Science.gov

Sample records for murine sarcoma virus

  1. Harvey Sarcoma Virus: A Second Murine Type C Sarcoma Virus with Rat Genetic Information

    PubMed Central

    Scolnick, Edward M.; Parks, Wade P.

    1974-01-01

    The nucleic acid sequences found in the Harvey strain of murine sarcoma virus have been analyzed by RNA·[3H]DNA and [3H]RNA·DNA hybridization techniques. The Harvey strain of murine sarcoma virus has been found to possess at least two sets of nucleic acid sequences. One set of sequences is contained in the Moloney strain of mouse type-C virus, and the other set is contained in DNA transcripts synthesized in endogenous reactions containing rat type-C virus(es). The nucleic acid sequences that are detected in the Harvey sarcoma virus with the DNA probes synthesized from the rat type-C virus(es) are related to the rat sequences detected in the Kirsten strain of murine sarcoma virus. The results support the model that both Kirsten and Harvey sarcoma viruses arose through a process of recombination or reassortment between mouse type-C viruses and sequences in rat cells and suggest that the information for transformation of fibroblasts may be contained in the rat type-C or cellular genome. PMID:4364897

  2. Transformation of rat liver cells with chicken sarcoma virus B77 and murine sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Altaner, C; Hlavayova, E

    1973-02-01

    Rat liver cells in vitro were transformed with chicken sarcoma virus B77, giving RL(B77) cells, and with murine sarcoma virus (Harvey), giving RL(MSV) cells. Rat liver cells transformed spontaneously in vitro were designated RL cells. In addition, the RL(MSV) cell line was adapted for growth in culture fluid containing 25 mug of 5-bromodeoxyuridine per ml. All cell lines were tumorigenic in 1-wk-old rats. The number of cells needed for induction of tumor growth was 1,000-fold higher in the case of RL(B77) cells in comparison with RL(MSV) cells and RL cells. No production of viral particles from any of the cell lines investigated was detected by plating concentrated supernatant fluid of the cultures on different secondary embryo cells with and without fusion by Sendai virus, by labeling with uridine-5-(3)H, or by assay for deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase activity. The viral genome was rescued by fusion of RL(B77) cells with chicken cells. Chicken sarcoma virus rescued from (RL(B77) cells differed in plating efficiency on duck cells from B77 virus rescued from transformed rat embryo cells. No virus was rescued after fusion of RL(MSV) and RL cells with mouse, rat, or chicken embryo cells. Infectious murine sarcoma virus can be induced by 5-bromodeoxyuridine from RL(MSV) cells. PMID:4347422

  3. Replication of the Moloney murine sarcoma-leukemia virus in XC cells.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, S T; Benyesh-Melnick, M; Biswal, N

    1973-01-01

    The XC rat cell line was found to support the replication of a strain of the Moloney murine sarcoma-leukemia virus. In growth curve experiments cytopathology was paralleled by the production of murine sarcoma virus and leukemia virus progeny having the biologic, antigenic, and biophysical properties of the infecting virus. PMID:4346280

  4. Comparative study of different isolates of murine sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, D J; Sharp, P A; Weinberg, R A

    1979-01-01

    The RNA genomes of a variety of murine sarcoma viruses (MSV) were compared by heteroduplex analysis. These viruses included the Moloney-derived isolates 124-MSV, m1-MSV, m3-MSV, HT1-MSV, and NP-MSV and also two independent isolates, Gazdar MSV and 1712-MSV. All of these viral genomes exhibited the acquired cellular sequences previously identified in 3124-MSV and thought to be responsible for transformation and sarcomagenesis. The location of the acquired cellular sequences within the envelope gene was variable in different MSV isolates, suggesting that the cellular sequences can be expressed in different positions relative to murine leukemia virus-derived information present in MSV. Deletions in the gag coding region of the different MSVs were consistent with their known gag-related gene products. Based on several features of the hetero-duplex analysis and the known genealogical relationships of the different MSVs, various possible mechanisms for the formation of MSV are considered. Images PMID:229256

  5. Genomic complexities of murine leukemia and sarcoma, reticuloendotheliosis, and visna viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Beemon, K L; Faras, A J; Hasse, A T; Duesberg, P H; Maisel, J E

    1976-01-01

    The genetic complexities of several ribodeoxyviruses were measured by quantitative analysis of unique RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides from 60-70S viral RNAs. Moloney murine leukemia virus was found to have an RNA complexity of 3.5 x 10(6) daltons, whereas Moloney murine sarcoma virus had a significantly smaller genome size of 2.3 x 10(6). Reticuleondotheliosis and visna virus RNAs had complexities of 3.9 x 10(6), respectively. Analysis of RNase A-resistant oligonucleotides of Rous sarcoma virus RNA gave a complexity of 3.6 x 10(6), similar to that previously obtained with RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides. Since each of these viruses was found to have a unique sequence genomic complexity near the molecular weight of a single 30-40S viral RNA subunit, it was concluded that ribodeoxyvirus genomes are at least largely polyploid. Images PMID:176429

  6. Enhanced transformation by a simian virus 40 recombinant virus containing a Harvey murine sarcoma virus long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Kriegler, M; Botchan, M

    1983-01-01

    We have constructed a recombinant simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA containing a copy of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus long terminal repeat (LTR). This recombinant viral DNA was converted into an infectious SV40 virus particle and subsequently infected into NIH 3T3 cells (either uninfected or previously infected with Moloney leukemia virus). We found that this hybrid virus, SVLTR1, transforms cells with 10 to 20 times the efficiency of SV40 wild type. Southern blot analysis of these transformed cell genomic DNAs revealed that simple integration of the viral DNA within the retrovirus LTR cannot account for the enhanced transformation of the recombinant virus. A restriction fragment derived from the SVLTR-1 virus which contains an intact LTR was readily identified in a majority of the transformed cell DNAs. These results suggest that the LTR fragment which contains the attachment sites and flanking sequences for the proviral DNA duplex may be insufficient by itself to facilitate correct retrovirus integration and that some other functional element of the LTR is responsible for the increased transformation potential of this virus. We have found that a complete copy of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus LTR linked to well-defined structural genes lacking their own promoters (SV40 early region, thymidine kinase, and G418 resistance) can be effectively used to promote marker gene expression. To determine which element of the LTR served to enhance the biological activity of the recombinant virus described above, we deleted DNA sequences essential for promoter activity within the LTR. SV40 virus stocks reconstructed with this mutated copy of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus LTR still transform mouse cells at an enhanced frequency. We speculate that when the LTR is placed more than 1.5 kilobases from the SV40 early promoter, the cis-acting enhancer element within the LTR can increase the ability of the SV40 promoter to effectively operate when integrated in a murine chromosome

  7. Rat sequences of the Kirsten and Harvey murine sarcoma virus genomes: nature, origin, and expression in rat tumor RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G R; Robbins, K C

    1976-01-01

    Two murine sarcoma viruses, the Kirsten and the Harvey, were isolated by passage of mouse type C leukemia viruses through rats. These sarcoma viruses have genomes containing portions of their parental type C mouse leukemia virus genomes, in stable association with specific rat cellular sequences that we find to be quite likely not those of a rat type C leukemia virus. To determine if these murine sarcoma viruses provide a model relevant to the events occurring in spontaneous tumors, we have hybridized DNA and RNA prepared from rat tumors and normal rat tissues to [3H]DNA prepared from the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. We have also hybridized these rat tissue nucleic acids to [3H]DNA prepared from a respresentative endogenous rat type C leukemia virus, the WFU (Wistar-Furth). Sarcoma-viral rat cellular sequences and endogenous rat leukemia viral sequences were detected in the DNA of both tumor and normal tissues, with no evidence of either gene amplification or additional sequences being present in tumor DNA. Sarcoma-viral rat cellular sequences and endogenous rat leukemia viral sequences were detected at elevated concentrations in the RNA of many rat tumors and in specific groups of normal tissues. PMID:176419

  8. Development and analysis of a transformation-defective mutant of Harvey murine sarcoma tk virus and its gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, M O; Hager, G L; Lowe, R; Scolnick, E M

    1985-01-01

    The Harvey murine sarcoma virus has been cloned and induces focus formation on NIH 3T3 cells. Recombinants of this virus have been constructed which include the thymidine kinase gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 in a downstream linkage with the p21 ras gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus. Harvey murine sarcoma tk virus rescued from cells transfected with this construct is both thymidine kinase positive and focus inducing in in vitro transmission studies. The hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine selectability of the thymidine kinase gene carried by this virus has been exploited to develop three mutants defective in the p21 ras sequence. All three are focus negative and thymidine kinase positive when transmitted to suitable cells. Of these, only one encodes a p22 that is immunologically related to p21. This mutant has been used to explore the relationship between the known characteristics of p21 and cellular transformation. Data presented herein indicate that the p21 of Harvey murine sarcoma virus consists of at least two domains, one which specifies the guanine nucleotide-binding activity of p21 and the other which is involved in p21-membrane association in transformed cells. Images PMID:2985821

  9. Virus-Specific Messenger RNA and Nascent Polypeptides in Polyribosomes of Cells Replicating Murine Sarcoma-Leukemia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, G.; Tsuchida, N.; Shanmugam, G.; Green, M.

    1973-01-01

    We present evidence that virus-specific RNA is present in polyribosomes of transformed cells replicating the murine sarcoma-leukemia virus complex and that it serves as messenger RNA for the synthesis of viral-coded proteins. Both virus-specific RNA (detected by hybridization with the [3H]DNA product of the viral RNA-directed DNA polymerase) and nascent viral polypeptides (measured by precipitation with antiserum to purified virus) were found in membrane-bound and free polyribosomes. Membrane-bound polyribosomes contained a higher content of both virus-specific RNA and nascent viral polypeptides. From 60 to 70% of viral RNA sequences were released from polyribosomes with EDTA, consistent with a function as messenger RNA. Maximum amounts of both virus-specific RNA and nascent viral polypeptides were found in the polyribosome region sedimenting at about 350 S. PMID:4352969

  10. Recombinational junctions of variants of Moloney murine sarcoma virus: generation and divergence of a mammalian transforming gene.

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, D J; Hunter, T

    1983-01-01

    Different variants of Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MSV) were examined by nucleotide sequencing to compare the junctions between the acquired cellular sequence, v-mos, and the adjacent virus-derived sequences. These variants included 124-MSV, m1-MSV, and HT1-MSV and also the purportedly independent isolate Gazdar MSV. These four strains have an identical 5' junction between the murine leukemia virus env gene and the v-mos gene. This junction lies within the sixth codon of the chimeric env-mos coding region that encodes the transforming gene product. In contrast, at the 3' junction between the v-mos gene and the murine leukemia virus env gene, the three variants examined here were all different. A small deletion was found in the COOH-terminal portion of the m1-MSV env-mos coding region, indicating that the COOH terminus of this transforming gene product must be different from that of 124-MSV or HT1-MSV. The data presented here are consistent with the thesis that a virus closely related to HT1-MSV was the primordial Moloney MSV, and that all other related strains evolved from it by deletion or rearrangement. The variability observed in the Moloney MSV family is discussed in terms of possible mechanisms for the initial capture of mos sequences by the parental retrovirus and also in comparison with other transforming retrovirus families, such as Abelson murine leukemia virus and Rous sarcoma virus. PMID:6300424

  11. In vitro differentiation of rhabdomyosarcomas induced by nickel or by Moloney murine sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, P.; Azzarello, G.; Tessarollo, L.; De Giovanni, C.; Lollini, P. L.; Nicoletti, G.; Scotlandi, K.; Landuzzi, L.; Panozzo, M.; D'Andrea, E.

    1991-01-01

    In vitro cultures and clonal derivatives have been established from rat rhabdomyosarcomas induced by Moloney-Murine Sarcoma Virus (MSV) or by nickel sulfide; differentiation ability has been studied as expression of desmin, embryonic and adult myosin isoforms, alpha-actin isoforms and cellular fusion. The two rhabdomyosarcoma models showed different levels of myogenic differentiation. Multinucleated myotube-like structures were frequently observed in cultures derived from nickel-induced tumours. Desmin was present in 50-80% of cells and embryonic myosin in up to 10%. In MSV-tumour-derived cultures and in their metastases or clonal derivatives two cell types are present in different ratios: spindle-shaped cells, adherent to plastic surfaces, and rounded cells, loosely attached or floating free in the medium. These cultures showed features of myogenic differentiation (10-80% desmin-positive cells), but embryonic myosin expression and production of multinucleated myotube-like structures were very rare events. Cultures from autochthonous lymph node and lung metastatic cells showed similar patterns of differentiation. Retinoic acid increased differentiated features (myotube formation and embryonic myosin expression) only in nickel-induced rhabdomyosarcoma cells. The two models described here mimic the heterogeneity in differentiation pattern found among human rhabdomyosarcomas. Myogenic differentiation ability was retained at a good level by nickel-induced tumours, whereas it was strongly impaired in MSV-induced tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2039698

  12. Immunization against primary, transplanted and spontaneous murine leukaemia using a live Moloney sarcoma virus vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, A. M.; Basombrio, M. A.; Pasqualini, C. D.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an immunization protocol with Moloney sarcoma virus (MSV-M) as active immunogen against exogenous and endogenous leukaemia. The s.c. route was chosen since it offered advantages over the i.m. route: the primary sarcomas were smaller, the regression faster, there were fewer recurrences and there was good persistent immunity. Strong protection was obtained against primary leukaemias induced by Friend leukaemia virus (FLV), Moloney leukaemia virus (MLV), Rauscher leukaemia virus (RLV), Precerutti-Law leukaemia virus (PLLV/T2), and H179A leukaemia virus. It was not possible to protect against leukaemia induced by Gross leukaemia virus (GLV). With transplantable leukaemias the results varied: partial protection was observed against H110 leukaemia (induced with human material) and R14 leukaemia (induced by X-irradiation) whilst no protection was obtained against P277 leukaemia (induced by Moloney leukaemia virus). As for spontaneous leukaemias, immunized BALB/c mice showed an increased incidence over the controls, while in F1 (Swiss x AKR) mice the incidence was similar but the latent period was shorter. Furthermore, in long-term observations the MSV-M-immunized mice showed an increased mortaltiy, which could be related to (1) new phenotypic mixtures between MSV-M and leukaemia viruses; (2) reactivation of MSV-M sarcoma-genesis with age, and (3) genotype susceptibility to MSV-M. PMID:6252923

  13. Human DNA sequence homologous to the transforming gene (mos) of Moloney murine sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, R; Oskarsson, M; Vande Woude, G F

    1982-01-01

    We describe the molecular cloning of a 9-kilo-base-pair BamHI fragment from human placental DNA containing a sequence homologous to the transforming gene (v-mos) of Moloney murine sarcoma virus. The DNA sequence of the homologous region of human DNA (termed humos) was resolved and compared to that of the mouse cellular homolog of v-mos (termed mumos) [Van Beveren, C., van Straaten, F., Galleshaw, J.A. & Verma, I.M. (1981) Cell 27, 97-108]. The humos gene contained an open reading frame of 346 codons that was aligned with the equivalent mumos DNA sequence by the introduction of two gaps of 15 and 3 bases into the mumos DNA and a single gap of 9 bases into the humos DNA. The aligned coding sequences were 77% homologous and terminated at equivalent opal codons. The humos open reading frame initiated at an ATG found internally in the mumos coding sequence. The polypeptides predicted from the DNA sequence to be encoded by humos and mumos also were found to be extensively homologous, and 253 of 337 amino acids were shared between the two polypeptides. The first five NH2-terminal and last two COOH-terminal amino acids of the humos gene product were in common with those of mumos. In addition, near the middle of the polypeptide chains, four regions ranging from 19 to 26 consecutive amino acids were conserved. However, we have not been able to transform mouse cells with transfected humos DNA fragments or with hybrid DNA recombinants containing humos and retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences. Images PMID:6287464

  14. Demonstration of biological activity and nucleotide sequence of an in vitro synthesized clone of the Moloney murine sarcoma virus mos gene.

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, D J

    1982-01-01

    A clone of the Moloney murine sarcoma virus mos gene derived by in vitro reverse transcription was characterized. When assayed for focus formation by DNA transfection on NIH/3T3 cells, this clone was biologically inactive, presumably due to the absence of a long terminal repeat sequence. Therefore, a long terminal repeat was inserted into the clone by in vitro recombination, after which the most gene was able to transform NIH/3T3 cells efficiently. The nucleotide sequence encompassing the transforming region of this clone was determined. A single long open reading frame was observed, which potentially encodes a polypeptide of 41,000 daltons. This open reading frame initiates with the first five amino acids of the murine leukemia virus env gene, after which it enters the mos sequence, where it terminates. The nucleotide sequence described in this paper was compared with other sequences of mos in an effort to resolve discrepancies in the position of the long open reading frame. Although Moloney murine sarcoma virus retains the 3' splicing site of the murine leukemia virus env gene, a mos-specific mRNA which corresponds structurally to the murine leukemia virus env mRNA was not identified. The sequence described here revealed a single nucleotide change in the proposed env gene 3' splicing site which was retained in Moloney murine sarcoma virus. This deviation from the consensus 3' splicing sequence may underlie the observed absence of mos expression via the env gene splicing pathway. Images PMID:7045395

  15. Oncolytic HSV virotherapy in murine sarcomas differentially triggers an antitumor T-cell response in the absence of virus permissivity

    PubMed Central

    Leddon, Jennifer L; Chen, Chun-Yu; Currier, Mark A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Jung, Francesca A; Denton, Nicholas L; Cripe, Kevin M; Haworth, Kellie B; Arnold, Michael A; Gross, Amy C; Eubank, Timothy D; Goins, William F; Glorioso, Joseph C; Cohen, Justus B; Grandi, Paola; Hildeman, David A; Cripe, Timothy P

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have indicated that in addition to direct oncolysis, virotherapy promotes an antitumor cytotoxic T cell response important for efficacy. To study this phenomenon further, we tested three syngeneic murine sarcoma models that displayed varied degrees of permissiveness to oncolytic herpes simplex virus replication and cytotoxicity in vitro, with the most permissive being comparable to some human sarcoma tumor lines. The in vivo antitumor effect ranged from no or modest response to complete tumor regression and protection from tumor rechallenge. The in vitro permissiveness to viral oncolysis was not predictive of the in vivo antitumor effect, as all three tumors showed intact interferon signaling and minimal permissiveness to virus in vivo. Tumor shrinkage was T-cell mediated with a tumor-specific antigen response required for maximal antitumor activity. Further analysis of the innate and adaptive immune microenvironment revealed potential correlates of susceptibility and resistance, including favorable and unfavorable cytokine profiles, differential composition of intratumoral myeloid cells, and baseline differences in tumor cell immunogenicity and tumor-infiltrating T-cell subsets. It is likely that a more complete understanding of the interplay between the immunologic immune microenvironment and virus infection will be necessary to fully leverage the antitumor effects of this therapeutic platform. PMID:27119100

  16. The malignant histiocytosis sarcoma virus, a recombinant of Harvey murine sarcoma virus and Friend mink cell focus-forming virus, has acquired myeloid transformation specificity by alterations in the long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Friel, J; Hughes, D; Pragnell, I; Stocking, C; Laker, C; Nowock, J; Ostertag, W; Padua, R A

    1990-01-01

    The malignant histiocytosis sarcoma virus (MHSV), in contrast to other viruses with the ras oncogene, induces acute histiocytosis in newborn and adult mice. Molecular structure and function studies were initiated to determine the basis of its unique macrophage-transforming potential. Characterization of the genomic structure showed that the virus evolved by recombination of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus (Ha-MuSV) and a virus of the Friend-mink cell focus-forming virus family. Structural analysis of MHSV showed two regions of the genome that are basically different from the Ha-MuSV: (i) the ras gene, which is altered by a point mutation in codon 181 leading to a Cys----Ser substitution of the p21 protein, and (ii) the U3 region of the long terminal repeat, which is largely derived from F-MCFV and contains a deletion of one direct repeat as well as a duplication of an altered enhancer-like region. Biological studies of Ha-MuSV, MHSV, and recombinants between the two viruses show that the U3 region of the MHSV long terminal repeat is essential for the malignancy and specificity of the disease. A contributing role of the ras point mutation in determining macrophage specificity, however, cannot be excluded. Images PMID:2152823

  17. Frequent site-specific deletion of coliphage lambda murine sarcoma virus recombinants and its use in the identification of a retrovirus integration site.

    PubMed Central

    McClements, W L; Enquist, L W; Oskarsson, M; Sullivan, M; Vande Woude, G F

    1980-01-01

    Stocks of hybrid lambda phages carrying the complete integrated provirus of either m1 or HT1 Moloney murine sarcoma virus, as well as flanking host sequences, frequently contain significant numbers of phages carrying a specific deletion. This deletion arises from a recombination event between the terminally repeated sequences in the provirus that deletes the unique Moloney murine sarcoma virus sequences bracketed by the terminally repeated sequences. Physical mapping has shown that the deletion phage retains one complete copy of the terminally repeated sequence and the flanking mink host sequences. One such deletion, lambdaHT1r+, was used to characterize a mink genomic DNA sequence that contains an HT1 Moloney murine sarcoma virus integration site. This integration site sequence from normal mink cells was also cloned into phage lambda. An analysis of the heteroduplexes between the integration site and the lambdaHT1r+ deletion indicated that no major rearrangement of host sequences occurred upon integration of the Moloney murine sarcoma provirus. Images PMID:6255187

  18. Tumour-Associated Transplantation Antigens of Neoplasms Induced by a Naturally Occurring Murine Sarcoma Virus (FBJ-MSV)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David B.; Moore, Michael

    1973-01-01

    FBJ osteosarcoma virus (FBJ-MSV) isolated originally from a spontaneously arising osteosarcoma in a CF1 mouse is the only known naturally occurring murine sarcoma virus (MSV). It is unique among strains of MSV in producing primarily sarcomata in mice. The capacity of tumour cells transformed in vivo by this agent to elicit specific transplantation immunity in syngeneic hosts was investigated. A low level of resistance (104-105 cells) was consistently induced by implantation of x-irradiated (15,000 rad) tumours or surgical excision of developing subcutaneous grafts. By contrast intraperitoneal inoculation of virus containing cellfree extracts of FBJ-MSV sarcomata was a far less effective immunization procedure. Confirmatory evidence for the antigenicity of these neoplasms was obtained in tests in which preincubation of tumour cells with lymphoid cells from specifically immune donors inhibited in vivo outgrowth of the FBJ-MSV cells in untreated syngeneic recipients. The induction of host resistance to FBJ-MSV cells by immunization with identical and independently-induced FBJ-MSV tumours established that FBJ-MSV cells possess common cell surface antigenic specificities in a manner analogous to those of experimental neoplasms induced by other oncogenic DNA and RNA viruses. Since FBJ-MSV cells release infectious virus it was not possible in this system to establish whether the tumour-rejection antigen was cellular or virion in nature. The antigenic weakness of FBJ-MSV cells in syngeneic hosts is comparable with that of virus-induced murine leukaemias of the Gross (G) or “wild” type subgroup to which category FBJ-MSV also belongs. These features suggest that FBJ-MSV exemplifies naturally occurring sarcomagenic viruses more closely than those of the Friend-Moloney-Rauscher-Graffi (FMRGr) subgroup which in general induce highly antigenic neoplasms. PMID:4516007

  19. Monoclonal antibody against IFN-gamma inhibits Moloney murine sarcoma virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zanovello, P.; Vallerani, E.; Biasi, G.; Landolfo, S.; Collavo, D.

    1988-02-15

    The role of autochthonous IFN- production was evaluated in immune reactions to Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV)-induced tumors which are characterized by spontaneous regression mainly caused by virus-specific CTL activity. A functional IFN- depletion, induced by repeated administration of mAb anti-IFN- at the site of virus inoculation, prevented tumor regression in M-MSV-injected mice. Moreover, this antibody inhibited in vitro both proliferation and differentiation of M-MSV-specific T lymphocytes obtained in bulk cultures, but not growth and lytic activity of the already differentiated virus-specific CTL clone CHM-14 stimulated with rIL-2 and relevant tumor Ag. In addition, in mice receiving mAb treatment the frequency of M-MSV-specific CTL precursors, evaluated by means of limiting dilution analysis, was strongly reduced in comparison with that of control mice injected only with virus. Because CTL secrete IFN- following antigenic stimulation, the possibility that non-T effector cells recruited by this lymphokine might mediate tumor regression was also considered. Adoptive immunotherapy experiments, performed in T cell-deficient (Tx + BM) and in sublethally irradiated mice, demonstrated that transfer of CHM-14 CTL clone, which secretes IFN-, was able to counteract M-MSV tumor growth despite the local mAb anti-IFN- treatment which may have prevented host cell recruitment. Moreover, repeated local rIFN- inoculations in Tx + BM mice did not counteract M-MSV tumor progression, thus confirming that other IFN- properties such as non-T cell recruitment, antiviral or anti-proliferative IFN- activities have little or no relevance when M-MSV-specific CTL are lacking. On the whole, these results indicate that in M-MSV-injected mice, tumor enhancement after mAb anti-IFN- treatment is principally caused by impaired differentiation of virus-specific CTL precursors.

  20. Purification and characterization of the DNA polymerase and RNase H activities in Moloney murine sarcoma-leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, G F; Grandgenett, D P

    1975-01-01

    Two RNase H (RNA-DNA hybrid ribonucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.34) activities separable by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration were identified in lysates of Moloney murine sarcoma-leukemia virus (MSV). The larger enzyme, which we have called RNase H-I, represented about 10% of the RNase H activity in the virion. RNase H-I (i) copurified with RNA-directed DNA polymerase from the virus, (ii) had a sedimentation coefficient of 4.4S (corresponds to an apparent mol wt of 70,000), (iii) required Mn-2+ (2 mM optimum) for activity with a [3-h]poly(A)-poly(dT) substrate, (iv) eluted from phosphocellulose at 0.2 M KC1, and (v) degraded [3-H]poly(A)-poly(dT) and [3-H]poly(C)-poly(dG) at approximately equal rates. The smaller enzyme, designated RNase H-II, which represented the majority of the RNase H activity in the virus preparation, was shown to be different since it (i) had no detectable, associated DNA polymerase activity, (ii) had a sedmimentation coefficient of 2.6S (corresponds to an apparent mol wt of 30,000), (iii) preferred Mg-2+ (10 to 15 mM optimum) over Mn-2+ (5 to 10 mM optimum) 2.5-fold for the degradation of [3-H]poly(A)-poly(dT), and (iv) degraded [3-H]poly(A)-poly(dT) 6 and 60 times faster than [3-H]poly(C)-poly(dG) in the presence of Mn-2+ and Mg-2+, respectively. Moloney MSV DNA polymerase (RNase H-I), purified by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration followed by phosphocellulose, poly(A)-oligo(dT)-cellulose, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography, transcribed heteropolymeric regions of avian myeloblastosis virus 70S RNA at a rate comparable to avian myeloblastosis virus DNA polymerase purified by the same procedure. PMID:46924

  1. Characterization of hyaluronate binding proteins isolated from 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus transformed 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, E.A.; Moore, D.; Hayden, L.J.

    1987-06-02

    A hyaluronic acid binding fraction was purified from the supernatant media of both 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus (MSV) transformed 3T3 cultures by hyaluronate and immunoaffinity chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resolved the hyaluronate affinity-purified fraction into three major protein bands of estimated molecular weight (M/sub r,e/) 70K, 66K, and 56K which contained hyaluronate binding activity and which were termed hyaluronate binding proteins (HABP). Hyaluronate affinity chromatography combined with immunoaffinity chromatography, using antibody directed against the larger HABP, allowed a 20-fold purification of HABP. Fractions isolated from 3T3 supernatant medium also contained additional binding molecules in the molecular weight range of 20K. This material was present in vanishingly small amounts and was not detected with a silver stain or with (/sup 35/S)methionine label. The three protein species isolated by hyaluronate affinity chromatography (M/sub r,e/ 70K, 66K, and 56K) were related to one another since they shared antigenic determinants and exhibited similar pI values. In isocratic conditions, HABP occurred as aggregates of up to 580 kilodaltons. Their glycoprotein nature was indicated by their incorporation of /sup 3/H-sugars. Enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay showed they were antigenically distinct from other hyaluronate binding proteins such as fibronectin, cartilage link protein, and the hyaluronate binding region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The results are discussed with regard both to the functional significance of hyaluronate-cell surface interactions in transformed as well as normal cells and to the relationship of HABP to other reported hyaluronate binding proteins.

  2. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G; Martin, Andrea P; Vassileva, Galya; Kelley, Kevin; Schwartz, Thue W; Lira, Sergio A

    2005-03-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor known as vGPCR that binds CXC chemokines with high affinity. In this study, we show that conditional transgenic expression of vGPCR by cells of endothelial origin triggers an angiogenic program in vivo, leading to development of an angioproliferative disease that resembles KS. This angiogenic program consists partly in the expression of the angiogenic factors placental growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor B, and inducible NO synthase by the vGPCR-expressing cells. Finally, we show that continued vGPCR expression is essential for progression of the KS-like phenotype and that down-regulation of vGPCR expression results in reduced expression of angiogenic factors and regression of the lesions. Together, these findings implicate vGPCR as a key element in KS pathogenesis and suggest that strategies to block its function may represent a novel approach for the treatment of KS. PMID:15749907

  3. Hydrodynamic diameters of murine mammary, Rous sarcoma, and feline leukemia RNA tumor viruses: studies by laser beat frequency light-scattering spectroscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Salmeen, I; Rimai, L; Luftig, R B; Libes, L; Retzel, E; Rich, M; McCormick, J J

    1976-01-01

    We have studied purified preparations of murine mammary tumor virus (MuMTV), Rous sarcoma virus (RSV; Prague strain), and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) by laser beat frequency light-scattering spectroscopy, ultra-centrifugation, and electron microscopy. The laser beat frequency light-scattering spectroscopy measurements yield the light-scattering intensity, weighted diffusion coefficients. The corresponding average hydrodynamic diameters, as calculated from the diffusion coefficients by the Stokes-Einstein equation for MuMTV, RSV, and FeLV, respectively, are: 144 +/- 6 nm, 147 +/- 7 nm, and 168 +/- 6 nm. Portions of the purified RSV and MuMTV preparations, from which light-scattering samples were obtained, and portions of the actual FeLV light-scattering samples were examined by negatively stained, catalase crystal-calibrated electron microscopy. The light-scattering intensity weighted averages of the electron micrograph size distributions were calculated by weighing each size by its theoretical relative scattering intensity, as obtained from published tables computed according to the Mie scattering theory. These averages and the experimentally observed hydrodynamic diameters agreed to within +/- 5%, which is the combined experimental error in the electron microscopic and light-scattering techniques. We conclude that the size distributions of singlet particles observed in the electron micrographs are statistically true representations of the sedimentation-purified solution size distributions. The sedimentation coefficients (S20, w) for MuMTV, RSV, and FeLV, respectively, are: 595 +/- 29S, 689 +/- 35S, and 880 +/- 44S. Virus partial specific volumes were taken as the reciprocals of the buoyant densities, determined in sucrose density gradients. The Svedberg equation was used to calculate particle weights from the measured diffusion and sedimentation coefficients. The particle weights for MuMTV, RSV, and FeLV, respectively, are: (3.17 +/- 0.32) x 10(8), (4.17 +/- 0

  4. The Homopolyadenylate and Adjacent Nucleotides at the 3′-Terminus of 30-40S RNA Subunits in the Genome of Murine Sarcoma-Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Hyune Mo; Green, Maurice

    1974-01-01

    Adenosine is the major 3′OH-terminal nucleoside of the 60-70S RNA genome of the murine sarcoma-leukemia virus, its 30-40S RNA subunits, and the poly(A) segments derived by RNase treatment of both RNA species, as determined by periodate oxidation-[3H]-borohydride reduction. The binding 30-40S RNA to oligo(dT)-cellulose suggests that most viral RNA subunits contain poly(A). The molecular weight of poly(A) derived from viral RNA by digestion with RNase and purified by affinity chromatography is 64,000-68,000, as determined by gel electrophoresis. From the size of poly(A) and the poly(A) content of viral RNA (1.6%), it is estimated that there is about one poly(A) segment for each viral 30-40S RNA subunit. The results of 3′-termini labeling with [3H]borohydride, in vivo labeling with [3H]adenosine, and base composition of [32P]poly(A) indicate that a homopoly(A) segment is located at the 3′-end of a 30-40S RNA subunit. The homogeneous poly(A) segments isolated from RNase T1 digests of 60-70S [32P]RNA consist of one cytidylate, one uridylate, and about 190 adenylate residues, while those isolated from RNase A digests consist exclusively of adenylate residues. These results indicate that -G(C,U)A190AOH is the 3′-terminal nucleotide sequence of the viral 30-40S RNA subunits. PMID:4366765

  5. Rescue of rous sarcoma virus from rous sarcoma virus-transformed mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Coffin, J M

    1972-07-01

    Rat cells transformed by the B77 strain of avian sarcoma virus produce no virus-like particles, yet B77 virus was rescued from these cells by Sendai virus-mediated fusion with chicken cells. This virus rescue was not affected by treatment of the chicken cells with agents that rendered the cells incapable of dividing, although such treatment greatly reduced the ability of the chicken cells to plate as infectious centers after infection with B77 virus. Fusion of R(B77) cells with chicken erythrocytes also led to virus rescue, although with less efficiency than fusion with chicken fibroblasts. Therefore, virus rescue was probably due to a factor or factors contributed by chicken cells which aid in virus production. PMID:4339192

  6. Therapy of a murine sarcoma using syngeneic monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Lankford, T.; Flynn, K.M.

    1983-01-01

    Syngeneic monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to Moloney sarcoma cells were produced by fusion of spleen cells from MSC regressor mice to myeloma SP2/0. MoAb 244-19A, an immunoglobulin G2b, bound to MSC cells and did not bind to two other sarcomas (K-BALB and Ha2), a carcinoma (Line 1), a fibroblast (A31) or a fibroblast infected with C-type virus (A31) or a fibroblast infected with C-type virus (A31-Moloney leukemia virus). In contrast, MoAb 271-1A bound to the MSC and Ha2 sarcoma and line 1 carcinoma as well as to the normal and infected fibroblast cultures. Antibodies were tested for therapeutic effect using three schedules of antibody injection. Injection i.p. of ascites fluid containing 244-19A MoAb given on Days -1, 0, and +1 relative to tumor cell injection increased life span significantly over that of control animals given injections (P3, immunoglobulin G, or MoAb 271-1A) and produced some seven of 19, one of five, and one of five long-term survivors in three separate experiments. Antibody given to animals with established tumors (4 days after implantation) also prolonged life span significantly and produced three of nine long-term survivors. Antibody given to animals with very large tumor burdens (10 days after implantation) did not prolong life span significantly. Optimal dose, schedule, and mechanism studies concerning this therapy are in progress.

