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Sample records for murine sertoli cells

  1. Sertoli cells as biochambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Don F. (Inventor); Sanberg, Paul R. (Inventor); Saporta, Samuel (Inventor); Hushen, Joelle J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    According to the present invention, there is provided a biological chamber system having a biochamber defined by outer walls of Sertoli cells. Also provided is a transplantation facilitator including a biochamber. A method of making biochambers by co-culturing facilitator cells and therapeutic cells and then aggregating the facilitator celes is also provided. Also provided is a method of transplanting cells by incorporating transplant cells into a biochamber and transplanting the biochamber containing the transplant cells.

  2. Sertoli cell tumour in an Amur tiger.

    PubMed

    Scudamore, C L; Meredith, A L

    2001-01-01

    The histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a malignant Sertoli cell tumour in a 17-year-old Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) are described. Histological examination of the primary lesion in the right testis and metastatic lesions throughout the internal organs showed a variable cellular pattern with an admixture of tubular structures divided by fine stroma filled with fusiform to stellate cells, and sheets of polygonal cells with abundant vacuolated cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical techniques demonstrated strong positive staining for neuron-specific enolase and variable positive staining for vimentin in neoplastic cells, supporting a diagnosis of a tumour of Sertoli cell origin. PMID:11428192

  3. Sertoli Cell Differentiation in Pubertal Boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meishan boars experience puberty at a younger age than crossbred (BX) boars in association with earlier cessation of Sertoli cell proliferation and smaller post pubertal testicular size. The current study defined changes in expression, assessed by immunohistochemistry, of anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH...

  4. Defined pattern of Sertoli cell differentiation in pubertal porcine testes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Number of Sertoli cells is a primary determinant of mature testicular size and sperm production. In boars, formation of the blood/testis barrier, which occurs by 4 mo of age in commercial breeds, signals the end of Sertoli cell proliferation. Previous studies established that expression of p27Kip1, ...

  5. Numerical Relation of Spermatozoa to Sertoli Cells

    E-print Network

    Hague, Florence S.

    1914-01-01

    , 3. 1892. The Origin of the Sertoli's Cell. Amer. Nat., 26 Wieman, Chromosomes in Man. 1913 Am. Journal of Anat. Vol. 14, Ho. 4. Wilcox, S. V. 1900 Human Spermatogenesis. Anat. Auz. 17. Winiwarther, H. von 1912 Studes our la spermatogen&3e... at least be clearly visible by the time the other three quarters had become secondary spermatocytes. o C Conclusions: 1. Spermatogenesis is continuous in the rat, mature sperm being found at all times, but it is not con— tinuous in man. 2...

  6. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in younger women. The cancer cells release a male sex hormone. As a result, the woman may develop symptoms such as: A deep voice Enlarged clitoris Facial hair Loss in breast size Stopping of menstrual periods Pain ...

  7. Porcine sertoli cell proliferation after androgen receptor inactivation.

    PubMed

    Legacki, Erin; Conley, Alan J; Nitta-Oda, Barbara Jean; Berger, Trish

    2015-04-01

    Sertoli cell proliferation in neonatal boars is potentially androgen dependent. Hence, the immediate objective was to evaluate effects of androgen receptor-mediated signaling on the first wave of Sertoli cell proliferation. The experimental design employed littermate pairs of boars with one member assigned to receive a daily oral dose of flutamide, an androgen receptor antagonist, beginning at 1 wk of age and the littermate the canola oil vehicle. Experiment 1 examined the response at 6.5 wk of age after completion of the first wave of Sertoli cell proliferation, and experiment 2 examined the response at 11 wk of age after initiation of the second wave of Sertoli cell proliferation. Experiment 3 was designed to evaluate initial responses at 2, 3, or 4 wk of age. Additional littermates from four of the litters evaluated at 2 wk of age were hemicastrated at 8 days of age. Testis weight increased approximately 50% in the flutamide-treated boars compared with vehicle-treated littermates (P = 0.01) by 6.5 wk of age. Approximately 80% more Sertoli cells/testis were present in flutamide-treated boars at 6.5 wk of age compared with their vehicle-treated littermates (P < 0.01). Animals that were hemicastrated at 8 days of age had more Sertoli cells/testis than their intact littermates at 2 wk of age (P < 0.01), but flutamide inhibited the hemicastration response. Androgen receptor antagonism during postnatal Sertoli cell proliferation increases Sertoli cell numbers, as does hemicastration, but receptor antagonism initially inhibits Sertoli cell proliferation induced by hemicastration. PMID:25715793

  8. A Rare Cause of Prepubertal Gynecomastia: Sertoli Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Fatma; Su Dur, ?eyma Meliha; ?ahin, Ceyhan; K?rm?z?bekmez, Heves; Karabulut, Murat Hakan; Yörük, As?m

    2015-01-01

    Prepubertal gynecomastia due to testis tumors is a very rare condition. Nearly 5% of the patients with testicular mass present with gynecomastia. Sertoli cell tumors are sporadic in 60% of the reported cases, while the remaining is a component of multiple neoplasia syndromes such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and Carney complex. We present a 4-year-old boy with gynecomastia due to Sertoli cell tumor with no evidence of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome or Carney complex. PMID:26366315

  9. Germ Cell Migration across Sertoli Cell Tight Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin E.; Braun, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier includes strands of tight junctions between somatic Sertoli cells that restricts solutes from crossing the paracellular space, creating a microenvironment within seminiferous tubules and providing immune privilege to meiotic and postmeiotic cells. Large cysts of germ cells transit the Sertoli cell tight junctions (SCTJs) without compromising their integrity. We used confocal microscopy to visualize SCTJ components during germ cell cyst migration across the SCTJs. Cysts become enclosed within a network of transient compartments fully bounded by old and new tight junctions. Dissolution of the old tight junctions releases the germ cells into the adluminal compartment, thus completing transit across the blood-testis barrier. Claudin 3, a tight junction protein, is transiently incorporated into new tight junctions and then replaced by claudin 11. PMID:22997133

  10. Reprogramming of Sertoli cells to fetal-like Leydig cells by Wt1 ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lianjun; Chen, Min; Wen, Qing; Li, Yaqiong; Wang, Yaqing; Wang, Yanbo; Qin, Yan; Cui, Xiuhong; Yang, Lin; Huff, Vicki; Gao, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli and Leydig cells, the two major somatic cell types in the testis, have different morphologies and functions. Both are essential for gonad development and spermatogenesis. However, whether these cells are derived from the same progenitor cells and the mechanism regulating the differentiation between these two cell types during gonad development remains unclear. A previous study showed that overactivation of Ctnnb1 (cadherin-associated protein, beta 1) in Sertoli cells resulted in Sertoli cell tumors. Surprisingly, in the present study, we found that simultaneous deletion of Wilms’ Tumor Gene 1 (Wt1) and overactivation of Ctnnb1 in Sertoli cells led to Leydig cell-like tumor development. Lineage tracing experiments revealed that the Leydig-like tumor cells were derived from Sertoli cells. Further studies confirmed that Wt1 is required for the maintenance of the Sertoli cell lineage and that deletion of Wt1 resulted in the reprogramming of Sertoli cells to Leydig cells. Consistent with this interpretation, overexpression of Wt1 in Leydig cells led to the up-regulation of Sertoli cell-specific gene expression and the down-regulation of steroidogenic gene expression. These results demonstrate that the distinction between Sertoli cells and Leydig cells is regulated by Wt1, implying that these two cell types most likely originate from the same progenitor cells. This study thus provides a novel concept for somatic cell fate determination in testis development that may also represent an etiology of male infertility in human patients. PMID:25775596

  11. Sertoli Cells Maintain Leydig Cell Number and Peritubular Myoid Cell Activity in the Adult Mouse Testis

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana; Milne, Laura; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Jeffrey, Nathan; Guillou, Florian; Freeman, Tom C.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2014-01-01

    The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR) specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health. PMID:25144714

  12. Mechanisms of hormonal regulation of sertoli cell development and proliferation: a key process for spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Escott, Gustavo M; da Rosa, Luciana A; Loss, Eloisa da Silveira

    2014-01-01

    In adulthood, the main function of the testes is the production of male gametes. In this process, Sertoli cells are essential for sustained spermatogenesis, providing the developing germ cells with the physical and nutritional support required. The total number of Sertoli cells in adulthood determines the daily gamete production, since Sertoli cells can support only a limited number of developing germ cells. Considering that Sertoli cell proliferation only occurs during the immature period, proper development and proliferation of the Sertoli cells during the proliferative phase are crucial to male reproductive health in adulthood. The proliferation process of the Sertoli cells is finely regulated by an assortment of hormonal and paracrine/autocrine factors, which regulate the rate and extent of proliferation. In the present review, we discuss the most important hormonal and paracrine factors involved in the regulation of Sertoli cell proliferation, as well as the signaling mechanisms by which they exert their effects. PMID:25620228

  13. Hormonal regulation of sertoli cell micro-RNAs at spermiation.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Peter K; Harrison, Craig A; Walton, Kelly L; McLachlan, Robert I; O'Donnell, Liza; Stanton, Peter G

    2011-04-01

    Spermatogenesis is absolutely dependent on FSH and androgens; suppression of these hormones inhibits germ cell development and thus sperm production. The final release of spermatids by the Sertoli cell, a process known as spermiation, is particularly sensitive to hormone suppression. To define the molecular mechanisms that mediate FSH and androgen effects in the Sertoli cell, we investigated the expression and regulation of micro-RNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding RNAs that regulate protein translation and modify cellular responses. By array analysis, we identified 23 miRNAs up-regulated more than 2-fold after hormone suppression in vivo and in vitro in primary Sertoli cell cultures. The regulation of four of these miRNAs (miR-23b, -30c, -30d, and -690) was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Bioinformatic analysis of potential targets of hormonally regulated miRNAs identified genes important for focal adhesion and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, processes known to be intimately associated with adhesion of spermatids to Sertoli cells. Two of the identified genes, Pten, an intracellular phosphatase, and Eps15, a mediator of endocytosis, were down-regulated by the withdrawal of hormones in vivo and possess miR-23b target sites in their 3'-untranslated regions. Overexpression of miR-23b in vitro resulted in decreased translation of PTEN and EPS15 protein as assessed by Western blot and luciferase analysis. We conclude that FSH and androgens act on Sertoli cells in stage VIII to control the expression of miRNAs that operate in a coordinated manner to regulate cell adhesion pathways and male fertility and that miRNA transcription is a new paradigm in the hormone dependence of spermiation. PMID:21325043

  14. Loss of Gata4 in Sertoli cells impairs the spermatogonial stem cell niche and causes germ cell exhaustion by attenuating chemokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, Ji-Xin; Cheng, Jin-Mei; Li, Jian; Jin, Cheng; Li, Xiao-Yu; Deng, Shou-Long; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2015-11-10

    Sertoli cells, the primary somatic cell in the seminiferous epithelium, provide the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) microenvironment (niche) through physical support and the expression of paracrine factors. However, the regulatory mechanisms within the SSC niche, which is primarily controlled by Sertoli cells, remain largely unknown. GATA4 is a Sertoli cell marker, involved in genital ridge initiation, sex determination and differentiation during the embryonic stage. Here, we showed that neonatal mice with a targeted disruption of Gata4 in Sertoli cells (Gata4flox/flox; Amh-Cre; hereafter termed Gata4 cKO) displayed a loss of the establishment and maintenance of the SSC pool and apoptosis of both gonocyte-derived differentiating spermatogonia and meiotic spermatocytes. Thus, progressive germ cell depletion and a Sertoli-cell-only syndrome were observed as early as the first wave of murine spermatogenesis. Transplantation of germ cells from postnatal day 5 (P5) Gata4 cKO mice into KitW/W-v recipient seminiferous tubules restored spermatogenesis. In addition, microarray analyses of P5 Gata4 cKO mouse testes showed alterations in chemokine signaling factors, including Cxcl12, Ccl3, Cxcr4 (CXCL12 receptor), Ccr1 (CCL3 receptor), Ccl9, Xcl1 and Ccrl2. Deletion of Gata4 in Sertoli cells markedly attenuated Sertoli cell chemotaxis, which guides SSCs or prospermatogonia to the stem cell niche. Finally, we showed that GATA4 transcriptionally regulated Cxcl12 and Ccl9, and the addition of CXCL12 and CCL9 to an in vitro testis tissue culture system increased the number of PLZF+ undifferentiated spermatogonia within Gata4 cKO testes. Together, these results reveal a novel role for GATA4 in controlling the SSC niche via the transcriptional regulation of chemokine signaling shortly after birth. PMID:26473289

  15. Clinicopathologic features of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-Yan; Zhu, Jia-Er; Huang, Wen; Zhu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ovarian Stertoli-Ledig cell tumor (SLCT) is a rare type of sex cord-stromal tumor of the ovary. The present study was to evaluate clinicalopahologic features and prognosis of patients with Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor treated by surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy during short term follow-up. Methods: A total of sixteen patients with ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor treated at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Shanghai, China, between Jan 2001 and Dec 2011 were reviewed. The clinical data, treatment and prognosis were obtained from medical records. Results: The median age of the patients with ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor was about 27.5 years old in non-menopausal women, while the median age of menopausal women was about 63 years old. The most common complaint was with hormonal-related symptoms in the form of secondary amenorrhea and infinity, features of virilization, abdominal mass or irregular vaginal bleeding. All of sixteen patients underwent surgical staging and all were found to have stage I disease at the time of diagnosis. Eleven patients with intermediate and two patients with poorly differentiated tumors received adjuvant chemotherapy. There were differences found in operative time, blood loss and postoperative recovery time between laparotomy and laparoscopy. There were no disease-related deaths and all patients were under complete remission at the last follow-up. Conclusions: Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors could happen in any period age of women. However, the tumors typically occur in the single side while still at the early stage, a favorable outcome could be achieved by surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Laparoscopy has similar surgical effects as laparotomy, but has a number of advantages. PMID:25400781

  16. Rictor Regulates Spermatogenesis by Controlling Sertoli Cell Cytoskeletal Organization and Cell Polarity in the Mouse Testis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Heling; Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Caixia; Xiong, Zhi; Zhao, Wanlu; Jia, Chunhong; Lin, Jun; Lin, Yan; Yuan, Weiping; Zhao, Allan Z; Bai, Xiaochun

    2015-11-01

    Maintenance of cell polarity is essential for Sertoli cell and blood-testis barrier (BTB) function and spermatogenesis; however, the signaling mechanisms that regulate the integrity of the cytoskeleton and polarity of Sertoli cells are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that rapamycin-insensitive component of target of rapamycin (TOR) (Rictor), a core component of mechanistic TOR complex 2 (mTORC2), was expressed in the seminiferous epithelium during testicular development, and was down-regulated in a cadmium chloride-induced BTB damage model. We then conditionally deleted the Rictor gene in Sertoli cells and mutant mice exhibited azoospermia and were sterile as early as 3 months old. Further study revealed that Rictor may regulate actin organization via both mTORC2-dependent and mTORC2-independent mechanisms, in which the small GTPase, ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1, and phosphorylation of the actin filament regulatory protein, Paxillin, are involved, respectively. Loss of Rictor in Sertoli cells perturbed actin dynamics and caused microtubule disarrangement, both of which accumulatively disrupted Sertoli cell polarity and BTB integrity, accompanied by testicular developmental defects, spermiogenic arrest and excessive germ cell loss in mutant mice. Together, these findings establish the importance of Rictor/mTORC2 signaling in Sertoli cell function and spermatogenesis through the maintenance of Sertoli cell cytoskeletal dynamics, BTB integrity, and cell polarity. PMID:26360620

  17. Impaired Sertoli cell function in males diagnosed with Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marcus, K A; Sweep, C G J; van der Burgt, I; Noordam, C

    2008-11-01

    In order to study male gonadal function in Noonan syndrome, clinical and laboratory data, including inhibin B, were gathered in nine pubertal males diagnosed with Noonan syndrome. Bilateral testicular maldescent was observed in four, and unilateral cryptorchidism occurred in two. Puberty was delayed in three patients. Luteinising hormone (LH) levels were normal in all patients in our series, while follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were raised in seven. Inhibin B was low in six males and just above the lower limit of normal in two. Importantly, all three men with normal testicular descent displayed signs of Sertoli cell dysfunction, indicating, in contrast to earlier reports, that bilateral cryptorchidism does not seem to be the main contributing factor to impairment of testicular function in Noonan syndrome. These findings suggest different mechanisms of disturbance in male gonadal function, which is frequently associated with Sertoli dysfunction. PMID:19189703

  18. Sertoli cell development and function in an animal model of testicular dysgenesis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Gary R; Scott, Hayley M; Walker, Marion; McKinnell, Chris; Ferrara, Diana; Mahood, I Kim; Sharpe, Richard M

    2008-02-01

    Pregnancy exposure to di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) in rats induces a testicular dysgenesislike syndrome (TDS) in male offspring. Earlier studies suggested altered Sertoli cell development/maturation may result, especially in testes that become cryptorchid. This study quantitatively assessed Sertoli cell numerical and functional development in DBP-exposed rats and compared (unilaterally) cryptorchid and scrotal testes. Pregnant rats were gavaged with 500 mg/kg/day DBP or corn oil from embryonic (E) Days 13.5 to 21.5. Male offspring were sampled on E21.5 or Postnatal Day 6, 10, 15, 25, or 90. Sertoli cell number in DBP-exposed males was reduced by approximately 50% at E21.5 but recovered to normal by Days 25-90, accompanied by significant changes in plasma inhibin B and testosterone levels. Sertoli cell maturational development in DBP-exposed males, assessed using five protein markers (anti-müllerian hormone, cytokeratin, androgen receptor, CDKN1B, and Nestin), was largely normal, with some evidence of delayed maturation. However, in adulthood, Sertoli cells (SC) in areas lacking germ cells (Sertoli cell-only [SCO] tubules) often exhibited immature features, especially in cryptorchid testes. Sertoli cells in DBP-exposed animals supported fewer germ cells during puberty, but this normalized in scrotal testes by adulthood. Scrotal and especially cryptorchid testes from DBP-exposed animals exhibited abnormalities (SCO tubules, focal dysgenetic areas) at all postnatal ages. Cryptorchid testes from DBP-exposed animals exhibited more Sertoli cell abnormalities at Day 25 compared with scrotal testes, perhaps indicating more severe underlying Sertoli cell malfunction in these testes. Our findings support the concept of altered Sertoli cell development in TDS, especially in cryptorchid testes, but show that maturational defects in Sertoli cells in adulthood most commonly reflect secondary dedifferentiation in absence of germ cells. PMID:17928633

  19. Deletion of the tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in Sertoli cells causes infertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Tang, Zhenzhou; Li, Yang; Liu, Wensheng; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Bingyan; Tian, Yingpu; Zhao, Yinan; Ran, Hao; Liu, Wenjie; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Shuai, Jianwei; Wang, Haibin; Lu, Zhongxian

    2015-01-01

    The male's ability to reproduce is completely dependent on Sertoli cells. However, the mechanisms governing the functional integrity of Sertoli cells have remained largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Shp2 in Sertoli cells results in infertility in mice. In Shp2 knockout mice (SCSKO), a normal population of Sertoli cells was observed, but the blood-testis barrier (BTB) was not formed. Shp2 ablation initiated the untimely and excessive differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) by disturbing the expression of paracrine factors. As a consequence, the process of spermatogenesis was disrupted, and the germ cells were depleted. Furthermore, Shp2 deletion impaired the cell junctions of the primary Sertoli cells and failed to support the clonal formation of SSCs co-cultured with SCSKO Sertoli cells. As expected, Shp2 restoration largely restores the cell junctions of the primary Sertoli cells and the clonal formation of SSCs. To identify the underlying mechanism, we further demonstrated that the absence of Shp2 suppressed Erk phosphorylation, and thus, the expression of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)- and testosterone-induced target genes. These results collectively suggest that Shp2 is a critical signaling protein that is required to maintain Sertoli cell function and could serve as a novel target for male infertility therapies. PMID:26265072

  20. Deletion of the tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in Sertoli cells causes infertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Tang, Zhenzhou; Li, Yang; Liu, Wensheng; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Bingyan; Tian, Yingpu; Zhao, Yinan; Ran, Hao; Liu, Wenjie; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Shuai, Jianwei; Wang, Haibin; Lu, Zhongxian

    2015-01-01

    The male’s ability to reproduce is completely dependent on Sertoli cells. However, the mechanisms governing the functional integrity of Sertoli cells have remained largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Shp2 in Sertoli cells results in infertility in mice. In Shp2 knockout mice (SCSKO), a normal population of Sertoli cells was observed, but the blood-testis barrier (BTB) was not formed. Shp2 ablation initiated the untimely and excessive differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) by disturbing the expression of paracrine factors. As a consequence, the process of spermatogenesis was disrupted, and the germ cells were depleted. Furthermore, Shp2 deletion impaired the cell junctions of the primary Sertoli cells and failed to support the clonal formation of SSCs co-cultured with SCSKO Sertoli cells. As expected, Shp2 restoration largely restores the cell junctions of the primary Sertoli cells and the clonal formation of SSCs. To identify the underlying mechanism, we further demonstrated that the absence of Shp2 suppressed Erk phosphorylation, and thus, the expression of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)- and testosterone-induced target genes. These results collectively suggest that Shp2 is a critical signaling protein that is required to maintain Sertoli cell function and could serve as a novel target for male infertility therapies. PMID:26265072

  1. Effects of simulated microgravity on mouse Sertoli cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angela, Masini Maria; Prato, Paola; Linda, Scarabelli; Lanza, Cristina; Palmero, Silvio; Pointis, Georges; Ricci, Franco; Strollo, Felice

    With the advent of space flights questions concerning the effects of microgravity (0xG) on hu-man reproduction physiology have got priority Spermatogenesis is a complex, highly ordered process of cell division and differentiation by which spermatogonial cells give rise to mature spermatozoa. Sertoli cells play a crucial role in the development of germ cells and the regulation of spermatogenesis. In this study the influence of 0xG on Sertoli cells was evaluated. A Sertoli cell line from mouse testis (42GPA9) was analyzed for cytoskeletal (using the 3D reconstruction generated from a stack of confocal images) and SHBG changes by immunohistochemistry, for antioxidant agents by RT-PCR and for culture medium lactate concentrations by wet chemistry. Cells were cultured for 6, 24 and 48 hrs on a three-dimensional Random Positioning Machine (3D-RPM); static controls (1xG) were positioned on the supporting frame. At the end of each experiment, cultured cells were either fixed in paraformaldehyde or RNA-extracted or used for culture medium lactate measurements as needed. At 0xG Sertoli cytoskeleton got disorganized, microtubules fragmented and SHBG undetectable already after 24 hrs, with alterations wors-ening further until 48 hrs; various antioxidant systems (SOD, GST, PARP, MTs) appreciably increased during the first 24 hrs but significantly decreased at 48 hrs. No changes occurred in 1xG samples. At least initially, 0xG seems to perturb antioxidant protection strategies allowing the testes to support sperm production, thus generating an aging-like state of oxidative stress. Lactate production at 0xG slightly decreased only after 24 hrs. Further experiments need to be carried out in space to investigate upon steroidogenesis and germ cell differentiation within the testis, to rule out eventually pending male infertility consequences, which would be a problem nowadays, when life expectancy increases and male fertility might become a social issue often extending into 60 years and over. (experiment funded by ASI, through a grant within the OSMA project).

  2. In vitro effects of simulated microgravity on Sertoli cell function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, M. A.; Prato, P.; Scarabelli, L.; Lanza, C.; Palmero, S.; Pointis, G.; Ricci, F.; Strollo, F.

    2011-02-01

    With the advent of space flights questions concerning the effects of microgravity (0×G) on human reproductive physiology have received great attention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 0×G on Sertoli cells. A Sertoli cell line from mouse testis (42GPA9) was analyzed for cytoskeletal and Sex Hormone Binding Globilin (SHBG) changes by immunohistochemistry, for antioxidant content by RT-PCR and for culture medium lactate concentrations by protein chemistry. Cells were cultured for 6, 24 and 48 h on a three-dimensional Random Positioning Machine (3D-RPM); static controls (1×G) were positioned on the supporting frame. At the end of each experiment, cultured cells were either fixed in paraformaldehyde or lysed and RNA-extracted or used for culture medium lactate measurements as needed. At 0×G, Sertoli cytoskeleton became disorganized, microtubules fragmented and SHBG undetectable already after 24 h, with alterations worsening by 48 h. It was evident that various antioxidant systems appreciably increased during the first 24 h but significantly decreased at 48 h. No changes occurred in the 1×G samples. Initially, 0×G seemed to disturb antioxidant protection strategies allowing the testes to support sperm production, thus generating an aging-like state of oxidative stress. Lactate production at 0×G slightly decreased after 24 h. Further experiments are needed in space to investigate upon steroidogenesis and germ cell differentiation within the testis, to rule out male infertility as a possible consequence, which could be a problem, as life expectancy increases.

  3. Intrauterine growth retardation associated with precocious puberty and Sertoli cell hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lodish, Maya B.; Gartner, Lou Ann; Albini, Paul; Brodie, Angela; Meck, Jeanne M.; Meloni-Ehrig, Aurelia M; Hill, Suvimol; Tsilou, Ekaterini; Carney, J. Aidan; Valera, Vladimir A.; Walter, Beatriz A.; Merino, Maria J.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2012-01-01

    The original description of patients with Russell-Silver syndrome included precocious puberty, the mechanism of which was unclear. We describe a child with a Russell-Silver syndrome-like phenotype who presented with precocious puberty that was associated with hyperplasia of the Sertoli cells. The patient was found to have an immature cryptorchid testicle; hyperplastic Sertoli cells were also aneuploid carrying trisomy 8. This chromosomal abnormality was present in Sertoli cells only and could not be detected in peripheral lymphocytes, tunica vaginalis, or other, normal, testicular tissue. Sertoli cells in culture showed excess aromatization providing an explanation for the rapid advancement of the patient’s bone age. We conclude that in a patient with a Russell-Silver syndrome-like phenotype, Sertoli cell hyperplasia was associated with somatic trisomy 8, increased aromatization and gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. PMID:20411478

  4. Testicular Sertoli cells influence the proliferation and immunogenicity of co-cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Ping; He, Lan; Pu, Dan; Lv, Xiaohong; Zhou, Wenxu; Sun, Yining; Hu, Nan

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} The proliferation of dramatic increased by co-cultured with Sertoli cells. {yields} VEGF receptor-2 expression of ECs was up-regulated by co-cultured with Sertoli cells. {yields} The MHC expression of ECs induced by INF-{gamma} and IL-6, IL-8 and sICAM induced by TNF-{alpha} decreased respectively after co-cultured with Sertoli cells. {yields} ECs co-cultured with Sertoli cells also didn't increase the stimulation index of spleen lymphocytes. -- Abstract: The major problem of the application of endothelial cells (ECs) in transplantation is the lack of proliferation and their immunogenicity. In this study, we co-cultured ECs with Sertoli cells to monitor whether Sertoli cells can influence the proliferation and immunogenicity of co-cultured ECs. Sertoli cells were isolated from adult testicular tissue. ECs were divided into the control group and the experimental group, which included three sub-groups co-cultured with 1 x 10{sup 3}, 1 x 10{sup 4} or 1 x 10{sup 5} cell/ml of Sertoli cells. The growth and proliferation of ECs were observed microscopically, and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 (KDR) was examined by Western blotting. In another experiment, ECs were divided into the control group, the single culture group and the co-culture group with the optimal concentration of Sertoli cells. After INF-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} were added to the culture medium, MHC II antigen expression was detected by immunofluorescence staining and western blotting; interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) were measured in the culture medium by ELISA. We demonstrated that 1 x 10{sup 4} cell/ml Sertoli cells promoted the proliferation of co-cultured ECs more dramatically than that in other groups (P < 0.05). Western blotting showed that 1 x 10{sup 4} cell/ml of the Sertoli cells was most effective in the up-regulation of KDR expression in the co-cultured ECs (P < 0.05). Sertoli cells can effectively suppress INF-{gamma}-induced MHC II antigen expression in co-cultured ECs compared with single culture group (P < 0.05). TNF-{alpha} induced the expression of IL-6, IL-8 and sICAM in ECs. When co-cultured with Sertoli cells, their expressions were significantly lower than in the EC single culture group (P < 0.05). ECs co-cultured with Sertoli cells also did not significantly increase the stimulation index of spleen lymphocytes compared to the single culture group (P < 0.05). Our results suggested that co-culturing with Sertoli cells can significantly promote the proliferation of ECs, accelerate post-transplant angiogenesis, while reduce EC immunogenicity and stimulus to lymphocytes.

  5. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fenxi; Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei; Ren, Tongming; Jing, Suhua; Lin, Juntang

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of 'nurse' cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  6. Direct Reprogramming of Fibroblasts into Embryonic Sertoli-like Cells by Defined Factors

    E-print Network

    Buganim, Yosef

    Sertoli cells are considered the “supporting cells” of the testis that play an essential role in sex determination during embryogenesis and in spermatogenesis during adulthood. Their essential roles in male fertility along ...

  7. Male differentiation of germ cells induced by embryonic age-specific Sertoli cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kohei; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Lin, Yanling; Hogg, Nathanael; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Behringer, Richard R; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2012-04-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a meiosis-inducing factor. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) in the developing ovary are exposed to RA, resulting in entry into meiosis. In contrast, PGCs in the developing testis enter mitotic arrest to differentiate into prospermatogonia. Sertoli cells express CYP26B1, an RA-metabolizing enzyme, providing a simple explanation for why XY PGCs do not initiate meios/is. However, regulation of entry into mitotic arrest is likely more complex. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate male germ cell differentiation, we cultured XX and XY germ cells at 11.5 and 12.5 days postcoitus (dpc) with an RA receptor inhibitor. Expression of Stra8, a meiosis initiation gene, was suppressed in all groups. However, expression of Dnmt3l, a male-specific gene, during embryogenesis was elevated but only in 12.5-dpc XY germ cells. This suggests that inhibiting RA signaling is not sufficient for male germ cell differentiation but that the male gonadal environment also contributes to this pathway. To define the influence of Sertoli cells on male germ cell differentiation, Sertoli cells at 12.5, 15.5, and 18.5 dpc were aggregated with 11.5 dpc PGCs, respectively. After culture, PGCs aggregated with 12.5 dpc Sertoli cells increased Nanos2 and Dnmt3l expression. Furthermore, these PGCs established male-specific methylation imprints of the H19 differentially methylated domains. In contrast, PGCs aggregated with Sertoli cells at late embryonic ages did not commit to the male pathway. These findings suggest that male germ cell differentiation is induced both by inhibition of RA signaling and by molecule(s) production by embryonic age-specific Sertoli cells. PMID:22262692

  8. Male Differentiation of Germ Cells Induced by Embryonic Age-Specific Sertoli Cells in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kohei; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Lin, Yanling; Hogg, Nathanael; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Behringer, Richard R.; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinoic acid (RA) is a meiosis-inducing factor. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) in the developing ovary are exposed to RA, resulting in entry into meiosis. In contrast, PGCs in the developing testis enter mitotic arrest to differentiate into prospermatogonia. Sertoli cells express CYP26B1, an RA-metabolizing enzyme, providing a simple explanation for why XY PGCs do not initiate meios/is. However, regulation of entry into mitotic arrest is likely more complex. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate male germ cell differentiation, we cultured XX and XY germ cells at 11.5 and 12.5 days postcoitus (dpc) with an RA receptor inhibitor. Expression of Stra8, a meiosis initiation gene, was suppressed in all groups. However, expression of Dnmt3l, a male-specific gene, during embryogenesis was elevated but only in 12.5-dpc XY germ cells. This suggests that inhibiting RA signaling is not sufficient for male germ cell differentiation but that the male gonadal environment also contributes to this pathway. To define the influence of Sertoli cells on male germ cell differentiation, Sertoli cells at 12.5, 15.5, and 18.5 dpc were aggregated with 11.5 dpc PGCs, respectively. After culture, PGCs aggregated with 12.5 dpc Sertoli cells increased Nanos2 and Dnmt3l expression. Furthermore, these PGCs established male-specific methylation imprints of the H19 differentially methylated domains. In contrast, PGCs aggregated with Sertoli cells at late embryonic ages did not commit to the male pathway. These findings suggest that male germ cell differentiation is induced both by inhibition of RA signaling and by molecule(s) production by embryonic age-specific Sertoli cells. PMID:22262692

  9. ETV5 Regulates Sertoli Cell Chemokines Involved in Mouse Stem/Progenitor Spermatogonia Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Liz; Ekman, Gail C; Garcia, Thomas; Carnes, Kay; Zhang, Zhen; Murphy, Theresa; Murphy, Kenneth M; Hess, Rex A; Cooke, Paul S; Hofmann, Marie–Claude

    2010-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells are the only stem cells in the body that transmit genetic information to offspring. Although growth factors responsible for self–renewal of these cells are known, the factors and mechanisms that attract and physically maintain these cells within their microenvironment are poorly understood. Mice with targeted disruption of Ets variant gene 5 (Etv5) show total loss of stem/progenitor spermatogonia following the first wave of spermatogenesis, resulting in a Sertoli cell–only phenotype and aspermia. Microarray analysis of primary Sertoli cells from Etv5 knockout (Etv5?/?) versus wild–type (WT) mice revealed significant decreases in expression of several chemokines. Chemotaxis assays demonstrated that migration of stem/progenitor spermatogonia toward Etv5?/? Sertoli cells was significantly decreased compared to migration toward WT Sertoli cells. Interestingly, differentiating spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids were not chemoattracted by WT Sertoli cells, whereas stem/progenitor spermatogonia showed a high and significant chemotactic index. Rescue assays using recombinant chemokines indicated that C-C-motif ligand 9 (CCL9) facilitates Sertoli cell chemoattraction of stem/progenitor spermatogonia, which express C-C-receptor type 1 (CCR1). In addition, there is protein–DNA interaction between ETV5 and Ccl9, suggesting that ETV5 might be a direct regulator of Ccl9 expression. Taken together, our data show for the first time that Sertoli cells are chemoattractive for stem/progenitor spermatogonia, and that production of specific chemokines is regulated by ETV5. Therefore, changes in chemokine production and consequent decreases in chemoattraction by Etv5?/? Sertoli cells helps to explain stem/progenitor spermatogonia loss in Etv5?/? mice. PMID:20799334

  10. Sertoli cells in the testis of caecilians, Ichthyophis tricolor and Uraeotyphlus cf. narayani (Amphibia: Gymnophiona): light and electron microscopic perspective.

    PubMed

    Smita, Mathew; Oommen, Oommen V; George, Jancy M; Akbarsha, M A

    2003-12-01

    The caecilians have evolved a unique pattern of cystic spermatogenesis in which cysts representing different stages in spermatogenesis coexist in a testis lobule. We examined unsettled issues relating to the organization of the caecilian testis lobules, including the occurrence of a fatty matrix, the possibility of both peripheral and central Sertoli cells, the origin of Sertoli cells from follicular cells, and the disengagement of older Sertoli cells to become loose central Sertoli cells. We subjected the testis of Ichthyophis tricolor (Ichthyophiidae) and Uraeotyphlus cf. narayani (Uraeotyphliidae) from the Western Ghats of Kerala, India, to light and transmission electron microscopic studies. Irrespective of the functional state of the testis, whether active or regressed, Sertoli cells constitute a permanent feature of the lobules. The tall Sertoli cells adherent to the basal lamina with basally located pleomorphic nuclei extend deeper into the lobule to meet at the core. There they provide for association of germ cells at different stages of differentiation, an aspect that has earlier been misconceived as the fatty matrix. Germ cells up to the 4-cell stage remain in the intercalating region of the Sertoli cells and they are located at the apices of the Sertoli cells from the 8-cell stage onwards. The developing germ cells are intimately associated with the Sertoli cell adherent to the basal lamina until spermiation. There are ameboid cells in the core of the lobules that appear to interact with the germ cells at the face opposite to their attachment with the Sertoli cells. Adherence of the Sertoli cells to the basal lamina is a permanent feature of the caecilian testicular lobules. The ameboid cells in the core are neither Sertoli cells nor their degeneration products. PMID:14584033

  11. Co-culture of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells with Sertoli Cells Promote in vitro Generation of Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Nayernia, Karim; Dianatpour, Mahdi; Mansouri, Fatemeh; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Sertoli cells support in vivo germ cell production; but, its exact mechanism has not been well understood. The present study was designed to analyze the effect of Sertoli cells in differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to germ cells. Materials and Methods: A fusion construct composed of a Stra8 gene promoter and the coding region of enhanced green fluorescence protein was produced to select differentiated mESCs. To analyze sertoli cells’ effect in differentiation process, mESCs were separated into two groups: the first group was cultured on gelatin with retinoic acid treatment and the second group was co-cultured with sertoli cell feeder without retinoic acid induction. Expressions of pre-meiotic (Stra8), meiotic (Dazl and Sycp3) and post-meiotic (Prm1) genes were evaluated at different differentiation stages (+7, +12 and +18 days of culture). Results: In the first group, expressions of meiotic and post-meiotic genes started 12 and 18 days after induction with retinoic acid, respectively. In the second group, 7 days after co-culturing with Sertoli cells, expression of meiotic and post-meiotic genes was observed. Conclusion: These results show that differentiation process to germ cells is supported by Sertoli cells. Our findings provide a novel effective approach for generation of germ cell in vitro and studying the interaction of germ cells with their niche. PMID:23997904

  12. The interaction between Sertoli cells and luekemia inhibitory factor on the propagation and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Tayebeh; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Parvari, Soraya; Baazm, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sertoli cells play a pivotal role in creating microenvironments essential for spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) self-renewal and commitment to differentiation. Maintenance of SSCs and or induction of in vitro spermiogenesis may provide a therapeutic strategy to treat male infertility. Objective: This study investigated the role of luekemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on the propagation of SSCs and both functions of Sertoli cells on the proliferation and differentiation of these cells. Materials and Methods: SSCs were sorted from the testes of adult male mice by magnetic activated cell sorting and thymus cell antigen 1 antibody. On the other hand, isolated Sertoli cells were enriched using lectin coated plates. SSCs were cultured on Sertoli cells for 7 days in the absence or presence of LIF. The effects of these conditions were evaluated by microscopy and expression of meiotic and post meiotic transcripts by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Our data showed that SSCs co-cultured with Sertoli cells in the presence of LIF formed colonies on top of the Sertoli cells. These colonies had alkaline phosphatesase activity and expressed SSCs specific genes. SSCs were enjoyed limited development after the mere removal of LIF, and exhibiting expression of meiotic and postmeiotic transcript and loss of SSCs specific gene expression (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings represent co-culture of SSCs with Sertoli cells provides conditions that may allow efficient proliferation and differentiation of SSCs for male infertility treatment.

  13. Connexin-43: A possible mediator of heat stress effects on ram Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Hassanpour, Hossain; Kadivar, Ali; Mirshokraei, Pejman; Nazari, Hassan; Afzali, Azita; Badisanaye, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli cells are an essential group of cells in seminiferous epithelium which provide nutritional and structural supports for spermatogenic cells via cell junctions. In this study, the gene expression of connexin-43, the most abundantly distributed gap junction protein of cells, was investigated in ram Sertoli cells under mild and severe heat stresses with real-time quantitative PCR. Sertoli cells were isolated from testes of 10 lambs. After culture and 3 passages, they were treated with mild (39 ?C) and severe (42 ?C) heat stress for 6 hr. The results showed a significant reduction in the percentage of live cells under severe heat stress compared to the control group (32 ?C), (p <0.05). Relative quantification analysis revealed significantly higher (3.80 fold increase) values of connexin-43 transcripts in severely heat stressed group than control group (p <0.05). It is concluded that challenging Sertoli cells with 42 ?C heat could threaten their survival, and overexpression of connexin-43 may cause dysfunction of Sertoli cells due to heat stress. These findings can be useful to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in adverse effects of heat stress on male reproduction and enhance our understanding of its pathogenesis. PMID:26261707

  14. Unilateral cryptorchidism induces morphological changes of testes and hyperplasia of Sertoli cells in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Joon Ho; Yoo, Dae Young; Jo, Young Kwang; Kim, Geon A; Jung, Hyo Young; Choi, Jung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is one of the most common genital defects in dogs. This study investigated the effects of abdominal cryptorchidism on morphology, cell proliferation, and Sertoli cell condition in a dog with spontaneous unilateral cryptorchidism. Elective orchidectomy was performed on the abdominal right testis and the scrotal left testis. Significant reductions in numbers of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids were observed in hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of the cryptorchid testis. The size of the epididymal duct was smaller than that of the control testis. Based on Ki67 immunohistochemistry, the proliferative activity of spermatogonia and spermatocytes was significantly decreased in the cryptorchid testis. However, proliferative activity was increased in the epididymal duct. Based on GATA-4 immunohistochemistry, Sertoli cells were relatively resistant to cryptorchidism, and the proliferative activity of Sertoli cells was markedly increased in the cryptorchid testis than in the control testis. These results suggest that spontaneous unilateral cryptorchidism causes morphological defects in spermatogonia and spermatocytes in the testis and changes the size of the efferent ductule of the epididymis. In addition, spontaneous unilateral cryptorchidism increases proliferative activity of Sertoli cells, which may be a predisposing factor for Sertoli cell cancer in cryptorchid testes. PMID:25628730

  15. Specific deficiency of Plzf paralog, Zbtb20, in Sertoli cells does not affect spermatogenesis and fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Huan; Yin, Shi; Zhang, Yuanwei; Yang, Weimei; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Liu; Wang, Zheng; Bukhari, Ihtisham; Cooke, Howard J.; Iqbal, Furhan; Shi, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Ztbt20 is a POK family transcription factor and primarily functions through its conserved C2H2 Krüppel type zinc finger and BTB/POZ domains. The present study was designed to define the function of the Zbtb20, in vivo, during mouse spermatogenesis. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that ZBTB20 protein was localized specifically in the nuclei of Sertoli cells in seminiferous tubules. To investigate its role during spermatogenesis, we crossed Amh-Cre transgenic mice with Zbtb20 floxp mice to generate conditionally knockout mice (cKO) in which Zbtb20 was specifically deleted in Sertoli cells. The cKO mice were fertile and did not show any detectable abnormalities in spermatogenesis. Taken together, though specific deletion of transcription factor Zbtb20 in Sertoli cells has no apparent influence on spermatogenesis, its specific localization in Sertoli cells makes Zbtb20 a useful marker for the identification of Sertoli cells in seminiferous tubules. PMID:25395169

  16. Sertoli cell tumors associated with feminizing syndrome and spermatic cord torsion in two cryptorchid dogs.

    PubMed

    Quartuccio, Marco; Marino, Gabriele; Garufi, Giuseppe; Cristarella, Santo; Zanghì, Antonina

    2012-06-01

    The association of cryptorchidism, functional Sertoli cell tumors, and spermatic cord torsion has been rarely reported in the literature. Two dogs were admitted for bilateral skin alopecia and weight loss. Both animals were cryptorchid and displayed a pendulous preputial sheath, prostate hypertrophy, and increased levels of circulating oestrogen. Transabdominal palpation and ultrasonography revealed the presence of neoplastic retained gonads. During surgery, spermatic cord torsion was also detected in the enlarged neoplastic testes of both dogs. Histologic examination confirmed the presence of Sertoli cell tumors that were primarily responsible for the feminizing syndrome. Complete remission of all symptoms occurred within 3 months after orchiectomy. PMID:22705745

  17. Sertoli cell tumors associated with feminizing syndrome and spermatic cord torsion in two cryptorchid dogs

    PubMed Central

    Quartuccio, Marco; Garufi, Giuseppe; Cristarella, Santo; Zanghì, Antonina

    2012-01-01

    The association of cryptorchidism, functional Sertoli cell tumors, and spermatic cord torsion has been rarely reported in the literature. Two dogs were admitted for bilateral skin alopecia and weight loss. Both animals were cryptorchid and displayed a pendulous preputial sheath, prostate hypertrophy, and increased levels of circulating oestrogen. Transabdominal palpation and ultrasonography revealed the presence of neoplastic retained gonads. During surgery, spermatic cord torsion was also detected in the enlarged neoplastic testes of both dogs. Histologic examination confirmed the presence of Sertoli cell tumors that were primarily responsible for the feminizing syndrome. Complete remission of all symptoms occurred within 3 months after orchiectomy. PMID:22705745

  18. Androgen-dependent sertoli cell tight junction remodeling is mediated by multiple tight junction components.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Papia; William Buaas, F; Sharma, Manju; Smith, Benjamin E; Greenlee, Anne R; Eacker, Stephen M; Braun, Robert E

    2014-07-01

    Sertoli cell tight junctions (SCTJs) of the seminiferous epithelium create a specialized microenvironment in the testis to aid differentiation of spermatocytes and spermatids from spermatogonial stem cells. SCTJs must be chronically broken and rebuilt with high fidelity to allow the transmigration of preleptotene spermatocytes from the basal to adluminal epithelial compartment. Impairment of androgen signaling in Sertoli cells perturbs SCTJ remodeling. Claudin (CLDN) 3, a tight junction component under androgen regulation, localizes to newly forming SCTJs and is absent in Sertoli cell androgen receptor knockout (SCARKO) mice. We show here that Cldn3-null mice do not phenocopy SCARKO mice: Cldn3(-/-) mice are fertile, show uninterrupted spermatogenesis, and exhibit fully functional SCTJs based on imaging and small molecule tracer analyses, suggesting that other androgen-regulated genes must contribute to the SCARKO phenotype. To further investigate the SCTJ phenotype observed in SCARKO mutants, we generated a new SCARKO model and extensively analyzed the expression of other tight junction components. In addition to Cldn3, we identified altered expression of several other SCTJ molecules, including down-regulation of Cldn13 and a noncanonical tight junction protein 2 isoform (Tjp2iso3). Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to demonstrate direct androgen receptor binding to regions of these target genes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CLDN13 is a constituent of SCTJs and that TJP2iso3 colocalizes with tricellulin, a constituent of tricellular junctions, underscoring the importance of androgen signaling in the regulation of both bicellular and tricellular Sertoli cell tight junctions. PMID:24825397

  19. Androgen-Dependent Sertoli Cell Tight Junction Remodeling Is Mediated by Multiple Tight Junction Components

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Papia; William Buaas, F.; Sharma, Manju; Smith, Benjamin E.; Greenlee, Anne R.; Eacker, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Sertoli cell tight junctions (SCTJs) of the seminiferous epithelium create a specialized microenvironment in the testis to aid differentiation of spermatocytes and spermatids from spermatogonial stem cells. SCTJs must be chronically broken and rebuilt with high fidelity to allow the transmigration of preleptotene spermatocytes from the basal to adluminal epithelial compartment. Impairment of androgen signaling in Sertoli cells perturbs SCTJ remodeling. Claudin (CLDN) 3, a tight junction component under androgen regulation, localizes to newly forming SCTJs and is absent in Sertoli cell androgen receptor knockout (SCARKO) mice. We show here that Cldn3-null mice do not phenocopy SCARKO mice: Cldn3?/? mice are fertile, show uninterrupted spermatogenesis, and exhibit fully functional SCTJs based on imaging and small molecule tracer analyses, suggesting that other androgen-regulated genes must contribute to the SCARKO phenotype. To further investigate the SCTJ phenotype observed in SCARKO mutants, we generated a new SCARKO model and extensively analyzed the expression of other tight junction components. In addition to Cldn3, we identified altered expression of several other SCTJ molecules, including down-regulation of Cldn13 and a noncanonical tight junction protein 2 isoform (Tjp2iso3). Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to demonstrate direct androgen receptor binding to regions of these target genes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CLDN13 is a constituent of SCTJs and that TJP2iso3 colocalizes with tricellulin, a constituent of tricellular junctions, underscoring the importance of androgen signaling in the regulation of both bicellular and tricellular Sertoli cell tight junctions. PMID:24825397

  20. Dynamin 2 is required for actin assembly in phagocytosis in Sertoli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Atsushi; Abe, Tadashi; Watanabe, Masami; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Takei, Kohji; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2009-01-16

    Dynamin 2 has been reported to be implicated in phagocytosis. However, the mode of action of dynamin is poorly understood. In this study, we examined whether dynamin 2 participates in actin assembly during phagocytosis in Sertoli cells. In the presence of dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, phagocytosis was reduced by 60-70% in Sertoli cells and macrophages. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that Sertoli cells treated with dynasore were unable to form phagocytic cups. In addition, dysfunction of dynamin 2 reduced both actin polymerization and recruitment of actin and dynamin 2 to phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P{sub 2}]-containing liposomes. The formation of dynamin 2-positive ruffles of Sertoli cells was decreased by 60-70% by sequestering PI(4,5)P{sub 2} either by expression of PH domain of PLC{delta} or treatment with neomycin. These results strongly suggest that dynamin 2 is involved in actin dynamics and the formation of dynamin 2-positive ruffles during phagocytosis.

