observation of MBG-treated followed by OVA-treated mice showed less filtration of eosinophil in pulmonary tissue sections. Our data suggested that administration of MBG treatments alters the natural course of the IgE-mediated hypersensitivities. In this investigation, we realize the mushroom beta glucan alter the Th2 response toward the Th1 in the allergic, resulting in a reduction in IgE productions which played a substantive role in reducing the severity of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. PMID:24723960

  11. Treatment of Murine Cerebral Malaria by Artemisone in Combination with Conventional Antimalarial Drugs: Antiplasmodial Effects and Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Guiguemde, W. Armand; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Guo, Jintao; Marciano, Annael; Haynes, Richard K.; Clark, Julie; Guy, R. Kiplin

    2014-01-01

    The decreasing effectiveness of antimalarial therapy due to drug resistance necessitates constant efforts to develop new drugs. Artemisinin derivatives are the most recent drugs that have been introduced and are considered the first line of treatment, but there are already indications of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins. Consequently, drug combinations are recommended for prevention of the induction of resistance. The research here demonstrates the effects of novel combinations of the new artemisinin derivative, artemisone, a recently described 10-alkylamino artemisinin derivative with improved antimalarial activity and reduced neurotoxicity. We here investigate its ability to kill P. falciparum in a high-throughput in vitro assay and to protect mice against lethal cerebral malaria caused by Plasmodium berghei ANKA when used alone or in combination with established antimalarial drugs. Artemisone effects against P. falciparum in vitro were synergistic with halofantrine and mefloquine, and additive with 25 other drugs, including chloroquine and doxycycline. The concentrations of artemisone combinations that were toxic against THP-1 cells in vitro were much higher than their effective antimalarial concentration. Artemisone, mefloquine, chloroquine, or piperaquine given individually mostly protected mice against cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA but did not prevent parasite recrudescence. Combinations of artemisone with any of the other three drugs did completely cure most mice of malaria. The combination of artemisone and chloroquine decreased the ratio of proinflammatory (gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor) to anti-inflammatory (interleukin 10 [IL-10], IL-4) cytokines in the plasma of P. berghei-infected mice. Thus, artemisone in combinations with other antimalarial drugs might have a dual action, both killing parasites and limiting the potentially deleterious host inflammatory response. PMID:24913162

  12. Effects of diallyl trisulfide on induction of apoptotic death in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro and alterations of the immune responses in normal and leukemic mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hung, Fang-Ming; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lu, Kung-Wen; Lin, Jing-Pin; Ko, Yang-Ching; Yu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Hai-Lung; Liao, Jung-Chi; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a chemopreventive dietary constituent and extracted from garlic, has been shown to against cultured many types of human cancer cell liens but the fate of apoptosis in murine leukemia cells in vitro and immune responses in leukemic mice remain elusive. Herein, we clarified the actions of DATS on growth inhibition of murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro and used WEHI-3 cells to generate leukemic mice in vivo, following to investigate the effects of DATS in animal model. In in vitro study, DATS induced apoptosis of WEHI-3 cells through the G0/G1 phase arrest and induction of caspase-3 activation. In in vivo study DATS decreased the weight of spleen of leukemia mice but did not affect the spleen weight of normal mice. DATS promoted the immune responses such as promotions of the macrophage phagocytosis and NK cell activities in WEHI-3 leukemic and normal mice. However, DATS only promotes NK cell activities in normal mice. DATS increases the surface markers of CD11b and Mac-3 in leukemia mice but only promoted CD3 in normal mice. In conclusion, the present study indicates that DATS induces cell death through induction of apoptosis in mice leukemia WHEI-3 cells. DATS also promotes immune responses in leukemia and normal mice in vivo. PMID:24890016

  13. The novel adjuvant dmLT promotes dose sparing, mucosal immunity and longevity of antibody responses to the inactivated polio vaccine in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Norton, Elizabeth B; Bauer, David L; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Lawson, Louise B; Clements, John D

    2015-04-15

    One option for achieving global polio eradication is to replace the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), which has the risk of reversion to wild-type virulence, with the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) vaccine. Adjuvants and alternate routes of immunization are promising options that may reduce antigen dose in IPV vaccinations, potentially allowing dose sparing and cost savings. Use of adjuvants and alternate routes of immunization could also help promote mucosal immunity, potentially mimicking the protection against intestinal virus shedding seen with OPV. In the current study, we examined the impact of combining the novel adjuvant dmLT with trivalent IPV for dose sparing, induction of mucosal immunity and increasing longevity of anti-poliovirus (PV) responses in a mouse model following either intradermal (ID) or intramuscular (IM) delivery. We found that non-adjuvanted ID delivery was not superior to IM delivery for fractional dose sparing, but was associated with development of mucosal immunity. Vaccination with IPV+dmLT promoted serum anti-PV neutralizing antibodies with fractional IPV doses by either IM or ID delivery, achieving at least five-fold dose sparing above non-adjuvanted fractional doses. These responses were most noticeable with the PV1 component of the trivalent vaccine. dmLT also promoted germinal center formation and longevity of serum anti-PV neutralizing titers. Lastly, dmLT enhanced mucosal immunity, as defined by fecal and intestinal anti-PV IgA secretion, when included in IPV immunization by ID or IM delivery. These studies demonstrate that dmLT is an effective adjuvant for either IM or ID delivery of IPV. Inclusion of dmLT in IPV immunizations allows antigen dose sparing and enhances mucosal immunity and longevity of anti-PV responses. PMID:25765967

  14. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells Within Murine Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gjurich, Breanne N; Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the modulation of atherogenesis at all stages of the disease. However, there are many technical difficulties when studying the immune system within murine aortas. Common techniques such as PCR and immunohistochemistry have answered many questions about the presence of immune cells and mediators of inflammation within the aorta yet many questions remain unanswered due to the limitations of these techniques. On the other hand, cumulatively the flow cytometry approach has propelled the immunology field forward but it has been challenging to apply this technique to aortic tissues. Here, we describe the methodology to isolate and characterize the immune cells within the murine aorta and provide examples of functional assays for aortic leukocytes using flow cytometry. The method involves the harvesting and enzymatic digestion of the aorta, extracellular and intracellular protein staining, and a subsequent flow cytometric analysis. PMID:26445788

  15. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  16. Activation of CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells can inhibit cancer cell proliferation during chemotherapy by promoting the immune responses in murine mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Licun; Yun, Zhihong; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; De la Maza, Luis; Wu, Matthew Onn; Yu, Julie; Zhao, Yidan; de Perrot, Marc

    2014-12-01

    We studied the impact of natural killer T (NKT) cell activation by alpha-galactocysylceramide (α-GalCer, α-GC) on cancer cell repopulation during chemotherapy in murine mesothelioma. The number of NKT cells was found to be increased during the development of murine mesothelioma. NKT cells specifically recognize α-GC through CD1d resulting in their activation and expansion. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with chemotherapy once weekly, and α-GC was followed after each cycle of chemotherapy. Anti-tumor effect was evaluated on wild-type (WT) and CD1d knockout (CD1dKO) mice. Cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by Ki67 and TUNEL immunohistochemistry. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proportion and activation in tumor, spleen, draining lymph node and peripheral blood were determined by flow cytometry, and gene expression of activated T cell-related cytokines was quantified by reverse transcription PCR. NKT cells were identified by CD1d-α-GC-tetramer staining. In WT mice, tumor growth delay was achieved by cisplatin (Cis), and this effect was improved in combination with α-GC, but α-GC alone had little effect. Cancer cell proliferation during chemotherapy was significantly inhibited by α-GC, while cancer cell death was significantly upregulated. α-GC following chemotherapy resulted in NKT cell expansion and an increase of interferon-γ production in the draining lymph node, blood and spleen. Gene expression of immune-associated cytokines was upregulated. Strikingly, the percentage of inducible T cell co-stimulator(+)CD4 T cells, Th17/Tc17 cells increased in splenocytes. In CD1d KO mice, however, Cis alone was less effective and Cis + α-GC provided no additional benefit over Cis alone. α-GC alone had minimal effect in both mice. NKT activation between cycles of chemotherapy could improve the outcome of mesothelioma treatment. PMID:25183171

  17. MUC1 and survivin combination tumor gene vaccine generates specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihong; Liu, Chenlu; Zhang, Fangfang; Geng, Fei; Xia, Qiu; Lu, Zhenzhen; Xu, Ping; Xie, Yu; Wu, Hui; Yu, Bin; Wu, Jiaxin; Yu, Xianghui; Kong, Wei

    2016-05-23

    MUC1 and survivin are ideal tumor antigens. Although many cancer vaccines targeting survivin or MUC1 have entered clinical trials, no vaccine combining MUC1 and survivin have been reported. Due to tumor heterogeneity, vaccines containing a combination of antigens may have improved efficacy and coverage of a broader spectrum of cancer targets. Here, cellular responses and anti-tumor activities induced by a combination of DNA vaccine targeting MUC1 and survivin (MS) were evaluated. Results showed that CTL activity and inhibition of tumor growth were obviously enhanced in mice immunized with the combined vaccine in a protection assay. However, in order to enhance the therapeutic effect in the treatment assay, a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vaccine expressing MUC1 and survivin (Ad-MS) was used as a booster following the DNA vaccine prime. Meanwhile, IL-2 promoting T cell proliferation was used as an immunoadjuvant for the DNA vaccine. Results showed that the CTL activity response to the DNA vaccine was enhanced nearly 200% when boosted by the rAd vaccine and was further enhanced by nearly 60% when combined with the IL-2 adjuvant. Therefore, DNA prime combined with rAd boost and IL-2 (MS/IL2/Ad-MS) adjuvant was considered as the best strategy and further evaluated. Multiple cytokines promoting cellular immune responses were shown to be greatly enhanced in mice immunized with MS/IL2/Ad-MS. Moreover, in the treatment assay, the tumor inhibition rate of MS/IL2/Ad-MS reached up to 50.1%, which may be attributed to the enhancement of immune responses and reduction of immunosuppressive factors in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggested that immunization with the combination vaccine targeting MUC1 and survivin using a DNA prime-rAd boost strategy along with IL-2 adjuvant may be an effective method for breaking through immune tolerance to tumors expressing these antigens with potential therapeutic benefits in melanoma cancer. PMID:27113167

  18. Adaptive immunity to murine skin commensals

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei; Li, Wenqing; Hixon, Julie A.; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Belkaid, Yasmine; Dzutzev, Amiran; Durum, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive immune system provides critical defense against pathogenic bacteria. Commensal bacteria have begun to receive much attention in recent years, especially in the gut where there is growing evidence of complex interactions with the adaptive immune system. In the present study, we observed that commensal skin bacteria are recognized by major populations of T cells in skin-draining lymph nodes of mice. Recombination activating gene 1 (Rag1)−/− mice, which lack adaptive immune cells, contained living skin-derived bacteria and bacterial sequences, especially mycobacteria, in their skin-draining lymph nodes. T cells from skin-draining lymph nodes of normal mice were shown, in vitro, to specifically recognize bacteria of several species that were grown from Rag1−/− lymph nodes. T cells from skin-draining lymph nodes, transferred into Rag1−/− mice proliferated in skin-draining lymph nodes, expressed a restricted T-cell receptor spectrotype and produced cytokines. Transfer of T cells into Rag1−/− mice had the effect of reducing bacterial sequences in skin-draining lymph nodes and in skin itself. Antibacterial effects of transferred T cells were dependent on IFNγ and IL-17A. These studies suggest a previously unrecognized role for T cells in controlling skin commensal bacteria and provide a mechanism to account for cutaneous infections and mycobacterial infections in T-cell–deficient patients. PMID:25002505

  19. Induction of a Specific Strong Polyantigenic Cellular Immune Response after Short-Term Chemotherapy Controls Bacillary Reactivation in Murine and Guinea Pig Experimental Models of Tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Guirado, Evelyn; Gil, Olga; Cáceres, Neus; Singh, Mahavir; Vilaplana, Cristina; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2008-01-01

    RUTI is a therapeutic vaccine that is generated from detoxified and liposomed Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell fragments that has demonstrated its efficacy in the control of bacillus reactivation after short-term chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to characterize the cellular immune response generated after the therapeutic administration of RUTI and to corroborate the lack of toxicity of the vaccine. Mouse and guinea pig experimental models were infected with a low-dose M. tuberculosis aerosol. RUTI-treated animals showed the lowest bacillary load in both experimental models. RUTI also decreased the percentage of pulmonary granulomatous infiltration in the mouse and guinea pig models. This was not the case after Mycobacterium bovis BCG treatment. Cellular immunity was studied through the characterization of the intracellular gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells after the splenocytes' stimulation with M. tuberculosis-specific structural and growth-related antigens. Our data show that the difference between the therapeutic administration of BCG and RUTI resides mainly in the stronger activation of IFN-γ+ CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells against tuberculin purified protein derivative, ESAT-6, and Ag85B that RUTI generates. Both vaccines also triggered a specific immune response against the M. tuberculosis structural antigens Ag16kDa and Ag38kDa and a marked mRNA expression of IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-12, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and RANTES in the lung. The results show that RUTI's therapeutic effect is linked not only to the induction of a Th1 response but also to the stimulation of a quicker and stronger specific immunity against structural and growth-related antigens that reduces both the bacillary load and the pulmonary pathology. PMID:18524883

  20. DNA-Protein Immunization Using Leishmania Peroxidoxin-1 Induces a Strong CD4+ T Cell Response and Partially Protects Mice from Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Role of Fusion Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor DNA Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Bayih, Abebe Genetu; Daifalla, Nada S.; Gedamu, Lashitew

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, no universally effective and safe vaccine has been developed for general human use. Leishmania donovani Peroxidoxin-1 (LdPxn-1) is a member of the antioxidant family of proteins and is predominantly expressed in the amastigote stage of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of LdPxn-1 in BALB/c mice in heterologous DNA-Protein immunization regimen in the presence of fusion murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGMCSF) DNA adjuvant. Methodology and Principal Findings A fusion DNA of LdPxn1 and mGMCSF was cloned into a modified pcDNA vector. To confirm the expression in mammalian system, Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected with the plasmid vector containing LdPxn1 gene. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn-1 or pcDNA-LdPxn1 DNA and boosted once with recombinant LdPxn-1 protein. Three weeks after the last immunization, mice were infected with Leishmania major promastigotes. The result showed that immunization with pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn1 elicited a mixed Th-1/Th-2 immune response with significantly higher production of IFN-γ than controls. Intracellular cytokine staining of antigen-stimulated spleen cells showed that immunization with this antigen elicited significantly higher proportion of CD4+ T cells that express IFN-γ, TNF-α, or IL-2. The antigen also induced significantly higher proportion of multipotent CD4+ cells that simultaneously express the three Th-1 cytokines. Moreover, a significant reduction in the footpad swelling was seen in mice immunized with pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn1 antigen. Expression study in CHO cells demonstrated that pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn-1 was expressed in mammalian system. Conclusion The result demonstrates that immunization of BALB/c mice with a plasmid expressing LdPxn1 in the presence of mGMCSF adjuvant elicits a strong specific immune response with high level induction of multipotent CD4+ cells that mediate protection of the

  1. Dendritic cells pulsed with tumor cells killed by high hydrostatic pressure induce strong immune responses and display therapeutic effects both in murine TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumors when combined with docetaxel chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    MIKYŠKOVÁ, ROMANA; ŠTĚPÁNEK, IVAN; INDROVÁ, MARIE; BIEBLOVÁ, JANA; ŠÍMOVÁ, JANA; TRUXOVÁ, IVA; MOSEROVÁ, IRENA; FUČÍKOVÁ, JITKA; BARTŮŇKOVÁ, JIŘINA; ŠPÍŠEK, RADEK; REINIŠ, MILAN

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been shown to induce immunogenic cell death of cancer cells, facilitating their uptake by dendritic cells (DC) and subsequent presentation of tumor antigens. In the present study, we demonstrated immunogenicity of the HHP-treated tumor cells in mice. HHP was able to induce immunogenic cell death of both TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumor cells, representing murine models for human papilloma virus-associated tumors and prostate cancer, respectively. HHP-treated cells induced stronger immune responses in mice immunized with these tumor cells, documented by higher spleen cell cytotoxicity and increased IFNγ production as compared to irradiated tumor cells, accompanied by suppression of tumor growth in vivo in the case of TC-1 tumors, but not TRAMP-C2 tumors. Furthermore, HHP-treated cells were used for DC-based vaccine antigen pulsing. DC co-cultured with HHP-treated tumor cells and matured by a TLR 9 agonist exhibited higher cell surface expression of maturation markers and production of IL-12 and other cytokines, as compared to the DC pulsed with irradiated tumor cells. Immunization with DC cell-based vaccines pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells induced high immune responses, detected by increased spleen cell cytotoxicity and elevated IFNγ production. The DC-based vaccine pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells combined with docetaxel chemotherapy significantly inhibited growth of both TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumors. Our results indicate that DC-based vaccines pulsed with HHP-inactivated tumor cells can be a suitable tool for chemoimmunotherapy, particularly with regard to the findings that poorly immunogenic TRAMP-C2 tumors were susceptible to this treatment modality. PMID:26718011

  2. Dendritic cells pulsed with tumor cells killed by high hydrostatic pressure induce strong immune responses and display therapeutic effects both in murine TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumors when combined with docetaxel chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mikyšková, Romana; Štěpánek, Ivan; Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Šímová, Jana; Truxová, Iva; Moserová, Irena; Fučíková, Jitka; Bartůňková, Jiřina; Špíšek, Radek; Reiniš, Milan

    2016-03-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been shown to induce immunogenic cell death of cancer cells, facilitating their uptake by dendritic cells (DC) and subsequent presentation of tumor antigens. In the present study, we demonstrated immunogenicity of the HHP-treated tumor cells in mice. HHP was able to induce immunogenic cell death of both TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumor cells, representing murine models for human papilloma virus-associated tumors and prostate cancer, respectively. HHP-treated cells induced stronger immune responses in mice immunized with these tumor cells, documented by higher spleen cell cytotoxicity and increased IFNγ production as compared to irradiated tumor cells, accompanied by suppression of tumor growth in vivo in the case of TC-1 tumors, but not TRAMP-C2 tumors. Furthermore, HHP-treated cells were used for DC-based vaccine antigen pulsing. DC co-cultured with HHP-treated tumor cells and matured by a TLR 9 agonist exhibited higher cell surface expression of maturation markers and production of IL-12 and other cytokines, as compared to the DC pulsed with irradiated tumor cells. Immunization with DC cell-based vaccines pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells induced high immune responses, detected by increased spleen cell cytotoxicity and elevated IFNγ production. The DC-based vaccine pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells combined with docetaxel chemotherapy significantly inhibited growth of both TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumors. Our results indicate that DC-based vaccines pulsed with HHP-inactivated tumor cells can be a suitable tool for chemoimmunotherapy, particularly with regard to the findings that poorly immunogenic TRAMP-C2 tumors were susceptible to this treatment modality. PMID:26718011

  3. CryJ-LAMP DNA Vaccines for Japanese Red Cedar Allergy Induce Robust Th1-Type Immune Responses in Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Michael; Marketon, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Allergies caused by Japanese Red Cedar (JRC) pollen affect up to a third of Japanese people, necessitating development of an effective therapeutic. We utilized the lysosomal targeting property of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) to make DNA vaccines that encode LAMP-1 and the sequences of immunodominant allergen CryJ1 or CryJ2 from the JRC pollen. This novel strategy is designed to skew the CD4 T cell responses to the target allergens towards a nonallergenic Th1 response. CryJ1-LAMP and CryJ2-LAMP were administrated to BALB/c mice and antigen-specific Th1-type IgG2a and Th2-type IgG1 antibodies, as well as IgE antibodies, were assayed longitudinally. We also isolated different T cell populations from immunized mice and adoptively transferred them into naïve mice followed by CryJ1/CryJ2 protein boosts. We demonstrated that CryJ-LAMP immunized mice produce high levels of IFN-γ and anti-CryJ1 or anti-CryJ2 IgG2a antibodies and low levels of IgE antibodies, suggesting that a Th1 response was induced. In addition, we found that CD4+ T cells are the immunological effectors of DNA vaccination in this allergy model. Together, our results suggest the CryJ-LAMP Vaccine has a potential as an effective therapeutic for JRC induced allergy by skewing Th1/Th2 responses. PMID:27239481

  4. CryJ-LAMP DNA Vaccines for Japanese Red Cedar Allergy Induce Robust Th1-Type Immune Responses in Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Connolly, Michael; Marketon, Anthony; Heiland, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Allergies caused by Japanese Red Cedar (JRC) pollen affect up to a third of Japanese people, necessitating development of an effective therapeutic. We utilized the lysosomal targeting property of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) to make DNA vaccines that encode LAMP-1 and the sequences of immunodominant allergen CryJ1 or CryJ2 from the JRC pollen. This novel strategy is designed to skew the CD4 T cell responses to the target allergens towards a nonallergenic Th1 response. CryJ1-LAMP and CryJ2-LAMP were administrated to BALB/c mice and antigen-specific Th1-type IgG2a and Th2-type IgG1 antibodies, as well as IgE antibodies, were assayed longitudinally. We also isolated different T cell populations from immunized mice and adoptively transferred them into naïve mice followed by CryJ1/CryJ2 protein boosts. We demonstrated that CryJ-LAMP immunized mice produce high levels of IFN-γ and anti-CryJ1 or anti-CryJ2 IgG2a antibodies and low levels of IgE antibodies, suggesting that a Th1 response was induced. In addition, we found that CD4(+) T cells are the immunological effectors of DNA vaccination in this allergy model. Together, our results suggest the CryJ-LAMP Vaccine has a potential as an effective therapeutic for JRC induced allergy by skewing Th1/Th2 responses. PMID:27239481

  5. Immunoglobulin G-mediated regulation of the murine immune response to transfused red blood cells occurs in the absence of active immune suppression: implications for the mechanism of action of anti-D in the prevention of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn?

    PubMed Central

    Brinc, Davor; Le-Tien, Hoang; Crow, Andrew R; Siragam, Vinayakumar; Freedman, John; Lazarus, Alan H

    2008-01-01

    Anti-D has been widely and effectively used in Rhesus blood group D negative mothers for the prevention of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn; its mechanism of action however, often referred to as antibody-mediated immune suppression (AMIS), remains largely unresolved. We investigated, in a murine model, whether active immune suppression or clonal deletion mediated by anti-red blood cell (RBC) immunoglobulin G (IgG) could explain the phenomenon of AMIS. Transfusion of IgG-opsonized foreign RBCs (i.e. AMIS) strongly attenuated antibody responses compared to transfusion of untreated foreign RBCs. When the AMIS-mice were subsequently transfused with untreated RBCs, no immune suppression was observed at 5 and 35 days after AMIS induction; in fact, the mice responded to retransfusion with untreated RBCs in a manner that was characteristic of a secondary immune response. When IgG-opsonized RBCs were transfused concurrently with untreated RBCs, a dose-dependent reduction of the antibody response was observed. This work suggests that the attenuation of the antibody responsiveness by anti-RBC IgG is not associated with active immune suppression or clonal deletion at either the T-cell or B-cell level; rather, the effect appears more characteristic of B-cell unresponsiveness to IgG-opsonized RBCs. These results may have implications for the understanding of the mechanism of action of anti-D in haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. PMID:18266717

  6. Maladjusted host immune responses induce experimental cerebral malaria-like pathology in a murine Borrelia and Plasmodium co-infection model.

    PubMed

    Normark, Johan; Nelson, Maria; Engström, Patrik; Andersson, Marie; Björk, Rafael; Moritz, Thomas; Fahlgren, Anna; Bergström, Sven

    2014-01-01

    In the Plasmodium infected host, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is required to clear the parasites without inducing major host pathology. Clinical reports suggest that bacterial infection in conjunction with malaria aggravates disease and raises both mortality and morbidity in these patients. In this study, we investigated the immune responses in BALB/c mice, co-infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 parasites and the relapsing fever bacterium Borrelia duttonii. In contrast to single infections, we identified in the co-infected mice a reduction of L-Arginine levels in the serum. It indicated diminished bioavailability of NO, which argued for a dysfunctional endothelium. Consistent with this, we observed increased sequestration of CD8+ cells in the brain as well over expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM by brain endothelial cells. Co-infected mice further showed an increased inflammatory response through IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as inability to down regulate the same through IL-10. In addition we found loss of synchronicity of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals seen in dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as increased numbers of regulatory T-cells. Our study shows that a situation mimicking experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is induced in co-infected mice due to loss of timing and control over regulatory mechanisms in antigen presenting cells. PMID:25075973

  7. Maladjusted Host Immune Responses Induce Experimental Cerebral Malaria-Like Pathology in a Murine Borrelia and Plasmodium Co-Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Normark, Johan; Nelson, Maria; Engström, Patrik; Andersson, Marie; Björk, Rafael; Moritz, Thomas; Fahlgren, Anna; Bergström, Sven

    2014-01-01

    In the Plasmodium infected host, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is required to clear the parasites without inducing major host pathology. Clinical reports suggest that bacterial infection in conjunction with malaria aggravates disease and raises both mortality and morbidity in these patients. In this study, we investigated the immune responses in BALB/c mice, co-infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 parasites and the relapsing fever bacterium Borrelia duttonii. In contrast to single infections, we identified in the co-infected mice a reduction of L-Arginine levels in the serum. It indicated diminished bioavailability of NO, which argued for a dysfunctional endothelium. Consistent with this, we observed increased sequestration of CD8+ cells in the brain as well over expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM by brain endothelial cells. Co-infected mice further showed an increased inflammatory response through IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as inability to down regulate the same through IL-10. In addition we found loss of synchronicity of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals seen in dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as increased numbers of regulatory T-cells. Our study shows that a situation mimicking experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is induced in co-infected mice due to loss of timing and control over regulatory mechanisms in antigen presenting cells. PMID:25075973

  8. Molecular cloning of a Poria cocos protein that activates Th1 immune response and allays Th2 cytokine and IgE production in a murine atopic dermatitis model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ya-Ting; Kuan, Yen-Chou; Chang, Hui-Hsin; Sheu, Fuu

    2014-04-01

    Edible fungus Poria cocos (Schw.) Wolf is a cooking material that has myriad health benefits. However, its active constituents have not been well-defined. We previously purified an immunomodulatory protein, PCP, from P. cocos and described its biochemical features and its ability to activate primary macrophage via TLR4. In this study, we cloned the gene of PCP and demonstrated its ability to activate Th1 response in cell cultures and in mice. The complete cDNA sequence of PCP consisted of 807 bp, which included a 579 bp coding sequence that encoded 194 amino acids. With the addition of co-stimulatory CD3/CD28 signals, PCP significantly increased the surface expression of CD44 and CD69 on effector T cells. PCP could also up-regulate T-bet and STAT4 expressions and IFN-γ and IL-2 secretions. Oral administration of PCP suppressed the production of both total and OVA-specific IgG1 in serum and enhanced the amounts of serum and OVA-specific IgG2a and Th1-related cytokine production in BALB/c splenocytes. In addition, oral administration of PCP significantly reduced IL-4 and IgE expressions in a murine model of atopic dermatitis. In conclusion, these results provide evidence that PCP could regulate mammalian immune cells and reveal their pharmaceutical potential in developing therapeutic strategies against Th2-mediated immune disorders. PMID:24625278