  7. Activation of thermosensitive RNA splicing and production of a heat-labile P85gag-mos kinase by the introduction of a specific deletion in murine sarcoma virus-124 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    de Mars, M; Cizdziel, P E; Murphy, E C

    1988-01-01

    Murine sarcoma virus ts110 (MuSVts110) is a conditionally transformation-defective MuSV mutant lacking 1,487 bases found in its wild-type parent, MuSV-349 (MuSV-124). Expression of the MuSVts110 v-mos gene product, P85gag-mos, requires splicing of the viral transcript to align the gag and mos genes in frame. However, this splice event is restricted to growth temperatures of 33 degrees C or lower. No splicing of the viral RNA, no production of P85gag-mos, and, hence, no cell transformation is observed at growth temperatures above 33 degrees C. To determine whether thermosensitive splicing is an intrinsic property of To determine whether thermosensitive splicing is an intrinsic property of MuSVts110 RNA specified by the 1,487-base deletion or a result of a cellular defect, we examined an "equivalent" or MuSVts110 DNA (designated ts32 DNA) constructed by combining wild-type MuSV-124 DNA fragments with a synthetic oligonucleotide to yield an otherwise wild-type viral DNA containing the same 1,487-base deletion as authentic MuSVts110. As observed in control cells (6m2 cells) infected with the authentic MuSVts110 virus, NIH 3T3 cells transfected with ts32 DNA appeared morphologically transformed when grown at 33 degrees C, but were converted to a more normal, flattened shape within a few hours of a shift to 39 degrees C. In concert with these morphological changes, both the processing of the ts32 RNA transcripts and the production of ts32 p85gag-mos kinase were found to be optimal at growth temperatures from 28 to 33 degrees C, but dramatically reduced at 37 to 41 degrees C. Like authentic P85gag-mos, the ts32 P85gag-mos kinase activity was rapidly inactivated by brief exposure to 39 degrees C. These results suggested that the MuSVts110 equivalent is functionally indistinguishable from authentic MuSVts110 and that the novel temperature-sensitive splicing of MuSVts110 transcripts is specified by an intrinsic property of the viral RNA. Images PMID:2835496

  8. Moloney murine sarcoma virions synthesize full-genome-length double-stranded DNA in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Benz, E W; Dina, D

    1979-01-01

    Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MSV) virions incubated under optimal conditions were shown to support extensive synthesis of double-stranded DNA. The major product, a 5950-base-pair (6-kilobase-pair DNA) double-stranded DNA, was characterized by cleavage with restriction endonucleases and shown to contain a 600-nucleotide-long direct repeat at both ends of the MSV genome. Linear DNA molecules made in vivo shortly after infection were compared to the linear double-stranded DNA synthesized in vitro. The restriction maps of both viral DNA products were indistinguishable. The 600-base-pair repeat results in a progeny DNA molecule that is longer than the parental MSV genomic RNA. The generation of this repeat must involve a mechanism that allows the viral reverse transcriptase (RNA-dependent DNA nucleotidyltransferase) to copy 5'- and 3'-terminal genomic (+) strand sequences twice. Images PMID:291003

  9. Immunotherapy of murine sarcomas with interleukin 2. I. Local administration of human recombinant IL-2 preparations.

    PubMed

    Bubeník, J; Indrová, M; Toulcová, A

    1986-01-01

    The immunotherapeutic effect of human recombinant interleukin 2 was examined with a panel of MC-induced murine sarcomas carrying individual tumour-specific transplantation antigens. Repeated peritumoral injections of RIL-2 inhibited growth of five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) out of six sarcomas in syngeneic mice. The sixth murine sarcoma (MC12) was resistant to the tumour-inhibitory effect of human recombinant IL-2 as well as to the tumour-inhibitory effect of murine and rat lymphoid IL-2 preparations. Since the IL-2-sensitive and IL-2-resistant sarcomas were induced with MC in mice of identical genotype and share most of their characteristics, they represent a useful model for investigation of structural target cell determinants and functional target cell properties responsible for the sensitivity of tumours to the immunotherapeutic effects of IL-2. PMID:3492396

  10. Molecular cloning, genomic analysis, and biological properties of rat leukemia virus and the onc sequences of Rasheed rat sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Gonda, M A; Young, H A; Elser, J E; Rasheed, S; Talmadge, C B; Nagashima, K; Li, C C; Gilden, R V

    1982-01-01

    Rasheed rat sarcoma virus (RaSV) has been shown to code for a protein of 29,000 Mr not present in replication-competent rat type C helper virus (RaLV)-infected cells. This protein is a fused gene product consisting of a portion of the RaLV p15 gag protein and the transformation-specific 21,000 Mr (p21) ras protein, which is also found in Harvey murine sarcoma virus. We now report the molecular cloning of both the SD-1 (Sprague-Dawley) strain of RaLV and the transforming ras sequences of RaSV. Heteroduplex analysis of these cloned DNAs demonstrated that the RaSV ras gene (v-Ra-ras) was inserted into the rat type C viral genome with a small deletion of RaLV genetic information in the 5' region of the gag gene and that the v-Ra-ras gene (0.72 kilobase pair) is homologous to and colinear with the p21 ras gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus (v-Ha-ras). Restriction enzyme mapping confirmed the homology demonstrated by heteroduplex mapping, showing strong site conservation of restriction endonucleases known to cleave v-Ha-ras. Cloned v-Ra-ras DNA transformed NIH 3T3 cells, inducing the synthesis of the p29 RaSVgag-ras protein. Images PMID:6292516

  11. Human herpes virus 8 (Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus).

    PubMed

    Porter, S R; Di Alberti, L; Kumar, N

    1998-01-01

    Human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) is a recently discovered herpesvirus related to Herpesvirus saimiri and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). It has been assigned to the Rhadinovirus genus (gamma-2 herpesvirus) on the basis of its genomic sequence and structure. HHV-8 is the first member of this genus known to infect humans and it is now evident that it is the likely cause of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). The virus is present in endothelial and spindle cells of KS, and in HIV disease the presence of HHV-8 in peripheral blood, and/or serum IgG antibodies to HHV-8, predicts the development of AIDS-related KS. HHV-8 can also infect CD19 + B cells and is of aetiological significance in the development of body cavity B cell lymphomas of AIDS. Of note, the translation products of viral open reading frames (ORFs) reveal HHV-8 to be a molecular pirate, capable of producing homologues of several human gene products that may result in alterations in cell cycle arrest, inhibit apoptosis and cell-mediated immune responses, and thus provide the potential for tumour production. PMID:9659514

  12. Unstable resistance of G mouse fibroblasts to ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikura, H; Naito, Y; Moriwaki, K

    1979-01-01

    G mouse cells were resistant to N- and NB-tropic Friend leukemia viruses and to B-tropic WN 1802B. Though the cells were resistant to focus formation by the Moloney isolate of murine sarcoma virus, they were relatively sensitive to helper component murine leukemia virus. To amphotropic murine leukemia virus and to focus formation by amphotropic murine sarcoma virus, G mouse cells were fully permissive. When the cell lines were established starting from the individual embryos, most cell lines were not resistant to the murine leukemia viruses. Only one resistant line was established. Cloning of this cell line indicated that the resistant cells constantly segregated sensitive cells during the culture; i.e., the G mouse cell cultures were probably always mixtures of sensitive and resistant cells. Among the sensitive cell clones, some were devoid of Fv-1 restriction. Such dually permissive cells, and also feral mouse-derived SC-1 cells, retained glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-1 and apparently normal number 4 chromosomes. The loss of Fv-1 restriction in these mouse cells was not brought about by any gross structural changes in the vicinity of Fv-1 on number 4 chromosomes. Images PMID:221667

  13. Isolation of Naturally Occurring Viruses of the Murine Leukemia Virus Group in Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Janet W.; Rowe, Wallace P.; Capps, Worth I.; Huebner, Robert J.

    1969-01-01

    A tissue culture cell system for isolation and identification of members of the murine leukemia virus group (the complement fixation for murine leukemia test) was modified to permit the isolation of naturally occurring virus from leukemic and normal mice. The important factors for increasing the sensitivity of the test were the use of National Institutes of Health (NIH) strain Webster Swiss embryo cell cultures and the selection of rat-immune sera having complement-fixing antibodies to tissue culture antigens of both the Gross and FMR subgroups. In all, 163 strains of mouse leukemia virus, from 11 inbred mouse strains, have been isolated. Representative virus isolates were shown to possess the properties of the murine leukemia virus group; i.e., they were chloroform-sensitive, noncytopathic agents which replicated in mouse embryo tissue culture and produced group-reactive, complement-fixing antigen and budding C-type particles visible by electron microscopy. These viruses could serve as helpers in the rescue of Moloney sarcoma virus genome from non-producer hamster sarcoma cells, yielding pseudotypes. All of the 19 field isolates tested were neutralized by Gross passage A antiserum but not by potent antisera to the Moloney, Rauscher, and Friend strains. Virus was recovered regularly from embryos and from the plasma and spleen of adult mice of high leukemic strains. In low leukemic mouse strains, different patterns of virus detection were observed. In C3H/He mice, virus was occasionally present in embryos and was found in 40% of adult spleens. BALB/c mice were virus-negative as fetuses or weanlings, but spleens of more than half of the mice over 6 months of age yielded virus. NIH mice have never yielded virus. In reciprocal matings between AKR and BALB/c mice, virus recovery from embryos was maternally determined. The development of tissue culture isolation procedures made possible for the first time the application of classical infectious disease methods to the

  14. Glucocorticoids induce focus formation and increase sarcoma viral expression in a mink cell line that contains a murine sarcoma viral genome.

    PubMed Central

    Lowy, D R; Scolnick, E M

    1978-01-01

    Dexamethasone (3 X 10(-10) to 3 X 10(-6) M) induced foci of morphologically transformed cells in a small proportion of a mink cell line that contains the Moloney murine sarcoma viral genome (S+L-). The induction was glucocorticoid specific, since other steroids with glucocorticoid activity (prednisolone, cortisol, and aldosterone) induced foci with an efficiency that paralleled their glucocorticoid activity, and steroids lacking glucocorticoid activity (17B-estradiol, testosterone, and progesterone) failed to induce foci. Viral antigen, as measured by specific immunofluorescence, was localized to the foci. The induction of foci by dexamethasone (3 X 10(-7)) was accompanied by an approximately 10-fold increase in intracellular Moloney murine sarcoma virus-specific RNA and viral p30 antigen. Removal of dexamethasone was followed by the disappearance of foci and a decrease in viral RNA and p30. In this cell system, therefore, glucocorticoids can affect the intracellular levels of type C viral RNA and protein. Images PMID:202733

  15. Structural Rearrangement and Subunit Composition of RNA from Released Soehner-Dmochowski Murine Sarcoma Virions

    PubMed Central

    East, James L.; Allen, Patton T.; Knesek, John E.; Chan, James C.; Bowen, James M.; Dmochowski, Leon

    1973-01-01

    Two types of genomic, high-molecular-weight RNA species were found in Soehner-Dmochowski murine sarcoma virions released from virus-induced rat tumor cells grown in tissue culture. The type of RNA species observed depended on the length of exposure of the tumor cells to radioactive precursor. Early RNA of virions labeled up to 4 h with radioactive uridine had a sedimentation coefficient of 50S, and late RNA of virions labeled for 24 h had a sedimentation coefficient of 58S. Thermal transitions of early and late RNA indicated a difference in the configuration or structure of these two types of RNA. The late RNA may represent either a different configurational state of the early RNA or an aggregate molecule of two early RNA components joined together. Heat dissociation revealed that the major subunit of both RNA types was a 28S species, which was not susceptible to degradation by the addition of micrococcal nuclease to virions. A transitional, intermediate RNA species with a sedimentation coefficient of 37 to 40S was detected when early RNA was dissociated by dimethyl sulfoxide or heat at temperatures suboptimal for complete conversion. No free RNA subunit components were detected in virions harvested at intervals as short as 30 s or 5 min. A model for the assembly of genomic RNA from 28S RNA subunits is proposed. PMID:4350715

  16. Friend strain of spleen focus-forming virus is a recombinant between ecotropic murine type C virus and the env gene region of xenotropic type C virus.

    PubMed Central

    Troxler, D H; Lowy, D; Howk, R; Young, H; Scolnick, E M

    1977-01-01

    The spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV), a replication-defective murine leukemia virus that causes the rapid transformation of certain hematopoietic target cells, has acquired specific xenotropic viral genetic information not contained in Friend helper virus. In the current studies, it is shown that a cDNA that represents a xenotropic virus portion of SFFV detects genetic sequences derived from the env gene region of murine xenotropic virus. The significance of the acquisition of these xenotropic viral sequences by SFFV is discussed with regard to their possible role in the rapid leukemogenicity of SFFV, and an analogy is drawn between the formation of SFFV and the formation of the Kirsten and Harvey sarcoma viruses. PMID:200927

  17. Survivin suppressor (YM155) enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy against canine histiocytic sarcoma in murine transplantation models.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroki; Takagi, Satoshi; Hosoya, Kenji; Okumura, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) in dogs exhibits aggressive clinical and biological behavior. Currently, no effective treatments are available for dogs with HS. Survivin, a member of a family of apoptosis protein inhibitors, could serve as a potential therapeutic target in several canine cancers. Sepantronium bromide (YM155) has recently been established as a novel survivin-targeting agent. The aim of this study was to use YM155 as a tool for evaluating survivin-targeted therapies against dogs with HS, and to investigate how YM155 treatment affects antitumor and chemotherapeutic efficacies in murine xenograft models using canine HS cells. The results showed that in HS cells with lomustine (CCNU) resistance, YM155 treatment suppressed both the cell-growth potential and cell resistance to CCNU, which essentially increases the chemotherapy efficacy in the murine models. The evidence presented here supports the favorable preclinical evaluation that survivin-targeted therapies might be effective against HS in dogs. PMID:25744435

  18. Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    HaDuong, Josephine H; Martin, Andrew A; Skapek, Stephen X; Mascarenhas, Leo

    2015-02-01

    Malignant bone tumors (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma) and soft-tissue sarcomas (rhabdomyosarcoma, nonrhabdomyosarcoma) account for approximately 14% of childhood malignancies. Successful treatment of patients with sarcoma depends on a multidisciplinary approach to therapy, including oncology, surgery, radiation oncology, radiology, pathology, and physiatry. By combining systemic treatment with chemotherapy and primary tumor control using surgery and/or radiation, survival rates for localized disease range from 70% to 75%. However, children with metastatic or recurrent disease continue to have dismal outcomes. A better understanding of the biology underlying both bone and soft-tissue sarcomas is required to further improve outcomes for children with these tumors. PMID:25435119

  19. Modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism by Rous sarcoma virus

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, K.; Aderem, A.; Hanafusa, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Arachidonic acid (C{sub 20:4}) metabolites were released constitutively from wild-type Rous sarcoma virus-transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF). {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} and its metabolites were released from unstimulated and uninfected CEF only in response to stimuli such as serum, phorbol ester, or the calcium ionophore A23187. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that the radioactivity released from ({sup 3}H)arachidonate-labeled transformed cells was contained in free arachidonate and in the cyclooxygenase products prostaglandin E{sub 2} and prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha; no lipoxygenase products were identified. The release of C{sub 20:4} and its metabolites from CEF infected with pp60{sup src} deletion mutants was correlated with serum-independent DNA synthesis and with the expression of the mRNA for 9E3, a gene expressed in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells which has homology with several mitogenic and inflammatory peptides. {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} release was not correlated with p36 phosphorylation, which argues against a role for this protein as a phospholipase A{sub 2} inhibitor. CEF infected with other oncogenic viruses encoding a tyrosine kinase also released C{sub 20:4}, as did CEF infected with viruses that contained mos and ras; however, infection with a crk-containing virus did not result in stimulation of {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} release, suggesting that utilization of this signaling pathway is specific for particular transformation stimuli.

  20. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  1. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release.

    PubMed

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  2. Specificity of Rous sarcoma virus nucleocapsid protein in genomic RNA packaging.

    PubMed Central

    Dupraz, P; Spahr, P F

    1992-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis has shown that the nucleocapsid (NC) protein of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) is required for packaging and dimerization of viral RNA. However, it has not been possible to demonstrate, in vivo or in vitro, specific binding of viral RNA sequences by NC. To determine whether specific packaging of viral RNA is mediated by NC in vivo, we have constructed RSV mutants carrying sequences of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV). Either the NC coding region alone, the psi RNA packaging sequence, or both the NC and psi sequences of MoMuLV were substituted for the corresponding regions of a full-length RSV clone to yield chimeric plasmid pAPrcMNC, pAPrc psi M, or pAPrcM psi M, respectively. In addition, a mutant of RSV in which the NC is completely deleted was tested as a control. Upon transfection, each of the chimeric mutants produced viral particles containing processed core proteins but were noninfectious. Thus, MoMuLV NC can replace RSV NC functionally in the assembly and release of mature virions but not in infectivity. Surprisingly, the full-deletion mutant showed a strong block in virus release, suggesting that NC is involved in virus assembly. Mutant PrcMNC packaged 50- to 100-fold less RSV RNA than did the wild type; in cotransfection experiments, MoMuLV RNA was preferentially packaged. This result suggests that the specific recognition of viral RNA during virus assembly involves, at least in part, the NC protein. Images PMID:1378506

  3. Herpes virus-like sequences are specifically found in Kaposi sarcoma lesions.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, E; Henson, T H; Ghorbani, A J; Land, M A; Webber, B L; Garcia, J V

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To detect the prevalence of herpes virus-like DNA sequences in AIDS associated Kaposi sarcoma (KSHV) lesions and normal tissue. METHODS: KSHV detection was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using four different sets of primers. PCR products were cloned, sequenced, and analysed. RESULTS: All of four biopsies of Kaposi sarcoma lesions and all of three paraffin embedded Kaposi sarcoma tissues were positive for KSHV, while normal tissue from the same patients was negative. Sequence analysis of amplification products revealed polymorphisms that result in amino acid changes of the predicted sequence. CONCLUSIONS: KSHV is prevalent in tissues from Kaposi sarcoma, suggesting a role in the development of the tumour. On this basis, anti-herpes virus agents should be considered to control Kaposi sarcoma. Images PMID:8655706

  4. Crystal structure of the Rous sarcoma virus intasome.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhiqi; Shi, Ke; Banerjee, Surajit; Pandey, Krishan K; Bera, Sibes; Grandgenett, Duane P; Aihara, Hideki

    2016-02-18

    Integration of the reverse-transcribed viral DNA into the host genome is an essential step in the life cycle of retroviruses. Retrovirus integrase catalyses insertions of both ends of the linear viral DNA into a host chromosome. Integrase from HIV-1 and closely related retroviruses share the three-domain organization, consisting of a catalytic core domain flanked by amino- and carboxy-terminal domains essential for the concerted integration reaction. Although structures of the tetrameric integrase-DNA complexes have been reported for integrase from prototype foamy virus featuring an additional DNA-binding domain and longer interdomain linkers, the architecture of a canonical three-domain integrase bound to DNA remained elusive. Here we report a crystal structure of the three-domain integrase from Rous sarcoma virus in complex with viral and target DNAs. The structure shows an octameric assembly of integrase, in which a pair of integrase dimers engage viral DNA ends for catalysis while another pair of non-catalytic integrase dimers bridge between the two viral DNA molecules and help capture target DNA. The individual domains of the eight integrase molecules play varying roles to hold the complex together, making an extensive network of protein-DNA and protein-protein contacts that show both conserved and distinct features compared with those observed for prototype foamy virus integrase. Our work highlights the diversity of retrovirus intasome assembly and provides insights into the mechanisms of integration by HIV-1 and related retroviruses. PMID:26887497

  5. Point mutations in the proximal Cys-His box of Rous sarcoma virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Dupraz, P; Oertle, S; Meric, C; Damay, P; Spahr, P F

    1990-01-01

    To extend our previous studies of the function of the Cys-His box of Rous sarcoma virus NC protein, we have constructed a series of point mutations of the conserved or nonconserved amino acids of the proximal Cys-His box and a one-amino-acid deletion. All mutants were characterized for production of viral proteins and particles, for packaging and maturation of viral RNA, for reverse transcriptase activity, and for infectivity. Our results indicated the following. (i) Mutations affecting the strictly conserved amino acids cysteine 21, cysteine 24, and histidine 29 were lethal; only the mutant His-29----Pro was still able to package viral RNA, most of it in an immature form. (ii) Mutation of the highly conserved glycine 28 to valine reduced viral RNA packaging by 90% and infectivity 30-fold, whereas mutant Gly-28----Ala was fully infectious. This suggests a steric hindrance limit at this position. (iii) Shortening the distance between cysteine 24 and histidine 29 by deleting one amino acid abolished the maturation of viral RNA and yielded noninfectious particles. (iv) Substitution of tyrosine 22 by serine lowered viral RNA packaging efficiency and yielded particles that were 400-fold less infectious; double mutant Tyr-22Thr-23----SerSer had the same infectivity as Tyr-22----Ser, whereas mutant Thr-23----Ser was fully infectious. (v) Changing glutamine 33 to a charged glutamate residue did not affect virus infectivity. Similarities and differences between our avian mutants and those in murine retroviruses are discussed. Images PMID:2168981

  6. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man. PMID:24396560

  7. Sequence heterogeneity of murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome virus: the role of endogenous virus.

    PubMed

    Gayama, S; Vaupel, B A; Kanagawa, O

    1995-05-01

    A defective murine leukemia virus is the causative agent of murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS). We have cloned cDNAs from both virus infected and non-infected cells using the PCR methods with primers corresponding to the franking sequence of the unique p12 gag gene. Sequence analysis of these cDNA clones revealed: (i) the presence of endogenous virus related to MAIDS virus in C57BL/6 mice, (ii) B cell lineage specific expression of endogenous virus and (iii) extensive heterogeneity of MAIDS virus recovered from virus infected cells due to the recombination of the related viruses (defective pathogenic virus, ecotropic virus and endogenous virus). These findings suggest that the creation of virus variants in infected cells may play an important role in virus pathogenesis and escape from immune attack during the development of MAIDS. PMID:7547712

  8. Chemical Modification of Recombinant Interleukin 2 by Polyethylene Glycol Increases Its Potency in the Murine Meth A Sarcoma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katre, Nandini V.; Knauf, Michael J.; Laird, Walter J.

    1987-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin 2 purified from Escherichia coli has limited solubility at neutral pH and a short circulatory half-life. This recombinant interleukin 2 was chemically modified by an active ester of polyethylene glycol. The modified interleukin 2 was purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. This conjugate was compared to unmodified recombinant interleukin 2 in vitro and in vivo. Covalent attachment of the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol enhanced the solubility of interleukin 2, decreased its plasma clearance, and increased its antitumor potency in the Meth A murine sarcoma model.

  9. Induction of transcription from the long terminal repeat of Moloney murine sarcoma provirus by UV-irradiation, x-irradiation, and phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.S.; Goldthwait, D.A.; Samols, D. )

    1990-01-01

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) of Moloney murine sarcoma virus (Mo-MuSV) was used as a model system to study the stress response of mammalian cells to physical carcinogens. The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was inserted between two Mo-MuSV LTRs, and the LTR-CAT-LTR construct was used for virus production and was integrated into the genome of NIH 3T3 cells in the proviral form. This construct was used to assure that the integrated CAT gene was driven by the promoter of the LTR. Expression of the CAT gene was stimulated 4-fold by UV irradiation, and the peak of activity was observed at 18 hr. In contrast, stimulation of the CAT expression after x-irradiation was 2-fold and occurred at 6 hr. Phorbol myristate acetate also stimulated CAT activity 4-fold with a peak at 6 hr. Down-regulation of protein kinase C blocked totally the response to x-irradiation but only partially the response to UV. The protein kinase inhibitor H7 blocked the response to treatment by UV, x-ray, and phorbol ester.

  10. A mos oncogene-containing retrovirus, myeloproliferative sarcoma virus, transforms rat thyroid epithelial cells and irreversibly blocks their differentiation pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, A; Portella, G; Di Fiore, P P; Berlingieri, M T; Di Lauro, R; Schneider, A B; Vecchio, G

    1985-01-01

    Differentiated, cloned rat thyroid epithelial cells (424 cells) were infected with a wild-type and a temperature-sensitive strain of the myeloproliferative variant of the Moloney murine sarcoma virus. The thyroid cells were productively infected and transformed by both virus strains and displayed some of the typical properties of malignant cells, such as morphological changes, growth in soft agar, and in vivo tumorigenicity. The acquisition of the transformed phenotype by the virus-infected cells was accompanied by a loss of the typical differentiated features of the thyroid epithelium, such as thyroglobulin (TG) secretion, iodide uptake, and dependence for growth on six factors including thyrotropin, the physiological thyroid stimulator. TG mRNA could not be demonstrated in cells transformed by both viral strains, suggesting a block at the level of the TG gene transcription. While the transformed state of the cell clones infected with the temperature-sensitive strain could be reverted by shifting the cultures to the temperature nonpermissive for transformation (39 degrees C), no reversion of the differentiated functions took place after such a shift, showing that the v-mos oncogene irreversibly shuts off the differentiation of thyroid epithelial cells in vitro. These results demonstrate, for the first time, an oncogenic potential of the v-mos oncogene family towards differentiated epithelial cells in vitro. Images PMID:2993656

  11. Cytoarchitecture of Kirsten sarcoma virus-transformed rat kidney fibroblasts: butyrate-induced reorganization within the actin microfilament network.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M P; Higgins, P J

    1988-10-01

    Murine sarcoma virus-transformed rat fibroblasts (KNRK cells) undergo marked cytoarchitectural reorganization during in vitro exposure to sodium-n-butyrate (NaB) resulting in restoration of (1) a more typical fibroblastoid morphology, (2) proper cell-to-cell orientation, and (3) substratum adherence. Augmented cell spreading, involving greater than 90% of the population, was a function of culture density and time of exposure to NaB (2 mM final concentration). Induced cell spreading reflected a 2.5- to 3.0-fold increase in both total cellular actin content and deposition of actin into the detergent-resistant cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal actin deposition in response to NaB was accompanied by the formation of occasionally dense, parallel alignments of F-actin-containing microfilaments and by a dramatic increase in the size and incidence of actin-enriched membrane ruffles. Long-term NaB-treated cells exhibited parallel orientations of microfilaments similar to those found in untransformed fibroblasts. Increased cytoskeletal actin occurred within 24 hr of NaB exposure, correlating with the initial reorganization of actin-containing microfilaments detected microscopically, and reflected concomitant 3-fold increases in cellular alpha-actinin and fibronectin content. In contrast, the amount of vimentin, tropomyosin, and tubulin in NaB-treated cells was significantly decreased. NaB-induced morphologic restructuring of sarcoma virus-transformed fibroblasts, thus, impacts on all three basic cytoskeletal systems. Selective increases, however, were evident in particular cytoskeletal proteins (actin, alpha-actinin, fibronectin) implicated in microfilament networking and cell spreading. PMID:2844835

  12. Zika Virus Infection and Development of a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), there is an urgent need to investigate the pathogenesis of the symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Since the first identification of the virus in 1947, the pathologies associated with ZIKV infection were thought to be limited with mild illness that presented fever, rashes, muscle aches, and weakness. However, ZIKV infection has been shown to cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and numerous cases of congenital microcephaly in children have been reported when pregnant females were exposed to the virus. The severity and the rate of spread of ZIKV in the last year has drawn alarming interest among researchers to investigate murine models to study viral pathogenesis and develop candidate vaccines. A recent study by Lazear and colleagues, in the May 2016 issue of cell host and microbe, is an effort to study the pathogenesis of contemporary and historical virus strains in various mouse models. PMID:27260223

  13. Proliferation of Rous sarcoma virus-infected, but not of normal, chicken fibroblasts in oxygen-enriched environment: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R S; Elgas, R J; Balk, S D

    1976-04-01

    Both normal and Rous sarcoma virus-infected chicken fibroblasts proliferate in an incubator containing 95% air, 5% CO2. In an incubator atmosphere enriched with oxygen, however, the normal fibroblasts are maintained without proliferation, while the Rous sarcoma virus-infected fibroblasts continue to proliferate. This suggests that a respiratory function may be involved in the regulation of proliferation of normal cells, and that neoplastic cells may proliferate autonomously because of a deficiency in this regulatory function. PMID:177983

  14. Viruses in Rodent Colonies: Lessons Learned from Murine Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Wobus, Christiane E

    2015-11-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are highly prevalent, positive-sense RNA viruses that infect a range of mammals, including humans and mice. Murine noroviruses (MuNoVs) are the most prevalent pathogens in biomedical research colonies, and they have been used extensively as a model system for human noroviruses (HuNoVs). Despite recent successes in culturing HuNoVs in the laboratory and a small animal host, studies of human viruses have inherent limitations. Thus, owing to its versatility, the MuNoV system-with its native host, reverse genetics, and cell culture systems-will continue to provide important insights into NoV and enteric virus biology. In the current review, we summarize recent findings from MuNoVs that increase our understanding of enteric virus pathogenesis and highlight similarities between human and murine NoVs that underscore the value of MuNoVs to inform studies of HuNoV biology. We also discuss the potential of endemic MuNoV infections to impact other disease models. PMID:26958927

  15. Detection of virus-specific RNA in simian sarcoma-leukemia virus-infected cells in in situ hybridization to viral complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, S L; Gallo, R C; Miller, N R

    1979-01-01

    An in situ molecular hybridization system which will detect retrovirus RNA in the cytoplasm of individual virus-infected cells has been developed. The technique was applied to cells infected with simian sarcoma-leukemia virus, where the virus-specific RNA was detected by hybridization to simian sarcoma-leukemia virus 3H-labeled complementary DNA. The system is useful for detecting viral RNA-containing cells in the presence of an excess of virus-negative cells and for determining which type of cell in a heterogenous population is expressing viral RNA. Images PMID:224220

  16. Mutations in the Spacer Peptide and Adjoining Sequences in Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Lead to Tubular Budding ▿

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Paul W.; Johnson, Marc C.; Vogt, Volker M.

    2008-01-01

    All orthoretroviruses encode a single structural protein, Gag, which is necessary and sufficient for the assembly and budding of enveloped virus-like particles from the cell. The Gag proteins of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contain a short spacer peptide (SP or SP1, respectively) separating the capsid (CA) and nucleocapsid (NC) domains. SP or SP1 and the residues immediately upstream are known to be critical for proper assembly. Using mutagenesis and electron microscopy analysis of insect cells or chicken cells overexpressing RSV Gag, we defined the SP assembly domain to include the last 8 residues of CA, all 12 residues of SP, and the first 4 residues of NC. Five- or two-amino acid glycine-rich insertions or substitutions in this critical region uniformly resulted in the budding of abnormal, long tubular particles. The equivalent SP1-containing HIV-1 Gag sequence was unable to functionally replace the RSV sequence in supporting normal RSV spherical assembly. According to secondary structure predictions, RSV and HIV-1 SP/SP1 and adjoining residues may form an alpha helix, and what is likely the functionally equivalent sequence in murine leukemia virus Gag has been inferred by mutational analysis to form an amphipathic alpha helix. However, our alanine insertion mutagenesis did not provide evidence for an amphipathic helix in RSV Gag. Taken together, these results define a short assembly domain between the folded portions of CA and NC, which is essential for formation of the immature Gag shell. PMID:18448521

  17. Correspondence between immunological and functional domains in the transforming protein of Fujinami sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, J C; Pawson, T

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with either gag or fps portions of the wild-type Fujinami sarcoma virus transforming protein have been used to probe the structure of proteins encoded by mutant genomes constructed in vitro. The pattern of immunoreactivity suggests that the functional domain defined in genetic studies (Stone et al., Cell 37:549-558, 1984) corresponds to a discrete immunological domain in the native, wild-type Fujinami sarcoma virus protein. At least one mutation affecting both the structure and function of the proposed NH2-terminal fps-specific domain encodes a product with high specific activities in kinase assays. Furthermore, a cell line expressing high levels of this mutant protein is only moderately transformed. The striking correspondence between the immunological domain defined here and the functional domain inferred from the results of transfection experiments suggests that this non-kinase-specifying region constitutes a discrete structural as well as functional component of the viral protein. Images PMID:2991592

  18. Cholera toxin treatment stimulates tumorigenicity of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, M M; Roth, C; Vlahakis, G; Pastan, I

    1984-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus form tumors poorly in nude mice. Tumorigenicity was markedly stimulated by pretreatment of the cells with cholera toxin, which raises cyclic AMP levels and activates cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Increased tumorigenicity was manifested by a severalfold increase in the rate of tumor formation, as well as earlier appearance and more rapid growth of tumors. In contrast, spontaneously transformed Chinese hamster ovary cells showed decreased tumorigenicity after cholera toxin treatment. The activation of tumorigenic potential in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed Chinese hamster ovary cells by cholera toxin correlated with increased phosphorylation of the viral oncogene product pp60src and stimulation of its tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:6098816

  19. Loss of transformed phenotype upon senescence of Rous sarcoma virus-infected chicken neuroretinal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Seigel, G M; Notter, M F

    1992-01-01

    Success in obtaining permanent Rous sarcoma virus-infected chicken cell lines has been limited because of a senescence phenomenon. We show that a diminished, transformed phenotype, followed by dramatic morphological changes, precedes senescence. These changes are associated with continued expression of pp60v-src, as well as specific alterations in expression of two possible phosphorylated substrates of pp60v-src. Images PMID:1326672

  20. Origin and biological properties of a new BALB/c mouse sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, S A; Barbacid, M

    1978-01-01

    A focus-forming virus previously isolated from a BALB/c mouse hemangiosarcoma has been shown to be replication defective. Analysis of individual BALB/c mouse sarcoma virus (BALB-MSV) nonproducer transformants for expression of helper virus-coded proteins revealed genetically stable variants that expressed two, three, or all four gag gene products in the absence of detectable helper viral env gene expression. The type-specific antigenic determinants of helper viral proteins encoded by the BALB-MSV genome and by the B-tropic virus isolated from the BALB-MSV stock were demonstrated to be indistinguishable from those of BALB:virus-1, a known endogenous virus of BALB/c cells. These findings imply that a BALB/c endogenous virus was involved in the generation of BALB-MSV. By the same immunological approach, the presence of at least a portion of the Moloney-MuLV gag gene has been identified in two other transforming viruses--Moloney-MSV and Abelson lymphosarcoma virus--previously isolated from the BALB/c strain. The tissue culture properties of cells transformed by these defective viruses were also shown to be distinguishable. These findings indicate that transforming virus isolates of the same inbred strain differ in their transforming activities as well as in the helper viral sequences stably associated with their genomes. Images PMID:80461

  1. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey; Kellam, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA 'off-target' effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host-pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host-virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host-virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  2. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA ‘off-target’ effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host–pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host–virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host–virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  3. Measles virus persistence in an immortalized murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M B; Buckthal, D J; Picciotto, S; O'Bryan, T A; Goldman, J N

    1995-02-20

    Persistent infection with the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) has been established in IC-21 cells, an immortalized murine macrophage cell line. Persistence was established immediately without syncytia formation or cytopathic effects. MV was expressed in the majority of the cells as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, infectious centers assays, and limiting dilution analysis. Hemagglutinin (H) and phosphoprotein expressed in persistently infected IC-21 cells had retarded migration in SDS-PAGE gels when compared to these proteins expressed in Vero cells. H protein differences were also found between freshly infected IC-21 cells and persistently infected IC-21 cells passaged for over 2 years. Six sublines of IC-21 cells, infected at different times, have maintained these characteristics for 2 years of passage. During this time period the intensity of immunofluorescence and the number of infectious virus particles recoverable fluctuated in five of the six cell lines. In one cell line virus expression remained at a consistent high level. The ability to establish a persistent MV infection in murine macrophages allows studies using a cell important in disseminating the infection. It facilitates experiments on immunological aspects of viral immunity by enabling cell mixing experiments with histocompatible cell populations and by making available the wide array of cellular and humoral reagents in the mouse. PMID:7871720

  4. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related Virus (XMRV) Backgrounder

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have not found evidence that XMRV causes any diseases in humans or in animals. The presence of an infectious agent, such as a virus, in diseased tissue does not mean that the agent causes the disease.