  1. CTNNB1 signaling in sertoli cells downregulates spermatogonial stem cell activity via WNT4.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Alexandre; Yeh, Jonathan R; Zhang, Xiangfan; Paquet, Marilène; Gaudin, Aurore; Nagano, Makoto C; Boerboom, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the WNT signaling effector CTNNB1 (?-catenin) in the Sertoli cells of the Ctnnb1(tm1Mmt/+);Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr/+) mouse model results in progressive germ cell loss and sterility. In this study, we sought to determine if this phenotype could be due to a loss of spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) activity. Reciprocal SSC transplants between Ctnnb1(tm1Mmt/+);Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr/+) and wild-type mice showed that SSC activity is lost in Ctnnb1(tm1Mmt/+);Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr/+) testes over time, whereas the mutant testes could not support colonization by wild-type SSCs. Microarray analyses performed on cultured Sertoli cells showed that CTNNB1 induces the expression of genes associated with the female sex determination pathway, which was also found to occur in Ctnnb1(tm1Mmt/+);Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr/+) testes. One CTNNB1 target gene encoded the secreted signaling molecule WNT4. We therefore tested the effects of WNT4 on SSC-enriched germ cell cultures, and found that WNT4 induced cell death and reduced SSC activity without affecting cell cycle. Conversely, conditional inactivation of Wnt4 in the Ctnnb1(tm1Mmt/+);Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr/+) model rescued spermatogenesis and male fertility, indicating that WNT4 is the major effector downstream of CTNNB1 responsible for germ cell loss. Furthermore, WNT4 was found to signal via the CTNNB1 pathway in Sertoli cells, suggesting a self-reinforcing positive feedback loop. Collectively, these data indicate for the first time that ectopic activation of a signaling cascade in the stem cell niche depletes SSC activity through a paracrine factor. These findings may provide insight into the pathogenesis of male infertility, as well as embryonic gonadal development. PMID:22253774

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced cytotoxicity in cultured rat Sertoli cells involves differential apoptotic response.

    PubMed Central

    Raychoudhury, Samir S; Kubinski, Dana

    2003-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous and persistent environmental contaminants. Some PAHs are carcinogens and may affect the male reproductive system. Therefore, we exposed cultured rat Sertoli cells to a variety of PAHs to determine possible direct toxic effects on the cells of the seminiferous epithelium. Sertoli cells were chosen because they support germ cell development and maintain spermatogenesis. Sertoli cells were isolated from 19-21-day-old male rats and cultured in medium containing 0.08% dimethylsulfoxide as vehicle or in the presence of a variety of PAHs. In the first set of experiments, cultured Sertoli cells were incubated in the presence of 10(-4) M, 10(-6 )M, 10(-8) M, 10(-12) M, and 10(-16) M fluoranthene (FL) for 24 hr. After 24 hr, FL at 10(4), 10(-6), and 10(-8) M killed significant numbers of Sertoli cells as revealed by cell viability determinations. Sertoli cells cultured in the presence of 10(-6) M and 10(-8) M FL showed morphologic changes. Cell protein levels were decreased and lactate production in the medium increased in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, Sertoli cells exposed to 10(6) M and 10(-8) M FL exhibited altered F-actin and alpha-tubulin distributions compared with untreated controls. Because FL killed about 62% of cells at 10(-4) M (100 micro g/mL) and 48% of cells at 10(-6) M (1 micro g/mL), increased lactate production about 3-fold at both concentrations, and decreased cell protein by half at 10(-4) M (100 micro g/mL), we decided to use a range of concentrations between 10 and 100 micro g/mL for the second set of experiments using benz[a]anthracene (BaA), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), or benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF). After 24 hr, BaA (100 micro g/mL), BaP (50 and 100 micro g/mL), and BbF (100 micro g/mL) significantly increased lactate level in the medium in a concentration-dependent manner. In a third set of experiments, cells were treated in culture uniformly with only 10 micro g/mL FL, BaA, BaP, or BbF for 24 hr. The cytotoxic effects exerted by these PAHs tested resulted in different apoptotic responses as characterized by in situ fluorescence staining. Microscopic analysis of apoptotic cells demonstrated nuclei of reduced size and labeled 3 -OH DNA ends when Sertoli cells had been incubated for 24 hr with 10 micro g BaP or BbF, but not with vehicle, media, FL, or BaA. Thus, our results demonstrate that the toxic effects of BaA and BbF on Sertoli cells are exerted through apoptosis, whereas FL and BaA do not elicit the apoptotic response. PMID:12515676

  3. Bilateral retiform variant of sertoli leydig cell tumour of ovary: An uncommon tumor with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Monika; Budania, Satish Kumar; Khalid, Mohammad; Mittal, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli-leydig cell tumors are the uncommon sex-cord stromal tumors of the ovary. We report a case of 42-year-old female with retiform variant of sertoli-leydig cell tumour. She presented with the complaint of mass in abdomen for 7 years. Ultrasound revealed bilateral ovarian mass suggestive of malignancy. Bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy with surgical staging was done. The tumor was diagnosed as stage I retiform variant of sertoli-leydig cell tumor on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. PMID:25861207

  4. Condensation behavior of the human x chromosome in male germ cells and Sertoli cells examined by flourescence in situ hybridisation

    SciTech Connect

    Kofman-Alfaro, S.; Cervantes, A.; Speed, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    The chromatin condensation behavior of the human x chromosome has been studied by FISH analysis in germ cells and Sertoli cells of the adult testes. Comparisons are made with previous findings for the human Y chromosome and for chromosome 7. In meiotic prophase, the X chromosome can be seen to extend greatly at zygotene and to contract through pachytene into the sex vesicle. Such extension, which has also been noted for the human Y chromosome at this state of meiosis, could be a prerequisite for XY pairing crossing-over. In patients with {open_quotes}Sertoli-cell-only{close_quotes} syndrome, the sex chromosomes, by in situ hybridization analysis, appear extremely contracted compared with their normal extended state seen in adult Sertoli cells of fertile men. By contrast, the state of expansion of chromosome 7 in Sertoli cells appears identical for sterile and fertile testes. This could suggest an association between gene-controlled germ cell losses and failure of expansion of the sex chromosome axes. The variable patterns of extension and contraction for the X and Y chromosome axes in germ cells and Sertoli cells might provide underlying clues to pattern of expression noted for sex-linked genes in the human testis.

  5. Prenatal and lactation nicotine exposure affects Sertoli cell and gonadotropin levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Paccola, C C; Miraglia, S M

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is largely consumed in the world as a component of cigarettes. It can cross the placenta and reach the milk of smoking mothers. This drug induces apoptosis, affects sex hormone secretion, and leads to male infertility. To investigate the exposure to nicotine during the whole intrauterine and lactation phases in Sertoli cells, pregnant rats received nicotine (2?mg/kg per day) through osmotic minipumps. Male offsprings (30, 60, and 90 days old) had blood collected for hormonal analysis (FSH and LH) and their testes submitted for histophatological study, analysis of the frequency of the stages of seminiferous epithelium cycle, immunolabeling of apoptotic epithelial cells (TUNEL and Fas/FasL), analysis of the function and structure of Sertoli cells (respectively using transferrin and vimentin immunolabeling), and analysis of Sertoli-germ cell junctional molecule (?-catenin immunolabeling). The exposure to nicotine increased the FSH and LH plasmatic levels in adult rats. Although nicotine had not changed the number of apoptotic cells, neither in Fas nor FasL expression, it provoked an intense sloughing of epithelial cells and also altered the frequency of some stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. Transferrin and ?-catenin expressions were not changed, but vimentin was significantly reduced in the early stages of the seminiferous cycle of the nicotine-exposed adult rats. Thus, we concluded that nicotine exposure during all gestational and lactation periods affects the structure of Sertoli cells by events causing intense germ cell sloughing observed in the tubular lumen and can compromise the fertility of the offspring. PMID:26556892

  6. Lycopene supplementation prevents reactive oxygen species mediated apoptosis in Sertoli cells of adult albino rats exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Gunasekaran; Selvakumar, Kandaswamy; Venkataraman, Prabhu; Elumalai, Perumal

    2013-01-01

    Sertoli cell proliferation is attenuated before attaining puberty and the number is fixed in adult testes. Sertoli cells determine both testis size and daily sperm production by providing physical and metabolic support to spermatogenic cells. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exposure disrupts functions of Sertoli cells causing infertility with decreased sperm count. On the other hand, lycopene is improving sperm count and motility by reducing oxidative stress in humans and animals. Hence we hypothesized that PCBs-induced infertility might be due to Sertoli cell apoptosis mediated by oxidative stress and lycopene might prevent PCBs-induced apoptosis by acting against oxidative stress. To test this hypothesis, animals were treated with vehicle control, lycopene, PCBs and PCBs + lycopene for 30 days. After the experimental period, the testes and cauda epididymidis were removed for isolation of Sertoli cells and sperm, respectively. We observed increased levels of oxidative stress markers (H2O2 and LPO) levels, increased expression of apoptotic molecules (caspase-8, Bad, Bid, Bax, cytochrome C and caspase-3), decreased anti-apoptotic (Bcl2) molecule and elevated apoptotic marker activity (caspase-3) in Sertoli cells of PCBs-exposed animals. These results were associated with decreased sperm count and motility in PCBs exposed animals. On the other hand, lycopene prevented the elevation of Sertoli cellular apoptotic parameters and prevented the reduction of sperm parameters (count and motility). The data confirmed that lycopene as an antioxidant scavenged reactive oxygen substances, prevented apoptosis, maintained normal function in Sertoli cells and helped to provide physical and metabolic support for sperm production, thereby treating infertility in men. PMID:24179434

  7. TiO2 nanoparticles-induced apoptosis of primary cultured Sertoli cells of mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fashui; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Chen, Ming; Zhou, Yingjun; Ze, Yuguan; Wang, Ling; Wang, Yajing; Ge, Yushuang; Zhang, Qi; Ye, Lingqun

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), as largest production and use of nanomaterials, have been demonstrated to have a potential toxicity on reproductive system. However, the mechanism underlying male reproductive toxicity of TiO2 NPs remains limited. Thus, our study was designed to examine the cellular viability, apoptosis, oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity, and expression of apoptotic cytokines in primary cultured Sertoli cells isolated from mice under TiO2 NPs exposure. Results showed that TiO2 NPs exposure from 5 to 30 ?g/mL resulted in reduction of cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, and induction of apoptosis or death on Sertoli cells. TiO2 NPs could migrate to Sertoli cells, which induced mitochondria-mediated or endoplasmic-reticulum-mediated apoptotic changes including elevation in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and reductions in superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities, decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential (??m), and releases of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In addition, upregulation of cytochrome c, Bax, caspase-3, glucose-regulated protein 78, and C/EBP homologous protein and caspase-12 protein expression, and downregulation of bcl-2 protein expression in primary cultured Sertoli cells induced by TiO2 NPs treatment. All of the results suggested that ROS generation may play a critical role in the initiation of TiO2 NPs-induced apoptosis by mediation of the disruption of ??m, the cytochrome c release, and further the activation of caspase cascade and unfolded protein response signaling pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 124-135, 2016. PMID:26238530

  8. Identification of the Functions of Liver X Receptor-? in Sertoli Cells Using a Targeted Expression-Rescue Model.

    PubMed

    Maqdasy, Salwan; El Hajjaji, Fatim-Zohra; Baptissart, Marine; Viennois, Emilie; Oumeddour, Abdelkader; Brugnon, Florence; Trousson, Amalia; Tauveron, Igor; Volle, David; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Baron, Silvère

    2015-12-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are key regulators of lipid homeostasis and are involved in multiple testicular functions. The Lxr?(-/-);Lxr?(-/-) mice have illuminated the roles of both isoforms in maintenance of the epithelium in the seminiferous tubules, spermatogenesis, and T production. The requirement for LXR? in Sertoli cells have been emphasized by early abnormal cholesteryl ester accumulation in the Lxr?(-/-) and Lxr?(-/-);Lxr?(-/-) mice. Other phenotypes, such as germ cell loss and hypogonadism, occur later in life in the Lxr?(-/-);Lxr?(-/-) mice. Thus, LXR? expression in Sertoli cells seems to be essential for normal testicular physiology. To decipher the roles of LXR? within the Sertoli cells, we generated Lxr?(-/-);Lxr?(-/-):AMH-Lxr? transgenic mice, which reexpress Lxr? in Sertoli cells in the context of Lxr?(-/-);Lxr?(-/-) mice. In addition to lipid homeostasis, LXR? is necessary for maintaining the blood-testis barrier and the integrity of the germ cell epithelium. LXR? is also implicated in the paracrine action of Sertoli cells on Leydig cells to modulate T synthesis. The Lxr?(-/-);Lxr?(-/-) and Lxr?(-/-);Lxr?(-/-):AMH-Lxr? mice exhibit lipid accumulation in germ cells after the Abcg8 down-regulation, suggesting an intricate LXR?-dependent cooperation between the Sertoli cells and germ cells to ensure spermiogenesis. Further analysis revealed also peritubular smooth muscle defects (abnormal lipid accumulation and disorganized smooth muscle actin) and spermatozoa stagnation in the seminiferous tubules. Together the present work elucidates specific roles of LXR? in Sertoli cell physiology in vivo beyond lipid homeostasis. PMID:26402841

  9. miRNA regulation of cytotoxic effects in mouse Sertoli cells exposed to nonylphenol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is known that some environmental chemicals affect the human endocrine system. The harmful effects of endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) nonylphenol (NP) have been studied since the 1980s. It is known that NP adversely affects physiological functions by mimicking the natural hormone 17 beta-estradiol. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of miRNAs and their target genes in mouse Sertoli TM4 cells to better understand the regulatory roles of miRNAs on Sertoli cells after NP exposure. Methods Mouse TM4 Sertoli cells were treated with NP for 3 or 24 h, and global gene and miRNA expression were analyzed using Agilent mouse whole genome and mouse miRNA v13 arrays. Results We identified genes that were > 2-fold differentially expressed in NP-treated cells and control cells (P < 0.05) and analyzed their functions through Gene Ontology analysis. We also identified miRNAs that were differentially expressed in NP-treated and control cells. Of the 186 miRNAs the expression of which differed between NP-treated and control cells, 59 and 147 miRNAs exhibited 1.3-fold increased or decreased expression at 3 and 24 h, respectively. Network analysis of deregulated miRNAs suggested that Ppara may regulate the expression of certain miRNAs, including miR-378, miR-125a-3p miR-20a, miR-203, and miR-101a, after exposure to NP. Additionally, comprehensive analysis of predicted target genes for miRNAs showed that the expression of genes with roles in cell proliferation, the cell cycle, and cell death were regulated by miRNA in NP-treated TM4 cells. Levels of expression of the miRNAs miR-135a* and miR-199a-5p were validated by qRT-PCR. Finally, miR-135a* target gene analysis suggests that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following exposure to NP exposure may be mediated by miR-135a* through regulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. Conclusions Collectively, these data help to determine NP's actions on mouse TM4 Sertoli cells and increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the adverse effects of xenoestrogens on the reproductive system. PMID:21914226

  10. The death of sertoli cells and the capacity to phagocytize elongated spermatids during testicular regression due to short photoperiod in Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Seco-Rovira, Vicente; Beltrán-Frutos, Esther; Ferrer, Concepción; Sáez, Francisco José; Madrid, Juan Francisco; Pastor, Luis Miguel

    2014-05-01

    In the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), an animal that displays testicular regression due to short photoperiod, germ cells are removed by apoptosis during this process and the apoptotic remains are phagocytized by Sertoli cells. The aim of this work was to investigate morphologically whether the testicular regression process due to short photoperiod leads to the apoptosis of Sertoli cells, and whether, during testicular regression, the elongated spermatids are eliminated through phagocytosis by Sertoli cells. To this end, we studied testis sections during testicular regression in Syrian hamster subjected to short photoperiod by means of several morphological techniques using conventional light microscopy (hematoxylin and eosin [H&E], semi-thin section vimentin, immunohistochemistry, SBA lectin, and TUNEL staining), fluorescence microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). H&E and semi-thin sections identified Sertoli cells with a degenerated morphology. Greater portion of Sertoli cells that were positive for TUNEL staining were observed especially during the mild regression (MR) and strong regression (SR) phases. In addition, TEM identified the characteristic apoptotic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm of Sertoli cells. Moreover, during testicular regression and using light microscopy, some elongated spermatids were seen in basal position next to the Sertoli cell nucleus. This Sertoli phagocytic activity was higher in MR and SR phases. TEM confirmed this to be the result of the phagocytic activity of Sertoli cells. In conclusion, during testicular regression in Syrian hamster due to short photoperiod, when germ cells are known to be lost through apoptosis, there is morphological evidences that Sertoli cells are also lost through apoptosis, while some elongated spermatids are phagocytized and eliminated by the Sertoli cells. PMID:24719257

  11. Sertoli cell-secreted protein(s) stimulates DNA synthesis in purified rat Leydig cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ojeifo, J O; Byers, S W; Papadopoulos, V; Dym, M

    1990-09-01

    We have examined the effects of Sertoli cell-secreted proteins (SCSP) on [3H]thymidine incorporation by purified preparations (greater than 96%) of rat Leydig cells to determine whether Sertoli cells influence DNA synthesis in these cells in vitro. Incubation of Leydig cells isolated from testes of rats of ages 16 to 90 days with SCSP (Mr greater than 10,000) induced significant dose-, time- and age-related increases in [3H]thymidine incorporation by the cells. A dose-response curve to SCSP showed that as little as 0.2 micrograms SCSP/ml consistently induced a small but significant increase (31% and 10% above control; P less than 0.001) in [3H]thymidine incorporation by Leydig cells isolated from immature (26 days) and mature (70 days) rats, respectively. The maximum response (230% and 48% above control) was obtained with a concentration of 18 micrograms SCSP/ml in cells isolated from immature and mature rats, respectively. Hydroxyurea, a specific inhibitor of replicative DNA synthesis, significantly (P less than 0.001) inhibited both basal and SCSP-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation in Leydig cells from immature and adult rats without affecting the viability of the cells. Incubation of immature rat Leydig cells in SCSP for 48 h also stimulated a 3-fold increase in cell number. The component of the crude SCSP which stimulated Leydig cell [3H]thymidine incorporation is trypsin-sensitive, heat-stable, and adsorbs to a heparin-agarose affinity column but not to concanavalin A-Sepharose. The secretion of this factor(s) by Sertoli cells is stimulated independently by FSH and testosterone. These results demonstrate for the first time that cultured Sertoli cells secrete a protein(s) which, in vitro, stimulates rat Leydig cell replicative DNA synthesis. PMID:2231558

  12. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced cytotoxicity accompanied by oxidative stress in rat Sertoli cells: Possible role of mitochondrial fractions of Sertoli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, Hamdy A.A.; Khafagy, Rasha M.

    2011-05-01

    TCDD, as an endocrine disruptor, is known to impair testicular functions and fertility. To elucidate the mechanism(s) underlying the testicular effects of TCDD, the potential toxicity of TCDD on Sertoli cells was investigated. Furthermore, the study aims to delineate whether mitochondrial fractions of Sertoli cells are involved in mediating the testicular effects of TCDD. Adult rat Sertoli cells were incubated with (5, 10 or 15 nM) of TCDD for 6, 12 or 24 h. Cell viability, lactate and LDH leakage into media along with lipid peroxidation, ROS generation, SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, {gamma}-GT and {beta}-glucuronidase activities, GSH content and {Delta}{psi}{sub m} were measured. Superoxide anion production, COX and cardiolipin content were measured in mitochondrial fractions. Cell viability was significantly decreased while lactate and LDH leakage into media were increased. ROS generation along with lipid peroxidation was also increased. SOD, CAT, GPx, GR activities and GSH content were significantly decreased. {gamma}-GT and {beta}-glucuronidase activities were also decreased. Superoxide anion production was increased while COX activity and cardiolipin content were decreased in mitochondrial fractions. Moreover, the {Delta}{psi}{sub m} was significantly decreased as measured in Sertoli cells. In conclusion, TCDD impairs Sertoli cell functions and this effect is, at least in part, attributed to oxidative stress. We have also found that TCDD increases mitochondrial superoxide anion production and decreases {Delta}{psi}{sub m}, COX activity and mitochondrial cardiolipin content. Our findings suggest that mitochondria may play an important role in ROS production, leading to the TCDD-induced oxidative stress response and resulting toxicological consequences in rat Sertoli cells.

  13. Expression of P450 Aromatase in Granulosa Cell Tumors and Sertoli-Stromal Cell Tumors of the Ovary: Which Cells Are Responsible for Estrogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Uchigasaki, Shinya; Fukase, Masayuki; Kurose, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors are representative of estrogenic ovarian tumors, and some Sertoli-stromal cell tumors are also estrogenic. The exact cells that are responsible for estrogenesis, however, have yet to be identified. In the present study, 25 sex cord-stromal tumors (20 granulosa cell tumors, 4 Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, and a Sertoli cell tumor) were immunohistochemically examined for expression of P450 aromatase, which is critical for estrogenesis. All of the tumors had been evaluated for estrogenic function, including contemporaneous endometrial hyperplasia and/or elevation of serum estradiol. Eleven of 14 estrogenic granulosa cell tumors showed sparse or aggregated immunoreactivity for aromatase, whereas 5 of 6 nonestrogenic tumors did not. Aromatase was selectively expressed by plump granulosa cells with eosinophilic or vacuolated cytoplasm, resembling luteinized granulosa cells. Such a localization of aromatase is analogous to that in normal ovaries. Aromatase expression in primary tumors was recapitulated by recurrent tumors. In Sertoli-stromal cell tumors, either undifferentiated plump cells or well-differentiated Sertoli cells expressed aromatase. In conclusion, the expression of P450 aromatase corresponds to specific cell morphology in sex cord-stromal tumors, including recurrent tumors. Aromatase status in granulosa cell tumors provides helpful information on whether serum estradiol could be a marker for recurrence. PMID:26166720

  14. Sodium fluoride induces apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway in Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Lin, Xinwei; Huang, Hui; Feng, Demin; Ba, Yue; Cheng, Xuemin; Cui, Liuxin

    2015-04-01

    Excessive fluoride exposure is known to contribute to reproductive system dysfunction, ultimately leading to pathological damage and apoptosis in cells. Although both oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses have been implicated in fluorosis, the signaling pathways and their roles in sodium fluoride (NaF)-induced apoptosis of Sertoli cells have been sparsely described. In this study, oxidative damage, ER stress, and apoptosis were analyzed after Sertoli cells were treated with varying doses of NaF for 24hr. Moreover, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and pro-apoptotic transcription factor CHOP knockdown were used to clarify the precise interplay between reactive oxygen species (ROS), ER stress and their roles in NaF-induced apoptosis in Sertoli cells. The present study indicated that NaF significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in Sertoli cells. In addition, NaF exposure facilitated the accumulation of ROS and increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in Sertoli cells. Treatment with NAC caused remarkable recovery from these NaF-induced responses. Meanwhile, excessive NaF triggered ER stress as evidenced by up-regulated glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2? (p-eIF2?) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP), without affecting total eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2? (eIF2?). NAC effectively blocked the activation of ER stress, suggesting that NaF-induced ROS is an early event that triggers ER stress. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the ROS-mediated ER stress pathway is the crucial mechanistic event involved in NaF-induced apoptosis of Sertoli cells. PMID:25872712

  15. Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumour with Heterologus Elements Masquerading as Mucinous Tumour on Frozen Section: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Valiathan, Manna; Kumar, Sandeep; Kapoor, Sukriti

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli-Leydig cell tumour (SLCT) is an extremely rare ovarian neoplasm. This tumour is characterized by excessive proliferation of normal testicular structures sertoli and leydig cells. These cells are seen in varying proportions and exhibit varying degrees of differentiation. We report a case of primary ovarian SLCT with heterologus elements in a 17-year-old girl which was misdiagnosed on frozen section as mucinous cystic neoplasm. We discuss the clinicopathologic features of SLCT along with the unusual features seen in this case. PMID:26393134

  16. Combined effects of two environmental endocrine disruptors nonyl phenol and di-n-butyl phthalate on rat Sertoli cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmei; Hu, Yang; Shen, Xiahong; Dai, Xinjue; Han, Xiaodong

    2010-11-01

    In this study, our purpose is to analyze combined effects of nonyl phenol (NP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) for rat testicular Sertoli cell toxicity in vitro. Sertoli cells were isolated, purified, cultured, and identified with FSHR fluorescence staining. Then the purified Sertoli cells were treated with different doses of NP, DBP or NP+DBP. Although we did not find dramatic morphological changes, cell viability decreased significantly at high-dose NP and their mixture. The following Annexin V-PI staining demonstrated that DBP alone did not show apoptosis induction, the combination effect on apoptosis induction was due to NP, in addition, nucleus of Sertoli cell showed apoptosis morphological changes. In addition, increased LDH leakage was also observed in high-dose mixture. According to the above phenomena, we inferred that the combined effect of the two substances on Sertoli cell toxicity had an additive effect, and the induction of apoptosis may play an important role. PMID:20600820

  17. Sertoli Leydig cell ovarian tumour and gastric polyps as presenting features of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Howell, Lisa; Bader, Abdulgader; Mullassery, Dhanya; Losty, Paul; Auth, Marcus; Kokai, George

    2010-07-15

    We report a case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) in a 2-year old with precocious puberty secondary to a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumour. Family history of PJS and other neoplasms were discovered. The tumour was excised and the STK11 gene deletion identified in both patient and father. Screening revealed hamartomatous gastric polyps, which were removed. Current recommendations for screening of children with PJS begin at age 8 years, based on reported occurrence of complications 1. This report illustrates the importance of considering early screening, along with close clinical review and patient/parent education, for detection of life threatening neoplasms and complications. PMID:20310004

  18. Metabolomic profiles reveal key metabolic changes in heat stress-treated mouse Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Chen, Minjian; Ji, Xiaoli; Yao, Mengmeng; Mao, Zhilei; Zhou, Kun; Xia, Yankai; Han, Xiao; Tang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Heat stress (HS) is a potential harmful factor for male reproduction. However, the effect of HS on Sertoli cells is largely unknown. In this study, the metabolic changes in Sertoli cell line were analyzed after HS treatment. Metabolomic analysis revealed that carnitine, 2-hydroxy palmitic acid, nicotinic acid, niacinamide, adenosine monophosphate, glutamine and creatine were the key changed metabolites. We found the expression levels of BTB factors (Connexin43, ZO-1, Vimentin, Claudin1, Claudin5) were disrupted in TM-4 cells after HS treatment, which were recovered by the addition of carnitine. RT-PCR indicated that the mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-1?, IL-6) were increased after HS treatment, and their related miRNAs (miR-132, miR-431, miR-543) levels were decreased. Our metabolomic data provided a novel understanding of metabolic changes in male reproductive cells after HS treatment and revealed that HS-induced changes of BTB factors and inflammatory status might be caused by the decreased carnitine after HS treatment. PMID:26165742

  19. Microparticle-loaded neonatal porcine Sertoli cells for cell-based therapeutic and drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Giovagnoli, S; Mancuso, F; Vannini, S; Calvitti, M; Piroddi, M; Pietrella, D; Arato, I; Falabella, G; Galli, F; Moretti, M; Neri, L M; Bodo, M; Capitani, S; Cameron, D F; Ricci, M; Luca, G; Calafiore, R

    2014-10-28

    Neonatal porcine Sertoli cells (NPSC) are immune privileged cells showing innate phagocytic and antibacterial activities. NPSC have been shown capable of immunoaltering the body's response and possess lung homing capacity. These properties encourage investigation of NPSC as functional components of cell-based therapeutic protocols to treat lung infections and related complications. In this work, for the first time, NPSC were tailored to carry an antibiotic drug loaded into poly(d,l lactic) acid microparticles (MP). A loading protocol was developed, which afforded 30% drug uptake and high stability over time, with little or no effects on NPSC viability, morphology, reactive oxygen species production and DNA integrity. FSH receptor integrity, and TGF? (transforming growth factor ?) and AMH (anti-Müllerian hormone) expressions were unchanged after 1month of cryopreservation. Protein tyrosine kinase activation due to phagocytosis may have had resulted in changes in inhibin B expression. The activity of MP-loaded or NPSC alone against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was maintained throughout 1month of storage. NPSC couple an innate antibacterial activity with the capacity to embody drug loaded MP. We showed for the first time that engineered NPSC can be cryopreserved with no loss of their basic properties, thereby possibly representing a novel approach for cell-based therapeutic and drug delivery system. PMID:25111130

  20. Differential proteomic profile of spermatogenic and Sertoli cells from peri-pubertal testes of three different bovine breeds

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Utkarsh K.; Aslam, Muhammad K. M.; Pandey, Shashank; Nayak, Samiksha; Chhillar, Shivani; Srinivasan, A.; Mohanty, T. K.; Kadam, Prashant H.; Chauhan, M. S.; Yadav, Savita; Kumaresan, Arumugam

    2014-01-01

    Sub-fertility is one of the most common problems observed in crossbred males, but the etiology remains unknown in most of the cases. Although proteomic differences in the spermatozoa and seminal plasma between breeds have been investigated, the possible differences at the sperm precursor cells and supporting/nourishing cells have not been studied. The present study reports the differential proteomic profile of spermatogenic and Sertoli cells in crossbred and purebred bulls. Testis was removed by unilateral castration of 12 peri-pubertal bulls (10 months age), four each from crossbred (Holstein Friesian × Tharparkar), exotic purebred [Holstein Friesian (HF)] and indigenous purebred [Tharparkar (TP)] bulls. Spermatogenic and Sertoli cells were isolated and subjected to proteomic analysis. Protein extracts from the Sertoli and spermatogenic cells of each breed were analyzed with 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and analyzed with Decyder™ software. Compared to HF, 26 protein spots were over expressed and 14 protein spots were under expressed in spermatogenic cells of crossbred bulls. Similarly, 7 protein spots were over expressed and 15 protein spots were under expressed in the spermatogenic cells of TP bulls compared to that of crossbred bulls. Out of 12 selected protein spots identified through mass spectrometry, Phosphatidyl ethanolamine binding protein was found to be over expressed in the spermatogenic cells of crossbred bulls compared to TP bulls. The protein, gamma actin was found to be over expressed in the Sertoli cells of HF bulls, whereas Speedy Protein-A was found to be over expressed in Sertoli cells of crossbred bulls. It may be concluded that certain proteomic level differences exist in sperm precursor cells and nourishing cells between breeds, which might be associated with differences in the fertility among these breeds. PMID:25364731

  1. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor with heterologous element: a case report and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Longwen; Tunnell, Cairo Dana; Petris, Giovanni De

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 19-year-old female who presented with a chief complaint of progressive pelvic pain. Preoperative ultrasound of the right ovary revealed an ovarian torsion as the cause of the patient’s progressive pain. Laparoscopy confirmed the torsion and revealed a right ovary measuring 10 cm in greatest diameter. Intraoperative incision into the ovary revealed a simple ovarian cystic mass measuring 3.0 x 1.5 x 0.8 cm. A solid component within the cyst was identified. Histological sections of the cystic mass demonstrated mononuclear and hyperchromatic Sertoli cells with a trabecular growth pattern. Clusters of medium-sized epithelioid cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm consistent with Leydig cells were also identified between the trabeculae of Sertoli cells. In addition, focal areas of intestinal type mucinous epithelium were identified embedded within the trabeculae of Sertoli cells. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the Sertoli cells were positive for calretinin (bright) while the Leydig cells were positive for calretinin (dim), inhibin, CAM5.2 and AE1&3. CEA showed positivity mainly of the intraluminal contents of the mucinous type intestinal epithelium. The patient had an uneventful post-operative course and was disease-free for 3 years. PMID:24696734

  2. SERTOLI CELLS IN THE BOAR TESTIS: CHANGES DURING DEVELOPMENT AND COMPENSATORY HYPERTROPHY AFTER HEMICASTRATION AT DIFFERENT AGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in Sertoli cell numbers and testicular structure during normal development and during compensatory hypertrophy were assessed in crossbred Meishan x White Composite males. Boars were assigned at birth to unilateral castration at 1, 10, 56 or 112 days, or remained as intact controls through 22...

  3. Loss of Sertoli-germ cell adhesion determines the rapid germ cell elimination during the seasonal regression of the seminiferous epithelium of the large hairy armadillo Chaetophractus villosus.

    PubMed

    Luaces, Juan Pablo; Rossi, Luis Francisco; Sciurano, Roberta Beatriz; Rebuzzini, Paola; Merico, Valeria; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Merani, Maria Susana; Garagna, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    The armadillo Chaetophractus villosus is a seasonal breeder whose seminiferous epithelium undergoes rapid regression with massive germ cell loss, leaving the tubules with only Sertoli cells and spermatogonia. Here, we addressed the question of whether this regression entails 1) the disassembly of cell junctions (immunolocalization of nectin-3, Cadm1, N-cadherin, and beta-catenin, and transmission electron microscopy [TEM]); 2) apoptosis (immunolocalization of cytochrome c and caspase 3; TUNEL assay); and 3) the involvement of Sertoli cells in germ cell phagocytosis (TEM). We showed a dramatic reduction in the extension of vimentin filaments associated with desmosomelike junctions at the interface between Sertoli and germ cells, and an increased diffusion of the immunosignals of nectin-3, Cadm1, N-cadherin, and beta-catenin. Together, these results suggest loss of Sertoli-germ cell adhesion, which in turn might determine postmeiotic cell sloughing at the beginning of epithelium regression. Then, loss of Sertoli-germ cell adhesion triggers cell death. Cytochrome c is released from mitochondria, but although postmeiotic cells were negative for late apoptotic markers, at advanced regression spermatocytes were positive for all apoptotic markers. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed cytoplasmic engulfment of cell debris and lipid droplets within Sertoli cells, a sign of their phagocytic activity, which contributes to the elimination of the residual meiocytes still present in the latest regression phases. These findings are novel and add new players to the mechanisms of seminiferous epithelium regression occurring in seasonal breeders, and they introduce the armadillo as an interesting model for studying seasonal spermatogenesis. PMID:24451984

  4. Hemicastration causes and testosterone prevents enhanced uptake of (/sup 3/H)thymidine by Sertoli cells in testes of immature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, J.M.; Higginbotham, C.A.; Salisbury, R.L.

    1984-02-01

    Rat pups were hemicastrated and uptake of (/sup 3/H)thymidine by Sertoli cells in the remaining testis was compared to that in testes of sham-operated pups at intervals of from 8 h to 21 days after surgery. Labeled thymidine was administered subcutaneously 2 h before sacrifice. Testes were processed for light microscope autoradiography and the percent of Sertoli cell nuclei that had incorporated (/sup 3/H)thymidine was determined by scoring nuclei in tissue sections as labeled or unlabeled. The percentage of cells labeled was increased in hemicastrates over intact controls by 8 h after surgery and testicular hypertrophy became apparent in hemicastrates by the following day. Labeling of Sertoli cells in hemicastrates remained elevated for 4 days and then returned to normal. When plasma levels of gonadotropins were measured in both groups 4 days after surgery, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was found to be more than twice normal in hemicastrates while luteinizing hormone (LH) was unchanged. The effect of testosterone on the response of Sertoli cells to hemicastration was also examined. In hemicastrates, 2 days of androgen therapy depressed, and an additional 2 days abolished, the proliferative response of the Sertoli cells. Our findings suggest that increased proliferation of Sertoli cells within the remaining testis is involved in the enlargement of the testis that follows hemicastration. They also imply that prevention of compensatory hypertrophy by testosterone involves interference with this response of Sertoli cells in some way. Finally, our data implicate FSH in control of Sertoli cell proliferation in vivo in immature rats.

  5. An Integrative Omics Strategy to Assess the Germ Cell Secretome and to Decipher Sertoli-Germ Cell Crosstalk in the Mammalian Testis

    PubMed Central

    Lavigne, Régis; Hernio, Nolwen; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Pineau, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis, which takes place in complex testicular structures called seminiferous tubules, is a highly specialized process controlled by the integration of juxtacrine, paracrine and endocrine information. Within the seminiferous tubules, the germ cells and Sertoli cells are surrounded by testicular fluid (TF), which probably contains most of the secreted proteins involved in crosstalk between these cells. It has already been established that germ cells can modulate somatic Sertoli cell function through the secretion of diffusible factors. We studied the germ cell secretome, which was previously considered inaccessible, by analyzing the TF collected by microsurgery in an “integrative omics” strategy combining proteomics, transcriptomics, genomics and interactomics data. This approach identified a set of proteins preferentially secreted by Sertoli cells or germ cells. An interaction network analysis revealed complex, interlaced cell-cell dialog between the secretome and membranome of seminiferous cells, mediated via the TF. We then focused on germ cell-secreted candidate proteins, and we identified several potential interacting partners located on the surface of Sertoli cells. Two interactions, APOH/CDC42 and APP/NGFR, were validated in situ, in a proximity ligation assay (PLA). Our results provide new insight into the crosstalk between germ cells and Sertoli cells occurring during spermatogenesis. Our findings also demonstrate that this “integrative omics” strategy is powerful enough for data mining and highlighting meaningful cell-cell communication events between different types of cells in a complex tissue, via a biological fluid. This integrative strategy could be applied more widely, to gain access to secretomes that have proved difficult to study whilst avoiding the limitations of in vitro culture. PMID:25111155

  6. Insulinoma presenting with long-standing depression, primary hypogonadism, and sertoli cell only syndrome.

    PubMed

    Malabu, Usman H; Gowda, Durgesh; Tan, Yong Mong

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to report an unusual case of insulinoma presenting with long-standing depression and primary testicular failure. We describe a 34-year-old male with clinical, laboratory, and radiologic data consistent with islet cell tumor and seminiferous tubule failure primary hypogonadism. The literature is reviewed relative to the component of this syndrome, and a possible association is discussed. The subject was investigated for a long-standing history of depression requiring medical attention because of mental confusion and slurred speech and was found to have an insulinoma. He was diagnosed with primary gonadal failure and physical examination showed no evidence of dysmorphic features. Chromosomal analysis revealed normal 46 XY and testicular biopsy showed Sertoli cell only syndrome (SCOS). Biochemistry revealed endogenous hyperinsulinism and histology confirmed an islet cell tumor. He remained euglycemic postoperatively and on followup. From this report, we emphasize drawing clinicians' attention to the possibility of an association between insulinoma and primary testicular failure and suggest consideration of this diagnosis in patients with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism who may present with infertility. PMID:24455334

  7. Estrogenic regulation of bicarbonate transporters from SLC4 family in rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Raquel L; Martins, Ana D; Jesus, Tito T; Sá, Rosália; Sousa, Mário; Alves, Marco G; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2015-10-01

    The formation of competent spermatozoa is a complex event that depends on the establishment of adequate environments throughout the male reproductive tract. Bicarbonate is essential not only to ionic homeostasis but also to pH maintenance along the male reproductive tract. Previous studies support an association of high 17?-estradiol (E2) levels with modulation of specific ion transporters expression. Herein we determined the effect of E2 on the expression/functionality of SLC4 family bicarbonate transporters in rat Sertoli cells (SCs). All studied transporters [anion exchanger 2 (AE2), Na(+)-driven Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger (NDCBE), electrogenic Na(+)/HCO3 (-) co-transporters (NBCe1), and electroneutral Na(+)/HCO3 (-) co-transporters (NBCn1)] were identified in SCs, being AE2 and NBCn1 the most abundant. In E2-treated cells (100 nM), increases in AE2 and NBCn1 protein levels were observed, as well as altered transcellular transport. E2-treated SCs presented a significant perturbation of ATP-induced short-circuit current. This alteration was concurrent with augmented AE2 and NBCn1 levels. Overall, we report a relation between increased E2 levels and the expression/function of AE2 and NBCn1 in rat SCs, providing new evidence on the mechanisms by which E2 can regulate SCs physiology and consequently spermatogenesis, with direct influence on male reproductive potential. PMID:26100313

  8. Ovarian Sertoli–Leydig cell tumors: MRI findings and pathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors (SLCT). Methods The clinical, MRI and pathological findings of five cases of SLCT were reviewed retrospectively. MRI appearances of tumors including laterality, shape and size, architecture, wall, septa and vegetation, signal intensity and contrast-enhancement pattern were evaluated and correlated with pathological findings. Results Two tumors were solid which appeared as low signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and moderate on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) with multiple small cysts in one of them. The remaining three SLCT were multilocular cystic with the irregularly thickened wall and septa, and with solid area and mural nodules in one of them. The cystic components had the same signal intensity as urine. All the solid components were intensely enhanced after administration of contrast medium. All five tumors were pathologically intermediate differentiation and at FIGO stage I. Conclusions SLCT demonstrate variable MRI morphological appearances. However, the irregularly thickened wall and septa, the moderate T2WI signal intensity and obvious enhancement in the solid components are three MRI features. PMID:24160866

  9. Sertoli-leydig cell tumour of ovary with menorrhagia: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Kanade, Umesh Sidheshwar; Dantkale, Sunita Sanjay; Narkhede, Rahul Ravindra; Kurawar, Rupali Ramrao; Bansode, Shubhada Yadavrao

    2014-10-01

    Sertoli-Leydig cell tumours (SLCTs) are rare sex cord stromal neoplasms of ovary accounting for less than 0.5% of all ovarian tumours. These are found in women of all age groups (2-75 y), but are most common in reproductive age group with an average age of 25 y. Mostly these are unilateral, confined to ovaries and usually stage I at the time of clinical diagnosis. The common presenting complaints in these patients are due to either mass occupying lesion (mostly pelviabdominal mass and/or pain) or hormonal production (mostly androgen and more rarely oestrogen). Androgenic manifestations, seen in 80% of patients with SLCT, are virilism, hirsutism, receding hairline, breast atrophy, clitoromegaly, acne, hoarseness of voice, etc. Estrogenic manifestations are precocious puberty, abnormal uterine bleeding, abnormal vaginal bleeding, menstrual irregularities, generalised oedema, weight gain, breast hypertrophy, endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial polyps and endometrial carcinoma. Histologically these are classified (WHO) as well-differentiated, intermediately differentiated, poorly differentiated, with heterologous components and retiform type. Prognosis depends upon degree of tumour differentiation (grading) and tumour extent (staging). We herein report an unusual case of SLCT of ovary with oestrogenic manifestation of menorrhagia. PMID:25478358

  10. Intraperitoneal injection of microencapsulated Sertoli cells restores muscle morphology and performance in dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Chiappalupi, Sara; Luca, Giovanni; Mancuso, Francesca; Madaro, Luca; Fallarino, Francesca; Nicoletti, Carmine; Calvitti, Mario; Arato, Iva; Falabella, Giulia; Salvadori, Laura; Di Meo, Antonio; Bufalari, Antonello; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Calafiore, Riccardo; Donato, Rosario; Sorci, Guglielmo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease characterized by progressive muscle degeneration leading to impaired locomotion, respiratory failure and premature death. In DMD patients, inflammatory events secondary to dystrophin mutation play a major role in the progression of the pathology. Sertoli cells (SeC) have been largely used to protect xenogeneic engraftments or induce trophic effects thanks to their ability to secrete trophic, antiinflammatory, and immunomodulatory factors. Here we have purified SeC from specific pathogen-free (SPF)-certified neonatal pigs, and embedded them into clinical grade alginate microcapsules. We show that a single intraperitoneal injection of microencapsulated SPF SeC (SeC-MC) in an experimental model of DMD can rescue muscle morphology and performance in the absence of pharmacologic immunosuppressive treatments. Once i.p. injected, SeC-MC act as a drug delivery system that modulates the inflammatory response in muscle tissue, and upregulates the expression of the dystrophin paralogue, utrophin in muscles through systemic release of heregulin-?1, thus promoting sarcolemma stability. Analyses performed five months after single injection show high biocompatibility and long-term efficacy of SeC-MC. Our results might open new avenues for the treatment of patients with DMD and related diseases. PMID:26523508

  11. Combined Leydig cell and Sertoli cell dysfunction in 46,XX males lacking the sex determining region Y gene

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, B.; Vordermark, J.S.; Fechner, P.Y.

    1995-07-03

    We have evaluated 3 individuals with a rare form of 46,XX sex reversal. All of them had ambiguous external genitalia and mixed wolffian and muellerian structures, indicating both Leydig cell and Sertoli cell dysfunction, similar to that of patients with true hermaphroditism. However, gonadal tissue was not ovotesticular but testicular with varying degrees of dysgenesis. SRY sequences were absent in genomic DNA from peripheral leukocytes in all 3 subjects. Y centromere sequences were also absent, indicating that testis development did not occur because of a low level mosaicism of Y-bearing cells. The subjects in this report demonstrate that there is a continuum in the extent of the testis determination in SRY-negative 46,XX sex reversal, ranging from nearly normal to minimal testicular development. 20 refs.