  9. Polysaccharide-K augments docetaxel-induced tumor suppression and antitumor immune response in an immunocompetent murine model of human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    WENNER, CYNTHIA A.; MARTZEN, MARK R.; LU, HAILING; VERNERIS, MICHAEL R.; WANG, HONGBO; SLATON, JOEL W.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer has high mortality rates and limited treatment options. Novel therapies are needed to better contend with this disease. Polysaccharide-K® (PSK), an extract of the mushroom Trametes versicolor, has immunomodulatory and tumor suppressive activities. PSK is used in Asia as a cancer immunotherapy. However, its benefit in combination with taxanes for prostate cancer is unknown. We examined whether PSK would enhance docetaxel-induced apoptosis and augment anti-tumor immune responses in orthotopic tumors using transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP)-C2-bearing mice. Combining PSK with docetaxel induced significantly higher tumor suppression than either treatment alone (p<0.05), including a reduction in tumor proliferation and enhanced apoptosis. Combined PSK and docetaxel treatment led to a lower decrease in number of white blood cells than docetaxel alone, an effect accompanied by increased numbers of tumor-infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. PSK with or without docetaxel significantly enhanced mRNA expression of IFN-γ compared to control, but did not significantly alter T-regulatory FoxP3 mRNA expression in tumors. PSK also augmented docetaxel-induced splenic natural killer cell cytolytic activity against YAC-1 target cells (p=0.045). This study is the first to show that PSK enhances docetaxel-induced prostate cancer tumor suppression, apoptosis and antitumor responses. PMID:22159900

  10. Dendritic Cell-Like Cells Accumulate in Regenerating Murine Skeletal Muscle after Injury and Boost Adaptive Immune Responses Only upon a Microbial Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; Bangen, Jörg M.; Pastille, Eva; Schmitz, Daniel; Flohé, Sascha; Schumak, Beatrix; Flohé, Stefanie B.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury causes a local sterile inflammatory response. In parallel, a state of immunosuppression develops distal to the site of tissue damage. Granulocytes and monocytes that are rapidly recruited to the site of injury contribute to tissue regeneration. In this study we used a mouse model of traumatic skeletal muscle injury to investigate the previously unknown role of dendritic cells (DCs) that accumulate in injured tissue. We injected the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) into the skeletal muscle of injured or sham-treated mice to address the ability of these DCs in antigen uptake, migration, and specific T cell activation in the draining popliteal lymph node (pLN). Immature DC-like cells appeared in the skeletal muscle by 4 days after injury and subsequently acquired a mature phenotype, as indicated by increased expression of the costimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86. After the injection of OVA into the muscle, OVA-loaded DCs migrated into the pLN. The migration of DC-like cells from the injured muscle was enhanced in the presence of the microbial stimulus lipopolysaccharide at the site of antigen uptake and triggered an increased OVA-specific T helper cell type 1 (Th1) response in the pLN. Naïve OVA-loaded DCs were superior in Th1-like priming in the pLN when adoptively transferred into the skeletal muscle of injured mice, a finding indicating the relevance of the microenvironment in the regenerating skeletal muscle for increased Th1-like priming. These findings suggest that DC-like cells that accumulate in the regenerating muscle initiate a protective immune response upon microbial challenge and thereby overcome injury-induced immunosuppression. PMID:27196728

  11. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  12. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first ‘immune’ cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1–3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide ‘layers’ of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. PMID:25871013

  13. Lymphatic vessels regulate immune microenvironments in human and murine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lund, Amanda W; Wagner, Marek; Fankhauser, Manuel; Steinskog, Eli S; Broggi, Maria A; Spranger, Stefani; Gajewski, Thomas F; Alitalo, Kari; Eikesdal, Hans P; Wiig, Helge; Swartz, Melody A

    2016-09-01

    Lymphatic remodeling in tumor microenvironments correlates with progression and metastasis, and local lymphatic vessels play complex and poorly understood roles in tumor immunity. Tumor lymphangiogenesis is associated with increased immune suppression, yet lymphatic vessels are required for fluid drainage and immune cell trafficking to lymph nodes, where adaptive immune responses are mounted. Here, we examined the contribution of lymphatic drainage to tumor inflammation and immunity using a mouse model that lacks dermal lymphatic vessels (K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice). Melanomas implanted in these mice grew robustly, but exhibited drastically reduced cytokine expression and leukocyte infiltration compared with those implanted in control animals. In the absence of local immune suppression, transferred cytotoxic T cells more effectively controlled tumors in K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice than in control mice. Furthermore, gene expression analysis of human melanoma samples revealed that patient immune parameters are markedly stratified by levels of lymphatic markers. This work suggests that the establishment of tumor-associated inflammation and immunity critically depends on lymphatic vessel remodeling and drainage. Moreover, these results have implications for immunotherapies, the efficacies of which are regulated by the tumor immune microenvironment. PMID:27525437

  14. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE in a Murine Model of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yin; Pfeifer, Andreas Klaus; Myschetzky, Rebecca; Garbyal, Rajendra Singh; Rasmussen, Palle; Knigge, Ulrich; Bzorek, Michael; Kristensen, Michael Holmsgaard; Kjaer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new mode of internally targeted radiotherapy currently in clinical trials. In PRRT, ionizing radioisotopes conjugated to somatostatin analogues are targeted to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) via somatostatin receptors. Despite promising clinical results, very little is known about the mechanism of tumor control. By using NCI-H727 cells in an in vivo murine xenograft model of human NETs, we showed that 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT led to increased infiltration of CD86+ antigen presenting cells into tumor tissue. We also found that following treatment with PRRT, there was significantly increased tumor infiltration by CD49b+/FasL+ NK cells potentially capable of tumor killing. Further investigation into the immunomodulatory effects of PRRT will be essential in improving treatment efficacy. PMID:26824927

  15. Defining the optimal murine models to investigate immune checkpoint blockers and their combination with other immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Sanmamed, M F; Chester, C; Melero, I; Kohrt, H

    2016-07-01

    The recent success of checkpoint blockers to treat cancer has demonstrated that the immune system is a critical player in the war against cancer. Historically, anticancer therapeutics have been tested in syngeneic mouse models (with a fully murine immune system) or in immunodeficient mice that allow the engraftment of human xenografts. Animal models with functioning human immune systems are critically needed to more accurately recapitulate the complexity of the human tumor microenvironment. Such models are integral to better predict tumor responses to both immunomodulatory agents and directly antineoplastic therapies. In this regard, the development of humanized models is a promising, novel strategy that offers the possibility of testing checkpoint blockers' capacity and their combination with other antitumor drugs. In this review, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the available animal models regarding their capacity to evaluate checkpoint blockers and checkpoint blocker-based combination immunotherapy. PMID:26912558

  16. Long-Term Survival of Photoreceptors Transplanted into the Adult Murine Neural Retina Requires Immune Modulation

    PubMed Central

    West, Emma L.; Pearson, Rachael A.; Barker, Susie E.; Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.; Maclaren, Robert E.; Barber, Amanda C.; Duran, Yanai; Smith, Alexander J.; Sowden, Jane C.; Ali, Robin R.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy presents an opportunity to replace photoreceptors that are lost as a result of inherited and age-related degenerative disease. We have previously shown that murine postmitotic rod photoreceptor precursor cells, identified by expression of the rod-specific transcription factor Nrl, are able to migrate into and integrate within the adult murine neural retina. However, their long-term survival has yet to be determined. Here, we found that integrated Nrl.gfp+ve photoreceptors were present up to 12 months post-transplantation, albeit in significantly reduced numbers. Surviving cells had rod-like morphology, including inner/outer segments and spherule synapses. In a minority of eyes, we observed an early, marked reduction in integrated photoreceptors within 1 month post-transplantation, which correlated with increased numbers of amoeboid macrophages, indicating acute loss of transplanted cells due to an inflammatory response. In the majority of transplants, similar numbers of integrated cells were observed between 1 and 2 months post-transplantation. By 4 months, however, we observed a significant decrease in integrated cell survival. Macrophages and T cells were present around the transplantation site, indicating a chronic immune response. Immune suppression of recipients significantly increased transplanted photoreceptor survival, indicating that the loss observed in unsuppressed recipients resulted from T cell-mediated host immune responses. Thus, if immune responses are modulated, correctly integrated transplanted photoreceptors can survive for extended periods of time in hosts with partially mismatched H-2 haplotypes. These findings suggest that autologous donor cells are optimal for therapeutic approaches to repair the neural retina, though with immune suppression nonautologous donors may be effective. PMID:20857496

  17. Altered Innate and Lymphocytic Immunity in Murine Splenocytes Following Short-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Quiriarte, Heather; Sams, Clarence F.

    2011-01-01

    Immune dysregulation has been demonstrated following spaceflight of varying durations and limited in-flight studies indicate this phenomenon may persist during spaceflight. Causes may include microgravity, physiological stress, isolation, confinement and disrupted circadian rhythms. To further investigate the mechanisms associated with flight-associated immune changes, murine splenocytes immune parameters were assessed following 14 day space flight on Space Shuttle mission STS-135.

  18. Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-β is oncolytic and promotes antitumor immune responses in a syngeneic murine model of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manish R.; Jacobson, Blake A.; Ji, Yan; Drees, Jeremy; Tang, Shaogeng; Xiong, Kerry; Wang, Hengbing; Prigge, Jennifer E.; Dash, Alexander S.; Kratzke, Andrea K.; Mesev, Emily; Etchison, Ryan; Federspiel, Mark J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Kratzke, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a potent oncolytic virus for many tumors. VSV that produces interferon-β (VSV-IFNβ) is now in early clinical testing for solid tumors. Here, the preclinical activity of VSV and VSV-IFNβ against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is reported. NSCLC cell lines were treated in vitro with VSV expressing green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP) and VSV-IFNβ. VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ were active against NSCLC cells. JAK/STAT inhibition with ruxolitinib re-sensitized resistant H838 cells to VSV-IFNβ mediated oncolysis. Intratumoral injections of VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ reduced tumor growth and weight in H2009 nude mouse xenografts (p < 0.01). A similar trend was observed in A549 xenografts. Syngeneic LM2 lung tumors grown in flanks of A/J mice were injected with VSV-IFNβ intratumorally. Treatment of LM2 tumors with VSV-IFNβ resulted in tumor regression, prolonged survival (p < 0.0001), and cure of 30% of mice. Intratumoral injection of VSV-IFNβ resulted in decreased tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased CD8+ T cells. Tumor cell expression of PDL-1 was increased after VSV-IFNβ treatment. VSV-IFNβ has potent antitumor effects and promotes systemic antitumor immunity. These data support further clinical investigation of VSV-IFNβ for NSCLC. PMID:26431376

  19. S. mansoni Bolsters Anti-Viral Immunity in the Murine Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Sebastian; Krempl, Christine; Kallfass, Carsten; Frey, Stefanie; Jakob, Thilo; Mouahid, Gabriel; Moné, Hélène; Schmitt-Gräff, Annette; Staeheli, Peter; Lamers, Marinus C.

    2014-01-01

    The human intestinal parasite Schistosoma mansoni causes a chronic disease, schistosomiasis or bilharzia. According to the current literature, the parasite induces vigorous immune responses that are controlled by Th2 helper cells at the expense of Th1 helper cells. The latter cell type is, however, indispensable for anti-viral immune responses. Remarkably, there is no reliable literature among 230 million patients worldwide describing defective anti-viral immune responses in the upper respiratory tract, for instance against influenza A virus or against respiratory syncitial virus (RSV). We therefore re-examined the immune response to a human isolate of S. mansoni and challenged mice in the chronic phase of schistosomiasis with influenza A virus, or with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a mouse virus to model RSV infections. We found that mice with chronic schistosomiasis had significant, systemic immune responses induced by Th1, Th2, and Th17 helper cells. High serum levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-13, IL-2, IL-17, and GM-CSF were found after mating and oviposition. The lungs of diseased mice showed low-grade inflammation, with goblet cell hyperplasia and excessive mucus secretion, which was alleviated by treatment with an anti-TNF-α agent (Etanercept). Mice with chronic schistosomiasis were to a relative, but significant extent protected from a secondary viral respiratory challenge. The protection correlated with the onset of oviposition and TNF-α-mediated goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus secretion, suggesting that these mechanisms are involved in enhanced immune protection to respiratory viruses during chronic murine schistosomiasis. Indeed, also in a model of allergic airway inflammation mice were protected from a viral respiratory challenge with PVM. PMID:25398130

  20. Review: 2-mercaptoethanol alteration of in vitro immune functions of species other than murine.

    PubMed

    Click, Robert E

    2014-01-15

    Descriptions that organosulfurs could alter biologically relevant cellular functions began some 40years ago when cell mediated and humoral murine in vitro immune responses were reported to be dramatically enhanced by any of four xenobiotic, sulfhydryl compounds-2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), dithiothreitol, glutathione, and l-cysteine; the most effective of the four was 2-ME. These findings triggered a plethora of reports defining 2-ME benefits for a multitude of immunological processes, primarily with murine models. This led to investigations on 2-ME alterations of (a) immune functions in other species, (b) activities of other cell-types, and (c) in situ diseases. In addition, the early findings may have been instrumental in the identification of the previously undefined anticarcinogenic chemicals in specific foods as organosulfurs. Outside the plant organosulfurs, there are no comprehensive reviews of these areas to help define mechanisms by which organosulfurs function as well as identify potential alternative uses. Therefore, the present review will focus on 2-ME alterations of in vitro immune functions in species other than murine; namely, fish, amphibian, reptile, avian, whales, dolphins, rat, hamster, rabbit, guinea pig, feline, canine, porcine, ovine, bovine, and human. Processes, some unique to a given species, were in general, enhanced and in some cases dependent upon the presence of 2-ME. The largest benefits occurred in media that were serum free, followed by those in autologous serum and then fetal bovine serum supplemented medium. Concentrations of 2-ME were generally in the low μM range, with exceptions of those for salamander (20mM), turtles (70mM) and dolphins (7mM). The few studies designed to assess mechanisms found that changes induced by 2-ME were generally accompanied by alterations of reduced/oxidized glutathione cellular concentrations. The major benefit for most studies, however, was to increase the sensitivity of the culture environment, which

  1. HUMORAL ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO INDIVIDUAL VIRAL PROTEINS AFTER MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to identify viral proteins that played an important role in the humoral immune response to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Viral proteins were separated from a purified virus preparation on polyacrylamide gels, were blotted onto nitrocellulose strips,...

  2. Immune evasion by murine melanoma mediated through CC chemokine receptor-10.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Cardones, Adela R; Finkelstein, Steven E; Restifo, Nicholas P; Klaunberg, Brenda A; Nestle, Frank O; Castillo, S Sianna; Dennis, Phillip A; Hwang, Sam T

    2003-11-01

    Human melanoma cells frequently express CC chemokine receptor (CCR)10, a receptor whose ligand (CCL27) is constitutively produced by keratinocytes. Compared with B16 murine melanoma, cells rendered more immunogenic via overexpression of luciferase, B16 cells that overexpressed both luciferase and CCR10 resisted host immune responses and readily formed tumors. In vitro, exposure of tumor cells to CCL27 led to rapid activation of Akt, resistance to cell death induced by melanoma antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent protection from apoptosis induced by Fas cross-linking. In vivo, cutaneous injection of neutralizing antibodies to endogenous CCL27 blocked growth of CCR10-expressing melanoma cells. We propose that CCR10 engagement by locally produced CCL27 allows melanoma cells to escape host immune antitumor killing mechanisms (possibly through activation of PI3K/Akt), thereby providing a means for tumor progression. PMID:14581607

  3. Ubiquitin signaling in immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongbo; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has emerged as a crucial mechanism that regulates signal transduction in diverse biological processes, including different aspects of immune functions. Ubiquitination regulates pattern-recognition receptor signaling that mediates both innate immune responses and dendritic cell maturation required for initiation of adaptive immune responses. Ubiquitination also regulates the development, activation, and differentiation of T cells, thereby maintaining efficient adaptive immune responses to pathogens and immunological tolerance to self-tissues. Like phosphorylation, ubiquitination is a reversible reaction tightly controlled by the opposing actions of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases. Deregulated ubiquitination events are associated with immunological disorders, including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27012466

  4. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  5. Chitin Modulates Innate Immune Responses of Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Barbara; Müller-Wiefel, Alisa Sophie; Rupec, Rudolph; Korting, Hans Christian; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background Chitin, after cellulose the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, is an essential component of exoskeletons of crabs, shrimps and insects and protects these organisms from harsh conditions in their environment. Unexpectedly, chitin has been found to activate innate immune cells and to elicit murine airway inflammation. The skin represents the outer barrier of the human host defense and is in frequent contact with chitin-bearing organisms, such as house-dust mites or flies. The effects of chitin on keratinocytes, however, are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We hypothesized that chitin stimulates keratinocytes and thereby modulates the innate immune response of the skin. Here we show that chitin is bioactive on primary and immortalized keratinocytes by triggering production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Chitin stimulation further induced the expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) TLR4 on keratinocytes at mRNA and protein level. Chitin-induced effects were mainly abrogated when TLR2 was blocked, suggesting that TLR2 senses chitin on keratinocytes. Conclusions/Significance We speculate that chitin-bearing organisms modulate the innate immune response towards pathogens by upregulating secretion of cytokines and chemokines and expression of MyD88-associated TLRs, two major components of innate immunity. The clinical relevance of this mechanism remains to be defined. PMID:21383982

  6. Dynamic Immune Cell Recruitment After Murine Pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus Infection under Different Immunosuppressive Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Kalleda, Natarajaswamy; Amich, Jorge; Arslan, Berkan; Poreddy, Spoorthi; Mattenheimer, Katharina; Mokhtari, Zeinab; Einsele, Hermann; Brock, Matthias; Heinze, Katrin Gertrud; Beilhack, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Humans are continuously exposed to airborne spores of the saprophytic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. However, in healthy individuals pulmonary host defense mechanisms efficiently eliminate the fungus. In contrast, A. fumigatus causes devastating infections in immunocompromised patients. Host immune responses against A. fumigatus lung infections in immunocompromised conditions have remained largely elusive. Given the dynamic changes in immune cell subsets within tissues upon immunosuppressive therapy, we dissected the spatiotemporal pulmonary immune response after A. fumigatus infection to reveal basic immunological events that fail to effectively control invasive fungal disease. In different immunocompromised murine models, myeloid, notably neutrophils, and macrophages, but not lymphoid cells were strongly recruited to the lungs upon infection. Other myeloid cells, particularly dendritic cells and monocytes, were only recruited to lungs of corticosteroid treated mice, which developed a strong pulmonary inflammation after infection. Lymphoid cells, particularly CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells and NK cells were highly reduced upon immunosuppression and not recruited after A. fumigatus infection. Moreover, adoptive CD11b+ myeloid cell transfer rescued cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice from lethal A. fumigatus infection but not cortisone and cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice. Our findings illustrate that CD11b+ myeloid cells are critical for anti-A. fumigatus defense under cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed conditions. PMID:27468286

  7. Dynamic Immune Cell Recruitment After Murine Pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus Infection under Different Immunosuppressive Regimens.

    PubMed

    Kalleda, Natarajaswamy; Amich, Jorge; Arslan, Berkan; Poreddy, Spoorthi; Mattenheimer, Katharina; Mokhtari, Zeinab; Einsele, Hermann; Brock, Matthias; Heinze, Katrin Gertrud; Beilhack, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Humans are continuously exposed to airborne spores of the saprophytic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. However, in healthy individuals pulmonary host defense mechanisms efficiently eliminate the fungus. In contrast, A. fumigatus causes devastating infections in immunocompromised patients. Host immune responses against A. fumigatus lung infections in immunocompromised conditions have remained largely elusive. Given the dynamic changes in immune cell subsets within tissues upon immunosuppressive therapy, we dissected the spatiotemporal pulmonary immune response after A. fumigatus infection to reveal basic immunological events that fail to effectively control invasive fungal disease. In different immunocompromised murine models, myeloid, notably neutrophils, and macrophages, but not lymphoid cells were strongly recruited to the lungs upon infection. Other myeloid cells, particularly dendritic cells and monocytes, were only recruited to lungs of corticosteroid treated mice, which developed a strong pulmonary inflammation after infection. Lymphoid cells, particularly CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cells and NK cells were highly reduced upon immunosuppression and not recruited after A. fumigatus infection. Moreover, adoptive CD11b(+) myeloid cell transfer rescued cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice from lethal A. fumigatus infection but not cortisone and cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice. Our findings illustrate that CD11b(+) myeloid cells are critical for anti-A. fumigatus defense under cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed conditions. PMID:27468286

  8. Protective effect of intranasal immunization with Neospora caninum membrane antigens against murine neosporosis established through the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ferreirinha, Pedro; Dias, Joana; Correia, Alexandra; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Santos, Carlos; Teixeira, Luzia; Ribeiro, Adília; Rocha, António; Vilanova, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexa parasite that in the last two decades was acknowledged as the main pathogenic agent responsible for economic losses in the cattle industry. In the present study, the effectiveness of intranasal immunization with N. caninum membrane antigens plus CpG adjuvant was assessed in a murine model of intragastrically established neosporosis. Immunized mice presented a lower parasitic burden in the brain on infection with 5 × 107 tachyzoites, showing that significant protection was achieved by this immunization strategy. Intestinal IgA antibodies raised by immunization markedly agglutinated live N. caninum tachyzoites whereas previous opsonization with IgG antibodies purified from immunized mice sera reduced parasite survival within macrophage cells. Although an IgG1 : IgG2a ratio < 1 was detected in the immunized mice before and after infection, indicative of a predominant T helper type 1 immune response, no increased production of interferon-γ was detected in the spleen or mesenteric lymph nodes of the immunized mice. Altogether, these results show that mucosal immunization with N. caninum membrane proteins plus CpG adjuvant protect against intragastrically established neosporosis and indicate that parasite-specific mucosal and circulating antibodies have a protective role against this parasitic infection. PMID:24128071

  9. Preserved antiviral adaptive immunity following polyclonal antibody immunotherapy for severe murine influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Natalie E.; Hatjopolous, Antoinette; Fraser, Cara K.; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Hayball, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy may have particular benefits for the treatment of severe influenza infection in at-risk populations, however little is known of the impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation of memory responses to the virus. Ideally, passive immunotherapy should attenuate the severity of infection while still allowing the formation of adaptive responses to confer protection from future exposure. In this study, we sought to determine if administration of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies could inhibit adaptive immune responses in a murine model of lethal influenza infection. Ovine polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant PR8 (H1N1) hemagglutinin exhibited potent prophylactic capacity and reduced lethality in an established influenza infection, particularly when administered intranasally. Surviving mice were also protected against reinfection and generated normal antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to the virus. The longevity of ovine polyclonal antibodies was explored with a half-life of over two weeks following a single antibody administration. These findings support the development of an ovine passive polyclonal antibody therapy for treatment of severe influenza infection which does not affect the formation of subsequent acquired immunity to the virus. PMID:27380890

  10. Preserved antiviral adaptive immunity following polyclonal antibody immunotherapy for severe murine influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Natalie E; Hatjopolous, Antoinette; Fraser, Cara K; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Hayball, John D

    2016-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy may have particular benefits for the treatment of severe influenza infection in at-risk populations, however little is known of the impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation of memory responses to the virus. Ideally, passive immunotherapy should attenuate the severity of infection while still allowing the formation of adaptive responses to confer protection from future exposure. In this study, we sought to determine if administration of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies could inhibit adaptive immune responses in a murine model of lethal influenza infection. Ovine polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant PR8 (H1N1) hemagglutinin exhibited potent prophylactic capacity and reduced lethality in an established influenza infection, particularly when administered intranasally. Surviving mice were also protected against reinfection and generated normal antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to the virus. The longevity of ovine polyclonal antibodies was explored with a half-life of over two weeks following a single antibody administration. These findings support the development of an ovine passive polyclonal antibody therapy for treatment of severe influenza infection which does not affect the formation of subsequent acquired immunity to the virus. PMID:27380890

  11. Overview of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, David D.

    2010-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host from a universe of pathogenic microbes that are themselves constantly evolving. The immune system also helps the host eliminate toxic or allergenic substances that enter through mucosal surfaces. Central to the immune system’s ability to mobilize a response to an invading pathogen, toxin or allergen is its ability to distinguish self from non-self. The host uses both innate and adaptive mechanisms to detect and eliminate pathogenic microbes. Both of these mechanisms include self-nonself discrimination. This overview identifies key mechanisms used by the immune system to respond to invading microbes and other exogenous threats and identifies settings in which disturbed immune function exacerbates tissue injury. PMID:20176265

  12. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  13. Immune response to H pylori

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Giovanni; Reyes, Victor E; Beswick, Ellen J

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer, attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium. PMID:17007009

  14. Physiology of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Denburg, J. A.; Bienenstock, J.

    1979-01-01

    The established mechanisms of immune responsiveness to foreign or self components are reviewed, with particular reference to relevant clinical problems and current research. A multitiered immunological system of cellular and subcellular elements are involved when the body deals with perturbations from without or within. The concept exists that a delicate balance between positive ('helper') and negative ('suppressor') forces is essential to maintaining health. Brief discussion is given to diagnosis of immune abnormalities in the light of these facts. PMID:21297689

  15. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion–induced allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:26771600

  16. Immune responses in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1998-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to have profound effects on immunological parameters of humans, monkeys and rodents. These studies have been carried out by a number of different laboratories. Among the parameters affected are leukocyte blastogenesis, natural killer cell activity, leukocyte subset distribution, cytokine production - including interferons and interleukins, and macrophage maturation and activity. These changes start to occur only after a few days space flight, and some changes continue throughout long-term space flight. Antibody responses have received only very limited study, and total antibody levels have been shown to be increased after long-term space flight. Several factors could be involved in inducing these changes. These factors could include microgravity, lack of load-bearing, stress, acceleration forces, and radiation. The mechanism(s) for space flight-induced changes in immune responses remain(s) to be established. Certainly, there can be direct effects of microgravity, or other factors, on cells that play a fundamental role in immune responses. However, it is now clear that there are interactions between the immune system and other physiological systems that could play a major role. For example, changes occurring in calcium use in the musculoskeletal system induced by microgravity or lack of use could have great impact on the immune system. Most of the changes in immune responses have been observed using samples taken immediately after return from space flight. However, there have been two recent studies that have used in-flight testing. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to common recall antigens of astronauts and cosmonauts have been shown to be decreased when tested during space flights. Additionally, natural killer cell and blastogenic activities are inhibited in samples taken from rats during space flight. Therefore, it is now clear that events occurring during space flight itself can affect immune responses. The biological

  17. A Comparative Analysis of the Porcine, Murine, and Human Immune Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A literature and laboratory-based analysis compared selected features of genotype, phenotype, and functional expression of the porcine, murine, and human immune systems. A total of 147 parameters were examined. Post-genomic analysis found about 300 unique mRNA coding sequences between mice and hum...

  18. Type I Interferon Receptor Deficiency in Dendritic Cells Facilitates Systemic Murine Norovirus Persistence Despite Enhanced Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nice, Timothy J.; Osborne, Lisa C.; Tomov, Vesselin T.; Artis, David; Wherry, E. John; Virgin, Herbert W.