  5. Temperature-sensitive tumorigenicity of cells transformed by a mutant of Moloney sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Klarlund, J K; Forchhammer, J

    1980-01-01

    Normal rat kidney cells were nonproductively infected either with CP27, a mutant of Moloney sarcoma virus that is temperature-sensitive for maintenance of transformation, or with the parental wild-type virus. The nonproducer cells were inoculated into the tails of athymic nude mice that were subsequently incubated at 28 or 36 degrees C. CP27-infected cells induced tumors only at 28 degrees C, whereas cells infected with wild-type Moloney sarcoma virus were tumorigenic at both temperatures. Tumors induced at 28 degrees C by wild-type virus-infected cells grew faster after shift of the mice to 36 degrees C. In contrast, tumors induced by CP27-infected cells regressed upon shift to 36 degrees C, indicating that continuous expression of viral functions is required for persistence and growth of the tumors. After regression, secondary tumor growth was observed late after upshift of temperature-sensitive tumors. Cells recovered from these late-appearing tumors were tumorigenic at the nonpermissive temperature, and tumors induced by these cells did not regress after upshift. Virus rescued from these recovered cells retained the temperature-sensitivity for focus formation, indicating that the occurrence of the phenotypically wild-type cells was due to host cell modifications rather than to reversion of the CP27 genome. Images PMID:6929500

  6. Mechanical Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Particles: Effect of Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kol, Nitzan; Gladnikoff, Micha; Barlam, David; Shneck, Roni Z.; Rein, Alan; Rousso, Itay

    2006-01-01

    After budding from the host cell, retroviruses undergo a process of internal reorganization called maturation, which is prerequisite to infectivity. Viral maturation is accompanied by dramatic morphological changes, which are poorly understood in physical/mechanistic terms. Here, we study the mechanical properties of live mature and immature murine leukemia virus particles by indentation-type experiments conducted with an atomic force microscope tip. We find that both mature and immature particles have an elastic shell. Strikingly, the virus shell is twofold stiffer in the immature (0.68 N/m) than the mature (0.31 N/m) form. However, finite-element simulation shows that the average Young's modulus of the immature form is more than fourfold lower than that of the mature form. This finding suggests that per length unit, the protein-protein interactions in the mature shell are stronger than those in the immature shell. We also show that the mature virus shell is brittle, since it can be broken by application of large loading forces, by firm attachment to a substrate, or by repeated application of force. Our results are the first analysis of the mechanical properties of an animal virus, and demonstrate a linkage between virus morphology and mechanical properties. PMID:16632508

  7. Analysis of the subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus receptor: the 40-residue, cysteine-rich, low-density lipoprotein receptor repeat motif of Tva is sufficient to mediate viral entry.

    PubMed

    Rong, L; Bates, P

    1995-08-01

    The genes encoding the receptor for subgroup A Rous sarcoma viruses (tva) were recently cloned from both chicken and quail cells (P. Bates, J. A. T. Young, and H. E. Varmus, Cell 74:1043-1051, 1993; J. A. T. Young, P. Bates, and H. E. Varmus, J. Virol. 67:1811-1816, 1993). Previous work suggested that only the extracellular domain of Tva interacts with the virus (P. Bates, J. A. T. Young, and H. E. Varmus, Cell 74:1043-1051, 1993). Tva is a small membrane-associated protein containing in its extracellular domain a 40-amino-acid region which is closely related to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) repeat motif. To determine the region of the Tva extracellular domain responsible for viral receptor function, we created chimeric proteins containing various regions of the Tva extracellular domain fused with a murine CD8 membrane anchor. Analysis of these proteins demonstrates that any chimera containing the Tva LDLR repeat motif can specifically bind the envelope protein of subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses. Furthermore, NIH 3T3 cell lines expressing these chimeric proteins were efficiently infected by subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus vectors. Our results demonstrate that the 40-residue-long LDLR repeat motif of Tva is responsible for viral receptor function. PMID:7609052

  8. Murine Models of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elshafa Hassan; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B-lymphotropic gamma herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies. Most EBV-related cancers present complex medical management challenges; thus it has been essential to develop preclinical in vivo models allowing for the study of pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Early in vivo models used nonhuman primates; however, such models were limited by the inability of EBV to achieve viral latency, availability, and cost. Immunodeficient mouse strains emerged as efficient models that allow for engraftment of human mononuclear cells and controlled evaluation of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). By using highly immunodeficient strains of mice such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid ILrg(-/-)(NOG) mice, investigators have developed efficient platforms for evaluating pathogenesis of benign (HLH) and malignant (EBV-LPD) diseases associated with EBV. Humanized murine chimeric models have been essential tools for evaluating preventive strategies with vaccine and adoptive cellular approaches, as well as development of experimental therapeutic strategies. Manipulation of the human immune cells before engraftment or mutation of viral lytic and latent genes has enhanced our understanding of the oncogenic nature of EBV and the complexity of human immune responses to EBV. In this review, we discuss how the EBV murine models have evolved to become essential tools for studying the virology of EBV as it relates to human EBV-LPD pathogenesis, the immunobiology of innate and adaptive responses, and limitations of these models. PMID:27034395

  9. A Multicenter Blinded Analysis Indicates No Association between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and either Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus or Polytropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Harvey J.; Mikovits, Judy A.; Switzer, William M.; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Lo, Shyh-Ching; Klimas, Nancy; Komaroff, Anthony L.; Montoya, Jose G.; Bateman, Lucinda; Levine, Susan; Peterson, Daniel; Levin, Bruce; Hanson, Maureen R.; Genfi, Afia; Bhat, Meera; Zheng, HaoQiang; Wang, Richard; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lee, Li Ling; Sameroff, Stephen; Heneine, Walid; Coffin, John; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disabling disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) has been linked in two independent studies to infection with xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and polytropic murine leukemia virus (pMLV). Although the associations were not confirmed in subsequent studies by other investigators, patients continue to question the consensus of the scientific community in rejecting the validity of the association. Here we report blinded analysis of peripheral blood from a rigorously characterized, geographically diverse population of 147 patients with CFS/ME and 146 healthy subjects by the investigators describing the original association. This analysis reveals no evidence of either XMRV or pMLV infection. PMID:22991430

  10. Properties and Location of Poly(A) in Rous Sarcoma Virus RNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Hai; Duesberg, Peter

    1974-01-01

    The poly(A) sequence of 30 to 40S Rous sarcoma virus RNA, prepared by digestion of the RNA with RNase T1, showed a rather homogenous electrophoretic distribution in formamide-polyacrylamide gels. Its size was estimated to be about 200 AMP residues. The poly(A) appears to be located at or near the 3′ end of the 30 to 40S RNA because: (i) it contained one adenosine per 180 AMP residues, and because (ii) incubation of 30 to 40S RNA with bacterial RNase H in the presence of poly(dT) removed its poly(A) without significantly affecting its hydrodynamic or electrophoretic properties in denaturing solvents. The viral 60 to 70S RNA complex was found to consist of 30 to 40S subunits both with (65%) and without (approximately 30%) poly(A). The heteropolymeric sequences of these two species of 30 to 40S subunits have the same RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotide composition. Some, perhaps all, RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides of 30 to 40S Rous sarcoma virus RNA appear to have a unique location relative to the poly(A) sequence, because the complexity of poly(A)-tagged fragments of 30 to 40S RNA decreased with decreasing size of the fragment. Two RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides which distinguish sarcoma virus Prague B RNA from that of a transformation-defective deletion mutant of the same virus appear to be associated with an 11S poly(A)-tagged fragment of Prague B RNA. Thus RNA sequences concerned with cell transformation seem to be located within 5 to 10% of the 3′ terminus of Prague B RNA. Images PMID:4372409

  11. Suppression of Rous Sarcoma Virus Growth in Tissue Cultures by Mycoplasma orale

    PubMed Central

    Somerson, Norman L.; Cook, M. K.

    1965-01-01

    Somerson, Norman L. (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Md.), and M. K. Cook. Suppression of Rous sarcoma virus growth in tissue cultures by Mycoplasma orale. J. Bacteriol. 90:534–540. 1965.—An agent which produced cell destruction in human diploid and chick-embryo fibroblasts was isolated from WI-26 strain of human diploid fibroblasts and shown to be a mycoplasma. The multiplication of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and Rous associated virus (RAV) was inhibited in WI-26, WI-38, and chick-embryo fibroblasts infected with this mycoplasma. The mycoplasma isolate, designated strain 941, reacted strongly in the complement-fixation test with antiserum to Mycoplasma orale CH19299, an isolate obtained from the human oral cavity. The cytopathic effect of mycoplasma strain 941 could be eliminated by growing the mycoplasma on an artificial agar medium before inoculation into chick-embryo fibroblasts. Serial passage in chick-embryo fibroblasts restored the cytopathogenicity of the agar-grown mycoplasma. However, growth of RSV and RAV was inhibited by both the tissue culture-grown and the agar-grown 941 strain, and also by the CH19299 strain which did not produce any cytopathic effect. Images PMID:14329470

  12. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  13. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  14. Hydroxyquinolines inhibit ribonucleic acid-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase and inactivate Rous sarcoma virus and herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Rohde, W; Mikelens, P; Jackson, J; Blackman, J; Whitcher, J; Levinson, W

    1976-08-01

    8-Hydroxyquinoline and several of its derivatives inactivate the transforming ability of Rous sarcoma virus and inhibit its ribonucleic acid-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase activity. The copper complex of these metal-binding ligands is as active as the free ligand. The activity of the 8-hydroxyquinolines is approximately 50-fold more effective than another group of metal-binding compounds that we have tested, the thiosemicarbazones. In contrast to the potency of the 8-hydroxyquinolines to inactivate Rous sarcoma virus, no intracellular inhibition of transformation could be demonstrated at a concentration that did not affect the growth and appearance of the cells. Cellular deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis was inhibited to a greater extent than was ribonucleic acid or protein synthesis. The phenomenon of "concentration quenching" was observed with high concentrations of drug, causing less inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis than was observed with lower concentrations. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was inactivated also by the 8-hydroxyquinolines and their copper complexes. No intracellular inhibition of plaque formation was observed. Treatment with 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate had no effect on the resolution of herpetic keratitis in rabbits. Some 8-hydroxyquinolines bind to deoxyribonucleic acid in the presence of copper, a phenomenon that may be important in their antiviral activity. PMID:185949

  15. Dengue virus protein recognition by virus-specific murine CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Lai, C J; Bray, M; Falgout, B; Men, R; Ennis, F A

    1993-01-01

    The identification of the protein targets for dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes may be useful for planning the development of subunit vaccines against dengue. We studied the recognition by murine dengue virus-specific major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) of dengue virus proteins using recombinant vaccinia viruses containing segments of the dengue virus genome. CTL from H-2k mice recognized a single serotype-cross-reactive epitope on the nonstructural (NS) protein NS3. CTL from H-2b mice recognized a serotype-cross-reactive epitope that was localized to NS4a or NS4b. CTL from H-2d mice recognized at least three epitopes: a serotype-specific epitope on one of the structural proteins, a serotype-cross-reactive epitope on NS3, and a serotype-cross-reactive epitope on NS1 or NS2a. Our findings demonstrate the limited recognition of dengue virus proteins by CTL from three inbred mouse strains and the predominance of CTL epitopes on dengue virus nonstructural proteins, particularly NS3. Since human dengue virus-specific CTL show similar patterns of recognition, these findings suggest that nonstructural proteins should be considered in designing vaccines against dengue. PMID:7678307

  16. Multiparameter analyses of spontaneous nonthymic lymphomas occurring in NFS/N mice congenic for ecotropic murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, T. N.; Morse, H. C.; Yetter, R. A.; Rowe, W. P.; Hartley, J. W.; Pattengale, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    Mouse strains congenic for ecotropic retrovirus genes have a much higher frequency of spontaneous lymphomas than the background NFS/N strain. In this study, most of these lymphomas have been identified as B-cell in origin by morphologic features, identification of immunoglobulin class, and cell-surface antigens. The classification suggested by Pattengale and Taylor proved to be applicable to the lymphomas studied. Most were of large follicular center cells and are considered typical of the type formerly designated as "reticulum cell sarcoma, type B." Many lymphomas contained a large proportion of nonneoplastic cells which partially obscured their neoplastic component. The role of ecotropic murine leukemia viruses as etiologic agents for B-cell lymphomas remains equivocal. However, because the only difference between the NFS/N and congenic mice is the expression of viruses in the latter, it appears that these viruses are somehow involved in induction of B-cell lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2998195

  17. Analysis of Rous sarcoma virus Gag protein by mass spectrometry indicates trimming by host exopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Pepinsky, R B; Papayannopoulos, I A; Campbell, S; Vogt, V M

    1996-01-01

    We have used electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry to investigate Gag protein structure and processing in Rous sarcoma virus, the prototype of the avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses. Molecular masses determined for the mature virion proteins MA, CA, NC, and PR agree closely with those predicted by currently accepted models for their structures. However, the data for p10 imply that only about 10% of the product has the predicted mass while the remainder is missing the C-terminal methionine residue. Molecular masses also were obtained for products generated by PR cleavage in vitro of a Gag precursor polyprotein expressed in Escherichia coli. The data confirm the predicted Gag cleavage sites for PR. Thus, carboxypeptidase activity appears to be responsible for generating the des-Met form of p10. The same activity may account for the small amount of the mature des-Met CA, as previously reported. Analysis of cleavage products generated in vitro also serves to define the PR processing site separating the p2a and p2b peptides, Asn-164-Cys-165. In conjunction with published characterizations of these two peptides processed from the segment of Gag between MA and p10, these data suggest trimming of p2b by an aminopeptidase. Finally, the molecular masses determined for the MA-related species p19f, p23, and p35 now accurately define the structures of these proteins. PMID:8627817

  18. Activation of DNA Damage Response Induced by the Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpes Virus

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Toma, Luigi; Bordignon, Valentina; Trento, Elisabetta; D’Agosto, Giovanna; Cordiali-Fei, Paola; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), can infect endothelial cells often leading to cell transformation and to the development of tumors, namely Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and the plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease. KSHV is prevalent in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa and the Mediterranean region presenting distinct genotypes, which appear to be associated with differences in disease manifestation, according to geographical areas. In infected cells, KSHV persists in a latent episomal form. However, in a limited number of cells, it undergoes spontaneous lytic reactivation to ensure the production of new virions. During both the latent and the lytic cycle, KSHV is programmed to express genes which selectively modulate the DNA damage response (DDR) through the activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) pathway and by phosphorylating factors associated with the DDR, including the major tumor suppressor protein p53 tumor suppressor p53. This review will focus on the interplay between the KSHV and the DDR response pathway throughout the viral lifecycle, exploring the putative molecular mechanism/s that may contribute to malignant transformation of host cells. PMID:27258263

  19. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of calmodulin in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fukami, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakayama, A; Kanehisa, T

    1986-01-01

    Calmodulin, a wide-spread eukaryotic Ca2+-binding protein, was phosphorylated at its tyrosine residues in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed chicken and rat cells but not in normal chicken embryo fibroblasts. In contrast, serine and threonine phosphorylation of calmodulin was found to occur in both normal and virus-transformed cells. In an in vitro system containing purified src kinase from RSV-transformed cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of calmodulin by the src kinase was inhibited by Ca2+. Furthermore, the tyrosine-phosphorylated calmodulin showed slower mobility than that of nonphosphorylated calmodulin in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis when Ca2+ was present. These results suggest that the structure of calmodulin Ca2+ complex may be altered by tyrosine phosphorylation. It is thus inferred that Ca2+ may regulate the level of tyrosine phosphorylation of calmodulin in RSV-transformed cells, and phosphorylation in turn may attenuate the function of this protein in vivo. Images PMID:2424020

  20. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Melanie; Schnierle, Barbara S. . E-mail: schba@pei.de

    2005-06-20

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles.

  1. Higher-Order Structure of the Rous Sarcoma Virus SP Assembly Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Di L.; Monroe, Eric B.; Bedwell, Gregory J.; Phillips, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purified retroviral Gag proteins can assemble in vitro to form immature virus-like particles (VLPs). By cryoelectron tomography, Rous sarcoma virus VLPs show an organized hexameric lattice consisting chiefly of the capsid (CA) domain, with periodic stalk-like densities below the lattice. We hypothesize that the structure represented by these densities is formed by amino acid residues immediately downstream of the folded CA, namely, the short spacer peptide SP, along with a dozen flanking residues. These 24 residues comprise the SP assembly (SPA) domain, and we propose that neighboring SPA units in a Gag hexamer coalesce to form a six-helix bundle. Using in vitro assembly, alanine scanning mutagenesis, and biophysical analyses, we have further characterized the structure and function of SPA. Most of the amino acid residues in SPA could not be mutated individually without abrogating assembly, with the exception of a few residues near the N and C termini, as well as three hydrophilic residues within SPA. We interpret these results to mean that the amino acids that do not tolerate mutations contribute to higher-order structures in VLPs. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange analyses of unassembled Gag compared that of assembled VLPs showed strong protection at the SPA region, consistent with a higher-order structure. Circular dichroism revealed that a 29mer SPA peptide shifts from a random coil to a helix in a concentration-dependent manner. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed concentration-dependent self-association of the peptide into a hexamer. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence for the formation of a critical six-helix bundle in Gag assembly. IMPORTANCE The structure of a retrovirus like HIV is created by several thousand molecules of the viral Gag protein, which assemble to form the known hexagonal protein lattice in the virus particle. How the Gag proteins pack together in the lattice is incompletely understood. A short segment of Gag known to

  2. Avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-receptor interactions: From classical genetics to novel insights into virus-cell membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, R.J.O.; Elleder, D.; Young, J.A.T. . E-mail: jyoung@salk.edu

    2006-01-05

    For over 40 years, avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV)-receptor interactions have been employed as a useful model system to study the mechanism of retroviral entry into cells. Pioneering studies on this system focused upon the genetic basis of the differential susceptibilities of different lines of chickens to infection by distinct subgroups of ASLV. These studies led to the definition of three distinct autosomal recessive genes that were predicted to encode cellular receptors for different viral subgroups. They also led to the concept of viral interference, i.e. the mechanism by which infection by one virus can render cells resistant to reinfection by other viruses that use the same cellular receptor. Here, we review the contributions that analyses of the ASLV-receptor system have made in unraveling the mechanisms of retroviral entry into cells and focus on key findings such as identification and characterization of the ASLV receptor genes and the subsequent elucidation of an unprecedented mechanism of virus-cell fusion. Since many of the initial findings on this system were published in the early volumes of Virology, this subject is especially well suited to this special anniversary issue of the journal.

  3. Comparing human norovirus surrogates: murine norovirus and Tulane virus.

    PubMed

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-01-01

    Viral surrogates are widely used by researchers to predict human norovirus behavior. Murine norovirus (MNV) is currently accepted as the best surrogate and is assumed to mimic the survival and inactivation of human noroviruses. Recently, a new calicivirus, the Tulane virus (TV), was discovered, and its potential as a human norovirus surrogate is being explored. This study aimed to compare the behavior of the two potential surrogates under varying treatments of pH (2.0 to 10.0), chlorine (0.2 to 2,000 ppm), heat (50 to 75°C), and survival in tap water at room (20°C) and refrigeration (4°C) temperatures for up to 30 days. Viral infectivity was determined by the plaque assay for both MNV and TV. There was no significant difference between the inactivation of MNV and TV in all heat treatments, and for both MNV and TV survival in tap water at 20°C over 30 days. At 4°C, MNV remained infectious over 30 days at a titer of approximately 5 log PFU/ml, whereas TV titers decreased significantly by 5 days. MNV was more pH stable, as TV titers were reduced significantly at pH 2.0, 9.0, and 10.0, as compared with pH 7.0, whereas MNV titers were only significantly reduced at pH 10.0. After chlorine treatment, there was no significant difference in virus with the exception of at 2 ppm, where TV decreased significantly compared with MNV. Compared with TV, MNV is likely a better surrogate for human noroviruses, as MNV persisted over a wider range of pH values, at 2 ppm of chlorine, and without a loss of titer at 4°C. PMID:23317870

  4. Induction of macrophage procoagulant activity by murine hepatitis virus strain 3: role of tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Dackiw, A P; Zakrzewski, K; Nathens, A B; Cheung, P Y; Fingerote, R; Levy, G A; Rotstein, O D

    1995-01-01

    The induction of a unique macrophage procoagulant molecule by murine hepatitis virus strain 3 correlates with the severity of viral hepatitis. The role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the signalling pathway leading to procoagulant expression was studied. Murine hepatitis virus strain 3 initiated a rapid increase in phosphotyrosine accumulation. Tyrosine kinase inhibition precluded this increase and abrogated expression of the virus-induced procoagulant mouse fibrinogen-like protein (musfiblp) gene. These findings suggest that manipulation of this signalling pathway in vivo might represent a novel approach to treating this disease. PMID:7543590

  5. Instigation of Notch signaling in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and other human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang; Pekkonen, Pirita; Ojala, Päivi M

    2012-10-01

    The Notch pathway is a highly conserved signaling circuit with a critical role in cell-fate determination and tumor initiation. Notch is reported to regulate various key events in tumor progression, such as angiogenesis, maintenance of cancer stem cells, resistance to therapeutic agents and metastasis. This review describes the intimate interplay of human tumor viruses with the Notch signaling pathway. Special attention is paid to Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma and rare lymphoproliferative disorders. The past decade of active research has led to significant advances in understanding how Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus exploits the Notch pathway to regulate its replication phase and to modulate the host cellular microenvironment to make it more favorable for viral persistence and spreading. PMID:23030424

  6. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus (XMRV) and the Safety of the Blood Supply.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew D; Cohn, Claudia S

    2016-10-01

    In 2006, a new virus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), was discovered in a cohort of U.S. men with prostate cancer. Soon after this initial finding, XMRV was also detected in samples from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The blood community, which is highly sensitive to the threat of emerging infectious diseases since the HIV/AIDS crisis, recommended indefinite deferral of all blood donors with a history of CFS. As XMRV research progressed, conflicting results emerged regarding the importance of this virus in the pathophysiology of prostate cancer and/or CFS. Molecular biologists traced the development of XMRV to a recombination event in a laboratory mouse that likely occurred circa 1993. The virus was propagated via cell lines derived from a tumor present in this mouse and spread through contamination of laboratory samples. Well-controlled experiments showed that detection of XMRV was due to contaminated samples and was not a marker of or a causal factor in prostate cancer or CFS. This paper traces the development of XMRV in the prostate and CFS scientific communities and explores the effect it had on the blood community. PMID:27358491

  7. A Structural Basis for BRD2/4-Mediated Host Chromatin Interaction and Oligomer Assembly of Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and Murine Gammaherpesvirus LANA Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Krausze, Joern; Richter, Ulrike; Adler, Heiko; Fedorov, Roman; Pietrek, Marcel; Rückert, Jessica; Ritter, Christiane; Schulz, Thomas F.; Lührs, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes a lifelong latent infection and causes several malignancies in humans. Murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) is a related γ2-herpesvirus frequently used as a model to study the biology of γ-herpesviruses in vivo. The KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (kLANA) and the MHV68 mLANA (orf73) protein are required for latent viral replication and persistence. Latent episomal KSHV genomes and kLANA form nuclear microdomains, termed ‘LANA speckles’, which also contain cellular chromatin proteins, including BRD2 and BRD4, members of the BRD/BET family of chromatin modulators. We solved the X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA binding domains (CTD) of kLANA and MHV-68 mLANA. While these structures share the overall fold with the EBNA1 protein of Epstein-Barr virus, they differ substantially in their surface characteristics. Opposite to the DNA binding site, both kLANA and mLANA CTD contain a characteristic lysine-rich positively charged surface patch, which appears to be a unique feature of γ2-herpesviral LANA proteins. Importantly, kLANA and mLANA CTD dimers undergo higher order oligomerization. Using NMR spectroscopy we identified a specific binding site for the ET domains of BRD2/4 on kLANA. Functional studies employing multiple kLANA mutants indicate that the oligomerization of native kLANA CTD dimers, the characteristic basic patch and the ET binding site on the kLANA surface are required for the formation of kLANA ‘nuclear speckles’ and latent replication. Similarly, the basic patch on mLANA contributes to the establishment of MHV-68 latency in spleen cells in vivo. In summary, our data provide a structural basis for the formation of higher order LANA oligomers, which is required for nuclear speckle formation, latent replication and viral persistence. PMID:24146614

  8. Evidence of methylation of B77 avian sarcoma virus genome RNA subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, C M; Dimock, K

    1976-01-01

    B77 avian sarcoma virus RNA was labeled with (methyl-3H) methionine under conditions that prevent non-methyl incorporation of 3H radioactivity into purine rings. From the determined values for the extent of methylation of 4S RNA isolated from infected chicken embryo cells, it was estimated that 30 to 40S RNA subunits that results from heat denaturation of the 60 to 70S RNA contain approximately 21 methyl groups, of which 14 to 16 are present at internal positions as N6 -methyladenosine residues. In addition, each of the virion RNA subunits appears to contain about two methyl groups in the "capped" 5' -terminal structure m7G(5')ppp(5') gm. These properties are consistent with the hypothesis that the 30 to 40S genome RNA os oncornaviruses also serves an mRNA function in infected cells. PMID:178899

  9. Innate immune defense defines susceptibility of sarcoma cells to measles vaccine virus-based oncolysis.

    PubMed

    Berchtold, Susanne; Lampe, Johanna; Weiland, Timo; Smirnow, Irina; Schleicher, Sabine; Handgretinger, Rupert; Kopp, Hans-Georg; Reiser, Jeanette; Stubenrauch, Frank; Mayer, Nora; Malek, Nisar P; Bitzer, Michael; Lauer, Ulrich M

    2013-03-01

    The oncolytic potential of measles vaccine virus (MeV) has been demonstrated in several tumor entities. Here, we investigated the susceptibility of eight sarcoma cell lines to MeV-mediated oncolysis and found five to be susceptible, whereas three proved to be resistant. In the MeV-resistant cell lines, we often observed an inhibition of viral replication along with a strong upregulation of the intracellular virus-sensing molecule RIG-I and of the interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene IFIT1. Not only expression of IFIT1 but also phosphorylation of IFN-stimulated Stat1 took place rapidly and were found to be persistent over time. In contrast, susceptible cell lines showed a much weaker, delayed, or completely missing expression of IFIT1 as well as a delayed or only transient phosphorylation of Stat1, whereas exogenic stimulation with beta interferon (IFN-β) resulted in a comparable profound activation of Stat1 and expression of IFIT1 in all cell lines. Pretreatment with IFN-β rendered three of the susceptible cell lines more resistant to MeV-mediated oncolysis. These data suggest that differences in the innate immune defense often account for different degrees of susceptibility of sarcoma cell lines to MeV-mediated oncolysis. From a therapeutic perspective, we were able to overcome resistance to MeV by increasing the multiplicity of infection (MOI) and by addition of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (FC), thereby exploiting the suicide gene function of virotherapeutic vector MeV-SCD armed with the SCD fusion protein, which consists of yeast cytosine deaminase and yeast uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:23302892

  10. Innate Immune Defense Defines Susceptibility of Sarcoma Cells to Measles Vaccine Virus-Based Oncolysis

    PubMed Central

    Berchtold, Susanne; Lampe, Johanna; Weiland, Timo; Smirnow, Irina; Schleicher, Sabine; Handgretinger, Rupert; Kopp, Hans-Georg; Reiser, Jeanette; Stubenrauch, Frank; Mayer, Nora; Malek, Nisar P.; Bitzer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The oncolytic potential of measles vaccine virus (MeV) has been demonstrated in several tumor entities. Here, we investigated the susceptibility of eight sarcoma cell lines to MeV-mediated oncolysis and found five to be susceptible, whereas three proved to be resistant. In the MeV-resistant cell lines, we often observed an inhibition of viral replication along with a strong upregulation of the intracellular virus-sensing molecule RIG-I and of the interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene IFIT1. Not only expression of IFIT1 but also phosphorylation of IFN-stimulated Stat1 took place rapidly and were found to be persistent over time. In contrast, susceptible cell lines showed a much weaker, delayed, or completely missing expression of IFIT1 as well as a delayed or only transient phosphorylation of Stat1, whereas exogenic stimulation with beta interferon (IFN-β) resulted in a comparable profound activation of Stat1 and expression of IFIT1 in all cell lines. Pretreatment with IFN-β rendered three of the susceptible cell lines more resistant to MeV-mediated oncolysis. These data suggest that differences in the innate immune defense often account for different degrees of susceptibility of sarcoma cell lines to MeV-mediated oncolysis. From a therapeutic perspective, we were able to overcome resistance to MeV by increasing the multiplicity of infection (MOI) and by addition of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (FC), thereby exploiting the suicide gene function of virotherapeutic vector MeV-SCD armed with the SCD fusion protein, which consists of yeast cytosine deaminase and yeast uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:23302892

  11. Irregular and Semi-Regular Polyhedral Models for Rous Sarcoma Virus Cores

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, J. Bernard; Butan, Carmen; Winkler, Dennis C.; Craven, Rebecca C.; Steven, Alasdair C.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas many viruses have capsids of uniquely defined sizes that observe icosahedral symmetry, retrovirus capsids are highly polymorphic. Nevertheless, they may also be described as polyhedral foldings of a fullerene lattice on which the capsid protein (CA) is arrayed. Lacking the high order of symmetry that facilitates the reconstruction of icosahedral capsids from cryo-electron micrographs, the three-dimensional structures of individual retrovirus capsids may be determined by cryo-electron tomography, albeit at lower resolution. Here we describe computational and graphical methods to construct polyhedral models that match in size and shape, capsids of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) observed within intact virions [8]. The capsids fall into several shape classes, including tubes, “lozenges”, and “coffins”. The extent to which a capsid departs from icosahedral symmetry reflects the irregularity of the distribution of pentamers, which are always 12 in number for a closed polyhedral capsid. The number of geometrically distinct polyhedra grows rapidly with increasing quotas of hexamers, and ranks in the millions for RSV capsids, which typically have 150 – 300 hexamers. Unlike the capsid proteins of icosahedral viruses that assume a minimal number of quasi-equivalent conformations equal to the triangulation number (T), retroviral CAs exhibit a near-continuum of quasi-equivalent conformations – a property that may be attributed to the flexible hinge linking the N- and C-terminal domains. PMID:19122884

  12. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a γ retrovirus that has been associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and prostate cancer. The search for viral causes of these syndromes was reignited by the finding that RNase L activity was low in hereditary prostate cancer and some CFS patients. The six strains of XMRV that have been sequenced have greater than 99% identity, indicating a new human infection rather than laboratory contamination. DNA, RNA, and proteins from XMRV have been detected in 50% to 67% of CFS patients and in about 3.7% of healthy controls. XMRV infections could be transmitted to permissive cell lines from CFS plasma, suggesting the potential for communicable and blood-borne spread of the virus and potentially CFS. This troubling concept is currently under intense evaluation. The most important steps now are to independently confirm the initial findings; develop reliable assays of biomarkers; and to move on to investigations of XMRV pathophysiology and treatment in CFS, prostate cancer, and potentially other virus-related syndromes, if they exist. PMID:20425007

  13. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S.; Basco, Maria D. S.; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L.; Hart, Mark E.; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P.

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together. PMID:26658916

  14. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Basco, Maria D S; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L; Hart, Mark E; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together. PMID:26658916

  15. Transduction of the cellular src gene and 3' adjacent sequences in avian sarcoma virus PR2257.

    PubMed Central

    Geryk, J; Dezélée, P; Barnier, J V; Svoboda, J; Nehyba, J; Karakoz, I; Rynditch, A V; Yatsula, B A; Calothy, G

    1989-01-01

    When injected into chickens, a transformation-defective mutant of the Prague C strain of Rous sarcoma virus induced tumors at low incidence and after a long latency. One such tumor released a replication-defective virus designated PR2257. We molecularly cloned and sequenced the proviral DNA from quail fibroblasts transformed by PR2257. Comparison of PR2257 sequence with that of Prague C, cellular src, and 3' adjacent cellular DNA showed that the spliced version of the c-src gene and about 950 base pairs (bp) of 3'-flanking cellular DNA were transduced into PR2257. This transduction eliminated nearly all replicative genes, since the gag gene splice donor site was linked to the splice acceptor site of the src gene and, on the 3' side, recombination occurred in the end of env gene. Insertion of two extra cytosines 23 bp before and 19 bp after the c-src stop codon resulted in an extension of the coding portion up to 587 amino acids, divergence of sequences after Pro-525 and replacement of Tyr-527 by a valine residue. In addition, it appears that the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of PR2257 result from multiple recombinations between exogenous and endogenous virus genomes. Limited digestion of p66src encoded by PR2257 with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease yielded a V2 peptide (C-terminal moiety) with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kilodaltons, consistent with the 5.7-kilodalton increase expected from the DNA sequence. The structure of PR2257 suggests that the first step in the capture of c-src gene by avian lymphomatosis viruses is the trans splicing of the viral leader mRNA to exon 1 of c-src. Images PMID:2463376

  16. Variable Genome Sequences of the Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Regulatory Region Isolated from an Infected Mouse Tissue Viral Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Libbey, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome, isolated from an infected murine tissue homogenate, was sequenced to completion. The lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys were the source of the tissue homogenate in order to mirror the heterogeneity of the virus population in vivo. The regulatory region sequence was found to be highly variable. PMID:27231357

  17. Variable Genome Sequences of the Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Regulatory Region Isolated from an Infected Mouse Tissue Viral Suspension.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Fujinami, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome, isolated from an infected murine tissue homogenate, was sequenced to completion. The lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys were the source of the tissue homogenate in order to mirror the heterogeneity of the virus population in vivo The regulatory region sequence was found to be highly variable. PMID:27231357

  18. Biochemical Characterization of Rous Sarcoma Virus MA Protein Interaction with Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Amanda K.; Murray, Paul S.; Murray, Diana; Vogt, Volker M.