  12. Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor with heterologous elements of gastrointestinal type associated with elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein level: an unusual case and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Horta, Mariana; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Marques, Rita Canas; Félix, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe the case of a 19-year-old woman with a poorly differentiated ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor and an elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein level. The patient presented with diffuse abdominal pain and bloating. Physical examination, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a right ovarian tumor that was histopathologically diagnosed as a poorly differentiated Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor with heterologous elements. Her alpha-fetoprotein serum level was undetectable after tumor resection. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that account for 0.5% of all ovarian neoplasms. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors tend to be unilateral and occur in women under 30 years of age. Although they are the most common virilizing tumor of the ovary, about 60% are endocrine-inactive tumors. Elevated serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein are rarely associated with Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, with only approximately 30 such cases previously reported in the literature. The differential diagnosis should include common alpha-fetoprotein-producing ovarian entities such as germ cell tumors, as well as other non-germ cell tumors that have been rarely reported to produce this tumor marker. PMID:25926909

  13. Blood-testis barrier and Sertoli cell function: lessons from SCCx43KO mice.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Jonathan; Heinrich, Julia; Brehm, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    The gap junction protein connexin43 (CX43) plays a vital role in mammalian spermatogenesis by allowing for direct cytoplasmic communication between neighbouring testicular cells. In addition, different publications suggest that CX43 in Sertoli cells (SC) might be important for blood-testis barrier (BTB) formation and BTB homeostasis. Thus, through the use of the Cre-LoxP recombination system, a transgenic mouse line was developed in which only SC are deficient of the gap junction protein, alpha 1 (Gja1) gene. Gja1 codes for the protein CX43. This transgenic mouse line has been commonly defined as the SC specific CX43 knockout (SCCx43KO) mouse line. Within the seminiferous tubule, SC aid in spermatogenesis by nurturing germ cells and help them to proliferate and mature. Owing to the absence of CX43 within the SC, homozygous KO mice are infertile, have reduced testis size, and mainly exhibit spermatogenesis arrest at the level of spermatogonia, seminiferous tubules containing only SC (SC-only syndrome) and intratubular SC-clusters. Although the SC specific KO of CX43 does not seem to have an adverse effect on BTB integrity, CX43 influences BTB composition as the expression pattern of different BTB proteins (like OCCLUDIN, ?-CATENIN, N-CADHERIN, and CLAUDIN11) is altered in mutant males. The supposed roles of CX43 in dynamic BTB regulation, BTB assembly and/or disassembly and its possible interaction with other junctional proteins composing this unique barrier are discussed. Data collectively indicate that CX43 might represent an important regulator of dynamic BTB formation, composition and function. PMID:26556893

  14. Mixture effects of nonylphenol and di-n-butyl phthalate (monobutyl phthalate) on the tight junctions between Sertoli cells in male rats in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Wang, Ruoyu; Xiang, Zou; Qian, Weiping; Han, Xiaodong; Li, Dongmei

    2014-12-01

    The estrogenic chemical nonylphenol (NP) and the antiandrogenic agent di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) are regarded as widespread environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) which at high doses in some species of laboratory animals have adverse effects on male reproduction and development. Given the ubiquitous coexistence of various classes of EEDs in the environment, their combined effects warrant investigation. In this study, we attempted to clarify the interactions of NP and DBP on tight junctions (TJs) between rat Sertoli cells. In the in vitro experiment, monobutyl phthalate (MBP), the active metabolite of DBP, was used instead of DBP. Sertoli cells were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats, and treated with NP and MBP, singly or combined. The morphology of Sertoli cells, and structure and functionality of TJs were measured. In the in vivo experiment, rats were gavaged on postnatal day 23-35 with a single or combined NP and DBP treatment. Testicular weight and morphology of TJs were recorded. These data indicated that NP and DBP/MBP, either in single or in combination, induced the structural and function changes of Sertoli cell tight junctions, both in vivo and in vitro. The combined effect on the regulation of TJ proteins at both the protein and gene levels was correlated to the effect exerted by NP, suggesting that the structure and function of Sertoli cells were more sensitive to exposure to NP than MBP. PMID:25200483

  15. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation with Estrogen Receptor 1 and the Promoter of Greb1 in TM4 Sertoli Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Lei, Zhenmin

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a technique to investigate the interaction between proteins and DNA within the natural chromatin context of the cell. There are two previously identified two canonical estrogen response elements (ERE1 and ERE2) present in the 5'-flanking region of the Greb1 gene which is a known estrogen-responsive gene. ChIP results showed the physical interaction between estrogen receptor I (ESR1) and EREs in the Greb1 promoter in TM4 mouse Sertoli cells. This chapter describes the protocol for chromatin immunoprecipitation applied to the estrogen response elements in the Greb1 promoter. PMID:26585128

  16. Asynchronic steroid activity of Leydig and Sertoli cells related to spermatogenic and testosterone cycle in Phymaturus antofagastensis.

    PubMed

    Boretto, J M; Ibargüengoytía, N R; Jahn, G A; Acosta, J C; Vincenti, A E; Fornés, M W

    2010-05-01

    The severe environments where Phymaturus lizards inhabit in the Andes highlands and in Patagonia, Argentina, impose restrictions on their reproduction, offering a framework for the development of life history strategies to overcome hard weather conditions. Among them, prolonged female cycles, asynchrony between sexes in receptivity, and sperm storage in males, were described. Asynchrony in the reproductive timing between males and females is a consequence of different energy requirements for gametogenesis, and often imply the existence of cellular mechanisms to enhance fertilization, such as the asynchronic steroid synthesis between testicular compartments, allowing gametogenesis independently of mating. In the present study ultrastructural and hormone assays were combined for the first time in liolaemids. Specifically, morphological features of steroid activity in Leydig and Sertoli cells, and serum testosterone concentrations have been studied in the lizard Phymaturus antofagastensis. Leydig and Sertoli cells presented morphological features characteristic of steroid synthesis during the spermatogenesis, and evident asynchronic steroid production between testicular compartments. Active Sertoli cells and inactive Leydig cells were observed in spring and autumn, while in mid-summer their steroid activity was synchronic in coincidence with maximal abundance of spermatozoa in epididymis. Serum testosterone concentration was at its maximum in mid-summer (126-230 ng ml(-1)), and minimum in late spring (4-24 ng ml(-1)) and early autumn (2-17 ng ml(-1)). In view of these results, P. antofagastensis males show an original approach to adjust their reproductive activity to physiological and environmental constraints at high latitudes and altitudes in the Andean highlands of Argentina. PMID:20152839

  17. A new role for follicle-stimulating hormone in the regulation of calcium flux in Sertoli cells: Inhibition of Na+/Ca++ exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Joseph, M.P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Elucidation of mechanisms regulating intracellular calcium levels in steroidogenic tissues is important for understanding control of cellular function. We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated flux of 45Ca++ into cultured rat Sertoli cells and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we report heretofore unrecognized inhibitory effects of FSH on Na+/Ca++ exchange in these two systems. An outwardly directed Na+ gradient, developed by preincubating Sertoli cell monolayers in buffer made hypertonic with NaCl, resulted in uptake of 45Ca++ that was unaffected by calcium channel blocking agents, ruthenium red or methoxyverapamil, but was enhanced by ouabain, a specific inhibitor of Na+/K(+)-ATPase. Sodium-dependent 45Ca++ flux into Sertoli cells was inhibited in a concentration-related manner by increased extracellular Na+ (up to 135 mM). FSH consistently and reproducibly (28.9 +/- 3.8%, 10 separate assays) reduced sodium-dependent 45Ca++ influx in the absence or presence of ouabain. A lesser effect on Na+/Ca++ exchange was seen when Li+ replaced Na+ in the preincubation buffer, and a marked reduction occurred when Sertoli cells were incubated in buffer containing KCl, presumably due to membrane depolarization. FSH-sensitive Na+/45Ca++ exchange was also observed when using FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. Our earlier calcium channel studies indicated that FSH affects Ca++ entry into Sertoli cells via a receptor-mediated process. The results reported here demonstrate that the interaction of FSH with its receptor is associated with changes in Na+/Ca++ exchange as well, and suggest that this activity may also be involved in regulating intracellular free Ca++ levels in the Sertoli cell.

  18. Bilateral Laparoscopic Gonadectomy in a Patient With Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome and Bilateral Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumor: A Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Asl Zare, Mohammad; Kalantari, Mahmood Reza; Asadpour, Amir Abbas; Kamalati, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (previously called testicular feminization) is specified by a 46 XY karyotype and negative sex chromatin, bilateral undescended testes, female genitalia appearance, and lack of mullerian derivatives. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old woman with complete (severe) androgen resistance underwent prophylactic laparoscopic bilateral gonadectomy because of the eventually increased risk of gonadal malignancy. Although the gonads appeared grossly normal, microscopic examination revealed bilateral well differentiated sertoli–leydig cell tumor (SLCT). Discussion: Our Medline search revealed that this is the first reported case of bilateral sertoli–leydig cell tumor (SLCT) in androgen insensitivity syndrome. PMID:25032133

  19. The Oncogenic Roles of DICER1 RNase IIIb Domain Mutations in Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumors12

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yemin; Chen, Jiamin; Yang, Winnie; Mo, Fan; Senz, Janine; Yap, Damian; Anglesio, Michael S.; Gilks, Blake; Morin, Gregg B.; Huntsman, David G.

    2015-01-01

    DICER1, an endoribonuclease required for microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, is essential for embryogenesis and the development of many organs including ovaries. We have recently identified somatic hotspot mutations in RNase IIIb domain of DICER1 in half of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, a rare class of sex-cord stromal cell tumors in young women. These hotspot mutations lost IIIb cleavage activity of DICER1 in vitro and failed to produce 5p-derived miRNAs in mouse Dicer1-null ES cells. However, the oncogenic potential of these hotspot DICER1 mutations has not been studied. Here, we further revealed that the global expression of 5p-derived miRNAs was dramatically reduced in ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors carrying DICER1 hotspot mutations compared with those without DICER1 hotspot mutation. The miRNA production defect was associated with the deregulation of genes controlling cell proliferation and the cell fate. Using an immortalized human granulosa cell line, SVOG3e, we determined that the D1709N-DICER1 hotspot mutation failed to produce 5p-derived miRNAs, deregulated the expression of several genes that control gonadal differentiation and cell proliferation, and promoted cell growth. Re-expression of let-7 significantly inhibited the growth of D1709N-DICER1 SVOG3e cells, accompanied by the suppression of key regulators of cell cycle control and ovarian gonad differentiation. Taken together, our data revealed that DICER1 hotspot mutations cause systemic loss of 5p-miRNAs that can both drive pseudodifferentiation of testicular elements and cause oncogenic transformation in the ovary. PMID:26408257

  20. Isolated Large Cell Calcifying Sertoli Cell Tumor in a Young Boy, not Associated with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome or Carney Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jin-Ping; Lee, Chyi-Chia; Crocker, Melissa; Najmuddin, Mufaddal; Lange, Eileen; Merino, Maria; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    Background Large cell calcifying sertoli cell tumor (LCCSCT) is an exceedingly rare lesion of the testicle. It is most often seen in patients with Carney complex (CNC) or Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS). We now report the first pediatric patient with what appears to be bilateral LCCSCT and no other conditions or a genetic syndrome, such as PJS or CNC, have been associated with it. Methods A 10-year-old boy was found to have a right testicular mass during a routine pediatric examination; he underwent right orchiectomy. He was then evaluated clinically for PJS or CNC and underwent genetic testing. His tumor was studied by immunohistochemistry for the expression of calretinin, NY-ESO-1, inhibin, CD99, S100, PLAP, AE1/AE3, Bcl-2, p53, and Mib1. Results Patient did not have clinical features or genetic abnormalities of CNC and PJS. Microscopic features showed large, round or cubical intratubular and aggregated tumor cells with prominent nuclear atypia, large and prominent nucleoli and extensive calcification. In the Immunohistochemical studies, calretinin and inhibin alpha were up regulated in LCCSCT as compared to the adjacent benign Sertoli cells. Meanwhile, NY-ESO-1 and CD99 were down-regulated in LCCSCT. Focally and weakly positive S100 was found in the tumor tissue, but no S100 expression was present in the adjacent Sertoli cells. There was no expression of PLAP, P53, Bcl-2, Mib1 and AE1/AE3 in LCCSCT and adjacent Sertoli cells. Micro-calcifications were found in the other gonad by ultrasonography, suggesting LCCSCT. Conclusion LCCSCT is a rare testicular neoplasm, and may present in isolated rather than in more typical association with syndromes such as CNC and PJS.

  1. Sertoli cells in culture secrete paracrine factor(s) that inhibit peritubular myoid cell proliferation: identification of heparinoids as likely candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, P.S.; Fritz, I.B. )

    1991-06-01

    Conditioned medium from Sertoli cells, prepared from testes of 20-day-old rats, contains component(s) that inhibit the incorporation of (3H)-thymidine into DNA of peritubular myoid cells (PMC) and inhibit the proliferation of PMC. These components are trypsin-resistant, heat-stable compounds having a molecular weight less than 30,000. The active inhibitory components in Sertoli cell conditioned medium are inactivated by treatment with heparinase, but not by treatment with hyaluronidase or chondroitin sulfate lyases. Addition of heparin or heparan sulfate results in inhibition of DNA synthesis by PMC in a dose-dependent manner, whereas other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) examined (hyaluronic acid, keratan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate) have no detectable effects. Heparin and heparan sulfate are unique among GAGs tested in inhibiting the characteristic multilayer growth pattern of PMC following the attainment of confluence in serum-rich medium. On the basis of these and other data presented, it is concluded that heparin and other heparin-like GAGs synthesized by Sertoli cells are implicated in the modulation of growth of PMC in vitro during co-culture. It is postulated that heparin may play a similar role in maintaining the quiescent peritubular myoid cell phenotype in vivo.

  2. The dynamic of the apical ectoplasmic specialization between spermatids and Sertoli cells: the case of the small GTPase Rap1.

    PubMed

    Berruti, Giovanna; Paiardi, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in assisted reproductive technologies, infertility remains a consistent health problem worldwide. Spermiation is the process through which mature spermatids detach from the supporting Sertoli cells and are released into the tubule lumen. Spermiation failure leads to lack of mature spermatozoa and, if not occasional, could result into azoospermia, major cause of male infertility in human population. Spermatids are led through their differentiation into spermatozoa by the apical ectoplasmic specialization (aES), a testis-specific, actin-based anchoring junction restricted to the Sertoli-spermatid interface. The aES helps spermatid movement across the seminiferous epithelium, promotes spermatid positioning, and prevents the release of immature spermatozoa. To accomplish its functions, aES needs to undergo tightly and timely regulated restructuring. Even if components of aES are partly known, the mechanism/s through which aES is regulated remains still elusive. In this review, we propose a model by which the small GTPase Rap1 could regulate aES assembly/remodelling. The characterization of key players in the dynamic of aES, such as Rap1, could open new possibility to develop prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic approaches for male patients under treatment for infertility as well as it could lead to the identification of new target for male contraception. PMID:24719879

  3. Candidate Sertoli cell specific promoter element for a TGF family member (Amh) and a 3 UTR enhancer/repressor for the same gene

    E-print Network

    Médecine de Rennes, 2 Ave.du Pr.Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes Cedex, France Received 20 April 2005; received high levels in immature Sertoli cells from 12.5 dpc in the mouse (Münsterberg and Lovell-Badge, 1991 and continues at this level for life (Jost et al., 1975; Bezard et al., 1987; Münsterberg and Lovell-Badge, 1991

  4. Identification of genetic networks involved in the cell injury accompanying endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by bisphenol A in testicular Sertoli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki . E-mail: ytabu@cts.u-toyama.ac.jp; Takasaki, Ichiro; Kondo, Takashi

    2006-07-07

    To identify detailed mechanisms by which bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical, induces cell injury in mouse testicular Sertoli TTE3 cells, we performed genome-wide microarray and computational gene network analyses. BPA (200 {mu}M) significantly decreased cell viability and simultaneously induced an increase in mRNA levels of HSPA5 and DDIT3, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker genes. Of the 22,690 probe sets analyzed, BPA down-regulated 661 probe sets and up-regulated 604 probe sets by >2.0-fold. Hierarchical cluster analysis demonstrated nine gene clusters. In decreased gene clusters, two significant genetic networks were associated with cell growth and proliferation and the cell cycle. In increased gene clusters, two significant genetic networks including many basic-region leucine zipper transcription factors were associated with cell death and DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The present results will provide additional novel insights into the detailed molecular mechanisms of cell injury accompanying ER stress induced by BPA in Sertoli cells.

  5. Implication of actin microfilaments in maintenance of intercellular bridges and the Sertoli cell barrier in the rat seminiferous epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Within the seminiferous epithelium, germ cells are connected to one another by intercellular bridges. Additionally, young germ cells are separated from more advanced germ cells by the Sertoli cell barrier, the occluding junctions of which are associated with actin microfilaments. To examine how microfilaments influence these structures in the rat the actin-disrupting agent cytochalasin D (CD) was injected intratesticularly (i.t.). In preliminary studies the optical injection volume was found to be 50 {mu}l and, by using the dye trypan blue, the injected solution was shown to enter the lymphatic system and rapidly spread throughout the testis. A 50% clearance of {sup 3}H-insulin from the testis was achieved at 3 hr and 95% by 24 hr. Vehicles with varying solubility properties did not cause testicular damage. Intercellular bridges were found to be dynamic structures. As spermatogenesis progressed, the bridge diameter gradually increased. The formation and degradation of bridge partitioning complexes within pre-existing bridges of dividing cells were described.

  6. Commonly dysregulated genes in murine APL cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wenlin; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Holt, Matthew S.; Link, Daniel C.; Watson, Mark A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    To identify genes that are commonly dysregulated in a murine model of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), we first defined gene expression patterns during normal murine myeloid development; serial gene expression profiling studies were performed with primary murine hematopoietic progenitors that were induced to undergo myeloid maturation in vitro with G-CSF. Many genes were reproducibly expressed in restricted developmental “windows,” suggesting a structured hierarchy of expression that is relevant for the induction of developmental fates and/or differentiated cell functions. We compared the normal myeloid developmental transcriptome with that of APL cells derived from mice expressing PML-RAR? under control of the murine cathepsin G locus. While many promyelocyte-specific genes were highly expressed in all APL samples, 116 genes were reproducibly dysregulated in many independent APL samples, including Fos, Jun, Egr1, Tnf, and Vcam1. However, this set of commonly dysregulated genes was expressed normally in preleukemic, early myeloid cells from the same mouse model, suggesting that dysregulation occurs as a “downstream” event during disease progression. These studies suggest that the genetic events that lead to APL progression may converge on common pathways that are important for leukemia pathogenesis. PMID:17008535

  7. Sertoli cell differentiation in rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) is an early event in puberty and precedes attainment of the adult complement of undifferentiated spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Simorangkir, D R; Ramaswamy, S; Marshall, G R; Roslund, R; Plant, T M

    2012-04-01

    In primates, the time course of Sertoli cell proliferation and differentiation during puberty and its relationship with the expansion of undifferentiated type A spermatogonia that occurs at this critical stage of development are poorly defined. Mid and late juvenile and early and late pubertal male rhesus monkeys were studied. Testes were immersion fixed, embedded in paraffin, and sectioned at 5??m. Sertoli cell number per testis, S-phase labeling (BrdU), and growth fraction (Ki67 labeling) were determined and correlated with corresponding parameters for undifferentiated type A spermatogonia (A dark and A pale). Dual fluorescence labeling was used in addition to histochemistry to monitor spermatogonial differentiation during the peripubertal period using GFR?-1 and cKIT as markers. While the adult complement of Sertoli cells/testis was attained in early pubertal monkeys after only a few weeks of exposure to the elevated gonadotropin secretion characteristic of this developmental stage, the number of undifferentiated type A spermatogonia several months later in mid pubertal monkeys was only 50% of that in adult testes. Both A dark and A pale spermatogonia exhibited high S-phase BrdU labeling at all stages of juvenile and pubertal development. Spermatogonial differentiation, as reflected histochemically and by relative changes in GFR?-1 and cKIT expression, was not observed until after the initiation of puberty. In the rhesus monkey and maybe in other higher primates including human, the pubertal proliferation of undifferentiated spermatogonia is insidious and proceeds in the wake of a surge in Sertoli cell proliferation following termination of the juvenile stage of development. PMID:22232743

  8. Genes involved in nonpermissive temperature-induced cell differentiation in Sertoli TTE3 cells bearing temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T-antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki . E-mail: ytabu@ms.toyama-mpu.ac.jp; Kondo, Takashi; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Obinata, Masuo

    2005-04-15

    Sertoli TTE3 cells, derived from transgenic mice bearing temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T (tsSV40LT)-antigen, proliferated continuously at a permissive temperature (33 deg C) whereas inactivation of the large T-antigen by a nonpermissive temperature (39 deg C) led to differentiation as judged by elevation of transferrin. To clarify the detailed mechanisms of differentiation, we investigated the time course of changes in gene expression using cDNA microarrays. Of the 865 genes analyzed, 14 genes showed increased levels of expression. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that the mRNA levels of p21{sup waf1}, milk fat globule membrane protein E8, heat-responsive protein 12, and selenoprotein P were markedly elevated. Moreover, the differentiated condition induced by the nonpermissive temperature significantly increased mRNA levels of these four genes in several cell lines from the transgenic mice bearing the oncogene. The present results regarding changes in gene expression will provide a basis for a further understanding of molecular mechanisms of differentiation in both Sertoli cells and cell lines transformed by tsSV40LT-antigen.

  9. Novel Role for p110? PI 3-Kinase in Male Fertility through Regulation of Androgen Receptor Activity in Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guillermet-Guibert, Julie; Smith, Lee B.; Halet, Guillaume; Whitehead, Maria A.; Pearce, Wayne; Rebourcet, Diane; León, Kelly; Crépieux, Pascale; Nock, Gemma; Strömstedt, Maria; Enerback, Malin; Chelala, Claude; Graupera, Mariona; Carroll, John; Cosulich, Sabina; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The organismal roles of the ubiquitously expressed class I PI3K isoform p110? remain largely unknown. Using a new kinase-dead knockin mouse model that mimics constitutive pharmacological inactivation of p110?, we document that full inactivation of p110? leads to embryonic lethality in a substantial fraction of mice. Interestingly, the homozygous p110? kinase-dead mice that survive into adulthood (maximum ~26% on a mixed genetic background) have no apparent phenotypes, other than subfertility in females and complete infertility in males. Systemic inhibition of p110? results in a highly specific blockade in the maturation of spermatogonia to spermatocytes. p110? was previously suggested to signal downstream of the c-kit tyrosine kinase receptor in germ cells to regulate their proliferation and survival. We now report that p110? also plays a germ cell-extrinsic role in the Sertoli cells (SCs) that support the developing sperm, with p110? inactivation dampening expression of the SC-specific Androgen Receptor (AR) target gene Rhox5, a homeobox gene critical for spermatogenesis. All extragonadal androgen-dependent functions remain unaffected by global p110? inactivation. In line with a crucial role for p110? in SCs, selective inactivation of p110? in these cells results in male infertility. Our study is the first documentation of the involvement of a signalling enzyme, PI3K, in the regulation of AR activity during spermatogenesis. This developmental pathway may become active in prostate cancer where p110? and AR have previously been reported to functionally interact. PMID:26132308

  10. Effects of 4-nonylphenol isomers on cell receptors and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse Sertoli TM4 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Nie, Shaoping; Chen, Yangjie; Huang, Danfei; Xie, Mingyong

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, experiments were performed to investigate the effects of nonylphenol (NP) isomers (4-[1,2, 4-trimethylhexyl]-phenol (NP41), 4-[1,2, 5-trimethylhexyl]-phenol (NP42)) on Sertoli TM4 cells. NP41 decreased mRNA expression levels of androgen receptor and toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 in 20-40?M (P<0.05), and increased mRNA levels of estrogen receptor (ER)-? and progesterone receptor in 1-40?M (P<0.05). NP42 treatment only evoked significant decrease in mRNA expression levels of ER-? in 20-40?M (P<0.05). Similarly, NP41 (1-40?M) drastically increased the protein expression of ER-?, which was significantly decreased in 20-40?M NP42 groups (P<0.01). Both NP41 and NP42 showed no effect on the expression of ER-?. Protein levels of follicle stimulating hormone receptor were increased significantly in high concentrations of NP41 (40?M) and NP42 (10-40?M) challenged cells. Furthermore, NP41 and NP42 showed various effects on the expression of junction-associated molecules and inhibin B secretion in TM4 cells. Additionally, activation of JNK1/2 pathway was induced by NP41 and NP42. However, ERK1/2 and p38 pathways were inhibited in TM4 cells exposed to low concentrations of NP41 (0.1-20?M) and NP42 (0.1-1?M), and high concentrations of NP41 (40?M) and NP42 (10-40?M) resulted in a return of p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 to control levels. We proposed that molecular mechanism of reproductive damage in Sertoli cells induced by NPs may be mediated by cell receptors and/or cell signaling pathways, and the effects may be related to the structure of NP isomer. PMID:25242005

  11. Sertoli-cell-specific knockout of connexin 43 leads to multiple alterations in testicular gene expression in prepubertal mice

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Sarah; Hossain, Hamid; Markmann, Melanie; Chakraborty, Trinad; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Guillou, Florian; Bergmann, Martin; Failing, Klaus; Weider, Karola; Brehm, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A significant decline in human male reproductive function has been reported for the past 20 years but the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. However, recent studies showed that the gap junction protein connexin-43 (CX43; also known as GJA1) might be involved. CX43 is the predominant testicular connexin (CX) in most species, including in humans. Alterations of its expression are associated with different forms of spermatogenic disorders and infertility. Men with impaired spermatogenesis often exhibit a reduction or loss of CX43 expression in germ cells (GCs) and Sertoli cells (SCs). Adult male transgenic mice with a conditional knockout (KO) of the Gja1 gene [referred to here as connexin-43 (Cx43)] in SCs (SCCx43KO) show a comparable testicular phenotype to humans and are infertile. To detect possible signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms leading to the testicular phenotype in adult SCCx43KO mice and to their failure to initiate spermatogenesis, the testicular gene expression of 8-day-old SCCx43KO and wild-type (WT) mice was compared. Microarray analysis revealed that 658 genes were significantly regulated in testes of SCCx43KO mice. Of these genes, 135 were upregulated, whereas 523 genes were downregulated. For selected genes the results of the microarray analysis were confirmed using quantitative real-time PCR and immunostaining. The majority of the downregulated genes are GC-specific and are essential for mitotic and meiotic progression of spermatogenesis, including Stra8, Dazl and members of the DM (dsx and map-3) gene family. Other altered genes can be associated with transcription, metabolism, cell migration and cytoskeleton organization. Our data show that deletion of Cx43 in SCs leads to multiple alterations of gene expression in prepubertal mice and primarily affects GCs. The candidate genes could represent helpful markers for investigators exploring human testicular biopsies from patients showing corresponding spermatogenic deficiencies and for studying the molecular mechanisms of human male sterility. PMID:22699423

  12. Listeriolysin O, but not Murine E-cadherin, is Involved in Invasion of Listeria monocytogenes into Murine Liver Parenchymal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Yu-ju; Kaneko, Masakazu; Emoto, Yoshiko; Emoto, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Human E-cadherin and listeriolysin O (LLO) are involved in invasion of Listeria monocytogenes into human liver parenchymal cells (LPC). Yet, it remains to be determined whether murine E-cadherin and LLO participate in invasion of L. monocytogenes into murine LPC. In the present study, involvement of murine E-cadherin and LLO in invasion of L. monocytogenes into murine LPC was investigated. Murine E-cadherin was expressed on murine LPC, but the expression became undetectable by insertion of transgene of Simian virus 40 large T antigen. Although invasion of L. monocytogenes into murine LPC was found regardless of murine E-cadherin expression, infection rate of L. monocytogenes being unable to secrete LLO was lower than that of L. monocytogenes being capable of secreting LLO. Our RESULTS verify that invasion of L. monocytogenes into murine LPC occurs independently of murine E-cadherin and indicate that LLO participates in invasion of L. monocytogenes into murine LPC. PMID:26668665

  13. Cardiotonic steroid ouabain stimulates expression of blood-testis barrier proteins claudin-1 and -11 and formation of tight junctions in Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Raimund; Shihan, Mazen; Stammler, Angelika; Konrad, Lutz; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2015-04-15

    The interaction of ouabain with the sodium pump induces signalling cascades resembling those triggered by hormone/receptor interactions. In the rat Sertoli cell line 93RS2, ouabain at low concentrations stimulates the c-Src/c-Raf/Erk1/2 signalling cascade via its interaction with the ?4 isoform of the sodium pump expressed in these cells, leading to the activation of the transcription factor CREB. As a result of this signalling sequence, ouabain stimulates expression of claudin-1 and claudin-11, which are also controlled by a CRE promoter. Both of these proteins are known to be essential constituents of tight junctions (TJ) between Sertoli cells, and as a result of the ouabain-induced signalling TJ formation between neighbouring Sertoli cells is significantly enhanced by the steroid. Thus, ouabain-treated cell monolayers display higher transepithelial resistance and reduced free diffusion of FITC-coupled dextran in tracer diffusion assays. Taking into consideration that the formation of TJ is indispensable for the maintenance of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and therefore for male fertility, the actions of ouabain described here and the fact that this and other related cardiotonic steroids (CTS) are produced endogenously suggest a direct influence of ouabain/sodium pump interactions on the maintenance of the BTB and thereby an effect on male fertility. Since claudin-1 and claudin-11 are also present in other blood-tissue barriers, one can speculate that ouabain and perhaps other CTS influence the dynamics of these barriers as well. PMID:25666991

  14. Dehydroepiandrosterone and 7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone in male reproductive health: Implications of differential regulation of human Sertoli cells metabolic profile.

    PubMed

    Dias, Tânia R; Alves, Marco G; Almeida, Susana P; Silva, Joaquina; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário; Silva, Branca M; Silvestre, Samuel M; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2015-11-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a precursor of androgen synthesis whose action is partially exerted through its metabolites. 7-Oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone (7-oxo-DHEA) is a common DHEA metabolite, non-convertible to androgens, which constitutes a promising therapeutic strategy for multiple conditions. Sertoli cells (SCs) are responsible for the support of spermatogenesis, having unique metabolic characteristics strongly modulated by androgens. Consequently, disruptions in androgen synthesis compromise SCs function and hence male fertility. We aimed to evaluate the effects of DHEA and 7-oxo-DHEA in human SCs (hSCs) metabolism and oxidative profile. To do so, hSCs were exposed to increasing concentrations of DHEA and 7-oxo-DHEA (0.025, 1 and 50 ?M) that revealed to be non-cytotoxic in these experimental conditions. We measured hSCs metabolites consumption/production by (1)H NMR, the protein expression levels of key players of the glycolytic pathway by Western blot as well as the levels of carbonyl groups, nitration and lipid peroxidation by Slot blot. The obtained data demonstrated that 7-oxo-DHEA is a more potent metabolic modulator than DHEA since it increased hSCs glycolytic flux. DHEA seem to redirect hSCs metabolism to the Krebs cycle, while 7-oxo-DHEA has some inhibitory effect in this path. The highest 7-oxo-DHEA concentrations (1 and 50 ?M) also increased lactate production, which is of extreme relevance for the successful progression of spermatogenesis in vivo. None of these steroids altered the intracellular oxidative profile of hSCs, illustrating that, at the concentrations used they do not have pro- nor antioxidant actions in hSCs. Our study represents a further step in the establishment of safe doses of DHEA and 7-oxo-DHEA to hSCs, supporting its possible use in hormonal and non-hormonal therapies against male reproductive problems. PMID:26134425

  15. Toxicogenomic Screening of Replacements for Di(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate (DEHP) Using the Immortalized TM4 Sertoli Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Nardelli, Thomas C.; Erythropel, Hanno C.; Robaire, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Phthalate plasticizers such as di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) are being phased out of many consumer products because of their endocrine disrupting properties and their ubiquitous presence in the environment. The concerns raised from the use of phthalates have prompted consumers, government, and industry to find alternative plasticizers that are safe, biodegradable, and have the versatility for multiple commercial applications. We examined the toxicogenomic profile of mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP, the active metabolite of DEHP), the commercial plasticizer diisononyl cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH), and three recently proposed plasticizers: 1,4-butanediol dibenzoate (BDB), dioctyl succinate (DOS), and dioctyl maleate (DOM), using the immortalized TM4 Sertoli cell line. Results of gene expression studies revealed that DOS and BDB clustered with control samples while MEHP, DINCH and DOM were distributed far away from the control-DOS-BDB cluster, as determined by principle component analysis. While no significant changes in gene expression were found after treatment with BDB and DOS, treatment with MEHP, DINCH and DOM resulted in many differentially expressed genes. MEHP upregulated genes downstream of PPAR and targeted pathways of cholesterol biosynthesis without modulating the expression of PPAR’s themselves. DOM upregulated genes involved in glutathione stress response, DNA repair, and cholesterol biosynthesis. Treatment with DINCH resulted in altered expression of a large number of genes involved in major signal transduction pathways including ERK/MAPK and Rho signalling. These data suggest DOS and BDB may be safer alternatives to DEHP/MEHP than DOM or the commercial alternative DINCH. PMID:26445464

  16. [The ultrastructural manifestations of the regenerative processes in the Sertoli cells under the action of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation in the rats subjected to stress].

    PubMed

    Korolev, Yu N; Geniatulina, M S; Nikulina, L A; Mikhailik, L V

    2015-01-01

    The experiments on the outbred female rats using the electron microscopic technique have demonstrated that the application of ultrahigh frequency low-intensity electromagnetic radiation (LIEMR) with a flux density below 1 mCW/Cm2 and a frequency of approximately 1,000 MHz in the regime of primary prophylaxis and therapeutic-preventive action suppressed the development of the post-stress pathological ultrastructural changes and increased the activity of the regenerative processes in the Sertoli cells. It was shown that the developing adaptive and compensatory changes in the Sertoli cells most frequently involve the energy-producing structures (mitochondria) that undergo the enlargement of their average and total dimensions. Simultaneously, the amount of granular endoplasmic reticulum and the number of ribosomes increased while the intracellular links between the organelles strengthened and the reserve potential of the cells improved. It is concluded that the observed effects may be due to the action of both local and systemic regulation mechanisms. PMID:26285333

  17. Intratubular Large Cell Hyalinizing Sertoli Cell Tumor of the Testes in a 4-Year-Old Male With Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Armijo, Beeling; Bocklage, Theresa; Heideman, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder that typically displays familial inheritance. Gastrointestinal polyposis and cutaneous pigmentation is a classic presentation of this syndrome. The reported lifetime cumulative cancer risk in PJS patients is >76% when compared with the general public with females affected more often than males. The prepubertal testicular tumor registry found Sertoli cell tumors (SCTs) to compose approximately 1% of all pediatric solid tumors. Prepubertal testicular masses are relatively rare. Only a small number of SCT cases have been reported in the first decade of life. The concurrence of PJS and feminizing SCTs of the testes is an increasingly recognized cause of prepubertal gynecomastia. The testicular lesions observed in patients with PJS primarily represent multifocal intratubular large cell hyalinizing SCTs with a distinct morphology that differs from large cell calcifying SCTs and sex cord tumors with annular tubules. Here, we describe the diagnosis and treatment course of a 4-year-old male with a SCT of the testes and diagnosis of PJS. PMID:25171448

  18. Murine Mueller cells are progenitor cells for neuronal cells and fibrous tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Florian, Christian; Langmann, Thomas; Weber, Bernhard H.F.; Morsczeck, Christian

    2008-09-19

    Mammalian Mueller cells have been reported to possess retinal progenitor cell properties and generate new neurons after injury. This study investigates murine Mueller cells under in vitro conditions for their capability of dedifferentiation into retinal progenitor cells. Mueller cells were isolated from mouse retina, and proliferating cells were expanded in serum-containing medium. For dedifferentiation, the cultured cells were transferred to serum-replacement medium (SRM) at different points in time after their isolation. Interestingly, early cell passages produced fibrous tissue in which extracellular matrix proteins and connective tissue markers were differentially expressed. In contrast, aged Mueller cell cultures formed neurospheres in SRM that are characteristic for neuronal progenitor cells. These neurospheres differentiated into neuron-like cells after cultivation on laminin/ornithine cell culture substrate. Here, we report for the first time that murine Mueller cells can be progenitors for both, fibrous tissue cells and neuronal cells, depending on the age of the cell culture.

  19. Follicular dendritic cell function and murine AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, A; Burton, G F; Fuchs, B A; Bhogal, B S; Rupper, R; Szakal, A K; Tew, J G

    1994-01-01

    Infection of mice with LP-BM5 elicits an immunodeficiency state referred to as murine acquired immune deficiency syndrome (MAIDS). Shortly after infection, retrovirus particles become associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and this study was undertaken to determine whether retroviruses alter FDC functions. The FDC functions examined included the ability to: (1) retain antigen (Ag) trapped prior to infection; (2) trap new Ag after infection; (3) maintain specific IgG responses; and (4) provide co-stimulatory signals to B cells. Mice were infected with LP-BM5 and the ability of their FDC to trap and retain 125I-Ag (HSA) was assessed. Serum anti-HSA levels were monitored and FDC co-stimulatory activity was indicated by increased B-cell proliferation. HSA trapped on FDC prior to infection began to disappear by 3 weeks and was practically gone by 6 weeks. Serum anti-HSA titres were maintained normally for about 3 weeks after infection and then declined precipitously. The ability of FDC to trap new Ag began to disappear around the second and third week of infection and was markedly depressed by the fourth week. However, FDC recovered from infected mice retained their ability to co-stimulate anti-mu- and interleukin-4 (IL-4)-activated B cells throughout a 5-week period. In short, the ability of FDC to trap and retain specific Ag and maintain specific antibody levels was markedly depressed after retrovirus infection. However, FDC from infected mice continued to provide co-stimulatory signals and these signals may contribute to the lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly characteristic of MAIDS. Images Figure 4 PMID:8132218

  20. Influences of follicle-stimulating hormone, proteases, and antiproteases on permeability of the barrier generated by Sertoli cells in a two-chambered assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Ailenberg, M.; Fritz, I.B.

    1989-03-01

    Factors have been identified that influence the integrity of the barrier generated by Sertoli cells (SC) in culture in a two-chambered assembly. The permeability of the barrier was assessed by determining rates of equilibration of (3H)methoxyinulin or (86Rb)Cl across the Sertoli cell monolayer. The complete system consisted of a confluent monolayer of SC maintained on an extracellular matrix (Matrigel)-coated filter together with peritubular cells on the opposite side of the filter. In confirmation of previous results, levels of plasminogen activator (PA) activity secreted were increased by treatment of SC with FSH or with cAMP derivatives ((Bu)2cAMP (dbcAMP)). PA levels in the culture medium were inversely related to times required for 50% equilibration of (3H)methoxyinulin across the SC monolayer. Thus, elevated PA levels, elicited by stimulation with FSH or dbcAMP, were associated with a decreased integrity of the barrier generated by SC preparations maintained in serum-free medium in the complete system. The increase in permeability of the barrier in SC elicited by FSH dbcAMP could be prevented, however, by the addition of various antiproteases. FSH actions on barrier function were complex. Effects of FSH that favored barrier integrity were most readily detected when proteolytic activity was inhibited. The addition of intact serum increased the integrity of the barrier, but acid-treated serum depleted of antiproteases had no such effect. We advance the hypothesis that proteases are implicated in modulation of the formation and maintenance of the seminiferous tubule barrier by SC.

  1. Treatment of High Risk Sertoli–Leydig Cell Tumors of the Ovary Using a Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Analog

    PubMed Central

    Lashkari, Harsha Prasada; Nash, Ruth; Albanese, Assunta; Okoye, Bruce; Millar, Robert; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Sertoli–Leydig cell tumors are rare ovarian neoplasms. We report two unusual cases with bilateral SLCTs suggesting evidence of genetic predisposition and at high risk of recurrence. To reduce this risk, we exploited the use of GnRH analog to lower gondadotropin and potentially directly inhibit the tumors through expressed GnRH receptors. We used it as maintenance antitumor therapy for 2 years after completion of chemotherapy, to cover the period of risk for recurrence. Both patients remain in complete remission at >2 years after completing leuprorelin therapy. Of note, both patients carry DICER1 mutations, frequently found in pleuropulmonary blastoma syndrome. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013; 60: E16–E18. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23193086

  2. Telomere sister chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.

  3. Activation of the Murine Sarcoma Virus Genome After Infection with the Murine Leukemia Virus as Determined by Cell Agglutination

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, Samuel; Green, Maurice

    1974-01-01

    Non-virus-producing NIH/3T3 cells transformed by the murine sarcoma virus are agglutinated by conconavalin A to the same low level as normal NIH/3T3 cells. Infection with the murine leukemia virus greatly increases the agglutination of transformed cells but not that of normal cells. These data suggest that the morphological expression of cell transformation and the surface alterations associated with increased cell agglutination are controlled by the expressions of different sarcoma virus genes. PMID:4363245

  4. Baicalin protects sertoli cells from heat stress-induced apoptosis via activation of the Fas/FasL pathway and Hsp72 expression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaotong; Chi, Shikai; Cong, Xia; Li, Huatao; Jiang, Zhongling; Cao, Rongfeng; Tian, Wenru

    2015-11-01

    Certain Chinese herbal medicines have antipyretic effects in both animal and human clinical practice. However, no report indicates their antipyretic effects on heat-stressed cells. The present study aimed to identify the protective effects of baicalin on the apoptosis of primary cultured bovine sertoli cells (SCs) subjected to heat stress (HS). The results demonstrated that HS induced apoptosis in the SCs exposed to 43°C for 1h as Fas/FasL was activated and caspase-3 was cleaved, the cells apoptotic rate was decreased. Moreover, the mRNA and protein levels of Hsp72 increased, whereas the cells apoptotic rate and expression of Fas, FasL, caspases 8 and 3 decreased in the SCs pretreated with various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10, 20?g/mL) of baicalin prior to HS. In conclusion, baicalin ameliorates heat stress-induced cell apoptosis via the modulation of the cell survival rate through Fas/FasL pathway activation and the upregulation of Hsp72 expression in bovine SCs. PMID:26103447

  5. BMP-4 Inhibits Neural Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    E-print Network

    Huettner, James E.

    BMP-4 Inhibits Neural Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells Michael F. A. Finley, Sandeep differentiation. To test for a possible role of BMP-4 in early mammalian neural specification, we examined its effect on neurogenesis in aggregate cultures of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Compared to control

  6. Hexavalent chromium at low concentration alters Sertoli cell barrier and connexin 43 gap junction but not claudin-11 and N-cadherin in the rat seminiferous tubule culture model

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Diane; Perrard, Marie-Hélène; Prisant, Nadia; Gilleron, Jérome; Pointis, Georges; Segretain, Dominique; Durand, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to toxic metals, specifically those belonging to the nonessential group leads to human health defects and among them reprotoxic effects. The mechanisms by which these metals produce their negative effects on spermatogenesis have not been fully elucidated. By using the Durand's validated seminiferous tubule culture model, which mimics the in vivo situation, we recently reported that concentrations of hexavalent chromium, reported in the literature to be closed to that found in the blood circulation of men, increase the number of germ cell cytogenetic abnormalities. Since this metal is also known to affect cellular junctions, we investigated, in the present study, its potential influence on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins present at this level such as connexin 43, claudin-11 and N-cadherin. Cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers expressed the three junctional proteins and ZO-1 for at least 12 days. Exposure to low concentrations of chromium (10 ?g/l) increased the trans-epithelial resistance without major changes of claudin-11 and N-cadherin expressions but strongly delocalized the gap junction protein connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells. The possibility that the hexavalent chromium-induced alteration of connexin 43 indirectly mediates the effect of the toxic metal on the blood–testis barrier dynamic is postulated. - Highlights: ? Influence of Cr(VI) on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins ? Use of cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers ? Low concentrations of Cr(VI) (10 ?g/l) altered the trans-epithelial resistance. ? Cr(VI) did not alter claudin-11 and N-cadherin. ? Cr(VI) delocalized connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells.

  7. Improving in vitro Sertoli cell/gonocyte co-culture model for assessing male reproductive toxicity: Lessons learned from comparisons of cytotoxicity versus genomic responses to phthalates

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaozhong; Hong, Sung Woo; Moreira, Estefania G.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2009-09-15

    Gonocytes exist in the neonatal testis and represent a transient population of male germ-line stem cells. It has been shown that stem cell self-renewal and progeny production is probably controlled by the neighboring differentiated cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) in vivo known as niches. Recently, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) Sertoli cell/gonocyte co-culture (SGC) model with ECM overlay, which creates an in vivo-like niche and supports germ-line stem cell functioning within a 3D environment. In this study, we applied morphological and cytotoxicity evaluations, as well as microarray-based gene expression to examine the effects of different phthalate esters (PE) on this model. Known in vivo male developmentally toxic PEs (DTPE) and developmentally non-toxic PEs (DNTPE) were evaluated. We observed that DTPE induced significantly greater dose-dependent morphological changes, a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cytotoxicity compared to those treated with DNTPE. Moreover, the gene expression was more greatly altered by DTPE than by DNTPE and non-supervised cluster analysis allowed the discrimination of DTPE from the DNTPE. Our systems-based GO-Quant analysis showed significant alterations in the gene pathways involved in cell cycle, phosphate transport and apoptosis regulation with DTPE but not with DNTPE treatment. Disruptions of steroidogenesis related-gene expression such as Star, Cyp19a1, Hsd17b8, and Nr4a3 were observed in the DTPE group, but not in the DNTPE group. In summary, our observation on cell viability, cytotoxicity, and microarray-based gene expression analysis induced by PEs demonstrate that our in vitro 3D-SGC system mimicked in vivo responses for PEs and suggests that the 3D-SGC system might be useful in identifying developmental reproductive toxicants.

  8. SYNCHRONIZATION OF RAPID GLOBIN EXPRESSION IN MURINE ERYTHROLEUKEMIC CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The addition of butyric acid (BA) to murine erythroleukemia cells (MELC) produces the expression of primarily A and E2 hemoglobins while DMSO incubation produces the expression of primarily A hemoglobin. Preincubation of MELC with DMSO followed by BA induction accelerates the exp...

  9. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors: hormonal profile after dynamic test with GnRH analogue: triptorelin represents a useful tool to evaluate tumoral hyperandrogenism.

    PubMed

    Turra, J; Granzotto, M; Gallea, M; Faggian, D; Conte, L; Litta, P; Vettor, R; Mioni, R

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 15-year-old woman with signs of hyperandrogenism affected by a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (SLCT). In our patient, blood analysis showed a high testosterone (T) level (T: 8.53?nmol/L; nv?