    2016-01-01

    In order for a virus to persist, there must be a balance between viral replication and immune clearance. It is commonly believed that adaptive immunity drives clearance of viral infections and, thus, dysfunction or viral evasion of adaptive immunity is required for a virus to persist. Type I interferons (IFNs) play pleiotropic roles in the antiviral response, including through innate control of viral replication. Murine norovirus (MNoV) replicates in dendritic cells (DCs) and type I IFN signaling in DCs is important for early control of MNoV replication. We show here that the non-persistent MNoV strain CW3 persists systemically when CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. Persistence in this setting is associated with increased early viral titers, maintenance of DC numbers, increased expression of DC activation markers and an increase in CD8 T cell and antibody responses. Furthermore, CD8 T cell function is maintained during the persistent phase of infection and adaptive immune cells from persistently infected mice are functional when transferred to Rag1-/- recipients. Finally, increased early replication and persistence are also observed in mixed bone marrow chimeras where only half of the CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. These findings demonstrate that increased early viral replication due to a cell-intrinsic innate immune deficiency is sufficient for persistence and a functional adaptive immune response is not sufficient for viral clearance. PMID:27327515

  19. Type I Interferon Receptor Deficiency in Dendritic Cells Facilitates Systemic Murine Norovirus Persistence Despite Enhanced Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Nice, Timothy J; Osborne, Lisa C; Tomov, Vesselin T; Artis, David; Wherry, E John; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-06-01

    In order for a virus to persist, there must be a balance between viral replication and immune clearance. It is commonly believed that adaptive immunity drives clearance of viral infections and, thus, dysfunction or viral evasion of adaptive immunity is required for a virus to persist. Type I interferons (IFNs) play pleiotropic roles in the antiviral response, including through innate control of viral replication. Murine norovirus (MNoV) replicates in dendritic cells (DCs) and type I IFN signaling in DCs is important for early control of MNoV replication. We show here that the non-persistent MNoV strain CW3 persists systemically when CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. Persistence in this setting is associated with increased early viral titers, maintenance of DC numbers, increased expression of DC activation markers and an increase in CD8 T cell and antibody responses. Furthermore, CD8 T cell function is maintained during the persistent phase of infection and adaptive immune cells from persistently infected mice are functional when transferred to Rag1-/- recipients. Finally, increased early replication and persistence are also observed in mixed bone marrow chimeras where only half of the CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. These findings demonstrate that increased early viral replication due to a cell-intrinsic innate immune deficiency is sufficient for persistence and a functional adaptive immune response is not sufficient for viral clearance. PMID:27327515

  20. Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 Modulates the Host Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Turroni, Francesca; Taverniti, Valentina; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Duranti, Sabrina; Guglielmetti, Simone; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Gioiosa, Laura; Palanza, Paola; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe data obtained from transcriptome profiling of human cell lines and intestinal cells of a murine model upon exposure and colonization, respectively, with Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010. Significant changes were detected in the transcription of genes that are known to be involved in innate immunity. Furthermore, results from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) showed that exposure to B. bifidum PRL2010 causes enhanced production of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 cytokines, presumably through NF-κB activation. The obtained global transcription profiles strongly suggest that Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 modulates the innate immune response of the host. PMID:24242237

  1. Immune responses to improving welfare

    PubMed Central

    Berghman, L. R.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that “increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better” because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as “sickness behavior,” includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  2. Immune Responses in Hookworm Infections

    PubMed Central

    Loukas, Alex; Prociv, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Hookworms infect perhaps one-fifth of the entire human population, yet little is known about their interaction with our immune system. The two major species are Necator americanus, which is adapted to tropical conditions, and Ancylostoma duodenale, which predominates in more temperate zones. While having many common features, they also differ in several key aspects of their biology. Host immune responses are triggered by larval invasion of the skin, larval migration through the circulation and lungs, and worm establishment in the intestine, where adult worms feed on blood and mucosa while injecting various molecules that facilitate feeding and modulate host protective responses. Despite repeated exposure, protective immunity does not seem to develop in humans, so that infections occur in all age groups (depending on exposure patterns) and tend to be prolonged. Responses to both larval and adult worms have a characteristic T-helper type 2 profile, with activated mast cells in the gut mucosa, elevated levels of circulating immunoglobulin E, and eosinoophilia in the peripheral blood and local tissues, features also characteristic of type I hypersensitivity reactions. The longevity of adult hookworms is determined probably more by parasite genetics than by host immunity. However, many of the proteins released by the parasites seem to have immunomodulatory activity, presumably for self-protection. Advances in molecular biotechnology enable the identification and characterization of increasing numbers of these parasite molecules and should enhance our detailed understanding of the protective and pathogenetic mechanisms in hookworm infections. PMID:11585781

  3. Identification and immune regulation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1-α-hydroxylase in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Overbergh, L; Decallonne, B; Valckx, D; Verstuyf, A; Depovere, J; Laureys, J; Rutgeerts, O; Saint-Arnaud, R; Bouillon, R; Mathieu, C

    2000-01-01

    Receptors for 1,25(OH)2vitaminD3 are found in most immune cells and important immunological effects have been described in vitro, reflected by its capacity to prevent autoimmunity and to prolong graft survival. The aim of this study was to examine the presence and nature of the enzyme responsible for final activation of the molecule, 1-α-hydroxylase, in murine macrophages and to analyse its regulation and possible role in the immune system. Peritoneal macrophages from C57Bl/6 mice were incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/ml), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ; 500 U/ml) or a combination of both. By quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, using primers based on the murine renal cDNA sequence, low levels of 1-α-hydroxylase mRNA were detected in freshly isolated cells (18 ± 7 × 10−6 copies/β-actin copies). Analysis of the cDNA sequence of the gene revealed identical coding sequences for the macrophage and renal enzymes. mRNA levels rose three-fold with LPS (NS), but a six-fold increase was seen after IFN-γ stimulation (P < 0·05). Combining LPS and IFN-γ did not result in a major additional increase, but addition of cyclosporin A further increased levels 2·5-fold both in IFN-γ- and combination-stimulated cells (P < 0·05). Time course analysis revealed that up-regulation of 1-α-hydroxylase was a late phenomenon, preceded by the up-regulation of activating macrophage products such as IL-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. Finally, a defect in 1-α-hydroxylase up-regulation by immune stimuli was found in autoimmune non-obese diabetic mice. In conclusion, we propose that the up-regulation of 1-α-hydroxylase in activated macrophages, resulting in the synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D3, might be a negative feedback loop in inflammation. A defect in this system might be an additional element in tipping the balance towards autoimmunity. PMID:10759775

  4. Optimization of murine small intestine leukocyte isolation for global immune phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodyear, Andrew W; Kumar, Ajay; Dow, Steven; Ryan, Elizabeth P

    2014-03-01

    New efforts to understand complex interactions between diet, gut microbiota, and intestinal immunity emphasize the need for a standardized murine protocol that has been optimized for the isolation of lamina propria immune cells. In this study multiple mouse strains including BALB/c, 129S6/Sv/EvTac and ICR mice were utilized to develop an optimal protocol for global analysis of lamina propria leukocytes. Incubation temperature was found to significantly improve epithelial cell removal, while changes in media formulation had minor effects. Tissue weight was an effective method for normalization of solution volumes and incubation times. Collagenase digestion in combination with thermolysin was identified as the optimal method for release of leukocytes from tissues and global immunophenotyping, based on the criteria of minimizing marker cleavage, improving cell viability, and reagent cost. The effects of collagenase in combination with dispase or thermolysin on individual cell surface markers revealed diverse marker specific effects. Aggressive formulations cleaved CD8α, CD138, and B220 from the cell surface, and resulted in relatively higher expression levels of CD3, γδ TCR, CD5, DX5, Ly6C, CD11b, CD11c, MHC-II and CD45. Improved collagenase digestion significantly improved viability and reduced debris formation, eliminating the need for density gradient purification. Finally, we demonstrate that two different digestion protocols yield significant differences in detection of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, NK cells, monocytes and interdigitating DC (iDC) populations, highlighting the importance and impact of cell collection protocols on assay outputs. The optimized protocol described herein will help assure the reproducibility and robustness of global assessment of lamina propria immune responses. Moreover, this technique may be applied to isolation of leukocytes from the entire gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24508527

  5. Critical role of preconceptional immunization for protective and nonpathological specific immunity in murine neonates.

    PubMed

    Uthoff, Heiko; Spenner, Achim; Reckelkamm, Werner; Ahrens, Birgit; Wölk, Guido; Hackler, Rolf; Hardung, Frank; Schaefer, Jürgen; Scheffold, A; Renz, Harald; Herz, Udo

    2003-10-01

    Expression of Th2 immunity against environmental Ags is the hallmark of the allergic phenotype and contrasts with the Th1-like pattern, which is stably expressed in healthy adults throughout life. Epidemiological studies indicate that the prenatal environment plays an important and decisive role in the development of allergy later in life. Since the underlying mechanisms were unclear, an animal model was developed to study the impact of maternal allergy on the development of an allergic immune response in early life. An allergic Th2 response was induced in pregnant mice by sensitization and aerosol allergen exposure. Both, IgG1 and IgG2a, but not IgE, Abs cross the placental barrier. Free allergen also crosses the placental area and was detected in serum and amniotic fluids of neonatal F(1) mice. These F(1) mice demonstrated a suppressed Th1 response, as reflected by lowered frequencies and reduced levels of IFN-gamma production. Development of an IgE response against the same allergen was completely prevented early in life. This effect was mediated by diaplacental transfer of allergen-specific IgG1 Abs. In contrast, allergic sensitization against a different allergen early in life was accelerated in these mice. This effect was mediated by maternal CD4 and OVA-specific Th2 cells induced by allergic sensitization during pregnancy. These data indicate a critical role for maternal T and B cell response in shaping pre- and postnatal maturation of specific immunity to allergens. PMID:14500644

  6. Surviving Sepsis: Taming a Deadly Immune Response

    MedlinePlus

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Surviving Sepsis Taming a Deadly Immune Response Many people have never heard of sepsis, or ... tract infection) and then a powerful and harmful response by your body’s own immune system . “With sepsis, ...

  7. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell–directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Allison M; Brown, Harrison C; Paik, Na Yoon; Knight, Kristopher A; Wright, J Fraser; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV)-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV) vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV. PMID:26909355

  8. Regulation of Immune Response by Autogenous Antibody against Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kluskens, L.; Köhler, H.

    1974-01-01

    BALB/c mice repeatedly immunized with Pneumococcus R36A vaccine produce antibodies to phosphorylcholine having the TEPC-15 myeloma idiotype (murine IgA myeloma protein that binds phosphorylcholine). The plaque-forming cell response to phosphorylcholine shows a decrease with repeated immunizations. In contrast, spleen cells from multiply immunized mice responded better in vitro than spleen cells from nonimmunized mice. The serum of animals immunized four or five times agglutinates TEPC-15-coated sheep erythrocytes. Inhibition of hemagglutination shows that the agglutinating activity is directed against the TEPC-15 idiotype. Sera from these mice, when added to cultures of normal spleen cells, specifically suppress the response to phosphorylcholine. The suppressive activity in the serum can be removed by solid absorption with TEPC-15. Evidently, repeated immunization with antigen induces two kinds of antibody responses: one directed against antigen and the other directed against the antibody to the antigen. It is proposed that this “auto” antibody against receptor is involved in the regulation of the immune response. PMID:4140517

  9. B cell regulation of anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Morgan, Richard; Podack, Eckhard R; Rosenblatt, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Our laboratory has been investigating the role of B cells on tumor immunity. We have studied the immune response in mice that are genetically lacking in B cells (BCDM) using a variety of syngeneic mouse tumors and compared immune responses in BCDM with those seen in wild type (WT) immunocompetent mice (ICM). A variety of murine tumors are rejected or inhibited in their growth in BCDM, compared with ICM, including the EL4 thymoma, and the MC38 colon carcinoma in C57BL/6 mice, as well as the EMT-6 breast carcinoma in BALB/c mice. In all three murine models, tumors show reduced growth in BCDM which is accompanied by increased T cell and NK cell infiltration, and a more vigorous Th1 cytokine response, and increased cytolytic T cell response in the absence of B cells. Reconstitution of the mice with B cells results in augmented tumor growth due to a diminished anti-tumor immune response and in reduction in CD8+ T cell and NK cell infiltration. Studies involving BCR transgenic mice indicated that B cells inhibit anti-tumor T cell responses through antigen non-specific mechanisms. More recent studies using the EMT-6 model demonstrated that both the number and function of Treg cells in ICM was increased relative to that seen in BCDM. Increased expansion of Treg cells was evident following EMT-6 implantation in ICM relative to that seen in non-tumor-bearing mice or BCDM. The percentage and number of Tregs in spleen, tumor draining lymph nodes, and the tumor bed are increased in ICM compared with BCDM. Treg functional capacity as measured by suppression assays appears to be reduced in BCDM compared with ICM. In contrast to other described types of B regulatory activity, adoptive transfer of B cells can rescue tumor growth independently of the ability of B cells to secrete IL-10, and also independently of MHC-II expression. In experiments using the MC38 adenocarcinoma model, BCDM reconstituted with WT B cells support tumor growth while tumor growth continues to be inhibited

  10. CXCL10-Mediates Macrophage, but not Other Innate Immune Cells-Associated Inflammation in Murine Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Kyoko; Freeman, Brittany L.; Bronk, Steven F.; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; White, Thomas A.; Hirsova, Petra; Ibrahim, Samar H.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an inflammatory lipotoxic disorder, but how inflammatory cells are recruited and activated within the liver is still unclear. We previously reported that lipotoxic hepatocytes release CXCL10-enriched extracellular vesicles, which are potently chemotactic for cells of the innate immune system. In the present study, we sought to determine the innate immune cell involved in the inflammatory response in murine NASH and the extent to which inhibition of the chemotactic ligand CXCL10 and its cognate receptor CXCR3 could attenuate liver inflammation, injury and fibrosis. C57BL/6J CXCL10−/−, CXCR3−/− and wild type (WT) mice were fed chow or high saturated fat, fructose, and cholesterol (FFC) diet. FFC-fed CXCL10−/− and WT mice displayed similar weight gain, metabolic profile, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. In contrast, compared to the WT mice, FFC-fed CXCL10−/− mice had significantly attenuated liver inflammation, injury and fibrosis. Genetic deletion of CXCL10 reduced FFC-induced proinflammatory hepatic macrophage infiltration, while natural killer cells, natural killer T cells, neutrophils and dendritic cells hepatic infiltration were not significantly affected. Our results suggest that CXCL10−/− mice are protected against diet-induced NASH, in an obesity-independent manner. Macrophage-associated inflammation appears to be the key player in the CXCL10-mediated sterile inflammatory response in murine NASH. PMID:27349927

  11. Eosinophils in mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Travers, J; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils, multifunctional cells that contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity, are involved in the initiation, propagation and resolution of immune responses, including tissue repair. They achieve this multifunctionality by expression of a diverse set of activation receptors, including those that directly recognize pathogens and opsonized targets, and by their ability to store and release preformed cytotoxic mediators that participate in host defense, to produce a variety of de novo pleotropic mediators and cytokines and to interact directly and indirectly with diverse cell types, including adaptive and innate immunocytes and structural cells. Herein, we review the basic biology of eosinophils and then focus on new emerging concepts about their role in mucosal immune homeostasis, particularly maintenance of intestinal IgA. We review emerging data about their development and regulation and describe new concepts concerning mucosal eosinophilic diseases. We describe recently developed therapeutic strategies to modify eosinophil levels and function and provide collective insight about the beneficial and detrimental functions of these enigmatic cells. PMID:25807184

  12. Tilapia show immunization response against Ich

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compares the immune response of Nile tilapia and red tilapia against parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) using a cohabitation challenge model. Both Nile and red tilapia showed strong immune response post immunization with live Ich theronts by IP injection or immersion. Blood serum...

  13. A genetic inference on cancer immune responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ena; Uccellini, Lorenzo; Marincola, Francesco M.

    2012-01-01

    A cancer immune signature implicating good prognosis and responsiveness to immunotherapy was described that is observed also in other aspects of immune-mediated, tissue-specific destruction (TSD). Its determinism remains, however, elusive. Based on limited but unique clinical observations, we propose a multifactorial genetic model of human cancer immune responsiveness. PMID:22754772

  14. Immune Adjuvant Activity of Pre-Resectional Radiofrequency Ablation Protects against Local and Systemic Recurrence in Aggressive Murine Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Fumito; Ku, Amy W.; Bucsek, Mark J.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Vardam-Kaur, Trupti; Kim, Minhyung; Fisher, Daniel T.; Camoriano, Marta; Khoury, Thaer; Skitzki, Joseph J.; Gollnick, Sandra O.; Evans, Sharon S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While surgical resection is a cornerstone of cancer treatment, local and distant recurrences continue to adversely affect outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Evidence that an alternative debulking strategy involving radiofrequency ablation (RFA) induces antitumor immunity prompted the current investigation of the efficacy of performing RFA prior to surgical resection (pre-resectional RFA) in a preclinical mouse model. Experimental Design Therapeutic efficacy and systemic immune responses were assessed following pre-resectional RFA treatment of murine CT26 colon adenocarcinoma. Results Treatment with pre-resectional RFA significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival compared to sham surgery, RFA, or resection alone. Mice in the pre-resectional RFA group that achieved a complete response demonstrated durable antitumor immunity upon tumor re-challenge. Failure to achieve a therapeutic benefit in immunodeficient mice confirmed that tumor control by pre-resectional RFA depends on an intact adaptive immune response rather than changes in physical parameters that make ablated tumors more amenable to a complete surgical excision. RFA causes a marked increase in intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration, thus substantially enhancing the ratio of CD8+ effector T cells: FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Importantly, pre-resectional RFA significantly increases the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment and tumor-draining lymph node but had no impact on infiltration by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, M1 macrophages or M2 macrophages at tumor sites or in peripheral lymphoid organs (i.e., spleen). Finally, pre-resectional RFA of primary tumors delayed growth of distant tumors through a mechanism that depends on systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. Conclusion Improved survival and antitumor systemic immunity elicited by pre-resectional RFA support the translational potential of this neoadjuvant

  15. Effect of cyclosporin on immune complex deposition in murine glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, D G; Fennell, J S; Sheils, O; Gaffney, E F; Feighery, C F

    1991-01-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN) was induced in N/M mice by daily injections of human serum albumin (HSA). The glomerular lesion was similar to that observed in human membranous GN and was characterized by intense mesangial and capillary loop immunofluorescent staining for HSA, IgG and C3. Electron microscopic examination revealed numerous electron-dense deposits in the mesangium and along the subepithelial side of the glomerular basement membrane, the latter deposits being associated with membranous spikes. Chronically injected mice that had been treated with cyclosporin (CsA) from Day 1 had different patterns of immune complex deposition. Mesangial deposition was apparently unaltered but no subepithelial deposits or spikes were evident. In addition, only two out of 21 HSA-injected mice which began CsA treatment on Day 21 had subepithelial deposits. There was no significant difference in serum levels of HSA-specific IgG between the three groups of mice. CsA treatment would therefore appear to ameliorate the immunopathology of antigen-induced glomerulonephritis in this model without affecting serum antibody levels, and may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of human membranous GN. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1828056

  16. Impact on allergic immune response after treatment with vitamin A

    PubMed Central

    Matheu, Victor; Berggård, Karin; Barrios, Yvelise; Barrios, Ysamar; Arnau, Maria-Rosa; Zubeldia, Jose M; Baeza, Maria L; Back, Ove; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2009-01-01

    Background Vitamin A may have some influence on the immune system, but the role in allergy modulation is still unclear. Objective To clarify whether high levels of retinoic acid (RA) affects allergic response in vivo, we used a murine experimental model of airway allergic disease. Methods Ovalbumin (OVA)-immunization/OVA-challenge (OVA/OVA) and house dust mite (HDM)-immunization/HDM-challenge (HDM/HDM) experimental murine models of allergic airway disease, using C57Bl.10/Q groups of mice (n = 10) treated subcutaneously with different concentrations of all-trans RA (0, 50, 500 and 2,500 ug) every 2-days were used to assess the allergic immune response. Results Levels of total and specific-IgE in sera were increased in all groups of RA treated OVA/OVA and HDM/HDM mice. Percentage and total amount of recruited eosinophil in airways by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were significantly enhanced in groups treated with 50, 500 and 2,500 ug of RA compared to non-treated mice. However, the group of mice treated with 2,500 ug had less eosinophil recruitment than the other two groups (50 and 500 ug). In parallel, levels of IL-5 and total IgE in BALF were also significantly diminished in the group treated with 2,500 ug compared to the other 2 groups (50 and 500 ug). Finally, total lung resistance was decreased in group treated with 2,500 ug compared to non-treated mice. Conclusion Our results suggest that retinoic acid directly enhances allergic response in vivo, but in higher doses may produce of immune suppression. PMID:19852821

  17. Anti-tumor effects of DNA vaccine targeting human fibroblast activation protein α by producing specific immune responses and altering tumor microenvironment in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiu; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Geng, Fei; Liu, Chen-Lu; Xu, Ping; Lu, Zhen-Zhen; Yu, Bin; Wu, Hui; Wu, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xiang-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is a tumor stromal antigen overexpressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). CAFs are genetically more stable compared with the tumor cells and immunosuppressive components of the tumor microenvironment, rendering them excellent targets for cancer immunotherapy. DNA vaccines are widely applied due to their safety. To specifically destroy CAFs, we constructed and examined the immunogenicity and anti-tumor immune mechanism of a DNA vaccine expressing human FAPα. This vaccine successfully reduced 4T1 tumor growth through producing FAPα-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses which could kill CAFs, and the decrease in FAPα-expressing CAFs resulted in markedly attenuated expression of collagen I and other stromal factors that benefit the tumor progression. Based on these results, a DNA vaccine targeting human FAPα may be an attractive and effective cancer immunotherapy strategy. PMID:27020681

  18. Immune response during space flight.

    PubMed

    Criswell-Hudak, B S

    1991-01-01

    The health status of an astronaut prior to and following space flight has been a prime concern of NASA throughout the Apollo series of lunar landings, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz Test Projects (ASTP), and the new Spacelab-Shuttle missions. Both humoral and cellular immunity has been studied using classical clinical procedures. Serum proteins show fluctuations that can be explained with adaptation to flight. Conversely, cellular immune responses of lymphocytes appear to be depressed in both in vivo as well as in vitro. If this depression in vivo and in vitro is a result of the same cause, then man's adaptation to outer space living will present interesting challenges in the future. Since the cause may be due to reduced gravity, perhaps the designs of the experiments for space flight will offer insights at the cellular levels that will facilitate development of mechanisms for adaptation. Further, if the aging process is viewed as an adaptational concept or model and not as a disease process then perhaps space flight could very easily interact to supply some information on our biological time clocks. PMID:1915698

  19. A murine model of stress controllability attenuates Th2-dominant airway inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Aniket; Kim, Byung-Jin; Gonzales, Xavier; Caffrey, James; Vishwanatha, Jamboor; Jones, Harlan P.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest a positive correlation between chronic respiratory inflammatory disease and the ability to cope with adverse stress. Interactions between neuroendocrine and immune systems are believed to provide insight toward the biological mechanisms of action. The utility of an experimental murine model was employed to investigate the immunological consequences of stress-controllability and ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. Pre-conditioned uncontrollable stress exacerbated OVA-induced lung histopathological changes that were typical of Th2-predominant inflammatory response along respiratory tissues. Importantly, mice given the ability to exert control over aversive stress attenuated inflammatory responses and reduced lung pathology. This model represents a means of investigating the neuro-immune axis in defining mechanisms of stress and respiratory disease. PMID:20462642

  20. NUTRITION AND THE AGING IMMUNE RESPONSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of neoplastic and infectious diseases is increased in the elderly, as is the resulting morbidity and mortality. The age-related changes of the immune response have mainly been reported for cell-mediated immune functions such as DTH skin response, antibody response to T cell-dependent a...

  1. Spaceflight and immune responses of Rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies indicates that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of space flight on immune responses of Rhesus monkeys. The expected significance of the work is a determination of the range of immunological functions of the Rhesus monkey, a primate similar in many ways to man, affected by space flight. Changes in immune responses that could yield alterations in resistance to infection may be determined as well as the duration of alterations in immune responses. Additional information on the nature of cellular interactions for the generation of immune responses may also be obtained.