    2005-01-01

    The MA domain of retroviral Gag proteins mediates association with the host cell membrane during assembly. The biochemical nature of this interaction is not well understood. We have used an in vitro flotation assay to directly measure Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) MA-membrane interaction in the absence of host cell factors. The association of purified MA and MA-containing proteins with liposomes of defined composition was electrostatic in nature and depended upon the presence of a biologically relevant concentration of negatively charged lipids. A mutant MA protein known to be unable to promote Gag membrane association and budding in vivo failed to bind to liposomes. These results were supported by computational modeling. The intrinsic affinity of RSV MA for negatively charged membranes appears insufficient to promote efficient plasma membrane binding during assembly. However, an artificially dimerized form of MA bound to liposomes by at least an order of magnitude more tightly than monomeric MA. This result suggests that the clustering of MA domains, via Gag-Gag interactions during virus assembly, drives membrane association in vivo. PMID:15858007

  19. Precise localization of m6A in Rous sarcoma virus RNA reveals clustering of methylation sites: implications for RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Kane, S E; Beemon, K

    1985-09-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) residues are present as internal base modifications in most higher eucaryotic mRNAs; however, the biological function of this modification is not known. We describe a method for localizing and quantitating m6A within a large RNA molecule, the genomic RNA of Rous sarcoma virus. Specific fragments of 32P-labeled Rous sarcoma virus RNA were isolated by hybridization with complementary DNA restriction fragments spanning nucleotides 6185 to 8050. RNA was digested with RNase and finger-printed, and individual oligonucleotides were analyzed for the presence of m6A by paper electrophoresis and thin-layer chromatography. With this technique, seven sites of methylation in this region of the Rous sarcoma virus genome were localized at nucleotides 6394, 6447, 6507, 6718, 7414, 7424, and 8014. Further, m6A was observed at two additional sites whose nucleotide assignments remain ambiguous. A clustering of two or more m6A residues was seen at three positions within the RNA analyzed. Modification at certain sites was found to be heterogeneous, in that different molecules of RNA appeared to be methylated differently. Previous studies have determined that methylation occurs only in the sequences Gm6AC and Am6AC. We observed a high frequency of methylation at PuGm6ACU sequences. The possible involvement of m6A in RNA splicing events is discussed. PMID:3016525

  20. No Evidence of Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Viruses in Live Attenuated Human Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, William M.; Zheng, HaoQiang; Simmons, Graham; Zhou, Yanchen; Tang, Shaohua; Shankar, Anupama; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric L.; Heneine, Walid

    2011-01-01

    Background The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV) in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents. Results All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) (SA-14-14-2), varicella (Varivax), measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II), measles (Attenuvax), rubella (Meruvax-II), rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix), and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells. Conclusions We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans. PMID:22216219

  1. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  2. In Vitro Assembly of Virus-Like Particles of a Gammaretrovirus, the Murine Leukemia Virus XMRV

    PubMed Central

    Hadravová, Romana; de Marco, Alex; Ulbrich, Pavel; Štokrová, Jitka; Doležal, Michal; Pichová, Iva; Ruml, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Immature retroviral particles are assembled by self-association of the structural polyprotein precursor Gag. During maturation the Gag polyprotein is proteolytically cleaved, yielding mature structural proteins, matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC), that reassemble into a mature viral particle. Proteolytic cleavage causes the N terminus of CA to fold back to form a β-hairpin, anchored by an internal salt bridge between the N-terminal proline and the inner aspartate. Using an in vitro assembly system of capsid-nucleocapsid protein (CANC), we studied the formation of virus-like particles (VLP) of a gammaretrovirus, the xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV). We show here that, unlike other retroviruses, XMRV CA and CANC do not assemble tubular particles characteristic of mature assembly. The prevention of β-hairpin formation by the deletion of either the N-terminal proline or 10 initial amino acids enabled the assembly of ΔProCANC or Δ10CANC into immature-like spherical particles. Detailed three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis of these particles revealed that below a disordered N-terminal CA layer, the C terminus of CA assembles a typical immature lattice, which is linked by rod-like densities with the RNP. PMID:22090120

  3. Immune response and resistance to Rous sarcoma virus challenge of chickens immunized with cell-associated glycoproteins provided with a recombinant avian leukosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chebloune, Y; Rulka, J; Cosset, F L; Valsesia, S; Ronfort, C; Legras, C; Drynda, A; Kuzmak, J; Nigon, V M; Verdier, G

    1991-01-01

    The Rous-associated virus 1 env gene, which encodes the envelope gp85 and gp37 glycoproteins, was isolated and inserted in place of the v-erbB oncogene into an avian erythroblastosis virus-based vector, carrying the neo resistance gene substituted for the v-erbA oncogene, to generate the pNEA recombinant vector. A helper-free virus stock of the pNEA vector was produced on an avian transcomplementing cell line and used to infect primary chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) or quail QT6 cells. These infected cells, selected with G418 (CEF/NEA and QT6/NEA, respectively) were found to be resistant to superinfections with subgroup A retroviruses. The CEF/NEA preparations were used as a cell-associated antigen to inoculate adult chickens by the intravenous route compared with direct inoculations of NEA recombinant helper-free virus used as a cell-free antigen. Chickens injected with the cell-associated antigen (CEF/NEA) exhibited an immune response demonstrated by induction of high titers of neutralizing antibodies and were found to be protected against tumor production after Rous sarcoma virus A challenge. Conversely, no immune response and no protection against Rous sarcoma virus A challenge were observed in chickens directly inoculated with cell-free NEA recombinant virus or in sham-inoculated chickens. PMID:1654445

  4. Creation and expression of myristylated forms of Rous sarcoma virus gag protein in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wills, J W; Craven, R C; Achacoso, J A

    1989-01-01

    Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), a member of the avian sarcoma and leukosis family of retroviruses, has long been known to be capable of infecting and transforming mammalian cells; however, such transformed cells do not release virus particles. The RSV gag product (Pr76gag) produced in these cells is not released into the culture medium or proteolytically processed to release mature products. Thus, the behavior of Pr76gag in mammalian cells is much like that of mammalian retroviral Gag proteins which have been altered so as to block the addition of myristic acid at residue 2 (Gly). Because the RSV gag product does not possess a myristic acid addition site, we hypothesized that the creation of one by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis might permit particles to be released from mammalian cells. Two myristylated forms of Pr76 were created. In Pr76myr1, the first 10 amino acids have been exchanged for those of p60v-src, which are known to be sufficient for myristylation. In Pr76myr2, the Glu at the second residue has been substituted with Gly. The alleles encoding the modified and wild-type forms of Pr76 have been expressed at high levels in mammalian (CV-1) cells by using an SV40-based vector. Surprisingly, we have found that expression of high levels of the unmodified (wild-type) product, Pr76myr0, results in low levels of particle formation and precursor processing. This indicates that myristic acid is not the sole determinant for targeting. However, the addition of myristic acid to Pr76myr1 or Pr76myr2 resulted in a fivefold enhancement in Gag function. In all aspects examined, the behavior of myristylated Pr76 was identical to that of the authentic product produced in avian cells. We also show that processing is mediated by the gag-encoded protease and that removal of the amino terminus to create Pr76gagX results in an inability to form particles or be processed. This suggests that proper targeting is prerequisite for activation of the RSV protease in mammalian cells

  5. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu; Morishita, Ryo; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially {sup 15}N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [{sup 1}H, {sup 15}N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has

  6. Immunotherapy of murine sarcomas with interleukin 2. II. Activation of killer cells by human recombinant IL-2.

    PubMed

    Indrová, M; Bubeník, J; Toulcová, A

    1986-01-01

    Highly purified human recombinant interleukin 2 induced cytotoxicity in mouse spleen cells against mouse sarcoma cells when added during the 51Cr microcytotoxicity assay. It elicited similar levels of killer cell activation as did human lymphoid (Jurkat leukaemia-derived) or mouse lymphoid (EL-4 leukaemia-derived) IL-2 preparations. The susceptibility of six MC-induced mouse sarcomas to the cytolytic effect of lymphokine-activated killer cells was compared. Five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) of six mouse sarcoma cell lines examined were sensitive in vitro to the LAK cell effect, whereas one cell line (MC12) was resistant. Since the sensitive and resistant target cell lines had been induced with the same carcinogen and in mice of the same genotype, they represent a very useful model for investigation of target cell structures responsible for the sensitivity to the LAK cell effect. PMID:3492397

  7. Rabies virus replication in primary murine bone marrow macrophages and in human and murine macrophage-like cell lines: implications for viral persistence.

    PubMed

    Ray, N B; Ewalt, L C; Lodmell, D L

    1995-02-01

    To determine whether rabies viruses replicate in macrophage or macrophage-like cells, several human and murine macrophage-like cell lines, as well as primary cultures of murine bone marrow macrophages, were incubated with the Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) virus and several different street rabies viruses (SRV). ERA rabies virus replicated well in human monocytic U937 and THP-1 cells and murine macrophage IC-21 cells, as well as primary cultures of murine macrophages. Minimal replication was detected in murine monocytic WEHI-3BD- and PU5-1R cells, and ERA virus did not replicate in murine monocytic P388D1 or J774A.1 cells. A tissue culture-adapted SRV of bat origin also replicated in IC-21 and U937 cells. Non-tissue culture-adapted SRV isolated from different animal species, particularly bats, replicated minimally in U937, THP-1, IC-21 cells and primary murine bone marrow macrophages. To determine whether rabies virus replication is dependent upon the state of differentiation of the macrophage-like cell, human promyelocytic HL-60 cells were differentiated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). ERA rabies virus replicated in the differentiated HL-60 cells but not in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Persistent infections were established in macrophage-like U937 cells with ERA rabies virus and SRV, and infectious SRV was isolated from adherent bone marrow cells of mice that had been infected 96 days previously. Virus harvested from persistently infected U937 cells and the adherent bone marrow cells had specifically adapted to each cell. This specificity was shown by the inability of the viruses to infect macrophages other than U937 cells and primary bone marrow macrophages, respectively. Virus titers of the persistently infected U937 cells fluctuated with extended cell passage. After 30 passages, virus released from the cells had lost virulence as shown by its inability to kill intracranially inoculated mice. However, the avirulent virus released from the

  8. Genetic analysis of the Rous sarcoma virus subgroup D env gene: mammal tropism correlates with temperature sensitivity of gp85.

    PubMed Central

    Bova-Hill, C; Olsen, J C; Swanstrom, R

    1991-01-01

    Subgroup D avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses can penetrate a variety of mammalian cells in addition to cells from their natural host, chickens. Sequences derived from the gp85-coding domain within the env gene of a mammal-tropic subgroup D virus (Schmidt-Ruppin D strain of Rous sarcoma virus [SR-D RSV]) and a non-mammal-tropic subgroup B virus (Rous-associated virus type 2) were recombined to map genetic determinants that allow penetration of mammalian cells. The following conclusions were based on host range analysis of the recombinant viruses. (i) The determinants of gp85 that result in the mammal tropism phenotype of SR-D RSV are encoded within the 160 codons that lie 3' of codon 121 from the corresponding amino terminus of the gp85 protein. (ii) Small linear domains of the SR-D RSV gp85-coding domain placed in the subgroup B background did not yield viruses with titers equal to that of the subgroup D virus in a human cell line. (iii) Recombinant viruses that contained subgroup D sequences within the hr1 variable domain of gp85 showed modest-to-significant increases in infectivity on human cells relative to chicken cells. A recombinant virus that contained three fortuitous amino acid substitutions in the gp85-coding domain was found to penetrate the human cell line and give a titer similar to that of the subgroup D virus. In addition, we found that the subgroup D virus, the mutant virus, and recombinant viruses with an increased mammal tropism phenotype were unstable at 42 degrees C. These results suggest that the mammal tropism of the SR-D strain is not related to altered receptor specificity but rather to an unstable and fusogenic viral glycoprotein. A temperature sensitivity phenotype for infectivity of mammalian cells was also observed for another mammal-tropic avian retrovirus, the Bratislava 77 strain of RSV, a subgroup C virus, but was not seen for any other avian retrovirus tested, strengthening the correlation between mammal tropism and temperature

  9. Genome Sequences of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Detected in Wild House Mice (Mus musculus)

    PubMed Central

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Moens, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Using generic PCR, we identified a variant of murine pneumotropic virus (MptV) (family Polyomaviridae) in 3 wild house mice (Mus musculus). The fully amplified and sequenced genomes display considerable differences from the MptV genomes published previously and enlighten us on the natural diversity of rodent polyomaviruses. PMID:26798094

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Clone pKV(37-1)

    PubMed Central

    Libbey, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome encoded by the pKV(37-1) clone was sequenced to completion. The regulatory region harbored a mutation not previously reported. The protein coding regions (large and small T antigens, viral proteins 1 to 3) showed multiple regions of high amino acid identity to the human, simian, and bovine polyomaviruses. PMID:27198030

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Clone pKV(37-1).

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Fujinami, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome encoded by the pKV(37-1) clone was sequenced to completion. The regulatory region harbored a mutation not previously reported. The protein coding regions (large and small T antigens, viral proteins 1 to 3) showed multiple regions of high amino acid identity to the human, simian, and bovine polyomaviruses. PMID:27198030

  12. Mediation of wound-related Rous sarcoma virus tumorigenesis by TFG (transforming growth factor)-. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sieweke, M.H.; Bissell, M.J. ); Thompson, N.L.; Sporn, M.B. )

    1990-06-29

    In Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-infected chickens, wounding leads to tumor formation with nearly 100% frequency in tissues that would otherwise remain tumor-free. Identifying molecular mediators of this phenomenon should yield important clues to the mechanisms involved in RSV tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that TGF-{beta} is present locally shortly after wounding, but not in unwounded controls. In addition, subcutaneous administration of recombinant transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) could substitute completely for wounding in tumor induction. A treatment protocol of four doses of 800 nanograms of TGF-{beta} resulted in v-src-expressing tumors with 100% frequency; four doses of only 10 nanograms still led to tumor formation in 80% of the animals. This effect was specific, as other growth factors with suggested roles in would healing did not elicit the same response. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) or TGF-{alpha} had no effect, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) yielded only occasional tumors after longer latency. TGF-{beta} release during the would-healing response may thus be a critical event that creates a conducive environment for RSV tumorigenesis and may act as a cofactor for transformation in this system. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Importance of Basic Residues in Binding of Rous Sarcoma Virus Nucleocapsid to the RNA Packaging Signal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-gyung; Alidina, Annie; May, Cynthia; Linial, Maxine L.

    2003-01-01

    In the context of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag polyprotein, only the nucleocapsid (NC) domain is required to mediate the specificity of genomic RNA packaging. We have previously showed that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae three-hybrid system provides a rapid genetic assay to analyze the RNA and protein components of the avian retroviral RNA-Gag interactions necessary for specific encapsidation. In this study, using both site-directed mutagenesis and in vivo random screening in the yeast three-hybrid binding assay, we have examined the amino acids in NC required for genomic RNA binding. We found that we could delete either of the two Cys-His boxes without greatly abrogating either RNA binding or packaging, although the two Cys-His boxes are likely to be required for efficient viral assembly and release. In contrast, substitutions for the Zn-coordinating residues within the boxes did prevent RNA binding, suggesting changes in the overall conformation of the protein. In the basic region between the two Cys-His boxes, three positively charged residues, as well as basic residues flanking the two boxes, were necessary for both binding and packaging. Our results suggest that the stretches of positively charged residues within NC that need to be in a proper conformation appear to be responsible for selective recognition and binding to the packaging signal (Ψ)-containing RNAs. PMID:12525635

  14. Importance of basic residues in binding of rous sarcoma virus nucleocapsid to the RNA packaging signal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-gyung; Alidina, Annie; May, Cynthia; Linial, Maxine L

    2003-02-01

    In the context of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag polyprotein, only the nucleocapsid (NC) domain is required to mediate the specificity of genomic RNA packaging. We have previously showed that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae three-hybrid system provides a rapid genetic assay to analyze the RNA and protein components of the avian retroviral RNA-Gag interactions necessary for specific encapsidation. In this study, using both site-directed mutagenesis and in vivo random screening in the yeast three-hybrid binding assay, we have examined the amino acids in NC required for genomic RNA binding. We found that we could delete either of the two Cys-His boxes without greatly abrogating either RNA binding or packaging, although the two Cys-His boxes are likely to be required for efficient viral assembly and release. In contrast, substitutions for the Zn-coordinating residues within the boxes did prevent RNA binding, suggesting changes in the overall conformation of the protein. In the basic region between the two Cys-His boxes, three positively charged residues, as well as basic residues flanking the two boxes, were necessary for both binding and packaging. Our results suggest that the stretches of positively charged residues within NC that need to be in a proper conformation appear to be responsible for selective recognition and binding to the packaging signal (Psi)-containing RNAs. PMID:12525635

  15. Cospeciation and Horizontal Transmission of Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Virus gag Genes in Galliform Birds

    PubMed Central

    Dimcheff, Derek E.; Drovetski, Sergei V.; Krishnan, Mallika; Mindell, David P.

    2000-01-01

    In a study of the evolution and distribution of avian retroviruses, we found avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) gag genes in 26 species of galliform birds from North America, Central America, eastern Europe, Asia, and Africa. Nineteen of the 26 host species from whom ASLVs were sequenced were not previously known to contain ASLVs. We assessed congruence between ASLV phylogenies based on a total of 110 gag gene sequences and ASLV-host phylogenies based on mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA and ND2 sequences to infer coevolutionary history for ASLVs and their hosts. Widespread distribution of ASLVs among diverse, endemic galliform host species suggests an ancient association. Congruent ASLV and host phylogenies for two species of Perdix, two species of Gallus, and Lagopus lagopus and L. mutus also indicate an old association with vertical transmission and cospeciation for these ASLVs and hosts. An inference of horizontal transmission of ASLVs among some members of the Tetraoninae subfamily (grouse and ptarmigan) is supported by ASLV monophyletic groups reflecting geographic distribution and proximity of hosts rather than host species phylogeny. We provide a preliminary phylogenetic taxonomy for the new ASLVs, in which named taxa denote monophyletic groups. PMID:10756010

  16. RNA of simian sarcoma-associated virus type 1 produced in human tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fidanián, H M; Drohán, W N; Baluda, M A

    1975-01-01

    Simian sarcoma-associated virus type 1 propagated in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells exhibited characteristics typical of oncornaviruses but seemed to have several aberrant properties. It had a buoyant density of 1.14 g/cm3, had RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity, seemed to be labile to high salt concentrations, and contained little 50 to 60S RNA but relatively large amounts of human ribosomal RNA. In addition to 50 to 60S RNA, purified virions contained smaller RNA molecules with sedimentation coefficients of 28 to 30S, 18 TO 20S, and 4 to 10S. Unlike the 50 to 60S RNA species, the smaller virion-associated RNAs lacked polyadenylic acid, and the 28 to 30S RNA had an average base composition similar to that of human ribosomal RNA. Upon heat denaturation, the native 50 to 60S RNA genome yielded polyadenylic acid-containing 28 to 30S subunits that degraded in to 18 to 20S molecules upon further heat treatment. The 50 to 60S viral RNA had a guanine plus cytosine content of 56%. PMID:46285

  17. Identification and characterization of cis-acting elements residing in the walleye dermal sarcoma virus promoter.

    PubMed

    Hronek, Brett W; Meagher, Ashley; Rovnak, Joel; Quackenbush, Sandra L

    2004-07-01

    Walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV) is a complex retrovirus found associated with tumors that appear and regress on a seasonal basis. There are quantitative and qualitative differences in the amount of virus expression between developing and regressing tumors. To understand the role of host cell factors in WDSV expression, DNase I footprint analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), and reporter gene assays were employed. DNase I footprint analysis of the U3 region of the WDSV long terminal repeat with nuclear extract prepared from a walleye cell line revealed protection of an Oct1, AP1, Whn, and two E4BP4 sites. Additionally, three regions that contained no putative transcription factor binding sites were protected. EMSA confirmed the specific binding of the protected sites and revealed three additional sites, NF1, AP3, and LVa, not protected in DNase I footprint analysis. Site-directed mutagenesis of the individual sites, in the context of a luciferase reporter plasmid, revealed that the NF1, Oct1, AP1, E4BP4#2, AP3, and LVa sites contributed to transcription activation driven by the WDSV U3 region. Mutation of Novel#2 resulted in an increase in luciferase activity, suggesting the Novel#2 site may function to bind a negative regulator of transcription. Anti-Jun and anti-Fos antiserum specifically inhibited protein-DNA complex formation, indicating the presence of c-Jun and c-Fos in the walleye cell nuclear extracts and their participation in binding to the AP1 site. Interestingly, degenerative 15-bp repeats found in the U3 region are differentially protected in DNase I footprint analysis by the walleye cell line nuclear extract and regressing-tumor nuclear extract. EMSA utilizing the 15-bp repeat probe revealed that there are similarities of binding with W12 cell and developing-tumor nuclear extracts and that the binding differs from that observed with regressing-tumor nuclear extract. PMID:15220434

  18. Analysis of cleavage site mutations between the NC and PR Gag domains of Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, G; Pichova, I; Vogt, V M

    1997-01-01

    In retroviruses, the viral protease (PR) is released as a mature protein by cleavage of Gag, Gag-Pro, or Gag-Pro-Pol precursor polypeptides. In avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses (ASLV), PR forms the C-terminal domain of Gag. Based on the properties of a mutation (cs22) in the cleavage site between the upstream NC domain and the PR domain, the proteolytic liberation of PR previously was inferred to be essential for processing of Gag and Pol proteins. To study this process in more detail, we have analyzed the effects that several mutations at the NC-PR cleavage site have on proteolytic processing in virus-like particles expressed in COS and quail cells. Mutant Gag proteins carrying the same mutations also were synthesized in vitro and tested for processing with purified PR. In both types of studies, N-terminal sequencing of the liberated PR domain was carried out to exactly identify the site of cleavage. Finally, synthetic peptides corresponding to the mutant proteins were assessed for the ability to act as substrates for PR. The results were all consistent and led to the following conclusions. (i) In vivo, if normal processing between NC and PR is prevented by mutations, limited cleavage occurs at a previously unrecognized alternative site three amino acids downstream, i.e., in PR. This N-terminally truncated PR is inactive as an enzyme, as inferred from the global processing defect in cs22 and a similar mutant. (ii) In Gag proteins translated in vitro, purified PR cleaves this alternative site as rapidly as it does the wild-type site. (iii) Contrary to previously accepted rules describing retroviral cleavage sites, an isoleucine residue placed at the P1 position of the NC-PR cleavage site does not hinder normal processing. (iv) A proline residue placed at the P2 position in this cleavage site blocks normal processing. PMID:8985369

  19. Murine leukemia virus envelope gp70 is a shared biomarker for the high-sensitivity quantification of murine tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Scrimieri, Francesca; Askew, David; Corn, David J; Eid, Saada; Bobanga, Iuliana D; Bjelac, Jaclyn A; Tsao, Matthew L; Allen, Frederick; Othman, Youmna S; Wang, Shih-Chung G; Huang, Alex Y

    2013-01-01

    The preclinical development of anticancer drugs including immunotherapeutics and targeted agents relies on the ability to detect minimal residual tumor burden as a measure of therapeutic efficacy. Real-time quantitative (qPCR) represents an exquisitely sensitive method to perform such an assessment. However, qPCR-based applications are limited by the availability of a genetic defect associated with each tumor model under investigation. Here, we describe an off-the-shelf qPCR-based approach to detect a broad array of commonly used preclinical murine tumor models. In particular, we report that the mRNA coding for the envelope glycoprotein 70 (gp70) encoded by the endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is universally expressed in 22 murine cancer cell lines of disparate histological origin but is silent in 20 out of 22 normal mouse tissues. Further, we detected the presence of as few as 100 tumor cells in whole lung extracts using qPCR specific for gp70, supporting the notion that this detection approach has a higher sensitivity as compared with traditional tissue histology methods. Although gp70 is expressed in a wide variety of tumor cell lines, it was absent in inflamed tissues, non-transformed cell lines, or pre-cancerous lesions. Having a high-sensitivity biomarker for the detection of a wide range of murine tumor cells that does not require additional genetic manipulations or the knowledge of specific genetic alterations present in a given neoplasm represents a unique experimental tool for investigating metastasis, assessing antitumor therapeutic interventions, and further determining tumor recurrence or minimal residual disease. PMID:24482753

  20. Cellular and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus microRNAs in sepsis and surgical trauma.

    PubMed

    Tudor, S; Giza, D E; Lin, H Y; Fabris, L; Yoshiaki, K; D'Abundo, L; Toale, K M; Shimizu, M; Ferracin, M; Challagundla, K B; Cortez, M Angelica; Fuentes-Mattei, E; Tulbure, D; Gonzalez, C; Henderson, J; Row, M; Rice, T W; Ivan, C; Negrini, M; Fabbri, M; Morris, J S; Yeung, S-C J; Vasilescu, C; Calin, G A

    2014-01-01

    Once a patient is in septic shock, survival rates drop by 7.6% for every hour of delay in antibiotic therapy. Biomarkers based on the molecular mechanism of sepsis are important for timely diagnosis and triage. Here, we study the potential roles of a panel of cellular and viral miRNAs as sepsis biomarkers. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling in leukocytes from septic patients and nonseptic controls, combined with quantitative RT-PCR in plasmas from two cohorts of septic patients, two cohorts of nonseptic surgical patients and healthy volunteers. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, miRNA transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation were used to study the effects of Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) miRNAs on interleukin's secretion. Differences related to sepsis etiology were noted for plasma levels of 10 cellular and 2 KSHV miRNAs (miR-K-10b and miR-K-12-12*) between septic and nonseptic patients. All the sepsis groups had high KSHV miRNAs levels compared with controls; Afro-American patients had higher levels of KSHV-miR-K12-12* than non-Afro-American patients. Both KSHV miRNAs were increased on postoperative day 1, but returned to baseline on day 7; they acted as direct agonists of Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8), which might explain the increased secretion of the IL-6 and IL-10. Cellular and KSHV miRNAs are differentially expressed in sepsis and early postsurgical patients and may be exploited for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Increased miR-K-10b and miR-K12-12* are functionally involved in sepsis as agonists of TLR8, forming a positive feedback that may lead to cytokine dysregulation. PMID:25476907

  1. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced cardiac and skeletal muscle disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, R M; Rinehart, J E; Wollmann, R; Roos, R P

    1996-01-01

    The DA strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, a member of the cardiovirus genus of picornaviruses, induces a restricted and persistent infection associated with a demyelinating process following intracerebral inoculation of mice; both virus infection and the immune response are believed to contribute to the late white matter disease. We now report that intraperitoneal inoculation with DA produces an acute myositis that progresses to a chronic inflammatory muscle disease in CD-1 mice as well as several inbred mouse strains. Some mouse strains also develop central nervous system white matter disease and a focal myocarditis. Infectious virus in skeletal muscle falls to undetectable levels 3 weeks postinoculation (p.i.), although viral genome persists for at least 12 weeks p.i., the longest period of observation. Severe combined immunodeficient animals have evidence of muscle pathology as long as 5 weeks p.i., suggesting that DA virus is capable of inducing chronic muscle disease in the absence of an immune response. The presence in immunocompetent mice, however, of prominent muscle inflammation in the absence of infectious virus suggests that the immune system also contributes to the pathology. T lymphocytes are the predominant cell type infiltrating the skeletal muscle during the chronic disease. This murine model may further our understanding of virus-induced chronic myositis and help to clarify the pathogenesis of human inflammatory myopathies. PMID:8971022

  2. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, no retroviral Gag protein has been highly purified in milligram quantities and in a biologically relevant and active form. We have purified Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein and in parallel several truncation mutants of Gag and have studied their biophysical properties and membrane interactions in vitro. RSV Gag is unusual in that it is not naturally myristoylated. From its ability to assemble into virus-like particles in vitro, we infer that RSV Gag is biologically active. By size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, Gag in solution appears extended and flexible, in contrast to previous reports on unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag, which is compact. However, by neutron reflectometry measurements of RSV Gag bound to a supported bilayer, the protein appears to adopt a more compact, folded-over conformation. At physiological ionic strength, purified Gag binds strongly to liposomes containing acidic lipids. This interaction is stimulated by physiological levels of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and by cholesterol. However, unlike HIV-1 Gag, RSV Gag shows no sensitivity to acyl chain saturation. In contrast with full-length RSV Gag, the purified MA domain of Gag binds to liposomes only weakly. Similarly, both an N-terminally truncated version of Gag that is missing the MA domain and a C-terminally truncated version that is missing the NC domain bind only weakly. These results imply that NC contributes to membrane interaction in vitro, either by directly contacting acidic lipids or by promoting Gag multimerization. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses like HIV assemble at and bud from the plasma membrane of cells. Assembly requires the interaction between thousands of Gag molecules to form a lattice. Previous work indicated that lattice formation at the plasma membrane is influenced by the conformation of monomeric HIV. We have extended this work to the more tractable RSV Gag. Our results show that RSV Gag is highly flexible

  3. Rous Sarcoma Virus Synaptic Complex Capable of Concerted Integration Is Kinetically Trapped by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Krishan K.; Bera, Sibes; Korolev, Sergey; Campbell, Mary; Yin, Zhiqi; Aihara, Hideki; Grandgenett, Duane P.

    2014-01-01

    We determined conditions to produce milligram quantities of the soluble Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) synaptic complex that is kinetically trapped by HIV strand transfer inhibitors (STIs). Concerted integration catalyzed by RSV integrase (IN) is effectively inhibited by HIV STIs. Optimized assembly of the RSV synaptic complex required IN, a gain-of-function 3′-OH-recessed U3 oligonucleotide, and an STI under specific conditions to maintain solubility of the trapped synaptic complex at 4 °C. A C-terminal truncated IN (1–269 residues) produced a homogeneous population of trapped synaptic complex that eluted at ∼151,000 Da upon Superdex 200 size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Approximately 90% of input IN and DNA are incorporated into the trapped synaptic complex using either the C-terminally truncated IN or wild type IN (1–286 residues). No STI is present in the SEC running buffer suggesting the STI-trapped synaptic complex is kinetically stabilized. The yield of the trapped synaptic complex correlates with the dissociative half-life of the STI observed with HIV IN-DNA complexes. Dolutegravir, MK-2048, and MK-0536 are equally effective, whereas raltegravir is ∼70% as effective. Without an STI present in the assembly mixture, no trapped synaptic complex was observed. Fluorescence and mass spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the STI remains associated with the trapped complex. SEC-multiangle light scattering analyses demonstrated that wild type IN and the C-terminal IN truncation are dimers that acted as precursors to the tetramer. The purified STI-trapped synaptic complex contained a tetramer as shown by cross-linking studies. Structural studies of this three-domain RSV IN in complex with viral DNA may be feasible. PMID:24872410

  4. Primary attachment of murine leukaemia virus vector mediated by particle-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Kureishy, Nina; Faruque, Daisy; Porter, Colin D.

    2006-01-01

    Target cell entry of murine leukaemia virus vectors proceeds via primary attachment, independent of the viral envelope protein and subsequent envelope–receptor interaction. Although much attention has been paid to modifying the latter for target cell specificity, the initial binding interaction has been overlooked, despite its opposing involvement both in providing the virus available for receptor binding and in depleting free virus. As a first step towards modifying primary attachment, both to provide specificity and to enhance vector availability, we sought to determine the nature of this interaction. Following an initial screen of GAGs (glycosaminoglycans) for their ability to inhibit virus binding and transduction, we have shown that production of virus from cells in which GAG sulfation is inhibited, or treatment of virus with heparinase III, reduces both particle attachment and infection. Detection in purified virus preparations of a neo-epitope generated by heparinase III confirmed the presence of virus-associated HSPG [HS (heparan sulfate) proteoglycan], acquired from the producer cell. We propose that host-acquired cell-surface HSPG (potentially including syndecan-2) provides a means of virus attachment to target cells that precedes specific receptor interaction and membrane fusion. Inhibition of HS biosynthesis may provide a sufficiently reduced background of primary binding such that novel mechanisms of attachment, ideally with appropriate target cell specificity, can be introduced. PMID:16895523

  5. Expression of murine leukemia viruses in the highly lymphomatous BXH-2 recombinant inbred mouse strain.

    PubMed Central

    Bedigian, H G; Taylor, B A; Meier, H

    1981-01-01

    Among 12 recombinant inbred strains of mice derived from crossing two strains, C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ, which have a low incidence of neoplastic disease, one strain (BXH-2) has been found to have a high incidence of lymphoma, of non-T-cell origin, at an early age. The BXH-2 strain carries the Fv-1b allele and spontaneously expresses a B-tropic murine leukemia virus beginning at as early as 10 days of gestation and continuing throughout their life. No significant differences in ecotropic virus titers were observed at any age tested (16 to 17 days of gestation through 7 months), whereas xenotropic virus was first detected in lymphoid tissues of 2-month-old mice and virus titers increased with age. Dual tropic virus(es), which induced cytopathic changes on mink lung cells, was isolated from BXH-2 lymphomatous tissues. Unlike AKR mink lung focus-forming virus (N-tropic recombinant), BXH-2 dual tropic virus is B tropic and induces cytopathic changes in mouse fibroblast cultures as well. The BXH-2 mouse provides a model system for studying the role of replication-competent viruses in spontaneously occurring leukemias of non-T-cell lineage and neurological disease. Images PMID:6268848

  6. Generation of mink cell focus-forming viruses by Friend murine leukemia virus: recombination with specific endogenous proviral sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, L H; Cloyd, M W

    1984-01-01

    A family of recombinant mink cell focus-forming viruses (MCF) was derived by inoculation of NFS mice with a Friend murine leukemia virus, and their genomes were analyzed by RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotide fingerprinting. The viruses were obtained from the thymuses and spleens of preleukemic and leukemic animals and were evaluated for dualtropism and oncogenicity. All these isolates induced cytopathic foci on mink cells but could be classified into two groups based on their relative infectivities for SC-1 (mouse) or mink (ATCC CCL64) cells. One group of Friend MCFs (F-MCFs) (group I) exhibited approximately equal infectivities for SC-1 and mink cells, whereas a second group (group II) infected mink cells 1,000- to 10,000-fold more efficiently than SC-1 cells. Structural analyses of the F-MCFs revealed that group I and group II viruses correlated with recombination of Friend murine leukemia virus with two distinct, but closely related, endogenous NFS proviral sequences. No correlation was found between the type of F-MCF and the tissue of origin or the disease state of the animal. Furthermore, none of the F-MCF isolates were found to be oncogenic in NFS/N or AKR/J mice. F-MCFs of both groups underwent extensive substitution of ecotropic sequences, involving much of the gag and env genes of group I F-MCFs and most of the gag, pol, and env genes of group II F-MCFs. All F-MCF isolates retained the 3' terminal U3 region of Friend murine leukemia virus. Comparison of the RNAs of the F-MCFs with RNAs of MCFs derived from NFS.Akv-1 or NFS.Akv-2 mice indicated that the F-MCFs were derived from NFS proviral sequences which are distinct from the sequences contained in NFS.Akv MCF isolates. This result suggested that recombination with particular endogenous proviral sequences to generate MCFs may be highly specific for a given murine leukemia virus. Images PMID:6422051

  7. Purification of the Moloney and Rauscher Murine Leukemia Viruses by Use of Zonal Ultracentrifuge Systems

    PubMed Central

    Toplin, I.

    1967-01-01

    The B-IV and B-IX zonal ultracentrifuge rotors were applied to the concentration and purification of the Moloney and Rauscher murine leukemia viruses from large volumes of infected tissue culture fluids and animal materials. Potassium tartrate, potassium citrate and sucrose gradients were used to obtain viral concentrates from the density 1.16 to 1.18 zone. Proteolytic enzyme digestion of tissue culture preparations prior to zonal ultracentrifuge processing was effective in releasing virus from cell debris and producing highly purified, though nonleukemogenic, viral concentrates. Infected Rauscher mouse plasma was processed to give highly purified infectious virus fractions. A single centrifugation of crude Rauscher mouse spleen homogenates resulted in partially purified infectious concentrates with high virus particle counts. Images Fig. 4 PMID:6035050

  8. In vitro expanded bone marrow-derived murine (C57Bl/KaLwRij) mesenchymal stem cells can acquire CD34 expression and induce sarcoma formation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Song; De Becker, Ann; De Raeve, Hendrik; Van Camp, Ben; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Riet, Ivan

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Murine MSCs can undergo spontaneously malignant transformation and form sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acquisition of CD34 is a transformation type for MSCs into sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch/Hh/Wnt pathways are related to the malignant phenotype of transformed MSCs. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have currently generated numerous interests in pre-clinical and clinical applications due to their multiple lineages differentiation potential and immunomodulary effects. However, accumulating evidence indicates that MSCs, especially murine MSCs (mMSCs), can undergo spontaneous transformation after long-term in vitro culturing, which might reduce the therapeutic application possibilities of these stem cells. In the present study, we observed that in vitro expanded bone marrow (BM) derived mMSCs from the C57Bl/KaLwRij mouse strain can lose their specific stem cells markers (CD90 and CD105) and acquire CD34 expression, accompanied with an altered morphology and an impaired tri-lineages differentiation capacity. Compared to normal mMSCs, these transformed mMSCs exhibited an increased proliferation rate, an enhanced colony formation and migration ability as well as a higher sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs. Transformed mMSCs were highly tumorigenic in vivo, resulting in aggressive sarcoma formation when transplanted in non-immunocompromised mice. Furthermore, we found that Notch signaling downstream genes (hey1, hey2 and heyL) were significantly upregulated in transformed mMSCs, while Hedgehog signaling downstream genes Gli1 and Ptch1 and the Wnt signaling downstream gene beta-catenin were all decreased. Taken together, we observed that murine in vitro expanded BM-MSCs can transform into CD34 expressing cells that induce sarcoma formation in vivo. We assume that dysregulation of the Notch(+)/Hh(-)/Wnt(-) signaling pathway is associated with the malignant phenotype of the transformed mMSCs.