  10. Human pontine glioma cells can induce murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Caretti, Viola; Sewing, A Charlotte P; Lagerweij, Tonny; Schellen, Pepijn; Bugiani, Marianna; Jansen, Marc H A; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Navis, Anna C; Horsman, Ilona; Vandertop, W Peter; Noske, David P; Wesseling, Pieter; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Nazarian, Javad; Vogel, Hannes; Hulleman, Esther; Monje, Michelle; Wurdinger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), with a median survival of only 9 months, is the leading cause of pediatric brain cancer mortality. Dearth of tumor tissue for research has limited progress in this disease until recently. New experimental models for DIPG research are now emerging. To develop preclinical models of DIPG, two different methods were adopted: cells obtained at autopsy (1) were directly xenografted orthotopically into the pons of immunodeficient mice without an intervening cell culture step or (2) were first cultured in vitro and, upon successful expansion, injected in vivo. Both strategies resulted in pontine tumors histopathologically similar to the original human DIPG tumors. However, following the direct transplantation method all tumors proved to be composed of murine and not of human cells. This is in contrast to the indirect method that included initial in vitro culture and resulted in xenografts comprising human cells. Of note, direct injection of cells obtained postmortem from the pons and frontal lobe of human brains not affected by cancer did not give rise to neoplasms. The murine pontine tumors exhibited an immunophenotype similar to human DIPG, but were also positive for microglia/macrophage markers, such as CD45, CD68 and CD11b. Serial orthotopic injection of these murine cells results in lethal tumors in recipient mice. Direct injection of human DIPG cells in vivo can give rise to malignant murine tumors. This represents an important caveat for xenotransplantation models of DIPG. In contrast, an initial in vitro culture step can allow establishment of human orthotopic xenografts. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon observed with direct xenotransplantation remains an open question. PMID:24777482

  11. Ex vivo expansion of murine and human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Doan, Phuong L; Chute, John P

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells have the capacity to self-renew and give rise to the entirety of the mature blood and immune system throughout the lifespan of an organism. Here, we describe methods to isolate and culture murine bone marrow (BM) CD34(-)ckit(+)Sca1(+)Lineage(-) (CD34(-)KSL) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We also describe a method to measure functional HSC content via the competitive repopulation assay. Furthermore, we summarize methods to isolate and culture human CD34(+)CD38(-)Lineage(-) cells which are enriched for human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. PMID:25062631

  12. Pancreatic Differentiation from Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sakano, Daisuke; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are considered as a cell source for replacement therapies for pancreatic beta cells and other organs.We identified tetrabenazine (TBZ), vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor as a promoter of late-stage differentiation of Pdx1-positive pancreatic progenitor cells into Ngn3-positive endocrine progenitor cells. A cell-permeable cAMP analog, dBu-cAMP promotes beta cell maturation in late stage of differentiation. The induced beta cells can secrete insulin in a glucose-dependent manner.Our protocol consists of a three -step differentiation process. ES cell recapitulate embryonic developmental processes in vitro. Therefore, the ES cell differentiation system is a useful model for the understanding of molecular mechanism of beta-cell differentiation and are useful for application for future regenerative medicine. PMID:25762295

  13. Low levels of G?s and Ric8b in testicular sertoli cells may underlie restricted FSH action during infancy in primates.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Indrashis; Basu, Sayon; Sarda, Kanchan; Gautam, Mukkesh; Nagarajan, Perumal; Pradhan, Bhola Shankar; Sarkar, Hironmoy; Devi, Yendrembam Sangeeta; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2015-03-01

    FSH acts via testicular Sertoli cells (Sc) bearing FSH receptor (FSH-R) for regulating male fertility. Despite an adult-like FSH milieu in infant boys and monkeys, spermatogenesis is not initiated until the onset of puberty. We used infant and pubertal monkey Sc to reveal the molecular basis underlying developmental differences of FSH-R signaling in them. Unlike pubertal Sc, increasing doses of FSH failed to augment cAMP production by infant Sc. The expression of G?s subunit and Ric8b, which collectively activate adenylyl cyclase (AC) for augmenting cAMP production and gene transcription, were significantly low in infant Sc. However, forskolin, which acts directly on AC bypassing FSH-R, augmented cAMP production and gene transcription uniformly in both infant and pubertal Sc. FSH-induced G?s mRNA expression was higher in pubertal Sc. However, G?i-2 expression was down-regulated by FSH in pubertal Sc, unlike infant Sc. FSH failed, but forskolin or 8-Bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate treatment to infant Sc significantly augmented the expression of transferrin, androgen binding protein, inhibin-?-B, stem cell factor, and glial-derived neurotropic factor, which are usually up-regulated by FSH in pubertal Sc during spermatogenic onset. This suggested that lack of FSH mediated down-regulation of G?i-2 expression and limited expression of G?s subunit as well as Ric8b may underlie limited FSH responsiveness of Sc during infancy. This study also divulged that intracellular signaling events downstream of FSH-R are in place and can be activated exogenously in infant Sc. Additionally, this information may help in the proper diagnosis and treatment of infertile individuals having abnormal G protein-coupled FSH-R. PMID:25549048

  14. Impaired NK cell education diminishes resistance to murine CMV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hairong; Nash, William T.; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.; Brown, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Ly49G2 (G2+) NK cells mediate murine (M)CMV resistance in MHC Dk-expressing mice. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) studies revealed that G2+ NK cell-mediated MCMV resistance requires Dk in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. As a Ly49G2 ligand, Dk in both cell lineages may contribute to lysis of virus-infected cells. Alternatively, cellular differences in self-MHC Dk may have affected NK-cell education, and consequently NK cell-mediated viral clearance. We investigated the Dk-licensing effect on BM-derived NK cells in BMT recipients by analyzing cytokines, cytotoxicity and MCMV resistance. In BMT recipients with lineage-restricted Dk, G2+ NK-cell reactivity and cytotoxicity was diminished in comparison to BMT recipients with self-MHC in all cells. Reduced G2+ NK-mediated MCMV resistance in BMT recipients with lineage-restricted self-MHC indicates that licensing of G2+ NK cells is related to NK cell reactivity and viral control. Titrating donor BM with self-MHC-bearing hematopoietic cells, as well as adoptive transfer of mature G2+ NK cells into BMT recipients with self-MHC in non-hematopoietic cells only, enhanced NK cell licensing and rescued MCMV resistance. This disparate self-MHC NK cell education model would suggest that inadequately licensed NK cells corresponded to inefficient viral sensing and clearance. PMID:25187217

  15. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.; Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  16. Trafficking of Murine Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Health and Vascular Disease

    E-print Network

    von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    Trafficking of Murine Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Health and Vascular Disease disease, mouse model Stem cells (SCs) are undifferentiated cells capable of transforming into multiple Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA ABSTRACT Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess the unique

  17. In vitro stimulation of murine lymphoid cell cultures by levamisole.

    PubMed Central

    Merluzzi, V J; Badger, A M; Kaiser, C W; Cooperband, S R

    1975-01-01

    Levamisole has been reported to act as an immunological adjuvant. Experiments reported here on the effect of this agent on a variety of murine lymphoid culture systems were designed to gain an insight into its mechanism of action. We have found levamisole to be a weak mitogen for mouse spleen cells producing a dose related response which peaks at 48 hr in culture. The drug acted to augment the response of spleen cells to sub-optimal concentrations of concanavalin A, but had no unusual effect on the lipopolysaccharide stimulation of B-cell DNA synthesis in vitro. Levamisole was directly stimulatory on enriched T-cell populations and was found to have two actions: (1) to stimulate a subpopulation of T cells and (2) to augment the response of suboptimal mitogen concentrations of concanavalin A. In addition, we have found that murine thymocytes stimulated by concanavalin A were greatly potentiated in the presence of levamisole, but this population of cells could not be stimulated directly by the drug. PMID:1083786

  18. Flow cytometric quantification of radiation responses of murine peritoneal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tokita, N.; Raju, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods have been developed to distinguish subpopulations of murine peritoneal cells, and these were applied to the measurement of early changes in peritoneal cells after irradiation. The ratio of the two major subpopulations in the peritoneal fluid, lymphocytes and macrophages, was measured rapidly by means of cell volume distribution analysis as well as by hypotonic propidium iodide (PI) staining. After irradiation, dose and time dependent changes were noted in the cell volume distributions: a rapid loss of peritoneal lymphocytes, and an increase in the mean cell volume of macrophages. The hypotonic PI staining characteristics of the peritoneal cells showed two or three distinctive G/sub 1/ peaks. The ratio of the areas of these peaks was also found to be dependent of the radiation dose and the time after irradiation. These results demonstrate that these two parameters may be used to monitor changes induced by irradiation (biological dosimetry), and to sort different peritoneal subpopulations.

  19. Dye-mediated photosensitization of murine neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, F.; Sieber-Blum, M.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if photosensitization mediated by the fluorescent dye, merocyanine 540, could be used to preferentially kill murine neuroblastoma cells in simulated autologous remission marrow grafts. Simultaneous exposure of Neuro 2a or NB41A3 neuroblastoma cells to merocyanine 540 and white light reduced the concentration of in vitro-clonogenic tumor cells 50,000-fold. By contrast, the same treatment had little effect on the graft's ability to rescue lethally irradiated syngeneic hosts. Lethally irradiated C57BL/6J X A/J F1 mice transplanted with photosensitized mixtures of neuroblastoma cells and normal marrow cells (1:100 or 1:10) survived without developing neuroblastomas. It is conceivable that merocyanine 540-mediated photosensitization will prove useful for the extracorporeal purging of residual neuroblastoma cells from human autologous remission marrow grafts.

  20. Stromal cells participate in the murine esophageal mucosal injury response

    PubMed Central

    Binkley, Jana; Darwech, Isra; Swietlicki, Elzbieta; McDonald, Keely; Newberry, Rodney; Rubin, Deborah C.

    2013-01-01

    We identified ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA)- and vimentin-expressing spindle-shaped esophageal mesenchymal cells in the adult and neonate murine esophageal lamina propria. We hypothesized that these esophageal mesenchymal cells express and secrete signaling and inflammatory mediators in response to injury. We established primary cultures of esophageal mesenchymal cells using mechanical and enzymatic digestion. We demonstrate that these primary cultures are nonhematopoietic, nonendothelial, stromal cells with myofibroblast-like features. These cells increase secretion of IL-6 in response to treatment with acidified media and IL-1?. They also increase bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp)-4 secretion in response to sonic hedgehog. The location of these cells and their biological functions demonstrate their potential role in regulating esophageal epithelial responses to injury and repair. PMID:23370675

  1. Index sorting resolves heterogeneous murine hematopoietic stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Reiner; Wilson, Nicola K.; Prick, Janine C.M.; Cossetti, Chiara; Maj, Michal K.; Gottgens, Berthold; Kent, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the cellular and molecular biology of single stem cells have uncovered significant heterogeneity in the functional properties of stem cell populations. This has prompted the development of approaches to study single cells in isolation, often performed using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, many stem cell populations are too rare to test all possible cell surface marker combinations, and virtually nothing is known about functional differences associated with varying intensities of such markers. Here we describe the use of index sorting for further resolution of the flow cytometric isolation of single murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Specifically, we associate single-cell functional assay outcomes with distinct cell surface marker expression intensities. High levels of both CD150 and EPCR associate with delayed kinetics of cell division and low levels of differentiation. Moreover, cells that do not form single HSC-derived clones appear in the 7AADdim fraction, suggesting that even low levels of 7AAD staining are indicative of less healthy cell populations. These data indicate that when used in combination with single-cell functional assays, index sorting is a powerful tool for refining cell isolation strategies. This approach can be broadly applied to other single-cell systems, both to improve isolation and to acquire additional cell surface marker information. PMID:26051918

  2. Index sorting resolves heterogeneous murine hematopoietic stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Reiner; Wilson, Nicola K; Prick, Janine C M; Cossetti, Chiara; Maj, Michal K; Gottgens, Berthold; Kent, David G

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in the cellular and molecular biology of single stem cells have uncovered significant heterogeneity in the functional properties of stem cell populations. This has prompted the development of approaches to study single cells in isolation, often performed using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, many stem cell populations are too rare to test all possible cell surface marker combinations, and virtually nothing is known about functional differences associated with varying intensities of such markers. Here we describe the use of index sorting for further resolution of the flow cytometric isolation of single murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Specifically, we associate single-cell functional assay outcomes with distinct cell surface marker expression intensities. High levels of both CD150 and EPCR associate with delayed kinetics of cell division and low levels of differentiation. Moreover, cells that do not form single HSC-derived clones appear in the 7AAD(dim) fraction, suggesting that even low levels of 7AAD staining are indicative of less healthy cell populations. These data indicate that when used in combination with single-cell functional assays, index sorting is a powerful tool for refining cell isolation strategies. This approach can be broadly applied to other single-cell systems, both to improve isolation and to acquire additional cell surface marker information. PMID:26051918

  3. Antagonistic Effects of a Mixture of Low-Dose Nonylphenol and Di-N-Butyl Phthalate (Monobutyl Phthalate) on the Sertoli Cells and Serum Reproductive Hormones in Prepubertal Male Rats In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zou; Qian, Weiping; Han, Xiaodong; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    The estrogenic chemical nonylphenol (NP) and the antiandrogenic agent di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) are regarded as widespread environmental endocrine disruptors (EDCs) which at high doses in some species of laboratory animals, such as mice and rats, have adverse effects on male reproduction and development. Given the ubiquitous coexistence of various classes of EDCs in the environment, their combined effects warrant clarification. In this study, we attempted to determine the mixture effects of NP and DBP on the testicular Sertoli cells and reproductive endocrine hormones in serum in male rats based on quantitative data analysis by a mathematical model. In the in vitro experiment, monobutyl phthalate (MBP), the active metabolite of DBP, was used instead of DBP. Sertoli cells were isolated from 9-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats followed by treatment with NP and MBP, singly or combined. Cell viability, apoptosis, necrosis, membrane integrity and inhibin-B concentration were tested. In the in vivo experiment, rats were gavaged on postnatal days 23–35 with a single or combined NP and DBP treatment. Serum reproductive hormone levels were recorded. Next, Bliss Independence model was employed to analyze the quantitative data obtained from the in vitro and in vivo investigation. Antagonism was identified as the mixture effects of NP and DBP (MBP). In this study, we demonstrate the potential of Bliss Independence model for the prediction of interactions between estrogenic and antiandrogenic agents. PMID:24676355

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduce Murine Atherosclerosis Development.

    PubMed

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Duijn, Janine; van Pel, Melissa; van Santbrink, Peter J; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C A

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative properties, but recently they were also found to have immunomodulatory capacities. We therefore investigated whether MSCs could reduce atherosclerosis, which is determined by dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. We adoptively transferred MSCs into low-density lipoprotein-receptor knockout mice and put these on a Western-type diet to induce atherosclerosis. Initially after treatment, we found higher levels of circulating regulatory T cells. In the long-term, overall numbers of effector T cells were reduced by MSC treatment. Moreover, MSC-treated mice displayed a significant 33% reduction in circulating monocytes and a 77% reduction of serum CCL2 levels. Most strikingly, we found a previously unappreciated effect on lipid metabolism. Serum cholesterol was reduced by 33%, due to reduced very low-density lipoprotein levels, likely a result of reduced de novo hepatic lipogenesis as determined by a reduced expression of Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and lipoprotein lipase. MSCs significantly affected lesion development, which was reduced by 33% in the aortic root. These lesions contained 56% less macrophages and showed a 61% reduction in T cell numbers. We show here for the first time that MSC treatment affects not only inflammatory responses but also significantly reduces dyslipidaemia in mice. This makes MSCs a potent candidate for atherosclerosis therapies. PMID:26490642

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduce Murine Atherosclerosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Duijn, Janine; van Pel, Melissa; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative properties, but recently they were also found to have immunomodulatory capacities. We therefore investigated whether MSCs could reduce atherosclerosis, which is determined by dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. We adoptively transferred MSCs into low-density lipoprotein-receptor knockout mice and put these on a Western-type diet to induce atherosclerosis. Initially after treatment, we found higher levels of circulating regulatory T cells. In the long-term, overall numbers of effector T cells were reduced by MSC treatment. Moreover, MSC-treated mice displayed a significant 33% reduction in circulating monocytes and a 77% reduction of serum CCL2 levels. Most strikingly, we found a previously unappreciated effect on lipid metabolism. Serum cholesterol was reduced by 33%, due to reduced very low-density lipoprotein levels, likely a result of reduced de novo hepatic lipogenesis as determined by a reduced expression of Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and lipoprotein lipase. MSCs significantly affected lesion development, which was reduced by 33% in the aortic root. These lesions contained 56% less macrophages and showed a 61% reduction in T cell numbers. We show here for the first time that MSC treatment affects not only inflammatory responses but also significantly reduces dyslipidaemia in mice. This makes MSCs a potent candidate for atherosclerosis therapies. PMID:26490642

  6. Surface Markers for the Murine Oval Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Dorrell, Craig; Erker, Laura; Lanxon-Cookson, Kelsea M.; Abraham, Stephanie L.; Victoroff, Tristan; Ro, Simon; Canaday, Pamela S.; Streeter, Philip R.; Grompe, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The biology of progenitor activation in the liver is of considerable medical and scientific interest. The powerful genetic tools available for the mouse make it an ideal model system to study this complex process involving many different cell types. However, reagents for the isolation and study of distinct hepatic subpopulations have been quite limited compared to those available for hematopoietic cells. To produce cell surface reactive reagents more specific for the oval cell response, we generated a new collection of monoclonal antibodies by immunization of Fischer rats with enzymatically dispersed nonparenchymal cells from the livers of adult mice treated with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine. Each of the resulting antibodies recognized a surface antigen present on a liver cell subset and permitted the viable isolation of the associated subpopulation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Differential activity was observed on normal liver cells and at different stages of oval cell activation, indicating potential utility for progenitor cell identification. The subdivision of liver cells using these tools should facilitate the study of the biology of ductal and periductal hepatic cell types, including progenitors. Conclusion A new panel of surface reactive monoclonal antibodies to support investigation of the murine oval cell response has been developed. PMID:18726953

  7. A murine-ES like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem cells have been shown to exist in two functionally distinct pluripotent states, embryonic stem cells (ES cell)- and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), which are defined by the culture growth factor conditions. Human ES cells appear to exist in an epiblast-like state, which in comparison to their murine counterparts, is relatively difficult to propagate and manipulate. As a result, gene targeting is difficult and to-date only a handful of human knock-in or knock-out cell lines exist. We explored whether an alternative stem cell state exists for human stem cells as well, and demonstrate that manipulation of the growth factor milieu allows the derivation of a novel human stem cell type that displays morphological, molecular and functional properties of murine ES cells and facilitates gene targeting. As such, the murine ES-like state provides a powerful tool for the generation of recombinant human pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:20569691

  8. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey; Kellam, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA 'off-target' effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host-pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host-virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host-virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  9. Migration of Dendritic Cells from Murine Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Eghtesad, Saman; Clemens, Paula R.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in skeletal muscle, we investigated the migration of DCs from murine skeletal muscle and compared that to previously studied footpad (FP) DC trafficking. We adoptively transferred carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-labeled mature DCs to syngeneic mice and followed them in various lymphatic tissues at different time points. Injection of DCs into the tibialis anterior muscle resulted in the peak number of CFSE+ DCs recovered in spleen at 12h, not at 24h, when the largest number of these cells appeared in the draining lymph nodes. Interestingly, this result for adoptive transfer of DCs to skeletal muscle differs with what is previously reported for adoptive transfer to the FP, a result that we also confirmed in parallel studies. These findings could have a significant impact on 1) understanding muscle diseases with immunological complications such as muscular dystrophies and 2) the immunologic effects of treatments for muscle diseases. PMID:20580121

  10. FLOW CYTOMETRIC COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF TRIALKYTING ON THE MURINE ERYTHROLEUKEMIC CELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cellular effects of exposure to tributyltin (TBT), triethyltin (TET), or trimethyltin (TMT) were investigated by flow cytometry employing the murine erythroleukemic cell (MELC) as a model cellular system. Cell viability was investigated by the carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) ...

  11. Enhanced natural killer cell activity in experimental murine encephalitozoonosis.

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, J Y; Brieland, J K; Mayhew, E

    1983-01-01

    Spleen cells from mice infected with the protozoan parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi demonstrated enhanced in vitro cytolysis of YAC-1 lymphoma cells. Selective cell depletion experiments showed that the dominant cell population mediating cytolysis of YAC-1 tumor cells expressed the characteristic phenotype of murine natural killer (NK) cells because (i) pretreatment of spleen cells with anti-asialo GM 1 antiserum plus complement abolished the cytotoxic activity; (ii) augmented cytolysis was found in athymic nude mice; (iii) pretreatment of spleen cells with anti-Thy 1.2 plus complement did not affect the level of cytolysis; and (iv) nylon wool removal of adherent cells did not reduce the augmented cytolysis. The augmented cytolysis peaked 7 days after infection, gradually diminished, and finally returned to control levels by 21 days postinfection. The parasite-induced augmentation of NK cell activity was dose-dependent: inoculation of 10(7) parasites gave maximum enhancement, whereas 10(5) or 10(4) parasites had an insignificant effect on spontaneous NK cell cytolysis. The augmented NK cell cytotoxicity was dependent upon viable parasites; inoculation of killed parasites failed to stimulate a significant increase in spontaneous cytolysis. An active infectious process was an important component of this process. The peak of NK activity in euthymic mice was closely correlated with the active stage of infection, and reduction of NK cell activity coincided with recovery from infection. By contrast, athymic nude mice were unable to control E. cuniculi infections yet maintained persistently elevated NK responses. The present data, along with previous reports, indicate that infection with E. cuniculi evokes transient modulation of host immune functions. PMID:6408001

  12. Control of Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection by ?? T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Sabrina; Dietz, Monika; Schneider, Andrea; Holtappels, Rafaela; Mach, Michael; Winkler, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with cytomegalovirus (CMV) can cause severe disease in immunosuppressed patients and infected newborns. Innate as well as cellular and humoral adaptive immune effector functions contribute to the control of CMV in immunocompetent individuals. None of the innate or adaptive immune functions are essential for virus control, however. Expansion of ?? T cells has been observed during human CMV (HCMV) infection in the fetus and in transplant patients with HCMV reactivation but the protective function of ?? T cells under these conditions remains unclear. Here we show for murine CMV (MCMV) infections that mice that lack CD8 and CD4 ??-T cells as well as B lymphocytes can control a MCMV infection that is lethal in RAG-1-/- mice lacking any T- and B-cells. ?? T cells, isolated from infected mice can kill MCMV infected target cells in vitro and, importantly, provide long-term protection in infected RAG-1-/- mice after adoptive transfer. ?? T cells in MCMV infected hosts undergo a prominent and long-lasting phenotypic change most compatible with the view that the majority of the ?? T cell population persists in an effector/memory state even after resolution of the acute phase of the infection. A clonotypically focused V?1 and V?2 repertoire was observed at later stages of the infection in the organs where MCMV persists. These findings add ?? T cells as yet another protective component to the anti-CMV immune response. Our data provide clear evidence that ?? T cells can provide an effective control mechanism of acute CMV infections, particularly when conventional adaptive immune mechanisms are insufficient or absent, like in transplant patient or in the developing immune system in utero. The findings have implications in the stem cell transplant setting, as antigen recognition by ?? T cells is not MHC-restricted and dual reactivity against CMV and tumors has been described. PMID:25658831

  13. The murine Fhit locus: isolation, characterization, and expression in normal and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pekarsky, Y; Druck, T; Cotticelli, M G; Ohta, M; Shou, J; Mendrola, J; Montgomery, J C; Buchberg, A M; Siracusa, L D; Manenti, G; Fong, L Y; Dragani, T A; Croce, C M; Huebner, K

    1998-08-01

    The murine Fhit locus maps near the centromere nu proximal Ptprg locus on mouse chromosome 14. The cDNA sequence and structure are similar to those of the human gene, with exons 5-9 encoding the protein. The predominant mRNA in the tissues and cell lines tested was an alternatively spliced form missing exon 3. Most murine cell lines tested, including lines established from normal mouse embryos and tumors, expressed very low or undetectable levels of Fhit mRNA. Most normal mouse tissues expressed wild-type Fhit mRNA, whereas approximately 40% of murine lung carcinomas expressed wild-type and aberrant Fhit RT-PCR products that lacked various exons. Several tumorigenic mouse cell lines exhibited homozygous deletions of Fhit exons. We conclude that the murine Fhit gene, like its human counterpart, is a target of alterations involved in murine carcinogenesis. PMID:9699672

  14. Toxicity of Calcium Hydroxide Nanoparticles on Murine Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Omid; Azadnia, Sina; Mozayeni, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major contributing factors, which may cause failure of endodontic treatment, is the presence of residual microorganisms in the root canal system. For years, most dentists have been using calcium hydroxide (CH) as the intracanal medicament between treatment sessions to eliminate remnant microorganisms. Reducing the size of CH particles into nanoparticles enhances the penetration of this medicament into dentinal tubules and increases their antimicrobial efficacy. This in vitro study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles and conventional CH on fibroblast cell line using the Mosmann’s Tetrazolium Toxicity (MTT) assay. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted on L929 murine fibroblast cell line by cell culture and evaluation of the direct effect of materials on the cultured cells. Materials were evaluated in two groups of 10 samples each at 24, 48 and 72 h. At each time point, 10 samples along with 5 positive and 5 negative controls were evaluated. The samples were transferred into tubes and exposed to fibroblast cells. The viability of cells was then evaluated. The Two-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Cytotoxicity of both materials decreased over time and for conventional CH was lower than that of nanoparticles. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles was similar to that of conventional CH. PMID:25598810

  15. The kin17 Protein in Murine Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Anelise C.; Gaspar, Vanessa P.; Kelmer, Sabrina M. G.; Sellani, Tarciso A.; Batista, Ana G. U.; De Lima Neto, Quirino A.; Rodrigues, Elaine G.; Fernandez, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    kin17 has been described as a protein involved in the processes of DNA replication initiation, DNA recombination, and DNA repair. kin17 has been studied as a potential molecular marker of breast cancer. This work reports the detection and localization of this protein in the murine melanoma cell line B16F10-Nex2 and in two derived subclones with different metastatic potential, B16-8HR and B16-10CR. Nuclear and chromatin-associated protein fractions were analyzed, and kin17 was detected in all fractions, with an elevated concentration observed in the chromatin-associated fraction of the clone with low metastatic potential, suggesting that the kin17 expression level could be a marker of melanoma. PMID:26610484

  16. The kin17 Protein in Murine Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Anelise C; Gaspar, Vanessa P; Kelmer, Sabrina M G; Sellani, Tarciso A; Batista, Ana G U; De Lima Neto, Quirino A; Rodrigues, Elaine G; Fernandez, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    kin17 has been described as a protein involved in the processes of DNA replication initiation, DNA recombination, and DNA repair. kin17 has been studied as a potential molecular marker of breast cancer. This work reports the detection and localization of this protein in the murine melanoma cell line B16F10-Nex2 and in two derived subclones with different metastatic potential, B16-8HR and B16-10CR. Nuclear and chromatin-associated protein fractions were analyzed, and kin17 was detected in all fractions, with an elevated concentration observed in the chromatin-associated fraction of the clone with low metastatic potential, suggesting that the kin17 expression level could be a marker of melanoma. PMID:26610484

  17. Complementation analysis of the murine scid cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zdzienicka, M.Z. |; Priestly, A.; Jeggo, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    It has been shown that several X-ray-sensitive Chinese hamster cell mutants defective in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are also impaired in the process of V(D)J recombination. The hamster mutants with this phenotype represent three distinct complementation groups, represented by the xrs series, XR-1 and V-3. The murine scid cell line also shows the same phenotype, and therefore we examined whether the scid mutant represents a new complementation group or belongs to one of the existing groups. Scid cells were fused with hamster cell mutants representing the three complementation groups. Hybrids between V-3 and scid cells were only partially complemented for X-ray sensitivity, whereas hybrids derived from fusions with the other mutants were resistant to X rays. These results suggest that V-3 and scid cells are defective in the same gene. To confirm this finding, a single human chromosome 8, which is known to carry the scid gene, was introduced into V-3 cells by microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Nine hybrid clones derived from V-3 and carrying human chromosome 8 were obtained, and seven were found to be partially complemented for X-ray sensitivity. When human chromosome 8 was introduced into scid cells, seven of eight hybrid clones became resistant to X rays. The results indicate that the defective genes in V-3 and scid are both localized on human chromosome 8. This supports the results from the fusion analysis that V-3 and scid cells are defective in the same gene. 53 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. High-dimensional analysis of the murine myeloid cell system.

    PubMed

    Becher, Burkhard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Chen, Jinmiao; Mair, Florian; Sumatoh, Hermi R; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; Low, Donovan; Ruedl, Christiane; Riccardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Poidinger, Michael; Greter, Melanie; Ginhoux, Florent; Newell, Evan W

    2014-12-01

    Advances in cell-fate mapping have revealed the complexity in phenotype, ontogeny and tissue distribution of the mammalian myeloid system. To capture this phenotypic diversity, we developed a 38-antibody panel for mass cytometry and used dimensionality reduction with machine learning-aided cluster analysis to build a composite of murine (mouse) myeloid cells in the steady state across lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. In addition to identifying all previously described myeloid populations, higher-order analysis allowed objective delineation of otherwise ambiguous subsets, including monocyte-macrophage intermediates and an array of granulocyte variants. Using mice that cannot sense granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor GM-CSF (Csf2rb(-/-)), which have discrete alterations in myeloid development, we confirmed differences in barrier tissue dendritic cells, lung macrophages and eosinophils. The methodology further identified variations in the monocyte and innate lymphoid cell compartment that were unexpected, which confirmed that this approach is a powerful tool for unambiguous and unbiased characterization of the myeloid system. PMID:25306126

  19. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by proteoliposomes and cultured rat sertoli cells: Evidence for involvement of voltage-activated and voltage-independent calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1989-12-01

    We have previously reported incorporation into liposomes of Triton X-100-solubilized FSH receptor-G-protein complexes derived from purified bovine calf testis membranes. In the present study we have used this model system to show that FSH induces flux of 45Ca2+ into such proteoliposomes in a hormone-specific concentration-dependent manner. FSH, inactivated by boiling, had no stimulatory effect on 45Ca2+ flux, nor did isolated alpha- or beta-subunits of FSH. Addition of GTP (or its analogs 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate and guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)) or sodium fluoride (in the presence or absence of GTP or its analogs) failed to induce 45Ca2+ flux into proteoliposomes, suggesting that the uptake of 45Ca2+ was receptor, and not G-protein, related. Voltage-independent (ruthenium red and gadolinium chloride) and voltage-activated (methyoxyverapamil and nifedipine) calcium channel-blocking agents reduced FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ flux into proteoliposomes to control levels. FSH also induced uptake of 45Ca2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells. Ruthenium red and gadolinium chloride had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake or estradiol secretion by cultured rat Sertoli cells, nor did methoxyverapamil or nifedipine. All four calcium channel blockers, however, were able to reduce FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake to basal levels and FSH-stimulated conversion of androstenedione to estradiol by up to 50%, indicating an involvement of Ca2+ in FSH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Our results suggest that the well documented changes in intracellular calcium levels consequent to FSH binding may be due, at least in part, to an influx of calcium through FSH receptor-regulated calcium channels.

  20. DNA repair in murine embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, Elisia D. Stambrook, Peter J.

    2008-06-10

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are rapidly proliferating, self-renewing cells that have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers to form the embryo proper. Since these cells are critical for embryo formation, they must have robust prophylactic mechanisms to ensure that their genomic integrity is preserved. Indeed, several studies have suggested that ES cells are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents and readily undergo apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells from the population. Other evidence suggests that DNA damage can cause premature differentiation in these cells. Several laboratories have also begun to investigate the role of DNA repair in the maintenance of ES cell genomic integrity. It does appear that ES cells differ in their capacity to repair damaged DNA compared to differentiated cells. This minireview focuses on repair mechanisms ES cells may use to help preserve genomic integrity and compares available data regarding these mechanisms with those utilized by differentiated cells.

  1. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savion, N.; Disatnik, M.H.; Nevo, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The degradation of (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10..mu..g/ml), arteparon (10..mu..g/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 ..mu..g/ml. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage haparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis.

  2. B cell lymphoma and myeloma in murine Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, E V; Wang, S Z; Archer, J; Dekker, N; Aerts, J M F G; Karlsson, S; Cox, T M

    2013-09-01

    Multiple myeloma and B cell lymphoma are leading causes of death in Gaucher's disease but the nature of the stimulus driving the often noted clonal expansion of immunoglobulin-secreting B cells and cognate lymphoid malignancy is unknown. We investigated the long-term development of B cell malignancies in an authentic model of non-neuronopathic Gaucher's disease in mice: selective deficiency of ?-glucocerebrosidase in haematopoietic cells [Gba(tm1Karl/tm1Karl)Tg(Mx1-cre)1Cgn/0, with excision of exons 9-11 of the murine GBA1 gene, is induced by poly[I:C]. Mice with Gaucher's disease showed visceral storage of ?-glucosylceramide and greatly elevated plasma ?-glucosylsphingosine [median 57.9 (range 19.8-159) nm; n = 39] compared with control mice from the same strain [median 0.56 (range 0.04-1.38) nm; n = 29] (p < 0.0001). Sporadic fatal B cell lymphomas developed in 11 of 21 GD mice (6-24 months) but only two of eight control animals developed tumours by age 24 months. Unexpectedly, most mice with overt lymphoma had absent or few Gaucher cells but local inflammatory macrophages were present. Eleven of 39 of Gaucher mice developed monoclonal gammopathy, but in the control group only one animal of 25 had clonal immunoglobulin abnormalities. Seven of 10 of the B cell lymphomas were found to secrete a monoclonal paraprotein and the lymphomas stained intensely for pan-B cell markers; reactive T lymphocytes were also present in tumour tissue. In the Gaucher mouse strain, it was notable that, as in patients with this disease, CD138(+) plasma cells frequently surrounded splenic macrophages engorged with glycosphingolipid. Our strain of mice, with inducible deficiency of ?-glucocerebrosidase in haematopoietic cells and a high frequency of sporadic lethal B cell malignancies, faithfully recapitulates human Gaucher's disease: it serves as a tractable model to investigate the putative role of bioactive sphingolipids in the control of B cell proliferation and the pathogenesis of myelomatosis-the most prevalent human cancer associated with this disorder. PMID:23775597

  3. Characterization of iron uptake from transferrin by murine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, R; Savigni, D L; Morgan, E H; Baker, E

    2000-01-01

    Iron is required by the brain for normal function, however, the mechanisms by which it crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are poorly understood. The uptake and efflux of transferrin (Tf) and Fe by murine brain-derived (bEND3) and lymph node-derived (m1END1) endothelial cell lines was compared. The effects of iron chelators, metabolic inhibitors and the cellular activators, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), on Tf and Fe uptake were investigated. Cells were incubated with 59Fe-125I-Tf; Fe uptake was shown to increase linearly over time for both cell lines, while Tf uptake reached a plateau within 2 h. Both Tf and Fe uptake were saturable. bEND3 cells were shown to have half as many Tf receptors as m1END1 cells, but the mean cycling times of a Tf molecule were the same. Tf and Fe efflux from the cells were measured over time, revealing that after 2 h only 25% of the Tf but 80% of the Fe remained associated with the cells. Of 7 iron chelators, only deferriprone (L1) markedly decreased Tf uptake. However, Fe uptake was reduced by more than 50% by L1, pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH) and desferrithiocin (DFT). The cellular activators TNF-alpha or LPS had little effect on Tf turnover, but they accelerated Fe uptake in both endothelial cell types. Phenylarsenoxide (PhAsO) and N-ethyl maleimide (NEM), inhibitors of Tf endocytosis, reduced both Tf and Fe uptake in both cell lines, while bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, reduced Fe uptake but did not affect Tf uptake. The results suggest that Tf and Fe uptake by both bEND3 and m1END1 is via receptor-mediated endocytosis with release of Fe from Tf within the cell and recycling of apo-Tf. On the basis of Tf- and Fe-metabolism both cell lines are similar and therefore well suited for use in in vitro models for Fe transport across the BBB. PMID:10865941

  4. A Block to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Assembly in Murine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Roberto; Rutter, Gabriel; Harris, Matthew E.; Hope, Thomas J.; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) does not replicate in murine cells. We investigated the basis of this block by infecting a murine NIH 3T3 reporter cell line that stably expressed human CD4, CCR5, and cyclin T1 and contained a transactivatable HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) cassette. Although the virus entered efficiently, formed provirus, and was expressed at a level close to that in a highly permissive human cell line, the murine cells did not support M-tropic HIV-1 replication. To determine why the virus failed to replicate, the efficiency of each postentry step in the virus replication cycle was analyzed using vesicular stomatitis virus G pseudotypes. The murine cells supported reverse transcription and integration at levels comparable to those in the human osteosarcoma-derived cell line GHOST.R5, and human cyclin T1 restored provirus expression, consistent with earlier findings of others. The infected murine cells contained nearly as much virion protein as did the human cells but released less than 1/500 the amount of p24gag into the culture medium. A small amount of p24gag was released and was in the form of fully infectious virus. Electron microscopy suggested that aberrantly assembled virion protein had accumulated in cytoplasmic vesicular structures. Virions assembling at the cell membrane were observed but were rare. The entry of M-tropic JR.FL-pseudotyped reporter virus was moderately reduced in the murine cells, suggesting a minor reduction in coreceptor function. A small reduction in the abundance of full-length viral mRNA transcripts was also noted; however, the major block was at virion assembly. This could have been due to a failure of Gag to target to the cell membrane. This block must be overcome before a murine model for HIV-1 replication can be developed. PMID:10729160

  5. Multivariate proteomic analysis of murine embryonic stem cell self-renewal versus differentiation signaling

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Multivariate proteomic analysis of murine embryonic stem cell self-renewal versus differentiation with cell proliferation and differentiation rate constants obtained from flow cytometry measurements of Oct of undifferentiated cells (MEK and ERK), and proliferation of differentiated cells (PKB , Stat3, Src, and PKC

  6. Localization of Label-Retaining Cells in Murine Vocal Fold Epithelium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leydon, Ciara; Bartlett, Rebecca S.; Roenneburg, Drew A.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Epithelial homeostasis is critical for vocal fold health, yet little is known about the cells that support epithelial self-renewal. As a known characteristic of stem cells is that they are slow-cycling in vivo, the purpose of this prospective controlled study was to identify and quantify slow-cycling cells or putative stem cells in murine

  7. Reprogramming of murine and human somatic cells using a single polycistronic vector

    E-print Network

    Saha, Krishanu

    concerns associated with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and human embryonic stem (hES) cellsReprogramming of murine and human somatic cells using a single polycistronic vector Bryce W. Careya, 2008) Directed reprogramming of somatic cells by defined factors pro- vides a novel method

  8. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Savion, N; Disatnik, M H; Nevo, Z

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells (B16-BL6 melanoma; ESb T-lymphoma) attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monlayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the [35S]O4 = -labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The macrophages do not store the heparanase intracellularly but it is instead found pericellularly and requires a continuous cell-matrix contact at the optimal pH for maintaining cell growth. The degradation of [35S]O4 = -labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10 micrograms/ml), arteparon (10 micrograms/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 micrograms/ml. In contrast, other glycosaminoglycans such as hyaluronic acid, dermatan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate as well as the specific inhibitor of exo-beta-glucuronidase D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone failed to inhibit the degradation of sulfated proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. However, the following antiproteases--alpha 2-macroglobulin, antithrombin III, leupeptin, and phenylmethylsulfony fluoride (PMSF)--failed to inhibit this degradation process, and only alpha 1-antitrypsin inhibited the heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage heparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase, inhibited at concentrations of 1 and 3 micrograms/ml, respectively. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis. PMID:3805131

  9. Anti-leukemic properties of deferasirox via apoptosis in murine leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sol-Rim; Lee, Jae-Wook; Jang, Pil-Sang; Cho, Bin; Jeong, Dae-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background Although deferasirox (DFX) is reported to have anti-tumor effects, its anti-leukemic activity remains unclear. We evaluated the effect of DFX treatment on two murine lymphoid leukemia cell lines, and clarified the mechanisms underlying its potential anti-leukemic activity. Methods L1210 and A20 murine lymphoid leukemia cell lines were treated with DFX. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthaizol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethylphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, respectively. Immunoblotting was performed to detect the expression of key apoptotic proteins. Results In dose- and time-dependent manner, DFX decreased viability and increased apoptosis of murine leukemic cells. Fas expression was significantly higher in A20 cells than in L1210 cells at all DFX concentrations tested. Although both cell lines exhibited high caspase 3 and caspase 9 expression, a critical component of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, expression was greater in L1210 cells. In contrast, caspase 8, a key factor in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, showed greater expression in A20 cells. Cytochrome c expression was significantly higher in L1210 cells. In both cell lines, co-treatment with ferric chloride and DFX diminished the expression of these intracellular proteins, as compared to DFX treatment alone. Conclusion Treatment with DFX increased caspase-dependent apoptosis in two murine lymphoid leukemia cell lines, with differing apoptotic mechanisms in each cell line. PMID:25830128

  10. Phenotypic, Morphological and Adhesive Differences of Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Cultured on Murine versus Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Doreen; Friedrichs, Jens; Ritter, Steffi; Käubler, Theresa; Werner, Carsten; Bornhäuser, Martin; Corbeil, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Xenogenic transplantation models have been developed to study human hematopoiesis in immunocompromised murine recipients. They still have limitations and therefore it is important to delineate all players within the bone marrow that could account for species-specific differences. Here, we evaluated the proliferative capacity, morphological and physical characteristics of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) after co-culture on murine or human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). After seven days, human CD34+CD133– HSPCs expanded to similar extents on both feeder layers while cellular subsets comprising primitive CD34+CD133+ and CD133+CD34– phenotypes are reduced fivefold on murine MSCs. The number of migrating HSPCs was also reduced on murine cells suggesting that MSC adhesion influences cellular polarization of HSPC. We used atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy to quantify their adhesive interactions. We found threefold higher detachment forces of human HSPCs from murine MSCs compared to human ones. This difference is related to the N-cadherin expression level on murine MSCs since its knockdown abolished their differential adhesion properties with human HSPCs. Our observations highlight phenotypic, morphological and adhesive differences of human HSPCs when cultured on murine or human MSCs, which raise some caution in data interpretation when xenogenic transplantation models are used. PMID:26498381

  11. Murine Norovirus Replication Induces G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest in Asynchronously Growing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Colin; Brown, Chris M.; Westphal, Dana; Ward, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many viruses replicate most efficiently in specific phases of the cell cycle, establishing or exploiting favorable conditions for viral replication, although little is known about the relationship between caliciviruses and the cell cycle. Microarray and Western blot analysis of murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1)-infected cells showed changes in cyclin transcript and protein levels indicative of a G1 phase arrest. Cell cycle analysis confirmed that MNV-1 infection caused a prolonging of the G1 phase and an accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. The accumulation in G0/G1 phase was caused by a reduction in cell cycle progression through the G1/S restriction point, with MNV-1-infected cells released from a G1 arrest showing reduced cell cycle progression compared to mock-infected cells. MNV-1 replication was compared in populations of cells synchronized into specific cell cycle phases and in asynchronously growing cells. Cells actively progressing through the G1 phase had a 2-fold or higher increase in virus progeny and capsid protein expression over cells in other phases of the cell cycle or in unsynchronized populations. These findings suggest that MNV-1 infection leads to prolonging of the G1 phase and a reduction in S phase entry in host cells, establishing favorable conditions for viral protein production and viral replication. There is limited information on the interactions between noroviruses and the cell cycle, and this observation of increased replication in the G1 phase may be representative of other members of the Caliciviridae. IMPORTANCE Noroviruses have proven recalcitrant to growth in cell culture, limiting our understanding of the interaction between these viruses and the infected cell. In this study, we used the cell-culturable MNV-1 to show that infection of murine macrophages affects the G1/S cell cycle phase transition, leading to an arrest in cell cycle progression and an accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, we show that MNV replication is enhanced in the G1 phase compared to other stages of the cell cycle. Manipulating the cell cycle or adapting to cell cycle responses of the host cell is a mechanism to enhance virus replication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a norovirus interacting with the host cell cycle and exploiting the favorable conditions of the G0/G1 phase for RNA virus replication. PMID:25810556

  12. Differential Effects of Mycobacterium bovis BCG on Macrophages and Dendritic Cells from Murine Spleen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhengzhong; Meng, Chuang; Qiang, Bin; Gu, Hongyan; Sun, Lin; Yin, Yuelan; Pan, Zhiming; Chen, Xiang; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (M?) and dendritic cells (DCs) are both pivotal antigen presenting cells capable of inducing specific cellular responses to inhaled mycobacteria, and thus, they may be important in the initiation of early immune responses to mycobacterial infection. In this study, we evaluated and compared the roles of murine splenic DCs and M?s in immunity against Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (M.bovis BCG). The number of internalized rBCG-GFP observed was obviously greater in murine splenic M?s compared with DCs, and the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) levels in M?s were all higher than in DCs. DCs have a stronger capacity for presenting Ag85A peptide to specific T hybridoma and when the murine splenic M?s were infected with BCG and rBCG::Ag85A, low level of antigen presenting activity was detected. These data suggest that murine splenic M?s participate in mycobacteria uptake, killing and inducing inflammatory response, whereas the murine splenic DCs are primarily involved in specific antigen presentation and T cell activation. PMID:26473844

  13. Differential Effects of Mycobacterium bovis BCG on Macrophages and Dendritic Cells from Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhengzhong; Meng, Chuang; Qiang, Bin; Gu, Hongyan; Sun, Lin; Yin, Yuelan; Pan, Zhiming; Chen, Xiang; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (M?) and dendritic cells (DCs) are both pivotal antigen presenting cells capable of inducing specific cellular responses to inhaled mycobacteria, and thus, they may be important in the initiation of early immune responses to mycobacterial infection. In this study, we evaluated and compared the roles of murine splenic DCs and M?s in immunity against Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (M.bovis BCG). The number of internalized rBCG-GFP observed was obviously greater in murine splenic M?s compared with DCs, and the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) levels in M?s were all higher than in DCs. DCs have a stronger capacity for presenting Ag85A peptide to specific T hybridoma and when the murine splenic M?s were infected with BCG and rBCG::Ag85A, low level of antigen presenting activity was detected. These data suggest that murine splenic M?s participate in mycobacteria uptake, killing and inducing inflammatory response, whereas the murine splenic DCs are primarily involved in specific antigen presentation and T cell activation. PMID:26473844

  14. Prevalence and Characterization of Murine Leukemia Virus Contamination in Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Uphoff, Cord C.; Lange, Sandra; Denkmann, Sabine A.; Garritsen, Henk S. P.; Drexler, Hans G.