  2. Immune responses to infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Coppo, Mauricio J C; Hartley, Carol A; Devlin, Joanne M

    2013-11-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an upper respiratory tract disease in chickens caused by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), an alphaherpesvirus. Despite the extensive use of attenuated, and more recently recombinant, vaccines for the control of this disease, ILT continues to affect the intensive poultry industries worldwide. Innate and cell-mediated, rather than humoral immune responses, have been identified as responsible for protection against disease. This review examines the current understandings in innate and adaptive immune responses towards ILTV, as well as the role of ILTV glycoprotein G in modulating the host immune response towards infection. Protective immunity induced by ILT vaccines is also examined. The increasing availability of tools and reagents for the characterisation of avian innate and cell-mediated immune responses are expected to further our understanding of immunity against ILTV and drive the development of new generation vaccines towards enhanced control of this disease. PMID:23567343

  3. Responses of Murine and Human Macrophages to Leptospiral Infection: A Study Using Comparative Array Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yingchao; Zhao, Jinping; Yang, Yutao; Cao, Yongguo; Hong, Cailing; Liu, Yuan; Sun, Lan; Huang, Minjun; Gu, Junchao

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a re-emerging tropical infectious disease caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. The different host innate immune responses are partially related to the different severities of leptospirosis. In this study, we employed transcriptomics and cytokine arrays to comparatively calculate the responses of murine peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) and human peripheral blood monocytes (HBMs) to leptospiral infection. We uncovered a series of different expression profiles of these two immune cells. The percentages of regulated genes in several biological processes of MPMs, such as antigen processing and presentation, membrane potential regulation, and the innate immune response, etc., were much greater than those of HBMs (>2-fold). In MPMs and HBMs, the caspase-8 and Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD)-like apoptosis regulator genes were significantly up-regulated, which supported previous results that the caspase-8 and caspase-3 pathways play an important role in macrophage apoptosis during leptospiral infection. In addition, the key component of the complement pathway, C3, was only up-regulated in MPMs. Furthermore, several cytokines, e.g. interleukin 10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), were differentially expressed at both mRNA and protein levels in MPMs and HBMs. Some of the differential expressions were proved to be pathogenic Leptospira-specific regulations at mRNA level or protein level. Though it is still unclear why some animals are resistant and others are susceptible to leptospiral infection, this comparative study based on transcriptomics and cytokine arrays partially uncovered the differences of murine resistance and human susceptibility to leptospirosis. Taken together, these findings will facilitate further molecular studies on the innate immune response to leptospiral infection. PMID:24130911

  4. Nitric oxide and redox mechanisms in the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Wink, David A.; Hines, Harry B.; Cheng, Robert Y. S.; Switzer, Christopher H.; Flores-Santana, Wilmarie; Vitek, Michael P.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Colton, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of redox molecules, such as NO and ROS, as key mediators of immunity has recently garnered renewed interest and appreciation. To regulate immune responses, these species trigger the eradication of pathogens on the one hand and modulate immunosuppression during tissue-restoration and wound-healing processes on the other. In the acidic environment of the phagosome, a variety of RNS and ROS is produced, thereby providing a cauldron of redox chemistry, which is the first line in fighting infection. Interestingly, fluctuations in the levels of these same reactive intermediates orchestrate other phases of the immune response. NO activates specific signal transduction pathways in tumor cells, endothelial cells, and monocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. As ROS can react directly with NO-forming RNS, NO bioavailability and therefore, NO response(s) are changed. The NO/ROS balance is also important during Th1 to Th2 transition. In this review, we discuss the chemistry of NO and ROS in the context of antipathogen activity and immune regulation and also discuss similarities and differences between murine and human production of these intermediates. PMID:21233414

  5. Humanized Mouse Models to Study Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Liver-Stage Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Good, Michael F; Hawkes, Michael T; Yanow, Stephanie K

    2015-11-01

    Malaria vaccine development is hampered by the lack of small animal models that recapitulate human immune responses to Plasmodium falciparum. We review the burgeoning literature on humanized mice for P. falciparum infection, including challenges in engraftment of human immune cells, hepatocytes, and erythrocytes. Recent advances in immune-compromised mouse models and stem cell technology have already enabled proof of concept that the entire parasite life cycle can be sustained in a murine model and that adaptive human immune responses to several parasite stages can be measured. Nonetheless, optimization is needed to achieve a reproducible and relevant murine model for malaria vaccine development. This review is focused on the complexities of T cell development in a mouse humanized with both a lymphoid system and hepatocytes. An understanding of this will facilitate the use of humanized mice in the development of liver-stage vaccines. PMID:26458783

  6. Noninvasive imaging of immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Keliher, Edmund J.; Bilate, Angelina M.; Duarte, Joao N.; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Jacobsen, Johanne Tracey; Cragnolini, Juanjo; Swee, Lee Kim; Victora, Gabriel D.; Weissleder, Ralph; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2015-01-01

    At their margins, tumors often contain neutrophils, dendritic cells, and activated macrophages, which express class II MHC and CD11b products. The interplay between stromal cells, tumor cells, and migratory cells such as lymphocytes creates opportunities for noninvasive imaging of immune responses. We developed alpaca-derived antibody fragments specific for mouse class II MHC and CD11b products, expressed on the surface of a variety of myeloid cells. We validated these reagents by flow cytometry and two-photon microscopy to obtain images at cellular resolution. To enable noninvasive imaging of the targeted cell populations, we developed a method to site-specifically label VHHs [the variable domain (VH) of a camelid heavy-chain only antibody] with 18F or 64Cu. Radiolabeled VHHs rapidly cleared the circulation (t1/2 ≈ 20 min) and clearly visualized lymphoid organs. We used VHHs to explore the possibility of imaging inflammation in both xenogeneic and syngeneic tumor models, which resulted in detection of tumors with remarkable specificity. We also imaged the infiltration of myeloid cells upon injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant. Both anti-class II MHC and anti-CD11b VHHs detected inflammation with excellent specificity. Given the ease of manufacture and labeling of VHHs, we believe that this method could transform the manner in which antitumor responses and/or infectious events may be tracked. PMID:25902531

  7. Noninvasive imaging of immune responses.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Keliher, Edmund J; Bilate, Angelina M; Duarte, Joao N; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Jacobsen, Johanne Tracey; Cragnolini, Juanjo; Swee, Lee Kim; Victora, Gabriel D; Weissleder, Ralph; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2015-05-12

    At their margins, tumors often contain neutrophils, dendritic cells, and activated macrophages, which express class II MHC and CD11b products. The interplay between stromal cells, tumor cells, and migratory cells such as lymphocytes creates opportunities for noninvasive imaging of immune responses. We developed alpaca-derived antibody fragments specific for mouse class II MHC and CD11b products, expressed on the surface of a variety of myeloid cells. We validated these reagents by flow cytometry and two-photon microscopy to obtain images at cellular resolution. To enable noninvasive imaging of the targeted cell populations, we developed a method to site-specifically label VHHs [the variable domain (VH) of a camelid heavy-chain only antibody] with (18)F or (64)Cu. Radiolabeled VHHs rapidly cleared the circulation (t1/2 ≈ 20 min) and clearly visualized lymphoid organs. We used VHHs to explore the possibility of imaging inflammation in both xenogeneic and syngeneic tumor models, which resulted in detection of tumors with remarkable specificity. We also imaged the infiltration of myeloid cells upon injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. Both anti-class II MHC and anti-CD11b VHHs detected inflammation with excellent specificity. Given the ease of manufacture and labeling of VHHs, we believe that this method could transform the manner in which antitumor responses and/or infectious events may be tracked. PMID:25902531

  8. c-di-GMP Enhances Protective Innate Immunity in a Murine Model of Pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Van Kessel, Jill; Kiros, Tedele G.; Strom, Stacy; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hyodo, Mamoru; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Gerdts, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Innate immunity represents the first line of defense against invading pathogens in the respiratory tract. Innate immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, and granulocytes contain specific pathogen-recognition molecules which induce the production of cytokines and subsequently activate the adaptive immune response. c-di-GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that stimulates innate immunity and regulates biofilm formation, motility and virulence in a diverse range of bacterial species with potent immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, c-di-GMP was used to enhance the innate immune response against pertussis, a respiratory infection mainly caused by Bordetella pertussis. Intranasal treatment with c-di-GMP resulted in the induction of robust innate immune responses to infection with B. pertussis characterized by enhanced recruitment of neutrophils, macrophages, natural killer cells and dendritic cells. The immune responses were associated with an earlier and more vigorous expression of Th1-type cytokines, as well as an increase in the induction of nitric oxide in the lungs of treated animals, resulting in significant reduction of bacterial numbers in the lungs of infected mice. These results demonstrate that c-di-GMP is a potent innate immune stimulatory molecule that can be used to enhance protection against bacterial respiratory infections. In addition, our data suggest that priming of the innate immune system by c-di-GMP could further skew the immune response towards a Th1 type phenotype during subsequent infection. Thus, our data suggest that c-di-GMP might be useful as an adjuvant for the next generation of acellular pertussis vaccine to mount a more protective Th1 phenotype immune response, and also in other systems where a Th1 type immune response is required. PMID:25333720

  9. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Quintanar, J. Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed. PMID:23964208

  10. Photodynamic therapy induces an immune response against a bacterial pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Vecchio, Daniela; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the triple combination of photosensitizers, visible light and ambient oxygen. When PDT is used for cancer, it has been observed that both arms of the host immune system (innate and adaptive) are activated. When PDT is used for infectious disease, however, it has been assumed that the direct antimicrobial PDT effect dominates. Murine arthritis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the knee failed to respond to PDT with intravenously injected Photofrin®. PDT with intra-articular Photofrin produced a biphasic dose response that killed bacteria without destroying host neutrophils. Methylene blue was the optimum photosensitizer to kill bacteria while preserving neutrophils. We used bioluminescence imaging to noninvasively monitor murine bacterial arthritis and found that PDT with intra-articular methylene blue was not only effective, but when used before infection, could protect the mice against a subsequent bacterial challenge. The data emphasize the importance of considering the host immune response in PDT for infectious disease. PMID:22882222

  11. Heat shock response of murine Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, J N; Pollack, J; Perara, E; Ganem, D

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the heat shock response in the mouse pneumonitis strain of Chlamydia trachomatis. The kinetics of the chlamydial heat shock response resembled that of other procaryotes: the induction was rapid, occurring over a 5- to 10-min time period, and was regulated at the level of transcription. Immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitations with heterologous antisera to the heat shock proteins DnaK and GroEL demonstrated that the rate of synthesis, but not the absolute amount of these two proteins, increased after heat shock. Using a general screen for genes whose mRNAs are induced by heat shock, we identified and cloned two of these. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that one of the genes is a homolog of dnaK. Further sequence analysis of the region upstream of the dnaK gene revealed that the chlamydial homolog of the grpE gene is located just adjacent to the dnaK gene. The second locus encoded three potential nonoverlapping open reading frames. One of the open reading frames was 52% homologous to the ribosomal protein S18 of Escherichia coli and thus presumably encodes the chlamydial homolog. Interestingly, this ribosomal protein is not known to be induced by heat shock in E. coli. S1 nuclease and primer extension analyses located the start site of the dnaK transcript to the last nucleotide of the grpE coding sequence, suggesting that these two genes, although tandemly arranged, are transcribed separately. No promoter sequences resembling the E. coli consensus heat shock promoter could be identified upstream of either the C. trachomatis dnaK, grpE, or S18 gene. The induction of the dnaK and S18 mRNAs by heat shock occurred at a transcriptional level; their induction could be blocked by rifampin. The mechanisms of induction for these two loci were not the same, however; they were differentially sensitive to chloramphenicol. Whereas the induction of dnaK mRNA required de novo protein synthesis, the induction of the S18 mRNA did not. Thus, C. trachomatis

  12. Oral administration of Parabacteroides distasonis antigens attenuates experimental murine colitis through modulation of immunity and microbiota composition

    PubMed Central

    Kverka, M; Zakostelska, Z; Klimesova, K; Sokol, D; Hudcovic, T; Hrncir, T; Rossmann, P; Mrazek, J; Kopecny, J; Verdu, E F; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, H

    2011-01-01

    Commensal bacteria have been shown to modulate the host mucosal immune system. Here, we report that oral treatment of BALB/c mice with components from the commensal, Parabacteroides distasonis, significantly reduces the severity of intestinal inflammation in murine models of acute and chronic colitis induced by dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). The membranous fraction of P. distasonis (mPd) prevented DSS-induced increases in several proinflammatory cytokines, increased mPd-specific serum antibodies and stabilized the intestinal microbial ecology. The anti-colitic effect of oral mPd was not observed in severe combined immunodeficient mice and probably involved induction of specific antibody responses and stabilization of the intestinal microbiota. Our results suggest that specific bacterial components derived from the commensal bacterium, P. distasonis, may be useful in the development of new therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:21087444

  13. Monitoring immune responses in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Jennifer A; Reddy, Sangeetha M; Reuben, Alexandre; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-08-01

    Immune monitoring in the tumor microenvironment allows for important insights into immune mechanisms of response and resistance to various cancer treatments; however clinical challenges exist using current strategies. Significant questions remain regarding monitoring of archival versus fresh tissue, assessment of static versus dynamic markers, evaluation of limited tissue samples, and the translation of insights gained from immunologically 'hot' tumors such as melanoma to other 'cold' tumor microenvironments prevalent in other cancer types. Current and emerging immune monitoring strategies will be examined herein, and genomic-based assays complementing these techniques will also be discussed. Finally, host genomic and external environmental factors influencing anti-tumor immune responses will be considered, including the role of the gut microbiome. Though optimal immune monitoring techniques are in evolution, great promise exists in recent advances that will help guide patient selection as far as type, sequence, and combination of therapeutic regimens to enhance anti-tumor immunity and clinical responses. PMID:27240055

  14. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R. Power; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  15. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R Power; Hoskin, David W

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  16. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    PubMed

    Allam, Uday Shankar; Krishna, M Gopala; Lahiri, Amit; Joy, Omana; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+) T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate. PMID:21347426

  17. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host–pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections. PMID:25598340

  18. Antitumor immunity induced by hybrid murine tumor cells: requirements for optimal immunization

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, C.S.; O'Donnell, R.W.; Horan, P.K.; Budd, H.S.; Spennacchio, J.L.; Chuang, C.; Henshaw, E.C.

    1982-09-01

    Hybrid tumor cells have been evaluated for their ability to induce specific antitumor immunity in inbred female C3H/He mice challenged with the syngeneic BA tumor. Hybrid cells were produced by fusion of BA cells with a BALB/c renal adenocarcinoma, which is hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase-deficient and grows well in culture. Corynebacterium parvum was evaluated as an adjuvant for BA and hybrid cells. The BA tumor was shown to be poorly immunogenic, and four weekly injections of BA cells alone or C. parvum alone did not confer significant immunity. When BA cells and C. parvum were mixed, survival time was prolonged and most mice remained tumor-free. Hybrid cell lines derived from the BA tumor were produced in culture in unlimited quantities and were successfully used as immunogens. The addition of C. parvum to hybrids gave a significant incremental increase in survival when compared to the survival resulting from immunization by hybrids without adjuvant. When hybrids without adjuvant were used, several weekly injections were required for effective immunization. Irradiated and unirradiated hybrids were compared, and it was found that irradiation did not diminish hybrid immunogenicity. The potential problems and advantages of this concept of therapy are discussed.

  19. Lack of Humoral Immune Protection against Treponema denticola Virulence in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Holt, Stanley C.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of humoral immune responses to Treponema denticola following primary infection, reinfection, and active immunization, as well as immune protection in mice. Primary infection with T. denticola induced a significant (400-fold) serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) response compared to that in control uninfected mice. The IgG response to reinfection was 20,000-fold higher than that for control mice and 10-fold higher than that for primary infection. Mice actively immunized with formalin-killed treponemes developed serum antibody levels seven- to eightfold greater than those in animals after primary infection. Nevertheless, mice with this acquired antibody following primary infection or active immunization demonstrated no significant alterations of lesion induction or decreased size of the abscesses following a challenge infection. Mice with primary infection developed increased levels of IgG3, IgG2b, and IgG2a antibodies, with IgG1 being lower than the other subclasses. Reinfected mice developed enhanced IgG2b, IgG2a, and IgG3 and less IgG1. In contrast, immunized mice developed higher IgG1 and lower IgG3 antibody responses to infection. These IgG subclass distributions indicate a stimulation of both Th1 and Th2 activities in development of the humoral immune response to infection and immunization. Our findings also demonstrated a broad antigen reactivity of the serum antibody, which was significantly increased with reinfection and active immunization. Furthermore, serum antibody was effective in vitro in immobilizing and clumping the bacteria but did not inhibit growth or passively prevent the treponemal infection. These observations suggest that humoral immune responses, as manifested by antibody levels, isotype, and antigenic specificity, were not capable of resolving a T. denticola infection. PMID:10531223

  20. Biofilm-derived Legionella pneumophila evades the innate immune response in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Fernández Dávila, Natalia S; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Novotny, Laura A; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Amer, Amal O

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, replicates in human alveolar macrophages to establish infection. There is no human-to-human transmission and the main source of infection is L. pneumophila biofilms established in air conditioners, water fountains, and hospital equipments. The biofilm structure provides protection to the organism from disinfectants and antibacterial agents. L. pneumophila infection in humans is characterized by a subtle initial immune response, giving time for the organism to establish infection before the patient succumbs to pneumonia. Planktonic L. pneumophila elicits a strong immune response in murine, but not in human macrophages enabling control of the infection. Interactions between planktonic L. pneumophila and murine or human macrophages have been studied for years, yet the interface between biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and macrophages has not been explored. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm-derived L. pneumophila replicates significantly more in murine macrophages than planktonic bacteria. In contrast to planktonic L. pneumophila, biofilm-derived L. pneumophila lacks flagellin expression, do not activate caspase-1 or -7 and trigger less cell death. In addition, while planktonic L. pneumophila is promptly delivered to lysosomes for degradation, most biofilm-derived bacteria were enclosed in a vacuole that did not fuse with lysosomes in murine macrophages. This study advances our understanding of the innate immune response to biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and closely reproduces the natural mode of infection in human. PMID:23750338

  1. Biofilm-derived Legionella pneumophila evades the innate immune response in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Fernández Dávila, Natalia S.; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Novotny, Laura A.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Amer, Amal O.

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, replicates in human alveolar macrophages to establish infection. There is no human-to-human transmission and the main source of infection is L. pneumophila biofilms established in air conditioners, water fountains, and hospital equipments. The biofilm structure provides protection to the organism from disinfectants and antibacterial agents. L. pneumophila infection in humans is characterized by a subtle initial immune response, giving time for the organism to establish infection before the patient succumbs to pneumonia. Planktonic L. pneumophila elicits a strong immune response in murine, but not in human macrophages enabling control of the infection. Interactions between planktonic L. pneumophila and murine or human macrophages have been studied for years, yet the interface between biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and macrophages has not been explored. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm-derived L. pneumophila replicates significantly more in murine macrophages than planktonic bacteria. In contrast to planktonic L. pneumophila, biofilm-derived L. pneumophila lacks flagellin expression, do not activate caspase-1 or -7 and trigger less cell death. In addition, while planktonic L. pneumophila is promptly delivered to lysosomes for degradation, most biofilm-derived bacteria were enclosed in a vacuole that did not fuse with lysosomes in murine macrophages. This study advances our understanding of the innate immune response to biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and closely reproduces the natural mode of infection in human. PMID:23750338

  2. Integrative analysis of breast cancer reveals prognostic haematopoietic activity and patient-specific immune response profiles

    PubMed Central

    Varn, Frederick S.; Andrews, Erik H.; Mullins, David W.; Cheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional programmes active in haematopoietic cells enable a variety of functions including dedifferentiation, innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Understanding how these programmes function in the context of cancer can provide valuable insights into host immune response, cancer severity and potential therapy response. Here we present a method that uses the transcriptomes of over 200 murine haematopoietic cells, to infer the lineage-specific haematopoietic activity present in human breast tumours. Correlating this activity with patient survival and tumour purity reveals that the transcriptional programmes of many cell types influence patient prognosis and are found in environments of high lymphocytic infiltration. Collectively, these results allow for a detailed and personalized assessment of the patient immune response to a tumour. When combined with routinely collected patient biopsy genomic data, this method can enable a richer understanding of the complex interplay between the host immune system and cancer. PMID:26725977

  3. Integrative analysis of breast cancer reveals prognostic haematopoietic activity and patient-specific immune response profiles.

    PubMed

    Varn, Frederick S; Andrews, Erik H; Mullins, David W; Cheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional programmes active in haematopoietic cells enable a variety of functions including dedifferentiation, innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Understanding how these programmes function in the context of cancer can provide valuable insights into host immune response, cancer severity and potential therapy response. Here we present a method that uses the transcriptomes of over 200 murine haematopoietic cells, to infer the lineage-specific haematopoietic activity present in human breast tumours. Correlating this activity with patient survival and tumour purity reveals that the transcriptional programmes of many cell types influence patient prognosis and are found in environments of high lymphocytic infiltration. Collectively, these results allow for a detailed and personalized assessment of the patient immune response to a tumour. When combined with routinely collected patient biopsy genomic data, this method can enable a richer understanding of the complex interplay between the host immune system and cancer. PMID:26725977

  4. Cellular immune response in intraventricular experimental neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Moura, Vania B L; Lima, Sarah B; Matos-Silva, Hidelberto; Vinaud, Marina C; Loyola, Patricia R A N; Lino, Ruy S

    2016-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is considered a neglected parasitic infection of the human central nervous system. Its pathogenesis is due to the host immune response, stage of evolution and location of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ and systemic immune response through cytokines dosage (IL-4, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ) as well as the local inflammatory response of the experimental NCC with Taenia crassiceps. The in situ and systemic cellular and inflammatory immune response were evaluated through the cytokines quantification at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days after inoculation and histopathological analysis. All cysticerci were found within the cerebral ventricles. There was a discrete intensity of inflammatory cells of mixed immune profile, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, at the beginning of the infection and predominance of mononuclear cells at the end. The systemic immune response showed a significant increase in all the analysed cytokines and predominance of the Th2 immune profile cytokines at the end of the infection. These results indicate that the location of the cysticerci may lead to ventriculomegaly. The acute phase of the infection showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile accompanied by high levels of IL-10 while the late phase showed a Th2 immune profile. PMID:26626017

  5. Human papillomavirus vaccines--immune responses.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Margaret; Pinto, Ligia A; Trimble, Connie

    2012-11-20

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are highly effective. The available evidence suggests that neutralising antibody is the mechanism of protection. However, despite the robust humoral response elicited by VLP vaccines, there is no immune correlate, no minimum level of antibody, or any other immune parameter, that predicts protection against infection or disease. The durability of the antibody response and the importance of antibody isotype, affinity and avidity for vaccine effectiveness are discussed. Once infection and disease are established, then cellular immune responses are essential to kill infected cells. These are complex processes and understanding the local mucosal immune response is a prerequisite for the rational design of therapeutic HPV vaccines. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:23199968

  6. EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES ON THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of various pesticides on the humoral and cellular immune response to fluorescein labeled ovalbumin has been analyzed. Pesticides (Aroclor 1260, Dinoseb, Parathion, pentachloronitrobenzene, piperonyl butoxide, mixed pyrethrins and Resmethrin) were administered intrag...

  7. The immune response to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Simonson, S R

    2001-08-01

    The immune response to exercise has received increased attention in the last decade. Most of this attention has focused on aerobic exercise (AEX), whereas the effect of resistance exercise (REX) has received comparatively little notice. Resistance exercise and AEX have different physiologic impacts; perhaps this also applies to the immune system. The purpose of this review was to determine a consensus from the REX immune studies that have been completed. This is complicated by the multitude of immune parameters, the varying methods used to assess them, and the paucity of studies performed. Thus, it is difficult to make a blanket statement. There is a REX-induced leukocytosis. Resistance conditioning (RCO) does not alter this response or affect the resting immune system. From these data, it appears that neither REX nor RCO demonstrates a significant impact on peripheral immunosurveillance. PMID:11710669

  8. The innate immune response in human tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Borel, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Summary M ycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection can be cleared by the innate immune system before the initiation of an adaptive immune response. This innate protection requires a variety of robust cell autonomous responses from many different host immune cell types. However, Mtb has evolved strategies to circumvent some of these defences. In this mini‐review, we discuss these host–pathogen interactions with a focus on studies performed in human cells and/or supported by human genetics studies (such as genome‐wide association studies). PMID:26135005

  9. Cellular immune response experiment MA-031

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, B. S.

    1976-01-01

    Significant changes in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) lymphocytic responsiveness occurred in the cellular immune response of three astronauts during the 9 day flight of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. Parameters studied were white blood cell concentrations, lymphocyte numbers, B- and T-lymphocyte distributions in peripheral blood, and lymphocyte responsiveness to PHA, pokeweed mitogen, Concanavalin A, and influenza virus antigen.

  10. Differential chemokine responses in the murine brain following lyssavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Hicks, D J; Núñez, A; Banyard, A C; Williams, A; Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N

    2013-11-01

    The hallmark of lyssavirus infection is lethal encephalomyelitis. Previous studies have reported distinct lyssavirus isolate-related differences in severity of cellular recruitment into the encephalon in a murine model of infection following peripheral inoculation with rabies virus (RABV) and European bat lyssavirus (EBLV)-1 and -2. In order to understand the role of chemokines in this process, comparative studies of the chemokine pattern, distribution and production in response to infection with these lyssaviruses were undertaken. Expression of CCL2, CCL5 and CXCL10 was observed throughout the murine brain with a distinct caudal bias in distribution, similar to both inflammatory changes and virus antigen distribution. CCL2 immunolabelling was localized to neuronal and astroglial populations. CCL5 immunolabelling was only detected in the astroglia, while CXCL10 labelling, although present in the astroglia, was more prominent in neurons. Isolate-dependent differences in the amount of chemokine immunolabelling in specific brain regions and chemokine production by neurons in vitro were observed, with a greater expression of CCL5 in vivo and CXCL10 production in vitro after EBLV infection. Additionally, strong positive associations between chemokine immunolabelling and perivascular cuffing and, to a lesser extent, virus antigen score were also observed. These differences in chemokine expression may explain the variation in severity of encephalitic changes observed in animals infected with different lyssavirus isolates. PMID:23746482

  11. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Two Probiotic Bacterial Strains on Metabolism and Innate Immunity in the RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Biswaranjan; Guha, Dipanjan; Ray, Pratikshya; Das, Debashmita; Aich, Palok

    2016-06-01

    Probiotic and potential probiotic bacterial strains are routinely prescribed and used as supplementary therapy for a variety infectious diseases, including enteric disorders among a wide range of individuals. While there are an increasing number of studies defining the possible mechanisms of probiotic activity, a great deal remains unknown regarding the diverse modes of action attributed to these therapeutic agents. More precise information is required to support the appropriate application of probiotics. To address this objective, we selected two probiotics strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus MTCC-10307 (LA) and Bacillus clausii MTCC-8326 (BC) that are frequently prescribed for the treatment of intestinal disorders and investigated their effects on the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. Our results reveal that LA and BC are potent activators of both metabolic activity and innate immune responses in these cells. We also observed that LA and BC possessed similar activity in preventing infection simulated in vitro in murine macrophages by Salmonella typhimurium serovar enterica. PMID:27038159

  12. Modulating immune responses with probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, T; Chin, J

    2000-02-01

    For many years, probiotic bacteria have been known to confer health benefits to the consumer. One possible mechanism for this may be the ability of probiotic bacteria to modulate immune responses. Oral administration of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) has been found to enhance innate immunity by stimulating the activity of splenic NK cells. Oral feeding with killed LcS was able to stimulate the production of Th1 cytokines, resulting in repressed production of IgE antibodies against Ovalbumin in experimental mice. The ability to switch mucosal immune responses towards Th1 with probiotic bacteria provides a strategy for treatment of allergic disorders. Growth of Meth A tumour cells in the lungs was also inhibited by intrapleural injection of LcS. Oral administration of other probiotic bacteria, such as Streptococcus thermophilus (St), Lactobacillus fermentum (Lf) and yeast (Y), elicited different immune responses. Mice that were prefed yeast or Lf followed by feeding with ovalbumin (OVA) responded better to vaccination with OVA than mice not given either probiotic or OVA or mice that had been prefed only OVA. However, antibody responses were significantly suppressed in response to vaccination with OVA in mice that had been prefed yeast followed by yeast and OVA as well as mice prefed Lf followed by Lf and OVA. Prefeeding St followed by OVA feeding enhanced cellular immune responses against ovalbumin. In contrast, mice prefed St followed by St + OVA were hyporesponsive against OVA. While antigen feeding alone appears to prime for an immune response, cofeeding antigen with probiotic bacteria can suppress both antibody and cellular immune responses and may provide an efficacious protocol to attenuate autoimmune diseases, such as experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, by jointly dosing with myelin basic protein and probiotic bacteria. PMID:10651931

  13. Immune Response to Biologic Scaffold Materials

    PubMed Central

    Badylak, Stephen F.; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Biologic scaffold materials composed of mammalian extracellular matrix are commonly used in regenerative medicine and in surgical procedures for the reconstruction of numerous tissue and organs. These biologic materials are typically allogeneic or xenogeneic in origin and are derived from tissues such as small intestine, urinary bladder, dermis, and pericardium. The innate and acquired host immune response to these biologic materials and the effect of the immune response upon downstream remodeling events has been largely unexplored. Variables that affect the host response include manufacturing processes, the rate of scaffold degradation, and the presence of cross species antigens. This manuscript provides an overview of studies that have evaluated the immune response to biologic scaffold materials and variables that affect this response. PMID:18083531

  14. Host innate immune responses to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wiersinga, Willem Joost; Leopold, Stije J; Cranendonk, Duncan R; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The immune response to sepsis can be seen as a pattern recognition receptor-mediated dysregulation of the immune system following pathogen invasion in which a careful balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses is vital. Invasive infection triggers both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory host responses, the magnitude of which depends on multiple factors, including pathogen virulence, site of infection, host genetics, and comorbidities. Toll-like receptors, the inflammasomes, and other pattern recognition receptors initiate the immune response after recognition of danger signals derived from microorganisms, so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns or derived from the host, so-called danger-associated molecular patterns. Further dissection of the role of host–pathogen interactions, the cytokine response, the coagulation cascade, and their multidirectional interactions in sepsis should lead toward the development of new therapeutic strategies in sepsis. PMID:23774844

  15. Sequential Infection with Common Pathogens Promotes Human-like Immune Gene Expression and Altered Vaccine Response.

    PubMed

    Reese, Tiffany A; Bi, Kevin; Kambal, Amal; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Beura, Lalit K; Bürger, Matheus C; Pulendran, Bali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David; Haining, W Nicholas; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-05-11

    Immune responses differ between laboratory mice and humans. Chronic infection with viruses and parasites are common in humans, but are absent in laboratory mice, and thus represent potential contributors to inter-species differences in immunity. To test this, we sequentially infected laboratory mice with herpesviruses, influenza, and an intestinal helminth and compared their blood immune signatures to mock-infected mice before and after vaccination against yellow fever virus (YFV-17D). Sequential infection altered pre- and post-vaccination gene expression, cytokines, and antibodies in blood. Sequential pathogen exposure induced gene signatures that recapitulated those seen in blood from pet store-raised versus laboratory mice, and adult versus cord blood in humans. Therefore, basal and vaccine-induced murine immune responses are altered by infection with agents common outside of barrier facilities. This raises the possibility that we can improve mouse models of vaccination and immunity by selective microbial exposure of laboratory animals to mimic that of humans. PMID:27107939

  16. Physiological and immune-biological characterization of a long-term murine model of blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Sebastian; Wagner, Katja; Wepler, Martin; Matallo, José; Gröger, Michael; McCook, Oscar; Scheuerle, Angelika; Huber-Lang, Markus; Frick, Manfred; Weber, Sandra; Stahl, Bettina; Jung, Birgit; Calzia, Enrico; Georgieff, Michael; Möller, Peter; Dietl, Paul; Radermacher, Peter; Wagner, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Blunt chest trauma causes pulmonary and systemic inflammation. It is still a matter of debate whether the long-term course of this inflammatory response is associated with persistent impairment of lung function. We hypothesized that an increase of inflammatory biomarkers may still be present at later time points after blunt chest trauma, eventually, despite normalized lung mechanics and gas exchange. Anesthetized spontaneously breathing male C57BL/6J mice underwent a blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma or sham procedure. Twelve and 24 h later, blood gases and lung mechanics were measured, together with blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and tissue cytokine concentrations (multiplex cytokine kit); heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), activated caspase-3, Bcl-xL, and Bax expression (Western blotting); nuclear factor-κB activation (electrophoretic mobility shift assay); nitrotyrosine formation; and purinergic (P2XR4 and P2XR7) receptor expression (immunohistochemistry). Histological damage was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-Schiff staining. High-resolution respirometry allowed assessing mitochondrial respiration in diaphragm biopsies. Chest trauma significantly increased tissue and BAL cytokine levels, associated with a significant increase in HO-1, purinergic receptor expression, and tissue nitrotyrosine formation. In contrast, lung mechanics, gas exchange, and histological damage did not show any significant difference between sham and trauma groups. Activation of the immune response remains present at later time points after murine blunt chest trauma. Discordance of the increased local inflammatory response and preserved pulmonary function may be explained by a dissociation of the immune response and lung function, such as previously suggested after experimental sepsis. PMID:25526372

  17. Plasticity of immunity in response to eating.

    PubMed

    Luoma, Rachel L; Butler, Michael W; Stahlschmidt, Zachary R

    2016-07-01

    Following a meal, an animal can exhibit dramatic shifts in physiology and morphology, as well as a substantial increase in metabolic rate associated with the energetic costs of processing a meal (i.e. specific dynamic action, SDA). However, little is known about the effects of digestion on another important physiological and energetically costly trait: immune function. Thus, we tested two competing hypotheses. (1) Digesting animals up-regulate their immune systems (putatively in response to the increased microbial exposure associated with ingested food). (2) Digesting animals down-regulate their immune systems (presumably to allocate energy to the breakdown of food). We assayed innate immunity (lytic capacity and agglutination) in cornsnakes (Pantherophis guttatus) during and after meal digestion. Lytic capacity was higher in females, and (in support of our first hypothesis) agglutination was higher during absorption. Given its potential energetic cost, immune up-regulation may contribute to SDA. PMID:27099367

  18. Xenogeneic human p53 DNA vaccination by electroporation breaks immune tolerance to control murine tumors expressing mouse p53.