  9. Reduced synthesis of pp60src and expression of the transformation-related phenotype in interferon-treated Rous sarcoma virus-transformed rat cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, S L; Garber, E A; Wang, E; Caliguiri, L A; Schellekens, H; Goldberg, A R; Tamm, I

    1983-09-01

    Treatment of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed rat cells with rat interferon-alpha (specific activity, 10(6) U/mg of protein) for 24 h caused a 50% reduction in intracellular pp60src-associated protein kinase activity. Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion of pp60src, derived from 32P-labeled monolayer cultures incubated with or without interferon, revealed no differences either in the phosphopeptide pattern or in the phosphoserine-phosphotyrosine ratio. However, [3H]leucine pulse-labeling experiments showed that the synthesis of pp60src was reduced by 42 to 48%, relative to the level of bulk protein synthesis, in the interferon-treated cultures. Rat interferon-alpha also reduced the growth rate of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed rat cells in a dose-dependent manner over a 72-h period. The decrease in growth rate was accompanied by increases in the thickness and number of actin fibers per cell and by a decline in intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation by pp60src. The results suggest that interferon can inhibit the expression of the transformation-related phenotype by selectively reducing the synthesis of the Rous sarcoma virus transforming gene product. However, the interferon effects on the cytoskeletal organization and proliferation of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells may be due at least in part to the predominance of interferon-induced phenotypic changes over those caused by pp60src. PMID:6314124

  10. Intronic deletions of tva receptor gene decrease the susceptibility to infection by subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The group of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) in chickens contains six highly related subgroups, A to E and J. Four genetic loci, tva, tvb, tvc and tvj, encode for corresponding receptors that determine the susceptibility to the ASLV subgroups. The prevalence of ASLV in hosts may have imposed...

  11. Capsid is an important determinant for functional complementation of murine leukemia virus and spleen necrosis virus Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Boyko, Vitaly; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2007-04-10

    In this report, we examined the abilities and requirements of heterologous Gag proteins to functionally complement each other to support viral replication. Two distantly related gammaretroviruses, murine leukemia virus (MLV) and spleen necrosis virus (SNV), were used as a model system because SNV proteins can support MLV vector replication. Using chimeric or mutant Gag proteins that could not efficiently support MLV vector replication, we determined that a homologous capsid (CA) domain was necessary for the functional complementation of MLV and SNV Gag proteins. Findings from the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay revealed that MLV and SNV Gag proteins were capable of colocalizing and interacting in cells. Taken together, our results indicated that MLV and SNV Gag proteins can interact in cells; however, a homologous CA domain is needed for functional complementation of MLV and SNV Gag proteins to complete virus replication. This requirement of homologous Gag most likely occurs at a postassembly step(s) of the viral replication. PMID:17156810

  12. Alternate Polypurine Tracts (PPTs) Affect the Rous Sarcoma Virus RNase H Cleavage Specificity and Reveal a Preferential Cleavage following a GA Dinucleotide Sequence at the PPT-U3 Junction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kevin W.; Julias, John G.; Alvord, W. Gregory; Oh, Jangsuk; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2005-01-01

    Retroviral polypurine tracts (PPTs) serve as primers for plus-strand DNA synthesis during reverse transcription. The generation and removal of the PPT primer requires specific cleavages by the RNase H activity of reverse transcriptases; removal of the PPT primer defines the left end of the linear viral DNA. We replaced the endogenous PPT from RSVP(A)Z, a replication-competent shuttle vector based on Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), with alternate retroviral PPTs and the duck hepatitis B virus “PPT.” Viruses in which the endogenous RSV PPT was replaced with alternate PPTs had lower relative titers than the wild-type virus. 2-LTR circle junction analysis showed that the alternate PPTs caused significant decreases in the fraction of viral DNAs with complete (consensus) ends and significant increases in the insertion of part or all of the PPT at the 2-LTR circle junctions. The last two nucleotides in the 3′ end of the RSV PPT are GA. Examination of the (mis)cleavages of the alternate PPTs revealed preferential cleavages after GA dinucleotide sequences. Replacement of the terminal 3′ A of the RSV PPT with G caused a preferential miscleavage at a GA sequence spanning the PPT-U3 boundary, resulting in the deletion of the terminal adenine normally present at the 5′ end of the U3. A reciprocal G-to-A substitution at the 3′ end of the murine leukemia virus PPT increased the relative titer of the chimeric RSV-based virus and the fraction of consensus 2-LTR circle junctions. PMID:16227289

  13. Comparative restriction endonuclease maps of proviral DNA of the primate type C simian sarcoma-associated virus and gibbon ape leukemia virus group.

    PubMed Central

    Trainor, C D; Wong-Staal, F; Reitz, M S

    1982-01-01

    Extrachromosomal DNA was purified from canine thymus cells acutely infected with different strains of infectious primate type C viruses of the woolly monkey (simian) sarcoma helper virus and gibbon ape leukemia virus group. All DNA preparations contained linear proviral molecules of 9.1 to 9.2 kilobases, at least some of which represent complete infectious proviral DNA. Cells infected with a replication-defective fibroblast-transforming sarcoma virus and its helper, a replication-competent nontransforming helper virus, also contained a 6.6- to 6.7-kilobase DNA. These proviral DNA molecules were digested with different restriction endonucleases, and the resultant fragments were oriented to the viral RNA by a combination of partial digestions, codigestion with more than one endonuclease, digestion of integrated proviral DNA, and hybridization with 3'- and 5'-specific viral probes. The 3'- and 5'-specific probes each hybridized to fragments from both ends of proviral DNA, indicating that, in common with those of other retroviruses, these proviruses contain a large terminal redundancy at both ends, each of which consists of sequences derived from both the 3' and 5' regions of the viral RNA. The proviral sequences are organized 3',5'-unique-3',5'. Four restriction enzymes (KpnI, SmaI, PstI, and SstI) recognized sites within the large terminal redundancies, and these sites were conserved within all the isolates tested. This suggests that both the 3' and 5' ends of the genomic RNA of these viruses are extremely closely related. In contrast, the restriction sites within the unique portion of the provirus were not strongly conserved within this group of viruses, even though they were related along most of their genomes. Whereas the 5' 60 to 70% of the RNA of these viruses was more closely related by liquid hybridization experiments than was the 3' 30 to 40%, restriction sites within this region were not preferentially conserved, suggesting that small sequence differences or

  14. Isolated limb perfusion with melphalan, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and oncolytic vaccinia virus improves tumour targeting and prolongs survival in a rat model of advanced extremity sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pencavel, Tim D; Wilkinson, Michelle J; Mansfield, David C; Khan, Aadil A; Seth, Rohit; Karapanagiotou, Eleni M; Roulstone, Victoria; Aguilar, Richard J; Chen, Nanhai G; Szalay, Aladar A; Hayes, Andrew J; Harrington, Kevin J

    2015-02-15

    Isolated limb perfusion (ILP) is a treatment for advanced extremity sarcoma and in-transit melanoma. Advancing this procedure by investigating the addition of novel agents, such as cancer-selective oncolytic viruses, may improve both the therapeutic efficacy of ILP and the tumour-targeted delivery of oncolytic virotherapy. Standard in vitro assays were used to characterise single agent and combinatorial activities of melphalan, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Lister strain vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68) against BN175 rat sarcoma cells. An orthotopic model of advanced extremity sarcoma was used to evaluate survival of animals after ILP with combinations of TNF-α, melphalan and GLV-1h68. We investigated the efficiency of viral tumour delivery by ILP compared to intravenous therapy, the locoregional and systemic biodistribution of virus after ILP, and the effect of mode of administration on antibody response. The combination of melphalan and GLV-1h68 was synergistic in vitro. The addition of virus to standard ILP regimens was well tolerated and demonstrated superior tumour targeting compared to intravenous administration. Triple therapy (melphalan/TNF-α/GLV-1h68) resulted in increased tumour growth delay and enhanced survival compared to other treatment regimens. Live virus was recovered in large amounts from perfused regions, but in smaller amounts from systemic organs. The addition of oncolytic vaccinia virus to existing TNF-α/melphalan-based ILP strategies results in survival advantage in an immunocompetent rat model of advanced extremity sarcoma. Virus administered by ILP has superior tumour targeting compared to intravenous delivery. Further evaluation and clinical translation of this approach is warranted. PMID:24978211

  15. Endogenous Murine BST-2/Tetherin Is Not a Major Restriction Factor of Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Job, Emma R.; Moffat, Jessica M.; Wakim, Linda M.; Gonelli, Christopher A.; Purcell, Damien F. J.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Villadangos, Jose A.; Reading, Patrick C.; Mintern, Justine D.

    2015-01-01

    BST-2 (tetherin, CD317, HM1.24) restricts virus growth by tethering enveloped viruses to the cell surface. The role of BST-2 during influenza A virus infection (IAV) is controversial. Here, we assessed the capacity of endogenous BST-2 to restrict IAV in primary murine cells. IAV infection increased BST-2 surface expression by primary macrophages, but not alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). BST-2-deficient AEC and macrophages displayed no difference in susceptibility to IAV infection relative to wild type cells. Furthermore, BST-2 played little role in infectious IAV release from either AEC or macrophages. To examine BST-2 during IAV infection in vivo, we infected BST-2-deficient mice. No difference in weight loss or in viral loads in the lungs and/or nasal tissues were detected between BST-2-deficient and wild type animals. This study rules out a major role for endogenous BST-2 in modulating IAV in the mouse model of infection. PMID:26566124

  16. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kakoki, Katsura; Kamiyama, Haruka; Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  17. An activation domain within the walleye dermal sarcoma virus retroviral cyclin protein is essential for inhibition of the viral promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Rovnak, Joel; Hronek, Brett W.; Ryan, Sean O.; Cai, Sumin; Quackenbush, Sandra L. . E-mail: sandra.quackenbush@colostate.edu

    2005-11-25

    Walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV) is a complex retrovirus associated with seasonal dermal sarcomas. Developing tumors have low levels of accessory gene transcripts, A1 and B, and regressing tumors have high levels of full-length and spliced transcripts. Transcript A1 encodes a retroviral cyclin (rv-cyclin) with limited homology to host cyclins. The rv-cyclin is physically linked to components of the transcriptional co-activator complex, Mediator, and regulates transcription. In walleye fibroblasts, it inhibits the WDSV promoter independently of cis-acting DNA sequences. The rv-cyclin activates transcription from GAL4 promoters when fused to the GAL4 DNA binding domain. A 30 a.a. activation domain in the carboxy region can be inactivated by single point mutations, and these mutations diminish the ability of the rv-cyclin to inhibit the WDSV promoter. When fused to glutathione S-transferase, the rv-cyclin, its carboxy region, and the activation domain pull down components of transcription complexes from nuclear extracts, and pulldown is lost by mutation of the activation domain.

  18. Walleye dermal sarcoma virus Orf B functions through receptor for activated C kinase (RACK1) and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Candelaria C.; Rovnak, Joel; Quackenbush, Sandra L.

    2008-06-05

    Walleye dermal sarcoma virus is a complex retrovirus that is associated with walleye dermal sarcomas that are seasonal in nature. Fall developing tumors contain low levels of spliced accessory gene transcripts A and B, suggesting a role for the encoded proteins, Orf A and Orf B, in oncogenesis. In explanted tumor cells the 35 kDa Orf B accessory protein is localized to the cell periphery in structures similar to focal adhesions and along actin stress fibers. Similar localization was observed in mammalian cells. The cellular protein, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), bound Orf B in yeast two-hybrid assays and in cell culture. Sequence analysis of walleye RACK1 demonstrated high conservation to other known RACK1 sequences. RACK1 binds to activated protein kinase C (PKC). Orf B associates with PKC{alpha}, which is constitutively activated and localized at the membrane. Activated PKC promoted cell survival, proliferation, and increased cell viability in Orf B-expressing cells.

  19. Targeting of a Nuclease to Murine Leukemia Virus Capsids Inhibits Viral Multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsoulis, Georges; Seshaiah, Partha; Federspiel, Mark J.; Rein, Alan; Hughes, Stephen H.; Boeke, Jef D.

    1995-01-01

    Capsid-targeted viral inactivation is an antiviral strategy in which toxic fusion proteins are targeted to virions, where they inhibit viral multiplication by destroying viral components. These fusion proteins consist of a virion structural protein moiety and an enzymatic moiety such as a nuclease. Such fusion proteins can severely inhibit transposition of yeast retrotransposon Ty1, an element whose transposition mechanistically resembles retroviral multiplication. We demonstrate that expression of a murine retrovirus capsid-staphylococcal nuclease fusion protein inhibits multiplication of the corresponding murine leukemia virus by 30- to 100-fold. Staphylococcal nuclease is apparently inactive intracellularly and hence nontoxic to the host cell, but it is active extracellularly because of its requirement for high concentrations of Ca2+ ions. Virions assembled in and shed from cells expressing the fusion protein contain very small amounts of intact viral RNA, as would be predicted for nuclease-mediated inhibition of viral multiplication.

  20. Partial purification of tumour-specific transplantation antigens from methylcholanthrene-induced murine sarcomas by immobilized lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, K.; Koch, G.; Brenner, S.; Lennox, E.

    1979-01-01

    Plasma membranes isolated from two immunogenic, non-cross-protecting, MC sarcomas were shown to retain the specific rejection antigens of whole cells as well as serologically detected H-2 antigens. Solubilization of the membranes with sodium deoxycholate gave quantitative release of H-2 and retained the rejection specificity of the tumour from which it was derived. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis (PAGE) showed no extensive degradation of membrane components during solubilization. The solubilized TSTAs were further characterized and purified on columns of 4 different lectins immobilized on sepharose beads. TSTA from both tumours bound to WGA but not to Con A, LCH or RCA columns. Specific activity was retained after elution from the WGA column. Serologically detectable H-2 bound to the Con A and LCH columns only. Clear separation of H-2 from TSTA activity was thus obtained. Furthermore the WGA-binding material represents a source for further purification of TSTA molecules in order to explore the basis for their diversity. Images Fig. 3 PMID:93484

  1. Survival of Murine Norovirus, Tulane Virus, and Hepatitis A Virus on Alfalfa Seeds and Sprouts during Storage and Germination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Hirneisen, Kirsten A.; Markland, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Human norovirus (huNoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) have been involved in several produce-associated outbreaks and identified as major food-borne viral etiologies. In this study, the survival of huNoV surrogates (murine norovirus [MNV] and Tulane virus [TV]) and HAV was investigated on alfalfa seeds during storage and postgermination. Alfalfa seeds were inoculated with MNV, TV, or HAV with titers of 6.46 ± 0.06 log PFU/g, 3.87 ± 0.38 log PFU/g, or 7.01 ± 0.07 log 50% tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50)/g, respectively. Inoculated seeds were stored for up to 50 days at 22°C and sampled during that storage period on days 0, 2, 5, 10, and 15. Following storage, virus presence was monitored over a 1-week germination period. Viruses remained infectious after 50 days, with titers of 1.61 ± 0.19 log PFU/g, 0.85 ± 0.21 log PFU/g, and 3.43 ± 0.21 log TCID50/g for MNV, TV, and HAV, respectively. HAV demonstrated greater persistence than MNV and TV, without a statistically significant reduction over 20 days (<1 log TCID50/g); however, relatively high levels of genomic copies of all viruses persisted over the testing time period. Low titers of viruses were found on sprouts and were located in all tissues as well as in sprout-spent water sampled on days 1, 3, and 6 following seed planting. Results revealed the persistence of viruses in seeds for a prolonged period of time, and perhaps of greater importance these data suggest the ease of which virus may transfer from seeds to sprouts and spent water during germination. These findings highlight the importance of sanitation and prevention procedures before and during germination. PMID:24014537

  2. Viral genome RNA serves as messenger early in the infectious cycle of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, R; Dolev, S; Aboud, M; Salzberg, S

    1979-01-01

    When NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were infected with the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus, part of the viral genome RNA molecules were detected in polyribosomes of the infected cells early in the infectious cycle. The binding appears to be specific, since we could demonstrate the release of viral RNA from polyribosomes with EDTA. Moreover, when infection occurred in the presence of cycloheximide, most viral RNA molecules were detected in the free cytoplasm. Size analysis on polyribosomal viral RNA molecules indicated that two size class molecules, 38S and 23S, are present in polyribosomes at 3 h after infection. Analysis of the polyriboadenylate [poly(rA)] content of viral RNA extracted from infected polyribosomes demonstrated that such molecules bind with greatest abundance at 3 h after infection, as has been detected with total viral RNA. No molecules lacking poly(rA) stretches could be detected in polyribosomes. Furthermore, when a similar analysis was performed on unbound molecules present in the free cytoplasm, identical results were obtained. We conclude that no selection towards poly(rA)-containing viral molecules is evident on binding to polyribosomes. These findings suggest that the incoming viral genome of the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus may serve as a messenger for the synthesis of one or more virus-specific proteins early after infection of mouse fibroblasts. PMID:117118

  3. Oncogene Activation in Myeloid Leukemias by Graffi Murine Leukemia Virus Proviral Integration

    PubMed Central

    Denicourt, Catherine; Edouard, Elsy; Rassart, Eric

    1999-01-01

    The Graffi murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a nondefective retrovirus that induces granulocytic leukemia in BALB/c and NFS mice. To identify genes involved in Graffi MuLV-induced granulocytic leukemia, tumor cell DNAs were examined for genetic alterations at loci described as common proviral integration sites in MuLV-induced myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid leukemias. Southern blot analysis revealed rearrangements in c-myc, Fli-1, Pim-1, and Spi-1/PU.1 genes in 20, 10, 3.3, and 3.3% of the tumors tested, respectively. These results demonstrate for the first time the involvement of those genes in granulocytic leukemia. PMID:10196342

  4. Feline Calicivirus, Murine Norovirus, Porcine Sapovirus, and Tulane Virus Survival on Postharvest Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Esseili, Malak A; Saif, Linda J; Farkas, Tibor; Wang, Qiuhong

    2015-08-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses, with an increasing number of outbreaks associated with leafy greens. Because HuNoV cannot be routinely cultured, culturable feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV), porcine sapovirus (SaV), and Tulane virus (TV) have been used as surrogates. These viruses are generated in different cell lines as infected cell lysates, which may differentially affect their stability. Our objective was to uniformly compare the survival of these viruses on postharvest lettuce while evaluating the effects of cell lysates on their survival. Viruses were semipurified from cell lysates by ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation followed by resuspension in sterile water. Virus survival was examined before and after semipurification: in suspension at room temperature (RT) until day 28 and on lettuce leaves stored at RT for 3 days or at 4°C for 7 and 14 days. In suspension, both methods significantly enhanced the survival of all viruses. On lettuce, the survival of MNV in cell lysates was similar to that in water, under all storage conditions. In contrast, the survival of FCV, SaV, and TV was differentially enhanced, under different storage conditions, by removing cell lysates. Following semipurification, viruses showed similar persistence to each other on lettuce stored under all conditions, with the exception of ultracentrifugation-purified FCV, which showed a higher inactivation rate than MNV at 4°C for 14 days. In conclusion, the presence of cell lysates in viral suspensions underestimated the survivability of these surrogate viruses, while viral semipurification revealed similar survivabilities on postharvest lettuce leaves. PMID:26002891

  5. Feline Calicivirus, Murine Norovirus, Porcine Sapovirus, and Tulane Virus Survival on Postharvest Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Esseili, Malak A.; Saif, Linda J.; Farkas, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses, with an increasing number of outbreaks associated with leafy greens. Because HuNoV cannot be routinely cultured, culturable feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV), porcine sapovirus (SaV), and Tulane virus (TV) have been used as surrogates. These viruses are generated in different cell lines as infected cell lysates, which may differentially affect their stability. Our objective was to uniformly compare the survival of these viruses on postharvest lettuce while evaluating the effects of cell lysates on their survival. Viruses were semipurified from cell lysates by ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation followed by resuspension in sterile water. Virus survival was examined before and after semipurification: in suspension at room temperature (RT) until day 28 and on lettuce leaves stored at RT for 3 days or at 4°C for 7 and 14 days. In suspension, both methods significantly enhanced the survival of all viruses. On lettuce, the survival of MNV in cell lysates was similar to that in water, under all storage conditions. In contrast, the survival of FCV, SaV, and TV was differentially enhanced, under different storage conditions, by removing cell lysates. Following semipurification, viruses showed similar persistence to each other on lettuce stored under all conditions, with the exception of ultracentrifugation-purified FCV, which showed a higher inactivation rate than MNV at 4°C for 14 days. In conclusion, the presence of cell lysates in viral suspensions underestimated the survivability of these surrogate viruses, while viral semipurification revealed similar survivabilities on postharvest lettuce leaves. PMID:26002891

  6. Induction of murine AIDS virus-related sequences after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kiho; Adamson, Lee K; Greenhalgh, David G

    2002-05-01

    To better understand the molecular signaling events leading to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF), changes in gene expression profiles after burn injury were investigated by differential display. C57BLKS/J mice were subjected to 18% total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness burn and various tissues were harvested at multiple time points after injury. Initial differential display revealed that retroviral transcripts similar to the envelope sequence of murine AIDS (MAIDS) virus were rapidly and transiently up-regulated after injury. Subsequent RT-PCR and DNA sequencing analyses confirmed the transient up-regulation of retroviral sequences similar to those of the MAIDS virus. In addition, the presence and induction of the subgenomic envelope transcripts of these MAIDS virus-related sequences, including a novel double spliced message, were identified after burn injury. These data suggest that the transcriptional efficiency of the integrated retroviral DNA and reactivation of defective MAIDS virus-related sequences may be affected by pathophysiological signals, such as burn injury. The elevated expression of these MAIDS virus-related retroviral sequences may affect the transcriptional activities of the flanking genes at the integration sites and may be a cause of altered local and systemic immune responses to burn-related stress. PMID:11971678

  7. Removal of xenotropic murine leukemia virus by nanocellulose based filter paper.

    PubMed

    Asper, M; Hanrieder, T; Quellmalz, A; Mihranyan, A

    2015-11-01

    The removal of xenotrpic murine leukemia virus (xMuLV) by size-exclusion filter paper composed of 100% naturally derived cellulose was validated. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. algae. The filter paper was characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, helium pycnometry, and model tracer (100 nm latex beads and 50 nm gold nanoparticles) retention tests. Following the filtration of xMuLV spiked solutions, LRV ≥5.25 log10 TCID50 was observed, as limited by the virus titre in the feed solution and sensitivity of the tissue infectivity test. The results of the validation study suggest that the nanocellulose filter paper is useful for removal of endogenous rodent retroviruses and retrovirus-like particles during the production of recombinant proteins. PMID:26328471

  8. Receptor choice determinants in the envelope glycoproteins of amphotropic, xenotropic, and polytropic murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Battini, J L; Heard, J M; Danos, O

    1992-01-01

    The envelope glycoproteins (SU) of mammalian type C retroviruses possess an amino-terminal domain of about 200 residues, which is involved in binding a cell surface receptor. In this domain, highly conserved amino acid sequences are interrupted by two segments of variable length and sequence, VRA and VRB. We have studied the role of these variable regions in receptor recognition and binding by constructing chimeric molecules in which portions of the amino-terminal domains from amphotropic (4070A), xenotropic (NZB), and polytropic (MCF 247) murine leukemia virus SU proteins were permuted. These chimeras, which exchanged either one or two variable regions, were expressed at the surface of replication-defective viral particles by a pseudotyping assay. Wild-type or recombinant env genes were transfected into a cell line producing Moloney murine leukemia virus particles devoid of envelope glycoproteins in which a retrovirus vector genome carrying an Escherichia coli lacZ gene was packaged. The host range and sensitivity to interference of pseudotyped virions were assayed, and we observed which permutations resulted in receptor switch or loss of function. Our results indicate that the determinants of receptor choice are found within the just 120 amino acids of SU proteins. Downstream sequences contribute to the stabilization of the receptor-specific structure. PMID:1310758

  9. The Epidemiology of Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomas account for over 20% of all pediatric solid malignant cancers and less than 1% of all adult solid malignant cancers. The vast majority of diagnosed sarcomas will be soft tissue sarcomas, while malignant bone tumors make up just over 10% of sarcomas. The risks for sarcoma are not well-understood. We evaluated the existing literature on the epidemiology and etiology of sarcoma. Risks for sarcoma development can be divided into environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and an interaction between the two. HIV-positive individuals are at an increased risk for Kaposi’s sarcoma, even though HHV8 is the causative virus. Radiation exposure from radiotherapy has been strongly associated with secondary sarcoma development in certain cancer patients. In fact, the risk of malignant bone tumors increases as the cumulative dose of radiation to the bone increases (p for trend <0.001). A recent meta-analysis reported that children with a history of hernias have a greater risk of developing Ewing’s sarcoma (adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9, 5.7). Bone development during pubertal growth spurts has been associated with osteosarcoma development. Occupational factors such as job type, industry, and exposures to chemicals such as herbicides and chlorophenols have been suggested as risk factors for sarcomas. A case-control study found a significant increase in soft tissue sarcoma risk among gardeners (adjusted OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.00, 14.00), but not among those strictly involved in farming. A European-based study reported an increased risk in bone tumors among blacksmiths, toolmakers, or machine-tool operators (adjusted OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.08, 4.26). Maternal and paternal characteristics such as occupation, age, smoking status, and health conditions experienced during pregnancy also have been suggested as sarcoma risk factors and would be important to assess in future studies. The limited studies we identified demonstrate significant relationships with sarcoma risk, but many of

  10. Mutational Analysis of the Candidate Internal Fusion Peptide of the Avian Leukosis and Sarcoma Virus Subgroup A Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Lorraine D.; White, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    The transmembrane subunit (TM) of the avian leukosis and sarcoma virus (ALSV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) contains a stretch of conserved hydrophobic amino acids internal to its amino terminus (residues 21 to 42). By analogy with similar sequences in other viral envelope glycoproteins, this region has been proposed to be a fusion peptide. We investigated the role of this region by changing each of three hydrophobic residues (Ile-21, Val-30, and Ile-39) to glutamatic acid and lysine in the ALSV subgroup A Env. Like wild-type (wt) Env, all six mutant Env proteins were proteolytically processed, oligomerized, and expressed at the cell surface in a form that bound Tva, the ALSV subgroup A receptor. Like wt Env, Ile21Glu, Ile21Lys, Val30Glu, and Val30Lys changed conformation upon binding Tva, as assayed by sensitivity to thermolysin. Ile39Glu and Ile39Lys were cleaved by thermolysin in both the absence and presence of Tva. Although incorporated into virus particles at approximately equal levels, all mutant Envs were compromised in their ability to support infection. The mutants at residues 21 and 30 showed levels of infection 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of wt Env. The mutants at residue 39 were noninfectious. Furthermore, none of the mutants displayed activity in a cell-cell fusion assay. Our results support the contention that residues 21 to 42 of ALSV subgroup A Env constitute its fusion peptide. PMID:9525653

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus LANA recruits the DNA polymerase clamp loader to mediate efficient replication and virus persistence

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiming; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Juillard, Franceline; Li, Lin; Li, Shijun; De León Vázquez, Erika; Chen, She; Kaye, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latently infects tumor cells and persists as a multiple-copy, extrachromosomal, circular episome. To persist, the viral genome must replicate with each cell cycle. The KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates viral DNA replication and persistence, but little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. We find that LANA recruits replication factor C (RFC), the DNA polymerase clamp [proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)] loader, to drive DNA replication efficiently. Mutated LANA lacking RFC interaction was deficient for LANA-mediated DNA replication and episome persistence. RFC depletion had a negative impact on LANA’s ability to replicate and maintain viral DNA in cells containing artificial KSHV episomes or in infected cells, leading to loss of virus. LANA substantially increased PCNA loading onto DNA in vitro and recruited RFC and PCNA to KSHV DNA in cells. These findings suggest that PCNA loading is a rate-limiting step in DNA replication that is incompatible with viral survival. LANA enhancement of PCNA loading permits efficient virus replication and persistence, revealing a previously unidentified mechanism for KSHV latency. PMID:25071216

  12. Effect of internal genomic sequences of the Moloney murine leukemia virus on replication

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, I.K.; Lobanova, A.B.; Voitenok, N.N.

    1995-11-01

    Construction and use of retrovirus vectors derived from the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) are described. These vectors, designated minimal vectors, contain the left and right long terminal repeats (LTRs), a binding site for proline tRNA, a polypurine tract (PPT), and a dominant marker for selective introduction of vectors into a packaging cell line, but lack the internal sequences of the virus genome. The experiments showed that the minimal vectors can be replicated and that their titer was approximately 1500-fold lower than that of wild-type vectors. The minimal vectors were shown to contain all the cis-acting sequences necessary for correct reverse transcription. One infectious virion, like wild-type viruses, produced only one provirus. Unlike the avian reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), {Psi}{sup +} and {Psi}{sup {minus}} genomes of MoMuLV did not compete for virion proteins in the {Psi}2 packaging cell line. When an insert was introduced into a central part of the LTR U5 region, the titer of the minimal vector remained the same, while the titer of the wild-type vector decreased approximately 40-fold. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Infectious Entry by Amphotropic as well as Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Viruses Occurs through an Endocytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Katen, Louis J.; Januszeski, Michael M.; Anderson, W. French; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Evans, Leonard H.

    2001-01-01

    Infectious entry of enveloped viruses is thought to proceed by one of two mechanisms. pH-dependent viruses enter the cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and are inhibited by transient treatment with agents that prevent acidification of vesicles in the endocytic pathway, while pH-independent viruses are not inhibited by such agents and are thought to enter the cell by direct fusion with the plasma membrane. Nearly all retroviruses, including amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1, are classified as pH independent. However, ecotropic MuLV is considered to be a pH-dependent virus. We have examined the infectious entry of ecotropic and amphotropic MuLVs and found that they were equally inhibited by NH4Cl and bafilomycin A. These agents inhibited both viruses only partially over the course of the experiments. Agents that block the acidification of endocytic vesicles also arrest vesicular trafficking. Thus, partial inhibition of the MuLVs could be the result of virus inactivation during arrest in this pathway. In support of this contention, we found that that the loss of infectivity of the MuLVs during treatment of target cells with the drugs closely corresponded to the loss of activity due to spontaneous inactivation at 37°C in the same period of time. Furthermore, the drugs had no effect on the efficiency of infection under conditions in which the duration of infection was held to a very short period to minimize the effects of spontaneous inactivation. These results indicate that the infectious processes of both ecotropic and amphotropic MuLVs were arrested rather than aborted by transient treatment of the cells with the drugs. We also found that infectious viruses were efficiently internalized during treatment. This indicated that the arrest occurred in an intracellular compartment and that the infectious process of both the amphotropic and ecotropic MuLVs very likely involved endocytosis. An important aspect of this study

  14. Characterization of mouse cellular deoxyribonucleic acid homologous to Abelson murine leukemia virus-specific sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, B; Ozanne, B

    1981-01-01

    The genome of Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) consists of sequences derived from both BALB/c mouse deoxyribonucleic acid and the genome of Moloney murine leukemia virus. Using deoxyribonucleic acid linear intermediates as a source of retroviral deoxyribonucleic acid, we isolated a recombinant plasmid which contained 1.9 kilobases of the 3.5-kilobase mouse-derived sequences found in A-MuLV (A-MuLV-specific sequences). We used this clone, designated pSA-17, as a probe restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses to examine the arrangement of homologous sequences in BALB/c deoxyribonucleic acid (endogenous Abelson sequences). The endogenous Abelson sequences within the mouse genome were interrupted by noncoding regions, suggesting that a rearrangement of the cell sequences was required to produce the sequence found in the virus. Endogenous Abelson sequences were arranged similarly in mice that were susceptible to A-MuLV tumors and in mice that were resistant to A-MuLV tumors. An examination of three BALB/c plasmacytomas and a BALB/c early B-cell tumor likewise revealed no alteration in the arrangement of the endogenous Abelson sequences. Homology to pSA-17 was also observed in deoxyribonucleic acids prepared from rat, hamster, chicken, and human cells. An isolate of A-MuLV which encoded a 160,000-dalton transforming protein (P160) contained 700 more base pairs of mouse sequences than the standard A-MuLV isolate, which encoded a 120,000-dalton transforming protein (P120). Images PMID:9279386

  15. Pediatric Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Regan F; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Gosain, Ankush

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors accounting for approximately 10% of childhood solid tumors. Treatment is focused on multimodality therapy, which has improved the prognosis over the past two decades. Current regimens focus on decreasing treatment for low-risk patients to decrease the long-term side effects while maximizing therapy for patients with metastatic disease to improve survival. Pediatric sarcomas can be divided into soft tissue sarcomas and osseous tumors. Soft tissue sarcomas are further delineated into rhabdomyosarcomas, which affect young children and nonrhabdomyosarcomas, which are most common in adolescents. The most common bone sarcomas are osteosarcomas and Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:27542645

  16. Murine leukemia virus-based Tat-inducible long terminal repeat replacement vectors: a new system for anti-human immunodeficiency virus gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, P M; Kim, N; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have constructed new murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors (TIN vectors) which, following integration, contain human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 U3 and R sequences in place of the MLV U3 and R regions. This provides, for the first time, single transcriptional unit retroviral vectors under the control of Tat. TIN vectors have several advantages for anti-HIV gene therapy applications. PMID:8892960

  17. Murine leukemia virus-based Tat-inducible long terminal repeat replacement vectors: a new system for anti-human immunodeficiency virus gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cannon, P M; Kim, N; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-11-01

    We have constructed new murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors (TIN vectors) which, following integration, contain human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 U3 and R sequences in place of the MLV U3 and R regions. This provides, for the first time, single transcriptional unit retroviral vectors under the control of Tat. TIN vectors have several advantages for anti-HIV gene therapy applications. PMID:8892960

  18. Leukemia induction by a new strain of Friend mink cell focus-inducing virus: synergistic effect of Friend ecotropic murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chesebro, B; Wehrly, K; Nishio, J; Evans, L

    1984-01-01

    A new strain of Friend recombinant mink cell focus-inducing retrovirus, FMCF -1-E, was found to induce leukemias in NFS and IRW mice. Although the isolate was obtained from a stock of FMCF -1 ( Troxler et al., J. Exp. Med. 148:639-653, 1978), FMCF -1-E was distinguishable from FMCF -1 by oligonucleotide fingerprinting and antigenic analysis, using monoclonal antibodies. These analyses suggested that FMCF -1-E is a distinct FMCF isolate rather than a simple variant of FMCF -1. After neonatal inoculation, the latency for leukemia induction was 3 to 8 months. A similar long latency was also seen when Friend murine leukemia virus 57 was inoculated into adult (6-week-old) IRW mice. However, sequential inoculation of FMCF -1-E at birth followed by Friend murine leukemia 57 at 6 weeks of age led to a shortened latency period (2.5 to 4 months). Only neonatal inoculation of Friend murine leukemia virus 57 was able to induce a more rapid appearance of leukemia. The leukemia cell type in the majority of cases, regardless of virus inoculation protocol, was erythroid, but occasional myeloid, lymphoid, and mixed leukemias were also observed. In contrast to NFS and IRW mice, BALB/c mice were resistant to leukemia induction by FMCF -1-E and also showed some transient resistance to leukemia induction by Friend murine leukemia virus 57. Images PMID:6202886

  19. Co-culture: A quick approach for isolation of street rabies virus in murine neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sasikalaveni, A.; Tirumurugaan, K. G.; Manoharan, S.; Raj, G. Dhinakar; Kumanan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laboratory detection of rabies in most cases is based on detection of the antigen by fluorescent antibody test, however, in weak positive cases confirmative laboratory diagnosis depends on widely accepted mouse inoculation test. Cell lines like neuroblastoma have been used to isolate the virus with greater success not only to target for diagnosis, but also for molecular studies that determine the epidemiology of the circulating street rabies strains and in studies that look at the efficiency of the developed monoclonal antibodies to neutralize the different rabies strains. Due to the recent issues in obtaining ethical permission for mouse experimentation, and also the passages required in the cell lines to isolate the virus, we report herewith a co-culture protocol using the murine neuroblastoma (MNA) cells, which enable quicker isolation of street rabies virus with minimum passages. Objective: This study is not to have an alternative diagnostic assay, but an approach to produce sufficient amount of rabies virus in minimum passages by a co-culture approach in MNA cells. Materials and Methods: The MNA cells are co-cultured by topping the normal cells with infected cells every 48 h and the infectivity was followed up by performing direct fluorescent-antibody test. Results: The co-culture approach results in 100% infectivity and hence the use of live mouse for experimentation could be avoided. Conclusion: Co-culture method provides an alternative for the situations with limited sample volume and for the quicker isolation of virus which warrants the wild type strains without much modification. PMID:27047148

  20. Genomic stability of murine leukemia viruses containing insertions at the Env-3' untranslated region boundary.

    PubMed

    Logg, C R; Logg, A; Tai, C K; Cannon, P M; Kasahara, N

    2001-08-01

    Retroviruses containing inserts of exogenous sequences frequently eliminate the inserted sequences upon spread in susceptible cells. We have constructed replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV) vectors containing internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-transgene cassettes at the env-3' untranslated region boundary in order to examine the effects of insert sequence and size on the loss of inserts during viral replication. A virus containing an insertion of 1.6 kb replicated with greatly attenuated kinetics relative to wild-type virus and lost the inserted sequences in a single infection cycle. In contrast, MLVs containing inserts of 1.15 to 1.30 kb replicated with kinetics only slightly attenuated compared to wild-type MLV and exhibited much greater stability, maintaining their genomic integrity over multiple serial infection cycles. Eventually, multiple species of deletion mutants were detected simultaneously in later infection cycles; once detected, these variants rapidly dominated the population and thereafter appeared to be maintained at a relative equilibrium. Sequence analysis of these variants identified preferred sites of recombination in the parental viruses, including both short direct repeats and inverted repeats. One instance of insert deletion through recombination with an endogenous retrovirus was also observed. When specific sequences involved in these recombination events were eliminated, deletion variants still arose with the same kinetics upon virus passage and by apparently similar mechanisms, although at different locations in the vectors. Our results suggest that while lengthened, insert-containing genomes can be maintained over multiple replication cycles, preferential deletions resulting in loss of the inserted sequences confer a strong selective advantage. PMID:11435579

  1. The BET family of proteins targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus integration near transcription start sites

    PubMed Central

    De Rijck, Jan; de Kogel, Christine; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vets, Sofie; Ashkar, Sara El; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D; Landuyt, Bart; Husson, Steven J.; Busschots, Katrien; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Summary A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome in the host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4) and MLV integrase specifically interact and co-localize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75, retargets MLV integration away from TSS and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conform to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration pattern. Together these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors. PMID:24183673

  2. Kaposi sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV, a weakened immune system, and the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8). Kaposi sarcoma has been linked ... on foot References Kaye KM. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus type 8). In: Mandell GL, Bennett ...