    2015-01-01

    Contaminations of cell cultures with microbiological organisms are well documented and can be managed in cell culture laboratories applying reliable detection, elimination and prevention strategies. However, the presence of viral contaminations in cell cultures is still a matter of debate and cannot be determined with general detection methods. In the present study we screened 577 human cell lines for the presence of murine leukemia viruses (MLV). Nineteen cell lines were found to be contaminated with MLV, including 22RV1 which is contaminated with the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus variant of MLV. Of these, 17 cell lines were shown to produce active retroviruses determined by product enhanced reverse transcriptase PCR assay for reverse transcriptase activity. The contaminated cell lines derive from various solid tumor types as well as from leukemia and lymphoma types. A contamination of primary human cells from healthy volunteers could not be substantiated. Sequence analyses of 17 MLV PCR products and five complete MLV genomes of different infected cell lines revealed at least three groups of related MLV genotypes. The viruses harvested from the supernatants of infected cell cultures were infectious to uninfected cell cultures. In the course of the study we found that contamination of human genomic DNA preparations with murine DNA can lead to false-positive results. Presumably, xenotransplantations of the human tumor cells into immune-deficient mice to determine the tumorigenicity of the cells are mainly responsible for the MLV contaminations. Furthermore, the use of murine feeder layer cells during the establishment of human cell lines and a cross-contamination with MLV from infected cultures might be sources of infection. A screening of cell cultures for MLV contamination is recommended given a contamination rate of 3.3%. PMID:25927683

  15. Involvement of a chromatin modifier in response to mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP)-induced Sertoli cell injury: Probably an indirect action via the regulation of NF?B/FasL circuitry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiwei; Dong, Yushu; Xu, Chun; Jiang, Liming; Chen, Yongjie; Jiang, Cheng; Hou, Wugang; Li, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •MTA1 expression is upregulated in SCs upon MEHP treatment. •Knockdown of MTA1 in SCs impairs the MEHP-induced NF?B signaling activation. •Knockdown of MTA1 inhibits recruitment of NF?B onto FasL promoter in MEHP-treated SCs. -- Abstract: The Fas/FasL signaling pathway, controlled by nuclear factor-?B (NF?B) at the transcriptional level, is critical for triggering germ cell apoptosis in response to mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP)-induced Sertoli cell (SC) injury, but the exact regulation mechanism remain unknown. Here, we discovered that expression level of Metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1), a component of the Mi-2/nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase complex, was upregulated in SCs during the early recovery after MEHP exposure. This expression change was in line with the dynamic changes in germ cell apoptosis in response to MEHP treatment. Furthermore, a knockdown of MTA1 by RNAi in SCs was found to impair the MEHP-induced early activation of NF?B pathway and abolish the recruitment of NF?B onto FasL promoter, which consequently diminished the MEHP-triggered FasL induction. Considering that Fas/FasL is a well characterized apoptosis initiating signaling during SCs injury, our results point to a potential “switch on” effect of MTA1, which may govern the activation of NF?B/FasL cascade in MEHP-insulted SCs. Overall, the MTA1/NF?B/FasL circuit may serve as an important defensive/repairing mechanism to help to control the germ cell quality after SCs injury.

  16. Effect of resveratrol on cell cycle proteins in murine transplantable liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liang; Sun, Zhong-Jie; Wu, Sheng-Li; Pan, Cheng-En

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the antitumour activity of resveratrol and its effect on the expression of cell cycle proteins including cyclin D1, cyclin B1 and p34cdc2 in transplanted liver cancer of murine. METHODS: Murine transplanted hepatoma H22 model was used to evaluate the in vivo antitumor activity of resveratrol. Following abdominal administration of resveratrol, the change in tumour size was recorded and the protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin B1 and p34cdc2 in the tumor and adjacent noncancerous liver tissues were measured by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Following treatment of H22 tumour bearing mice with resveratrol at 10 or 15 mg/kg bodyweight for 10 d, the growth of murine transplantable liver cancer was inhibited by 36.3% or 49.3%, respectively. The inhibitory effect was significant compared to that in control group (P < 0.05). The level of expression of cyclin B1 and p34cdc2 protein was decreased in the transplantable murine hepatoma 22 treated with resveratrol whereas the expression of cyclin D1 protein did not change. CONCLUSION: Resveratrol exhibits anti-tumour activities on murine hepatoma H22. The underlying anti-tumour mechanism of resveratrol might involve the inhibition of the cell cycle progression by decreasing the expression of cyclinB1 and p34cdc2 protein. PMID:14562407

  17. An Examination of the Effect of Decaying Exponential Pulse Electric Fields on Cell Mortality in Murine Spleenocytes, Hybridomas, and Human Natural Killer Cells

    E-print Network

    Stryker, Gabrielle A.

    in Murine Spleenocytes, Hybridomas, and Human Natural Killer Cells Sachin Kandlikar1 , Barbara Oakley2 spleenocytes, hybridomas, and human natural killer. Cells were cultured and separate samples examined at 24 in this experiment were the murine hybridoma TIB-200 (HNK-1); and the human natural killer cell line CRL-2408 (NK-92

  18. METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE MURINE HEPATOMA CELL BIOASSAY-DIRECTED ISOLATION OF CANCER CHEMOPREVENTIVE AGENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of a murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cell line over a decade ago for the isolation of phase II enzyme inducing agents by a group from Johns Hopkins University led to the identification of sulforaphane as a major cancer chemopreventive agent in broccoli. We have found that choices among...

  19. GPBAR1/TGR5 Mediates Bile Acid-Induced Cytokine Expression in Murine Kupffer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Guiyu; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Fu, Xianghui; Meng, Zhipeng; Zhang, Wenyu; Wang, Yan-Dong; Van Ness, Carl; Yu, Donna; Xu, Rongzhen; Huang, Wendong

    2014-01-01

    GPBAR1/TGR5 is a novel plasma membrane-bound G protein–coupled bile acid (BA) receptor. BAs are known to induce the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the liver with unknown mechanism. Here we show that without other external stimuli, TGR5 activation alone induced the expression of interleukin 1? (IL-1?) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) in murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 or murine Kupffer cells. The TGR5-mediated increase of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was suppressed by JNK inhibition. Moreover, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in mouse liver by 1% cholic acid (CA) diet was blunted in JNK?/? mice. TGR5 activation by its ligands enhanced the phosphorylation levels, DNA-binding and trans-activities of c-Jun and ATF2 transcription factors. Finally, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Kupffer cells by TGR5 activation correlated with the suppression of Cholesterol 7?-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) expression in murine hepatocytes. These results suggest that TGR5 mediates the BA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in murine Kupffer cells through JNK-dependent pathway. This novel role of TGR5 may correlate to the suppression of Cyp7a1 expression in hepatocytes and contribute to the delicate BA feedback regulation. PMID:24755711

  20. Incorporation of Murine Brain Progenitor Cells into the Developing Mammalian Retina

    E-print Network

    Sakaguchi, Donald S.

    the influence of a developing host environment on the survival, differentiation, and morphologic integration of murine brain progenitor cells (mBPCs) trans- planted into the mammalian retina. METHODS. Enhanced green. Transplanted mBPCs survived and differentiated in vivo, and extensive morphologic integration was observed

  1. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIFFERENT EMISSION PARTICLES IN MURINE PULMONARY EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative Toxicity of Different Emission Particles in Murine Pulmonary Epithelial Cells and Macrophages. T Stevens1, M Daniels2, P Singh2, M I Gilmour2. 1 UNC, Chapel Hill 27599 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    Epidemiological studies have shown ...

  2. Comparative study of artificial chromosome centromeres in human and murine cells

    PubMed Central

    Moralli, Daniela; Jefferson, Andrew; Valeria Volpi, Emanuela; Larin Monaco, Zoia

    2013-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are a valuable tool in the analysis of complex chromatin structures such as the human centromere because of their small size and relative simplicity compared with normal human chromosomes. This report includes a comprehensive study of the centromere and chromatin composition of HAC, expressing human genes, generated in human cells and transferred to murine cells. The analysis involved chromatin immuno-precipitation and immuno-FISH on metaphase chromosomes and chromatin fibres. In both the cell types, the HAC consisted of alphoid and non-alphoid DNA and were mainly euchromatic in composition, although a pericentromeric heterochromatic region was present on all the HAC. Fibre-FISH and chromatin immuno-precipitation data indicated that the position of the centromere differed between HAC in human cells and in murine cells. Our work highlights the importance and utilisation of HAC for understanding the epigenetic aspects of chromosome biology. PMID:23403904

  3. Cytotoxic activity of methanol extracts from Basidiomycete mushrooms on murine cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, S; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, F; Sauleau, P; Bézivin, C; Boustie, J

    2004-04-01

    Crude methanol extracts of 58 mushroom species were screened for their cytotoxic activities against two murine cancer cell lines, L1210 and 3LL, using the tetrazolium assay. A majority of extracts (74%) exhibited IC50 > 100 microg/ml against both cell lines. A most marked activity against one of the cell lines was noted for nine species (14% of the tested species). While Amanitales and Russulales tested were not found active, Polyporales and Boletales gave better results. Four species exhibited a significant cytotoxic activity (IC50 < or = 20 microg/ml) against at least one of the two murine cancer cell lines (Ganoderma lucidum, Meripilus giganteus, Suillus granulatus, S. luteus). The last one had never been investigated for its cytotoxic compounds before. PMID:15125575

  4. Hydroxyflutamide affects connexin 43 via the activation of PI3K/Akt-dependent pathway but has no effect on the crosstalk between PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways at the Raf-1 kinase level in primary rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Zarzycka, Marta; Hejmej, Anna; Mruk, Dolores D; Gorowska, Ewelina; Kotula-Balak, Malgorzata; Klimek, Monika; Bilinska, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the effects of 2-hydroxyflutamide (HF), an active metabolite of the anti-androgen flutamide, on the activation of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) in rat Sertoli cells. Sertoli cells, isolated from 20-day-old rat testes, were cultured in vitro and treated with HF, testosterone, or HF+testosterone. Studies by western blotting demonstrated that HF inhibited the testosterone-mediated increase in c-Src activity (p<0.05). In contrast, Akt phosphorylation was augmented within 5min after HF treatment (p<0.01). This effect was accompanied by a rapid upregulation in PTEN phosphorylation (p<0.001). Despite no changes in Raf-1 phosphorylation, HF increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation (p<0.001), indicating that the effect of the anti-androgen on ERK1/2 was independent of PI3K/Akt-pathway activation at this level. Since HF inhibited the testosterone-mediated increase in c-Src activity, it is likely that activation of both Akt and ERK1/2 occurred in a p-Src independent manner. Activation of PI3K/Akt-pathway by HF resulted in the reduced level of Sertoli cell functional marker, connexin 43 (p<0.01). Collectively, these data provide evidence that HF rapidly and transiently affects the protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways, acting both as an antagonist and agonist. Moreover, using testes of flutamide-treated rats for 7days, we demonstrated that the anti-androgen can modulate the protein kinase-dependent pathways in long term by enhancing Akt and ERK1/2 protein expression (p<0.05). PMID:26437446

  5. Development and characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine T-cell lines and clones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepe, George S., Jr.; Smith, James G.; Denman, David; Bullock, Ward E.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Several Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine cloned T-cell lines (TCLs) were isolated from spleens of C57BL/6 mice immunized with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells, using the methodology of Kimoto and Fathman (1980). These T-cells were characterized phenotypically as Thy-1.2(+) Lyt-1(+) L3T4(+) Lyt-2(-), that is, as the helper/inducer phenotype. The cloned T cells proliferate in response to histoplasmin and, in some cases, to heterologous fungal anigens. Upon injection of mice with the antigen, the T-cells mediate local delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and, after stimulation, release regulatory lymphokines.

  6. Barriers in contribution of human mesenchymal stem cells to murine muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel S; Boersma, Hester; Dambrot, Cheryl; de Vries, Antoine AF; van Bekkum, Dirk W; Knaän-Shanzer, Shoshan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study regeneration of damaged human and murine muscle implants and the contribution of added xenogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). METHODS: Minced human or mouse skeletal muscle tissues were implanted together with human or mouse MSCs subcutaneously on the back of non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. The muscle tissues (both human and murine) were minced with scalpels into small pieces (< 1 mm3) and aliquoted in portions of 200 mm3. These portions were either cryopreserved in 10% dimethylsulfoxide or freshly implanted. Syngeneic or xenogeneic MSCs were added to the minced muscles directly before implantation. Implants were collected at 7, 14, 30 or 45 d after transplantation and processed for (immuno)histological analysis. The progression of muscle regeneration was assessed using a standard histological staining (hematoxylin-phloxin-saffron). Antibodies recognizing Pax7 and von Willebrand factor were used to detect the presence of satellite cells and blood vessels, respectively. To enable detection of the bone marrow-derived MSCs or their derivatives we used MSCs previously transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing a cytoplasmic LacZ gene. X-gal staining of the fixed tissues was used to detect ?-galactosidase-positive cells and myofibers. RESULTS: Myoregeneration in implants of fresh murine muscle was evident as early as day 7, and progressed with time to occupy 50% to 70% of the implants. Regeneration of fresh human muscle was slower. These observations of fresh muscle implants were in contrast to the regeneration of cryopreserved murine muscle that proceeded similarly to that of fresh tissue except for day 45 (P < 0.05). Cryopreserved human muscle showed minimal regeneration, suggesting that the freezing procedure was detrimental to human satellite cells. In fresh and cryopreserved mouse muscle supplemented with LacZ-tagged mouse MSCs, ?-galactosidase-positive myofibers were identified early after grafting at the well-vascularized periphery of the implants. The contribution of human MSCs to murine myofiber formation was, however, restricted to the cryopreserved mouse muscle implants. This suggests that fresh murine muscle tissue provides a suboptimal environment for maintenance of human MSCs. A detailed analysis of the histological sections of the various muscle implants revealed the presence of cellular structures with a deviating morphology. Additional stainings with alizarin red and alcian blue showed myofiber calcification in 50 of 66 human muscle implants, and encapsulated cartilage in 10 of 81 of murine muscle implants, respectively. CONCLUSION: In mouse models the engagement of human MSCs in myoregeneration might be underestimated. Furthermore, our model permits the dissection of species-specific factors in the microenvironment. PMID:25992329

  7. Analysis of apoptosis in murine embryonic stem cells 

    E-print Network

    Weaks, Regina Lanell

    1999-01-01

    Currently, efforts to generate transgenic swine using embryonic germ (EG) cells are hampered by the loss of the cells to apostasis in vitro. Yet, due to complex culture conditions, it is difficult to study apostasis directly in these cells. A...

  8. Doxorubicin treatment induces tumor cell death followed by immunomodulation in a murine neuroblastoma model

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, SEIICHIRO; SETOYAMA, YUMIKO; ODAKA, AKIO

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy of malignant tumors induces tumor cell death. Numerous antitumor agents induce apoptosis of tumor cells, which are subsequently engulfed by phagocytes, initiating an immune reaction. The induction of immunogenic cell death by antitumor agents may be advantageous for antitumor immunity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether doxorubicin is capable of inducing an immunogenic reaction in murine neuroblastoma cells. The murine neuroblastoma cell line (neuro-2a cells) was cultured in a medium containing doxorubicin or cisplatin (CDDP), and induction of cell death was confirmed by cell viability assays. Cluster of differentiation (CD)8?+ lymphocytes were co-cultured with neuro-2a cells that had died following treatment with either doxorubicin or CDDP, and CD11b+ spleen cells or bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) were added to the culture. Proliferation of CD8?+ lymphocytes and interferon (IFN)-? production were evaluated. When CD8?+ cells were co-cultured with doxorubicin-treated neuro-2a cells and BM-DCs, CD8?+ cells reacted to anti-CD3/CD28 antibody stimulation, proliferated and increased IFN-? production. IFN-? production was more effectively promoted by co-culture with doxorubicin-treated neuro-2a cells than by co-culture with CDDP-treated neuro-2a cells. These findings suggest that doxorubicin is capable of inducing immunogenic cell death in neuroblastoma cells, and thus has an immunological advantage for chemotherapy of neuroblastoma compared with CDDP. BM-DCs are considered to be the key antigen-presenting cells in the immune reaction following the induction of immunogenic neuroblastoma cell death and phagocytosis. PMID:24520271

  9. In vitro Assay for Screening of Optimal Targets for Antigen-Delivery to Murine Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Pugholm, L H; Varming, K; Agger, R

    2015-12-01

    Targeting of antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) increase the efficiency of immunization procedures and may facilitate the development of more effective vaccines. Several surface molecules on DCs have shown to be useful for antigen targeting, but many more deserves investigation for their efficacy in this respect. With this end in mind, a simple in vitro assay for screening of optimal targets for antigen-delivery to murine DCs was established. Splenocytes from mice immunized with rat IgG were targeted in vitro with a panel of different rat monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against surface markers on murine DCs. The resulting T-cell activation was analysed by determining the number of IFN-? and IL-4 secreting cells by ELISPOT. A positive effect of targeting was evident with several of the mAbs. Thus, mAbs against CD11c, CD36, CD205 and Clec7A all induced IFN-? responses that were significantly higher than those induced by non-targeting control mAbs. Anti-CD36 also induced IL-4 responses that were significantly higher than the control. The assay described here allows simultaneous analysis of a large number of potential target structures and facilitates direct comparison between the different targets regarding the strength of the T-cell responses induced by the targeted DCs. The assay could be useful as a first-line screening of potential target structures on murine DCs. PMID:26331836

  10. Murine CLCA5 is uniquely expressed in distinct niches of airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dietert, Kristina; Mundhenk, Lars; Erickson, Nancy A; Reppe, Katrin; Hocke, Andreas C; Kummer, Wolfgang; Witzenrath, Martin; Gruber, Achim D

    2015-03-01

    The murine mCLCA5 protein is a member of the chloride channel regulators, calcium-activated (CLCA) family and is suspected to play a role in airway mucus cell differentiation. Although mCLCA5 mRNA was previously found in total lung extracts, the expressing cells and functions in the naive murine respiratory tract are unknown. Therefore, mCLCA5 protein expression was identified by immunohistochemistry and confocal laser scanning microscopy using entire lung sections of naive mice. Moreover, we determined mRNA levels of functionally related genes (mClca3, mClca5, Muc5ac and Muc5b) and quantified mCLCA5-, mCLCA3- and CC10-positive cells and periodic acid-Schiff-positive mucus cells in naive, PBS-treated or Staphylococcus aureus-infected mice. We also investigated mCLCA5 protein expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus lung infection models. Finally, we determined species-specific differences in the expression patterns of the murine mCLCA5 and its human and porcine orthologs, hCLCA2 and pCLCA2. The mCLCA5 protein is uniquely expressed in highly select bronchial epithelial cells and submucosal glands in naive mice, consistent with anatomical locations of progenitor cell niches. Under conditions of challenge (PBS, S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, influenza virus), mRNA and protein expression strongly declined with protein recovery only in models retaining intact epithelial cells. In contrast to mice, human and porcine bronchial epithelial cells do not express their respective mCLCA5 orthologs and submucosal glands had fewer expressing cells, indicative of fundamental differences in mice versus humans and pigs. PMID:25212661

  11. Lenalidomide Synergistically Enhances the Effect of Dendritic Cell Vaccination in a Model of Murine Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Pham, Thanh-Nhan; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Vo, Manh-Cuong; Thanh-Tran, Huong-Thi; Lee, Youn-Kyung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Choi, Nu-Ri; Hoang, My-Dung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the efficacy of lenalidomide (LEN) in combination with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in the MOPC-315 murine myeloma model. After tumor growth, LEN was injected intraperitoneally for 4 consecutive days in combination with DC vaccination. The combination of LEN and vaccination efficiently inhibited tumor growth compared with the single agents alone. A cytotoxic assay revealed that the anticancer effects of DC vaccination plus LEN involved not only generation of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes but also NK cells. Vaccinated mice had reduced numbers of suppressor cells, including both myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells, in the spleen. The proportions of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased in the spleen, and a Th1 cytokine (interferon-?) rather than a Th2 cytokine (interleukin-10) was synthesized in response to tumor antigens. LEN enhanced the innate immune response by modulating NK cell numbers and function. In addition, LEN reduced the production levels of angiogenesis-inducing factors in tumor-bearing mice. Together, these results suggest that a combination of LEN and DC vaccination may synergistically enhance anticancer immunity in the murine myeloma model, by inhibiting immunosuppressor cells and stimulating effector cells, as well as effectively polarizing the Th1/Th2 balance in favor of a Th1-specific immune response. PMID:26325377

  12. Targeting Syk-activated B cells in murine and human chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Ryan; Allen, Jessica L; Luznik, Leo; MacDonald, Kelli P; Paz, Katelyn; Alexander, Kylie A; Vulic, Ante; Du, Jing; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taylor, Patricia A; Poe, Jonathan C; Serody, Jonathan S; Murphy, William J; Hill, Geoffrey R; Maillard, Ivan; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey S; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Ritz, Jerome; Chao, Nelson J; Clynes, Raphael A; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R

    2015-06-25

    Novel therapies for chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) are needed. Aberrant B-cell activation has been demonstrated in mice and humans with cGVHD. Having previously found that human cGVHD B cells are activated and primed for survival, we sought to further evaluate the role of the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in cGVHD in multiple murine models and human peripheral blood cells. In a murine model of multiorgan system, nonsclerodermatous disease with bronchiolitis obliterans where cGVHD is dependent on antibody and germinal center (GC) B cells, we found that activation of Syk was necessary in donor B cells, but not T cells, for disease progression. Bone marrow-specific Syk deletion in vivo was effective in treating established cGVHD, as was a small-molecule inhibitor of Syk, fostamatinib, which normalized GC formation and decreased activated CD80/86(+) dendritic cells. In multiple distinct models of sclerodermatous cGVHD, clinical and pathological disease manifestations were not eliminated when mice were therapeutically treated with fostamatinib, though both clinical and immunologic effects could be observed in one of these scleroderma models. We further demonstrated that Syk inhibition was effective at inducing apoptosis of human cGVHD B cells. Together, these data demonstrate a therapeutic potential of targeting B-cell Syk signaling in cGVHD. PMID:25852057

  13. ?? T Cells Confer Protection against Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV)

    PubMed Central

    Villacreces, Arnaud; Juzan, Marina; Rousseau, Benoît; Dulanto, Sara; Giese, Alban; Costet, Pierre; Praloran, Vincent; Moreau, Jean-François; Dubus, Pierre; Vermijlen, David

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading infectious cause of morbidity in immune-compromised patients. ?? T cells have been involved in the response to CMV but their role in protection has not been firmly established and their dependency on other lymphocytes has not been addressed. Using C57BL/6 ?? and/or ?? T cell-deficient mice, we here show that ?? T cells are as competent as ?? T cells to protect mice from CMV-induced death. ?? T cell-mediated protection involved control of viral load and prevented organ damage. ?? T cell recovery by bone marrow transplant or adoptive transfer experiments rescued CD3??/? mice from CMV-induced death confirming the protective antiviral role of ?? T cells. As observed in humans, different ?? T cell subsets were induced upon CMV challenge, which differentiated into effector memory cells. This response was observed in the liver and lungs and implicated both CD27+ and CD27? ?? T cells. NK cells were the largely preponderant producers of IFN? and cytotoxic granules throughout the infection, suggesting that the protective role of ?? T cells did not principally rely on either of these two functions. Finally, ?? T cells were strikingly sufficient to fully protect Rag?/??c?/? mice from death, demonstrating that they can act in the absence of B and NK cells. Altogether our results uncover an autonomous protective antiviral function of ?? T cells, and open new perspectives for the characterization of a non classical mode of action which should foster the design of new ?? T cell based therapies, especially useful in ?? T cell compromised patients. PMID:25747674

  14. ?? T cells confer protection against murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV).

    PubMed

    Khairallah, Camille; Netzer, Sonia; Villacreces, Arnaud; Juzan, Marina; Rousseau, Benoît; Dulanto, Sara; Giese, Alban; Costet, Pierre; Praloran, Vincent; Moreau, Jean-François; Dubus, Pierre; Vermijlen, David; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Capone, Myriam

    2015-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading infectious cause of morbidity in immune-compromised patients. ?? T cells have been involved in the response to CMV but their role in protection has not been firmly established and their dependency on other lymphocytes has not been addressed. Using C57BL/6 ?? and/or ?? T cell-deficient mice, we here show that ?? T cells are as competent as ?? T cells to protect mice from CMV-induced death. ?? T cell-mediated protection involved control of viral load and prevented organ damage. ?? T cell recovery by bone marrow transplant or adoptive transfer experiments rescued CD3?-/- mice from CMV-induced death confirming the protective antiviral role of ?? T cells. As observed in humans, different ?? T cell subsets were induced upon CMV challenge, which differentiated into effector memory cells. This response was observed in the liver and lungs and implicated both CD27+ and CD27- ?? T cells. NK cells were the largely preponderant producers of IFN? and cytotoxic granules throughout the infection, suggesting that the protective role of ?? T cells did not principally rely on either of these two functions. Finally, ?? T cells were strikingly sufficient to fully protect Rag-/-?c-/- mice from death, demonstrating that they can act in the absence of B and NK cells. Altogether our results uncover an autonomous protective antiviral function of ?? T cells, and open new perspectives for the characterization of a non classical mode of action which should foster the design of new ?? T cell based therapies, especially useful in ?? T cell compromised patients. PMID:25747674

  15. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-05-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN/sup -/) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10/sup -6/ M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied.

  16. Anti-(human LFA-1) monoclonal antibodies bind P815 murine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Palisson, M J; Altemeyer, A; Moosbrugger, I; Warter, S; Hauptmann, G; Bischoff, P

    1992-01-01

    Using anti-CD11a and anti-CD18 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed respectively against the alpha and the beta chains of LFA-1, we obtained an important and specific staining of P815 murine tumour cells. Both ascitic and cultured cells displayed a positive staining. Other murine tumours of haematopoietic origin, as well as lymphocytes or lymphoblasts from DBA/2 mice, were not labelled by the same monoclonal antibodies. These results were surprising since, to our knowledge, no case of cross-reaction between species has been reported with LFA-1. Moreover, competition assays showed that epitopes recognized by the two anti-CD11a antibodies were different from those identified by H35.89.9, a mAb raised against the murine LFA-1 alpha chain. Using allogeneic cytotoxic T lymphocytes, we also showed that anti-(human LFA-1) mAbs were unable to block the lysis of P815 by these effector cells. Thus, the putative functional properties of these structures, as well as their importance from an antigeneic point of view, remain to be assessed. PMID:1373342

  17. Notch signalling pathway in murine embryonic stem cell derived haematopoiesis 

    E-print Network

    Huang, Caoxin

    2013-07-06

    Haematopoiesis is the process to produce haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), haematopoietic progenitors (HPCs) and terminally differentiated cell types. In the adult, HSCs resided in bone marrow while in the embryo, ...

  18. 1.8 Å structure of murine GITR ligand dimer expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Almo, Steven C.

    2009-05-01

    1.8 Å X-ray crystal structure of mouse GITRL expressed in D. melanogaster S2 cells shows an identical ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric assembly similar to that observed previously for the E. coli-expressed protein. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand (GITRL), a prominent member of the TNF superfamily, activates its receptor on both effector and regulatory T cells to generate critical costimulatory signals that have been implicated in a wide range of T-cell immune functions. The crystal structures of murine and human orthologs of GITRL recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have previously been determined. In contrast to all classical TNF structures, including the human GITRL structure, murine GITRL demonstrated a unique ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric organization. Such a novel assembly behavior indicated a dramatic impact on receptor activation as well as on the signaling mechanism associated with the murine GITRL costimulatory system. In this present work, the 1.8 Å resolution crystal structure of murine GITRL expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells is reported. The eukaryotic protein-expression system allows transport of the recombinant protein into the extracellular culture medium, thus maximizing the possibility of obtaining correctly folded material devoid of any folding/assembly artifacts that are often suspected with E. coli-expressed proteins. The S2 cell-expressed murine GITRL adopts an identical ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric structure to that observed for the E. coli-expressed protein, thus conclusively demonstrating the novel quaternary structure assembly behavior of murine GITRL.

  19. Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Are a Site of Murine Cytomegalovirus Latency and Reactivation?

    PubMed Central

    Seckert, Christof K.; Renzaho, Angélique; Tervo, Hanna-Mari; Krause, Claudia; Deegen, Petra; Kühnapfel, Birgit; Reddehase, Matthias J.; Grzimek, Natascha K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) is frequently transmitted by organ transplantation, and its reactivation under conditions of immunosuppressive prophylaxis against graft rejection by host-versus-graft disease bears a risk of graft failure due to viral pathogenesis. CMV is the most common cause of infection following liver transplantation. Although hematopoietic cells of the myeloid lineage are a recognized source of latent CMV, the cellular sites of latency in the liver are not comprehensively typed. Here we have used the BALB/c mouse model of murine CMV infection to identify latently infected hepatic cell types. We performed sex-mismatched bone marrow transplantation with male donors and female recipients to generate latently infected sex chromosome chimeras, allowing us to distinguish between Y-chromosome (gene sry or tdy)-positive donor-derived hematopoietic descendants and Y-chromosome-negative cells of recipients' tissues. The viral genome was found to localize primarily to sry-negative CD11b? CD11c? CD31+ CD146+ cells lacking major histocompatibility complex class II antigen (MHC-II) but expressing murine L-SIGN. This cell surface phenotype is typical of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). Notably, sry-positive CD146+ cells were distinguished by the expression of MHC-II and did not harbor latent viral DNA. In this model, the frequency of latently infected cells was found to be 1 to 2 per 104 LSECs, with an average copy number of 9 (range, 4 to 17) viral genomes. Ex vivo-isolated, latently infected LSECs expressed the viral genes m123/ie1 and M122/ie3 but not M112-M113/e1, M55/gB, or M86/MCP. Importantly, in an LSEC transfer model, infectious virus reactivated from recipients' tissue explants with an incidence of one reactivation per 1,000 viral-genome-carrying LSECs. These findings identified LSECs as the main cellular site of murine CMV latency and reactivation in the liver. PMID:19535440

  20. Targeting the inhibitory receptor CTLA-4 on T cells increased abscopal effects in murine mesothelioma model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Licun; Wu, Matthew Onn; De la Maza, Luis; Yun, Zhihong; Yu, Julie; Zhao, Yidan; Cho, John; de Perrot, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that blockade of immune suppressive CTLA-4 resulted in tumor growth delay when combined with chemotherapy in murine mesothelioma. Tumor-infiltrating T cells (TIT) after local radiotherapy (LRT) play critical roles in abscopal effect against cancer. We attempt to improve the local and abscopal effect by modulating T cell immunity with systemic blockade of CTLA-4 signal. The growth of primary tumors was significantly inhibited by LRT while CTLA-4 antibody enhanced the antitumor effect. Growth delay of the second tumors was achieved when the primary tumor was radiated. LRT resulted in more T cell infiltration into both tumors, including Treg and cytotoxic T cells. Interestingly, the proportion of Treg over effector T cells in both tumors was reversed after CTLA-4 blockade, while CD8 T cells were further activated. The expression of the immune-related genes was upregulated and cytokine production was significantly increased. LRT resulted in an increase of TIT, while CTLA-4 blockade led to significant reduction of Tregs and increase of cytotoxic T cells in both tumors. The abscopal effect is enhanced by targeting the immune checkpoints through modulation of T cell immune response in murine mesothelioma. PMID:25980578

  1. Generation of murine induced pluripotent stem cells by using high-density distributed electrodes network.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Yu; Li, Zhihong; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Linju Yen, B; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-09-01

    This study reports a robust method of gene transfection in a murine primary cell model by using a high-density electrodes network (HDEN). By demonstrating high cell viability after gene transfection and successful expression of transgenes including fluorescent proteins, the HDEN device shows great promise as a solution in which reprogramming efficiency using non-viral induction for generation of murine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is optimized. High and steady transgene expression levels in host cells of iPSCs can be demonstrated using this method. Moreover, the HDEN device achieved successful gene transfection with a low voltage of less than 180 V while requiring relatively low cell numbers (less than 1.5?×?10(4) cells). The results are comparable to current conventional methods, demonstrating a reasonable fluorescent-plasmid transfection rate (42.4% in single transfection and 24.5% in triple transfection) and high cell viability of over 95%. The gene expression levels of each iPSC factor was measured to be over 10-fold higher than that reported in previous studies using a single mouse embryonic fibroblast cell. Our results demonstrate that the generation of iPSCs using HDEN transfection of plasmid DNA may be a feasible and safe alternative to using viral transfection methods in the near future. PMID:26396661

  2. Identification and Analysis of Natural Killer Cells in Murine Nasal Passages

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazunari; Sato, Shintaro; Sato, Ayuko; Mandelboim, Ofer; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Natural killer (NK) cells in the upper respiratory airways are not well characterized. In the current study, we sought to characterize and functionally assess murine nasal NK cells. Methods Using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, we compared the nasal NK cells of Ncr1GFP/+ knock-in mice, whose NK cells produced green fluorescent protein, with their splenic and pulmonary counterparts. In addition, we functionally analyzed the nasal NK cells of these mice in vitro. To assess the in vivo functions of nasal NK cells, C57BL/6 mice depleted of NK cells after treatment with PK136 antibody were nasally infected with influenza virus PR8. Results Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the presence of NK cells in the lamina propria of nasal mucosa, and flow cytometry showed that these cells were of NK cell lineage. The expression patterns of Ly49 receptor, CD11b/CD27, CD62L and CD69 revealed that nasal NK cells had an immature and activated phenotype compared with that of their splenic and pulmonary counterparts. Effector functions including degranulation and IFN(interferon)-? production after in vitro stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate plus ionomycin or IL(interleukin)-12 plus IL-18 were dampened in nasal NK cells, and the depletion of NK cells led to an increased influenza virus titer in nasal passages. Conclusions The NK cells of the murine nasal passage belong to the conventional NK cell linage and characteristically demonstrate an immature and activated phenotype. Despite their hyporesponsiveness in vitro, nasal NK cells play important roles in the host defense against nasal influenza virus infection. PMID:26575399

  3. A murine stromal cell line promotes the proliferation of the human factor-dependent leukemic cell line UT-7.

    PubMed

    Auffray, I; Dubart, A; Izac, B; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1994-05-01

    In long-term human bone marrow cultures, stromal cells of human origin are usually used on the assumption that human primitive progenitor cells do not respond to cytokines produced by stromal cells from other species. There is accumulating evidence, however, that murine stromal cells also promote maintenance and differentiation of very primitive human stem cells, which suggests the existence of novel stromal activities that cross species barriers. In this study, we show that a murine bone marrow-derived stromal cell line, MS-5, allows the proliferation of the human leukemic cell line UT-7. The long-term growth of UT-7 is usually supported only by human interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or erythropoietin (Epo). None of these three cytokines was involved in the observed effect, since murine GM-CSF and IL-3 do not act on human cells and MS-5 cells do not produce Epo. Soluble stem cell factor (SCF) induced UT-7 cell proliferation. However, S1/S1 mutant fibroblasts also supported UT-7 cell growth and anti-c-kit antibodies only partially abolished UT-7 cell proliferative response to MS-5 cells. These observations excluded a major role of SCF in this system. MS-5-derived growth-promoting activity was diffusible, but attempts to grow UT-7 cells in high levels of known soluble murine stromal-derived cytokines active on human cells showed no or minimal response, suggesting that MS-5's proliferative effect was not mediated by known cytokines. Finally, involvement of an autocrine loop of activation induced by MS-5 was excluded: RT-PCR analysis did not detect increased transcripts for GM-CSF, IL-3, IL-6, SCF, or Epo in UT-7 cells cocultured for 2 to 6 days with MS-5. In addition, UT-7 cell proliferation on MS-5 was not inhibited by neutralizing antibodies against the human GM-CSF receptor or the human IL-6 receptor alpha chain. Whether UT-7 cell proliferation triggered by MS-5 reflects the existence of novel stromal cytokines or results from synergistic interactions on the MS-5 cell surface between extracellular matrix proteins and cytokines will require further investigation. PMID:7513651

  4. Enhanced gene expression of the murine ecotropic retroviral receptor and its human homolog in proliferating cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, T; Yoshimoto, E; Meruelo, D

    1992-01-01

    The receptor for gp70 envelope glycoprotein of murine ecotropic leukemia virus is essential for virus entry into the host cell and has been recently demonstrated to function as a cationic amino acid transporter. In the experiments reported herein, we compared the gene expression of the murine ecotropic retroviral receptor (ERR) and its human homolog (H13) in rapidly proliferating cells versus resting cells using four different systems. (i) The expression of ERR gene is enhanced during activation of T and B lymphocytes by concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide, respectively. Similar enhancement is observed by adding phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or calcium ionophore (A23187). These phenomena appear to involve protein kinase C; two PMA analogs, 4 alpha-phorbol and 4 alpha-PMA, lacking the ability to activate protein kinase C fail to induce elevated levels of gene expression, and the protein kinase C inhibitor, H7 [1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride[, inhibits the enhancement induced by PMA. (ii) Friend murine leukemia virus induces rapid splenomegaly, and acute erythroleukemia in sensitive mice. Concomitantly with splenomegaly, ERR gene expression in spleen cells increases dramatically. (iii) The level of expression of the ERR or H13 gene in a variety of tumor cells is highly elevated compared with the level in noncancerous cells. (iv) H13 gene expression decreases upon terminal differentiation of the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 into granulocytes or macrophages by dimethyl sulfoxide or PMA, respectively. These results suggest that ERR and H13 genes play an important role in cellular proliferation. Images PMID:1318407

  5. Murine CMV infection induces the continuous production of mucosal resident T cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Caldeira-Dantas, Sofia; Turula, Holly; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a herpesvirus that persists for life and maintains extremely large numbers of T cells with select specificities in circulation. However, it is unknown how viral persistence impacts T cell populations in mucosal sites. We found that many murine (M)CMV-specific CD8s in mucosal tissues became resident memory T cells (TRM). These cells adopted an intraepithelial localization in the salivary gland that correlated with, but did not depend on, expression of the integrin CD103. MCMV-specific TRM cells formed early after infection and spleen-localized cells had reduced capacities to become TRM at late times. Surprisingly however, small numbers of new TRM cells were formed from the circulating pool throughout infection, favoring populations maintained at high levels in the blood and shifting the immunodominance within the TRM populations over time. These data show that mucosal TRM populations can be dynamically maintained by a persistent infection. PMID:26526996

  6. Murine CMV Infection Induces the Continuous Production of Mucosal Resident T Cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Corinne J; Caldeira-Dantas, Sofia; Turula, Holly; Snyder, Christopher M

    2015-11-10

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a herpesvirus that persists for life and maintains extremely large numbers of T cells with select specificities in circulation. However, it is unknown how viral persistence impacts T cell populations in mucosal sites. We found that many murine (M)CMV-specific CD8s in mucosal tissues became resident memory T cells (TRM). These cells adopted an intraepithelial localization in the salivary gland that correlated with, but did not depend on, expression of the integrin CD103. MCMV-specific TRM cells formed early after infection, and spleen-localized cells had reduced capacities to become TRM at late times. Surprisingly, however, small numbers of new TRM cells were formed from the circulating pool throughout infection, favoring populations maintained at high levels in the blood and shifting the immunodominance within the TRM populations over time. These data show that mucosal TRM populations can be dynamically maintained by a persistent infection. PMID:26526996

  7. Regulation of Glycan Structures in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nairn, Alison V.; Aoki, Kazuhiro; dela Rosa, Mitche; Porterfield, Mindy; Lim, Jae-Min; Kulik, Michael; Pierce, J. Michael; Wells, Lance; Dalton, Stephen; Tiemeyer, Michael; Moremen, Kelley W.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance and structural diversity of glycans on glycoproteins and glycolipids are highly regulated and play important roles during vertebrate development. Because of the challenges associated with studying glycan regulation in vertebrate embryos, we have chosen to study mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as they differentiate into embryoid bodies (EBs) or into extraembryonic endodermal (ExE) cells as a model for cellular differentiation. We profiled N- and O-glycan structures isolated from these cell populations and examined transcripts encoding the corresponding enzymatic machinery for glycan biosynthesis in an effort to probe the mechanisms that drive the regulation of glycan diversity. During differentiation from mouse ES cells to either EBs or ExE cells, general trends were detected. The predominance of high mannose N-glycans in ES cells shifted to an equal abundance of complex and high mannose structures, increased sialylation, and increased ?-Gal termination in the differentiated cell populations. Whereas core 1 O-glycan structures predominated in all three cell populations, increased sialylation and increased core diversity characterized the O-glycans of both differentiated cell types. Increased polysialylation was also found in both differentiated cell types. Differences between the two differentiated cell types included greater sialylation of N-glycans in EBs, whereas ?-Gal-capped structures were more prevalent in ExE cells. Changes in glycan structures generally, but not uniformly, correlated with alterations in transcript abundance for the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting that transcriptional regulation contributes significantly to the regulation of glycan expression. Knowledge of glycan structural diversity and transcript regulation should provide greater understanding of the roles of protein glycosylation in vertebrate development. PMID:22988249

  8. Cholinergic epithelial cell with chemosensory traits in murine thymic medulla.

    PubMed

    Panneck, Alexandra Regina; Rafiq, Amir; Schütz, Burkhard; Soultanova, Aichurek; Deckmann, Klaus; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Weihe, Eberhard; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Grau, Veronika; del Rey, Adriana; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Specialized epithelial cells with a tuft of apical microvilli ("brush cells") sense luminal content and initiate protective reflexes in response to potentially harmful substances. They utilize the canonical taste transduction cascade to detect "bitter" substances such as bacterial quorum-sensing molecules. In the respiratory tract, most of these cells are cholinergic and are approached by cholinoceptive sensory nerve fibers. Utilizing two different reporter mouse strains for the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), we observed intense labeling of a subset of thymic medullary cells. ChAT expression was confirmed by in situ hybridization. These cells showed expression of villin, a brush cell marker protein, and ultrastructurally exhibited lateral microvilli. They did not express neuroendocrine (chromogranin A, PGP9.5) or thymocyte (CD3) markers but rather thymic epithelial (CK8, CK18) markers and were immunoreactive for components of the taste transduction cascade such as G?-gustducin, transient receptor potential melastatin-like subtype 5 channel (TRPM5), and phospholipase C?2. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction confirmed the expression of G?-gustducin, TRPM5, and phospholipase C?2. Thymic "cholinergic chemosensory cells" were often in direct contact with medullary epithelial cells expressing the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit ?3. These cells have recently been identified as terminally differentiated epithelial cells (Hassall's corpuscle-like structures in mice). Contacts with nerve fibers (identified by PGP9.5 and CGRP antibodies), however, were not observed. Our data identify, in the thymus, a previously unrecognized presumptive chemosensitive cell that probably utilizes acetylcholine for paracrine signaling. This cell might participate in intrathymic infection-sensing mechanisms. PMID:25300645

  9. 1.8 Astroms Structure of Murine GITR Ligand Dimer Expressed in Drosophila Melanogaster S2 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, K.; Ramagopal, U; Nathenson, S; Almo, S

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand (GITRL), a prominent member of the TNF superfamily, activates its receptor on both effector and regulatory T cells to generate critical costimulatory signals that have been implicated in a wide range of T-cell immune functions. The crystal structures of murine and human orthologs of GITRL recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have previously been determined. In contrast to all classical TNF structures, including the human GITRL structure, murine GITRL demonstrated a unique 'strand-exchanged' dimeric organization. Such a novel assembly behavior indicated a dramatic impact on receptor activation as well as on the signaling mechanism associated with the murine GITRL costimulatory system. In this present work, the 1.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of murine GITRL expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells is reported. The eukaryotic protein-expression system allows transport of the recombinant protein into the extracellular culture medium, thus maximizing the possibility of obtaining correctly folded material devoid of any folding/assembly artifacts that are often suspected with E. coli-expressed proteins. The S2 cell-expressed murine GITRL adopts an identical 'strand-exchanged' dimeric structure to that observed for the E. coli-expressed protein, thus conclusively demonstrating the novel quaternary structure assembly behavior of murine GITRL.

  10. Granzyme D Is a Novel Murine Mast Cell Protease That Is Highly Induced by Multiple Pathways of Mast Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Calounova, Gabriela; Guss, Bengt; Lundequist, Anders; Pejler, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Granzymes are serine proteases known mostly for their role in the induction of apoptosis. Granzymes A and B have been extensively studied, but relatively little is known about granzymes C to G and K to M. T cells, lymphohematopoietic stromal cells, and granulated metrial gland cells express granzyme D, but the function of granzyme D is unknown. Here we show that granzyme D is expressed by murine mast cells and that its level of expression correlates positively with the extent of mast cell maturation. Coculture of mast cells with live, Gram-positive bacteria caused a profound, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent induction of granzyme D expression. Granzyme D expression was also induced by isolated bacterial cell wall components, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan, and by stem cell factor, IgE receptor cross-linking, and calcium ionophore stimulation. Granzyme D was released into the medium in response to mast cell activation. Granzyme D induction was dependent on protein kinase C and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Together, these findings identify granzyme D as a novel murine mast cell protease and implicate granzyme D in settings where mast cells are activated, such as bacterial infection and allergy. PMID:23529614

  11. MN1–Fli1 oncofusion transforms murine hematopoietic progenitor cells into acute megakaryoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Wenge, D V; Felipe-Fumero, E; Angenendt, L; Schliemann, C; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, L H; Thiede, C; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Arteaga, M-F; Mikesch, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Long-term outcome of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) patients without Down's syndrome remains poor. Founding mutations and chimeric oncogenes characterize various AMKL subtypes. However, for around one third of all cases the underlying mechanisms of AMKL leukemogenesis are still largely unknown. Recently, an in-frame fusion of meningeoma 1–friend leukemia virus integration 1 (MN1–Fli1) gene was detected in a child with AMKL. We intended to investigate the potential role of this oncofusion in leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. Strikingly, expression of MN1–Fli1 in murine hematopoietic progenitor cells was sufficient to induce leukemic transformation generating immature myeloid cells with cytomorphology and expression of surface markers typical for AMKL. Systematic structure function analyses revealed FLS and 3?ETS domains of Fli1 as decisive domains for the AMKL phenotype. Our data highlight an important role of MN1–Fli1 in AMKL leukemogenesis and provide a basis for research assessing the value of this oncofusion as a future diagnostic marker and/or therapeutic target in AMKL patients. PMID:26690545

  12. The effects of simulated hypogravity on murine bone marrow cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Desales

    1989-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells grown in complete medium at unit gravity were compared with a similar population cultured in conditions that mimic some aspects of microgravity. After the cells adjusted to the conditions that simulated microgravity, they proliferated as fetal or oncogenic populations; their numbers doubled in twelve hour periods. Differentiated subpopulations were depleted from the heterogeneous mixture with time and the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem cells increased in numbers. The cells in the control groups in unit gravity and those in the bioreactors in conditions of microgravity were monitored under a number of parameters. Each were phenotyped as to cell surface antigens using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. Other parameters compared included: pH, glucose uptake, oxygen consumption and carbon-dioxide production. Nuclear DNA was monitored by flow cytometry. Functional responses were studied by mitogenic stimulation by various lectins. The importance of these findings should have relevance to the space program. Cells should behave predictably in zero gravity; specific populations can be eliminated from diverse populations and other populations isolated. The availability of stem cell populations will enhance both bone marrow and gene transplant programs. Stem cells will permit developmental biologists study the paths of hematopoiesis.