    PubMed

    Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Trieu, Janson; Lee, Sung Yong; He, Liangmei; Tsai, Ya-Chea; Wu, T-C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2013-01-01

    The pivotal role of p53 as a tumor suppressor protein is illustrated by the fact that this protein is found mutated in more than 50% of human cancers. In most cases, mutations in p53 greatly increase the otherwise short half-life of this protein in normal tissue and cause it to accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumors. The overexpression of mutated p53 in tumor cells makes p53 a potentially desirable target for the development of cancer immunotherapy. However, p53 protein represents an endogenous tumor-associated antigen (TAA). Immunization against a self-antigen is challenging because an antigen-specific immune response likely generates only low affinity antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cells. This represents a bottleneck of tumor immunotherapy when targeting endogenous TAAs expressed by tumors. The objective of the current study is to develop a safe cancer immunotherapy using a naked DNA vaccine. The vaccine employs a xenogeneic p53 gene to break immune tolerance resulting in a potent therapeutic antitumor effect against tumors expressing mutated p53. Our study assessed the therapeutic antitumor effect after immunization with DNA encoding human p53 (hp53) or mouse p53 (mp53). Mice immunized with xenogeneic full length hp53 DNA plasmid intramuscularly followed by electroporation were protected against challenge with murine colon cancer MC38 while those immunized with mp53 DNA were not. In a therapeutic model, established MC38 tumors were also well controlled by treatment with hp53 DNA therapy in tumor bearing mice compared to mp53 DNA. Mice vaccinated with hp53 DNA plasmid also exhibited an increase in mp53-specific CD8(+) T-cell precursors compared to vaccination with mp53 DNA. Antibody depletion experiments also demonstrated that CD8(+) T-cells play crucial roles in the antitumor effects. This study showed intramuscular vaccination with xenogeneic p53 DNA vaccine followed by electroporation is capable of inducing potent antitumor effects against tumors expressing mutated

  19. Exploring the translational disconnect between the murine and human inflammatory response: analysis of LPS dose–response relationship in murine versus human cell lines and implications for translation into murine models of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    McCarron, Eamon P; Williams, Dominic P; Antoine, Daniel J; Kipar, Anja; Lemm, Jana; Stehr, Sebastian; Welters, Ingeborg D

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation forms an important part of the human innate immune system and is largely dependent on the activation of the “classical” NF-κB pathway through Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Understanding this has allowed researchers to explore roles of therapeutic targets in managing conditions such as sepsis. Recapitulating an inflammatory response using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a “sterile” technique, can provide information that is dissimilar to the clinical condition. By examining NF-κB activation (through immunoblotting of the p65 subunit) in two separate cell lines (murine and human) and analyzing two murine models of sepsis (intraperitoneal [IP] LPS and IP stool inoculation), an evaluation of the translational disconnect between experimental and clinical sepsis can be made. Methods THP-1 (human) cells and RAW 264.7 (murine) cells were dosed with concentrations of LPS (human, 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL; murine, 30 pg/mL to 1,000 ng/mL) and nuclear actin and p65 were immunoblotted to measure changes in nuclear density. In vivo, C57BL/6 mice received either IP injection of stool suspension (5 µL/g) or LPS (25 mg/kg) or saline (1 mL/kg). Animals were culled at 6 hours and tissues were analyzed. Results An increase in basal p65:actin density in THP-1 cells (mean 0.214, standard error of the mean 0.024) was seen at doses as small as 0.1 ng/mL (0.519±0.064). In contrast to RAW 264.7 cells, basal increases (0.170±0.025) were only seen when a dose of 3 ng/mL (0.387±0.078) was used. Dose–response analysis of p65:actin ratio showed that THP-1 cells respond to lower doses of LPS than RAW 264.7 cells and lower doses produce a greater fold increase in the nuclear p65 density. Both in vivo models showed evidence of neutrophil (NL) recruitment into tissues (which was more intense after LPS treatment). IP stool inoculation resulted in an acute suppurative peritonitis and more substantial evidence of NL recruitment into adipose tissue and skeletal muscle

  20. Effect of cellular mobility on immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. B.; Mannion, R.; Ruskin, H. J.

    2000-08-01

    Mobility of cell types in our HIV immune response model is subject to an intrinsic mobility and an explicit directed mobility, which is governed by Pmob. We investigate how restricting the explicit mobility, while maintaining the innate mobility of a viral-infected cell, affects the model's results. We find that increasing the explicit mobility of the immune system cells leads to viral dominance for certain levels of viral mutation. We conclude that increasing immune system cellular mobility indirectly increases the virus’ inherent mobility.

  1. Mosquito immune responses to arbovirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Carol D.; Olson, Ken E.

    2014-01-01

    The principal mosquito innate immune response to virus infections, RNA interference (RNAi), differs substantially from the immune response to bacterial and fungal infections. The exo-siRNA pathway constitutes the major anti-arboviral RNAi response and its essential genetic components have been identified. Recent research has also implicated the Piwi-interacting RNA pathway in mosquito anti-arboviral immunity, but Piwi gene-family components involved are not well-defined. Arboviruses must evade or suppress RNAi without causing pathogenesis in the vector to maintain their transmission cycle, but little is known about mechanisms of arbovirus modulation of RNAi. Genetic manipulation of mosquitoes to enhance their RNAi response can limit arbovirus infection and replication and could be used in novel strategies for interruption of arbovirus transmission and greatly reduce disease. PMID:25401084

  2. A quantitative ELISA for antigen-specific IgG subclasses using equivalence dilutions of anti-kappa and anti-subclass specific secondary reagents. Application to the study of the murine immune response against the capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B.

    PubMed

    Colino, J; Diez, M; Outschoorn, I

    1996-04-19

    We have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure murine antigen-specific IgG antibodies of defined subclass using precalibrated equivalence dilutions of anti-kappa (in the standard) and each anti-IgG subclass-specific polyclonal secondary antibody (in the test sample). The calibration of secondary reagents could be carried out easily with a set of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) specific for all IgG subclasses. These MoAbs do not require purification or standardization. In addition the MoAbs can be of different antigenic specificity. Once the equivalence dilutions have been determined, they can be applied in a quantitative ELISA using the same antigen in the standard and sample, and using only one IgG subclass standard for the determination of all the IgG subclasses. The method is easy to standardize for many antigenic systems. It is particularly useful when the only standard available is one standardized MoAb of the appropriate specificity, and it could be adapted to use with standard polyclonal antibodies having a known content of total antigen-specific IgG bearing kappa chains but unknown IgG subclass composition. The use of this method to quantitate IgG specific for the capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (CpsB) gave highly reproducible measures with an interbatch CV of 5-6% similar for all IgG subclasses and low detection limits ranging from 0.3 ng/well for IgG3 to 0.8 ng/well for IgG2a. The IgG subclass response observed after immunization with live meningococci was mainly IgG2a (74%) and IgG2b (18%). Hyperimmunization modified this IgG distribution to one of mainly IgG3 (62%) and IgG1 (28%) which was maintained in the response to a single immunization 4 weeks later, possibly indicating the generation of resting B cells during continuous stimulation. PMID:8621957

  3. Immunization with the Yersiniabactin Receptor, FyuA, Protects against Pyelonephritis in a Murine Model of Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brumbaugh, Ariel R.; Smith, Sara N.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common and represent a substantial economic and public health burden. Roughly 80% of these infections are caused by a heterogeneous group of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains. Antibiotics are standard therapy for UTI, but a rise in antibiotic resistance has complicated treatment, making the development of a UTI vaccine more urgent. Iron receptors are a promising new class of vaccine targets for UTI, as UPEC require iron to colonize the iron-limited host urinary tract and genes encoding iron acquisition systems are highly expressed during infection. Previously, three of six UPEC siderophore and heme receptors were identified as vaccine candidates by intranasal immunization in a murine model of ascending UTI. To complete the assessment of iron receptors as vaccine candidates, an additional six UPEC iron receptors were evaluated. Of the six vaccine candidates tested in this study (FyuA, FitA, IroN, the gene product of the CFT073 locus c0294, and two truncated derivatives of ChuA), only FyuA provided significant protection (P = 0.0018) against UPEC colonization. Intranasal immunization induced a robust and long-lived humoral immune response. In addition, the levels of FyuA-specific serum IgG correlated with bacterial loads in the kidneys [Spearman's rank correlation coefficient ρ(14) = −0.72, P = 0.0018], providing a surrogate of protection. FyuA is the fourth UPEC iron receptor to be identified from our screens, in addition to IutA, Hma, and IreA, which were previously demonstrated to elicit protection against UPEC challenge. Together, these iron receptor antigens will facilitate the development of a broadly protective, multivalent UTI vaccine to effectively target diverse strains of UPEC. PMID:23798537

  4. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL. PMID:25523759

  5. Gelam Honey Scavenges Peroxynitrite During the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Kassim, Mustafa; Mansor, Marzida; Suhaimi, Anwar; Ong, Gracie; Yusoff, Kamaruddin Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are part of the first-line defense against bacterial, fungal, and viral infections during host immune responses; they express high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic molecules, including nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, and their reaction product peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite is a short-lived oxidant and a potent inducer of cell death. Honey, in addition to its well-known sweetening properties, is a natural antioxidant that has been used since ancient times in traditional medicine. We examined the ability of Gelam honey, derived from the Gelam tree (Melaleuca spp.), to scavenge peroxynitrite during immune responses mounted in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide/interferon-γ (LPS/IFN-γ) and in LPS-treated rats. Gelam honey significantly improved the viability of LPS/IFN-γ-treated RAW 264.7 cells and inhibited nitric oxide production—similar to the effects observed with an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (1400W). Furthermore, honey, but not 1400W, inhibited peroxynitrite production from the synthetic substrate 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) and prevented the peroxynitrite-mediated conversion of dihydrorhodamine 123 to its fluorescent oxidation product rhodamine 123. Honey inhibited peroxynitrite synthesis in LPS-treated rats. Thus, honey may attenuate inflammatory responses that lead to cell damage and death, suggesting its therapeutic uses for several inflammatory disorders. PMID:23109904

  6. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  7. Proinflammatory Cytokine Gene Expression by Murine Macrophages in Response to Brugia malayi Wolbachia Surface Protein

    PubMed Central

    Porksakorn, Chantima; Nuchprayoon, Surang; Park, Kiwon; Scott, Alan L.

    2007-01-01

    Wolbachia, an endosymbiotic bacterium found in most species of filarial parasites, is thought to play a significant role in inducing innate inflammatory responses in lymphatic filariasis patients. However, the Wolbachia-derived molecules that are recognized by the innate immune system have not yet been identified. In this study, we exposed the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to a recombinant form of the major Wolbachia surface protein (rWSP) to determine if WSP is capable of innately inducing cytokine transcription. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNAs were all upregulated by the rWSP stimulation in a dose-dependant manner. TNF transcription peaked at 3 hours, whereas IL-1β and IL-6 transcription peaked at 6 hours post-rWSP exposure. The levels of innate cytokine expression induced by a high-dose (9.0 μg/mL) rWSP in the RAW 264.7 cells were comparable to the levels induced by 0.1 μg/mL E. coli-derived lipopolysaccharides. Pretreatment of the rWSP with proteinase-K drastically reduced IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF transcription. However, the proinflammatory response was not inhibited by polymyxin B treatment. These results strongly suggest that the major Wolbachia surface protein molecule WSP is an important inducer of innate immune responses during filarial infections. PMID:17641731

  8. Strain-specific Loss of Formyl Peptide Receptor 3 in the Murine Vomeronasal and Immune Systems.

    PubMed

    Stempel, Hendrik; Jung, Martin; Pérez-Gómez, Anabel; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Zufall, Frank; Bufe, Bernd

    2016-04-29

    Formyl peptide receptor 3 (Fpr3, also known as Fpr-rs1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in subsets of sensory neurons of the mouse vomeronasal organ, an olfactory substructure essential for social recognition. Fpr3 has been implicated in the sensing of infection-associated olfactory cues, but its expression pattern and function are incompletely understood. To facilitate visualization of Fpr3-expressing cells, we generated and validated two new anti-Fpr3 antibodies enabling us to analyze acute Fpr3 protein expression. Fpr3 is not only expressed in murine vomeronasal sensory neurons but also in bone marrow cells, the primary source for immune cell renewal, and in mature neutrophils. Consistent with the notion that Fpr3 functions as a pathogen sensor, Fpr3 expression in the immune system is up-regulated after stimulation with a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide). These results strongly support a dual role for Fpr3 in both vomeronasal sensory neurons and immune cells. We also identify a large panel of mouse strains with severely altered expression and function of Fpr3, thus establishing the existence of natural Fpr3 knock-out strains. We attribute distinct Fpr3 expression in these strains to the presence or absence of a 12-nucleotide in-frame deletion (Fpr3Δ424-435). In vitro calcium imaging and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrate that the lack of four amino acids leads to an unstable, truncated, and non-functional receptor protein. The genome of at least 19 strains encodes a non-functional Fpr3 variant, whereas at least 13 other strains express an intact receptor. These results provide a foundation for understanding the in vivo function of Fpr3. PMID:26957543

  9. The immune response to Nipah virus infection.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Joseph; de Wit, Emmie; Feldmann, Heinz; Munster, Vincent J

    2012-09-01

    Nipah virus has recently emerged as a zoonotic agent that is highly pathogenic in humans. Outbreaks have occurred regularly over the last two decades in South and Southeast Asia, where mortality rates reach as high as 100 %. The natural reservoir of Nipah virus has been identified as bats from the Pteropus family, where infection is largely asymptomatic. Human disease is characterized by both respiratory and encephalitic components, and thus far, no effective vaccine or intervention strategies are available. Little is know about how the immune response of either the reservoir host or incidental hosts responds to infection, and how this immune response is either inadequate or might contribute to disease in the dead-end host. Experimental vaccines strategies have given us some insight into the immunological requirements for protection. This review summarizes our current understanding of the immune response to Nipah virus infection and emphasizes the need for further research. PMID:22669317

  10. T-cell-receptor dose and the time of treatment during murine retrovirus infection for maintenance of immune function.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, B; Ardestani, S; Marchalonis, J J; Watson, R R

    1996-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice were injected with different doses of human T-cell receptor (TCR) V beta 8.1 CDR1 peptide at different times after murine retrovirus (LP-BM5) infection. Injection with TCR V beta 8.1 CDR1 peptide largely prevented the retrovirus-induced reduction in B- and T-cell proliferation, and T-helper 1 (Th1) cytokines [interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)] secretion. It also suppressed T-helper 2 (Th2) cytokines (IL-6 and IL-10) production, which was stimulated by retrovirus infection. These effects were accomplished using at least 100 micrograms of peptide per mouse and the most effective dose of peptide had to be given within 4 weeks after retrovirus infection. Immunization with doses above 100 micrograms/mouse as long as 4 weeks postinfection maintained natural killer (NK) cell activity during retrovirus infection. Reducing the dose of peptide or delaying it until the disease progressed towards early murine acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) allowed development of immune dysfunction. These studies provide data suggesting that immune dysfunction, induced by murine retrovirus infection, was largely prevented by TCR V beta CDR1 peptide injection. PMID:8698380

  11. Studies of Immune Responses in Candida vaginitis.

    PubMed

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Graziani, Sofia; Norelli, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of vaginal candidiasis and the development of resistance against anti-fungal agents has stimulated interest in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. The aim of our work was to characterize, in an animal model of vaginal candidiasis, the mechanisms that play a role in the induction of mucosal immunity against C. albicans and the interaction between innate and adaptive immunity. Our studies evidenced the elicitation of cell-mediated immunity (CMIs) and antibody (Abs)-mediated immunity with a Th1 protective immunity. An immune response of this magnitude in the vagina was very encouraging to identify the proper targets for new strategies for vaccination or immunotherapy of vaginal candidiasis. Overall, our data provide clear evidence that it is possible to prevent C. albicans vaginal infection by active intravaginal immunization with aspartyl proteinase expressed as recombinant protein. This opens the way to a modality for anti-Candida protection at the mucosa. The recombinant protein Sap2 was assembled with virosomes, and a vaccine PEVION7 (PEV7) was obtained. The results have given evidence that the vaccine, constituted of virosomes and Secretory aspartyl proteinase 2 (Sap2) (PEV7), has an encouraging therapeutic potential for the treatment of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. PMID:26473934

  12. Studies of Immune Responses in Candida vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Graziani, Sofia; Norelli, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of vaginal candidiasis and the development of resistance against anti-fungal agents has stimulated interest in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. The aim of our work was to characterize, in an animal model of vaginal candidiasis, the mechanisms that play a role in the induction of mucosal immunity against C. albicans and the interaction between innate and adaptive immunity. Our studies evidenced the elicitation of cell-mediated immunity (CMIs) and antibody (Abs)-mediated immunity with a Th1 protective immunity. An immune response of this magnitude in the vagina was very encouraging to identify the proper targets for new strategies for vaccination or immunotherapy of vaginal candidiasis. Overall, our data provide clear evidence that it is possible to prevent C. albicans vaginal infection by active intravaginal immunization with aspartyl proteinase expressed as recombinant protein. This opens the way to a modality for anti-Candida protection at the mucosa. The recombinant protein Sap2 was assembled with virosomes, and a vaccine PEVION7 (PEV7) was obtained. The results have given evidence that the vaccine, constituted of virosomes and Secretory aspartyl proteinase 2 (Sap2) (PEV7), has an encouraging therapeutic potential for the treatment of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. PMID:26473934

  13. Damage signals in the insect immune response

    PubMed Central

    Krautz, Robert; Arefin, Badrul; Theopold, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Insects and mammals share an ancient innate immune system comprising both humoral and cellular responses. The insect immune system consists of the fat body, which secretes effector molecules into the hemolymph and several classes of hemocytes, which reside in the hemolymph and of protective border epithelia. Key features of wound- and immune responses are shared between insect and mammalian immune systems including the mode of activation by commonly shared microbial (non-self) patterns and the recognition of these patterns by dedicated receptors. It is unclear how metazoan parasites in insects, which lack these shared motifs, are recognized. Research in recent years has demonstrated that during entry into the insect host, many eukaryotic pathogens leave traces that alert potential hosts of the damage they have afflicted. In accordance with terminology used in the mammalian immune systems, these signals have been dubbed danger- or damage-associated signals. Damage signals are necessary byproducts generated during entering hosts either by mechanical or proteolytic damage. Here, we briefly review the current stage of knowledge on how wound closure and wound healing during mechanical damage is regulated and how damage-related signals contribute to these processes. We also discuss how sensors of proteolytic activity induce insect innate immune responses. Strikingly damage-associated signals are also released from cells that have aberrant growth, including tumor cells. These signals may induce apoptosis in the damaged cells, the recruitment of immune cells to the aberrant tissue and even activate humoral responses. Thus, this ensures the removal of aberrant cells and compensatory proliferation to replace lost tissue. Several of these pathways may have been co-opted from wound healing and developmental processes. PMID:25071815

  14. Injury-induced immune responses in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Yvan; Buzgariu, Wanda; Reiter, Silke; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The impact of injury-induced immune responses on animal regenerative processes is highly variable, positive or negative depending on the context. This likely reflects the complexity of the innate immune system that behaves as a sentinel in the transition from injury to regeneration. Early-branching invertebrates with high regenerative potential as Hydra provide a unique framework to dissect how injury-induced immune responses impact regeneration. A series of early cellular events likely require an efficient immune response after amputation, as antimicrobial defence, epithelial cell stretching for wound closure, migration of interstitial progenitors toward the wound, cell death, phagocytosis of cell debris, or reconstruction of the extracellular matrix. The analysis of the injury-induced transcriptomic modulations of 2636 genes annotated as immune genes in Hydra identified 43 genes showing an immediate/early pulse regulation in all regenerative contexts examined. These regulations point to an enhanced cytoprotection via ROS signaling (Nrf, C/EBP, p62/SQSMT1-l2), TNFR and TLR signaling (TNFR16-like, TRAF2l, TRAF5l, jun, fos-related, SIK2, ATF1/CREB, LRRC28, LRRC40, LRRK2), proteasomal activity (p62/SQSMT1-l1, Ced6/Gulf, NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12), stress proteins (CRYAB1, CRYAB2, HSP16.2, DnaJB9, HSP90a1), all potentially regulating NF-κB activity. Other genes encoding immune-annotated proteins such as NPYR4, GTPases, Swap70, the antiproliferative BTG1, enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (5-lipoxygenase, ACSF4), secreted clotting factors, secreted peptidases are also pulse regulated upon bisection. By contrast, metalloproteinases and antimicrobial peptide genes largely follow a context-dependent regulation, whereas the protease inhibitor α2macroglobulin gene exhibits a sustained up-regulation. Hence a complex immune response to injury is linked to wound healing and regeneration in Hydra. PMID:25086685

  15. Modulation of Th1/Th2 Immune Responses by Killed Propionibacterium acnes and Its Soluble Polysaccharide Fraction in a Type I Hypersensitivity Murine Model: Induction of Different Activation Status of Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mussalem, Juliana Sekeres; Ishimura, Mayari Eika; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus present in normal human skin microbiota, which exerts important immunomodulatory effects, when used as heat- or phenol-killed suspensions. We previously demonstrated that heat-killed P. acnes or its soluble polysaccharide (PS), extracted from the bacterium cell wall, suppressed or potentiated the Th2 response to ovalbumin (OVA) in an immediate hypersensitivity model, depending on the treatment protocol. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for these effects, using the same model and focusing on the activation status of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We verified that higher numbers of APCs expressing costimulatory molecules and higher expression levels of these molecules are probably related to potentiation of the Th2 response to OVA induced by P. acnes or PS, while higher expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) seems to be related to Th2 suppression. In vitro cytokines production in cocultures of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes indicated that P. acnes and PS seem to perform their effects by acting directly on APCs. Our data suggest that P. acnes and PS directly act on APCs, modulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and TLRs, and these differently activated APCs drive distinct T helper patterns to OVA in our model. PMID:25973430

  16. Modulation of Th1/Th2 immune responses by killed Propionibacterium acnes and its soluble polysaccharide fraction in a type I hypersensitivity murine model: induction of different activation status of antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Squaiella-Baptistão, Carla Cristina; Teixeira, Daniela; Mussalem, Juliana Sekeres; Ishimura, Mayari Eika; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus present in normal human skin microbiota, which exerts important immunomodulatory effects, when used as heat- or phenol-killed suspensions. We previously demonstrated that heat-killed P. acnes or its soluble polysaccharide (PS), extracted from the bacterium cell wall, suppressed or potentiated the Th2 response to ovalbumin (OVA) in an immediate hypersensitivity model, depending on the treatment protocol. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for these effects, using the same model and focusing on the activation status of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We verified that higher numbers of APCs expressing costimulatory molecules and higher expression levels of these molecules are probably related to potentiation of the Th2 response to OVA induced by P. acnes or PS, while higher expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) seems to be related to Th2 suppression. In vitro cytokines production in cocultures of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes indicated that P. acnes and PS seem to perform their effects by acting directly on APCs. Our data suggest that P. acnes and PS directly act on APCs, modulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and TLRs, and these differently activated APCs drive distinct T helper patterns to OVA in our model. PMID:25973430

  17. Regulation of Immune Responses by Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Paul D.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) including exosomes, are small membrane vesicles derived from multivesicular bodies or from the plasma membrane. Most, if not all, cell types release EVs that then enter the bodily fluids. These vesicles contain a subset of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that are derived from the parent cell. It is postulated that EVs have important roles in intercellular communication, both locally and systemically, by transferring their contents, including protein, lipids and RNAs, between cells. EVs are involved in numerous physiological processes, and vesicles from both non-immune and immune cells have important roles in immune regulation. Moreover, EV-based therapeutics are being developed and tested clinically for treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and cancer. Given the tremendous therapeutic potential of EVs this review focuses on the role of EVs in modulating immune responses and the therapeutic applications. PMID:24566916

  18. Optically Triggered Immune Response through Photocaged Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Jeane M.; Young, Douglas D.; Lively, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial and viral CpG oligonculeotides are unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanosine dinucleotide sequences and trigger an innate immune response through activation of the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). We have developed synthetic photocaged CpGs via site-specific incorporation of nitropiperonyloxymethyl (NPOM)-caged thymidine residues. These oligonucleotides enable the optical control of TLR9 function and thereby provide light-activation of an immune response. We provide a proof-of-concept model by applying a reporter assay in live cells and by quantification of endogenous production of interleukin 6. PMID:26034339

  19. Immune response from a resource allocation perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rauw, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is a life history trait that can be expected to trade off against other life history traits. Whether or not a trait is considered to be a life history trait has consequences for the expectation on how it responds to natural selection and evolution; in addition, it may have consequences for the outcome of artificial selection when it is included in the breeding objective. The immune system involved in pathogen resistance comprises multiple mechanisms that define a host's defensive capacity. Immune resistance involves employing mechanisms that either prevent pathogens from invading or eliminate the pathogens when they do invade. On the other hand, tolerance involves limiting the damage that is caused by the infection. Both tolerance and resistance traits require (re)allocation of resources and carry physiological costs. Examples of trade-offs between immune function and growth, reproduction and stress response are provided in this review, in addition to consequences of selection for increased production on immune function and vice versa. Reaction norms are used to deal with questions of immune resistance vs. tolerance to pathogens that relate host health to infection intensity. In essence, selection for immune tolerance in livestock is a particular case of selection for animal robustness. Since breeding goals that include robustness traits are required in the implementation of more sustainable agricultural production systems, it is of interest to investigate whether immune tolerance is a robustness trait that is positively correlated with overall animal robustness. Considerably more research is needed to estimate the shapes of the cost functions of different immune strategies, and investigate trade-offs and cross-over benefits of selection for disease resistance and/or disease tolerance in livestock production. PMID:23413205

  20. 7 alpha-hydroxy-dehydroepiandrosterone and immune response.