  3. Ewing sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    Bone cancer - Ewing sarcoma; Ewing family of tumors; Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET); Bone neoplasm - Ewing sarcoma ... NCCN clinical practice guidelines in oncology (NCCN guidelines): bone cancer. Updated 2016. www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/ ...

  4. Effects of murine leukemia virus env gene proteins on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Takemoto, L. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    F5b Tumor cells were incubated with concentrated culture supernatants taken from cells resistant (F5m) or sensitive (F5b) to contact-dependent macrophage cytotoxicity. Macrophage cell line B6MP102 and murine peritoneal macrophages killed targets incubated with supernatants taken from sensitive cells but poorly killed cells incubated in supernatants isolated from resistant cells. Membranes from cells resistant to macrophage killing, F5m, were fused into F5b cells. The fused F5b cells were killed significantly less than F5b cells fused with F5b cell membranes or untreated F5b cells. The decreased killing of F5b cells corresponded to increased concentrations of gp70(a) molecules on F5b cells. Affinity purified gp70(a) was added to cytotoxicity assays but failed to inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. P15E molecules were detectable on both F5b and F5m cells. In addition, a synthetic peptide found to exhibit the inhibitory properties of p15E was added to cytotoxicity assays. P15E synthetic peptide also did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. Therefore, env gene proteins of murine leukemia virus do not appear responsible for inducing tumor cell resistance to activated macrophage contact-dependent cytotoxicity.

  5. Lymphatic Reprogramming by Kaposi Sarcoma Herpes Virus Promotes the Oncogenic Activity of the Virus-Encoded G-protein Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Berenice; Choi, Inho; Choi, Dongwon; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Sunju; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Lee, Yong Suk; Maeng, Yong Sun; Lee, Ha Neul; Park, Eunkyung; Kim, Kyu Eui; Kim, Nam Yoon; Baik, Jae Myung; Jung, Jae U.; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), the most common cancer in HIV-positive individuals, is caused by endothelial transformation mediated by the KS herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded G-protein coupled receptor (vGPCR). Infection of blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) by KSHV reactivates an otherwise silenced embryonic program of lymphatic differentiation. Thus, KS tumors express numerous lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC)-signature genes. A key unanswered question is how lymphatic reprogramming by the virus promotes tumorigenesis leading to KS formation. In this study, we present evidence that this process creates an environment needed to license the oncogenic activity of vGPCR. We found that the G-protein regulator RGS4 is an inhibitor of vGPCR that is expressed in BECs, but not in LECs. RGS4 was downregulated by the master regulator of LEC differentiation PROX1, which is upregulated by KSHV and directs KSHV-induced lymphatic reprogramming. Moreover, we found that KSHV upregulates the nuclear receptor LRH1, which physically interacts with PROX1 and synergizes with it to mediate repression of RGS4 expression. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RGS4 reduced vGPCR-enhanced cell proliferation, migration, VEGF expression and Akt activation and to suppress tumor formation induced by vGPCR. Our findings resolve long-standing questions about the pathological impact of KSHV-induced reprogramming of host cell identity, and they offer biological and mechanistic insights supporting the hypothesis that a lymphatic microenvironment is more favorable for KS tumorigenesis. PMID:22942256

  6. Expression of infectious woodchuck hepatitis virus in murine and avian fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, C; Baldwin, B; Tennant, B C

    1989-01-01

    The liver is the primary site for replication of the hepadnavirus genome. We asked whether the posttranscriptional phase of the viral replication cycle would depend on hepatocyte-specific functions. For this purpose, we assayed a previously constructed chimera between sequences of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-enhancer region and woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) (C. Seeger and J. Maragos, J. Virol. 63:1907-1915, 1989) for its ability to direct the synthesis of infectious WHV in hepatoma cells and in murine and avian fibroblast cells. Viruslike particles containing WHV DNA were produced transiently in transfected hepatoma cells and in fibroblasts. Inoculation of woodchucks with culture medium from hepatoma cells or fibroblasts transfected with viral DNA led to productive WHV infection, as observed following infection of woodchucks with serum from WHV-infected animals. These results demonstrate that posttranscriptional events of the hepadnavirus replication cycle are not dependent on hepatocyte-specific functions. Images PMID:2795716

  7. Sex-specific quantitative trait loci govern susceptibility to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination.

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Russell J; Roper, Randall J; Rhein, Dominic M; Melvold, Roger W; Haynes, Lia; Ma, Runlin Z; Doerge, R W; Teuscher, Cory

    2003-01-01

    Susceptibility to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination (TMEVD), a mouse model for multiple sclerosis (MS), is genetically controlled. Through a mouse-human comparative mapping approach, identification of candidate susceptibility loci for MS based on the location of TMEVD susceptibility loci may be possible. Composite interval mapping (CIM) identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling TMEVD severity in male and female backcross populations derived from susceptible DBA/2J and resistant BALBc/ByJ mice. We report QTL on chromosomes 1, 5, 15, and 16 affecting male mice. In addition, we identified two QTL in female mice located on chromosome 1. Our results support the existence of three linked sex-specific QTL on chromosome 1 with opposing effects on the severity of the clinical signs of TMEV-induced disease in male and female mice. PMID:12663542

  8. Structure of the catalytic domain of avian sarcoma virus integrase with a bound HIV-1 integrase-targeted inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lubkowski, Jacek; Yang, Fan; Alexandratos, Jerry; Wlodawer, Alexander; Zhao, He; Burke, Terrence R.; Neamati, Nouri; Pommier, Yves; Merkel, George; Skalka, Anna Marie

    1998-01-01

    The x-ray structures of an inhibitor complex of the catalytic core domain of avian sarcoma virus integrase (ASV IN) were solved at 1.9- to 2.0-Å resolution at two pH values, with and without Mn2+ cations. This inhibitor (Y-3), originally identified in a screen for inhibitors of the catalytic activity of HIV type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN), was found in the present study to be active against ASV IN as well as HIV-1 IN. The Y-3 molecule is located in close proximity to the enzyme active site, interacts with the flexible loop, alters loop conformation, and affects the conformations of active site residues. As crystallized, a Y-3 molecule stacks against its symmetry-related mate. Preincubation of IN with metal cations does not prevent inhibition, and Y-3 binding does not prevent binding of divalent cations to IN. Three compounds chemically related to Y-3 also were investigated, but no binding was observed in the crystals. Our results identify the structural elements of the inhibitor that likely determine its binding properties. PMID:9560188

  9. Production and characterization of a soluble, active form of Tva, the subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus receptor.

    PubMed

    Balliet, J W; Berson, J; D'Cruz, C M; Huang, J; Crane, J; Gilbert, J M; Bates, P

    1999-04-01

    The receptor for the subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses [ASLV(A)] is the cellular glycoprotein Tva. A soluble form of Tva, sTva, was produced and purified with a baculovirus expression system. Using this system, 7 to 10 mg of purified sTva per liter of cultured Sf9 cells was obtained. Characterization of the carbohydrate modification of sTva revealed that the three N glycosylation sites in sTva were differentially utilized; however, the O glycosylation common to Tva produced in mammalian and avian cells was not observed. Purified sTva demonstrates significant biological activity, specifically blocking infection of avian cells by ASLV(A) with a 90% inhibitory concentration of approximately 25 pM. A quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, developed to assess the binding of sTva to ASLV envelope glycoprotein, demonstrates that sTva has a high affinity for EnvA, with an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 0.3 nM. Once they are bound, a very stable complex is formed between EnvA and sTva, with an estimated complex half-life of 6 h. The soluble receptor protein described here represents a valuable tool for analysis of the receptor-envelope glycoprotein interaction and for structural analysis of Tva. PMID:10074155

  10. Intronic deletions of tva receptor gene decrease the susceptibility to infection by avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiguo; Liu, Yang; Li, Hongxing; Chang, Shuang; Shu, Dingming; Zhang, Huanmin; Chen, Feng; Xie, Qingmei

    2015-01-01

    The group of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) in chickens contains six highly related subgroups, A to E and J. Four genetic loci, tva, tvb, tvc and tvj, encode for corresponding receptors that determine the susceptibility to the ASLV subgroups. The prevalence of ASLV in hosts may have imposed strong selection pressure toward resistance to ASLV infection, and the resistant alleles in all four receptor genes have been identified. In this study, two new alleles of the tva receptor gene, tvar5 and tvar6, with similar intronic deletions were identified in Chinese commercial broilers. These natural mutations delete the deduced branch point signal within the first intron, disrupting mRNA splicing of the tva receptor gene and leading to the retention of intron 1 and introduction of premature TGA stop codons in both the longer and shorter tva isoforms. As a result, decreased susceptibility to subgroup A ASLV in vitro and in vivo was observed in the subsequent analysis. In addition, we identified two groups of heterozygous allele pairs which exhibited quantitative differences in host susceptibility to ASLV-A. This study demonstrated that defective splicing of the tva receptor gene can confer genetic resistance to ASLV subgroup A in the host. PMID:25873518

  11. Targeted gene transfer to lymphocytes using murine leukaemia virus vectors pseudotyped with spleen necrosis virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Engelstädter, M; Buchholz, C J; Bobkova, M; Steidl, S; Merget-Millitzer, H; Willemsen, R A; Stitz, J; Cichutek, K

    2001-08-01

    In contrast to murine leukaemia virus (MLV)-derived vector systems, vector particles derived from the avian spleen necrosis virus (SNV) have been successfully targeted to subsets of human cells by envelope modification with antibody fragments (scFv). However, an in vivo application of the SNV vector system in gene transfer protocols is hampered by its lack of resistance against human complement. To overcome this limitation we established pseudotyping of MLV vector particles produced in human packaging cell lines with the SNV envelope (Env) protein. Three variants of SNV Env proteins differing in the length of their cytoplasmic domains were all efficiently incorporated into MLV core particles. These pseudotype particles infected the SNV permissive cell line D17 at titers of up to 10(5) IU/ml. A stable packaging cell line (MS4) of human origin released MLV(SNV) pseudotype vectors that were resistant against human complement inactivation. To redirect their tropism to human T cells, MS4 cells were transfected with the expression gene encoding the scFv 7A5 in fusion with the transmembrane domain (TM) of the SNV Env protein, previously shown to retarget SNV vector particles to human lymphocytes. MLV(SNV-7A5)-vector particles released from these cells were selectively infectious for human T cell lines. The data provide a proof of principle for targeting MLV-derived vectors to subpopulations of human cells through pseudotyping with SNV targeting envelopes. PMID:11509952

  12. Crystal structures of the reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia-virus related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dongwen; Chung, Suhman; Miller, Maria; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-06-19

    The ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain of retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a critical role in the life cycle by degrading the RNA strands of DNA/RNA hybrids. In addition, RNase H activity is required to precisely remove the RNA primers from nascent (-) and (+) strand DNA. We report here three crystal structures of the RNase H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) RT, namely (i) the previously identified construct from which helix C was deleted, (ii) the intact domain, and (iii) the intact domain complexed with an active site {alpha}-hydroxytropolone inhibitor. Enzymatic assays showed that the intact RNase H domain retained catalytic activity, whereas the variant lacking helix C was only marginally active, corroborating the importance of this helix for enzymatic activity. Modeling of the enzyme-substrate complex elucidated the essential role of helix C in binding a DNA/RNA hybrid and its likely mode of recognition. The crystal structure of the RNase H domain complexed with {beta}-thujaplicinol clearly showed that coordination by two divalent cations mediates recognition of the inhibitor.

  13. Model of the TVA Receptor Determinants Required for Efficient Infection by Subgroup A Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Melder, Deborah C.; Pike, Gennett M.; VanBrocklin, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study of the interactions of subgroup A avian sarcoma and leucosis viruses [ASLV(A)] with the TVA receptor required to infect cells offers a powerful experimental model of retroviral entry. Several regions and specific residues in the TVA receptor have previously been identified to be critical determinants of the binding affinity with ASLV(A) envelope glycoproteins and to mediate efficient infection. Two homologs of the TVA receptor have been cloned: the original quail TVA receptor, which has been the basis for most of the initial characterization of the ASLV(A) TVA, and the chicken TVA receptor, which is 65% identical to the quail receptor overall but identical in the region thought to be critical for infection. Our previous work characterized three mutant ASLV(A) isolates that could efficiently bind and infect cells using the chicken TVA receptor homolog but not using the quail TVA receptor homolog, with the infectivity of one mutant virus being >500-fold less with the quail TVA receptor. The mutant viruses contained mutations in the hr1 region of the surface glycoprotein. Using chimeras of the quail and chicken TVA receptors, we have identified new residues of TVA critical for the binding affinity and entry of ASLV(A) using the mutant glycoproteins and viruses to probe the function of those residues. The quail TVA receptor required changes at residues 10, 14, and 31 of the corresponding chicken TVA residues to bind wild-type and mutant ASLV(A) glycoproteins with a high affinity and recover the ability to mediate efficient infection of cells. A model of the TVA determinants critical for interacting with ASLV(A) glycoproteins is proposed. IMPORTANCE A detailed understanding of how retroviruses enter cells, evolve to use new receptors, and maintain efficient entry is crucial for identifying new targets for combating retrovirus infection and pathogenesis, as well as for developing new approaches for targeted gene delivery. Since all retroviruses share

  14. Survival of murine norovirus and hepatitis A virus in different types of manure and biosolids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Jin, Yan; Sims, Tom; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2010-08-01

    Noroviruses and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are common causes of foodborne disease. They are usually shed in feces and have been found in sewage water, biosolids, and animal manures. With the wide application of manure and biosolids on agricultural lands, there is an increasing interest in investigating virus survival in manure and biosolids. In this study, Murine norovirus-1 (MNV) and HAV were inoculated into different types of animal manure and three types of differently treated biosolids at 20 degrees C and 4 degrees C for up to 60 days. Both HAV and MNV viral genomes degraded immediately in high pH biosolids type 2 and 3 at time zero. For other types of manure and biosolids, HAV RNA was significantly reduced in biosolids type 1 and in liquid dairy manure (DM) after 60 days stored at 20 degrees C, but was stable in all types of manure and biosolids type 1 at 4 degrees C. MNV RNA was unstable in pelletized poultry litter and biosolids type 1 at 20 degrees C, and less stable in liquid DM at both temperatures. For MNV infectivity, there was no significant difference among pelletized poultry litter, alum-treated poultry litter, raw poultry litter, and swine manure at either 20 degrees C or 4 degrees C after 60 days of storage. However, HAV stored in swine manure and raw poultry litter had significantly higher infectivity levels than HAV stored in alum-treated poultry litter at both 20 degrees C and 4 degrees C. Overall, both viruses were inactivated rapidly in alkaline pH biosolids and unstable in liquid DM, but alum added in poultry litter had different effects on the two viruses: alum inactivated some HAV at both temperatures but had no effect on MNV. PMID:20455755

  15. Characterization of a novel murine leukemia virus-related subgroup within mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Tristem, M; Kabat, P; Lieberman, L; Linde, S; Karpas, A; Hill, F

    1996-01-01

    The murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related retroviruses are one of seven genera which together constitute the family Retroviridae. They are widespread as both endogenous and exogenous agents within vertebrates and have been associated with a variety of malignancies and other disorders. We isolated and characterized 12 endogenous representatives of this genus from a number of mammalian hosts. Subsequent sequence analysis revealed that the isolated viruses cluster into two clearly distinct groups. All of the exogenous MuLV-related retroviruses which have been isolated to date, as well as several endogenous examples, fall into the first group, whereas the second group is represented solely by endogenous representatives, including human endogenous retrovirus type E (HERV.E). The two groups are widespread within mammals, with both often present within one animal species. Despite this, there is no evidence to date that recombination between members of the different groups has occurred. Genetic distances and several other properties of the HERV.E genome suggest that if exogenous members of this subgroup exist, they are likely to have biological properties different from those of the other exogenous viruses of this genus. Several of these viruses are known to have been integrated within their hosts' genomes for a long period of time, and a most recent divergence date for the MuLV and HERV.E subgroups can thus be proposed. This date, approximately 30 million years ago, is the most recent date possible, and it is probable that the actual period of time since their divergence is significantly longer. PMID:8892961

  16. Significant differences in integration sites of Moloney murine leukemia virus/Moloney murine sarcoma virus retroviral vector carrying recombinant coagulation factor IX in two human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Castilho-Fernandes, Andrielle; Fontes, Aparecida Maria; Abraham, Kuruvilla Joseph; de Freitas, Marcela Cristina Corrêa; da Rosa, Nathalia Gonsales; Picanço-Castro, Virginia; de Sousa Russo-Carbolante, Elisa Maria; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2015-05-01

    Ligation-mediated-PCR was performed followed by the mapping of 177 and 150 integration sites from HepG2 and Hek293 transduced with chimera vector carrying recombinant human Factor IX (rhFIX) cDNA, respectively. The sequences were analyzed for chromosome preference, CpG, transcription start site (TSS), repetitive elements, fragile sites and target genes. In HepG2, rhFIX was had an increased preference for chromosomes 6 and 17; the median distance to the nearest CpG islands was 15,240 base pairs and 37 % of the integrations occurred in RefSeq genes. In Hek293, rhFIX had an increased preference for chromosome 5; the median distance to the nearest CpG islands was 209,100 base pairs and 74 % of the integrations occurred in RefSeq genes. The integrations in both cell lines were distant from the TSS. The integration patterns associated with this vector are different in each cell line. PMID:25650340

  17. Expression of mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia virus-related transcripts in AKR mice

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.S.; Laigret, F.; Rodi, C.P.

    1987-03-01

    The authors used a synthetic 16-base-pair mink cell focus-forming (MCF) env-specific oligomer as radiolabeled probe to study MCF murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related transcripts in brain, kidney, liver, spleen, and thymus tissues of AKR mice ranging from 5 weeks to 6 months (mo) of age. Tissue-specific expression of poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs was seen. In addition, all the tissues tested contained 3.0-kb messages. The transcription of these MCF-related mRNAs was independent of the presence of ecotropic and xenotropic MuLVs. In general, expression of the MCF env-related transcripts appeared to peak at 2 mo of age; these messages were barely detectable in brain, kidney, liver, and spleen tissues after 2 mo and in thymus tissue after 4 mo of age. All of the subgenomic MCF env-related mRNAs appeared to contain the 190-base-pair cellular DNA insert, characteristic of the long terminal repeats associated with endogenous MCF env-related proviruses. No genomic-size (8.4-kb) transcripts corresponding to endogenous MCF-related proviruses were detected. An 8.4-kb MCF env-related mRNA was first seen at 3 mo of age, exclusively in thymus tissue. This species most likely represents the first appearance of a recombinant MCF-related MuLV genome. The transcripts which were detected in thymus tissue might be involved in the generation of leukemogenic MCF viruses.

  18. Insights into the nuclear export of murine leukemia virus intron-containing RNA

    PubMed Central

    Pessel-Vivares, Lucie; Houzet, Laurent; Lainé, Sébastien; Mougel, Marylène

    2015-01-01

    The retroviral genome consists of an intron-containing transcript that has essential cytoplasmic functions in the infected cell. This viral transcript can escape splicing, circumvent the nuclear checkpoint mechanisms and be transported to the cytoplasm by hijacking the host machinery. Once in the cytoplasm, viral unspliced RNA acts as mRNA to be translated and as genomic RNA to be packaged into nascent viruses. The murine leukemia virus (MLV) is among the first retroviruses discovered and is classified as simple Retroviridae due to its minimal encoding capacity. The oncogenic and transduction abilities of MLV are extensively studied, whereas surprisingly the crucial step of its nuclear export has remained unsolved until 2014. Recent work has revealed the recruitment by MLV of the cellular NXF1/Tap-dependent pathway for export. Unconventionally, MLV uses of Tap to export both spliced and unspliced viral RNAs. Unlike other retroviruses, MLV does not harbor a unique RNA signal for export. Indeed, multiple sequences throughout the MLV genome appear to promote export of the unspliced MLV RNA. We review here the current understanding of the export mechanism and highlight the determinants that influence MLV export. As the molecular mechanism of MLV export is elucidated, we will gain insight into the contribution of the export pathway to the cytoplasmic fate of the viral RNA. PMID:26158194

  19. Murine leukemia virus in organs of senescence-prone and -resistant mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Carp, R I; Meeker, H C; Chung, R; Kozak, C A; Hosokawa, M; Fujisawa, H

    2002-03-31

    A series of inbred strains of mice have been developed that are either prone (SAMP) or resistant (SAMR) to accelerated senescence. All of these strains originated from an inadvertent cross or crosses between the AKR/J mouse strain and an unknown strain(s). The characteristics of the nine senescence-prone lines differ, with all strains showing generalized aspects of accelerated aging but with each line having a specific aging-related change that is emphasized, e.g. learning and memory deficits, osteoporosis and senile amyloidosis. The senescence-resistant strains have normal patterns of aging and do not show the specific aging-related changes seen in SAMP strains. The fact that AKR mice have high levels of endogenous, ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) prompted an examination of the expression levels of MuLV in SAM strains. Analysis of brain, spleen and thymus samples revealed that seven of nine SAMP strains had high levels of MuLV and contained the Emv11 provirus (previously termed Akv1) that encodes the predominant MuLV found in AKR mice. In contrast, none of the SAMR strains had Emv11 or significant amounts of virus. The current findings represent an initial step in determining the role of MuLV in the accelerated senescence seen in SAMP strains. PMID:11850021

  20. Assembly and composition of intracellular particles formed by Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M; Jelinek, L; Jones, R S; Stegeman-Olsen, J; Barklis, E

    1993-01-01

    Assembly of type C retroviruses such as Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) ordinarily occurs at the plasma membranes of infected cells and absolutely requires the particle core precursor protein, Pr65gag. Previously we have shown that Pr65gag is membrane associated and that at least a portion of intracellular Pr65gag protein appears to be routed to the plasma membrane by a vesicular transport pathway. Here we show that intracellular particle formation can occur in M-MuLV-infected cells. M-MuLV immature particles were observed by electron microscopy budding into and within rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and vacuolar compartments. Biochemical fractionation studies indicated that intracellular Pr65gag was present in nonionic detergent-resistant complexes of greater than 150S. Additionally, viral RNA and polymerase functions appeared to be associated with intracellular particles, as were Gag-beta-galactosidase fusion proteins which have the capacity to be incorporated into virions. Immature intracellular particles in postnuclear lysates could be proteolytically processed in vitro to mature forms, while extracellular immature M-MuLV particles remained immature as long as 10 h during incubations. The occurrence of M-MuLV-derived intracellular particles demonstrates that Pr65gag can associate with intracellular membranes and indicates that if a plasma membrane Pr65gag receptor exists, it also can be found in other membrane compartments. These results support the hypothesis that intracellular particles may serve as a virus reservoir during in vivo infections. Images PMID:8350394

  1. Cellular transformation by Simian Virus 40 and Murine Polyoma Virus T antigens.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingwei; DeCaprio, James A; Fluck, Michele M; Schaffhausen, Brian S

    2009-08-01

    Simian Virus 40 (SV40) and Mouse Polyoma Virus (PY) are small DNA tumor viruses that have been used extensively to study cellular transformation. The SV40 early region encodes three tumor antigens, large T (LT), small T (ST) and 17KT that contribute to cellular transformation. While PY also encodes LT and ST, the unique middle T (MT) generates most of the transforming activity. SV40 LT mediated transformation requires binding to the tumor suppressor proteins Rb and p53 in the nucleus and ST binding to the protein phosphatase PP2A in the cytoplasm. SV40 LT also binds to several additional cellular proteins including p300, CBP, Cul7, IRS1, Bub1, Nbs1 and Fbxw7 that contribute to viral transformation. PY MT transformation is dependent on binding to PP2A and the Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and assembly of a signaling complex on cell membranes that leads to transformation in a manner similar to Her2/neu. Phosphorylation of MT tyrosine residues activates key signaling molecules including Shc/Grb2, PI3K and PLCgamma1. The unique contributions of SV40 LT and ST and PY MT to cellular transformation have provided significant insights into our understanding of tumor suppressors, oncogenes and the process of oncogenesis. PMID:19505649

  2. Cellular Transformation by Simian Virus 40 and Murine Polyoma Virus T antigens

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jingwei; DeCaprio, James A.; Fluck, Michele M.; Schaffhausen, Brian S.

    2009-01-01

    Simian Virus 40 (SV40) and Mouse Polyoma Virus (PY) are small DNA tumor viruses that have been used extensively to study cellular transformation. The SV40 early region encodes three tumor antigens, Large T (LT), small T (ST) and 17KT that contribute to cellular transformation. While PY also encodes LT and ST, the unique Middle T (MT) generates most of the transforming activity. SV40 LT mediated transformation requires binding to the tumor suppressor proteins Rb and p53 in the nucleus and ST binding to the protein phosphatase PP2A in the cytoplasm. SV40 LT also binds to several additional cellular proteins including p300, CBP, Cul7, IRS1, Bub1, Nbs1 and Fbw7 that contribute to viral transformation. PY MT transformation is dependent binding to PP2A and the Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and assembly of a signaling complex on cell membranes that leads to transformation in a manner similar to Her2/neu. Phosphorylation of MT tyrosine residues activates key signaling molecules including Shc/Grb2, PI3K and PLCγ1. The unique contributions of SV40 LT and ST and PY MT to cellular transformation have provided significant insights into our understanding of tumor suppressors, oncogenes and the process of oncogenesis. PMID:19505649

  3. Membrane Binding of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein Is Cooperative and Dependent on the Spacer Peptide Assembly Domain

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Jin, Danni; Lösche, Mathias; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The principles underlying membrane binding and assembly of retroviral Gag proteins into a lattice are understood. However, little is known about how these processes are related. Using purified Rous sarcoma virus Gag and Gag truncations, we studied the interrelation of Gag-Gag interaction and Gag-membrane interaction. Both by liposome binding and by surface plasmon resonance on a supported bilayer, Gag bound to membranes much more tightly than did matrix (MA), the isolated membrane binding domain. In principle, this difference could be explained either by protein-protein interactions leading to cooperativity in membrane binding or by the simultaneous interaction of the N-terminal MA and the C-terminal nucleocapsid (NC) of Gag with the bilayer, since both are highly basic. However, we found that NC was not required for strong membrane binding. Instead, the spacer peptide assembly domain (SPA), a putative 24-residue helical sequence comprising the 12-residue SP segment of Gag and overlapping the capsid (CA) C terminus and the NC N terminus, was required. SPA is known to be critical for proper assembly of the immature Gag lattice. A single amino acid mutation in SPA that abrogates assembly in vitro dramatically reduced binding of Gag to liposomes. In vivo, plasma membrane localization was dependent on SPA. Disulfide cross-linking based on ectopic Cys residues showed that the contacts between Gag proteins on the membrane are similar to the known contacts in virus-like particles. Taken together, we interpret these results to mean that Gag membrane interaction is cooperative in that it depends on the ability of Gag to multimerize. IMPORTANCE The retroviral structural protein Gag has three major domains. The N-terminal MA domain interacts directly with the plasma membrane (PM) of cells. The central CA domain, together with immediately adjoining sequences, facilitates the assembly of thousands of Gag molecules into a lattice. The C-terminal NC domain interacts with

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Persistence in Murine Macrophages Impairs IFN-β Response but Not Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Torres-González, Laura; Gómez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Type-I interferon (IFN-I) production is an early response to viral infection and pathogenic viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade this cellular defense. Some viruses can establish and maintain persistent infections by altering the IFN-I signaling pathway. Here, we studied IFN-I synthesis and response in an in vitro model of persistent infection by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a murine macrophage-like cell line. In this model, interferon regulatory factor 3 was constitutively active and located at nuclei of persistently infected cells, inducing expression of IFN-beta mRNA and protein. However, persistently infected macrophages did not respond in an autocrine manner to the secreted-IFN-beta or to recombinant-IFN-beta, since phosphorylated-STAT1 was not detected by western blot and transcription of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx1 and ISG56 was not induced. Treatment of non-infected macrophages with supernatants from persistently infected cells induced STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression, mediated by the IFN-I present in the supernatants, because blocking the IFN-I receptor inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation. Results suggest that the lack of autocrine response to IFN-I by the host cell may be one mechanism for maintenance of RSV persistence. Furthermore, STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression induced in non-infected cells by supernatants from persistently infected macrophages suggest that RSV persistence may trigger a proinflammatory phenotype in non-infected cells as part of the pathogenesis of RSV infection. PMID:26501312

  5. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Persistence in Murine Macrophages Impairs IFN-β Response but Not Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Torres-González, Laura; Gómez, Beatriz

    2015-10-01

    Type-I interferon (IFN-I) production is an early response to viral infection and pathogenic viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade this cellular defense. Some viruses can establish and maintain persistent infections by altering the IFN-I signaling pathway. Here, we studied IFN-I synthesis and response in an in vitro model of persistent infection by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a murine macrophage-like cell line. In this model, interferon regulatory factor 3 was constitutively active and located at nuclei of persistently infected cells, inducing expression of IFN-beta mRNA and protein. However, persistently infected macrophages did not respond in an autocrine manner to the secreted-IFN-beta or to recombinant-IFN-beta, since phosphorylated-STAT1 was not detected by western blot and transcription of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx1 and ISG56 was not induced. Treatment of non-infected macrophages with supernatants from persistently infected cells induced STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression, mediated by the IFN-I present in the supernatants, because blocking the IFN-I receptor inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation. Results suggest that the lack of autocrine response to IFN-I by the host cell may be one mechanism for maintenance of RSV persistence. Furthermore, STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression induced in non-infected cells by supernatants from persistently infected macrophages suggest that RSV persistence may trigger a proinflammatory phenotype in non-infected cells as part of the pathogenesis of RSV infection. PMID:26501312

  6. Proliferation of Rous sarcoma virus-infected, but not of normal, chicken fibroblasts in a medium of reduced calcium and magnesium concentration

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Samuel D.; Polimeni, Philip I.; Hoon, Baldev Singh; LeStourgeon, Dana N.; Mitchell, Richard S.