  13. Reprogramming Committed Murine Blood Cells to Induced Hematopoietic

    E-print Network

    Yuan, Guo-Cheng "GC"

    and Genetics, BGU Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cells, National Institute for Biotechnology in regenerative medicine. Allogeneic and autologous HSC transplantation is used in the treatment of $50. Rossi1,2,3,8,* 1Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

  14. AN IN VITRO MODEL FOR MURINE URETERIC EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a model developed to study growth and differentiation of primary cultures of ureteric epithelial cells from embryonic C57BL/6N mouse urinary tracts. Single cells were resuspended in medium and plated onto transwells coated with collagen IV and laminin. Basa...

  15. IFN-?-mediated hematopoietic cell destruction in murine models of immune-mediated bone marrow failure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jichun; Feng, Xingmin; Desierto, Marie J; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Young, Neal S

    2015-12-10

    Interferon gamma (IFN-?) has been reported to have both negative and positive activity on hematopoietic cells, adding complexity to the interpretation of its pleiotropic functions. We examined the effects of IFN-? on murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors in vitro and in vivo by using mouse models. IFN-? treatment expanded bone marrow (BM) c-Kit(+)Sca1(+)Lin(-) (KSL) cell number but reduced BM KLCD150(+) and KLCD150(+)CD48(-) cells. IFN-?-expanded KSL cells engrafted poorly when tested by competitive repopulation in vivo. KSL, KLCD150(+), and KLCD150(+)CD48(-) cells from IFN-?-treated animals all showed significant upregulation in Fas expression. When cocultured with activated T cells in vitro, KSL and KLCD150(+) cells from IFN-?-treated donors showed increased apoptosis relative to those from untreated animals, and infusion of activated CD8 T cells into IFN-?-injected animals in vivo led to partial elimination of KSL cells. Exposure of BM cells or KSL cells to IFN-? increased expression of Fas, caspases, and related proapoptotic genes and decreased expression of Ets-1 and other hematopoietic genes. In mouse models of BM failure, mice genetically deficient in IFN-? receptor expression showed attenuation of immune-mediated marrow destruction, whereas effector lymphocytes from IFN-?-deficient donors were much less potent in initiating BM damage. We conclude that the activity of IFN-? on murine hematopoiesis is context dependent. IFN-?-augmented apoptotic gene expression facilitates destruction of HSCs and progenitors in the presence of activated cytotoxic T cells, as occurs in human BM failure. PMID:26491068

  16. Disruption of canonical TGF?-signaling in murine coronary progenitor cells by low level arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Patrick; Huang, Tianfang; Broka, Derrick; Parker, Patti; Barnett, Joey V.; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to arsenic results in several types of cancers as well as heart disease. A major contributor to ischemic heart pathologies is coronary artery disease, however the influences by environmental arsenic in this disease process are not known. Similarly, the impact of toxicants on blood vessel formation and function during development has not been studied. During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types including smooth muscle cells which contribute to the coronary vessels. The TGF? family of ligands and receptors is essential for developmental cardiac epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and differentiation into coronary smooth muscle cells. In this in vitro study, 18 hour exposure to 1.34 ?M arsenite disrupted developmental EMT programming in murine epicardial cells causing a deficit in cardiac mesenchyme. The expression of EMT genes including TGF?2, TGF? receptor-3, Snail, and Has-2 are decreased in a dose-dependent manner following exposure to arsenite. TGF?2 cell signaling is abrogated as detected by decreases in phosphorylated Smad2/3 when cells are exposed to 1.34 ?M arsenite. There is also loss of nuclear accumulation pSmad due to arsenite exposure. These observations coincide with a decrease in vimentin positive mesenchymal cells invading three-dimensional collagen gels. However, arsenite does not block TGF?2 mediated smooth muscle cell differentiation by epicardial cells. Overall these results show that arsenic exposure blocks developmental EMT gene programming in murine coronary progenitor cells by disrupting TGF?2 signals and Smad activation, and that smooth muscle cell differentiation is refractory to this arsenic toxicity. - Highlights: • Arsenic blocks TGF?2 induced expression of EMT genes. • Arsenic blocks TGF?2 triggered Smad2/3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • Arsenic blocks epicardial cell differentiation into cardiac mesenchyme. • Arsenic does not block TGF?2 induced smooth muscle cell differentiation.

  17. Dexamethasone facilitates erythropoiesis in murine embryonic stem cells differentiating into hematopoietic cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Anand S.; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Mishra, Rangnath; Lane, Thomas A.; Carrier, Ewa . E-mail: assrivastava@ucsd.edu

    2006-07-28

    Differentiating embryonic stem (ES) cells are increasingly emerging as an important source of hematopoietic progenitors with a potential to be useful for both basic and clinical research applications. It has been suggested that dexamethasone facilitates differentiation of ES cells towards erythrocytes but the mechanism responsible for sequential expression of genes regulating this process are not well-understood. Therefore, we in vitro induced differentiation of murine ES cells towards erythropoiesis and studied the sequential expression of a set of genes during the process. We hypothesized that dexamethasone-activates its cognate nuclear receptors inducing up-regulation of erythropoietic genes such as GATA-1, Flk-1, Epo-R, and direct ES cells towards erythropoietic differentiation. ES cells were cultured in primary hematopoietic differentiation media containing methyl-cellulose, IMDM, IL-3, IL-6, and SCF to promote embryoid body (EB) formation. Total RNA of day 3, 5, and 9-old EBs was isolated for gene expression studies using RT-PCR. Cells from day 9 EBs were subjected to secondary differentiation using three different cytokines and growth factors combinations: (1) SCF, EPO, dexamethasone, and IGF; (2) SCF, IL-3, IL-6, and TPO; and (3) SCF IL-3, IL-6, TPO, and EPO. Total RNA from day 12 of secondary differentiated ES cells was isolated to study the gene expression pattern during this process. Our results demonstrate an up-regulation of GATA-1, Flk-1, HoxB-4, Epo-R, and globin genes ({alpha}-globin, {beta}H-1 globin, {beta}-major globin, {epsilon} -globin, and {zeta}-globin) in the 9-day-old EBs, whereas, RNA from 5-day-old EBs showed expression of HoxB-4, {epsilon}-globin, {gamma}-globin, {beta}H1-globin, and Flk-1. Three-day-old EBs showed only HoxB-4 and Flk-1 gene expression and lacked expression of all globin genes. These findings indicate that erythropoiesis-specific genes are activated later in the course of differentiation. Gene expression studies on the ES cells of secondary EB origin cultured in media containing dexamethasone showed a down-regulation of GATA-3 and an up-regulation of GATA-1, Flk-1, and Epo-R in comparison to the two other cytokines and growth factor combinations containing media. The secondary differentiation also showed an enhanced production of erythrocytic precursors in dexamethasone containing media in comparison to that in the control media. Our results indicate that dexamethasone can prove to be an effective agent which can be employed to enhance differentiation towards erythrocytic progenitors from ES cells.

  18. Spontaneous electrical rhythmicity in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal from the murine small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M

    1998-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are pacemaker cells in the small bowel, and therefore this cell type must express the mechanism responsible for slow wave activity. Isolated ICC were cultured for 1–3 days from the murine small intestine and identified with c-Kit-like immunoreactivity (c-Kit-LI).Electrical recordings were obtained from cultured ICC with the whole-cell patch clamp technique. ICC were rhythmically active, producing regular slow wave depolarizations with waveforms and properties similar to slow waves in intact tissues.Spontaneous activity of c-Kit-LI cells was inhibited by reduced extracellular Na+, gadolinium, and reduced extracellular Ca2+. The activity was not affected by nisoldipine. Voltage clamp studies showed rhythmic inward currents that were probably responsible for the slow wave activity. The current-voltage relationship showed that the spontaneous currents reversed at about +17 mV. These observations are consistent with the involvement of a non-selective cation current in the generation of slow waves, but do not rule out contributions from other conductances or transporters.A Ba2+-sensitive inwardly rectifying K+ current in c-Kit-LI cells that may be involved in slow wave repolarization and maintenance of a negative potential between slow waves was also found. Similar pharmacology was observed in studies of intact murine intestinal muscles.Cultured ICC may be a useful model for studying the properties and pharmacology of some of the ionic conductances involved in spontaneous rhythmicity in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:9782170

  19. Characterization of tumor cell lines derived from murine gammaherpesvirus-68-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Usherwood, E J; Stewart, J P; Nash, A A

    1996-01-01

    Cell lines were derived from mice with murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68)-associated lymphoproliferative disease. Four were of an ambiguous phenotype and were MHV-68 negative. One, S11, was a B lymphocyte that contained MHV-68 genomes in both linear and episomal forms and released virus. The line was clonable and grew into tumors in nude mice. This is the first naturally occurring MHV-68-positive B-cell line to be generated, and it will be an invaluable tool for the study of MHV-68 latency. PMID:8709292

  20. Cytotoxic activity of some lichen extracts on murine and human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bézivin, C; Tomasi, S; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, F; Boustie, J

    2003-01-01

    Eight lichens were extracted successively with n-hexane, diethyl ether and methanol using a Soxhlet process. The cytotoxic activity of the 24 lichen extracts was evaluated in vitro using two murine (the L1210: lymphocytic leukaemia, and the 3LL: Lewis lung carcinoma) and four human (the K-562: chronic myelogenous leukaemia, the U251: glioblastoma, the DU145: prostate carcinoma, and the MCF7: breast adenocarcinoma) cancer cell lines and non-cancerous cells, the Vero cell line (African green monkey kidney cell line). The MTT assay revealed significant cytotoxicity (IC50 < or = 20 microg/ml) on one of the tested cancer cell lines for at least one extract of each lichen species. Some extracts of Cladonia convoluta, Cladonia rangiformis, Parmelia caperata, Platismatia glauca and Ramalina cuspidata demonstrated interesting activities particularly on human cancer cell lines as good selectivity indices were recorded (SI > 3). PMID:13678234

  1. Guardians of the Gut – Murine Intestinal Macrophages and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Mor; Salame, Tomer-Meir; Jung, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mononuclear phagocytes find themselves in a unique environment, most prominently characterized by its constant exposure to commensal microbiota and food antigens. This anatomic setting has resulted in a number of specializations of the intestinal mononuclear phagocyte compartment that collectively contribute the unique steady state immune landscape of the healthy gut, including homeostatic innate lymphoid cells, B, and T cell compartments. As in other organs, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate in addition the immune defense against pathogens, both in lymph nodes and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Here, we will discuss origins and functions of intestinal DCs and macrophages and their respective subsets, focusing largely on the mouse and cells residing in the lamina propria. PMID:26082775

  2. Development and function of murine B cells lacking RANK.

    PubMed

    Perlot, Thomas; Penninger, Josef M

    2012-02-01

    RANKL-RANK signaling regulates numerous physiologic processes such as bone remodeling, lymph node organogenesis, central thermoregulation, and formation of a lactating mammary gland in pregnancy. Recently, a receptor activator of NF-?B ligand (RANKL)-blocking Ab has been approved for human use in potentially millions of osteoporosis and cancer patients. However, germline deficiencies in RANKL or receptor activator of NF-?B (RANK) also lead to strong B cell defects in mice and human patients, suggesting that RANKL-RANK inhibition could interfere with B cell physiology and thereby trigger immunologic side-effects. To address this key question--that is, whether RANKL-RANK signaling affects B cell physiology directly or the observed defects are secondary because of the severe osteopetrosis--we generated B cell-specific RANK knockout mice. We show that B cells deficient for RANK undergo normal development and do not show any obvious defects in Ab secretion, class switch recombination, or somatic hypermutation. Our data indicate that ablation of the RANKL-RANK pathway has no direct adverse effect on B cell physiology. PMID:22219325

  3. Murine lipid phosphate phosphohydrolase-3 acts as a cell-associated integrin ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Humtsoe, Joseph O.; Bowling, Rodney A.; Feng, Shu; Wary, Kishore K. . E-mail: kwary@ibt.tamhsc.edu

    2005-09-30

    Lipid phosphate phosphohydrolase-3 (LPP3) is a cell surface protein that exhibits ectoenzyme activity. Previously, we identified human LPP3 in a functional assay of angiogenesis and showed that the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif in the proposed second extracellular domain interacts with a subset of integrins to mediate cell-cell adhesion. In contrast to the RGD domain of human LPP3, murine Lpp3 contains a variant sequence, Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE). Whether the RGE motif of murine Lpp3 mediates cell-cell interaction has not been studied. In this report, we test the hypothesis that the cell adhesion function of the LPP3 protein is conserved across mouse and human. A glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein of the proposed second extracellular loop of the murine Lpp3 sequence (GST-mLpp3-RGE) promoted attachment of cells in a long-term cell adhesion assay. GST-mLpp3-RGE interacted with {alpha}{sub 5}{beta}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrins in a solid-phase ELISA, while a mutant control, GST-hLPP3-RAD, did not. Long-term adhesion of endothelial cells to GST-mLpp3-RGE induced phosphorylation of FAK, SHC, and CAS, whereas adhesion to GST-hLPP3-RAD failed to do so. Upon long-term adhesion both the GST-hLPP3-RGD and GST-mLpp3-RGE substrates bound to the {alpha}{sub 5}{beta}{sub 1} integrin of FRT-{alpha}{sub 5}(+) cells, an interaction that was inhibited by an anti-{alpha}{sub 5} integrin antibody. In addition, a cell aggregation assay showed that the intact mLpp3-RGE protein interacts with {alpha}{sub 5}{beta}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrins expressed by adjacent cells, an interaction that can be blocked by GRGDSP peptides and anti-LPP3-RGD antibodies. These data, together with the known importance of integrins in angiogenesis, provide a mechanism for the function of LPP3 in cell-cell interactions in both human and mouse.

  4. Oatp-associated uptake and toxicity of microcystins in primary murine whole brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Feurstein, D.; Holst, K.; Fischer, A.; Dietrich, D.R.

    2009-01-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are naturally occurring cyclic heptapeptides that exhibit hepato-, nephro- and possibly neurotoxic effects in mammals. Organic anion transporting polypeptides (rodent Oatp/human OATP) appear to be specifically required for active uptake of MCs into hepatocytes and kidney epithelial cells. Based on symptoms of neurotoxicity in MC-intoxicated patients and the presence of Oatp/OATP at the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal-fluid-barrier (BCFB) it is hypothesized that MCs can be transported across the BBB/BCFB in an Oatp/OATP-dependent manner and can induce toxicity in brain cells via inhibition of protein phosphatase (PP). To test these hypotheses, the presence of murine Oatp (mOatp) in primary murine whole brain cells (mWBC) was investigated at the mRNA and protein level. MC transport was tested by exposing mWBCs to three different MC-congeners (MC-LR, -LW, -LF) with/without co-incubation with the OATP/Oatp-substrates taurocholate (TC) and bromosulfophthalein (BSP). Uptake of MCs and cytotoxicity was demonstrated via MC-Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, cell viability and PP inhibition assays. All MC congeners bound covalently and inhibited mWBC PP. MC-LF was the most cytotoxic congener followed by -LW and -LR. The lowest toxin concentration significantly reducing mWBC viability after 48 h exposure was 400 nM (MC-LF). Uptake of MCs into mWBCs was inhibited via co-incubation with excess TC (50 and 500 {mu}M) and BSP (50 {mu}M). MC-Western blot analysis demonstrated a concentration-dependent accumulation of MCs. In conclusion, the in vitro data support the assumed MC-congener-dependent uptake in a mOatp-associated manner and cytotoxicity of MCs in primary murine whole brain cells.

  5. Therapeutic liver reconstitution with murine cells isolated long after death

    PubMed Central

    Erker, Laura; Azuma, Hisaya; Lee, Andrew Y.; Guo, Changsheng; Orloff, Susan; Eaton, Laura; Benedetti, Eric; Jensen, Bryan; Finegold, Milton; Willenbring, Holger; Grompe, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Due to the shortage of donor organs many patients needing liver transplantation cannot receive one. For some liver diseases hepatocyte transplantation could be a viable alternative, but donor cells are currently procured from the same sources as whole organs and thus the supply is severely limited. Methods Here, we investigated the possibility of isolating viable hepatocytes for liver cell therapy from the plentiful source of morgue cadavers. In order to determine the utility of this approach, cells were isolated from the livers of non-heart-beating cadaveric mice long after death and transplanted into fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah) deficient mice, a model for the human metabolic liver disease hereditary tyrosinemia type I and a stringent in vivo model for hepatic cell transplantation. Results Surprisingly, complete and therapeutic liver repopulation could be achieved with hepatocytes derived up to 27 hours post-mortem. Conclusions Competitive repopulation experiments demonstrated that cadaveric liver cells had a repopulation capacity similar to freshly isolated hepatocytes. Importantly, viable hepatocytes could also be efficiently isolated from cadaveric primate liver (monkey and human). These data provide evidence that non-heart-beating donors could be a suitable source of hepatocytes for much longer time periods than previously thought possible. PMID:20621682

  6. Hinokitiol induces autophagy in murine breast and colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Kuang; Lin, Song-Tao; Chang, Wen-Wei; Liu, Li-Wen; Li, Tom Yu-Tung; Kuo, Chun-Yu; Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Hinokitiol is found in the heartwood of cupressaceous plants and possesses several biological activities. Hinokitiol may play an important role in anti-inflammation and antioxidant processes, making it potentially useful in therapies for inflammatory-mediated disease. Previously, the suppression of tumor growth by hinokitiol has been shown to occur through apoptosis. Programmed cell death can also occur through autophagy, but the mechanism of hinokitiol-induced autophagy in tumor cells is poorly defined. We used an autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine) to demonstrate that hinokitiol can induce cell death via an autophagic pathway. Further, we suggest that hinokitiol induces autophagy in a dose-dependent manner. Markers of autophagy were increased after tumor cells were treated with hinokitiol. In addition, immunoblotting revealed that the levels of phosphoprotein kinase B (P-AKT), phosphomammalian target of rapamycin (P-mTOR), and phospho-p70 ribosomal s6 kinase (P-p70S6K) in tumor cells were decreased after hinokitiol treatment. In conclusion, our results indicate that hinokitiol induces the autophagic signaling pathway via downregulation of the AKT/mTOR pathway. Therefore, our findings show that hinokitiol may control tumor growth by inducing autophagic signaling. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 77-84, 2016. PMID:25044443

  7. An ES-Like Pluripotent State in FGF-Dependent Murine iPS cells

    PubMed Central

    Ungaro, Federica; Prigione, Alessandro; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Welling, Maaike; Eijpe, Maureen; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Tesar, Paul; Adjaye, James; Geijsen, Niels; Broccoli, Vania

    2010-01-01

    Recent data demonstrates that stem cells can exist in two morphologically, molecularly and functionally distinct pluripotent states; a naïve LIF-dependent pluripotent state which is represented by murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and an FGF-dependent primed pluripotent state represented by murine and rat epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). We find that derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) under EpiSC culture conditions yields FGF-dependent iPSCs from hereon called FGF-iPSCs) which, unexpectedly, display naïve ES-like/ICM properties. FGF-iPSCs display X-chromosome activation, multi-lineage differentiation, teratoma competence and chimera contribution in vivo. Our findings suggest that in 129 and Bl6 mouse strains, iPSCs can dominantly adopt a naive pluripotent state regardless of culture growth factor conditions. Characterization of the key molecular signalling pathways revealed FGF-iPSCs to depend on the Activin/Nodal and FGF pathways, while signalling through the JAK-STAT pathway is not required for FGF-iPS cell maintenance. Our findings suggest that in 129 and Bl6 mouse strains, iPSCs can dominantly adopt a naive pluripotent state regardless of culture growth factor conditions. PMID:21209851

  8. Ex vivo 3D osteocyte network construction with primary murine bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiaoling; Gu, Yexin; Zhang, Wenting; Dziopa, Leah; Zilberberg, Jenny; Lee, Woo

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes reside as three-dimensionally (3D) networked cells in the lacunocanalicular structure of bones and regulate bone and mineral homeostasis. Despite of their important regulatory roles, in vitro studies of osteocytes have been challenging because: (1) current cell lines do not sufficiently represent the phenotypic features of mature osteocytes and (2) primary cells rapidly differentiate to osteoblasts upon isolation. In this study, we used a 3D perfusion culture approach to: (1) construct the 3D cellular network of primary murine osteocytes by biomimetic assembly with microbeads and (2) reproduce ex vivo the phenotype of primary murine osteocytes, for the first time to our best knowledge. In order to enable 3D construction with a sufficient number of viable cells, we used a proliferated osteoblastic population of healthy cells outgrown from digested bone chips. The diameter of microbeads was controlled to: (1) distribute and entrap cells within the interstitial spaces between the microbeads and (2) maintain average cell-to-cell distance to be about 19 µm. The entrapped cells formed a 3D cellular network by extending and connecting their processes through openings between the microbeads. Also, with increasing culture time, the entrapped cells exhibited the characteristic gene expressions (SOST and FGF23) and nonproliferative behavior of mature osteocytes. In contrast, 2D-cultured cells continued their osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation. This 3D biomimetic approach is expected to provide a new means of: (1) studying flow-induced shear stress on the mechanotransduction function of primary osteocytes, (2) studying physiological functions of 3D-networked osteocytes with in vitro convenience, and (3) developing clinically relevant human bone disease models. PMID:26421212

  9. A novel cholinergic epithelial cell with chemosensory traits in the murine conjunctiva.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Stephanie; Papadakis, Tamara; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We recently identified a specialized cholinergic cell type in tracheal and urethral epithelium that utilizes molecules of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade to sense potentially harmful substances in the luminal content. Upon stimulation, this cell initiates protective reflexes. Assuming a sentinel role of such cells at mucosal surfaces exposed to bacteria, we hypothesized their occurrence also in ocular mucosal surfaces. Utilizing a mouse strain expressing eGFP under the promoter of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-eGFP), we observed a cholinergic cell in the murine conjunctiva. Singular cholinergic cells reaching the epithelial surface with slender processes were detected in fornical, but neither in bulbar nor palpebral epithelia. These cells were found neither in the lacrimal canaliculi, nor in the lacrimal sac and the nasolacrimal duct. Cholinergic conjunctival epithelial cells were immunoreactive for components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade, i.e. ?-gustducin, phospholipase C?2 and the monovalent cation channel TRPM5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide- and substance P-immunoreactive sensory nerve fibers were observed extending into the conjunctival epithelium approaching slender ChAT-eGFP-positive cells. In addition, we noted both ChAT-eGFP expression and ?-gustducin-immunoreactivity, albeit in different cell populations, in occasionally occurring lymphoid follicles of the nictitating membrane. The data show a previously unidentified cholinergic cell in murine conjunctiva with chemosensory traits that presumably utilizes acetylcholine for signaling. In analogy to similar cells described in the respiratory and urethral epithelium, it might serve to detect bacterial products and to initiate protective reflexes. PMID:26119492

  10. Label-Retaining Cells in the Adult Murine Salivary Glands Possess Characteristics of Adult Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chibly, Alejandro M.; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2?-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction. PMID:25238060

  11. Hyphal growth of phagocytosed Fusarium oxysporum causes cell lysis and death of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Katja; Bain, Judith M; Di Pietro, Antonio; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars P

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen and an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we investigated phagocytosis of F. oxysporum by J774.1 murine cell line macrophages using live cell video microscopy. Macrophages avidly migrated towards F. oxysporum germlings and were rapidly engulfed after cell-cell contact was established. F. oxysporum germlings continued hyphal growth after engulfment by macrophages, leading to associated macrophage lysis and escape. Macrophage killing depended on the multiplicity of infection. After engulfment, F. oxysporum inhibited macrophages from completing mitosis, resulting in large daughter cells fused together by means of a F. oxysporum hypha. These results shed new light on the initial stages of Fusarium infection and the innate immune response of the mammalian host. PMID:25025395

  12. Nuclear localization and cell cycle regulation of a murine protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Tillmann, U; Wagner, J; Boerboom, D; Westphal, H; Tremblay, M L

    1994-01-01

    MPTP is a murine homolog of the human T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) and the rat PTP-S enzyme. Enzymatic activity of this ubiquitously expressed protein was demonstrated in immunoprecipitates from NIH 3T3 cells and in recombinant protein overexpressed in bacteria. Expression of beta-galactosidase-MPTP MPTP chimeric proteins in COS1 cells identified a nuclear localization signal at the carboxyl terminus of the MPTP that was sufficient to direct beta-galactosidase as well as a tagged version of the MPTP to the nucleus. Deletion analysis of amino acids within the nuclear targeting signal showed that this sequence does not conform to the bipartite type of nuclear localization signals. Furthermore, it was shown that the steady-state levels of MPTP RNA fluctuate in a cell cycle-specific manner. On the basis of these experiments, we discuss the possible function of MPTP in the cell cycle and other nuclear processes. Images PMID:8164659

  13. Hyphal Growth of Phagocytosed Fusarium oxysporum Causes Cell Lysis and Death of Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Katja; Bain, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen and an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we investigated phagocytosis of F. oxysporum by J774.1 murine cell line macrophages using live cell video microscopy. Macrophages avidly migrated towards F. oxysporum germlings and were rapidly engulfed after cell-cell contact was established. F. oxysporum germlings continued hyphal growth after engulfment by macrophages, leading to associated macrophage lysis and escape. Macrophage killing depended on the multiplicity of infection. After engulfment, F. oxysporum inhibited macrophages from completing mitosis, resulting in large daughter cells fused together by means of a F. oxysporum hypha. These results shed new light on the initial stages of Fusarium infection and the innate immune response of the mammalian host. PMID:25025395

  14. An In Vitro Murine Model of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kelynack, Kristen J; Holt, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is seen ubiquitously in aging blood vessels and prematurely in disease states like renal failure. It is thought to be driven by a number of systemic and local factors that lead to extra-osseous deposition of mineral in the vascular wall and valves as a common endpoint. The response of resident vascular smooth muscle cell to these dystrophic signals appears to be important in this process. Whilst in vivo models allow the observation of global changes in a pro-calcific environment, identifying the specific cells and mechanisms involved has been largely garnered from in vitro experiments, which provide added benefits in terms of reproducibility, cost, and convenience. Here we describe a 7-21 day cell culture model of calcification developed using immortalized murine vascular smooth muscle cells (MOVAS-1). This model provides a method by which vascular smooth muscle cell involvement and manipulation within a mineralizing domain can be studied. PMID:26676135

  15. Circadian Mechanisms in Murine and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Following Dexamethasone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiying; Yu, Gang; Parks, Helen; Hebert, Teddi; Goh, Brian C.; Dietrich, Marilyn A.; Pelled, Gadi; Izadpanah, Reza; Gazit, Dan; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    A core group of transcriptional regulatory factors regulate circadian rhythms in mammalian cells. While the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the brain serves as the central core circadian oscillator, circadian clocks also exist within peripheral tissues and cells. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that >20% of expressed mRNAs in bone and adipose tissues oscillate in a circadian manner. The current manuscript reports evidence of the core circadian transcriptional apparatus within primary cultures of murine and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Exposure of confluent, quiescent BMSCs to dexamethasone synchronized the oscillating expression of the mRNAs encoding the albumin D binding protein (dbp), brain-muscle arnt-like 1 (bmal1), period 3 (per3), rev-erb ?, and rev-erb ?. The genes displayed a mean oscillatory period of 22.2 to 24.3 hours. The acrophase or peak expression of mRNAs encoding “positive” (bmal1) and “negative” (per3) transcriptional regulatory factors were out of phase with each other by ?8-12 hours, consistent with in vivo observations. In vivo, glycogen synthase kinase 3? (GSK3?) mediated phosphorylation regulates the turnover of per3 and core circadian transcriptional apparatus. In vitro addition of lithium chloride, a GSK3? inhibitor, significantly shifted the acrophase of all genes by 4.2-4.7 hours oscillation in BMSCs; however, only the male murine BMSCs displayed a significant increase in the length of the period of oscillation. We conclude that human and murine BMSCs represent a valid in vitro model for the analysis of circadian mechanisms in bone metabolism and stem cell biology. PMID:18302991

  16. Slow and steady cell shrinkage reduces osmotic stress in bovine and murine oocyte and zygote vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Lai, D.; Ding, J.; Smith, G.W.; Smith, G.D.; Takayama, S.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does the use of a new cryoprotectant agent (CPA) exchange protocol designed to minimize osmotic stress improve oocyte or zygote vitrification by reducing sublethal cryodamage? SUMMARY ANSWER The use of a new CPA exchange protocol made possible by automated microfluidics improved oocyte and zygote vitrification with superior morphology as indicated by a smoother cell surface, higher sphericity, higher cytoplasmic lipid retention, less cytoplasmic leakage and higher developmental competence compared with conventional methods. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The use of more ‘steps’ of CPA exposure during the vitrification protocol increases cryosurvival and development in the bovine model. However, such an attempt to eliminate osmotic stress is limited by the practicality of performing numerous precise pipetting steps in a short amount of time. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Murine meiotically competent germinal vesicle intact oocytes and zygotes were harvested from the antral follicles in ovaries and ampulla, respectively. Bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir at random stages of the estrous cycle. A total of 110 murine oocytes, 802 murine zygotes and 52 bovine oocytes were used in this study. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Microfluidic devices were fabricated using conventional photo- and soft-lithography. CPAs used were 7.5% ethylene glycol (EG) and 7.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for equilibration solution and 15% EG, 15% DMSO and 0.5 M sucrose for vitrification solution. End-point analyses include mathematical modeling using Kedem–Katchalsky equations, morphometrics assessed by conventional and confocal microscopy, cytoplasmic lipid quantification by nile red staining, cytoplasmic leakage quantification by fluorescent dextran intercalation and developmental competence analysis by 96 h embryo culture and blastomere quantification. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The automated microfluidics protocol decreased the shrinkage rate of the oocyte and zygote by 13.8 times over its manual pipetting alternative. Oocytes and zygotes with a lower shrinkage rate during CPA exposure experienced less osmotic stress resulting in better morphology, higher cell quality and improved developmental competence. This microfluidic procedure resulted in murine zygotes with a significantly smoother cell surface (P < 0.001), more spherical cellular morphology (P < 0.001), increased cytoplasmic lipid retention in vitrified and warmed bovine oocytes (P < 0.01), decreased membrane perforations and cytoplasmic leakage in CPA-exposed murine zygotes (P < 0.05) and improved developmental competence of vitrified and warmed murine zygotes (P < 0.05) than CPA exposure using the current clinically used manual pipetting method. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION It is necessary to design the microfluidic device to be more user-friendly for widespread use. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS The theory and approach of eliminating osmotic stress by decreasing shrinkage rate is complementary to the prevalent osmotic stress theory in cryobiology which focuses on a minimum cell volume at which the cells shrink. The auto-microfluidic protocol described here has immediate applications for improving animal and human oocyte, zygote and embryo cryopreservation. On a fundamental level, the clear demonstration that at the same minimum cell volume, cell shrinkage rate affects sublethal damage should be broadly useful for cryobiology. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) This project was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the University of Michigan Reproductive Sciences Program. The authors declare no conflicts of interest. PMID:25355589

  17. Generation of a murine hepatic angiosarcoma cell line and reproducible mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Rothweiler, Sonja; Dill, Michael T; Terracciano, Luigi; Makowska, Zuzanna; Quagliata, Luca; Hlushchuk, Ruslan; Djonov, Valentin; Heim, Markus H; Semela, David

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare and highly aggressive tumor of endothelial origin with dismal prognosis. Studies of the molecular biology of AS and treatment options are limited as animal models are rare. We have previously shown that inducible knockout of Notch1 in mice leads to spontaneous formation of hepatic AS. The aims of this study were to: (1) establish and characterize a cell line derived from this murine AS, (2) identify molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets, and (3) generate a tumor transplantation model. AS cells retained specific endothelial properties such as tube formation activity, as well as expression of CD31 and Von Willebrand factor. However, electron microscopy analysis revealed signs of dedifferentiation with loss of fenestrae and loss of contact inhibition. Microarray and pathway analysis showed substantial changes in gene expression and revealed activation of the Myc pathway. Exposing the AS cells to sorafenib reduced migration, filopodia dynamics, and cell proliferation but did not induce apoptosis. In addition, sorafenib suppressed ERK phosphorylation and expression of cyclin D2. Injection of AS cells into NOD/SCID mice resulted in formation of undifferentiated tumors, confirming the tumorigenic potential of these cells. In summary, we established and characterized a murine model of spontaneous AS formation and hepatic AS cell lines as a useful in vitro tool. Our data demonstrate antitumor activity of sorafenib in AS cells with potent inhibition of migration, filopodia formation, and cell proliferation, supporting further evaluation of sorafenib as a novel treatment strategy. In addition, AS cell transplantation provides a subcutaneous tumor model useful for in vivo preclinical drug testing. PMID:25418579

  18. Differential effects of protoporphyrin and uroporphyrin on murine mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.W.; Gigli, I.; Wasserman, S.I.

    1987-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the distinct cutaneous manifestations of erythropoietic protoporphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda, the effects of protoporphyrin (PP) and uroporphyrin (URO), the predominant porphyrins in the respective disease, on mast cells were examined. Release of preformed and generated mediators was assessed by the release of radioactivity from cells labeled with (/sup 3/H)serotonin and (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, respectively. Clinically relevant doses of PP (25-500 ng/ml) and 396-407 nm irradiation (3-16 X 10(2)J/m2) induced maximal net release of preformed mediators ,f 44.52 +/- 6.6 to 58.01 +/- 4.0% (mean +/- SE). In contrast, irradiation in the presence of URO (50-5000 ng/ml) resulted in less than 5% net release. (3H)Serotonin release induced by PP and irradiation was calcium-independent, and was not enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a known activator of protein kinase C. This release was suppressed by catalase, a scavenger of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, irradiation in the presence of PP, but not in the presence of URO, resulted in perturbation of cell membrane. Irradiation in the presence of PP also resulted in a maximal net release of generated mediators of 9.98 +/- 3.5% (mean +/- SE), whereas similar treatment in the presence of URO induced less than 0.5% net release. These results suggested that the burning, stinging, erythema, and edema experienced by patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria following sun exposure, and the lack of such findings in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda, may be explained, at least in part, by the differential effects of PP and URO on mast cells.

  19. Alveolar epithelial cells orchestrate DC function in murine viral pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Unkel, Barbara; Hoegner, Katrin; Clausen, Björn E.; Lewe-Schlosser, Peter; Bodner, Johannes; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Janßen, Hermann; Seeger, Werner; Lohmeyer, Juergen; Herold, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses (IVs) cause pneumonia in humans with progression to lung failure. Pulmonary DCs are key players in the antiviral immune response, which is crucial to restore alveolar barrier function. The mechanisms of expansion and activation of pulmonary DC populations in lung infection remain widely elusive. Using mouse BM chimeric and cell-specific depletion approaches, we demonstrated that alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) GM-CSF mediates recovery from IV-induced injury by affecting lung DC function. Epithelial GM-CSF induced the recruitment of CD11b+ and monocyte-derived DCs. GM-CSF was also required for the presence of CD103+ DCs in the lung parenchyma at baseline and for their sufficient activation and migration to the draining mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs) during IV infection. These activated CD103+ DCs were indispensable for sufficient clearance of IVs by CD8+ T cells and for recovery from IV-induced lung injury. Moreover, GM-CSF applied intratracheally activated CD103+ DCs, inducing increased migration to MLNs, enhanced viral clearance, and attenuated lung injury. Together, our data reveal that GM-CSF–dependent cross-talk between IV-infected AECs and CD103+ DCs is crucial for effective viral clearance and recovery from injury, which has potential implications for GM-CSF treatment in severe IV pneumonia. PMID:22996662

  20. Direct Induction of Trophoblast Stem Cells from Murine Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kubaczka, Caroline; Senner, Claire E; Cierlitza, Monika; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Kuckenberg, Peter; Peitz, Michael; Hemberger, Myriam; Schorle, Hubert

    2015-11-01

    Trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) arise from the first cell fate decision in the developing embryo and generate extra-embryonic lineages, giving rise to the fetal portion of the placenta. Mouse embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages are strictly separated by a distinct epigenetic barrier, which is not fully overcome following expression of TSC-determining factors in embryonic stem cells. Here, we show that transient expression of Tfap2c, Gata3, Eomes, and Ets2 is sufficient to reprogram mouse embryonic fibroblasts and post-natal tail-tip-derived fibroblasts into induced TSCs (iTSCs) and surmount the epigenetic barrier separating somatic from extra-embryonic lineages. iTSCs share nearly identical morphological characteristics, gene expression profiles, and DNA methylation patterns with blastocyst-derived TSCs. Furthermore, iTSCs display transgene-independent self-renewal, differentiate along extra-embryonic lineages, and chimerize host placentas following blastocyst injection. These findings provide insights into the transcription factor networks governing TSC identity and opportunities for studying the epigenetic barriers underlying embryonic and extra-embryonic lineage segregation. PMID:26412560

  1. A VCAM-like adhesion molecule on murine bone marrow stromal cells mediates binding of lymphocyte precursors in culture

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Two new mAbs (M/K-1 and M/K-2) define an adhesion molecule expressed on stromal cell clones derived from murine bone marrow. The protein is similar in size to a human endothelial cell adhesion molecule known as VCAM-1 or INCAM110. VCAM-1 is expressed on endothelial cells in inflammatory sites and recognized by the integrin VLA-4 expressed on lymphocytes and monocytes. The new stromal cell molecule is a candidate ligand for the VLA-4 expressed on immature B lineage lymphocytes and a possible homologue of human VCAM-1. We now report additional similarities in the distribution, structure, and function of these proteins. The M/K antibodies detected large cells in normal bone marrow, as well as rare cells in other tissues. The antigen was constitutively expressed and functioned as a cell adhesion molecule on cultured murine endothelial cells. It correlated with the presence of mRNA which hybridized to a human VCAM-1 cDNA probe. Partial NH2 terminal amino acid sequencing of the murine protein revealed similarities to VCAM-1 and attachment of human lymphoma cells to murine endothelial cell lines was inhibited by the M/K antibodies. All of these observations suggest that the murine and human cell adhesion proteins may be related. The antibodies selectively interfered with B lymphocyte formation when included in long term bone marrow cultures. Moreover, they caused rapid detachment of lymphocytes from the adherent layer when added to preestablished cultures. The VCAM-like cell adhesion molecule on stromal cells and VLA-4 on lymphocyte precursors may both be important for B lymphocyte formation. PMID:1713592

  2. Cue, signal, response analysis of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation : multivariable analysis of cytokine and ECM effects on commitment to differentiation

    E-print Network

    Prudhomme, Wendy A. (Wendy Adele), 1975-

    2004-01-01

    The highly complex nature of developmental cell fate decisions is exemplified by murine embryonic stem cell (ES cell) differentiation, for which almost two decades of study has identified a small set of putative individual ...

  3. Simultaneous Isolation of Three Different Stem Cell Populations from Murine Skin

    PubMed Central

    Forni, Maria Fernanda; Ramos Maia Lobba, Aline; Pereira Ferreira, Alexandre Hamilton; Sogayar, Mari Cleide

    2015-01-01

    The skin is a rich source of readily accessible stem cells. The level of plasticity afforded by these cells is becoming increasingly important as the potential of stem cells in Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine continues to be explored. Several protocols described single type stem cell isolation from skin; however, none of them afforded simultaneous isolation of more than one population. Herein, we describe the simultaneous isolation and characterization of three stem cell populations from the dermis and epidermis of murine skin, namely Epidermal Stem Cells (EpiSCs), Skin-derived Precursors (SKPs) and Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs). The simultaneous isolation was possible through a simple protocol based on culture selection techniques. These cell populations are shown to be capable of generating chondrocytes, adipocytes, osteocytes, terminally differentiated keratinocytes, neurons and glia, rendering this protocol suitable for the isolation of cells for tissue replenishment and cell based therapies. The advantages of this procedure are far-reaching since the skin is not only the largest organ in the body, but also provides an easily accessible source of stem cells for autologous graft. PMID:26462205

  4. Accessing the Genomic Effects of Naked Nanoceria in Murine Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tin-Lap; Raitano, Joan M.; Rennert, Owen M; Chan, Siu-Wai; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2011-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are versatile engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) due to their unique redox properties. We and others have previously demonstrated naked nanoceria could act as antioxidants to protect cells against oxidative damage. While the redox properties may be beneficial, the genome-wide effects of nanoceria on gene transcription and associated biological processes remain elusive. Here we applied functional genomic approach to examine the genome-wide effects of nanoceria on global gene transcription and cellular functions in mouse neuronal cells. Importantly, we demonstrated nanoceria induced chemical- and size-specific changes in the murine neuronal cell transcriptome. The nanoceria specially contributed more than 83% of uniquely altered gene population and associate with a unique spectrum of genes related to neurological disease, cell cycle control and growth. These observations suggest an in-depth assessment of potential health effects of naked nanoceria and other naked nanoparticles is both necessary and imminent. PMID:21889474

  5. Genetic engineering of murine CD8+ and CD4+ T cells for pre-clinical adoptive immunotherapy studies

    PubMed Central

    Kerkar, Sid P; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Yang, Shicheng; Borman, Zachary; Muranski, Pawel; Ji, Yun; Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Kaiser, Andrew DM; Hinrichs, Christian; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Scott, Christopher; Gattinoni, Luca; Morgan, Richard A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2011-01-01

    T-cell-receptor (TCR) gene therapy enables for the rapid creation of antigen-specific T cells from mice of any strain and represents a valuable tool for pre-clinical immunotherapy studies. Here, we describe the superiority of gamma-retroviral vectors compared to lentiviral vectors for transduction of murine T cells and surprisingly illustrate robust gene-transfer into phenotypically naïve/memory-stem cell (CD62Lhi/CD44low) and central memory (CD62Lhi/CD44hi) CD8+ T cells using murine-stem-cell-based gamma-retroviral vectors (MSGV1). We created MSGV1 vectors for a MHC-class I restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) specific for the melanocyte-differentiation antigen, gp100 (MSGV1-pmel-1), and a MHC-class II restricted TCR specific for tyrosinase-related-protein-1 (MSGV1-TRP-1), and found that robust gene expression required codon optimization of TCR sequences for the pmel-1 TCR. To test for functionality, we adoptively transferred TCR-engineered T cells into mice bearing B16 melanomas and observed delayed growth of established tumors with pmel-1TCR engineered CD8+ T cells and significant tumor regression with TRP-1 TCR transduced CD4+ T cells. We simultaneously created lentiviral vectors encoding the pmel-1TCR, but found that these vectors mediated low TCR expression in murine T cells, but robust gene expression in other murine and human cell lines. These results indicate that preclinical murine models of adoptive immunotherapies are more practical using gamma-retroviral rather than lentiviral vectors. PMID:21499127

  6. Differentiation of murine embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells to renal lineage in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Morizane, Ryuji; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-12-25

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells which have the unlimited proliferative capacity and extensive differentiation potency can be an attractive source for kidney regeneration therapies. Recent breakthroughs in the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have provided with another potential source for the artificially-generated kidney. The purpose of this study is to know how to differentiate mouse ES and iPS cells into renal lineage. We used iPS cells from mouse fibroblasts by transfection of four transcription factors, namely Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. Real-time PCR showed that renal lineage markers were expressed in both ES and iPS cells after the induction of differentiation. It also showed that a tubular specific marker, KSP progressively increased to day 18, although the differentiation of iPS cells was slower than ES cells. The results indicated that renal lineage cells can be differentiated from both murine ES and iPS cells. Several inducing factors were tested whether they influenced on cell differentiation. In ES cells, both of GDNF and BMP7 enhanced the differentiation to metanephric mesenchyme, and Activin enhanced the differentiation of ES cells to tubular cells. Activin also enhanced the differentiation of iPS cells to tubular cells, although the enhancement was lower than in ES cells. ES and iPS cells have a potential to differentiate to renal lineage cells, and they will be an attractive resource of kidney regeneration therapy. This differentiation is enhanced by Activin in both ES and iPS cells.

  7. Histopathology and host response associated with reduced tumorigenicity of 5-bromodeoxyuridine--treated murine melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gyi, K. K.; Wrathall, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Growth of B16 murine melanoma cells (clone B559) with low concentrations of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) has previously been shown to have little effect upon cell proliferation in culture but to significantly reduce the tumorigenicity of the cells when they are injected into adult syngeneic mice. To determine the fate of BrdUrd-grown cells in vivo, we compared the sites of injection of control, fully tumorigenic B559 cells, and BrdUrd-grown cells (3 micrograms/ml for 3 days, termed 3BRM cells) with greatly reduced tumorigenicity (only 8%). We found no evidence of even a transitory period of progressive growth in vivo of BrdUrd-grown cells. At sites of injection of 3BRM cells, as early as Day 1 after injection, there was a significantly lower proliferation rate of the melanoma cells, significantly greater numbers of infiltrating host mononuclear cells, and a significantly higher ratio of host mononuclear to melanoma cells. There was no evidence of endothelial cell proliferation or neovascularization at the sites of 3BRM cells. When sites of injection at 1 day after injection were examined electron-microscopically, evidence of host melanoma cell interactions was more frequently observed at sites of 3BRM cells. The results suggest that the reduced tumorigenicity of BrdUrd-grown melanoma cells may be due to cytostatic and/or cytotoxic influences generated by an enhanced mononuclear cell response. Because the host response occurs so quickly, the involvement of natural killer cells is postulated. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:6824061

  8. Identification and enrichment of colony-forming cells from the adult murine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Lepore, D.A.; Roeszler, K.; Wagner, J.; Ross, S.A.; Bauer, K.; Thomas, P.Q. , E-Mail: paul.thomas@mcri.edu.au

    2005-08-01

    Stem and progenitor cells have been identified in many adult tissues including bone marrow, the central nervous system, and skin. While there is direct evidence to indicate the activity of a progenitor cell population in the pituitary gland, this putative subpopulation has not yet been identified. Herein we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel clonogenic cell type in the adult murine pituitary, which we have termed Pituitary Colony-Forming Cells (PCFCs). PCFCs constitute 0.2% of pituitary cells, and generate heterogeneous colonies from single cells. PCFCs exhibit variable proliferative potential, and may exceed 11 population doublings in 14 days. Enrichment of PCFCs to 61.5-fold with 100% recovery can be obtained through the active uptake of the fluorescent dipeptide, {beta}-Ala-Lys-N{epsilon}-AMCA. PCFCs are mostly contained within the large, agranular subpopulation of AMCA{sup +} cells, and constitute 28% of this fraction, corresponding to 140.5-fold enrichment. Interestingly, the AMCA{sup +} population contains rare cells that are GH{sup +} or PRL{sup +}. GH{sup +} cells were also identified in PCFC single cell colonies, suggesting that PCFCs have the potential to differentiate into GH{sup +} cells. Together, these data show that the pituitary contains a rare clonogenic population which may correspond to the somatotrope/lactotrope progenitors suggested by previous experiments.