    PubMed

    Morfin, R; Lafaye, P; Cotillon, A C; Nato, F; Chmielewski, V; Pompon, D

    2000-01-01

    In human and murine lymphoid organs, circulating 3 beta-hydroxysteroids, including pregnenolone (PREG), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and epiandrosterone (EPIA), are 7 alpha-hydroxylated by a cytochrome P450 identified in the hippocampus as P4507B1. Mouse and human lymphoid organs produced different patterns of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid 7 alpha-hydroxylation with the absence of pregnenolone and epiandrosterone hydroxylation in human and mouse, respectively. Both 7 alpha-hydroxy-DHEA and 7 alpha-hydroxy-EPIA triggered a significant increase of antitetanus toxoid and anti-Bordetella pertussis toxins IgGs production in cultures of activated B + T cells derived from human tonsils, whereas both 7 alpha-hydroxy-PREG and 7 alpha-hydroxy-DHEA increased the immune response in mouse. Paracrine action of 7 alpha-hydroxysteroids resulted from their production in cells of the lymphoid organs. Comparison of P4507B1 sequences in rat, human, and two mouse species showed that one amino acid change might explain important differences in KM for 7 alpha-hydroxylation, and suggested that such differences might contribute to the extent of immune response. PMID:11268429

  1. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunizations are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to up-regulate IL-12 production

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Y; Liu, L -J; Shono, N; Hinkula, J; Kjerrström, A; Aoki, I; Okuda, K; Wahren, B; Fukushima, J

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA-based immunization in conferring protective immunity against certain microbial pathogens including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been described. The potential advantage of DNA-based immunization over the traditional vaccines largely results from its capacity to efficiently induce Th1-biased immune responses against an encoded antigen. We describe how Th1-biased immune responses are induced by DNA-based immunization, using a DNA vaccine construct encoding HIV-1 gp160 cDNA and an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying murine IFN-γ cDNA. Transfection of an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying immunostimulatory sequences (ISS) as well as a gene of interest (DNA vaccine) into professional antigen presenting cells (APC) induced transactivation of IL-12 mRNA, which resulted in antigen-specific Th1-biased immune responses against the encoded antigen. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization were substantially upregulated by a codelivery of an ectopic IFN-γ expression system, and this augmentation was mediated via action on professional antigen presenting cells to upregulate IL-12 production. Taken together, it appears likely that Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to produce IL-12. Interestingly, the model provided strikingly resembles that previously described in infection with Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that induces strong Th1-biased immune responses. The result suggests that DNA-based immunization mimics certain aspects of natural infection with microbial organisms like attenuated vaccines, which in turn provides a rationale to the question of why DNA-based immunization so efficiently induces protective immunity against these microbial pathogens. PMID:10606974

  2. Hydrolysates of egg white proteins modulate T- and B-cell responses in mitogen-stimulated murine cells.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-02-01

    This work assessed the effects of hydrolysates of ovalbumin (OVA), lysozyme (LYS), ovomucoid (OM) and whole egg white (EW) on cytokine secretion, antibody production, oxidative stress and proliferation of murine spleen and mesenteric lymph node cells stimulated with T- (concanavalin A - ConA) or B-cell mitogens (lipopolysaccharide - LPS). The hydrolysates of OVA, LYS and EW with alcalase reduced ConA-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and production of Th2-biased cytokines, such as IL-13 and IL-10, and decreased the secretion of the Th1 cytokine TNF-α. In addition, these hydrolysates considerably inhibited IgG1-class switching induced by LPS and counteracted the release of reactive oxygen species. EW peptides modulated the immune responses of murine cells to mitogen stimuli, revealing potential activities that could be used for different purposes as Th1- or Th2-skewing mediators. PMID:26778535

  3. Innate Immune Responses of Pulmonary Epithelial Cells to Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Siew Hoon; Liu, Yichun; Wang, Dongling; Novem, Vidhya; Sivalingam, Suppiah Paramalingam; Thong, Tuck Weng; Ooi, Eng Eong; Tan, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei, a facultative intracellular pathogen, causes systemic infection in humans with high mortality especially when infection occurs through an infectious aerosol. Previous studies indicated that the epithelial cells in the lung are an active participant in host immunity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the innate immune responses of lung epithelial cells against B. pseudomallei. Methodology and Principal Findings Using a murine lung epithelial cell line, primary lung epithelial cells and an inhalational murine infection model, we characterized the types of innate immunity proteins and peptides produced upon B. pseudomallei infection. Among a wide panel of immune components studied, increased levels of major pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNFα, chemokine MCP-1, and up-regulation of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) were observed. Inhibition assays using specific inhibitors suggested that NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways were responsible for these B. pseudomallei-induced antimicrobial peptides. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the respiratory epithelial cells, which form the majority of the cells lining the epithelial tract and the lung, have important roles in the innate immune response against B. pseudomallei infection. PMID:19806192

  4. Plant Immune Responses: Aphids Strike Back.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Philippe; Calandra, Thierry

    2015-07-20

    To survive and complete their life cycle, herbivorous insects face the difficult challenge of coping with the arsenal of plant defences. A new study reports that aphids secrete evolutionarily conserved cytokines in their saliva to suppress host immune responses. PMID:26196486

  5. [Modulation of immune response by bacterial lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Aldapa-Vega, Gustavo; Pastelín-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a molecule that is profusely found on the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is also a potent stimulator of the immune response. As the main molecule on the bacterial surface, is also the most biologically active. The immune response of the host is activated by the recognition of LPS through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and this receptor-ligand interaction is closely linked to LPS structure. Microorganisms have evolved systems to control the expression and structure of LPS, producing structural variants that are used for modulating the host immune responses during infection. Examples of this include Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella spp. High concentrations of LPS can cause fever, increased heart rate and lead to septic shock and death. However, at relatively low concentrations some LPS are highly active immunomodulators, which can induce non-specific resistance to invading microorganisms. The elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the recognition of LPS and its structural variants has been fundamental to understand inflammation and is currently a pivotal field of research to understand the innate immune response, inflammation, the complex host-pathogen relationship and has important implications for the rational development of new immunomodulators and adjuvants. PMID:27560917

  6. Differential regional immune response in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    de Meis, Juliana; Morrot, Alexandre; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Villa-Verde, Déa Maria Serra; Savino, Wilson

    2009-01-01

    Following infection, lymphocytes expand exponentially and differentiate into effector cells to control infection and coordinate the multiple effector arms of the immune response. Soon after this expansion, the majority of antigen-specific lymphocytes die, thus keeping homeostasis, and a small pool of memory cells develops, providing long-term immunity to subsequent reinfection. The extent of infection and rate of pathogen clearance are thought to determine both the magnitude of cell expansion and the homeostatic contraction to a stable number of memory cells. This straight correlation between the kinetics of T cell response and the dynamics of lymphoid tissue cell numbers is a constant feature in acute infections yielded by pathogens that are cleared during the course of response. However, the regional dynamics of the immune response mounted against pathogens that are able to establish a persistent infection remain poorly understood. Herein we discuss the differential lymphocyte dynamics in distinct central and peripheral lymphoid organs following acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. While the thymus and mesenteric lymph nodes undergo a severe atrophy with massive lymphocyte depletion, the spleen and subcutaneous lymph nodes expand due to T and B cell activation/proliferation. These events are regulated by cytokines, as well as parasite-derived moieties. In this regard, identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying regional lymphocyte dynamics secondary to T. cruzi infection may hopefully contribute to the design of novel immune intervention strategies to control pathology in this infection. PMID:19582140

  7. Immune Response in Mussels To Environmental Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Stephen C.; Facher, Evan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of mussels in measuring the extent of chemical contamination and its variation in different coastal regions. Presents an experiment to introduce students to immune response and the effects of environmental pollution on marine organisms. Contains 14 references. (JRH)

  8. Innate Immune Sensing and Response to Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Pulendran, Bali; Maddur, Mohan S.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses pose a substantial threat to human and animal health worldwide. Recent studies in mouse models have revealed an indispensable role for the innate immune system in defense against influenza virus. Recognition of the virus by innate immune receptors in a multitude of cell types activates intricate signaling networks, functioning to restrict viral replication. Downstream effector mechanisms include activation of innate immune cells and, induction and regulation of adaptive immunity. However, uncontrolled innate responses are associated with exaggerated disease, especially in pandemic influenza virus infection. Despite advances in the understanding of innate response to influenza in the mouse model, there is a large knowledge gap in humans, particularly in immunocom-promised groups such as infants and the elderly. We propose here, the need for further studies in humans to decipher the role of innate immunity to influenza virus, particularly at the site of infection. These studies will complement the existing work in mice and facilitate the quest to design improved vaccines and therapeutic strategies against influenza. PMID:25078919

  9. DNAs from Brucella strains activate efficiently murine immune system with production of cytokines, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Zahra; Ardestani, Sussan K; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Kariminia, Amina; Zahraei Salehi, Taghi; Tavassoli, Nasser

    2009-09-01

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease with high impact on innate immune responses which is induced partly by its DNA. In the present study the potential differences of wild type and patients isolates versus attenuated vaccine strains in terms of cytokines, ROS and NO induction on murine splenocytes and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. This panel varied in base composition and included DNA from B. abortus, B. melitensis, B.abortus strain S19 and melitensis strain Rev1, as attenuated live vaccine. Also we included Escherichia coli DNA, calf thymus DNA (a mammalian DNA), as controls. These DNA were evaluated for their ability to stimulate IL-12, TNF-alpha, IL-10, IFN-gamma and ROS production from spleenocytes as well as NO production from peritoneal macrophages. Spleen cells were cultured in 24 well at a concentration of 106 cells/ ml with subsequent addition of 10 microg/ml of Brucella or Ecoli DNAs. These cultures were incubated at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2 for 5 days. Supernatants were harvested and cytokines, ROS and NOx were evaluated. It was observed that TNF-alpha was induced in days 1,3,5 by all Brucella strains DNAs and E. coli DNA, IL-10 only was induced in day 1, IFN- gamma was induced only in day 5 and IL-12 not induced. ROS and NOx were produced by all strains; however, we observed higher production of NOx which were stimulated by DNA of B. melitensis. PMID:20124603

  10. Cytokine and antibody responses of reactivated murine toxoplasmosis upon administration of dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ki-Man; Choi, In-Uk; Shin, Dae-Whan

    2006-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii has been shown to result in life-threatening encephalitis in immunocompromised patients after reactivation of dormant parasites. In order to obtain information on immune responses related to this phenomenon, BALB/c mice were infected with 25 cysts of the 76K strain of T. gondii, then, treated orally with dexamethasone (Toxo/Dexa-treated group) in order to reactivate the chronic toxoplasmosis. None of the T. gondii-infected mice died during the experimental periods, whereas the Toxo/Dexa-treated mice evidenced a significant attenuation of survival periods. Toxoplasma-specific IgG2a, IgA and IgM titers in sera were significantly depressed in the Toxo/Dexa-treated mice; however, the IgG1 sera titers were similar to those seen in the Toxoplasma-infected mice. The percentages of CD4+ and CD8α+ T cells in the Toxo/Dexa-treated mice were significantly reduced 2 weeks after dexamethasone treatment. IFN-γ and IL-10 production levels in the Toxo/Dexa-treated mice were depressed significantly, whereas IL-4 production was increased temporarily. The expression levels of the Toxoplasma-specific P30 and B1 genes were found to have been increased in the Toxo/Dexa-treated mice in comparison with the Toxoplasma-infected mice. Collectively, the findings of this study demonstrate that reactivation of murine toxoplasmosis as the result of dexamethasone treatment induced a depression in Th1 immune responses, whereas Th2 immune responses were not significantly influenced. PMID:16969058

  11. Genomic Expression Analyses Reveal Lysosomal, Innate Immunity Proteins, as Disease Correlates in Murine Models of a Lysosomal Storage Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md. Suhail; Getz, Michelle; Safeukui, Innocent; Yi, Sue; Tamez, Pamela; Shin, Jenny; Velázquez, Peter; Haldar, Kasturi

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease is a rare, genetic, lysosomal disorder with progressive neurodegeneration. Poor understanding of the pathophysiology and a lack of blood-based diagnostic markers are major hurdles in the treatment and management of NPC and several additional, neurological lysosomal disorders. To identify disease severity correlates, we undertook whole genome expression profiling of sentinel organs, brain, liver, and spleen of Balb/c Npc1−/− mice relative to Npc1+/− at an asymptomatic stage, as well as early- and late-symptomatic stages. Unexpectedly, we found prominent up regulation of innate immunity genes with age-dependent change in their expression, in all three organs. We shortlisted a set of 12 secretory genes whose expression steadily increased with age in both brain and liver, as potential plasma correlates of neurological and/or liver disease. Ten were innate immune genes with eight ascribed to lysosomes. Several are known to be elevated in diseased organs of murine models of other lysosomal diseases including Gaucher’s disease, Sandhoff disease and MPSIIIB. We validated the top candidate lysozyme, in the plasma of Npc1−/− as well as Balb/c Npc1nmf164 mice (bearing a point mutation closer to human disease mutants) and show its reduction in response to an emerging therapeutic. We further established elevation of innate immunity in Npc1−/− mice through multiple functional assays including inhibition of bacterial infection as well as cellular analysis and immunohistochemistry. These data revealed neutrophil elevation in the Npc1−/− spleen and liver (where large foci were detected proximal to damaged tissue). Together our results yield a set of lysosomal, secretory innate immunity genes that have potential to be developed as pan or specific plasma markers for neurological diseases associated with lysosomal storage and where diagnosis is a major problem. Further, the accumulation of neutrophils in diseased organs (hitherto

  12. Identification of Immunomodulatory Signatures Induced by American Ginseng in Murine Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Ma, Yonghui; Zhao, Fusheng; Gu, Weikuan; Jiao, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Background. American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius, AG) has been used for more than 300 years. Some of its claimed benefits can be attributed to the immunomodulatory activities, whose molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Methods. Murine splenic cells from adult male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were isolated and divided into 4 groups to mimic 4 basic pathophysiological states: (1) normal naïve; (2) normal activated; (3) deficient naïve; (4) deficient activated. Then, different AG extracts were added to all groups for 24 h incubation. MTT proliferation assays were performed to evaluate the phenotypic features of cells. Finally, microarray assays were carried out to identify differentially expressed genes associated with AG exposure. Real-time PCR was performed to validate the expression of selected genes. Results. Microarray data showed that most of gene expression changes were identified in the deficient naïve group, suggesting that the pathophysiological state has major impacts on transcriptomic changes associated with AG exposure. Specifically, this study revealed downregulation of interferon-γ signaling pathway in the deficient group of cells. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that only specific groups of immune cells responded to AG intervention and immunocompromised cells were more likely regulated by AG treatment. PMID:24319490

  13. Humoral Immune Response to AAV

    PubMed Central

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a member of the family Parvoviridae that has been widely used as a vector for gene therapy because of its safety profile, its ability to transduce both dividing and non-dividing cells, and its low immunogenicity. AAV has been detected in many different tissues of several animal species but has not been associated with any disease. As a result of natural infections, antibodies to AAV can be found in many animals including humans. It has been shown that pre-existing AAV antibodies can modulate the safety and efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy by blocking vector transduction or by redirecting distribution of AAV vectors to tissues other than the target organ. This review will summarize antibody responses against natural AAV infections, as well as AAV gene therapy vectors and their impact in the clinical development of AAV vectors for gene therapy. We will also review and discuss the various methods used for AAV antibody detection and strategies to overcome neutralizing antibodies in AAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:24151496

  14. Investigation of HIFU-induced anti-tumor immunity in a murine tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenlin; Yang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Yunbo; Morse, Michael A.; Lyerly, H. Kim; Clay, Timothy M.; Zhong, Pei

    2006-05-01

    To determine whether HIFU treatment can elicit a systemic, anti-tumor immune response in vivo, MC-38 solid tumors grown subcutaneously at the right hindlimbs of C57BL/6 mice were treated in an experimental HIFU system. Three different treatment strategies that produce thermal, mechanical, or thermal combined with mechanical damage to the tumor tissue were evaluated. To detect anti-tumor immune response, a tumor challenge was performed on the left hindlimbs of the mice one day following the HIFU treatment, and subsequently, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was evaluated on day 14. All three HIFU treatment strategies were found to cause significant regression of the primary tumor, with the best suppressive effect produced by the thermal HIFU. In contrast, the most significant regression of the challenged tumor with concomitantly elevated CTL response were detected in mice treated by the mechanical HIFU, followed by the thermal combined with mechanical HIFU, but not in mice treated by the thermal HIFU alone. These findings suggest that alternative treatment strategies that promote mechanical lysis of the tumor cells (in contrast to purely thermal ablation) may enhance HIFU-induced anti-tumor immune response.

  15. Humoral immune responses in foetal sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, K J; Morris, B

    1978-01-01

    A total of fifty-two foetal sheep between 49 and 126 days gestation were injected with polymeric and monomeric flagellin, dinitrophenylated monomeric flagellin, chicken red blood cells, ovalbumin, ferritin, chicken gamma-globulin and the somatic antigens of Salmonella typhimurium in a variety of combinations. Immune responses were followed in these animals by taking serial blood samples from them through indwelling vascular cannulae and measuring the circulating titres of antibody. Of the antigens tested, ferritin induced immune responses in the youngest foetuses. A short time later in gestation, the majority of foetuses responded to chicken red blood cells, polymeric flagellin, monomeric flagellin and dinitrophenylated monomeric flagellin. Only older foetuses responded regularly to chicken gamma-globulin and ovalbumin. However, antibodies to all these antigens were first detected over the relatively short period of development between 64 and 82 days gestation and this made it difficult to define any precise order in the development of immune responsiveness. Of the antigens tested only the somatic antigens of S. typhimurium failed to induce a primary antibody response during foetal life. The character and magnitude of the antibody responses in foetuses changed throughout in utero development. Both the total amount of antibody produced and the duration of the response increased with foetal age. Foetuses younger than 87 days gestation did not synthesize 2-mercaptoethanol resistant antibodies or IgG1 immunoglobulin to any of the antigens tested, whereas most foetuses older than this regularly did so. PMID:711249

  16. Immune response modulation by curcumin in a latex allergy model

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Viswanath P; Barrios, Christy S; Raju, Raghavan; Johnson, Bryon D; Levy, Michael B; Fink, Jordan N

    2007-01-01

    Background There has been a worldwide increase in allergy and asthma over the last few decades, particularly in industrially developed nations. This resulted in a renewed interest to understand the pathogenesis of allergy in recent years. The progress made in the pathogenesis of allergic disease has led to the exploration of novel alternative therapies, which include herbal medicines as well. Curcumin, present in turmeric, a frequently used spice in Asia has been shown to have anti-allergic and inflammatory potential. Methods We used a murine model of latex allergy to investigate the role of curcumin as an immunomodulator. BALB/c mice were exposed to latex allergens and developed latex allergy with a Th2 type of immune response. These animals were treated with curcumin and the immunological and inflammatory responses were evaluated. Results Animals exposed to latex showed enhanced serum IgE, latex specific IgG1, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, eosinophils and inflammation in the lungs. Intragastric treatment of latex-sensitized mice with curcumin demonstrated a diminished Th2 response with a concurrent reduction in lung inflammation. Eosinophilia in curcumin-treated mice was markedly reduced, co-stimulatory molecule expression (CD80, CD86, and OX40L) on antigen-presenting cells was decreased, and expression of MMP-9, OAT, and TSLP genes was also attenuated. Conclusion These results suggest that curcumin has potential therapeutic value for controlling allergic responses resulting from exposure to allergens. PMID:17254346

  17. Ovine model for studying pulmonary immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Chanana, A.D.

    1984-11-25

    Anatomical features of the sheep lung make it an excellent model for studying pulmonary immunity. Four specific lung segments were identified which drain exclusively to three separate lymph nodes. One of these segments, the dorsal basal segment of the right lung, is drained by the caudal mediastinal lymph node (CMLN). Cannulation of the efferent lymph duct of the CMLN along with highly localized intrabronchial instillation of antigen provides a functional unit with which to study factors involved in development of pulmonary immune responses. Following intrabronchial immunization there was an increased output of lymphoblasts and specific antibody-forming cells in efferent CMLN lymph. Continuous divergence of efferent lymph eliminated the serum antibody response but did not totally eliminate the appearance of specific antibody in fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. In these studies localized immunization of the right cranial lobe served as a control. Efferent lymphoblasts produced in response to intrabronchial antigen were labeled with /sup 125/I-iododeoxyuridine and their migrational patterns and tissue distribution compared to lymphoblasts obtained from the thoracic duct. The results indicated that pulmonary immunoblasts tend to relocate in lung tissue and reappear with a higher specific activity in pulmonary lymph than in thoracic duct lymph. The reverse was observed with labeled intestinal lymphoblasts. 35 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Immune response in pemphigus and beyond: progresses and emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Di Zenzo, Giovanni; Amber, Kyle T; Sayar, Beyza S; Müller, Eliane J; Borradori, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus (PF) are two severe autoimmune bullous diseases of the mucosae and/or skin associated with autoantibodies directed against desmoglein (Dsg) 3 and/or Dsg1. These two desmosomal cadherins, typifying stratified epithelia, are components of cell adhesion complexes called desmosomes and represent extra-desmosomal adhesion receptors. We herein review the advances in our understanding of the immune response underlying pemphigus, including human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II-associated genetic susceptibility, characteristics of pathogenic anti-Dsg antibodies, antigenic mapping studies as well as findings about Dsg-specific B and T cells. The pathogenicity of anti-Dsg autoantibodies has been convincingly demonstrated. Disease activity and clinical phenotype correlate with anti-Dsg antibody titers and profile while passive transfer of anti-Dsg IgG from pemphigus patients' results in pemphigus-like lesions in neonatal and adult mice. Finally, adoptive transfer of splenocytes from Dsg3-knockout mice immunized with murine Dsg3 into immunodeficient mice phenotypically recapitulates PV. Although the exact pathogenic mechanisms leading to blister formation have not been fully elucidated, intracellular signaling following antibody binding has been found to be necessary for inducing cell-cell dissociation, at least for PV. These new insights not only highlight the key role of Dsgs in maintenance of tissue homeostasis but are expected to progressively change pemphigus management, paving the way for novel targeted immunologic and pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26597100

  19. Combined PD-1 blockade and GITR triggering induce a potent antitumor immunity in murine cancer models and synergizes with chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The coinhibitory receptor Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) inhibits effector functions of activated T cells and prevents autoimmunity, however, cancer hijack this pathway to escape from immune attack. The costimulatory receptor glucocorticoid-induced TNFR related protein (GITR) is up-regulated on activated T cells and increases their proliferation, activation and cytokine production. We hypothesize that concomitant PD-1 blockade and GITR triggering would synergistically improve the effector functions of tumor-infiltrating T cells and increase the antitumor immunity. In present study, we evaluated the antitumor effects and mechanisms of combined PD-1 blockade and GITR triggering in a clinically highly relevant murine ID8 ovarian cancer model. Methods Mice with 7 days-established peritoneal ID8 ovarian cancer were treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with either control, anti-PD-1, anti-GITR or anti-PD-1/GITR monoclonal antibody (mAb) and their survival was evaluated; the phenotype and function of tumor-associated immune cells in peritoneal cavity of treated mice was analyzed by flow cytometry, and systemic antigen-specific immune response was evaluated by ELISA and cytotoxicity assay. Results Combined anti-PD-1/GITR mAb treatment remarkably inhibited peritoneal ID8 tumor growth with 20% of mice tumor free 90 days after tumor challenge while treatment with either anti-PD-1 or anti-GITR mAb alone exhibited little antitumor effect. The durable antitumor effect was associated with a memory immune response and conferred by CD4+ cells and CD8+ T cells. The treatment of anti-PD-1/GITR mAb increased the frequencies of interferon-γ-producing effector T cells and decreased immunosuppressive regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, shifting an immunosuppressive tumor milieu to an immunostimulatory state in peritoneal cavity. In addition, combined treatment of anti-PD-1/GITR mAb mounted an antigen-specific immune response as evidenced by antigen-specific IFN

  20. Vitamin E, immune response, and disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Tengerdy, R P

    1989-01-01

    Vitamin E as a dietary supplement or as part of an adjuvant vaccine formulation increases humoral and cell-mediated immunity and disease resistance in laboratory animals, farm animals, and humans. Adjuvant administration has far greater effect than dietary supplementation. Vitamin E as an antioxidant protects the cells of the immune response from peroxidative damage; possibly through a modulation of lipoxygenation of arachidonic acid, vitamin E alters cell membrane functions and cell-cell interactions. The most pronounced effect of vitamin E is on immune phagocytosis. Dietary supplementation is beneficial to animals, especially under stress, in decreasing susceptibility to infections. Vitamin E adjuvant vaccines have provided greater immunoprotection against enterotoxemia and epididymitis in sheep than conventional vaccines. PMID:2698109

  1. dl-2-Hydroxyisocaproic Acid Attenuates Inflammatory Responses in a Murine Candida albicans Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, M. T.; Hernandez, M.; Novak-Frazer, L.; Kuula, H.; Ramage, G.; Bowyer, P.; Warn, P.; Sorsa, T.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic biofilm infections are often accompanied by a chronic inflammatory response, leading to impaired healing and increased, irreversible damage to host tissues. Biofilm formation is a major virulence factor for Candida albicans and a challenge for treatment. Most current antifungals have proved ineffective in eradicating infections attributed to biofilms. The biofilm structure protects Candida species against antifungals and provides a way for them to evade host immune systems. This leads to a very distinct inflammatory response compared to that seen in planktonic infections. Previously, we showed the superior efficacy of dl-2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) against various bacteria and fungi. However, the immunomodulatory properties of HICA have not been studied. Our aim was to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory response to HICA in vivo. We hypothesized that HICA reduces the levels of immune mediators and attenuates the inflammatory response. In a murine model, a robust biofilm was formed for 5 days in a diffusion chamber implanted underneath mouse skin. The biofilm was treated for 12 h with HICA, while caspofungin and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as controls. The pathophysiology and immunoexpression in the tissues surrounding the chamber were determined by immunohistochemistry. Histopathological examination showed an attenuated inflammatory response together with reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) compared to those of chambers containing caspofungin and PBS. Interestingly, the expression of developmental endothelial locus 1 (Del-1), an antagonist of neutrophil extravasation, increased after treatment with HICA. Considering its anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activity, HICA may have enormous therapeutic potential in the treatment of chronic biofilm infections and inflammation, such as those seen with chronic wounds. PMID:24990903