    1979-01-01

    Both normal and Rous sarcoma virus-infected chicken fibroblasts proliferate actively in a culture medium containing physiological concentrations of calcium (1.2 mM) and magnesium (0.7 mM). In the presence of a physiological concentration of magnesium, reduction of the calcium concentration to 0.125 mM resulted in a significant decrease in the proliferation of the normal, but not of the neoplastic, fibroblasts. Reduction of the magnesium concentration to 0.05 mM in the presence of a physiological concentration of calcium had a similar effect. In a culture medium containing reduced concentrations of both calcium (0.20 mM) and magnesium (0.05 mM), the normal fibroblasts were maintained without proliferation, whereas the Rous sarcoma virus-infected fibroblasts continued to proliferate actively. The cytosol concentrations of ionized calcium and magnesium are known to be regulated by a balance between net passive influx and active extrusion and sequestration. On the basis of this consideration and the findings described above it can be hypothesized that: (i) Fibroblast replication is initiated when cytosolic concentrations of calcium, magnesium, or both rise above a critical level. (ii) Autonomous initiation of replication of neoplastic fibroblasts is a result of failure of cytoplasmic divalent cation homeostasis; alternatively, sarcoma virus infection may endow cells with a divalent cation-independent mechanism that bypasses an initiation mechanism that is, normally, divalent cation-dependent. (iii) Proliferation of normal fibroblasts is controlled by extracellular matrix components that interact with cell surfaces in a manner that limits the permeability of plasma membranes to divalent cations or otherwise functions to lower cytosol divalent cation concentrations. PMID:226989

  7. Generation of high-titre virus stocks using BrK.219, a B-cell line infected stably with recombinant Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Kati, Semra; Hage, Elias; Mynarek, Martin; Ganzenmueller, Tina; Indenbirken, Daniela; Grundhoff, Adam; Schulz, Thomas F

    2015-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a gamma-2-lymphotropic human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). KSHV establishes latency soon after infection in vivo and in vitro. Consequently, it is technically difficult to generate high-titre virus stocks required for infection experiments in tissue culture. Currently used methods of KSHV stock production involve induction of the lytic/productive cycle in PEL cell lines or in adherent cell lines harbouring recombinant KSHV genomes. In this study, the BJAB-derived B-cell line BrK.219, which is infected latently with a recombinant KSHV (rKSHV.219), is used to produce high-titre virus stocks. BrK.219 cells enter the lytic KSHV replication cycle upon cross-linking of B-cell receptors (BCRs) with anti-IgM antibodies without the need for additional, potentially toxic chemical inducers. High cell concentrations can be cultured and induced easily in spinner flasks, saving time and resources. The established protocol allows the generation of KSHV virus stocks with titres of up to 10(6) IU/ml in unconcentrated culture supernatants, representing a 10(3)-10(4)-fold improvement compared to conventional methods. PMID:25736227

  8. Crystallin gene expression and lentoid body formation in quail embryo neuroretina cultures transformed by the oncogenic retrovirus Mill Hill 2 or Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Simonneau, L; Crisanti, P; Lorinet, A M; Alliot, F; Courtois, Y; Calothy, G; Pessac, B

    1986-01-01

    The lens-specific proteins alpha and delta crystallins and lentoid bodies, structures that follow a differentiation pathway similar to that of the lens, regularly appear after 4 to 5 weeks in quail embryo neuroretina monolayer cultures. We have investigated the effects of the avian oncogenic retroviruses Mill Hill 2 and Rous sarcoma virus on this process. Quail embryo neuroretina cells transformed by Mill Hill 2 virus were established into permanent cultures that synthesized alpha and delta crystallins and contained stem cells for the production of lentoid bodies. In contrast, transformation with the Rous sarcoma virus mutant tsNY-68 blocked the appearance of mRNA crystallins, but cytoplasmic alpha and delta crystallin mRNA and alpha crystallin appeared 44 h after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature. However, delta crystallins and lentoid bodies were only present after 7 days. The crystallins of transformed quail neuroretina cultures were immunologically indistinguishable from those of quail lenses and of normal quail embryo neuroretina cultures. Images PMID:3025609

  9. Use of Murine CXCR-4 as a Second Receptor by Some T-Cell-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Parolin, Cristina; Borsetti, Alessandra; Choe, Hyeryun; Farzan, Michael; Kolchinsky, Peter; Heesen, Michael; Ma, Qing; Gerard, Craig; Palú, Giorgio; Dorf, Martin E.; Springer, Timothy; Sodroski, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    The human CXCR-4 molecule serves as a second receptor for primary, T-cell-tropic, and laboratory-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. Here we show that murine CXCR-4 can support the entry of some of these HIV-1 isolates. Differences between mouse and human CXCR-4 in the ability to function as an HIV-1 receptor are determined by sequences in the second extracellular loop of the CXCR-4 protein. PMID:9445072

  10. Prolonged gray matter disease without demyelination caused by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus with a mutation in VP2 puff B.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, I; Wada, Y; Libbey, J E; Cannon, T S; Whitby, F G; Fujinami, R S

    2001-08-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is divided into two subgroups based on neurovirulence. During the acute phase, DA virus infects cells in the gray matter of the central nervous system (CNS). Throughout the chronic phase, DA virus infects glial cells in the white matter, causing demyelinating disease. Although GDVII virus also infects neurons in the gray matter, infected mice developed a severe polioencephalomyelitis, and no virus is detected in the white matter or other areas in the CNS in rare survivors. Several sequence differences between the two viruses are located in VP2 puff B and VP1 loop II, which are located near each other, close to the proposed receptor binding site. We constructed a DA virus mutant, DApBL2M, which has the VP1 loop II of GDVII virus and a mutation at position 171 in VP2 puff B. While DApBL2M virus replicated less efficiently than DA virus during the acute phase, DApBL2M-induced acute polioencephalitis was comparable to that in DA virus infection. Interestingly, during the chronic phase, DApBL2M caused prolonged gray matter disease in the brain without white matter involvement in the spinal cord. This is opposite what is observed during wild-type DA virus infection. Our study is the first to demonstrate that conformational differences via interaction of VP2 puff B and VP1 loop II between GDVII and DA viruses can play an important role in making the transition of infection from the gray matter in the brain to the spinal cord white matter during TMEV infection. PMID:11462022

  11. Changes in Rous Sarcoma Virus RNA Secondary Structure near the Primer Binding Site upon tRNATrp Primer Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Shannon; Leis, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    Predicted secondary-structure elements encompassing the primer binding site in the 5′ untranslated region of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) RNA play an integral role in multiple viral replications steps including reverse transcription, DNA integration, and RNA packaging (A. Aiyar, D. Cobrinik, Z. Ge, H. J. Kung, and J. Leis, J. Virol. 66:2464–2472, 1992; D. Cobrinik, A. Aiyar, Z. Ge, M. Katzman, H. Huang, and J. Leis, J. Virol. 65:3864–3872, 1991; J. T. Miller, Z. Ge, S. Morris, K. Das, and J. Leis, J. Virol. 71:7648–7656, 1997). These elements include the U5-Leader stem, U5-IR stem-loop, and U5-TΨC interaction region. Limited digestion of the 5′ untranslated region of wild-type and mutant RSV RNAs with structure- and/or sequence-specific RNases detects the presence of the U5-Leader stem and the U5-IR stem-loop. When a tRNATrp primer is annealed to wild-type RNAs in vitro, limited nuclease mapping indicates that the U5-IR stem becomes partially unwound. This is not observed when mutant RNAs with altered U5-IR stem-loop structures are substituted for wild-type RNAs. The U5-Leader stem also becomes destabilized when the tRNA primer is annealed to either wild-type or mutant RNA fragments. Nuclease mapping studies of tRNATrp, as well as the viral RNA, indicate that the U5-TΨC helix does form in vitro upon primer annealing. Collectively, these data suggest that the various structural elements near the RSV primer binding site undergo significant changes during the process of primer annealing. PMID:10400722

  12. Suppression subtractive hybridization method for the identification of a new strain of murine hepatitis virus from xenografted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed M; Toohey, Brendan; Purcell, Damian F J; Kannourakis, George

    2015-12-01

    During attempts to clone retroviral determinants associated with a mouse model of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify unique viruses in the liver of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice transplanted with LCH tissues. A partial genomic sequence of a murine coronavirus was identified, and the whole genome (31428 bp) of the coronavirus was subsequently sequenced using PCR cloning techniques. Nucleotide sequence comparisons revealed that the genome sequence of the new virus was 91-93% identical to those of known murine hepatitis viruses (MHVs). The predicted open reading frame from the nucleotide sequence encoded all known proteins of MHVs. Analysis at the protein level showed that the virus was closely related to the highly virulent MHV-JHM strain. The virus strain was named MHV-MI. No type D retroviruses were found. Degenerate PCR targeting of type D retrovirus and 5'-RACE targeting of other types of retroviruses confirmed the absence of any retroviral association with the LCH xenografted SCID mice. PMID:26347284

  13. A humanised murine monoclonal antibody protects mice from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Everglades virus and Mucambo virus when administered up to 48 h after airborne challenge

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Lyn M. Goodchild, Sarah A.; Phillpotts, Robert J.; Perkins, Stuart D.

    2012-05-10

    Currently there are no licensed antiviral treatments for the Alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), Everglades virus and Mucambo virus. We previously developed a humanised version of the mouse monoclonal antibody 1A3B-7 (Hu1A3B-7) which exhibited a wide range of reactivity in vitro and was able to protect mice from infection with VEEV. Continued work with the humanised antibody has now demonstrated that it has the potential to be a new human therapeutic. Hu1A3B-7 successfully protected mice from infection with multiple Alphaviruses. The effectiveness of the humanisation process was determined by assessing proliferation responses in human T-cells to peptides derived from the murine and humanised versions of the V{sub H} and V{sub L} domains. This analysis showed that the number of human T-cell epitopes within the humanised antibody had been substantially reduced, indicating that Hu1A3B-7 may have reduced immunogenicity in vivo.

  14. Complete sequence of the Rous sarcoma virus env gene: identification of structural and functional regions of its product.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, E; Hill, E; Hardwick, M; Bhown, A; Schwartz, D E; Tizard, R

    1983-01-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of gp85 and gp37, the envelope glycoproteins of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), were determined. Alignment of these sequences with the amino acid sequence predicted from the complete nucleotide sequence of the Prague strain of RSV, subgroup C (PR-C), has allowed us to delineate the env gene-coding region of this virus. The coding sequences for gp85 and gp37 have been placed in an open reading frame that extends from nucleotide 5045 to nucleotide 6862 and predict sizes of 341 amino acids (36,962 molecular weight) for gp85 and 198 amino acids (21,566 molecular weight) for gp37. Carbohydrate makes a significant contribution to the observed molecular weights of these polypeptides--the amino acid sequence contains 14 potential glycosylation sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) in gp85 and two in gp37. Experiments aimed at estimating the number of carbohydrate side chains yielded results consistent with most or all of these sites being occupied. Although an initiation codon is located early (codon 4) in the open reading frame, it is likely that splicing yields an mRNA on which translation initiates at the same AUG as that of the gag gene to produce a nascent polypeptide in which gp85 is preceded by a 62-amino-acid-long leader peptide. This leader contains the hydrophobic sequence (signal sequence) necessary for translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum and is completely removed from the env gene product during translation. The polyprotein precursor, Pr95env, is cleaved to gp85 and gp37 at the carboxyl side of the basic sequence:-Arg-Arg-Lys-Arg-. gp85 is attached through a disulphide linkage to gp37, and although the positions of the cysteines involved in this linkage are not known, the presence of a 27-amino-acid-long hydrophobic region at the carboxy-terminus of gp37 is consistent with its role as a membrane anchor for the viral glycoprotein complex. The location of host range variable regions with respect to the possible tertiary structure of

  15. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  16. Dengue virus-specific murine T-lymphocyte proliferation: serotype specificity and response to recombinant viral proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Zhang, Y M; Lai, C J; Ennis, F A

    1989-01-01

    Definition of the T-lymphocyte responses to dengue viruses should aid in the development of safe and effective vaccines and help to explain the pathophysiology of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. In this study, we demonstrated that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes were detected in spleen cells from dengue virus-immune mice using an in vitro proliferation assay. Following immunization with a single dose of infectious dengue virus, murine lymphocytes showed increased proliferation when incubated in the presence of viral antigens of the same serotype but not in the presence of control antigens. Depletion experiments with antibody and complement showed that the population of responding cells expressed the Thy1+ L3T4+ Lyt2- phenotype. This indicates that the predominant proliferating cells are T lymphocytes of the helper-inducer phenotype. Dengue virus-specific memory lymphocyte responses were detectable for at least 22 weeks after immunization. The response to primary infection was primarily serotype specific, with some serotype cross-reactivity present at a low level. We demonstrated that lymphocytes from mice immunized with dengue 4 virus proliferate in response to a combination of dengue 4 virus C, pre-M, E, NS1, and NS2a proteins expressed in Sf9 cells with a recombinant baculovirus, and, to a lesser extent, to the dengue 4 virus E protein alone. PMID:2786087

  17. Construction and characterization of the recombinant Moloney murine leukemia viruses bearing the mouse Fv-4 env gene.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, M; Yoshikura, H

    1990-01-01

    A nucleotide sequence of the mouse Fv-4 env gene was completed. Structural comparison revealed a close relationship of Fv-4 to the ecotropic Cas-Br-E murine leukemia virus isolated from a wild mouse in southern California. Various portions of the env gene of Moloney murine leukemia virus were replaced by the corresponding Fv-4 env sequence to construct recombinant murine leukemia virus clones. Infectivity of these recombinants was checked by the S+L- cell focus induction assay and the XC cell syncytium formation assay. Recombinants bearing the following Fv-4 env sequence retained ecotropic infectivity; the AccI-BamHI and BamHI-BalI regions coding for the N- and C-terminal halves of Fv-4 gp70SU, respectively; and the BalI-NcoI region encoding the cleavage site between gp70SU and p15(E)TM of the Fv-4 env. However, when the Fv-4 sequence was substituted for the p15(E)TM-coding NcoI-EcoRV region or the AccI-EcoRV region covering almost the entire env gene, infectivity was undetectable in our assays. The recombinant clone containing the Fv-4 AccI-EcoRV region, i.e., almost the entire Fv-4 env sequence, was introduced with pSV2neo into NIH 3T3 cells, and a G418r cell line named NIH(Fv4)-2 was isolated. The NIH(Fv4)-2 cell released viral particles that contained reverse transcriptase, Fv-4 env molecules as well as the other viral proteins, and viral genomic RNA. However, proviral DNA synthesis was not detected upon inoculation of this virus in NIH 3T3 cells. The loss of infectivity of the recombinant virus bearing the Fv-4 AccI-EcoRV region appeared to be caused by failure in an early step of replication. Images PMID:2304138

  18. Free and integrated recombinant murine leukemia virus DNAs appear in preleukemic thymuses of AKR/J mice.

    PubMed Central

    Herr, W; Gilbert, W

    1984-01-01

    We studied the appearance and structure of murine leukemia viral genomes in preleukemic AKR/J mice by Southern hybridization. Up to an average of one to two copies per thymocyte of unintegrated murine leukemia virus DNA appears in the thymuses of preleukemic mice beginning at 4 to 5 months of age and disappears in leukemic thymuses. The free viral genomes are absent in the spleens, livers, and brains of preleukemic mice. Using a series of ecotropic and nonecotropic murine leukemia virus hybridization probes, we showed that the unintegrated viral genomes are structurally analogous to those of recombinant mink cell focus-forming viruses that appear as proviruses in leukemic AKR thymocytes, suggesting that these free viral DNAs are the direct precursors to the leukemia-specific proviruses. The mosaic of ecotropic and nonecotropic sequences within these unintegrated viral DNAs varies from one preleukemic thymus to another but often appears structurally homogeneous within individual thymuses, indicating that often each thymus was being infected by a unique mink cell focus-forming virus. Analysis of high-molecular-weight DNA shows that recombinant proviruses reside in the chromosomal DNA of thymocytes within the preleukemic thymus, with the number rising to an average of several copies per thymocyte, but we do not detect any preferred integration sites. These results suggest that, in general, before the development of thymic leukemias in AKR mice there is a massive infection by a unique mink cell focus-forming virus which then integrates into many different sites of individual thymocytes, one of which grows out to become a tumor. Images PMID:6321787

  19. Liver injury caused by antibodies against dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Chen, Mei-Chun; Lin, Shin-Chao; Cheng, Chu-Chen; Chiu, Shu-Chen; Hsiao, Yu-Ling; Lei, Huan-Yao; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2008-10-01

    Clinical manifestations of severe dengue diseases include thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and liver damage. Evidence shows that hepatic injury is involved in the pathogenesis of dengue infection; however, the mechanisms are not fully resolved. Our previous in vitro studies suggested a mechanism of molecular mimicry in which antibodies directed against dengue virus (DV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) cross-reacted with endothelial cells and caused inflammatory activation and apoptosis. In this study, the pathogenic effects of anti-DV NS1 antibodies were further examined in a murine model. We found, in liver sections, that anti-DV NS1 antibodies bound to naive mouse vessel endothelium and the binding activity was inhibited by preabsorption of antibodies with DV NS1. Active immunization with DV NS1 resulted in antibody deposition to liver vessel endothelium, and also apoptotic cell death of liver endothelium. Liver tissue damage was observed in DV NS1-immunized mice by histological examination. The serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were increased in mice either actively immunized with DV NS1 protein or passively immunized with antibodies obtained from DV NS1-immunized mice. Furthermore, histological examination revealed mononuclear phagocyte infiltration and cell apoptosis in mice passively immunized with antibodies obtained from mice immunized with DV NS1. Increased AST and ALT levels were observed in mice passively immunized with purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) from dengue patients compared with normal control human IgG-immunized mice. The increased AST and ALT levels were inhibited when dengue patient serum IgG was preabsorbed with DV NS1. In conclusion, active immunization with DV NS1 protein causes immune-mediated liver injury in mice. Passive immunization provides additional evidence that anti-DV NS1 antibodies may play a role in liver damage, which is a pathologic manifestation in dengue virus disease. PMID

  20. Crystal Structure of the Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus RNase H Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lim,D.; Gregorio, G.; Bingman, C.; Martinez-Hackert, E.; Hendrickson, W.; Goff, S.

    2006-01-01

    A crystallographic study of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) RNase H domain was performed to provide information about its structure and mechanism of action. These efforts resulted in the crystallization of a mutant Mo-MLV RNase H lacking the putative helix C ({Delta}C). The 1.6-{angstrom} resolution structure resembles the known structures of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Escherichia coli RNase H. The structure revealed the coordination of a magnesium ion within the catalytic core comprised of the highly conserved acidic residues D524, E562, and D583. Surface charge mapping of the Mo-MLV structure revealed a high density of basic charges on one side of the enzyme. Using a model of the Mo-MLV structure superimposed upon a structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase bound to an RNA/DNA hybrid substrate, Mo-MLV RNase H secondary structures and individual amino acids were examined for their potential roles in binding substrate. Identified regions included Mo-MLV RNase H {beta}1-{beta}2, {alpha}A, and {alpha}B and residues from {alpha}B to {alpha}D and its following loop. Most of the identified substrate-binding residues corresponded with residues directly binding nucleotides in an RNase H from Bacillus halodurans as observed in a cocrystal structure with RNA/DNA. Finally, superimposition of RNases H of Mo-MLV, E. coli, and HIV-1 revealed that a loop of the HIV-1 connection domain resides within the same region of the Mo-MLV and E. coli C-helix. The HIV-1 connection domain may serve to recognize and bind the RNA/DNA substrate major groove.

  1. Bimodal high-affinity association of Brd4 with murine leukemia virus integrase and mononucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Larue, Ross C; Plumb, Matthew R; Crowe, Brandon L; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Sharma, Amit; DiFiore, Julia; Malani, Nirav; Aiyer, Sriram S; Roth, Monica J; Bushman, Frederic D; Foster, Mark P; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2014-04-01

    The importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integration into host chromatin is highlighted by the development of MLV-based vectors for human gene-therapy. We have recently identified BET proteins (Brd2, 3 and 4) as the main cellular binding partners of MLV integrase (IN) and demonstrated their significance for effective MLV integration at transcription start sites. Here we show that recombinant Brd4, a representative of the three BET proteins, establishes complementary high-affinity interactions with MLV IN and mononucleosomes (MNs). Brd4(1-720) but not its N- or C-terminal fragments effectively stimulate MLV IN strand transfer activities in vitro. Mass spectrometry- and NMR-based approaches have enabled us to map key interacting interfaces between the C-terminal domain of BRD4 and the C-terminal tail of MLV IN. Additionally, the N-terminal fragment of Brd4 binds to both DNA and acetylated histone peptides, allowing it to bind tightly to MNs. Comparative analyses of the distributions of various histone marks along chromatin revealed significant positive correlations between H3- and H4-acetylated histones, BET protein-binding sites and MLV-integration sites. Our findings reveal a bimodal mechanism for BET protein-mediated MLV integration into select chromatin locations. PMID:24520112

  2. Functional dissection of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein gp70.

    PubMed

    Bae, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-03-01

    The envelope protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) is a complex glycoprotein that mediates receptor binding and entry via fusion with cell membranes. By using a series of substitution mutations and truncations in the Mo-MLV external envelope surface protein gp70, we have identified regions important for these processes. Firstly, truncations of gp70 revealed that the minimal continuous receptor-binding region is amino acids 9 to 230, in broad agreement with other studies. Secondly, within this region there are two key basic amino acids, Arg-83 and Arg-95, that are essential for receptor binding and may interact with a negatively charged residue(s) or with the pi electrons of the aromatic ring on a hydrophobic residue(s) in the basic amino acid transporter protein that is the Mo-MLV ecotropic receptor. Finally, we showed that outside the minimal receptor-binding region at amino acids 2 to 8, there is a region that is essential for postbinding fusion events. PMID:9032341

  3. Solution Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Protein: Differences from HIV-1 Gag▿

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Clark, Patrick K.; Campbell, Stephen J.; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Immature retrovirus particles are assembled from the multidomain Gag protein. In these particles, the Gag proteins are arranged radially as elongated rods. We have previously characterized the properties of HIV-1 Gag in solution. In the absence of nucleic acid, HIV-1 Gag displays moderately weak interprotein interactions, existing in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Neutron scattering and hydrodynamic studies suggest that the protein is compact, and biochemical studies indicate that the two ends can approach close in three-dimensional space, implying the need for a significant conformational change during assembly. We now describe the properties of the Gag protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), a gammaretrovirus. We found that this protein is very different from HIV-1 Gag: it has much weaker protein-protein interaction and is predominantly monomeric in solution. This has allowed us to study the protein by small-angle X-ray scattering and to build a low-resolution molecular envelope for the protein. We found that MLV Gag is extended in solution, with an axial ratio of ∼7, comparable to its dimensions in immature particles. Mutational analysis suggests that runs of prolines in its matrix and p12 domains and the highly charged stretch at the C terminus of its capsid domain all contribute to this extended conformation. These differences between MLV Gag and HIV-1 Gag and their implications for retroviral assembly are discussed. PMID:21917964

  4. Fv-1 restriction and its effects on murine leukemia virus integration in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pryciak, P M; Varmus, H E

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms by which alleles at the mouse Fv-1 locus restrict replication of murine leukemia viruses. Inhibition of productive infection is closely paralleled by reduced accumulation of integrated proviral DNA as well as by reduced levels of linear viral DNA in a cytoplasmic fraction. Nevertheless, viral DNA is present at nearly normal levels in a nuclear fraction, and total amounts of viral DNA are only mildly affected in restrictive infections, suggesting a block in integration to account for reduced levels of proviral DNA. However, integrase (IN)-dependent trimming of 3' ends of viral DNA occurs normally in vivo during restrictive infections, demonstrating that not all IN-mediated events are prevented in vivo. Furthermore, viral integration complexes present in nuclear extracts of infected restrictive cells are fully competent to integrate their DNA into a heterologous target in vitro. Thus, the Fv-1-dependent activity that restricts integration in vivo may be lost in vitro; alternatively, Fv-1 restriction may prevent a step required for integration in vivo that is bypassed in vitro. Images PMID:1326652

  5. Solution Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Protein: Differences from HIV-1 Gag

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Clark, Patrick K.; Campbell, Stephen J.; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan

    2012-05-09

    Immature retrovirus particles are assembled from the multidomain Gag protein. In these particles, the Gag proteins are arranged radially as elongated rods. We have previously characterized the properties of HIV-1 Gag in solution. In the absence of nucleic acid, HIV-1 Gag displays moderately weak interprotein interactions, existing in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Neutron scattering and hydrodynamic studies suggest that the protein is compact, and biochemical studies indicate that the two ends can approach close in three-dimensional space, implying the need for a significant conformational change during assembly. We now describe the properties of the Gag protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), a gammaretrovirus. We found that this protein is very different from HIV-1 Gag: it has much weaker protein-protein interaction and is predominantly monomeric in solution. This has allowed us to study the protein by small-angle X-ray scattering and to build a low-resolution molecular envelope for the protein. We found that MLV Gag is extended in solution, with an axial ratio of {approx}7, comparable to its dimensions in immature particles. Mutational analysis suggests that runs of prolines in its matrix and p12 domains and the highly charged stretch at the C terminus of its capsid domain all contribute to this extended conformation. These differences between MLV Gag and HIV-1 Gag and their implications for retroviral assembly are discussed.

  6. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-06-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins.

  7. Autophagy Genes Enhance Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from Latency by Preventing Virus-Induced Systemic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunmin; Buck, Michael D; Desai, Chandni; Zhang, Xin; Loginicheva, Ekaterina; Martinez, Jennifer; Freeman, Michael L; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo; Guan, Jun-Lin; He, You-Wen; Blackman, Marcia A; Handley, Scott A; Levine, Beth; Green, Douglas R; Reese, Tiffany A; Artyomov, Maxim N; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-01-13

    Host genes that regulate systemic inflammation upon chronic viral infection are incompletely understood. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection is characterized by latency in macrophages, and reactivation is inhibited by interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Using a lysozyme-M-cre (LysMcre) expression system, we show that deletion of autophagy-related (Atg) genes Fip200, beclin 1, Atg14, Atg16l1, Atg7, Atg3, and Atg5, in the myeloid compartment, inhibited MHV68 reactivation in macrophages. Atg5 deficiency did not alter reactivation from B cells, and effects on reactivation from macrophages were not explained by alterations in productive viral replication or the establishment of latency. Rather, chronic MHV68 infection triggered increased systemic inflammation, increased T cell production of IFN-γ, and an IFN-γ-induced transcriptional signature in macrophages from Atg gene-deficient mice. The Atg5-related reactivation defect was partially reversed by neutralization of IFN-γ. Thus Atg genes in myeloid cells dampen virus-induced systemic inflammation, creating an environment that fosters efficient MHV68 reactivation from latency. PMID:26764599

  8. Structure of glycosylated and unglycosylated gag polyproteins of Rauscher murine leukemia virus: carbohydrate attachment sites.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, A M; Lockhart, S M; Rabin, E M; Oroszlan, S

    1981-01-01

    The structural relationships among the gag polyproteins Pr65gag, Pr75gag, and gPr80gag of Rauscher murine leukemia virus were studied by endoglycosidase H digestion and formic acid cleavage. Fragments were identified by precipitation with specific antisera to constituent virion structural proteins followed by one-dimensional mapping. Endoglycosidase H reduced the size of gPr80gag to that of Pr75gag. By comparing fragments of gPr80gag and the apoprotein Pr75gag, the former was shown to contain two mannose-rich oligosaccharide units. By comparing fragments of Pr65gag and Pr75gag, the latter was shown to differ from Pr65gag at the amino terminus by the presence of a leader peptide approximately 7,000 daltons in size. The internal and carboxyl-terminal peptides of the two unglycosylated polyproteins were not detectably different. The location of the two N-linked carbohydrate chains in gPr80gag has been specified. One occurs in the carboxyl-terminal half of the polyprotein at asparagine177 of the p30 sequence and the other is found in a 23,000-dalton fragment located in the amino-terminal region of gPr80gag and containing the additional amino acid sequences not found in Pr65gag plus a substantial portion of p15. Images PMID:7241663

  9. Depletion of Olig2 in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells infected by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    Benner, Bayleigh; Martorell, Anthony J; Mahadevan, Padmanabhan; Najm, Fadi J; Tesar, Paul J; Freundt, Eric C

    2016-06-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infects the central nervous system of mice and causes a demyelinating disease that is a model for multiple sclerosis. During the chronic phase of the disease, TMEV persists in oligodendrocytes and macrophages. Lack of remyelination has been attributed to insufficient proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), but the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we employed pluripotent stem cell technologies to generate pure populations of mouse OPCs to study the temporal and molecular effects of TMEV infection. Global transcriptome analysis of RNA sequencing data revealed that TMEV infection of OPCs caused significant up-regulation of 1926 genes, whereas 1853 genes were significantly down-regulated compared to uninfected cells. Pathway analysis revealed that TMEV disrupted many genes required for OPC growth and maturation. Down-regulation of Olig2, a transcription factor necessary for OPC proliferation, was confirmed by real-time PCR, immunofluorescence microscopy, and western blot analysis. Depletion of Olig2 was not found to be specific to viral strain and did not require expression of the leader (L) protein, which is a multifunctional protein important for persistence, modulation of gene expression, and cell death. These data suggest that direct infection of OPCs by TMEV may inhibit remyelination during the chronic phase of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. PMID:26631080

  10. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L; Bowler, Matthew W; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J Robert; Goff, Stephen P; Song, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins. PMID:27329342

  11. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag–Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins. PMID:27329342

  12. Invasion of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 into Murine Epidermis: An Ex Vivo Infection Study.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elena; Petermann, Philipp; Thier, Katharina; Bloch, Wilhelm; Morgner, Jessica; Wickström, Sara A; Knebel-Mörsdorf, Dagmar

    2015-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) invades its human host via the skin or mucosa. We aim to understand how HSV-1 overcomes the barrier function of the host epithelia, and for this reason, we established an ex vivo infection assay initially with murine skin samples. Here, we report how tissue has to be prepared to be susceptible to HSV-1 infection. Most efficient infection of the epidermis was achieved by removing the dermis. HSV-1 initially invaded the basal epidermal layer, and from there, spreading to the suprabasal layers was observed. Strikingly, in resting stage hair follicles, only the hair germ was infected, whereas the quiescent bulge stem cells (SCs) were resistant to infection. However, during the growth phase, infected cells were also detected in the activated bulge SCs. We demonstrated that cell proliferation was not a precondition for HSV-1 invasion, but SC activation was required as shown by infection of aberrantly activated bulge SCs in integrin-linked kinase (ILK)-deficient hair follicles. These results suggest that the status of the bulge SCs determines whether HSV-1 can reach its receptors, whereas the receptors on basal keratinocytes are accessible irrespective of their proliferation status. PMID:26203638

  13. Sequence-specific binding of DNA by the Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase protein.

    PubMed Central

    Krogstad, P A; Champoux, J J

    1990-01-01

    Genetic studies have indicated that integration of retroviral DNA into the host genome depends on the presence of the inverted repeats at the free termini of the long terminal repeats on the unintegrated DNA and on the product of the 3' end of the pol gene (the integrase [IN] protein). While the precise function of the Moloney murine leukemia virus IN protein is uncertain, others have shown that it is a DNA-binding protein and functions in the processing of the inverted repeats prior to integration. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we cloned and expressed the IN protein in Escherichia coli. Crude extracts of total cellular protein were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose filters, denatured in guanidine, renatured, and incubated with oligonucleotide probes. Single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides corresponding to the termini of unintegrated linear viral DNA were specifically bound by the IN protein in this assay. These data suggest that the role of the Moloney IN protein in the early steps of integration involves sequence-specific recognition of the DNA sequences found at the ends of the long terminal repeats. Images PMID:2186176

  14. Change of hyaluronic acid synthesis during differentiation of myogenic cells and its relation to transformation of myoblasts by Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, M

    1985-05-01

    Hyaluronic acid synthesis was examined in cultures of differentiating chick embryo muscle cells before, during and after fusion. Prior to fusion, hyaluronic acid was synthesized and secreted into the medium, but once fusion began this synthesis was reduced significantly. Synthesis then increased again after completion of fusion. Thus, production of hyaluronic acid was lowest at the time of or right before cell fusion. When myoblasts were transformed by Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), a higher amount of hyaluronic acid was synthesized, and cells were not able to fuse. The turnover rate of hyaluronic acid might be different between myotubes and RSV-transformed myoblasts. The addition of exogenous hyaluronic acid to myoblast cultures resulted in the partial inhibition of fusion. The effect was reversible because fusion took place after removal of the exogenous hyaluronic acid. These observations suggest that hyaluronic acid plays an important role in the differentiation of myogenic cells, and that elevated hyaluronic acid synthesis may partly be the reason for inhibition of myotube formation upon transformation by Rous sarcoma virus. PMID:2988797

  15. Active proliferation of Rous sarcoma virus-infected, but not normal, chicken heart mesenchymal cells in culture medium of physiological composition.

    PubMed Central

    Balk, S D

    1980-01-01

    Normal as well as Rous sarcoma virus-infected chicken pectoral and chicken embryo fibroblasts proliferate actively in a plasma containing medium of physiological ion concentrations (Ca2+, 1.2 mM; Mg2+, 0.7 mM). Reduction of medium calcium and magnesium concentrations is necessary to achieve selective quiescence of normal fibroblasts in these cell systems. By contrast, normal chicken heart mesenchymal cells proliferate only sluggishly (one doubling or less during a 6-day period) in a plasma containing medium of physiologic ion concentrations, whereas Rous sarcoma virus-infected heart mesenchymal cells proliferate actively (more than four doublings during an initial 2-day phase of exponential growth). The chicken heart mesenchymal cell system therefore has great potential for studies of the mechanism that initiates cell replication and of the failure in cellular regulatory processes that is responsible for the autonomous initiation of replication of neoplastic cells. From comparison of the chicken heart mesenchymal cell system to dialyzed plasma-based systems in which 3T3 cells tend to proliferative quiescence, it is argued that this proliferative quiescence of 3T3 cells is a result of cell starvation and is not physiologically meaningful. Images PMID:6256750

  16. Yeast Three-Hybrid Screening of Rous Sarcoma Virus Mutants with Randomly Mutagenized Minimal Packaging Signals Reveals Regions Important for Gag Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Linial, Maxine L.

    2000-01-01

    We previously showed that the yeast three-hybrid system provides a genetic assay of both RNA and protein components for avian retroviral RNA encapsidation. In the current study, we used this assay to precisely define cis-acting determinants involved in avian leukosis sarcoma virus packaging RNA binding to Gag protein. In vivo screening of Rous sarcoma virus mutants was performed with randomly mutated minimal packaging sequences (MΨ) made using PCR amplification after cotransformation with GagΔPR protein into yeast cells. Colonies with low β-galactosidase activity were analyzed to locate mutations in MΨ sequences affecting binding to Gag proteins. This genetic assay delineated secondary structural elements that are important for efficient RNA binding, including a single-stranded small bulge containing the initiation codon for uORF3, as well as adjacent stem structures. This implies a possible tertiary structure favoring the high-affinity binding sites for Gag. In most cases, results from the three-hybrid assay were well correlated with those from the viral RNA packaging assays. The results from random mutagenesis using the rapid three-hybrid binding assay are consistent with those from site-directed mutagenesis using in vivo packaging assays. PMID:10982363

  17. Biochemical analysis of murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced leukemias of strain BALB/c

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.W.; Hopkins, N.; Fleissner, E.

    1980-02-01

    Murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced BALB/c leukemias were characterized with respect to viral proteins and RNA. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral structural proteins revealed that for p12, p15, p30, and gp70, three to four electrophoretic variants of each could be detected. There was no correlation found between any of these mobilities and N- or B-tropism of the viruses. Proteins of all xenotropic viral isolates were identical in their gel electrophoretic profiles. The similar phenotypes of multiple viral clones from individual leukemias and of isolates grown in different cells suggest that the polymorphism of ecotropic viruses was generated in vivo rather than during in vitro virus growth. By two-dimensional fingerprinting of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides from 70S viral RNA, the previously reported association of N- and B-tropism with two distinct oligonucleotides was confirmed. The presence of two other oligonucleotides was correlated with positive and negative phenotypes of the virus-coded G/sub IX/ cell surface antigen. The RNAs of two B-tropic isolates with distinctive p15 and p12 phenotypes differed from the RNA of a prototype N-tropic virus by the absence of three oligonucleotides mapping in the 5' portion (gag region) of the prototype RNA. In addition, one small-plaque B-tropic virus displayed extensive changes in the RNA sequences associated with the env region of the prototype.