  9. Aneuploidy, oncogene amplification and epithelial to mesenchymal transition define spontaneous transformation of murine epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; McNeil, Nicole E.

    2013-01-01

    Human epithelial cancers are defined by a recurrent distribution of specific chromosomal aneuploidies, a trait less typical for murine cancer models induced by an oncogenic stimulus. After prolonged culture, mouse epithelial cells spontaneously immortalize, transform and become tumorigenic. We assessed genome and transcriptome alterations in cultures derived from bladder and kidney utilizing spectral karyotyping, array CGH, FISH and gene expression profiling. The results show widespread aneuploidy, yet a recurrent and tissue-specific distribution of genomic imbalances, just as in human cancers. Losses of chromosome 4 and gains of chromosome 15 are common and occur early during the transformation process. Global gene expression profiling revealed early and significant transcriptional deregulation. Chromosomal aneuploidy resulted in expression changes of resident genes and consequently in a massive deregulation of the cellular transcriptome. Pathway interrogation of expression changes during the sequential steps of transformation revealed enrichment of genes associated with DNA repair, centrosome regulation, stem cell characteristics and aneuploidy. Genes that modulate the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and genes that define the chromosomal instability phenotype played a dominant role and were changed in a directionality consistent with loss of cell adhesion, invasiveness and proliferation. Comparison with gene expression changes during human bladder and kidney tumorigenesis revealed remarkable overlap with changes observed in the spontaneously transformed murine cultures. Therefore, our novel mouse models faithfully recapitulate the sequence of genomic and transcriptomic events that define human tumorigenesis, hence validating them for both basic and preclinical research. PMID:23619298

  10. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are a site of murine cytomegalovirus latency and reactivation.

    PubMed

    Seckert, Christof K; Renzaho, Angélique; Tervo, Hanna-Mari; Krause, Claudia; Deegen, Petra; Kühnapfel, Birgit; Reddehase, Matthias J; Grzimek, Natascha K A

    2009-09-01

    Latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) is frequently transmitted by organ transplantation, and its reactivation under conditions of immunosuppressive prophylaxis against graft rejection by host-versus-graft disease bears a risk of graft failure due to viral pathogenesis. CMV is the most common cause of infection following liver transplantation. Although hematopoietic cells of the myeloid lineage are a recognized source of latent CMV, the cellular sites of latency in the liver are not comprehensively typed. Here we have used the BALB/c mouse model of murine CMV infection to identify latently infected hepatic cell types. We performed sex-mismatched bone marrow transplantation with male donors and female recipients to generate latently infected sex chromosome chimeras, allowing us to distinguish between Y-chromosome (gene sry or tdy)-positive donor-derived hematopoietic descendants and Y-chromosome-negative cells of recipients' tissues. The viral genome was found to localize primarily to sry-negative CD11b(-) CD11c(-) CD31(+) CD146(+) cells lacking major histocompatibility complex class II antigen (MHC-II) but expressing murine L-SIGN. This cell surface phenotype is typical of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). Notably, sry-positive CD146(+) cells were distinguished by the expression of MHC-II and did not harbor latent viral DNA. In this model, the frequency of latently infected cells was found to be 1 to 2 per 10(4) LSECs, with an average copy number of 9 (range, 4 to 17) viral genomes. Ex vivo-isolated, latently infected LSECs expressed the viral genes m123/ie1 and M122/ie3 but not M112-M113/e1, M55/gB, or M86/MCP. Importantly, in an LSEC transfer model, infectious virus reactivated from recipients' tissue explants with an incidence of one reactivation per 1,000 viral-genome-carrying LSECs. These findings identified LSECs as the main cellular site of murine CMV latency and reactivation in the liver. PMID:19535440

  11. Functional heterogeneity in the CD4+ T cell response to murine ?-herpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhuting; Blackman, Marcia A; Kaye, Kenneth M; Usherwood, Edward J

    2015-03-15

    CD4(+) T cells are critical for the control of virus infections, T cell memory, and immune surveillance. We studied the differentiation and function of murine ?-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68)-specific CD4(+) T cells using gp150-specific TCR-transgenic mice. This allowed a more detailed study of the characteristics of the CD4(+) T cell response than did previously available approaches for this virus. Most gp150-specific CD4(+) T cells expressed T-bet and produced IFN-?, indicating that MHV-68 infection triggered differentiation of CD4(+) T cells largely into the Th1 subset, whereas some became follicular Th cells and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. These CD4(+) T cells were protective against MHV-68 infection in the absence of CD8(+) T cells and B cells, and protection depended on IFN-? secretion. Marked heterogeneity was observed in the CD4(+) T cells, based on lymphocyte Ag 6C (Ly6C) expression. Ly6C expression positively correlated with IFN-?, TNF-?, and granzyme B production; T-bet and KLRG1 expression; proliferation; and CD4(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Ly6C expression inversely correlated with survival, CCR7 expression, and secondary expansion potential. Ly6C(+) and Ly6C(-) gp150-specific CD4(+) T cells were able to interconvert in a bidirectional manner upon secondary Ag exposure in vivo. These results indicate that Ly6C expression is closely associated with antiviral activity in effector CD4(+) T cells but is inversely correlated with memory potential. Interconversion between Ly6C(+) and Ly6C(-) cells may maintain a balance between the two Ag-specific CD4(+) T cell populations during MHV-68 infection. These findings have significant implications for Ly6C as a surface marker to distinguish functionally distinct CD4(+) T cells during persistent virus infection. PMID:25662997

  12. Cyclic-radiation response of murine fibrosarcoma cells grown as pulmonary nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hunter, N.

    1982-10-01

    The radiation age response of murine fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells grown as pulmonary nodules in C/sub 3/Hf/Kam mice was determined. FSa cells were irradiated in vivo either with 10 Gy as 14 day-old lung tumors (i.e., artificial macrometastases) prior to cell separation or with 5 Gy as single cells trapped in the lungs of recipient mice (i.e., artificial micrometastases) following cell separation and synchronization by centrifugal elutriation. Flow microfluorometry (FMF) was used to determine cell-cycle parameters and the relative synchrony of the separated populations, as well as the percent contamination of normal diploid cells in each of the tumor cell populations. Tumor populations containing up to 90% G/sub 1/, 60% S-, and 75% G/sub 2/+M-phase tumor cells were obtained. Cell clonogenicity, determined using a lung colony assay, ranged from 0.7 to 6% for control FSa cells from the various elutriator fractions. The radiation sensitivity of these separated cell populations varied by a factor of 6, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated as artificial micro or macro-metastases. In each experiment, tumor populations most enriched in s-phase cells exhibited the greatest radiation sensitivity. To confirm that these populations were highly enriched in S-phase cells and to demonstrate that they were more radiosensitive than FSa cells in other parts of the cell cycle, the elutriated tumor populations were exposed to either suicide labeling by high specific activity tritiated thymidine or hydroxyurea. The resultant age response curves were qualitatively similar to those obtained following irradiation and reflected the S-phase sensitivity of FSa cells to these agents.

  13. Human and Murine Clonal CD8+ T Cell Expansions Arise during Tuberculosis Because of TCR Selection

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Booty, Matthew G.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Rothchild, Alissa C.; Martin, Constance J.; Desjardins, Danielle; Steblenko, Katherine; Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Madansein, Rajhmun; Ramsuran, Duran; Leslie, Alasdair; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Behar, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system can recognize virtually any antigen, yet T cell responses against several pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are restricted to a limited number of immunodominant epitopes. The host factors that affect immunodominance are incompletely understood. Whether immunodominant epitopes elicit protective CD8+ T cell responses or instead act as decoys to subvert immunity and allow pathogens to establish chronic infection is unknown. Here we show that anatomically distinct human granulomas contain clonally expanded CD8+ T cells with overlapping T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires. Similarly, the murine CD8+ T cell response against M. tuberculosis is dominated by TB10.44-11-specific T cells with extreme TCR? bias. Using a retrogenic model of TB10.44-11-specific CD8+ T cells, we show that TCR dominance can arise because of competition between clonotypes driven by differences in affinity. Finally, we demonstrate that TB10.4-specific CD8+ T cells mediate protection against tuberculosis, which requires interferon-? production and TAP1-dependent antigen presentation in vivo. Our study of how immunodominance, biased TCR repertoires, and protection are inter-related, provides a new way to measure the quality of T cell immunity, which if applied to vaccine evaluation, could enhance our understanding of how to elicit protective T cell immunity. PMID:25945999

  14. Longitudinal Tracking of Human Dendritic Cells in Murine Models Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Leboeuf, Marylene; Dickson, Stephen; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Merad, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Ex vivo generated dendritic cells are currently used to induce therapeutic immunity in solid tumors. Effective immune response requires dendritic cells to home and remain in lymphoid organs to allow for adequate interaction with T lymphocytes. The aim of the current study was to detect and track Feridex labeled human dendritic cells in murine models using magnetic resonance imaging. Human dendritic cells were incubated with Feridex and the effect of labeling on dendritic cells immune function was evaluated. Ex vivo dendritic cell phantoms were used to estimate sensitivity of the magnetic resonance methods and in vivo homing was evaluated after intravenous or subcutaneous injection. R2*-maps of liver, spleen, and draining lymph nodes were obtained and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or relaxometry methods were used to quantify the Feridex tissue concentrations. Correlations between in vivo R2* values and iron content were then determined. Feridex labeling did not affect dendritic cell maturation or function. Phantom results indicated that it was possible to detect 125 dendritic cells within a given slice. Strong correlation between in vivo R2* values and iron deposition was observed. Importantly, Feridex-labeled dendritic cells were detected in the spleen for up to 2 weeks postintravenous injection. This study suggests that magnetic resonance imaging may be used to longitudinally track Feridex-labeled human dendritic cells for up to 2 weeks after injection. PMID:20593373

  15. Longitudinal tracking of human dendritic cells in murine models using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C; Leboeuf, Marylene; Dickson, Stephen; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A; Palucka, A Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Merad, Miriam

    2010-11-01

    Ex vivo generated dendritic cells are currently used to induce therapeutic immunity in solid tumors. Effective immune response requires dendritic cells to home and remain in lymphoid organs to allow for adequate interaction with T lymphocytes. The aim of the current study was to detect and track Feridex labeled human dendritic cells in murine models using magnetic resonance imaging. Human dendritic cells were incubated with Feridex and the effect of labeling on dendritic cells immune function was evaluated. Ex vivo dendritic cell phantoms were used to estimate sensitivity of the magnetic resonance methods and in vivo homing was evaluated after intravenous or subcutaneous injection. R2*-maps of liver, spleen, and draining lymph nodes were obtained and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or relaxometry methods were used to quantify the Feridex tissue concentrations. Correlations between in vivo R2* values and iron content were then determined. Feridex labeling did not affect dendritic cell maturation or function. Phantom results indicated that it was possible to detect 125 dendritic cells within a given slice. Strong correlation between in vivo R2* values and iron deposition was observed. Importantly, Feridex-labeled dendritic cells were detected in the spleen for up to 2 weeks postintravenous injection. This study suggests that magnetic resonance imaging may be used to longitudinally track Feridex-labeled human dendritic cells for up to 2 weeks after injection. PMID:20593373

  16. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-? secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL. PMID:25523759

  17. Perforin Gene Transfer Into Hematopoietic Stem Cells Improves Immune Dysregulation in Murine Models of Perforin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-01-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8+ lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-? secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL. PMID:25523759

  18. CD43 is a murine T cell costimulatory receptor that functions independently of CD28

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Costimulation mediated by the CD28 receptor has been shown to play an important role in the development of a vigorous T cell immune response. Nevertheless, CD28-deficient mice can mount effective T cell-dependent immune responses. These data suggest that other costimulatory molecules may play a role in T cell activation. In a search for other costimulatory receptors on T cells, we have characterized a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that can costimulate T cells in the absence of accessory cells. Similar to CD28 antibodies, this mAb, R2/60, was found to synergize with T cell receptor engagement in inducing proliferation. Independent ligation of CD3 and the ligand recognized by R2/60 results in T cell proliferation, suggesting that the two molecules do not have to colocalize to activate the R2/60 costimulatory pathway. R2/60 does not react with CD28, and furthermore, R2/60 costimulates in a CD28- independent fashion since the mAb costimulates T cells from the CD28- deficient mice as well as wild-type mice. Expression cloning of the R2/60 antigen identified the ligand as murine CD43. Together, these data demonstrate that CD43 can serve as a receptor on T cells that can provide CD28-independent costimulation. PMID:7790813

  19. Transferrin, carbonic anhydrase C and ferritin in dissociated murine brain cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Griot, C; Vandevelde, M

    1988-07-01

    It is shown here that transferrin (Tf), the iron transport protein and carbonic anhydrase C (CA C) are specifically located within oligodendrocytes in murine brain cell cultures. Ferritin (F), the major iron storage protein, was demonstrated in oligodendrocytes, as well as in astrocytes and microglial cells and was more prominent in the former. CA C and Tf were seen first after 6-7 days in culture. CA C and F positivity increased rapidly and at day 20, 80-85% of galactocerebroside + oligodendrocytes were positive for both proteins. Only a small number of oligodendrocytes was Tf+ up to day 14, after which their numbers increased rapidly until day 20, when 67% of the oligodendrocytes were Tf+. Because of the presence of Tf and F in oligodendrocytes it is suggested that these cells may play an important role in the metabolism of iron within the central nervous system. PMID:3133394

  20. Effects of ethanol on cAMP production in murine embryonic palate mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, W.M.; Greene, R.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Ethanol affected the ability of murine embryonic palate mesenchymal (MEPM) cells to produce cAMP in response to hormone treatment. Acute exposure to ethanol resulted in an increase in hormone-stimulated cAMP levels, while chronic ethanol treatment led to decreased sensitivity to hormone. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels were decreased by both acute and chronic ethanol treatment, while the cells' response to cholera toxin was unchanged by ethanol treatment. The lack of sensitivity of the cholera toxin response to ethanol suggests that,in contrast to what has been observed in other systems, ethanol does not affect the production or activity of G{alpha}s in MEPM cells. These results suggest a possible explanation for the molecular basis for the craniofacial abnormalities observed in the fetal alcohol syndrome.

  1. Chemically linked phage idiotype vaccination in the murine B cell lymphoma 1 model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background B cell malignancies are characterized by clonal expansion of B cells expressing tumor-specific idiotypes on their surface. These idiotypes are ideal target antigens for an individualized immunotherapy. However, previous idiotype vaccines mostly lacked efficiency due to a low immunogenicity of the idiotype. The objective of the present study was the determination of the feasibility, safety and immunogenicity of a novel chemically linked phage idiotype vaccine. Methods In the murine B cell lymphoma 1 model, tumor idiotypes were chemically linked to phage particles used as immunological carriers. For comparison, the idiotype was genetically expressed on the major phage coat protein g8 or linked to keyhole limpet hemocynanin. After intradermal immunizations with idiotype vaccines, tolerability and humoral immune responses were assessed. Results Feasibility and tolerability of the chemically linked phage idiotype vaccine was demonstrated. Vaccination with B cell lymphoma 1 idiotype expressing phage resulted in a significant survival benefit in the murine B cell lymphoma 1 protection model (60.2?±?23.8 days vs. 41.8?±?1.6 days and 39.8?±?3.8 days after vaccination with wild type phage or phosphate buffered saline, respectively). Superior immunogenicity of the chemically linked phage idiotype vaccine compared to the genetically engineered phage idiotype and keyhole limpet hemocynanin-coupled idiotype vaccine was demonstrated by significantly higher B cell lymphoma 1 idiotype-specific IgG levels after vaccination with chemically linked phage idiotype. Conclusion We present a novel, simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible therapy and may produce a superior immune response compared to previously employed idiotype vaccination strategies. PMID:24152874

  2. Cyclic-radiation response of murine fibrosarcoma cells grown as pulmonary nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hunter, N.

    1982-10-01

    The radiation age response of murine fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells grown as pulmonary nudules in C/sub 3/Hf/Kam mice was determined. FSa cells were irradiated in vivo either with 10 Gy as 14 day-old lung tumors (i.e., artifical micrometastases) following cell separation and synchronization by centrifugal elutriation. Flow microfluorometry (FMF) was used to determine cell-cycle parameters and the relative synchrony of the separated populations, as well as the percent contamination of normal diploid cells in each of the tumor cells populations. Tumor populations containing up to 90% G/sub 1/-, 60% S-, and 75% G/sub 2/+M-phase tumor cells were obtained. Cell clonogenicity, determined using a lung colony assay, ranged from 0.7 to 6% for control FSa cells from the various elutriator fractions. The radiation sensitivity of these separated cell populations varied by a factor of 6, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated as artifical micro or macro-metastases. In each experiment, tumor population most enriched in S-phase cells exhibited the greatest radiation sensitivity. To confirm that these populations were highly enriched in S-phase cells and to demonstrate that they were more radiosensitive than FSa cells in other parts of the cell cycle, the elutriated tumor population were exposed to either suicide labeling by high specific activity tritated thymidine or hydroxyurea. The resultant age response curves were qualitatively similar to those obtained following irradiation and reflected the S-phase sensitivity of FSa cells to these agents.

  3. Expression of TCR-V? peptides by murine bone marrow cells does not identify T-cell progenitors.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Janice L; Karsunky, Holger; Serwold, Thomas; Papathanasiou, Peter; Weissman, Irving L; O'Neill, Helen C

    2015-08-01

    Germline transcription has been described for both immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes, raising questions of their functional significance during haematopoiesis. Previously, an immature murine T-cell line was shown to bind antibody to TCR-V?8.2 in absence of anti-C? antibody binding, and an equivalent cell subset was also identified in the mesenteric lymph node. Here, we investigate whether germline transcription and cell surface V?8.2 expression could therefore represent a potential marker of T-cell progenitors. Cells with the TCR phenotype of V?8.2(+) C?(-) are found in several lymphoid sites, and among the lineage-negative (Lin(-)) fraction of hematopoietic progenitors in bone marrow (BM). Cell surface marker analysis of these cells identified subsets reflecting common lymphoid progenitors, common myeloid progenitors and multipotential progenitors. To assess whether the Lin(-) V?8.2(+) C?(-) BM subset contains hematopoietic progenitors, cells were sorted and adoptively transferred into sub-lethally irradiated recipients. No T-cell or myeloid progeny were detected following introduction of cells via the intrathymic or intravenous routes. However, B-cell development was detected in spleen. This pattern of restricted in vivo reconstitution disputes Lin(-) V?8.2(+) C?(-) BM cells as committed T-cell progenitors, but raises the possibility of progenitors with potential for B-cell development. PMID:25754612

  4. Embryotoxic effects of the marine biotoxin okadaic acid on murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Anke; Stempin, Sandra; Al-Hamwi, Regina; Lampen, Alfonso

    2010-04-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), a marine toxin produced by dinoflagellates, can accumulate in various bivalve molluscs. In humans, consumption of OA induces acute toxic effects like diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. OA is a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and 2A (PP2A), enzymes that are known to be critical regulators of embryonic development. To determine the embryotoxic potential of OA, we performed two independent cellular in-vitro assays, both of which are applicable for the detection of teratogenic compounds: (i) the validated embryonic stem cell test (EST) based on the morphological analysis of beating cardiomyocytes in embryoid bodies and (ii) the F9 cell assay quantifying the induction of cell differentiation by measuring the emitted luminescence of a reporter gene. In the presence of OA, beating cardiomyocytes in the EST were inhibited and the reporter gene in transiently transfected F9 cells was activated. Furthermore, OA treatment led to rapid morphological changes including cell rounding, the loss of cell-cell contacts and changed electrical impedance as monitored in real time by the xCELLigence system. The two independent bioassays (EST and F9 cell test) detected OA as a potential embryotoxic compound, since OA influences the differentiation process of cultured murine embryonic cells. PMID:20026154

  5. Erythropoietin acts as an anti-inflammatory signal on murine mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wiedenmann, Tanja; Ehrhardt, Stefanie; Cerny, Daniela; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Klein, Sabrina; Heeg, Klaus; Kubatzky, Katharina F

    2015-05-01

    Recently it was found that the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed on innate immune cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages. We found that murine bone marrow-derived mast cells express the EpoR and that its expression is increased under hypoxic conditions. Interestingly, Epo stimulation of the cells did not activate signal transducer and activator of transcription molecules, nor did we find differences in the expression of typical STAT-dependent genes, the proliferation rate, and the ability to differentiate or to protect the cells from apoptosis. Instead, we demonstrate that stimulation of mast cells with Epo leads to phosphorylation of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-kit. We hypothesize that this is due to the formation of a receptor complex between the EpoR and c-kit. The common beta chain of the IL-3 receptor family, which was described as part of the tissue protective receptor (TPR) on other non-erythroid cells, however is not activated. To investigate whether the EpoR/c-kit complex has tissue protective properties, cells were treated with the Toll-like receptor ligand LPS. Combined Epo and LPS treatment downregulated the inflammatory response of the cells as detected by a decrease in IL-6 and TNF-? secretion. PMID:25645506

  6. T cell-mediated eradication of murine metastatic melanoma induced by targeted interleukin 2 therapy

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Induction of a T-cell mediated antitumor response is the ultimate goal for tumor immunotherapy. We demonstrate here that antibody-targeted IL2 therapy is effective against established pulmonary and hepatic melanoma metastases in a syngeneic murine tumor model. The effector mechanisms involved in this tumor eradication are not dependent on NK cells, since the therapeutic effect of antibody-IL2 fusion protein was not altered in NK cell-deficient mice. In contrast, T cells are essential for the observed antitumor effect, since therapy with antibody IL2 fusion proteins is unable to induce tumor eradication in T cell-deficient SCID mice. In vivo depletion studies characterized the essential effector cell population further as CD8 + T cells. Such CD8 + T cells, isolated from tumor bearing mice after antibody-directed IL2 therapy, exerted a MHC class I-restricted cytotoxicity against the same tumor in vitro. These data demonstrate the ability of antibody-targeted IL2 delivery to induce a T cell-dependent host immune response that is capable of eradicating established melanoma metastases in clinically relevant organs. PMID:8642346

  7. Confluence dependent resistance (CDR) to doxorubicin and E-cadherin expression in murine mammary cells.

    PubMed

    Dimanche-Boitrel, M T; Genne, P; Duchamp, O; Chauffert, B

    1994-10-14

    Confluence dependent resistance (CDR) is one of the principal mechanisms by which solid tumor cells resist anthracyclines. CDR is thought to be mediated by cell-cell contact which increases the fraction of non-proliferating resistant cells in a post confluence monolayer culture. As E-cadherin is a major Ca2+ dependent adhesion molecule, involved in cell-cell adhesion, differentiation and polarity of normal and cancerous epithelial cells, we decided to investigate its involvement in the CDR mechanism. In order to do this, we measured the intracellular accumulation and the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin (DXR) in four subclones, derived from the same parental murine mammary cell line (NMuMG), differing in their expression of E-cadherin. A significant reduction in DXR accumulation and cytotoxicity was observed in NM-f-ras-TD-CAMx, which expresses E-cadherin, suggesting that E-cadherin could play a role in the increase of drug resistance observed in confluent cancer cells. PMID:7954333

  8. Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccination in Cancer: Therapeutic Implications Emerging from Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Mac Keon, Soledad; Ruiz, María Sol; Gazzaniga, Silvina; Wainstok, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel-T), there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts toward an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment. PMID:26042126

  9. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPRS Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human and Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bunin, Anna; Sisirak, Vanja; Ghosh, Hiyaa S; Grajkowska, Lucja T; Hou, Z Esther; Miron, Michelle; Yang, Cliff; Ceribelli, Michele; Uetani, Noriko; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Hendriks, Wiljan; Tremblay, Michel L; Häcker, Hans; Staudt, Louis M; Green, Peter H; Bhagat, Govind; Reizis, Boris

    2015-08-18

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are primary producers of type I interferon (IFN) in response to viruses. The IFN-producing capacity of pDCs is regulated by specific inhibitory receptors, yet none of the known receptors are conserved in evolution. We report that within the human immune system, receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPRS) is expressed specifically on pDCs. Surface PTPRS was rapidly downregulated after pDC activation, and only PTPRS(-) pDCs produced IFN-?. Antibody-mediated PTPRS crosslinking inhibited pDC activation, whereas PTPRS knockdown enhanced IFN response in a pDC cell line. Similarly, murine Ptprs and the homologous receptor phosphatase Ptprf were specifically co-expressed in murine pDCs. Haplodeficiency or DC-specific deletion of Ptprs on Ptprf-deficient background were associated with enhanced IFN response of pDCs, leukocyte infiltration in the intestine and mild colitis. Thus, PTPRS represents an evolutionarily conserved pDC-specific inhibitory receptor, and is required to prevent spontaneous IFN production and immune-mediated intestinal inflammation. PMID:26231120

  10. Effects of Murine and Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Cuprizone Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Gudi, Viktoria; Hoffmann, Andrea; Salinas Tejedor, Laura; Janßen, Stefanie; Prajeeth, Chittappen Kandiyil; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J.; van Velthoven, Cindy; Hansmann, Florian; Skripuletz, Thomas; Stangel, Martin

    2013-01-01

    For the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis there are no regenerative approaches to enhance remyelination. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been proposed to exert such regenerative functions. Intravenous administration of human MSC reduced the clinical severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model mimicking some aspects of multiple sclerosis. However, it is not clear if this effect was achieved by systemic immunomodulation or if there is an active neuroregeneration in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to investigate remyelination and regeneration in the CNS we analysed the effects of intravenously and intranasally applied murine and human bone marrow-derived MSC on cuprizone induced demyelination, a toxic animal model which allows analysis of remyelination without the influence of the peripheral immune system. In contrast to EAE no effects of MSC on de- and remyelination and glial cell reactions were found. In addition, neither murine nor human MSC entered the lesions in the CNS in this toxic model. In conclusion, MSC are not directed into CNS lesions in the cuprizone model where the blood-brain-barrier is intact and thus cannot provide support for regenerative processes. PMID:23922802

  11. A flavone derivative from Sesbania sesban leaves and its cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianhar, Hanhan; Syah, Yana Maolana; Mujahidin, Didin; Hakim, Euis Holisotan; Juliawaty, Lia Dewi

    2014-03-01

    Sesbania sesban, locally named as Jayanti, is one of Indonesia plants belonging to Fabaceae family. This species is traditionally used by Indonesian people to cure digestive disorders, fever, or headache. Jayanti can grow well in tropical to subtropical region, such as in Asia and Africa. Based on literature, qualitative analysis of the methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban showed that it contained flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. In addition, the activity assay of extracts of different tissues of this species showed antitumor, antimalarial, and antidiabetic activityies (leaves and seed extracts), antioxidants (flower extract), and analgesic (wood extract). Though the extracts of S. sesban parts showed interesting activities, chemical study of those extracts have not been widely reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to isolate the secondary metabolites from methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban and to determine their cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells. One compound has been obtained and identified as 3-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (1), a new isolated compound from nature. This compound was obtained through separation of methanol extract using various chromatographic techniques, such as vacuum liquid chromatography and radial chromatography. The structure elucidation of isolated compound was based on 1D NMR (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR) and 2D NMR (HMBC). The cytotoxicity of methanol extract and compound 1 against murine leukemia P-388 cells examined through MTT assay showed IC50 value of 60.04 ?g/mL and 5.40 ?g/mL, respectively.

  12. Autocrine fibroblast growth factor 18 mediates dexamethasone-induced osteogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Fromigué, Olivia; Nuber, Ulrike; Vaudin, Pascal; Pages, Jean-Christophe; Ebert, Regina; Jakob, Franz; Miraoui, Hichem; Marie, Pierre J

    2010-08-01

    The potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to differentiate into functional bone forming cells provides an important tool for bone regeneration. The identification of factors capable of promoting osteoblast differentiation in MSCs is therefore critical to enhance the osteogenic potential of MSCs. Using microarray analysis combined with biochemical and molecular approach, we found that FGF18, a member of the FGF family, is upregulated during osteoblast differentiation induced by dexamethasone in murine MSCs. We showed that overexpression of FGF18 by lentiviral (LV) infection, or treatment of MSCs with recombinant human (rh)FGF18 increased the expression of the osteoblast specific transcription factor Runx2, and enhanced osteoblast phenotypic marker gene expression and in vitro osteogenesis. Molecular silencing using lentiviral shRNA demonstrated that downregulation of FGFR1 or FGFR2 abrogated osteoblast gene expression induced by either LV-FGF18 or rhFGF18, indicating that FGF18 enhances osteoblast differentiation in MSCs via activation of FGFR1 or FGFR2 signaling. Biochemical and pharmacological analyses showed that the induction of phenotypic osteoblast markers by LV-FGF18 is mediated by activation of ERK1/2-MAPKs and PI3K signaling in MSCs. These results reveal that FGF18 is an essential autocrine positive regulator of the osteogenic differentiation program in murine MSCs and indicate that osteogenic differentiation induced by FGF18 in MSCs is triggered by FGFR1/FGFR2-mediated ERK1/2-MAPKs and PI3K signaling. PMID:20432451

  13. Drug resistance to chlorambucil in murine B-cell leukemic cells is overcome by its conjugation to a targeting peptide.

    PubMed

    Gellerman, Gary; Baskin, Sophia; Galia, Luboshits; Gilad, Yosef; Firer, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    Targeting drugs through small-molecule carriers with a high affinity to receptors on cancer cells can overcome the lack of target cell specificity of most anticancer drugs. These targeted carrier-drug conjugates are also capable of reversing drug resistance in cancer cells. Although many targeted drug delivery approaches are being tested, the linkage of several and different drugs to a single carrier molecule might further enhance their therapeutic efficacy, particularly if the drugs are engineered for variable time release. This report shows that murine B-cell leukemic cells previously resistant to a chemotherapeutic drug can be made sensitive to that drug as long as it is conjugated to a targeting peptide and, in particular, when the conjugate contains multiple copies of the drug. Using a 13mer peptide (VHFFKNIVTPRTP) derived from the myelin basic protein (p-MBP), dendrimer-based peptide conjugates containing one, two, or four molecules of chlorambucil were synthesized. Although murine hybridomas expressing antibodies to either p-MBP (MBP cells) or a nonrelevant antigen (BCL-1 cells) were both resistant to free chlorambucil, exposure of the cells to the p-MBP-chlorambucil conjugate completely reversed the drug resistance in MBP, but not BCL-1 cells or normal spleen cells. Moreover, at equivalent drug doses, there was significant enhancement in the cytotoxic activity of multidrug versus single-drug copy conjugates. On the basis of these results, the use of multifunctional dendrone linkers bearing several covalently bound cytotoxic agents allows the development of more effective targeted drug systems and enhances the efficacy of currently approved drugs for B-cell leukemia. PMID:23187462

  14. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, ? particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by ?H2AX-immunostaining. Osteoblastogenesis was estimated by measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and production of mineralized matrix (von-Kossa staining, Alizarin Red staining). During the process of osteoblastic cell differentiation, the expression of the bone specific marker genes osteocalcin (OCN) and osteopontin (OPN) were recorded by quantitative real time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Compared with standard culture conditions, the osteogenic marker genes OCN and OPN were highly expressed during the differentiation process induced either by osteo-inductive media additives (50 µg/ml ascorbic acid, 10 mmol/l ?-glycero phosphate) or by sparsely ionizing radiation (X-rays). After 21 days of postirradiation incubation sparsely ionizing radiation could be shown to induce the formation of bone-like nodules (von-Kossa staining) for OCT-1 and MC3T3-E1 S4 cells but nor for MC3T3- E1 S24 cells. Ionizing radiation leads to a cell cycle arrest which is resolved in a dose and time dependent way. This was accompanied by a dose dependent regulation of the cyclin kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21/WAF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-?1). TGF-?1 is known to affect osteoblast differentiation, matrix formation and mineralization. Modulation of its expression could influence the expression of main osteogenic transcription factors. For exposure with high LET radiation a pronounced cell cycle block was evident. The expression of the osteogenic marker genes OCN and Osterix (OSX) was increased in the OCT-1 cells with differentiation potential for exposure to ? particles and accelerated carbon and argon ions. The results on the expression of differentiation markers during radiation-induced premature differentiation of bone cells of the osteoblast lineage show that densely ionizing radiation results in expression of proteins essential for bone formation and consequently in an increase in bone volume. Such an effect has been observed in in-vivo carbon ion irradiated rats. As radiation dependent permanent cell cycle blocks lead to a depletion of proliferation-competent cel

  15. Localized colonic stem cell transplantation enhances tissue regeneration in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, QiQi; Price, Donald D; Dreher, Kara L; Pronold, Barry; Callam, Christopher S; Sharma, Jay; Verne, G Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Many patients suffer from chronic gastrointestinal diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and visceral pain in which there is no definitive treatment. Adult stem cells have recently been used in various disease states to contribute wound-healing processes. In the current study we investigated the ability of intra-colonic adult stem cells application to heal colonic inflammation in IL-10?/? mice with active colitis. The aims of this study were to determine whether intra-colonic infusion of adult colonic stem cells (CSCs) (local stem cell transplantation): (i) restores intestinal permeability; (ii) attenuates visceral hypersensitivity; (iii) heals murine colitis. IL-10?/? mice with active colitis were transplanted with adult stem cells. Mice received either a single intracolonic infusion of CSCs or colonic epithelial cells. Two weeks after transplantation, we measured visceral hypersensitivity and intestinal permeability and correlated these with histological improvement of colitis. IL-10?/? mice that received stem cell transplantation showed histopathologic evidence of recovery from colitis. Improvement in colitis as graded by pathology scores correlated with restoration of intestinal permeability and decreased visceral hypersensitivity. Intra-colonic administration of CSCs is a potential therapeutic method for treating refractory symptoms in patients with chronic gastrointestinal diseases associated with chronic inflammation and visceral hypersensitivity. This method may be safer and should have far fewer side effects than systemic stem cell administration. PMID:22050903

  16. Exploring the translational disconnect between the murine and human inflammatory response: analysis of LPS dose–response relationship in murine versus human cell lines and implications for translation into murine models of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    McCarron, Eamon P; Williams, Dominic P; Antoine, Daniel J; Kipar, Anja; Lemm, Jana; Stehr, Sebastian; Welters, Ingeborg D

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation forms an important part of the human innate immune system and is largely dependent on the activation of the “classical” NF-?B pathway through Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Understanding this has allowed researchers to explore roles of therapeutic targets in managing conditions such as sepsis. Recapitulating an inflammatory response using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a “sterile” technique, can provide information that is dissimilar to the clinical condition. By examining NF-?B activation (through immunoblotting of the p65 subunit) in two separate cell lines (murine and human) and analyzing two murine models of sepsis (intraperitoneal [IP] LPS and IP stool inoculation), an evaluation of the translational disconnect between experimental and clinical sepsis can be made. Methods THP-1 (human) cells and RAW 264.7 (murine) cells were dosed with concentrations of LPS (human, 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL; murine, 30 pg/mL to 1,000 ng/mL) and nuclear actin and p65 were immunoblotted to measure changes in nuclear density. In vivo, C57BL/6 mice received either IP injection of stool suspension (5 µL/g) or LPS (25 mg/kg) or saline (1 mL/kg). Animals were culled at 6 hours and tissues were analyzed. Results An increase in basal p65:actin density in THP-1 cells (mean 0.214, standard error of the mean 0.024) was seen at doses as small as 0.1 ng/mL (0.519±0.064). In contrast to RAW 264.7 cells, basal increases (0.170±0.025) were only seen when a dose of 3 ng/mL (0.387±0.078) was used. Dose–response analysis of p65:actin ratio showed that THP-1 cells respond to lower doses of LPS than RAW 264.7 cells and lower doses produce a greater fold increase in the nuclear p65 density. Both in vivo models showed evidence of neutrophil (NL) recruitment into tissues (which was more intense after LPS treatment). IP stool inoculation resulted in an acute suppurative peritonitis and more substantial evidence of NL recruitment into adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Conclusion Our results support previous observations that translation of murine models into the human clinical setting suffers from considerable limitations including species-associated differences in LPS response seen at a molecular level. Furthermore, the histopathological changes during clinical sepsis cannot be adequately reproduced by injection of LPS. Therefore, the so-called translational disconnect that exists between murine LPS models and human sepsis involves NF-?B activation at a molecular level and is further augmented by the use of LPS as a stimulus for infectious responses in vivo. PMID:26527892

  17. Murine Spleen Tissue Regeneration from Neonatal Spleen Capsule Requires Lymphotoxin Priming of Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jonathan K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Spleen is a tissue with regenerative capacity, which allows autotransplantation of human spleen fragments to counteract the effects of splenectomy. We now reveal in a murine model that transplant of neonatal spleen capsule alone leads to the regeneration of full spleen tissue. This finding indicates that graft-derived spleen stromal cells, but not lymphocytes, are essential components of tissue neogenesis, a finding verified by transplant and regeneration of Rag1KO spleen capsules. We further demonstrate that lymphotoxin and lymphoid tissue inducer cells participate in two key elements of spleen neogenesis, bulk tissue regeneration and white pulp organization, identifying a lymphotoxin-dependent pathway for neonatal spleen regeneration that contrasts with previously defined lymphotoxin-independent embryonic spleen organogenesis. PMID:24951816

  18. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Inhibit Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection through a Multi-Step Process

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Hideya; Kosugi, Isao; Arai, Yoshifumi; Iwashita, Toshihide; Tsutsui, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    In humans, cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most significant infectious cause of intrauterine infections that cause congenital anomalies of the central nervous system. Currently, it is not known how this process is affected by the timing of infection and the susceptibility of early-gestational-period cells. Embryonic stem (ES) cells are more resistant to CMV than most other cell types, although the mechanism responsible for this resistance is not well understood. Using a plaque assay and evaluation of immediate-early 1 mRNA and protein expression, we found that mouse ES cells were resistant to murine CMV (MCMV) at the point of transcription. In ES cells infected with MCMV, treatment with forskolin and trichostatin A did not confer full permissiveness to MCMV. In ES cultures infected with elongation factor-1? (EF-1?) promoter-green fluorescent protein (GFP) recombinant MCMV at a multiplicity of infection of 10, less than 5% of cells were GFP-positive, despite the fact that ES cells have relatively high EF-1? promoter activity. Quantitative PCR analysis of the MCMV genome showed that ES cells allow approximately 20-fold less MCMV DNA to enter the nucleus than mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) do, and that this inhibition occurs in a multi-step manner. In situ hybridization revealed that ES cell nuclei have significantly less MCMV DNA than MEF nuclei. This appears to be facilitated by the fact that ES cells express less heparan sulfate, ?1 integrin, and vimentin, and have fewer nuclear pores, than MEF. This may reduce the ability of MCMV to attach to and enter through the cellular membrane, translocate to the nucleus, and cross the nuclear membrane in pluripotent stem cells (ES/induced pluripotent stem cells). The results presented here provide perspective on the relationship between CMV susceptibility and cell differentiation. PMID:21407806

  19. CrxOS maintains the self-renewal capacity of murine embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Ryota; Yamasaki, Tokiwa; Nagai, Yoko; Wu, Jinzhan; Department of Physiological Chemistry, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 ; Kajiho, Hiroaki; Yokoi, Tadashi; Noda, Eiichiro; Department of Ophthalmology, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo 157-8535 ; Nishina, Sachiko; Niwa, Hitoshi; Azuma, Noriyuki; Katada, Toshiaki; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2009-12-25

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells maintain pluripotency by self-renewal. Several homeoproteins, including Oct3/4 and Nanog, are known to be key factors in maintaining the self-renewal capacity of ES cells. However, other genes required for the mechanisms underlying this process are still unclear. Here we report the identification by in silico analysis of a homeobox-containing gene, CrxOS, that is specifically expressed in murine ES cells and is essential for their self-renewal. ES cells mainly express the short isoform of endogenous CrxOS. Using a polyoma-based episomal expression system, we demonstrate that overexpression of the CrxOS short isoform is sufficient for maintaining the undifferentiated morphology of ES cells and stimulating their proliferation. Finally, using RNA interference, we show that CrxOS is essential for the self-renewal of ES cells, and provisionally identify foxD3 as a downstream target gene of CrxOS. To our knowledge, ours is the first delineation of the physiological role of CrxOS in ES cells.

  20. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynertson, Kurt A.; Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 ; Charlson, Mary E.; Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 ; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from 12 species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from 3 species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells.

  1. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    Reynertson, Kurt A.; Charlson, Mary E.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly-cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from twelve species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from three species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells. PMID:20955699

  2. Apoptosis induced by oxysterols in murine lymphoma cells and in normal thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Christ, M; Luu, B; Mejia, J E; Moosbrugger, I; Bischoff, P

    1993-01-01

    Oxygenated derivatives of cholesterol (oxysterols), a family of naturally occurring compounds, possess marked anti-proliferative and immunosuppressive activities, in particular they have been shown to inhibit T-cell responses to different stimuli. 25-Hydroxycholesterol (25-OHC) and 7 beta,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7.25-OHC) are able to kill not only RDM4 murine lymphoma in vitro, but also, surprisingly, mouse thymocytes after several hours of incubation. In this study, we report that the death of RDM4 and thymocytes induced by oxysterols exhibits the features of apoptosis. This phenomenon was identified by agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA fragments extracted from the cells and quantified by flow cytometric analysis of the DNA fluorescence of propidium iodide-stained cells. Cycloheximide and actinomycin D were found to decrease the number of apoptotic cells and to increase cell viability, indicating a requirement for the synthesis of macromolecules in oxysterol-induced programmed cell death. The pathway by which 25-OHC and 7.25-OHC are able to induce apoptosis in this type of cell and the possible contribution of these compounds to thymus involution during development are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7682990

  3. A natural mutation of the amino acid residue at position 60 destroys staphylococcal enterotoxin A murine T-cell mitogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Mahana, W; al-Daccak, R; Lévéillé, C; Valet, J P; Hébert, J; Ouellette, M; Mourad, W

    1995-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been used to identify the amino acid residues of bacterial superantigens involved in their interactions with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and T-cell receptor (TCR). In this study, we isolated a naturally mutated staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) from three different Staphylococcus aureus strains, in which the amino acid at position 60 has been changed from aspartic acid (D) to asparagine (N). We then studied the influence of this change on the immunological activities of SEA. Our results demonstrated that this mutation does not affect the capacity of SEA to bind MHC class II molecules and consequently activates human monocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes. In contrast, mutated SEA failed to stimulate the proliferation of murine splenic lymphocytes of two different strains, and when presented by human MHC class II molecules, it also failed to activate murine cell line 3DT, which expresses the SEA-specific TCR V beta element (V beta 1). These results indicate that this mutation alters the interaction between SEA and murine TCR. The reactivity patterns of the mutated SEA with two specific anti-SEA monoclonal antibodies suggested that the observed effect of the isolated mutation in the murine system might be due to certain conformational changes in the SEA molecule introduced upon changing the D at position 60 to N. Site-directed mutagenesis of the N residue to D or to glycine reconstituted the ability of SEA to stimulate murine splenic lymphocytes. The different effects of this natural mutation at position 60 on the immunological activities of SEA with murine and human cells highlight the relevance of the affinity and avidity in SEA-TCR interactions in the function of different species or may reflect a difference in epitope specificity. PMID:7622202

  4. Effects of nicotine on cellular proliferation, macromolecular synthesis and cell cycle phase distribution in human and murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, S.; Chiao, J.; Rossi, J.; Wang, C.H.; Wu, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Addition of nicotine causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth in established human and murine cells. In the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemic cells, 3 mM nicotine results in a 50% inhibition of cellular proliferation after 80 h. Nicotine was also found to affect the cell cycle distribution of HL-60 cells. Treatment with 4 mM nicotine for 20 h causes an increase in proportion of Gl-phase cells (from 49% to 57%) and a significant decrease in the proportion of S-phase cells (from 41% to 32%). These results suggest that nicotine causes cell arrest in the Gl-phase which may in part account for its effects on cell growth. To determine whether nicotine has a primary effect on the uptake/transport of macromolecular precursors into cells, HL-60 cells were treated with 2-6 mM nicotine for 30 h/sub 3/ at the end of which time cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine, (/sup 3/H)uridine, (/sup 14/C)lysine and (/sup 35/S)methionine, the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) soluble and insoluble radioactivities from each of the labeling conditions were determined. These studies show that nicotine primarily affect the synthesis of proteins.