  2. Differences in Host Innate Responses among Coccidioides Isolates in a Murine Model of Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Eric R. G.; David, Victoria R.; Doyle, Adina L.; Rajabi, Khadijeh; Kiefer, Jeffrey A.; Pirrotte, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are soil-dwelling fungi and the causative agents of coccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic to certain semiarid regions in the Americas. The most common route of infection is by inhalation of airborne Coccidioides arthroconidia. Once a susceptible host inhales the conidia, a transition to mature endosporulated spherules can occur within the first 5 days of infection. For this study, we examined the host response in a murine model of coccidioidomycosis during a time period of infection that has not been well characterized. We collected lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from BALB/c mice that were infected with a C. immitis pure strain, a C. immitis hybrid strain, or a C. posadasii strain as well as uninfected mice. We compared the host responses to the Coccidioides strains used in this study by assessing the level of transcription of selected cytokine genes in lung tissues and characterized host and fungal proteins present in BALF. Host response varied depending on the Coccidioides strain that was used and did not appear to be overly robust. This study provides a foundation to begin to dissect the host immune response early in infection, to detect abundant Coccidioides proteins, and to develop diagnostics that target these early time points of infection. PMID:26275879

  3. Schistosoma mansoni antigens modulate the allergic response in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, L S; Oliveira, S C; Góes, A M; Oliveira, R R; Pacífico, L G; Marinho, F V; Fonseca, C T; Cardoso, F C; Carvalho, E M; Araujo, M I

    2010-05-01

    Schistosoma mansoni infection has been associated with protection against allergies. The mechanisms underlying this association may involve regulatory cells and cytokines. We evaluated the immune response induced by the S. mansoni antigens Sm22.6, PIII and Sm29 in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation. BALB/c mice were sensitized with subcutaneously injected OVA-alum and challenged with aerolized OVA. Mice were given three doses of the different S. mansoni antigens. Lung histopathology, cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and eosinophil peroxidase activity in lung were evaluated. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E levels in serum and cytokines in BAL were also measured. Additionally, we evaluated the frequency of CD4+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells in cultures stimulated with OVA and the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by these cells. The number of total cells and eosinophils in BAL and the levels of OVA-specific IgE were reduced in the immunized mice. Also, the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in the BAL of mice immunized with PIII and Sm22.6 were decreased, while the levels of IL-10 were higher in mice immunized with Sm22.6 compared to the non-immunized mice. The frequency of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells was higher in the groups of mice who received Sm22.6, Sm29 and PIII, being the expression of IL-10 by these cells only higher in mice immunized with Sm22.6. We concluded that the S. mansoni antigens used in this study are able to down-modulate allergic inflammatory mediators in a murine model of airway inflammation and that the CD4+FoxP3+ T cells, even in the absence of IL-10 expression, might play an important role in this process. PMID:20132231

  4. Schistosoma mansoni antigens modulate the allergic response in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, L S; Oliveira, S C; Góes, A M; Oliveira, R R; Pacífico, L G; Marinho, F V; Fonseca, C T; Cardoso, F C; Carvalho, E M; Araujo, M I

    2010-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni infection has been associated with protection against allergies. The mechanisms underlying this association may involve regulatory cells and cytokines. We evaluated the immune response induced by the S. mansoni antigens Sm22·6, PIII and Sm29 in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation. BALB/c mice were sensitized with subcutaneously injected OVA-alum and challenged with aerolized OVA. Mice were given three doses of the different S. mansoni antigens. Lung histopathology, cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and eosinophil peroxidase activity in lung were evaluated. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E levels in serum and cytokines in BAL were also measured. Additionally, we evaluated the frequency of CD4+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells in cultures stimulated with OVA and the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by these cells. The number of total cells and eosinophils in BAL and the levels of OVA-specific IgE were reduced in the immunized mice. Also, the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in the BAL of mice immunized with PIII and Sm22·6 were decreased, while the levels of IL-10 were higher in mice immunized with Sm22·6 compared to the non-immunized mice. The frequency of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells was higher in the groups of mice who received Sm22·6, Sm29 and PIII, being the expression of IL-10 by these cells only higher in mice immunized with Sm22·6. We concluded that the S. mansoni antigens used in this study are able to down-modulate allergic inflammatory mediators in a murine model of airway inflammation and that the CD4+FoxP3+ T cells, even in the absence of IL-10 expression, might play an important role in this process. PMID:20132231

  5. Dendritic Cells: A Double-Edged Sword in Immune Responses during Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Gil-Jaramillo, Natalia; Motta, Flávia N; Favali, Cecília B F; Bastos, Izabela M D; Santana, Jaime M

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most important member of the antigen presenting cells group due to their ability to recognize antigen at the infection site and their high specialized antigen internalization capacity. These cells have central role in connecting the innate and adaptive immune responses against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. These first line defense cells modulate host immune response depending on type, maturation level, cytokine milieu and DC receptor involved in the interactions with T. cruzi, influencing the development of the disease clinic forms. Here, we present a review of DCs-T. cruzi interactions both in human and murine models, pointing out the parasite ability to manipulate DCs activity for the purpose of evading innate immune response and assuring its own survival and persistence. PMID:27471496

  6. Dendritic Cells: A Double-Edged Sword in Immune Responses during Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Jaramillo, Natalia; Motta, Flávia N.; Favali, Cecília B. F.; Bastos, Izabela M. D.; Santana, Jaime M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most important member of the antigen presenting cells group due to their ability to recognize antigen at the infection site and their high specialized antigen internalization capacity. These cells have central role in connecting the innate and adaptive immune responses against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. These first line defense cells modulate host immune response depending on type, maturation level, cytokine milieu and DC receptor involved in the interactions with T. cruzi, influencing the development of the disease clinic forms. Here, we present a review of DCs–T. cruzi interactions both in human and murine models, pointing out the parasite ability to manipulate DCs activity for the purpose of evading innate immune response and assuring its own survival and persistence. PMID:27471496

  7. Concurrent influenza vaccination reduces anti-FVIII antibody responses in murine hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jesse D; Moorehead, Paul C; Sponagle, Kate; Steinitz, Katharina N; Reipert, Birgit M; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2016-06-30

    Inflammatory signals such as pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns have been hypothesized as risk factors for the initiation of the anti-factor VIII (FVIII) immune response seen in 25% to 30% of patients with severe hemophilia A (HA). In these young patients, vaccines may be coincidentally administered in close proximity with initial exposure to FVIII, thereby providing a source of such stimuli. Here, we investigated the effects of 3 vaccines commonly used in pediatric patients on FVIII immunogenicity in a humanized HA murine model with variable tolerance to recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII). Mice vaccinated intramuscularly against the influenza vaccine prior to multiple infusions of rhFVIII exhibited a decreased incidence of rhFVIII-specific neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies. Similar findings were observed with the addition of an adjuvant. Upon exposure to media from influenza- or FVIII-stimulated lymph node or splenic lymphocytes, naïve CD4(+) lymphocytes preferentially migrated toward media from influenza-stimulated cells, indicating that antigen competition, by means of lymphocyte recruitment to the immunization site, is a potential mechanism for the observed decrease in FVIII immunogenicity. We also observed no differences in incidence or titer of rhFVIII-specific antibodies and inhibitors in mice exposed to the live-attenuated measles-mumps-rubella vaccine regardless of route of administration. Together, our results suggest that concomitant FVIII exposure and vaccination against influenza does not increase the risk of inhibitor formation and may in fact decrease anti-FVIII immune responses. PMID:27034428

  8. Immunological signaling networks: Integrating the body's immune response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune system’s role is to eliminate disease from the host. Immune cells are primarily responsible for eliminating pathogens or cancerous cells. In addition, immune cells regulate the immune response affecting the types of cells that are activated or suppressed. The following discussion is an...

  9. Waddlia chondrophila induces systemic infection, organ pathology, and elicits Th1-associated humoral immunity in a murine model of genital infection

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevsky, Sam; Gyger, Joel; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Pilloux, Ludovic; Greub, Gilbert; Stojanov, Milos; Baud, David

    2015-01-01

    Waddlia chondrophila is a known bovine abortigenic Chlamydia-related bacterium that has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in human. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how W. chondrophila infection spreads, its ability to elicit an immune response and induce pathology. A murine model of genital infection was developed to investigate the pathogenicity and immune response associated with a W. chondrophila infection. Genital inoculation of the bacterial agent resulted in a dose-dependent infection that spread to lumbar lymph nodes and successively to spleen and liver. Bacterial-induced pathology peaked on day 14, characterized by leukocyte infiltration (uterine horn, liver, and spleen), necrosis (liver) and extramedullary hematopoiesis (spleen). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of a large number of W. chondrophila in the spleen on day 14. Robust IgG titers were detected by day 14 and remained high until day 52. IgG isotypes consisted of high IgG2a, moderate IgG3 and no detectable IgG1, indicating a Th1-associated immune response. This study provides the first evidence that W. chondrophila genital infection is capable of inducing a systemic infection that spreads to major organs, induces uterus, spleen, and liver pathology and elicits a Th1-skewed humoral response. This new animal model will help our understanding of the mechanisms related to intracellular bacteria-induced miscarriages, the most frequent complication of pregnancy that affects one in four women. PMID:26583077

  10. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  11. Dengue virus-specific murine T-lymphocyte proliferation: serotype specificity and response to recombinant viral proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Zhang, Y M; Lai, C J; Ennis, F A

    1989-01-01

    Definition of the T-lymphocyte responses to dengue viruses should aid in the development of safe and effective vaccines and help to explain the pathophysiology of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. In this study, we demonstrated that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes were detected in spleen cells from dengue virus-immune mice using an in vitro proliferation assay. Following immunization with a single dose of infectious dengue virus, murine lymphocytes showed increased proliferation when incubated in the presence of viral antigens of the same serotype but not in the presence of control antigens. Depletion experiments with antibody and complement showed that the population of responding cells expressed the Thy1+ L3T4+ Lyt2- phenotype. This indicates that the predominant proliferating cells are T lymphocytes of the helper-inducer phenotype. Dengue virus-specific memory lymphocyte responses were detectable for at least 22 weeks after immunization. The response to primary infection was primarily serotype specific, with some serotype cross-reactivity present at a low level. We demonstrated that lymphocytes from mice immunized with dengue 4 virus proliferate in response to a combination of dengue 4 virus C, pre-M, E, NS1, and NS2a proteins expressed in Sf9 cells with a recombinant baculovirus, and, to a lesser extent, to the dengue 4 virus E protein alone. PMID:2786087

  12. Natural history of tumor growth and immune modulation in common spontaneous murine mammary tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren; Slota, Meredith; Koehnlein, Marlese; Treuting, Piper M.; Dang, Yushe; Stanton, Sasha; Disis, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies in patients with breast cancer suggest the immune microenvironment influences response to therapy. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between growth rates of tumors in common spontaneous mammary tumor models and immune biomarkers evaluated in the tumor and blood. Methods TgMMTV-neu and C3(1)-Tag transgenic mice were followed longitudinally from birth, and MPA-DMBA treated mice from the time of carcinogen administration, for the development of mammary tumors. Tumor infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Serum cytokines were evaluated in subsets of mice. Fine needle aspirates of tumors were collected and RNA isolated to determine levels of immune and proliferation markers. Results Age of tumor onset and kinetics of tumor growth were significantly different among the models. Mammary tumors from TgMMTV-neu contained a lower CD8/CD4 ratio than other models (p<0.05). MPA-DMBA induced tumors contained a higher percentage of FOXP3+ CD4+ T-cells (p<0.01) and MDSC (p<0.001) as compared to the other models. Individuals with significantly slower tumor growth demonstrated higher levels of Type I serum cytokines prior to the development of lesions as compared to those with rapid tumor growth. Moreover, the tumors of animals with more rapid tumor growth demonstrated a significant increase in expression of genes associated with Type II immunity than those with slower progressing tumors. Conclusions These data provide a foundation for the development of in vivo models to explore the relationship between endogenous immunity and response to standard therapies for breast cancer. PMID:25395320

  13. Thymopoietic and Bone Marrow Response to Murine Pneumocystis Pneumonia▿

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xin; Zhang, Ping; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a key role in host defense against Pneumocystis infection. To define the role of naïve CD4+ T cell production through the thymopoietic response in host defense against Pneumocystis infection, Pneumocystis murina infection in the lung was induced in adult male C57BL/6 mice with and without prior thymectomy. Pneumocystis infection caused a significant increase in the number of CCR9+ multipotent progenitor (MPP) cells in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation, an increase in populations of earliest thymic progenitors (ETPs) and double negative (DN) thymocytes in the thymus, and recruitment of naïve and total CD4+ T cells into the alveolar space. The level of murine signal joint T cell receptor excision circles (msjTRECs) in spleen CD4+ cells was increased at 5 weeks post-Pneumocystis infection. In thymectomized mice, the numbers of naïve, central memory, and total CD4+ T cells in all tissues examined were markedly reduced following Pneumocystis infection. This deficiency of naïve and central memory CD4+ T cells was associated with delayed pulmonary clearance of Pneumocystis. Extracts of Pneumocystis resulted in an increase in the number of CCR9+ MPPs in the cultured bone marrow cells. Stimulation of cultured bone marrow cells with ligands to Toll-like receptor 2 ([TLR-2] zymosan) and TLR-9 (ODN M362) each caused a similar increase in CCR9+ MPP cells via activation of the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway. These results demonstrate that enhanced production of naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes through the thymopoietic response and enhanced delivery of lymphopoietic precursors from the bone marrow play an important role in host defense against Pneumocystis infection. PMID:21343353

  14. In vitro immune toxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on murine peritoneal macrophages: apoptosis and immune cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi-Yan; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong; Zhao, Lixia; Yang, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants and are often detected in the environment, wildlife, and humans, presenting potential threats to ecosystem and human health. PBDEs can cause neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and endocrine disruption. However, data on PBDE immunotoxicity are limited, and the toxicity mechanisms remain largely unknown. Both immune cell death and dysfunction can modulate the responses of the immune system. This study examined the toxic effects of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on the immune system by using peritoneal macrophages as the model. The macrophages were exposed to PBDEs, and cell death was determined through flow cytometry and immunochemical blot. The results showed that after 24h of exposure, BDE-47 (>5 μM) and BDE-209 (>20 μM) induced cell apoptosis, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and depleted glutathione. BDE-47 was more potent than BDE-209; the cytotoxic concentrations for BDE-47 and BDE-209 were determined to be 5 μM and 20 μM, respectively, during 24h of exposure. However, pretreatment with n-acetyl-l-cysteine (ROS scavenger) partially reversed the cytotoxic effects. Further gene expression analyses on Caspase-3,-8,-9, TNFR1, and Bax revealed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were activated. More importantly, non-cytotoxic concentrations BDE-47 (<2 μM) and BDE-209 (<10 μM) could impair macrophage accessory cell function in a concentration-dependent manner, but no effects were observed on phagocytic responses. These revealed effects of PBDEs on macrophages may shed light on the toxicity mechanisms of PBDEs and suggest the necessity of evaluating cellular functionality during the risk assessment of PBDE immunotoxicity. PMID:25462306

  15. Evolutionary responses of innate Immunity to adaptive immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innate immunity is present in all metazoans, whereas the evolutionarily more novel adaptive immunity is limited to jawed fishes and their descendants (gnathostomes). We observe that the organisms that possess adaptive immunity lack diversity in their innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), rais...

  16. Humoral innate immune response and disease

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Stephanie N.; Varahan, Sriram; Yuan, Kai; Li, Xiangdong; Fleming, Sherry D.

    2012-01-01

    The humoral innate immune response consists of multiple components, including the naturally occurring antibodies (NAb), pentraxins and the complement and contact cascades. As soluble, plasma components, these innate proteins provide key elements in the prevention and control of disease. However, pathogens and cells with altered self proteins utilize multiple humoral components to evade destruction and promote pathogy. Many studies have examined the relationship between humoral immunity and autoimmune disorders. This review focuses on the interactions between the humoral components and their role in promoting the pathogenesis of bacterial and viral infections and chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. Understanding the beneficial and detrimental aspects of the individual components and the interactions between proteins which regulate the innate and adaptive response will provide therapeutic targets for subsequent studies. PMID:22771788

  17. Regulation of immune responses by neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Arase, Hisashi

    2014-06-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant circulating cells in humans, are major pathogen-killing immune cells. For many years, these cells were considered to be simple killers at the "bottom" of immune responses. However, recent studies have revealed more sophisticated mechanisms associated with neutrophilic cytotoxic functions, and neutrophils have been shown to contribute to various infectious and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the key features of neutrophils during inflammatory responses, from their release from the bone marrow to their death in inflammatory loci. We also discuss the expanding roles of neutrophils that have been identified in the context of several inflammatory diseases. We further focus on the mechanisms that regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflamed tissues and neutrophil cytotoxic activities against both pathogens and host tissues. PMID:24850053

  18. Murine Antibody Responses to Cleaved Soluble HIV-1 Envelope Trimers Are Highly Restricted in Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Joyce K.; Crampton, Jordan C.; Cupo, Albert; Ketas, Thomas; van Gils, Marit J.; Sliepen, Kwinten; de Taeye, Steven W.; Sok, Devin; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Deresa, Isaiah; Stanfield, Robyn; Ward, Andrew B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Generating neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) is a major goal of many current HIV-1 vaccine efforts. To be of practical value, these nAbs must be both potent and cross-reactive in order to be capable of preventing the transmission of the highly diverse and generally neutralization resistant (Tier-2) HIV-1 strains that are in circulation. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike is the only target for nAbs. To explore whether Tier-2 nAbs can be induced by Env proteins, we immunized conventional mice with soluble BG505 SOSIP.664 trimers that mimic the native Env spike. Here, we report that it is extremely difficult for murine B cells to recognize the Env epitopes necessary for inducing Tier-2 nAbs. Thus, while trimer-immunized mice raised Env-binding IgG Abs and had high-quality T follicular helper (Tfh) cell and germinal center (GC) responses, they did not make BG505.T332N nAbs. Epitope mapping studies showed that Ab responses in mice were specific to areas near the base of the soluble trimer. These areas are not well shielded by glycans and likely are occluded on virions, which is consistent with the lack of BG505.T332N nAbs. These data inform immunogen design and suggest that it is useful to obscure nonneutralizing epitopes presented on the base of soluble Env trimers and that the glycan shield of well-formed HIV Env trimers is virtually impenetrable for murine B cell receptors (BCRs). IMPORTANCE Human HIV vaccine efficacy trials have not generated meaningful neutralizing antibodies to circulating HIV strains. One possible hindrance has been the lack of immunogens that properly mimic the native conformation of the HIV envelope trimer protein. Here, we tested the first generation of soluble, native-like envelope trimer immunogens in a conventional mouse model. We attempted to generate neutralizing antibodies to neutralization-resistant circulating HIV strains. Various vaccine strategies failed to induce neutralizing antibodies to a neutralization

  19. Humoral and cellular immunity in secondary infection due to murine Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D M; Grubbs, B G; Pack, E; Kelly, K; Rank, R G

    1997-01-01

    A murine model of pneumonia due to the mouse pneumonitis agent (MoPn [murine Chlamydia trachomatis]) in mice deficient in CD4+ T-cell function (major histocompatibility complex [MHC] class II function [class II-/-], CD8+ T-cell function (beta2-microglobulin deficient, MHC class I deficient [Beta2m-/-]), B-cell function (C57BL/10J-Igh(tm1Cgn) [Igh-/-]), and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) (C57BL/6-Ifg(tm1) [Ifg-/-]) or interleukin-4 (C57BL/6J(tm1Cgn29) [IL4-/-]) production was employed to determine if each of these mechanisms was critical to resistance against reinfection by C. trachomatis or if alternate compensatory mechanisms existed in their absence which could potentially be exploited in vaccine development. Resistance to reinfection with MoPn was heavily dependent on CD4+ T cells. CD4 T-cell-deficient MHC class II-/- mice were very susceptible to reinfection with MoPn, showing the critical importance of this cell to resistance. These mice lacked antibody production but did produce IFN-gamma, apparently by mechanisms involving NK and CD8+ T cells. Neutralization of IFN-gamma in these mice led to a borderline increase in susceptibility, showing a possible role (albeit small) of this cytokine in this setting. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was also present at increased levels in these mice. Igh-/- B-cell-deficient mice which produce no antibody to MoPn were only modestly more susceptible to reinfection than immunized B-cell-intact controls, showing that antibody, including lung immunoglobulin A, is not an absolute requirement for relatively successful host defense in this setting. Levels of lung IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were elevated in Igh-/- mice compared to those in controls. IL-4-/- mice (deficient in Th2 function) could develop normal resistance to reinfection with MoPn. Conversely, normal mice rendered partially IFN-gamma deficient by antibody depletion were somewhat impaired in their ability to develop acquired immunity to MoPn, again indicating a

  20. The therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic virus Delta24-RGD in a murine glioma model depends primarily on antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kleijn, Anne; Kloezeman, Jenneke; Treffers-Westerlaken, Elike; Fulci, Giulia; Leenstra, Sieger; Dirven, Clemens; Debets, Reno; Lamfers, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses selectively lyse tumor cells, making these agents a promising treatment modality for glioma. Accumulating data suggest that the immune system plays an important role in the anti-glioma activity of oncolytic viruses. In an immune competent glioma model, the therapeutic effect of the oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD was found to depend primarily on antitumor immune responses. PMID:25941622

  1. Immune responses to pertussis vaccines and disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kathryn M; Berbers, Guy A M

    2014-04-01

    In this article we discuss the following: (1) acellular vaccines are immunogenic, but responses vary by vaccine; (2) pertussis antibody levels rapidly wane but promptly increase after vaccination; (3) whole-cell vaccines vary in immunogenicity and efficacy; (4) whole-cell vaccines and naturally occurring pertussis generate predominantly T-helper 1 (Th1) responses, whereas acellular vaccines generate mixed Th1/Th2 responses; (5) active transplacental transport of pertussis antibody is documented; (6) neonatal immunization with diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine has been associated with some suppression of pertussis antibody, but suppression has been seen less often with acellular vaccines; (7) memory B cells persist in both acellular vaccine- and whole cell vaccine-primed children; and (8) in acellular vaccine-primed children, T-cell responses remain elevated and do not increase with vaccine boosters, whereas in whole-cell vaccine-primed children, these responses can be increased by vaccine boosting and natural exposure. Despite these findings, challenges remain in understanding the immune response to pertussis vaccines. PMID:24158958

  2. Immunization with recombinant prion protein leads to partial protection in a murine model of TSEs through a novel mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xanthopoulos, Konstantinos; Lagoudaki, Rosa; Kontana, Anastasia; Kyratsous, Christos; Panagiotidis, Christos; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Yiangou, Minas; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are neurodegenerative diseases, which despite fervent research remain incurable. Immunization approaches have shown great potential at providing protection, however tolerance effects hamper active immunization protocols. In this study we evaluated the antigenic potential of various forms of recombinant murine prion protein and estimated their protective efficacy in a mouse model of prion diseases. One of the forms tested provided a significant elongation of survival interval. The elongation was mediated via an acute depletion of mature follicular dendritic cells, which are associated with propagation of the prion infectious agent in the periphery and in part to the development of humoral immunity against prion protein. This unprecedented result could offer new strategies for protection against transmissible encephalopathies as well as other diseases associated with follicular dendritic cells. PMID:23554984

  3. Immunization with Recombinant Prion Protein Leads to Partial Protection in a Murine Model of TSEs through a Novel Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xanthopoulos, Konstantinos; Lagoudaki, Rosa; Kontana, Anastasia; Kyratsous, Christos; Panagiotidis, Christos; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Yiangou, Minas; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are neurodegenerative diseases, which despite fervent research remain incurable. Immunization approaches have shown great potential at providing protection, however tolerance effects hamper active immunization protocols. In this study we evaluated the antigenic potential of various forms of recombinant murine prion protein and estimated their protective efficacy in a mouse model of prion diseases. One of the forms tested provided a significant elongation of survival interval. The elongation was mediated via an acute depletion of mature follicular dendritic cells, which are associated with propagation of the prion infectious agent in the periphery and in part to the development of humoral immunity against prion protein. This unprecedented result could offer new strategies for protection against transmissible encephalopathies as well as other diseases associated with follicular dendritic cells. PMID:23554984

  4. Dengue virus infection: current concepts in immune mechanisms and lessons from murine models

    PubMed Central

    Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Ryffel, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV), a group of four serologically distinct but related flaviviruses, are responsible for one of the most important emerging viral diseases. This mosquito-borne disease has a great impact in tropical and subtropical areas of the world in terms of illness, mortality and economic costs, mainly due to the lack of approved vaccine or antiviral drugs. Infections with one of the four serotypes of DENV (DENV-1–4) result in symptoms ranging from an acute, self-limiting febrile illness, dengue fever, to severe dengue haemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. We reviewed the existing mouse models of infection, including the DENV-2-adapted strain P23085. The role of CC chemokines, interleukin-17 (IL-17), IL-22 and invariant natural killer T cells in mediating the exacerbation of disease in immune-competent mice is highlighted. Investigations in both immune-deficient and immune-competent mouse models of DENV infection may help to identify key host–pathogen factors and devise novel therapies to restrain the systemic and local inflammatory responses associated with severe DENV infection. PMID:24182427

  5. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency. PMID:26729813

  6. A comparison of two distinct murine macrophage gene expression profiles in response to Leishmania amazonensis infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The experimental murine model of leishmaniasis has been widely used to characterize the immune response against Leishmania. CBA mice develop severe lesions, while C57BL/6 present small chronic lesions under L. amazonensis infection. Employing a transcriptomic approach combined with biological network analysis, the gene expression profiles of C57BL/6 and CBA macrophages, before and after L. amazonensis infection in vitro, were compared. These strains were selected due to their different degrees of susceptibility to this parasite. Results The genes expressed by C57BL/6 and CBA macrophages, before and after infection, differ greatly, both with respect to absolute number as well as cell function. Uninfected C57BL/6 macrophages express genes involved in the deactivation pathway of macrophages at lower levels, while genes related to the activation of the host immune inflammatory response, including apoptosis and phagocytosis, have elevated expression levels. Several genes that participate in the apoptosis process were also observed to be up-regulated in C57BL/6 macrophages infected with L. amazonensis, which is very likely related to the capacity of these cells to control parasite infection. By contrast, genes involved in lipid metabolism were found to be up-regulated in CBA macrophages in response to infection, which supports the notion that L. amazonensis probably modulates parasitophorous vacuoles in order to survive and multiply in host cells. Conclusion The transcriptomic profiles of C57BL/6 macrophages, before and after infection, were shown to be involved in the macrophage pathway of activation, which may aid in the control of L. amazonensis infection, in contrast to the profiles of CBA cells. PMID:22321871

  7. Staphylococcal manipulation of host immune responses.

    PubMed

    Thammavongsa, Vilasack; Kim, Hwan Keun; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterial commensal of the human nares and skin, is a frequent cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections. A hallmark of staphylococcal infections is their frequent recurrence, even when treated with antibiotics and surgical intervention, which demonstrates the bacterium's ability to manipulate innate and adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we highlight how S. aureus virulence factors inhibit complement activation, block and destroy phagocytic cells and modify host B cell and T cell responses, and we discuss how these insights might be useful for the development of novel therapies against infections with antibiotic resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:26272408

  8. Staphylococcal manipulation of host immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Thammavongsa, Vilasack; Kim, Hwan Keun; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterial commensal of the human nares and skin, is a frequent cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections. A hallmark of staphylococcal infections is their frequent recurrence, even when treated with antibiotics and surgical intervention, which demonstrates the bacterium’s ability to manipulate innate and adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we highlight how S. aureus virulence factors inhibit complement activation, block and destroy phagocytic cells and modify host B and T cell responses, and we discuss how these insights might be useful for the development of novel therapies against infections with antibiotic resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:26272408