  18. Mutagenesis analysis of the murine leukemia virus matrix protein: identification of regions important for membrane localization and intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Soneoka, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-07-01

    We have created two sets of substitution mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) matrix protein in order to identify domains involved in association with the plasma membrane and in incorporation of the viral envelope glycoproteins into virus particles. The first set of mutations was targeted at putative membrane-associating regions similar to those of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein, which include a polybasic region at the N terminus of the Mo-MuLV matrix protein and two regions predicted to form beta strands. The second set of mutations was created within hydrophobic residues to test for the production of virus particles lacking envelope proteins, with the speculation of an involvement of the membrane-spanning region of the envelope protein in incorporation into virus particles. We have found that mutation of the N-terminal polybasic region redirected virus assembly to the cytoplasm, and we show that tryptophan residues may also play a significant role in the intracellular transport of the matrix protein. In total, 21 mutants of the Mo-MuLV matrix protein were produced, but we did not observe any mutant virus particles lacking the envelope glycoproteins, suggesting that a direct interaction between the Mo-MuLV matrix protein and envelope proteins either may not exist or may occur through multiple redundant interactions. PMID:9188629

  19. Nucleotide Sequence of the Envelope Gene of Gardner-Arnstein Feline Leukemia Virus B Reveals Unique Sequence Homologies with a Murine Mink Cell Focus-Forming Virus

    PubMed Central

    Elder, John H.; Mullins, James I.

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the envelope gene and the adjacent 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) of Gardner-Arnstein feline leukemia virus of subgroup B (GA-FeLV-B) has been determined. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of the gp70-p15E polyprotein to those of several previously reported murine retroviruses revealed striking homologies between GA-FeLV-B gp70 and the gp70 of a Moloney virus-derived mink cell focus-forming virus. These homologies were located within the substituted (presumably xenotropic) portion of the mink cell focus-forming virus envelope gene and comprised amino acid sequences not present in three ecotropic virus gp70s. In addition, areas of insertions and deletions, in general, were the same between GA-FeLV-B and Moloney mink cell focus-forming virus, although the sizes of the insertions and deletions differed. Homologies between GA-FeLV-B and mink cell focus-forming virus gp70s is functionally significant in that they both possess expanded host ranges, a property dictated by gp70. The amino acid sequence of FeLV-B contains 12 Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences, indicating 12 possible sites of N-linked glycosylation as compared with 7 or 8 for its murine counterparts. Comparison of the 3′ LTR of GA-FeLV-B to AKR and Moloney virus LTRs revealed extensive conservation in several regions including the “CCAAT” and Goldberg-Hogness (TATA) boxes thought to be involved in promotion of transcription and in the repeat region of the LTR. The inverted repeats that flanked the LTR of GA-FeLV-B were identical to the murine inverted repeats, but were one base longer than the latter. The region of U3 corresponding to the approximately 75-nucleotide “enhancer sequence” is present in GA-FeLV-B, but contains deletions relative to AKR and Moloney virus and is not repeated. An interesting pallindrome in the repeat region immediately 3′ to the U3 region was noted in all the LTRs, but was particularly pronounced in GA-FeLV-B. Possible roles for this

  20. The fate of murine norovirus and hepatitis A virus during preparation of fresh produce by cutting and grating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Erickson, Marilyn; Ortega, Ynes R; Cannon, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    Human noroviruses and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are commonly associated with outbreaks occurring in restaurant establishments and catered events. Food handlers are major contributing factors to foodborne illnesses initiated in the kitchen setting. In this study, transfer of HAV and murine norovirus (MNV-1), a human norovirus surrogate, between produce (cucumbers, strawberries, tomatoes, cantaloupes, carrots, and honeydew melons) and common kitchen utensils (graters and knives) was investigated. The extent of virus transfer to produce during utensil application, in the presence and the absence of food residue, and the impact of knife surface properties (sharp, dull, serrated) was also investigated. Transfer of MNV-1 and HAV from produce items, initially contaminated with ~5.5 log PFU, to knives and graters during application ranged from 0.9 to 5.1 log PFU. MNV-1 transfer to knives was the greatest for cucumbers, strawberries, and tomatoes, and the least for honeydew melons, while transfer of HAV to knives was greater for tomatoes and honeydew melons than strawberries, cantaloupes, and cucumbers. After preparation of a contaminated produce item, knife cross-contamination easily occurred as viruses were detected on almost all of the seven produce items successively prepared. Produce residues on utensils often resulted in less virus transfer when compared to utensils without residue accumulation. Knife surface properties did not impact virus transfer. The ease of virus transfer between produce and utensils demonstrated by the current study highlights the importance of efforts aimed toward preventing cross-contamination in the kitchen environment. PMID:23412721

  1. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR), 5′ leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3′ LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5′ LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3′ LTR. There is a 5′ splice site in the 5′ leader sequence and a 3′ splice site at the 3′ end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  2. Basis for receptor specificity of nonecotropic murine leukemia virus surface glycoprotein gp70SU.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, D; Rein, A

    1992-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) initiate infection of NIH 3T3 cells by binding of the viral envelope (Env) protein to a cell surface receptor. Interference assays have shown that MuLVs can be divided into four groups, each using a distinct receptor: ecotropic, polytropic, amphotropic, and 10A1. In this study, we have attempted to map the determinants within viral Env proteins by constructing chimeric env genes. Chimeras were made in all six pairwise combinations between Moloney MCF (a polytropic MuLV), amphotropic MuLV, and 10A1, using a conserved EcoRI site in the middle of the Env coding region. The receptor specificity of each chimera was determined by using an interference assay. We found that amphotropic receptor specificity of each chimera was determined by using an interference assay. We found that amphotropic receptor specificity seems to map to the N-terminal portion of surface glycoprotein gp70SU. The difference between amphotropic and 10A1 receptor specificity can be attributed to one or more of only six amino acid differences in this region. Nearly all other cases showed evidence of interaction between Env domains in the generation of receptor specificity. Thus, a chimera composed exclusively of MCF and amphotropic sequences was found to exhibit 10A1 receptor specificity. None of the chimeras were able to infect cells by using the MCF receptor; however, two chimeras containing the C-terminal portion of MCF gp70SU could bind to this receptor, while they were able to infect cells via the amphotropic receptor. This result raises the possibility that receptor binding maps to the C-terminal portion of MCF gp70SU but requires MCF N-terminal sequences for a functional interaction with the MCF receptor. Images PMID:1321266

  3. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes.

    PubMed

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5' long terminal repeat (LTR), 5' leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3' LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5' LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3' LTR. There is a 5' splice site in the 5' leader sequence and a 3' splice site at the 3' end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  4. Preparation and characterization of the RNase H domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kosaku; Yokokawa, Kanta; Hisayoshi, Tetsuro; Fukatsu, Kosuke; Kuze, Ikumi; Konishi, Atsushi; Mikami, Bunzo; Kojima, Kenji; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase (MMLV RT) contains fingers, palm, thumb, and connection subdomains as well as an RNase H domain. The DNA polymerase active site resides in the palm subdomain, and the RNase H active site is located in the RNase H domain. The RNase H domain contains a positively charged α-helix called the C helix (H(594)GEIYRRR(601)), that is thought to be involved in substrate recognition. In this study, we expressed three versions of the RNase H domain in Escherichia coli, the wild-type domain (WT) (residues Ile498-Leu671) and two variants that lack the regions containing the C helix (Ile593-Leu603 and Gly595-Thr605, which we called ΔC1 and ΔC2, respectively) with a strep-tag at the N-terminus and a deca-histidine tag at the C-terminus. These peptides were purified from the cells by anion-exchange, Ni(2+) affinity, and Strep-Tactin affinity column chromatography, and then the tags were removed by proteolysis. In an RNase H assay using a 25-bp RNA-DNA heteroduplex, WT, ΔC1, and ΔC2 produced RNA fragments ranging from 7 to 16 nucleotides (nt) whereas the full-length MMLV RT (Thr24-Leu671) produced 14-20-nt RNA fragments, suggesting that elimination of the fingers, palm, thumb, and connection subdomains affects the binding of the RNase H domain to the RNA-DNA heteroduplex. The activity levels of WT, ΔC1, and ΔC2 were estimated to be 1%, 0.01%, and 0.01% of full-length MMLV RT activity, indicating that the C helix is important, but not critical, for the activity of the isolated RNase H domain. PMID:25959458

  5. Physical properties of moloney murine leukemia virus high-molecular-weight RNA: a two subunit structure.

    PubMed Central

    Riggin, C H; Bondurant, M; Mitchell, W M

    1975-01-01

    The high-molecular-weight RNA of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) was analyzed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation. Molecular weights of 7.2 x 10(6) and 3.4 x 10(6) were found for the native and subunit forms, respectively, indicating that the native structure is a dimer. S20,w and frictional coefficients were determined for MuLV RNA by analytical velocity centrifugation as a function of ionic strength. The apparent S20,w of native MuLV RNA was 47.3, 57.4, and 66.5 in 0.01, 0.1, and 0.20 M Na+, respectively; the corresponding frictional coefficients were 5.44, 4.48, and 3.87. Native RNA was estimated by circular dichroism to be 85% helical, whereas denatured RNA was 54% helical. Thermal denaturation profiles were obtained from uv absorbance scans. Melting temperatures of 57 and 68 C were obtained for high-molecular-weight RNA in 0.01 M Na+ and 0.122 M Na+, 1mM Mg2+, respectively. van't Hoff plots of the thermal denaturation data gave enthalpies for the helix-coil transition of 21,600 cal (ca. 90,500 J) per mol of cooperatively melting unit in high salt and 19,600 cal (ca. 82,100 J) per mol in low salt, consistent with both base stacking and pairing. The melting of Mu LV RNA occurred over a broad temprange and van't Hoff plots were linear over most of the melting range, indicating a noncooperative process of helix stabilization. PMID:1202247

  6. Identification of homeodomain proteins, PBX1 and PREP1, involved in the transcription of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Chao, Sheng-Hao; Walker, John R; Chanda, Sumit K; Gray, Nathanael S; Caldwell, Jeremy S

    2003-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) have been shown to block human immunodeficiency virus and herpes simplex virus. It is hypothesized that CDKIs block viral replication by inhibiting transcription of specific cellular genes. Here we find that three CDKIs, flavopiridol, purvalanol A, and methoxy-roscovitine, block Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) transcription events. Using gene expression microarray technology to examine the inhibitory effects of CDKIs, we observed a cellular gene, the pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 1 (Pbx1) gene, down-regulated by CDKI treatment. The PBX consensus element (PCE), TGATTGAC, is conserved in the long terminal repeats of several murine retroviruses, including Moloney MLV. Mutations in the PCE completely inhibited viral transcription whereas overexpression of PBX1 and a PBX1-associated protein, PREP1, enhanced viral transcription. The interaction between the PCE and PBX1-PREP1 proteins was confirmed by gel shift experiments. Blocking PBX1 protein synthesis resulted in a significant decrease in viral transcription. Collectively, our results represent the first work demonstrating that the homeodomain proteins PBX1 and PREP1 are cellular factors involved in Moloney MLV transcription regulation. PMID:12529389

  7. Kaposi's Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a cancer that causes patches of abnormal tissue to grow under the skin, in the lining of ... of cancer cells, blood vessels, and blood cells. KS is caused by infection with human herpesvirus-8 ( ...

  8. Uterine sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer called retinoblastoma also increases the risk of uterine sarcoma. Symptoms Fibroids in the uterus are a common problem in women. Common symptoms of fibroids include abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, and a pelvic ...

  9. Expression of murine leukemia viruses in RFM mice with host versus graft disease after perinatal inoculation of (T6 X RFM)F1 lymphohemopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, S S; Brede, G; Tucker, H S; Maloney, M; Montour, J L; Hard, R C

    1983-01-01

    Host versus graft disease is the fatal syndrome of altered immunity that follows the perinatal inoculation of related F1 hybrid spleen cells to susceptible strains of inbred mice. The allogenic reaction results in severe depletion of T-lymphocytes, but causes hyperplasia and hypersecretion of B-cells. Among the long-term survivors of acute host versus graft reactions, there is a high incidence of nonthymic lymphomas associated with ecotropic murine leukemia virus that may be of donor F1 origin. The present studies were done to determine whether ecotropic murine leukemia virus played any role in the pathogenesis of acute host versus graft disease in RFM mice perinatally inoculated with (T6 X RFM)F1 spleen cells. In RFM/(T6 X RFM)F1 chimeras, N-tropic murine leukemia virus can be detected as early as 3 days. The progression of the disease was accompanied by increasing viral expression. The inoculation of N-tropic virus of F1 donor origin into RFM neonates failed to induce disease, although the virus proliferated. Detection of progressively rising titers of antibody to murine leukemia virus linked the virus to the development of hyperimmunoglobulinemia by virtue of its ability to serve as a replicating source of antigens. These and other studies provided evidence that the seemingly paradoxical appearance of hyperimmunoglobulinemia in T-cell-deficient mice with the host versus graft syndrome is due, at least in part, to the stimulation of presensitized F1 donor B-cells, which are not destroyed in the allogenic reaction, as are the T-cells. Another unusual finding was the detection of polytropic murine leukemia virus in 25-day-old RFM/(T6 X RFM)F1 chimeras. It is suggested that the allogenic host versus graft reaction favored the formation of recombinants. PMID:6135664

  10. Kaposin-B Enhances the PROX1 mRNA Stability during Lymphatic Reprogramming of Vascular Endothelial Cells by Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpes Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jaehyuk; Kang, Jinjoo; Lee, Ha Neul; Aguilar, Berenice; Kafka, Darren; Lee, Sunju; Choi, Inho; Lee, Juneyong; Ramu, Swapnika; Haas, Juergen; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common cancer among HIV-positive patients. Histogenetic origin of KS has long been elusive due to a mixed expression of both blood and lymphatic endothelial markers in KS tumor cells. However, we and others discovered that Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) induces lymphatic reprogramming of blood vascular endothelial cells by upregulating PROX1, which functions as the master regulator for lymphatic endothelial differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that the KSHV latent gene kaposin-B enhances the PROX1 mRNA stability and plays an important role in KSHV-mediated PROX1 upregulation. We found that PROX1 mRNA contains a canonical AU-rich element (ARE) in its 3′-untranslated region that promotes PROX1 mRNA turnover and that kaposin-B stimulates cytoplasmic accumulation of the ARE-binding protein HuR through activation of the p38/MK2 pathway. Moreover, HuR binds to and stabilizes PROX1 mRNA through its ARE and is necessary for KSHV-mediated PROX1 mRNA stabilization. Together, our study demonstrates that kaposin-B plays a key role in PROX1 upregulation during lymphatic reprogramming of blood vascular endothelial cells by KSHV. PMID:20730087

  11. Mutational analysis of the putative receptor-binding domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus glycoprotein gp70.

    PubMed

    Panda, B R; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    2000-07-20

    The entry of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to murine cells is mediated by the binding of its envelope glycoprotein gp70 to its receptor, the cationic amino acid transporter MCAT-1. The binding property of the envelope protein lies mainly in the N-terminal half of the protein. To identify essential residues involved in the binding of gp70 to its receptor, we have mutated amino acids within the putative receptor-binding domain of MoMuLV gp70. Changes in the residues P94 and W100 resulted in lower viral titers in comparison to the wild-type virions. Single, double, or triple point mutations involving the residue W100 make the envelope protein severely defective in binding to its receptor. Binding studies and cell fusion experiments with murine XC cells suggested that the residue W100 might play an important role in the process of infection by making contact between gp70 and its receptor. PMID:10891411

  12. Atomic resolution structure of Moloney murine leukemia virus matrix protein and its relationship to other retroviral matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Nico; Harlos, Karl; Iourin, Oleg; Rao, Zihe; Kingsman, Alan; Stuart, David; Fry, Elizabeth

    2002-12-01

    Matrix proteins associated with the viral membrane are important in the formation of the viral particle and in virus maturation. The 1.0 A crystal structure of the ecotropic Gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) matrix protein reveals the conserved topology of other retroviral matrix proteins, despite undetectable sequence similarity. The N terminus (normally myristylated) is exposed and adjacent to a basic surface patch, features likely to contribute to membrane binding. The four proteins in the asymmetric unit make varied contacts. The M-MuLV matrix structure is intermediate, between those of the lentiviruses and other retroviruses. The protein fold appears to be maintained, in part, by the conservation of side chain packing, which may provide a useful tool for searching for weak distant similarities in proteins. PMID:12467570

  13. Murine leukemia virus mutant with a frameshift in the reverse transcriptase coding region: implications for pol gene structure.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, J G; Hu, S C; Rein, A; Messer, L I; Gerwin, B I

    1984-01-01

    The molecular defect in the nonconditional B-tropic MuLV pol mutant, clone 23 (Gerwin et al., J. Virol. 31:741-751, 1979), has been characterized by recombinant DNA technology. The entire mutant genome was cloned from an EcoRI digest of integrated cellular DNA into bacteriophage lambda Charon 4A and then subcloned at the EcoRI site of pBR322. NIH-3T3 cells transfected with the plasmid clone, termed pRTM (RTM, reverse transcriptase mutant), reproduced the properties of clone 23 virus-infected cells. In vivo ligation experiments involving cotransfection of subclones of pRTM and wild-type murine leukemia virus localized the defect in the clone 23 genome to an approximately 400-base-pair region in the pol gene between the SalI and XhoI sites. Sequence analysis of this region in the wild-type and mutant genomes revealed that the mutant has one additional C residue located 231 bases downstream of the last base of the SalI recognition site. This 1-base insertion brings three TGA termination codons into phase. Thus, the mutation in clone 23 leads to premature termination of translation, explaining the presence in clone 23 virions of a truncated polymerase with low levels of enzymatic activity. It was previously shown that the gag precursor is cleaved normally in clone 23-infected cells; therefore, if a virus-coded protease is involved in this cleavage, it must be encoded by sequences upstream of the reverse transcriptase region of the pol gene. This consideration, coupled with the observed molecular weight of the mutant polymerase and our precise determination of its C terminus, have led to a proposal for the genetic organization of the murine leukemia virus pol gene. Images PMID:6205170

  14. Retrovirus gene expression during the cell cycle. I. Virus production, synthesis, and expression of viral proteins in Rauscher murine leukemia virus-infected mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Balazs, I; Caldarella, J

    1981-01-01

    Synchronized mouse cells (JLS-V9) chronically infected with Rauscher murine leukemia virus were used to study virus production, the synthesis of gag and env precursor proteins, and the expression of env protein on the cell surface during the cell cycle. The amount of virus released into the medium by synchronized cells during a 30-min interval was determined by using the XC plaque assay and by measuring reverse transcriptase activity. The results show that virus production occurs during mitosis. Labeling of the cell surface of synchronized cells with 125I or with fluorescein-conjugated antiserum shows that the amount of gp 70env on the cell surface parallels cellular growth. Therefore, the cell cycle-dependent release of virus is not accompanied by similar variations in the amount of viral envelope protein on the cell surface. Immunoprecipitation of cells labeled with [35S]methionine, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was used to measure viral protein synthesis during the cell cycle. The rate of synthesis of gag precursor proteins show three maximums corresponding to the G1, middle S, and late S to G2 phases of the cell cycle. The rate of synthesis of env precursor proteins does not change, suggesting that in these cells the synthesis of these two gene products is controlled separately. Images PMID:7288918

  15. Refractory ulcerative colitis and iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Girelli, C M; Serio, G; Rocca, E; Rocca, F

    2009-02-01

    Colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpes virus-8 associated mesenchymal tumour, is exceedingly rare in human immunodeficiency virus-negative subjects and almost always reported in association with severe, refractory, inflammatory bowel disease. In this paper we report a case--the second from Italy--of a colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative, heterosexual man with severe refractory ulcerative colitis. Kaposi's sarcoma developed after starting glucocorticosteroid therapy, supporting the theory that colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma associated with ulcerative colitis is iatrogenic. PMID:18054849

  16. Identification and Characterization of an Exogenous Retrovirus from Atlantic Salmon Swim Bladder Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Thomas A.; Quackenbush, Sandra L.; Sutton, Claudia; Casey, Rufina N.; Bowser, Paul R.; Casey, James W.

    2006-01-01

    A novel piscine retrovirus has been identified in association with an outbreak of leiomyosarcoma in the swim bladders of Atlantic salmon. The complete nucleotide sequence of the Atlantic salmon swim bladder sarcoma virus (SSSV) provirus is 10.9 kb in length and shares a structure and transcriptional profile similar to those of murine leukemia virus-like simple retroviruses. SSSV appears unique to simple retroviruses by not harboring sequences in the Atlantic salmon genome. Additionally, SSSV differs from other retroviruses in potentially utilizing a methionine tRNA primer binding site. SSSV-associated tumors contain high proviral copy numbers (greater than 30 per cell) and a polyclonal integration pattern. Phylogenetic analysis based on reverse transcriptase places SSSV with zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) between the Gammaretrovirus and Epsilonretrovirus genera. Large regions of continuous homology between SSSV and ZFERV Gag, Pol, and Env suggest that these viruses represent a new group of related piscine retroviruses. PMID:16501103

  17. Immunomodulatory and Antioxidant Effects of Purple Sweet Potato Extract in LP-BM5 Murine Leukemia Virus-Induced Murine Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok-Kyung; Nam, Da-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Baek, Sun Jung; Jun, Woojin; Lee, Jeongmin

    2015-08-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of a dietary supplement of purple sweet potato extract (PSPE) in LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-induced immune-deficient mice were investigated. Mice were divided into six groups: normal control, infected control (LP-BM5 MuLV infection), positive control (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of red ginseng 300 mg/kg), purple sweet potato water extract (PSPWE) (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of PSPE 300 mg/kg), PSP10EE (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of 10% ethanol PSPE 300 mg/kg), and PSP80EE (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of 80% ethanol PSPE 300 mg/kg). Dietary supplementation began on the day of LP-BM5 MuLV infection and continued for 12 weeks. Dietary supplementation of PSPE inhibited LP-BM5 MuLV-induced splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy and attenuated the suppression of T- and B-cell proliferation and T helper 1/T helper 2 cytokine imbalance in LP-BM5 MuLV-infected mice. Dietary supplement of PSPE increased the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The data suggest that PSPE may ameliorate immune dysfunction due to LP-BM5 MuLV infection by modulating antioxidant defense systems. PMID:26076116

  18. [Biochemical characteristics of a calf leukemia virus in chronically infected cells].

    PubMed

    Argirova, R

    1979-01-01

    Studied were the conditions of cultivation of FLK cells chronically infected with a calf leucosis virus. The gradient values of density were compared to those of the murine sarcoma virus--1.14--1.15 vs, 1.17--1.18/cm3. Established were the parameters of the reverse transcriptase reaction for the calf leukosis virus (Magnesium-dependent reverse transcriptase). Data showed that the calf leucosis virus may not resolutely be referred either to the B- or the the C-type of retroviruses. PMID:92095

  19. EFFECTS OF NICL2 AND CDCL2 ON SUSCEPTIBILITY TO MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS AND VIRUS-AUGMENTED NATURAL KILLER CELL AND INTERFERON RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Female C3H/HeJ or CD-1 mice were infected with a sublethal dose of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and then exposed to nickel chloride NiCl2 or cadmium chloride (CdCl2), intramuscularly (im) or by inhalation. Effects of these treatments on disease susceptibility, virus-augmented an...

  20. K1 and K15 of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Are Partial Functional Homologues of Latent Membrane Protein 2A of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrück, Lisa; Gustems, Montse; Medele, Stephanie; Schulz, Thomas F.; Lutter, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human herpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and Primary effusion lymphomas (PEL), respectively, which are B cell malignancies that originate from germinal center B cells. PEL cells but also a quarter of EBV-positive HL tumor cells do not express the genuine B cell receptor (BCR), a situation incompatible with survival of normal B cells. EBV encodes LMP2A, one of EBV's viral latent membrane proteins, which likely replaces the BCR's survival signaling in HL. Whether KSHV encodes a viral BCR mimic that contributes to oncogenesis is not known because an experimental model of KSHV-mediated B cell transformation is lacking. We addressed this uncertainty with mutant EBVs encoding the KSHV genes K1 or K15 in lieu of LMP2A and infected primary BCR-negative (BCR−) human B cells with them. We confirmed that the survival of BCR– B cells and their proliferation depended on an active LMP2A signal. Like LMP2A, the expression of K1 and K15 led to the survival of BCR− B cells prone to apoptosis, supported their proliferation, and regulated a similar set of cellular target genes. K1 and K15 encoded proteins appear to have noncomplementing, redundant functions in this model, but our findings suggest that both KSHV proteins can replace LMP2A's key activities contributing to the survival, activation and proliferation of BCR– PEL cells in vivo. IMPORTANCE Several herpesviruses encode oncogenes that are receptor-like proteins. Often, they are constitutively active providing important functions to the latently infected cells. LMP2A of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is such a receptor that mimics an activated B cell receptor, BCR. K1 and K15, related receptors of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expressed in virus-associated tumors, have less obvious functions. We found in infection experiments that both viral receptors of KSHV can replace LMP2A and deliver functions

  1. Tap and Dbp5, but not Gag, are involved in DR-mediated nuclear export of unspliced Rous sarcoma virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, Jason J.; Uddowla, Sabena; Abraham, Benjamin; Clatterbuck, Sarah; Beemon, Karen L. . E-mail: KLB@jhu.edu

    2007-07-05

    All retroviruses must circumvent cellular restrictions on the export of unspliced RNAs from the nucleus. While the unspliced RNA export pathways for HIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus are well characterized, that of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) is not. We have previously reported that the RSV direct repeat (DR) elements are involved in the cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced viral RNA. Here, using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we demonstrate that unspliced viral RNAs bearing a single point mutation (G8863C) in the DR exhibit a restricted cellular localization in and around the nucleus. In contrast, wild type unspliced viral RNA had a diffuse localization throughout the nucleus and cytoplasm. Since the RSV Gag protein has a transient localization in the nucleus, we examined the effect of Gag over-expression on a DR-mediated reporter construct. While Gag did not enhance DR-mediated nuclear export, the dominant-negative expression of two cellular export factors, Tap and Dbp5, inhibited expression of the same reporter construct. Furthermore, FISH studies using the dominant-negative Dbp5 demonstrated that unspliced wild type RSV RNA was retained within the nucleus. Taken together, these results further implicate the DR in nuclear RNA export through interactions with Tap and Dbp5.

  2. Glutamic acid decarboxylase activity is stimulated in quail retina neuronal cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus and is regulated by pp60v-src.

    PubMed Central

    Crisanti, P; Lorinet, A M; Calothy, G; Pessac, B

    1985-01-01

    Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) stimulates in quail embryo neuro-retina (NR) cultures the specific activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in NR and in central nervous system. In quail embryo NR cultures transformed by ts NY-68, a thermodependent transformation-defective mutant of RSV, stimulation of GAD activity is regulated by pp60v-src, the product of the src gene of RSV. Fibroblasts and myoblasts have a very low GAD activity that is not stimulated after transformation by RSV. Neuronal clones, previously derived from ts NY-68-transformed established NR cell lines, have a high GAD activity which is regulated by pp60v-src, while other clones have a low GAD activity apparently not regulated by pp60v-src. These data indicate that pp60v-src selectively activates the expression of GAD in distinct neuronal cells of quail embryo NR cultures transformed by RSV. GAD activity is also stimulated in NR cells infected with viruses containing v-mil. PMID:2992933

  3. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Anders H.; Duch, Mogens; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNAPro molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian retroviruses have revealed evidence of molecular adaptation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites. While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3′-end of tRNAPro, we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNAArg(CCU), tRNAPhe(GAA) and a hitherto unknown human tRNASer(CGA). PMID:10637332

  4. Immunotherapy of murine leukemia. Efficacy of passive serum therapy of Friend leukemia virus-induced disease in immunocompromised mice

    SciTech Connect

    Genovesi, E.V.; Livnat, D.; Collins, J.J.

    1983-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the passive therapy of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced disease with chimpanzee anti-F-MuLV serum is accompanied by the development of host antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, the latter measurable in adoptive transfer protocols and by the ability of serum-protected mice to resist virus rechallenge. The present study was designed to further examine the contribution of various compartments of the host immune system to serum therapy itself, as well as to the acquired antiviral immunity that develops in serum-protected mice, through the use of naturally immunocompromised animals (e.g., nude athymic mice and natural killer (NK)-deficient beige mutant mice) or mice treated with immunoabrogating agents such as sublethal irradiation, cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan (Cy)), cortisone, and /sup 89/Sr. The studies in nude mice indicate that while mature T-cells are not needed for effective serum therapy, they do appear to be necessary for the long-term resistance of serum-protected mice to virus rechallenge and for the generation of the cell population(s) responsible for adoptive transfer of antiviral immunity. Furthermore, this acquired resistance is not due to virus neutralization by serum antibodies since antibody-negative, Cy-treated, serum-protected mice still reject the secondary virus infection. Lastly, while the immunocompromise systems examined did effect various host antiviral immune responses, none of them, including the NK-deficient beige mutation, significantly diminished the efficacy of the passive serum therapy of F-MuLV-induced disease.

  5. Immunovirotherapy with vesicular stomatitis virus and PD-L1 blockade enhances therapeutic outcome in murine acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiwei; Patnaik, Mrinal M; Ruiz, Autumn; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2016-03-17

    Patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have limited therapeutic options. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-interferon β (IFNβ)-sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is an oncolytic VSV encoding IFNβ and the NIS reporter. Syngeneic AML C1498 tumors responded to IV therapy with VSV-murine IFNβ (mIFNβ)-NIS in a dose-dependent manner. Imaging for NIS expression showed robust virus infection within the tumors. Virus infection did not increase programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) on tumor cells. Combining VSV-mIFNβ-NIS with anti-PD-L1 antibody (Ab) therapy enhanced antitumor activity compared with treatment with virus alone or Ab alone; this enhancement was not significant at higher VSV-mIFNβ-NIS doses. Systemic VSV therapy reduced systemic C1498-green fluorescent protein (GFP) tumor burden in the blood, bone marrow, spleen, and liver of mice with AML. Combination VSV-mIFNβ-NIS and anti-PD-L1 Ab therapy significantly enhanced the survival of these mice with no evidence of toxicity, compared with isotype control, anti-PD-L1, or virus alone. There was an increase in tumor-infiltrating CD4 and CD8 cells. Single-agent VSV-mIFNβ-NIS virotherapy induced both VSV-specific and GFP-specific CD8 T cells as determined by IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot, pentamer, and intracellular IFN-γ staining assays. Both of these responses were further enhanced by addition of anti-PD-L1 Ab. Depletion of CD8 or natural killer cells, but not CD4 cells, resulted in loss of antitumor activity in the VSV/anti-PD-L1 group. Clinical samples from chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myelomonocytic leukemia appear to be especially susceptible to VSV. Overall, our studies show that oncolytic virotherapy combined with immune checkpoint blockade is a promising approach to AML therapy. PMID:26712908

  6. A preliminary study of recombinant human interferon-α-2a activity against rabies virus in murine model.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Patil, D; Ghadigaonkar, S; Roy, R; Mukherjee, S; Chowdhary, A; Deshmukh, R

    2015-01-01

    Rabies remains an important public health problem in the world due to uncontrolled enzootic rabies. Although rabies associated fatalities may be prevented with timely immunoprophylaxis, but till date a therapeutic molecule has remained elusive. We investigated the role of rhuIFN α-2a in murine model challenged with rabies virus. Titre of 10(4.25) LD50/0.03 ml of 10% w/v RV CVS stock suspension were obtained. Based on 1LD50 titre, challenge dose of 50 LD 50 was administered along with rhuIFN α-2a with pre-exposure (primed) and post-exposure with the rabies virus. Both showed increased survival time as compared with the virus controls. These findings suggest that the rhuIFN α-2a might have some anti-viral activity, which can be used for the treatment of rabies infection. Further research on the efficacy of interferon along with anti-viral drugs for the treatment will be helpful in designing combination therapy against the disease. PMID:25560017

  7. Fine-structure analyses of lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions of gag protein p19 of the avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses by cyanogen bromide mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Pepinsky, R B; Vogt, V M

    1984-01-01

    In avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses, the gag protein p19 functions structurally as a matrix protein, connecting internal components with the viral envelope. We have used a combination of in situ cross-linking and peptide mapping to localize within p19 the regions responsible for two major interactions in this complex, p19 with lipid and p19 with p19. Lipid-protein cross-links were localized near the amino terminus within the first 35 amino acids of the polypeptide. Homotypic protein-protein disulfide bridges were found to originate from near the carboxy terminus of p19, from cysteine residues at amino acids 111 and 153. These results suggest that p19 is divided into domains with distinct functions. The peptide maps constructed for p19, and for the related proteins p23 in avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses and p19 beta in recombinant avian sarcoma viruses, should serve as useful tools for other types of studies involving these proteins. Images PMID:6090691

  8. Expression of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus RNase H Rescues the Growth Defect of an Escherichia coli Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Andrew G.

    2001-01-01

    A 157-amino-acid fragment of Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase encoding RNase H is shown to rescue the growth-defective phenotype of an Escherichia coli mutant. In vitro assays of the recombinant wild-type protein purified from the conditionally defective mutant confirm that it is catalytically active. Mutagenesis of one of the presumptive RNase H-catalytic residues results in production of a protein variant incapable of rescue and which lacks activity in vitro. Analyses of additional active site mutants demonstrate that their encoded variant proteins lack robust activity yet are able to rescue the bacterial mutant. These results suggest that genetic complementation may be useful for in vivo screening of mutant viral RNase H gene fragments and in evaluating their function under conditions that more closely mimic physiological conditions. The rescue system may also be useful in verifying the functional outcomes of mutations based on protein structural predictions and modeling. PMID:11390625

  9. Dimethyl fumarate suppresses Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease by modifying the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kunitoshi; Tomiki, Hiroki; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2015-07-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a modifier of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-2 (Nrf2)-kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the development of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) both clinically and histologically. DMF treatment leads to an enhanced Nrf2 antioxidant response in TMEV-IDD mice. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the level of IL-17A mRNA. DMF is known to inhibit differentiation of T helper 17 (Th17) cells via suppressing NF-κB. Taken together, our data suggest that DMF treatment in the effector phase may suppress TMEV-IDD not only via enhancing the antioxidant response but also via suppressing IL-17A. PMID:25721871

  10. Proteomic analysis reveals down-regulation of surfactant protein B in murine type II pneumocytes infected with influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Kebaabetswe, Lemme P.; Haick, Anoria K.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Matzke, Melissa M.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Miura, Tanya A.

    2015-01-01

    Infection of type II alveolar epithelial (ATII) cells by influenza A viruses (IAV) correlates with severe respiratory disease in humans and mice. To understand pathogenic mechanisms during IAV infection of ATII cells, murine ATII cells were cultured to maintain a differentiated phenotype, infected with IAV-PR8, which causes severe lung pathology in mice, and proteomics analyses were performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. PR8 infection increased levels of proteins involved in interferon signaling, antigen presentation, and cytoskeleton regulation. Proteins involved in mitochondrial membrane permeability, energy metabolism, and chromatin formation had reduced levels in PR8-infected cells. Phenotypic markers of ATII cells in vivo were identified, confirming the differentiation status of the cultures. Surfactant protein B had decreased levels in PR8-infected cells, which was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. Analysis of ATII cell protein profiles will elucidate cellular processes in IAV pathogenesis, which may provide insight into potential therapies to modulate disease severity. PMID:25965799