  9. Local immunity in lung-associated lymph nodes in a murine model of pulmonary histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Fojtasek, M F; Sherman, M R; Garringer, T; Blair, R; Wheat, L J; Schnizlein-Bick, C T

    1993-01-01

    Local immunity against acute pulmonary histoplasmosis was studied in the lung-associated lymph nodes of normal nonimmune mice infected intratracheally with live Histoplasma capsulatum yeasts. The phenotypes and distribution of cells in lung-associated lymph nodes and spleens were determined by flow cytometry. In addition, the immune responsiveness of these cells was evaluated by in vitro blastogenesis. Anti-H. capsulatum antibodies in serum and H. capsulatum antigen in tissue were measured by immunoassays. Cellular immune responses were greater in the lymph nodes than in the spleens. In lymph nodes 7 days after infection, a marked increase in the number of B lymphocytes caused the percentage to rise to 43%, compared with 26% in controls, and it remained elevated throughout the course of infection. A CD3+ cell that did not express CD4 or CD8 increased in number until it constituted 21% of lymph node cells, compared with 5% in controls, by day 14. The numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were modestly increased from days 7 to 35, but their percentages dropped because of the greater numbers of B lymphocytes and CD3+4-8- cells. Macrophages consistently constituted 2 to 3% of lymph node cells during the study. In spleens 7 days after infection, the percentage of macrophages in infected mice rose to 21%, compared with 9% in controls, but the total spleen cell number did not increase until day 14, when all cell subsets were nearly double in number. The in vitro blastogenic response of lymph node cells to H. capsulatum peaked at day 7, but spleen cell response was minimal during the course of infection. Histoplasma-specific serum immunoglobulin G antibodies reached peak levels by day 21 and remained high to the end of the study. In contrast, levels of antigen-specific immunoglobulin M antibodies were very low. These data suggest that antigen-specific immune responses occur in lung-associated lymph nodes and that this draining lymph node response may be an important

  10. Iron Deficiency Impairs Intra-Hepatic Lymphocyte Mediated Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi-Riani, Eliano; Danger, Richard; Lozano, Juan José; Martinez-Picola, Marta; Kodela, Elisavet; Mas-Malavila, Roser; Bruguera, Miquel; Collins, Helen L; Hider, Robert C; Martinez-Llordella, Marc; Sanchez-Fueyo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic expression of iron homeostasis genes and serum iron parameters predict the success of immunosuppression withdrawal following clinical liver transplantation, a phenomenon known as spontaneous operational tolerance. In experimental animal models, spontaneous liver allograft tolerance is established through a process that requires intra-hepatic lymphocyte activation and deletion. Our aim was to determine if changes in systemic iron status regulate intra-hepatic lymphocyte responses. We used a murine model of lymphocyte-mediated acute liver inflammation induced by Concanavalin A (ConA) injection employing mice fed with an iron-deficient (IrDef) or an iron-balanced diet (IrRepl). While the mild iron deficiency induced by the IrDef diet did not significantly modify the steady state immune cell repertoire and systemic cytokine levels, it significantly dampened inflammatory liver damage after ConA challenge. These findings were associated with a marked decrease in T cell and NKT cell activation following ConA injection in IrDef mice. The decreased liver injury observed in IrDef mice was independent from changes in the gut microflora, and was replicated employing an iron specific chelator that did not modify intra-hepatic hepcidin secretion. Furthermore, low-dose iron chelation markedly impaired the activation of isolated T cells in vitro. All together, these results suggest that small changes in iron homeostasis can have a major effect in the regulation of intra-hepatic lymphocyte mediated responses. PMID:26287688

  11. C3d enhanced DNA vaccination induced humoral immune response to glycoprotein C of pseudorabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Tiezhu; Fan Huiying; Tan Yadi; Xiao Shaobo; Ling Jieyu; Chen Huanchun; Guo Aizhen . E-mail: aizhen@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2006-09-08

    Murine C3d were utilized to enhance immunogenicity of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gC DNA vaccination. Three copies of C3d and four copies of CR2-binding domain M28{sub 4} were fused, respectively, to truncated gC gene encoding soluble glycoprotein C (sgC) in pcDNA3.1. BALB/c mice were, respectively, immunized with recombinant plasmids, blank vector, and inactivated vaccine. The antibody ELISA titer for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA was 49-fold more than that for sgC DNA, and the neutralizing antibody obtained 8-fold rise. Protection of mice from death after lethal PrV (316 LD{sub 5}) challenge was augmented from 25% to 100%. Furthermore, C3d fusion increased Th2-biased immune response by inducing IL-4 production. The IL-4 level for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA immunization approached that for the inactivated vaccine. Compared to C3d, M28 enhanced sgC DNA immunogenicity to a lesser extent. In conclusion, we demonstrated that murine C3d fusion significantly enhanced gC DNA immunity by directing Th1-biased to a balanced and more effective Th1/Th2 response.

  12. Antiviral immune responses of bats: a review.

    PubMed

    Baker, M L; Schountz, T; Wang, L-F

    2013-02-01

    Despite being the second most species-rich and abundant group of mammals, bats are also among the least studied, with a particular paucity of information in the area of bat immunology. Although bats have a long history of association with rabies, the emergence and re-emergence of a number of viruses from bats that impact human and animal health has resulted in a resurgence of interest in bat immunology. Understanding how bats coexist with viruses in the absence of disease is essential if we are to begin to develop therapeutics to target viruses in humans and susceptible livestock and companion animals. Here, we review the current status of knowledge in the field of bat antiviral immunology including both adaptive and innate mechanisms of immune defence and highlight the need for further investigations in this area. Because data in this field are so limited, our discussion is based on both scientific discoveries and theoretical predictions. It is hoped that by provoking original, speculative or even controversial ideas or theories, this review may stimulate further research in this important field. Efforts to understand the immune systems of bats have been greatly facilitated in recent years by the availability of partial genome sequences from two species of bats, a megabat, Pteropus vampyrus, and a microbat, Myotis lucifugus, allowing the rapid identification of immune genes. Although bats appear to share most features of the immune system with other mammals, several studies have reported qualitative and quantitative differences in the immune responses of bats. These observations warrant further investigation to determine whether such differences are associated with the asymptomatic nature of viral infections in bats. PMID:23302292

  13. Photodynamic therapy stimulates anti-tumor immunity in a murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Wu, Mei X.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2007-02-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death among modern peoples largely due to metastatic disease. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with the minimal toxicity. This is best accomplished by educating the body's immune system to recognize the tumor as foreign so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the IV administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA), and induction of heat-shock proteins. The induction of specific CD8+ T lymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. We here report on PDT of mice bearing tumors that either do or do not express an established TAA. We utilized a BALB/c colon adenocarcinoma cell line termed CT26.CL25 retrovirally transduced to stably express β-galactosidase ( β-gal, a bacterial protein), and its non-β-gal expressing wild-type counterpart termed CT26 WT, as well as the control cell line consisting of CT26 transduced with the empty retroviral vector termed CT26-neo. All cells expressed class I MHC restriction element H-2Ld syngenic to BALB/c mice. Vascular PDT with a regimen of 1mg/kg BPD injected IV, and 120 J/cm2 of 690-nm laser light after 15 minutes successfully cured 100% of CT26.CL25 tumors but 0% of CT26-neo tumors and 0% of CT26 WT tumors. After 90 days tumor free interval the CT26.CL25 cured mice were rechallenged with CT26.CL25 tumor cells and 96% rejected the rechallenge while the CT26.CL25 cured mice did not reject a CT26 WT tumor cell challenge. Experiments with mice bearing two CT26.CL25 tumors (one

  14. Murine Anorectic Response to Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin) Is Sex-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erica S.; Flannery, Brenna M.; Pestka, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin), a common trichothecene mycotoxin found in cereal foods, dysregulates immune function and maintenance of energy balance. The purpose of this study was to determine if sex differences are similarly evident in DON’s anorectic responses in mice. A bioassay for feed refusal, previously developed by our lab, was used to compare acute i.p. exposures of 1 and 5 mg/kg bw DON in C57BL6 mice. Greater anorectic responses were seen in male than female mice. Male mice had higher organ and plasma concentrations of DON upon acute exposure than their female counterparts. A significant increase in IL-6 plasma levels was also observed in males while cholecystokinin response was higher in females. When effects of sex on food intake and body weight changes were compared after subchronic dietary exposure to 1, 2.5, and 10 ppm DON, males were found again to be more sensitive. Demonstration of male predilection to DON-induced changes in food intake and weight gain might an important consideration in future risk assessment of DON and other trichothecenes. PMID:26230710

  15. Ubiquitination in the Antiviral Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Meredith E.; Gack, Michaela U.

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has long been known to regulate fundamental cellular processes through the induction of proteasomal degradation of target proteins. More recently, ‘atypical’ nondegradative types of polyubiquitin chains have been appreciated as important regulatory moieties by modulating the activity or subcellular localization of key signaling proteins. Intriguingly, many of these non-degradative types of ubiquitination regulate the innate sensing pathways initiated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), ultimately coordinating an effective antiviral immune response. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the functional roles of degradative and atypical types of ubiquitination in innate immunity to viral infections, with a specific focus on the signaling pathways triggered by RIG-I-like receptors, Toll-like receptors, and the intracellular viral DNA sensor cGAS. PMID:25753787

  16. Antitumor activity of a novel small molecule TLR7 agonist via immune response induction and tumor microenvironment modulation.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yuwen; Wang, Xiaodong; Wan, Yanyan; Zhong, Jingjing; Gao, Dong; Liu, Yu; Gao, Ningning; Li, Wang; Liu, Bing; Huang, Xinping; Jin, Zhenchao; Peng, Boya; Wang, Zhulin; Fu, Li; Chen, Siping; Jin, Guangyi

    2016-02-01

    Immunotherapy is emerging as a powerful and active tumor-specific approach against cancer via triggering the immune system. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are fundamental elements of the immune system, which facilitate our understanding of the innate and adaptive immune pathways. TLR agonists used as single agents can effectively eradicate tumors due to their potent stimulation of innate and adaptive immunity. We examined the effects of a novel adenine type of TLR7 agonists on both innate and adaptive immune activation in vitro and in vivo. We established the local and distant tumor‑bearing mice derived from murine mammary carcinoma cell line (4T1) to model metastatic disease. Our data demonstrated that SZU101 was able to stimulate innate immune cells to release cytokines at the very high level compared with LPS at the same or lower concentration. Locally intratumoral SZU101 injection can elicit a systemic antitumor effect on murine breast tumor model. SZU101 affected the frequency of intratumoral immune cell infiltration, including the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ increase, and the ratio of Tregs decrease. Our data reveal that the antitumor effect of SZU101 is associated with multiple mechanisms, inducing tumor‑specific immune response, activation of innate immune cells and modulation of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26718332

  17. Spaceflight and Development of Immune Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1996-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The number of flight experiments has been small, and the full breadth of immunological alterations occurring after space flight remains to be established. Among the major effects on immune responses after space flight that have been reported are: alterations in lymphocyte blastogenesis and natural killer cell activity, alterations in production of cytokines, changes in leukocyte sub-population distribution, and decreases in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors. Changes have been reported in immunological parameters of both humans and rodents. The significance of these alterations in relation to resistance to infection remains to be established. The objective of the studies contained in this project was to determine the effects of space flight on immune responses of pregnant rats and their offspring. The hypothesis was that space flight and the attendant period of microgravity will result in alteration of immunological parameters of both the pregnant rats as well as their offspring carried in utero during the flight. The parameters tested included: production of cytokines, composition of leukocyte sub- populations, response of bone marrow/liver cells to granulocyte/monocyte colony stimulating factor, and leukocyte blastogenesis. Changes in immune responses that could yield alterations in resistance to infection were determined. This yielded useful information for planning studies that could contribute to crew health. Additional information that could eventually prove useful to determine the potential for establishment of a permanent colony in space was obtained.

  18. Epithelial and stromal-specific immune pathway activation in the murine endometrium post-coitum.

    PubMed

    Field, S L; Cummings, M; Orsi, N M

    2015-08-01

    The endometrium is a dynamic tissue, demonstrating cyclical growth/remodelling in preparation for implantation. In mice, seminal constituents trigger mechanisms to prepare the endometrium, a process dubbed 'seminal priming' that modifies immune system components and mediates endometrial remodelling in preparation for pregnancy. An array of cytokines has been reported to mediate this interaction, although much of the literature relates to in vitro studies on isolated endometrial epithelial cells. This study measured changes in immune-related gene expression in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells in vivo following natural mating. CD1 mice were naturally mated and sacrificed over the first 4 days post-coitum (n=3 each day). Endometrial epithelial and stromal compartments were isolated by laser capture microdissection. Labelled cRNA was generated and hybridised to genome-wide expression microarrays. Pathway analysis identified several immune-related pathways active within epithelial and stromal compartments, in particular relating to cytokine networks, matrix metalloproteinases and prostaglandin synthesis. Cluster analysis demonstrated that the expression of factors involved in immunomodulation/endometrial remodelling differed between the epithelial and stromal compartments in a temporal fashion. This study is the first to examine the disparate responses of the endometrial epithelial and stromal compartments to seminal plasma in vivo in mice, and demonstrates the complexity of the interactions between these two compartments needed to create a permissive environment for implantation. PMID:26015594

  19. Anti-tumor immunity generated by photodynamic therapy in a metastatic murine tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a modality for the treatment of cancer involving excitation of photosensitizers with harmless visible light producing reactive oxygen species. The major biological effects of PDT are apoptosis of tumor cells, destruction of the blood supply and activation of the immune system. The objective of this study is to compare in an animal model of metastatic cancer, PDT alone and PDT combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY). Since the tumor we used is highly metastatic, it is necessary to generate anti-tumor immunity using PDT to both cure the primary tumor and prevent death from metastasis. This immunity may be potentiated by low dose CY. In our model we used J774 cells (a Balb/c reticulum cell sarcoma line with the characteristics of macrophages) and the following PDT regimen: benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD, 2mg/kg injected IV followed after 15 min by 150 J/cm2 of 690-nm light). CY (50 mg/kg i.p.) was injected 48 hours before light delivery. BPD-PDT led to complete regression of the primary tumor in more than half the mice but no permanent cures were obtained. BPD-PDT in combination with CY led to 60% permanent cures. CY alone gave no permanent cures but did provide a survival advantage. To probe permanent immunity cured animals were rechallenged with the same tumor cell line and the tumors were rejected in 71% of mice cured with BPD-PDT plus CY. We conclude that BPD-PDT in combination with CY gives best overall results and that this is attributable to immunological response activation in addition to PDT-mediated destruction of the tumor.

  20. Antibody-mediated immune suppression of erythrocyte alloimmunization can occur independently from red cell clearance or epitope masking in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Honghui; Stowell, Sean R; Bernardo, Lidice; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Zimring, James C; Amash, Alaa; Uchikawa, Makoto; Lazarus, Alan H

    2014-09-15

    Anti-D can prevent immunization to the RhD Ag on RBCs, a phenomenon commonly termed Ab-mediated immune suppression (AMIS). The most accepted theory to explain this effect has been the rapid clearance of RBCs. In mouse models using SRBC, these xenogeneic cells are always rapidly cleared even without Ab, and involvement of epitope masking of the SRBC Ags by the AMIS-inducing Ab (anti-SRBC) has been suggested. To address these hypotheses, we immunized mice with murine transgenic RBCs expressing the HOD Ag (hen egg lysozyme [HEL], in sequence with ovalbumin, and the human Duffy transmembrane protein) in the presence of polyclonal Abs or mAbs to the HOD molecule. The isotype, specificity, and ability to induce AMIS of these Abs were compared with accelerated clearance as well as steric hindrance of the HOD Ag. Mice made IgM and IgG reactive with the HEL portion of the molecule only. All six of the mAbs could inhibit the response. The HEL-specific Abs (4B7, IgG1; GD7, IgG2b; 2F4, IgG1) did not accelerate clearance of the HOD-RBCs and displayed partial epitope masking. The Duffy-specific Abs (MIMA 29, IgG2a; CBC-512, IgG1; K6, IgG1) all caused rapid clearance of HOD RBCs without steric hindrance. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of AMIS to erythrocytes in an all-murine model and shows that AMIS can occur in the absence of RBC clearance or epitope masking. The AMIS effect was also independent of IgG isotype and epitope specificity of the AMIS-inducing Ab. PMID:25122924

  1. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Gössl, Dorothée; Schmidt, Alexandra; Niedermayer, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Endres, Stefan; Bein, Thomas; Bourquin, Carole

    2016-01-14

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1β. In contrast, when surface-functionalized MSN with a pH-responsive polymer capping were loaded with an immune-activating drug, the synthetic Toll-like receptor 7 agonist R848, a strong immune response was provoked. We thus demonstrate that MSN represent an efficient drug delivery vehicle to primary immune cells that is both non-toxic and non-inflammagenic, which is a prerequisite for the use of these particles in biomedical applications. PMID:26659601

  2. Immunogenicity of murine solid tumor models as a defining feature of in vivo behavior and response to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Karimi, Saman S; Barry-Holson, Keegan; Angell, Trevor E; Murphy, Katherine A; Church, Connor H; Ohlfest, John R; Hu, Peisheng; Epstein, Alan L

    2013-01-01

    Immune profiling has been widely used to probe mechanisms of immune escape in cancer and identify novel targets for therapy. Two emerging uses of immune signatures are to identify likely responders to immunotherapy regimens among individuals with cancer and to understand the variable responses seen among subjects with cancer in immunotherapy trials. Here, the immune profiles of 6 murine solid tumor models (CT26, 4T1, MAD109, RENCA, LLC, and B16) were correlated to tumor regression and survival in response to 2 immunotherapy regimens. Comprehensive profiles for each model were generated using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry techniques, as well as functional studies of suppressor cell populations (regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells), to analyze intratumoral and draining lymphoid tissues. Tumors were stratified as highly or poorly immunogenic, with highly immunogenic tumors showing a significantly greater presence of T-cell costimulatory molecules and immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. An absence of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes and mature dendritic cells was seen across all models. Delayed tumor growth and increased survival with suppressor cell inhibition and tumor-targeted chemokine+/-dendritic cells vaccine immunotherapy were associated with high tumor immunogenicity in these models. Tumor MHC class I expression correlated with the overall tumor immunogenicity level and was a singular marker to predict immunotherapy response with these regimens. By using experimental tumor models as surrogates for human cancers, these studies demonstrate how select features of an immune profile may be utilized to identify patients most likely to respond to immunotherapy regimens. PMID:24145359

  3. Monitoring Regulatory Immune Responses in Tumor Immunotherapy Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Brian M.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2013-01-01

    While immune monitoring of tumor immunotherapy often focuses on the generation of productive Th1-type inflammatory immune responses, the importance of regulatory immune responses is often overlooked, despite the well-documented effects of regulatory immune responses in suppressing anti-tumor immunity. In a variety of malignancies, the frequency of regulatory cell populations has been shown to correlate with disease progression and a poor prognosis, further emphasizing the importance of characterizing the effects of immunotherapy on these populations. This review focuses on the role of suppressive immune populations (regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and tumor-associated macrophages) in inhibiting anti-tumor immunity, how these populations have been used in the immune monitoring of clinical trials, the prognostic value of these responses, and how the monitoring of these regulatory responses can be improved in the future. PMID:23653893

  4. Compartmentalization of Immune Responses in Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Sayma; Gudetta, Berhanu; Fink, Joshua; Granath, Anna; Ashenafi, Senait; Aseffa, Abraham; Derbew, Milliard; Svensson, Mattias; Andersson, Jan; Brighenti, Susanna Grundström

    2009-01-01

    Immune responses were assessed at the single-cell level in lymph nodes from children with tuberculous lymphadenitis. Tuberculosis infection was associated with tissue remodeling of lymph nodes as well as altered cellular composition. Granulomas were significantly enriched with CD68+ macrophages expressing the M. tuberculosis complex-specific protein antigen MPT64 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. There was a significant increase in CD8+ cytolytic T cells surrounding the granuloma; however, CD8+ T cells expressed low levels of the cytolytic and antimicrobial effector molecules perforin and granulysin in the granulomatous lesions. Quantitative real-time mRNA analysis revealed that interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17 were not up-regulated in infected lymph nodes, but there was a significant induction of both transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-13. In addition, granulomas contained an increased number of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells co-expressing the immunoregulatory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor molecules. Low numbers of CD8+ T cells in the lesions correlated with high levels of transforming growth factor-β and FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, suggesting active immunosuppression at the local infection site. Compartmentalization and skewing of the immune response toward a regulatory phenotype may result in an uncoordinated effector T-cell response that reduces granule-mediated killing of M. tuberculosis-infected cells and subsequent disease control. PMID:19435796

  5. Immunomodulatory and Antioxidant Effects of Purple Sweet Potato Extract in LP-BM5 Murine Leukemia Virus-Induced Murine Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok-Kyung; Nam, Da-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Baek, Sun Jung; Jun, Woojin; Lee, Jeongmin

    2015-08-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of a dietary supplement of purple sweet potato extract (PSPE) in LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-induced immune-deficient mice were investigated. Mice were divided into six groups: normal control, infected control (LP-BM5 MuLV infection), positive control (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of red ginseng 300 mg/kg), purple sweet potato water extract (PSPWE) (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of PSPE 300 mg/kg), PSP10EE (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of 10% ethanol PSPE 300 mg/kg), and PSP80EE (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of 80% ethanol PSPE 300 mg/kg). Dietary supplementation began on the day of LP-BM5 MuLV infection and continued for 12 weeks. Dietary supplementation of PSPE inhibited LP-BM5 MuLV-induced splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy and attenuated the suppression of T- and B-cell proliferation and T helper 1/T helper 2 cytokine imbalance in LP-BM5 MuLV-infected mice. Dietary supplement of PSPE increased the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The data suggest that PSPE may ameliorate immune dysfunction due to LP-BM5 MuLV infection by modulating antioxidant defense systems. PMID:26076116

  6. Immune Response of Amebiasis and Immune Evasion by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of amebiasis. It is estimated approximately 1% of humans are infected with E. histolytica, resulting in an estimate of 100,000 deaths annually. Clinical manifestations of amebic infection range widely from asymptomatic to severe symptoms, including dysentery and extra-intestinal abscesses. Like other infectious diseases, it is assumed that only ~20% of infected individuals develop symptoms, and genetic factors of both the parasite and humans as well as the environmental factors, e.g., microbiota, determine outcome of infection. There are multiple essential steps in amebic infection: degradation of and invasion into the mucosal layer, adherence to the intestinal epithelium, invasion into the tissues, and dissemination to other organs. While the mechanisms of invasion and destruction of the host tissues by the amebae during infection have been elucidated at the molecular levels, it remains largely uncharacterized how the parasite survive in the host by evading and attacking host immune system. Recently, the strategies for immune evasion by the parasite have been unraveled, including immunomodulation to suppress IFN-γ production, elimination of immune cells and soluble immune mediators, and metabolic alterations against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to fend off the attack from immune system. In this review, we summarized the latest knowledge on immune reaction and immune evasion during amebiasis. PMID:27242782

  7. Immune Response of Amebiasis and Immune Evasion by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of amebiasis. It is estimated approximately 1% of humans are infected with E. histolytica, resulting in an estimate of 100,000 deaths annually. Clinical manifestations of amebic infection range widely from asymptomatic to severe symptoms, including dysentery and extra-intestinal abscesses. Like other infectious diseases, it is assumed that only ~20% of infected individuals develop symptoms, and genetic factors of both the parasite and humans as well as the environmental factors, e.g., microbiota, determine outcome of infection. There are multiple essential steps in amebic infection: degradation of and invasion into the mucosal layer, adherence to the intestinal epithelium, invasion into the tissues, and dissemination to other organs. While the mechanisms of invasion and destruction of the host tissues by the amebae during infection have been elucidated at the molecular levels, it remains largely uncharacterized how the parasite survive in the host by evading and attacking host immune system. Recently, the strategies for immune evasion by the parasite have been unraveled, including immunomodulation to suppress IFN-γ production, elimination of immune cells and soluble immune mediators, and metabolic alterations against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to fend off the attack from immune system. In this review, we summarized the latest knowledge on immune reaction and immune evasion during amebiasis. PMID:27242782

  8. Dissociation of Innate Immune Responses in Microglia Infected with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Fernandez-Prieto, Lorena; Calderon-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Del Río, Estela; Yañez-Diaz, Sonsoles; López-Fanarraga, Monica; Alvarez-Domínguez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, plays a central role in cerebral listeriosis. Here, we present evidence that microglia control Listeria infection differently than macrophages. Infection of primary microglial cultures and murine cell lines with Listeria resulted in a dual function of the two gene expression programmes involved in early and late immune responses in macrophages. Whereas the bacterial gene hly seems responsible for both transcriptional programmes in macrophages, Listeria induces in microglia only the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-regulated transcriptional programme. Listeria also represses in microglia the late immune response gathered in two clusters, microbial degradation, and interferon (IFN)-inducible genes. The bacterial gene actA was required in microglia to induce TNF-regulated responses and to repress the late response. Isolation of microglial phagosomes revealed a phagosomal environment unable to destroy Listeria. Microglial phagosomes were also defective in several signaling and trafficking components reported as relevant for Listeria innate immune responses. This transcriptional strategy in microglia induced high levels of TNF-α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and low production of other neurotoxic compounds such as nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, and Type I IFNs. These cytokines and toxic microglial products are also released by primary microglia, and this cytokine and chemokine cocktail display a low potential to trigger neuronal apoptosis. This overall bacterial strategy strongly suggests that microglia limit Listeria inflammation pattern exclusively through TNF-mediated responses to preserve brain integrity. GLIA 2014;62:233–246 PMID:24311463

  9. Dissociation of innate immune responses in microglia infected with Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Fernandez-Prieto, Lorena; Calderon-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Del Río, Estela; Yañez-Diaz, Sonsoles; López-Fanarraga, Monica; Alvarez-Domínguez, Carmen

    2014-02-01

    Microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, plays a central role in cerebral listeriosis. Here, we present evidence that microglia control Listeria infection differently than macrophages. Infection of primary microglial cultures and murine cell lines with Listeria resulted in a dual function of the two gene expression programmes involved in early and late immune responses in macrophages. Whereas the bacterial gene hly seems responsible for both transcriptional programmes in macrophages, Listeria induces in microglia only the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-regulated transcriptional programme. Listeria also represses in microglia the late immune response gathered in two clusters, microbial degradation, and interferon (IFN)-inducible genes. The bacterial gene actA was required in microglia to induce TNF-regulated responses and to repress the late response. Isolation of microglial phagosomes revealed a phagosomal environment unable to destroy Listeria. Microglial phagosomes were also defective in several signaling and trafficking components reported as relevant for Listeria innate immune responses. This transcriptional strategy in microglia induced high levels of TNF-α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and low production of other neurotoxic compounds such as nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, and Type I IFNs. These cytokines and toxic microglial products are also released by primary microglia, and this cytokine and chemokine cocktail display a low potential to trigger neuronal apoptosis. This overall bacterial strategy strongly suggests that microglia limit Listeria inflammation pattern exclusively through TNF-mediated responses to preserve brain integrity. PMID:24311463

  10. Precision Immunization: NASA Studies Immune Response to Flu Vaccine

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Human Research Program Twins Study investigator Emmanuel Mignot, M.D., Ph.D, known for discovering the cause of narcolepsy is related to the immune system, is studying twin astronauts Scott an...