  5. Impurity of Stem Cell Graft by Murine Embryonic Fibroblasts – Implications for Cell-Based Therapy of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Molcanyi, Marek; Mehrjardi, Narges Zare; Schäfer, Ute; Haj-Yasein, Nadia Nabil; Brockmann, Michael; Penner, Marina; Riess, Peter; Reinshagen, Clemens; Rieger, Bernhard; Hannes, Tobias; Hescheler, Jürgen; Bosche, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells have been demonstrated to possess a therapeutic potential in experimental models of various central nervous system disorders, including stroke. The types of implanted cells appear to play a crucial role. Previously, groups of the stem cell network NRW implemented a feeder-based cell line within the scope of their projects, examining the implantation of stem cells after ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Retrospective evaluation indicated the presence of spindle-shaped cells in several grafts implanted in injured animals, which indicated potential contamination by co-cultured feeder cells (murine embryonic fibroblasts – MEFs). Because feeder-based cell lines have been previously exposed to a justified criticism with regard to contamination by animal glycans, we aimed to evaluate the effects of stem cell/MEF co-transplantation. MEFs accounted for 5.3?±?2.8% of all cells in the primary FACS-evaluated co-culture. Depending on the culture conditions and subsequent purification procedure, the MEF-fraction ranged from 0.9 to 9.9% of the cell suspensions in vitro. MEF survival and related formation of extracellular substances in vivo were observed after implantation into the uninjured rat brain. Impurity of the stem cell graft by MEFs interferes with translational strategies, which represents a threat to the potential recipient and may affect the graft microenvironment. The implications of these findings are critically discussed. PMID:25249934

  6. Protective activity of hamamelitannin on cell damage of murine skin fibroblasts induced by UVB irradiation.

    PubMed

    Masaki, H; Atsumi, T; Sakurai, H

    1995-07-01

    The protective activities of hamamelitannin (2',5-di-O-galloyl-hamamelose) in Hamamelis virginiana L. and its related compound, gallic acid, on damaged murine skin fibroblasts induced by UVB irradiation were investigated. In order to exclude the UV absorbing effect of the compounds, the protection study was performed such that the fibroblasts were pretreated with hamamelitannin or gallic acid for 24 h before UVB irradiation. At 200 microM concentration, hamamelitannin gave the higher survival of 72.6 +/- 0.4% in comparison with that of gallic acid (35.5 +/- 1.0%), while UVB absorbers such as 2-ethylhexyl p-methoxycinnamate and hexylbenzoate did not show such protection. The scavenging activities of hamamelitannin and gallic acid against active oxygens such as superoxide anion radicals, hydroxyl radicals and singlet oxygens were evaluated using electron spin resonance (ESR-spin trapping method). Hamamelitannin and gallic acid showed potent scavenging activities against all active oxygens tested. Furthermore, the association of hamamelitannin to fibroblasts was examined by comparing it with that of gallic acid, and the following results were obtained: (1) hamamelitannin reduces the reaction rate of liposome entrapped-nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) with external superoxide anions, and (2) several glycosides associate with fibroblasts. From these results, it was concluded that hamamelitannin protects murine fibroblasts against external active oxygens by associating with the cell surface through its sugar moiety. PMID:7577835

  7. Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cells Requires IRF4 but Not XBP-1

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Caline G.; Rangaswamy, Udaya Shankari; Wakeman, Brian S.; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses display tropism for B cells and, like all known herpesviruses, exhibit distinct lytic and latent life cycles. One well-established observation among members of the gammaherpesvirus family is the link between viral reactivation from latently infected B cells and plasma cell differentiation. Importantly, a number of studies have identified a potential role for a CREB/ATF family member, X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), in trans-activating the immediate early BZLF-1 or BRLF1/gene 50 promoters of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), respectively. XBP-1 is required for the unfolded protein response and has been identified as a critical transcription factor in plasma cells. Here, we demonstrate that XBP-1 is capable of trans-activating the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) RTA promoter in vitro, consistent with previous observations for EBV and KSHV. However, we show that in vivo there does not appear to be a requirement for XBP-1 expression in B cells for virus reactivation. The MHV68 M2 gene product under some experimental conditions plays an important role in virus reactivation from B cells. M2 has been shown to drive B cell differentiation to plasma cells, as well as interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, both of which are dependent on M2 induction of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) expression. IRF4 is required for plasma cell differentiation, and consistent with a role for plasma cells in MHV68 reactivation from B cells, we show that IRF4 expression in B cells is required for efficient reactivation of MHV68 from splenocytes. Thus, the latter analyses are consistent with previous studies linking plasma cell differentiation to MHV68 reactivation from B cells. The apparent independence of MHV68 reactivation from XBP-1 expression in plasma cells may reflect redundancy among CREB/ATF family members or the involvement of other plasma cell-specific transcription factors. Regardless, these findings underscore the importance of in vivo studies in assessing the relevance of observations made in tissue culture models. IMPORTANCE All known herpesviruses establish a chronic infection of their respective host, persisting for the life of the individual. A critical feature of these viruses is their ability to reactivate from a quiescent form of infection (latency) and generate progeny virus. In the case of gammaherpesviruses, which are associated with the development of lymphoproliferative disorders, including lymphomas, reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes occurs upon terminal differentiation of these cells to plasma cells—the cell type that produces antibodies. A number of studies have linked a plasma cell transcription factor, XBP-1, to the induction of gammaherpesvirus reactivation, and we show here that indeed in tissue culture models this cellular transcription factor can trigger expression of the murine gammaherpesvirus gene involved in driving virus reactivation. However, surprisingly, when we examined the role of XBP-1 in the setting of infection of mice—using mice that lack a functional XBP-1 gene in B cells—we failed to observe a role for XBP-1 in virus reactivation. However, we show that another cellular factor essential for plasma cell differentiation, IRF4, is critical for virus reactivation. Thus, these studies point out the importance of studies in animal models to validate findings from studies carried out in cell lines passaged in vitro. PMID:25078688

  8. Calcium ion concentrations and DNA fragmentation in target cell destruction by murine cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the destruction of target cells by murine CTLs, we examined intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and DNA fragmentation in target cells. Changes in [Ca2+]i were followed by flow cytometry by loading the cells with indo-1, a Ca2+-binding fluorescent dye, and determining the ration of fluorescence intensities at 405 nm (emission maximum for Ca2+-bound dye) over 480 nm (emission maximum for the free dye). Within minutes after interacting with the cytolytic granule fraction that had been isolated from CTLs, [Ca2+]i in target cells was strikingly increased. A pronounced increase in [Ca2+]i was also observed in target cells when they were specifically recognized by intact CTLs. Since ionomycin, a Ca2+ ionophore, caused a similar increase in [Ca2+]i and lysed cells (provided that extracellular Ca2+ was present), it appears that a sustained high level of [Ca2+]i is cytolytic. In contrast with other cells, CTLs, which have been shown to be refractory to granule-mediated lysis and to be poor targets for other CTLs, did not manifest an elevation in [Ca2+]i when they were similarly loaded with indo-1 and treated with isolated granules. The characteristic cleavage of target cell DNA into nucleosome-sized fragments was also induced by isolated granules as well as by valinomycin, a K+ ionophore, but not by ionomycin. The results support the view that lysis of most target cells by cloned CTLs is due primarily to target cell membrane changes that are fundamentally equivalent to the formation of nonspecific ion channels. The resulting large increase in [Ca2+]i is probably responsible for target cell lysis; and changes in intracellular ion concentrations also appear to be responsible for DNA fragmentation, probably by activating endogenous target cell endonucleases. PMID:2450162

  9. Partial characterization of the Sox2+ cell population in an adult murine model of digit amputation.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vineet; Siu, Bernard F; Chao, Hsu; Hirschi, Karen K; Raborn, Eric; Johnson, Scott A; Tottey, Stephen; Hurley, Katherine B; Medberry, Chris J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2012-07-01

    Tissue regeneration in response to injury in adult mammals is generally limited to select tissues. Nonmammalian species such as newts and axolotls undergo regeneration of complex tissues such as limbs and digits via recruitment and accumulation of local and circulating multipotent progenitors preprogrammed to recapitulate the missing tissue. Directed recruitment and activation of progenitor cells at a site of injury in adult mammals may alter the default wound-healing response from scar tissue toward regeneration. Bioactive molecules derived from proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo to the site of injury. The present study further characterized the population of cells accumulating at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products in a well-established model of murine digit amputation. After a mid-second phalanx digit amputation in 6-8-week-old adult mice, treatment with ECM degradation products resulted in the accumulation of a heterogeneous population of cells, a subset of which expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a marker of pluripotent and adult progenitor cells. Sox2+ cells were localized lateral to the amputated P2 bone and coexpressed progenitor cell markers CD90 and Sca1. Transgenic Sox2 eGFP/+ and bone marrow chimeric mice showed that the bone marrow and blood circulation did not contribute to the Sox2+ cell population. The present study showed that, in addition to circulating progenitor cells, resident tissue-derived cells also populate at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products. Although future work is necessary to determine the contribution of Sox2+ cells to functional tissue at the site of injury, recruitment and/or activation of local tissue-derived cells may be a viable approach to tissue engineering of more complex tissues in adult mammals. PMID:22530556

  10. Partial Characterization of the Sox2+ Cell Population in an Adult Murine Model of Digit Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vineet; Siu, Bernard F.; Chao, Hsu; Hirschi, Karen K.; Raborn, Eric; Johnson, Scott A.; Tottey, Stephen; Hurley, Katherine B.; Medberry, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue regeneration in response to injury in adult mammals is generally limited to select tissues. Nonmammalian species such as newts and axolotls undergo regeneration of complex tissues such as limbs and digits via recruitment and accumulation of local and circulating multipotent progenitors preprogrammed to recapitulate the missing tissue. Directed recruitment and activation of progenitor cells at a site of injury in adult mammals may alter the default wound-healing response from scar tissue toward regeneration. Bioactive molecules derived from proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo to the site of injury. The present study further characterized the population of cells accumulating at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products in a well-established model of murine digit amputation. After a mid-second phalanx digit amputation in 6–8-week-old adult mice, treatment with ECM degradation products resulted in the accumulation of a heterogeneous population of cells, a subset of which expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a marker of pluripotent and adult progenitor cells. Sox2+ cells were localized lateral to the amputated P2 bone and coexpressed progenitor cell markers CD90 and Sca1. Transgenic Sox2 eGFP/+ and bone marrow chimeric mice showed that the bone marrow and blood circulation did not contribute to the Sox2+ cell population. The present study showed that, in addition to circulating progenitor cells, resident tissue-derived cells also populate at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products. Although future work is necessary to determine the contribution of Sox2+ cells to functional tissue at the site of injury, recruitment and/or activation of local tissue-derived cells may be a viable approach to tissue engineering of more complex tissues in adult mammals. PMID:22530556

  11. Markers of murine embryonic and neural stem cells, neurons and astrocytes: reference points for developmental neurotoxicity testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) is a significant concern for environmental chemicals, as well as for food and drug constituents. The sensitivity of animal-based DNT models is unclear, and they are expensive and time consuming. Murine embryonic stem cells (mESC) recapitulate sev...

  12. Expression of human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) in murine acinar cells promotes pancreatitis and apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Athwal, T; Huang, W; Mukherjee, R; Latawiec, D; Chvanov, M; Clarke, R; Smith, K; Campbell, F; Merriman, C; Criddle, D; Sutton, R; Neoptolemos, J; Vlatkovi?, N

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is an autosomal dominant disease that displays the features of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Mutations in human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) are associated with HP and have provided some insight into the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, but mechanisms responsible for the initiation of pancreatitis have not been elucidated and the role of apoptosis and necrosis has been much debated. However, it has been generally accepted that trypsinogen, prematurely activated within the pancreatic acinar cell, has a major role in the initiation process. Functional studies of HP have been limited by the absence of an experimental system that authentically mimics disease development. We therefore developed a novel transgenic murine model system using wild-type (WT) human PRSS1 or two HP-associated mutants (R122H and N29I) to determine whether expression of human cationic trypsinogen in murine acinar cells promotes pancreatitis. The rat elastase promoter was used to target transgene expression to pancreatic acinar cells in three transgenic strains that were generated: Tg(Ela-PRSS1)NV, Tg(Ela-PRSS1*R122H)NV and Tg(Ela-PRSS1*N29I)NV. Mice were analysed histologically, immunohistochemically and biochemically. We found that transgene expression is restricted to pancreatic acinar cells and transgenic PRSS1 proteins are targeted to the pancreatic secretory pathway. Animals from all transgenic strains developed pancreatitis characterised by acinar cell vacuolisation, inflammatory infiltrates and fibrosis. Transgenic animals also developed more severe pancreatitis upon treatment with low-dose cerulein than controls, displaying significantly higher scores for oedema, inflammation and overall histopathology. Expression of PRSS1, WT or mutant, in acinar cells increased apoptosis in pancreatic tissues and isolated acinar cells. Moreover, studies of isolated acinar cells demonstrated that transgene expression promotes apoptosis rather than necrosis. We therefore conclude that expression of WT or mutant human PRSS1 in murine acinar cells induces apoptosis and is sufficient to promote spontaneous pancreatitis, which is enhanced in response to cellular insult. PMID:24722290

  13. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis augments lysis of murine tumor cells by sulfhydryl-reactive antineoplastics.

    PubMed Central

    Arrick, B A; Nathan, C F; Cohn, Z A

    1983-01-01

    GSH plays an important role in cellular defense against a wide variety of toxic electrophiles via the formation of thioether conjugates. We studied the role of GSH in murine tumor cell defense against a novel class of sulfhydryl-reactive antineoplastics, the sesquiterpene lactones (SL). Incubation of P815 mastocytoma cells with any of the four SL tested (vernolepin, helenalin, elephantopin, and eriofertopin) for 1 h resulted in 70-97% depletion of GSH. The importance of GSH resynthesis upon exposure of tumor cells to SL was evaluated with the use of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a selective, nontoxic inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase. Inhibition of GSH synthesis with 0.2 mM BSO markedly enhanced SL-mediated cytolysis of four murine tumor cell lines. A 6- to 34-fold reduction in the amount of SL causing 50% lysis was obtained with BSO. Addition of BSO to P815cells either during or immediately after a 1-h pulse with 10 micrograms/ml of vernolepin increased cytolysis from less than 3% to 78-82%. However, a 1.5-h delay in the addition of BSO to such cells, which allowed for substantial resynthesis of GSH, reduced cytolysis to 30%. Recovery of GSH synthetic capacity after BSO treatment correlated with loss of the synergistic effect of BSO on lysis by vernolepin. BSO did not augment cytolysis by six other antineoplastics (doxorubicin, mitomycin C, vinblastine, cytosine arabinoside, maytansine, and 1,3-bis-[2-chloroethyl]-1-nitrosourea [BCNU]). Of these, only BCNU depleted cellular GSH. Lysis by jatrophone, another GSH-depleting antitumor agent, was increased 21-fold by BSO. Since prolonged incubation with BSO alone results in near-complete GSH depletion without loss of cell viability, SL-mediated cytolysis is probably not a result of GSH depletion. We have demonstrated, however, a critical role for GSH synthetic capacity as a determinant of tumor cell susceptibility to cytolysis by SL. GSH also plays an important role in cellular defense against oxidative injury. Vernolepin, acting as a GSH-depleting agent, markedly sensitized tumor cells to lysis by H2O2 (greater than 6.5-fold increase with 20 micrograms/ml of vernolepin). These findings suggest the possibility that the coordinated deployment of sulfhydryl-reactive antitumor agents, BSO, and oxidative injury might constitute an effective chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:6401768

  14. Characterization of a tachykinin peptide NK sub 2 receptor transfected into murine fibroblast B82 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Van Giersbergen, P.L.M. Univ. of Cincinnati, OH ); Shatzer, S.A.; Buck, S.H. ); Henderson, A.K.; Lai, J.; Yamamura, Henry, I. ); Nakanishi, Shigetada )

    1991-03-01

    Membranes isolated from a murine fibroblast B82 cell line (SKLKB82{number sign}3) transfected with the bovine stomach cDNA pSKR56S exhibited binding of (His({sup 125}I){sup 1})neurokinin A ({sup 125}I-NKA) to a single population of sites with a B{sub max} of 147 fmol/mg of protein and a K{sub d} of 0.59 nM. The ligand binding in SKLKB82{number sign}3 cells was reversible. Thus, SKLKB82{number sign}3 cells have been transfected with NK{sub 2} receptors that have become associated with an endogenous guanine nucleotide-binding protein. In comparison with membranes from the hamster urinary bladder, a tissue enriched in NK{sub 2} receptors, NK{sub 2} receptor antagonists displayed markedly different potencies, either more or less potent, in inhibiting specific binding in membranes of the transfected cells. Furthermore, inhibition of {sup 125}I-NKA binding by nucleotide analogues was markedly different in SKLKB82{number sign}3 cells compared with hamster bladder tissue. The different binding profile in the cells is not due to an artefact introduced during cDNA transfection because a similar profile was also observed in bovine stomach membranes. These results may indicate the existence of two distinct NK{sub 2} receptors.

  15. Osteogenic gene expression of murine osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells under cyclic tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, C. T.; Chen, C. C.; Cheong, U.-I.; Liu, S. L.; Huang, T. H.

    2014-08-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can promote cell proliferation. The remodeling ability of the tension side of orthodontic teeth affects post-orthodontic stability. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the osteogenic effects of LLLT on osteoblast-like cells treated with a simulated tension system that provides a mechanical tension regimen. Murine osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells were cultured in a Flexcell strain unit with programmed loads of 12% elongation at a frequency of 0.5?Hz for 24 and 48?h. The cultured cells were treated with a low-level diode laser using powers of 5?J and 10?J. The proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells was determined using the Alamar Blue assay. The expression of osteogenic genes (type I collagen (Col-1), osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OC), osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), bone morphologic protein (BMP-2), and bone morphologic protein (BMP-4)) in MC3T3-E1 cells was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The proliferation rate of tension-cultured MC3T3-E1 cells under 5?J and 10?J LLLT increased compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05). Prominent mineralization of the MC3T3-E1 cells was visible using a von Kossa stain in the 5?J LLLT group. Osteogenic genes (Col-1, OC, OPG and BMP-2) were significantly expressed in the MC3T3-E1 cells treated with 5?J and 10?J LLLT (p < 0.05). LLLT in tension-cultured MC3T3-E1 cells showed synergistic osteogenic effects, including increases in cell proliferation and Col-1, OPN, OC, OPG and BMP-2 gene expression. LLLT might be beneficial for bone remodeling on the tension side of orthodontics.

  16. Assessment of DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells in the adult murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Florian Mehrkens, Dennis Starbatty, Jutta Nicol, Philipp Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Islet-1 was expressed in the adult heart. • Islet-1-positive cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. • Sinoatrial node cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. - Abstract: Rationale: Islet-1 positive (Islet-1{sup +}) cardiac progenitor cells give rise to the right ventricle, atria and outflow tract during murine cardiac development. In the adult heart Islet-1 expression is limited to parasympathetic neurons, few cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, within the proximal aorta and pulmonary artery and sinoatrial node cells. Its role in these cells is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that Islet-1{sup +} cells retain proliferative activity and may therefore play a role in regenerating specialized regions in the heart. Methods and results: DNA synthesis was analyzed by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine ({sup 3}H-thymidine) in Isl-1-nLacZ mice, a transgenic model with an insertion of a nuclear beta-galactosidase in the Islet-1 locus. Mice received daily injections of {sup 3}H-thymidine for 5 days. DNA synthesis was visualized throughout the heart by dipping autoradiography of cryosections. Colocalization of an nLacZ-signal and silver grains would indicate DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells. Whereas Islet{sup ?} non-myocyte nuclei were regularly marked by accumulation of silver grains, colocalization with nLacZ-signals was not detected in >25,000 cells analyzed. Conclusions: Islet-1{sup +} cells are quiescent in the adult heart, suggesting that, under normal conditions, even pacemaking cells do not proliferate at higher rates than normal cardiac myocytes.

  17. Infection of Xenotransplanted Human Cell Lines by Murine Retroviruses: A Lesson Brought Back to Light by XMRV

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Heidi A.; Burns, Kathleen H.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Sfanos, Karen S.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of xenotransplanted human cells by xenotropic retroviruses is a known phenomenon in the scientific literature, with examples cited since the early 1970s. However, arguably, until recently, the importance of this phenomenon had not been largely recognized. The emergence and subsequent debunking of Xenotropic Murine leukemia virus-Related Virus (XMRV) as a cell culture contaminant as opposed to a potential pathogen in several human diseases, notably prostate cancer and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, highlighted a potential problem of murine endogenous gammaretroviruses infecting commonly used human cell lines. Subsequent to the discovery of XMRV, many additional cell lines that underwent xenotransplantation in mice have been shown to harbor murine gammaretroviruses. Such retroviral infection poses the threat of not only confounding experiments performed in these cell lines via virus-induced changes in cellular behavior but also the potential infection of other cell lines cultured in the same laboratory. Thus, the possibility of xenotropic retroviral infection of cell lines may warrant additional precautions, such as periodic testing for retroviral sequences in cell lines cultured in the laboratory. PMID:23785669

  18. The efficacy of a novel vaccine approach using tumor cells that ectopically express a codon-optimized murine GM-CSF in a murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chu-Chi; Tsai, Ching-Chou; Lee, Jan-Mou; Fang, Chih-Hao; Chang, Kuo-Shian; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Lin, Cheng-Tao; Qiu, Jiantai Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a potent immunomodulatory cytokine that is known to facilitate vaccine efficacy by promoting the development and prolongation of both humoral and cellular immunity. Here, we investigated a novel vaccine approach using a human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 E6/E7-transformed cell line, TC-1, that ectopically expresses a codon-optimized 26-11-2015 murine GM-CSF (cGM-CSF). Ectopically expressing cGM-CSF in TC-1 (TC-1/cGM) cells significantly increased expression of a GM-CSF that was functionally identical to wt GM-CSF by 9-fold compared with ectopically expressed wild type GM-CSF in TC-1 cells (TC-1/wt). Mice vaccinated with irradiated TC-1/cGM cells exhibited enhanced survival compared with mice vaccinated with TC-1/wt cells when both groups were subsequently injected with live TC-1. Consistently, mice vaccinated with irradiated TC-1/cGM cells exhibited stronger IFN-? production in HPV E7-specific CD8(+) T cells. More dendritic cells were recruited to the draining lymph nodes (dLNs) of mice vaccinated with TC-1/cGM cells than C-1/wt cells. Regarding dLN cell recall responses, both proliferation and IFN-? production in the HPV E7-specific CD8(+) T cells were enhanced in mice that were vaccinated with TC-1/cGM cells. Our results demonstrate that a novel practical molecular strategy utilizing a codon-optimized GM-CSF gene overcomes the limitation and improves the efficacy of tumor cell-based vaccines. PMID:26546261

  19. Effects of Berberine on Cell Cycle, DNA, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Apoptosis in L929 Murine Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Manman; Xu, Jing; Han, Chunyang; Kang, Youxi; Liu, Tengfei; He, Yanfei; Huang, Yanfei; Liu, Cuiyan

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from several traditional Chinese herbal medicines (TCM), exhibits a strong antimicrobial activity in the treatment of diarrhea. However, it causes human as well as animal toxicity from heavy dosage. The present study was conducted to investigate the cytotoxicity of berberine and its possible trigger mechanisms resulting in cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, ROS (reactive oxygen species) level, mitochondrial membrane potential change, and cell apoptosis in L929 murine fibroblast (L929) cells. The cells were cultured in vitro and treated with different concentrations of berberine for 24?h. The results showed that cell viability was significantly decreased in a subjected dose-dependent state; berberine concentrations were higher than 0.05?mg/mL. Berberine at a concentration above 0.1?mg/mL altered the morphology of L929 cells. Cells at G2/M phase were clear that the level of ROS and cell apoptosis rates increased in 0.1?mg/mL group. Each DNA damage indicator score (DIS) increased in groups where concentration of berberine was above 0.025?mg/mL. The mitochondrial membrane potential counteractive balance mechanics were significantly altered when concentrations of berberine were above 0.005?mg/mL. In all, the present study suggested that berberine at high dosage exhibited cytotoxicity on L929 which was related to resultant: cell cycle arrest; DNA damage; accumulation of intracellular ROS; reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential; and cell apoptosis. PMID:26508985

  20. Bifidobacterium breve Attenuates Murine Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis and Increases Regulatory T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bin; van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Overbeek, Saskia; van de Kant, Hendrik J. G.; Garssen, Johan; Folkerts, Gert; Vos, Paul; Morgan, Mary E.; Kraneveld, Aletta D.

    2014-01-01

    While some probiotics have shown beneficial effects on preventing or treating colitis development, others have shown no effects. In this study, we have assessed the immunomodulating effects of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus) and Bifidobacterium breve (B. breve) on T cell polarization in vitro, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and in vivo, using murine dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis model. With respect to the latter, the mRNA expression of T cell subset-associated transcription factors and cytokines in the colon was measured and the T helper type (Th) 17 and regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets were determined in the Peyer's patches. Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve incubations in vitro reduced Th17 and increased Th2 cell subsets in human PBMCs. In addition, B. breve incubation was also able to reduce Th1 and increase Treg cell subsets in contrast to L. rhamnosus. In vivo intervention with B. breve, but not L. rhamnosus, significantly attenuated the severity of DSS-induced colitis. In DSS-treated C57BL/6 mice, intervention with B. breve increased the expression of mRNA encoding for Th2- and Treg-associated cytokines in the distal colon. In addition, intervention with B. breve led to increases of Treg and decreases of Th17 cell subsets in Peyer's patches of DSS-treated mice. B. breve modulates T cell polarization towards Th2 and Treg cell-associated responses in vitro and in vivo. In vivo B. breve intervention ameliorates DSS-induced colitis symptoms and this protective effect may mediated by its effects on the T-cell composition. PMID:24787575

  1. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: Aberrant cellular division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, T.K.; Derby, M.; Martin, D.F.; Wright, S.D.; Dao, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells.

  2. An increase in telomere sister chromatid exchange in murine embryonic stem cells possessing critically shortened telomeres

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Wu, Jun; Gomez, Marla V; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    Telomerase deficiency leads to a progressive loss of telomeric DNA that eventually triggers cell apoptosis in human primary cells during prolonged growth in culture. Rare survivors can maintain telomere length through either activation of telomerase or recombination-based telomere lengthening, and thus proliferate indefinitely. We have explored the possibility that telomeres may be maintained through telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE) in murine telomere reverse transcriptase-deficient (mTert -/-) splenocytes and ES cells. Because telomerase deficiency leads to gradual loss of telomeric DNA in mTert -/- splenocytes and ES cells and eventually to chromosomes with telomere signal-free ends (SFEs), we examined these cell types for evidence of sister chromatid exchange at telomeres, and observed an increase in T-SCEs only in a subset of mTert -/- splenocytes or ES cells that possessed multiple SFEs. Furthermore, T-SCEs were more often detected in ES cells than in splenocytes that harbored a similar frequency of SFEs. In mTert heterozygous (mTert +/-) ES cells or splenocytes, which are known to exhibit a decrease in average telomere length but no SFEs, no increase in T-SCE was observed. In addition to T-SCE, other genomic rearrangements (i.e., SCE) were also significantly increased in mTert -/- ES cells possessing critically short telomeres, but not in splenocytes. Our results suggest that animals and cell culture differ in their ability to carry out genomic rearrangements as a means of maintaining telomere integrity when telomeres become critically shortened.

  3. Purification and characterization of an erythroid cell-specific factor that binds the murine alpha- and beta-globin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, K M; Kim, C G; Sheffery, M

    1989-01-01

    An erythroid cell-specific nuclear factor that binds tightly to a sequence motif (5'-GATAAGGA-3') shared by many erythroid cell-specific promoters was purified to homogeneity by DNA sequence affinity chromatography. Visualization of the purified factor, which we term EF-1, showed a simple pattern comprising a polypeptide doublet with Mrs of 18,000 and 19,000. We confirmed that these species account for EF-1-binding activity by eluting the polypeptides from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and renaturing the appropriate binding activity. Using the purified polypeptides, we mapped seven factor-binding sites that are dispersed across the murine alpha- and beta-globin genes. The murine alpha-globin gene is flanked by at least two EF-1-binding sites. One site is centered at nucleotide (nt) -180 (with respect to the alpha-globin cap site). A fivefold-weaker site is located downstream of the alpha-globin poly(A) addition site, at nt +1049. We mapped five EF-1-binding sites near the murine beta-globin gene. The strongest site was centered at nt -210. Four additional sites were centered at nt -266 (adjacent to the binding site of a factor present in both murine erythroleukemia and Raji cells), -75 (overlapping the beta-globin CCAAT box), +543 (within the second intervening sequence), and -111. Images PMID:2761541

  4. Entry of Francisella tularensis into Murine B Cells: The Role of B Cell Receptors and Complement Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Plzakova, Lenka; Krocova, Zuzana; Kubelkova, Klara; Macela, Ales

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is an intracellular pathogen that dominantly infects and proliferates inside phagocytic cells but can be seen also in non-phagocytic cells, including B cells. Although protective immunity is known to be almost exclusively associated with the type 1 pathway of cellular immunity, a significant role of B cells in immune responses already has been demonstrated. Whether their role is associated with antibody-dependent or antibody-independent B cell functions is not yet fully understood. The character of early events during B cell–pathogen interaction may determine the type of B cell response regulating the induction of adaptive immunity. We used fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to identify the basic requirements for the entry of F. tularensis into B cells within in vivo and in vitro infection models. Here, we present data showing that Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strain LVS significantly infects individual subsets of murine peritoneal B cells early after infection. Depending on a given B cell subset, uptake of Francisella into B cells is mediated by B cell receptors (BCRs) with or without complement receptor CR1/2. However, F. tularensis strain FSC200 ?iglC and ?ftdsbA deletion mutants are defective in the ability to enter B cells. Once internalized into B cells, F. tularensis LVS intracellular trafficking occurs along the endosomal pathway, albeit without significant multiplication. The results strongly suggest that BCRs alone within the B-1a subset can ensure the internalization process while the BCRs on B-1b and B-2 cells need co-signaling from the co receptor containing CR1/2 to initiate F. tularensis engulfment. In this case, fluidity of the surface cell membrane is a prerequisite for the bacteria’s internalization. The results substantially underline the functional heterogeneity of B cell subsets in relation to F. tularensis. PMID:26161475

  5. Entry of Francisella tularensis into Murine B Cells: The Role of B Cell Receptors and Complement Receptors.

    PubMed

    Plzakova, Lenka; Krocova, Zuzana; Kubelkova, Klara; Macela, Ales

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is an intracellular pathogen that dominantly infects and proliferates inside phagocytic cells but can be seen also in non-phagocytic cells, including B cells. Although protective immunity is known to be almost exclusively associated with the type 1 pathway of cellular immunity, a significant role of B cells in immune responses already has been demonstrated. Whether their role is associated with antibody-dependent or antibody-independent B cell functions is not yet fully understood. The character of early events during B cell-pathogen interaction may determine the type of B cell response regulating the induction of adaptive immunity. We used fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to identify the basic requirements for the entry of F. tularensis into B cells within in vivo and in vitro infection models. Here, we present data showing that Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strain LVS significantly infects individual subsets of murine peritoneal B cells early after infection. Depending on a given B cell subset, uptake of Francisella into B cells is mediated by B cell receptors (BCRs) with or without complement receptor CR1/2. However, F. tularensis strain FSC200 ?iglC and ?ftdsbA deletion mutants are defective in the ability to enter B cells. Once internalized into B cells, F. tularensis LVS intracellular trafficking occurs along the endosomal pathway, albeit without significant multiplication. The results strongly suggest that BCRs alone within the B-1a subset can ensure the internalization process while the BCRs on B-1b and B-2 cells need co-signaling from the co receptor containing CR1/2 to initiate F. tularensis engulfment. In this case, fluidity of the surface cell membrane is a prerequisite for the bacteria's internalization. The results substantially underline the functional heterogeneity of B cell subsets in relation to F. tularensis. PMID:26161475

  6. Hepatic Differentiation of Murine Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Allows Disease Modelling In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Eggenschwiler, Reto; Loya, Komal; Sgodda, Malte; André, Francoise; Cantz, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent cells by retrovirus-mediated expression of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and C-MYC is a promising approach to derive disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this study, we focused on three murine models for metabolic liver disorders: the copper storage disorder Wilson's disease (toxic-milk mice), tyrosinemia type 1 (fumarylacetoacetate-hydrolase deficiency, FAH?/? mice), and alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZ mice). Colonies of iPSCs emerged 2-3 weeks after transduction of fibroblasts, prepared from each mouse strain, and were maintained as individual iPSC lines. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated the expression of endogenous pluripotency markers. Hepatic precursor cells could be derived from these disease-specific iPSCs applying an in vitro differentiation protocol and could be visualized after transduction of a lentiviral albumin-GFP reporter construct. Functional characterization of these cells allowed the recapitulation of the disease phenotype for further studies of underlying molecular mechanisms of the respective disease. PMID:21977043

  7. An optimized protocol for expression and purification of murine perforin in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Naneh, Omar; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Pahovnik, David; Žagar, Ema; Gilbert, Robert J C; Križaj, Igor; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-11-01

    Perforin (PFN) is one of the most important protein effectors of the immune system. It is produced by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells and helps with the clearance of virus-infected and tumor cells. PFN is a pore-forming protein that readily binds to the lipid membranes of target cells, oligomerizes at the cell surface and forms transmembrane pores that allow passage of ions and other larger molecules. Its characterization was hindered in the past by a lack of efficient and reliable expression systems that would result in pure and functional product. In this paper we present optimization of PFN expression in a baculovirus expression system. We optimized several parameters of murine PFN (mPFN) expression and purification and showed that the expressed product is pure and hemolytically active and that it forms pores in the plasma membranes of K562 cells. We could also observe circular pores formed on liposome membranes by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Our protocol opens the door for further biochemical and biophysical assessment of PFN properties and interactions with small ligands and lipid membranes. PMID:26196227

  8. Pleural cavity type 2 innate lymphoid cells precede Th2 expansion in murine Litomosoides sigmodontis infection.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alexis; Killoran, Kristin; Mitre, Edward; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a family of innate cells has been identified that respond to IL-25 and IL-33 in murine intestinal helminths. Termed Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) they facilitate the development of Th2 responses responsible for helminth clearance. We evaluated these cells in a tissue-invasive helminth model. Using Litomosides sigmodontis (a strong Th2 polarizing filarial infection) we observed a robust Th2 response in the pleural cavity, where adult worms reside, marked by increased levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in infected mice. In parallel, ILC2s were expanded in the pleural cavity early in the infection, peaking during the pre-patent period. L. sigmodontis also elicits a strong systemic Th2 response, which includes significantly increased levels of IgG1, IgE and IL-5 in the plasma of infected mice. Although ILC2s were expanded locally, they were not expanded in the spleen, blood, or mediastinal lymph nodes in response to L. sigmodontis infection, suggesting that ILC2s function primarily at the site of infection. The increase in ILC2s in the pleural cavity and the expansion in Th2 responses indicates a probable role for these cells in initiating and maintaining the Th2 response and highlights the importance of these cells in helminth infections and their role in Th2 immunity. PMID:26394284

  9. Specific PAF antagonist WEB-2086 induces terminal differentiation of murine and human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Cellai, Cristina; Laurenzana, Anna; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Della Malva, Nunzia; Bianchi, Lucia; Paoletti, Francesco

    2002-05-01

    A pharmacological approach to neoplasia by differentiation therapy relies on the availability of cytodifferentiating agents whose antitumor efficacy is usually assayed first on malignant cells in vitro. Using murine erythroleukemia cells (MELCs) as the model, we found that WEB-2086, a triazolobenzodiazepine-derived PAF antagonist originally developed as an anti-inflammatory drug, induces a dose-dependent inhibition of MELC growth and hemoglobin accumulation as a result of a true commitment to differentiation. MELCs treated for 5 days with 1 mM WEB-2086 show greater than or equal to 85% benzidine-positive cells, increased expression of alpha- and beta-globin genes, and down-regulation of c-Myb. This differentiation pattern, which does not involve histone H4 acetylation and is abrogated by the action of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, recalls the pattern induced by hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). In addition to MELCs, human erythroleukemia K562 and HEL and myeloid HL60 cells are massively committed to maturation by WEB-2086 and, with some differences, by its analog, WEB-2170. This suggests that WEB-2086, structurally distant from other known inducers, might be a member of a new class of cytodifferentiation agents active on a broad range of transformed cells in vitro and useful, prospectively, for anticancer therapy due to their high tolerability in vivo. PMID:11923217

  10. X-ray induced alterations in the differentiation and mineralization potential of murine preosteoblastic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yueyuan; Lau, Patrick; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine E.; Reitz, Günther

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on murine preosteoblastic cell differentiation, we directed OCT-1 cells to the osteoblastic lineage by treatment with a combination of ?-glycerophosphate (?-GP), ascorbic acid (AA), and dexamethasone (Dex). In vitro mineralization was evaluated based on histochemical staining and quantification of the hydroxyapatite content of the extracellular bone matrix. Expression of mRNA encoding Runx2, transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1), osteocalcin (OCN), and p21CDKN1A was analyzed. Exposure to IR reduced the growth rate and diminished cell survival of OCT-1 cells under standard conditions. Notably, calcium content analysis revealed that deposition of mineralized matrix increased significantly under osteogenic conditions after X-ray exposure in a time-dependent manner. In this study, higher radiation doses exert significant overall effects on TGF-?1, OCN, and p21CDKN1A gene expression, suggesting that gene expression following X-ray treatment is affected in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we verified that Runx2 was suppressed within 24 h after irradiation at 2 and 4 Gy. Although further studies are required to verify the molecular mechanism, our observations strongly suggest that treatment with IR markedly alters the differentiation and mineralization process of preosteoblastic cells.

  11. Blockade of ?6-Integrin Reveals Diversity in Homing Patterns Among Human, Baboon, and Murine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, Gregory V.; Wohlfahrt, Martin; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Papayannopoulou, Thalia

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms by which intravenously transplanted hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) home to and engraft the bone marrow (BM) remains incomplete, but participation of adhesion molecules has been documented. We here demonstrate that blockade of the ?6-integrin enhanced BM homing of human and nonhuman primate BM-derived HSPCs by >60% in the xenogeneic transplant model and led to significantly improved engraftment. The effect was limited to BM-derived HSPCs, as granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor mobilized peripheral blood or cord blood HSPCs express little or no ?6 integrin. By contrast, despite high ?6 integrin expression, no effect of ?6 blockade on murine BM-HSPCs homing/engraftment was observed. PMID:18842099

  12. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Yuan; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Induced embryonic stem (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell resources for the observation of the cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  13. Different processing of LH/hCG receptors in cultured rat luteal cells and murine Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kellokumpu, S.

    1987-02-01

    The metabolic fate of LH/hCG receptors after exposure to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was examined in cultured rat luteal cells and murine Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1). Kinetic studies performed after pulse-labelling of the cells with (/sup 125/I)hCG indicated that the bound hormone was lost much more rapidly from the tumor cells than from the luteal cells. The tumor cells were also found to internalize and degrade the hormone more effectively than the luteal cells. Chemical cross-linking and analyses by SDS-PAGE of this material revealed that both cell types also released, in addition to intact hCG, two previously characterized receptor fragment-(/sup 125/I)hCG complexes (M/sub r/ 96,000 and 74,000) into the medium, although their amount was negligible in MLTC-1 cells. Possibly due to rapid discharge of the ligand from its receptor, no similar complexes could be detected inside the MLTC-1 cells, suggesting that they were released directly from the cell surface. However, the M/sub r/ 74,000 complex was observed inside MLTC-1 cells if chloroquine, a lysosomotropic agent, was present during the incubations. This suggests that the internalized receptor also becomes degraded, at least when complexed to hCG. The results thus provide evidence that there exist two different mechanisms for proteolytic processing of LH/hCG receptors in these target cells. In tumor cells, the degradation seems to occur almost exclusively intracellularly, whereas in luteal cells a substantial portion of the receptors is also degraded at the cell surface.

  14. The Murine Bladder Supports a Population of Stromal Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Meredith A.; Kulkulka, Natalie A.; Firmiss, Paula R.; Ross, Michael J.; Flum, Andrew S.; Santos, Grace B. Delos; Bowen, Diana K.; Dettman, Robert W.; Gong, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder fibrosis is an undesired end point of injury of obstruction and often renders the smooth muscle layer noncompliant. In many cases, the long-term effect of bladder fibrosis is renal failure. Despite our understanding of the progression of this disease, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that lead to a remodeled bladder wall. Resident stem (progenitor) cells have been identified in various organs such as the brain, heart and lung. These cells function normally during organ homeostasis, but become dysregulated after organ injury. Here, we aimed to characterize a mesenchymal progenitor cell population as a first step in understanding its role in bladder fibrosis. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we identified a Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- (PECAM-: CD45-: Ter119-) population in the adult murine bladder. These cells were localized to the stromal layer of the adult bladder and appeared by postnatal day 1. Cultured Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- bladder cells self-renewed, formed colonies and spontaneously differentiated into cells expressing smooth muscle genes. These cells differentiated into other mesenchymal lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes and osteocytes) upon culture in induction medium. Both acute and partial obstruction of the bladder reduced expression of CD34 and changed localization of Sca-1 to the urothelium. Partial obstruction resulted in upregulation of fibrosis genes within the Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- population. Our data indicate a resident, mesenchymal stem cell population in the bladder that is altered by bladder obstruction. These findings provide new information about the cellular changes in the bladder that may be associated with bladder fibrosis. PMID:26540309

  15. The Murine Bladder Supports a Population of Stromal Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Meredith A; Kulkulka, Natalie A; Firmiss, Paula R; Ross, Michael J; Flum, Andrew S; Santos, Grace B Delos; Bowen, Diana K; Dettman, Robert W; Gong, Edward M

    2015-01-01

    Bladder fibrosis is an undesired end point of injury of obstruction and often renders the smooth muscle layer noncompliant. In many cases, the long-term effect of bladder fibrosis is renal failure. Despite our understanding of the progression of this disease, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that lead to a remodeled bladder wall. Resident stem (progenitor) cells have been identified in various organs such as the brain, heart and lung. These cells function normally during organ homeostasis, but become dysregulated after organ injury. Here, we aimed to characterize a mesenchymal progenitor cell population as a first step in understanding its role in bladder fibrosis. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we identified a Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- (PECAM-: CD45-: Ter119-) population in the adult murine bladder. These cells were localized to the stromal layer of the adult bladder and appeared by postnatal day 1. Cultured Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- bladder cells self-renewed, formed colonies and spontaneously differentiated into cells expressing smooth muscle genes. These cells differentiated into other mesenchymal lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes and osteocytes) upon culture in induction medium. Both acute and partial obstruction of the bladder reduced expression of CD34 and changed localization of Sca-1 to the urothelium. Partial obstruction resulted in upregulation of fibrosis genes within the Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- population. Our data indicate a resident, mesenchymal stem cell population in the bladder that is altered by bladder obstruction. These findings provide new information about the cellular changes in the bladder that may be associated with bladder fibrosis. PMID:26540309

  16. A flavone derivative from Sesbania sesban leaves and its cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dianhar, Hanhan Syah, Yana Maolana Mujahidin, Didin Hakim, Euis Holisotan Juliawaty, Lia Dewi

    2014-03-24

    Sesbania sesban, locally named as Jayanti, is one of Indonesia plants belonging to Fabaceae family. This species is traditionally used by Indonesian people to cure digestive disorders, fever, or headache. Jayanti can grow well in tropical to subtropical region, such as in Asia and Africa. Based on literature, qualitative analysis of the methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban showed that it contained flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. In addition, the activity assay of extracts of different tissues of this species showed antitumor, antimalarial, and antidiabetic activityies (leaves and seed extracts), antioxidants (flower extract), and analgesic (wood extract). Though the extracts of S. sesban parts showed interesting activities, chemical study of those extracts have not been widely reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to isolate the secondary metabolites from methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban and to determine their cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells. One compound has been obtained and identified as 3-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (1), a new isolated compound from nature. This compound was obtained through separation of methanol extract using various chromatographic techniques, such as vacuum liquid chromatography and radial chromatography. The structure elucidation of isolated compound was based on 1D NMR ({sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR) and 2D NMR (HMBC). The cytotoxicity of methanol extract and compound 1 against murine leukemia P-388 cells examined through MTT assay showed IC{sub 50} value of 60.04 ?g/mL and 5.40 ?g/mL, respectively.

  17. Sesquiterpene lactones from Ambrosia spp. are active against a murine lymphoma cell line by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Martino, Renzo; Beer, María Florencia; Elso, Orlando; Donadel, Osvaldo; Sülsen, Valeria; Anesini, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (STLs) are natural terpenoid compounds. They have been recognized as antitumor agents. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the antiproliferative effects of psilostachyin, psilostachyin C, peruvin and cumanin on the murine lymphoma cell line BW5147. Cells were treated with the STLs at different concentrations. Tritiated thymidine uptake was employed to determine cell proliferation. MTT assay was used to analyze cell viability. Flow cytometry assay with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide was employed to evaluate cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and cell cycle analysis were also evaluated by flow cytometry. Antioxidant enzymes activities were determined spectrophotometrically by kinetic assays. Results showed that these STLs inhibited cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner by exerting cytotoxicity through apoptosis. Psilostachyin C was the most active and the less toxic compound. This STL induced apoptosis with an impairment in mitochondrial membrane potential. Psilostachyin C was able to induce ROS generation, related to a modulation of the antioxidant enzymes activity. In addition, it induced cell cycle arrest in S phase. In conclusion, psilostachyin C was found to be active against lymphoma cells exerting both cytostatic and cytotoxic effects. These findings may provide a novel approach for lymphoma treatment. PMID:26086122

  18. HIV-1 Myristoylated Nef Treatment of Murine Microglial Cells Activates Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, NO2 Production and Neurotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Caterina; Veroni, Caterina; Percario, Zulema Antonia; Leone, Stefano; Fiorucci, Gianna; Lülf, Sebastian; Romeo, Giovanna; Agresti, Cristina; Persichini, Tiziana; Geyer, Matthias; Affabris, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential role of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) accessory protein Nef in the pathogenesis of neuroAIDS is still poorly understood. Nef is a molecular adapter that influences several cellular signal transduction events and membrane trafficking. In human macrophages, Nef expression induces the production of extracellular factors (e.g. pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines) and the recruitment of T cells, thus favoring their infection and its own transfer to uninfected cells via exosomes, cellular protrusions or cell-to-cell contacts. Murine cells are normally not permissive for HIV-1 but, in transgenic mice, Nef is a major disease determinant. Both in human and murine macrophages, myristoylated Nef (myr+Nef) treatment has been shown to activate NF-?B, MAP kinases and interferon responsive factor 3 (IRF-3), thereby inducing tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducers and activator of transcription (STAT)-1, STAT-2 and STAT-3 through the production of proinflammatory factors. Methodology/Principal Findings We report that treatment of BV-2 murine microglial cells with myr+Nef leads to STAT-1, -2 and -3 tyrosine phosphorylation and upregulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) with production of nitric oxide. We provide evidence that extracellular Nef regulates iNOS expression through NF-?B activation and, at least in part, interferon-? (IFN?) release that acts in concert with Nef. All of these effects require both myristoylation and a highly conserved acidic cluster in the viral protein. Finally, we report that Nef induces the release of neurotoxic factors in the supernatants of microglial cells. Conclusions These results suggest a potential role of extracellular Nef in promoting neuronal injury in the murine model. They also indicate a possible interplay between Nef and host factors in the pathogenesis of neuroAIDS through the production of reactive nitrogen species in microglial cells. PMID:26066624

  19. Organelle rearrangement and cell volume changes during squeezing invasion of peritoneal elastic lamina by targeted murine breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Parsons, D F; Marko, M; Leith, A

    1991-01-01

    Murine breast cancer cell lines were developed to selectively invade the peritoneum while they proliferated in ascites form in the abdominal cavity. In a dominant form of invasion, tumor cells showed special affinity for elastin fibers and squeezed through narrow gaps in the elastic fiber meshwork of the stroma. Even in fixed tissue, such cells could be recognized as being in the process of invasive migration because of their dumbbell shape. This appearance was similar to that of diapedetic blood cells traversing bone marrow sinus endothelium. Three-dimensional STERECON graphics reconstruction from serial thick sections of 44 such cells was carried out. The reconstructions showed that, in mid-penetration, the cells spread extensively over the exterior surface of the elastic fiber meshwork. The cell surface contact of these forward projections was mainly with the elastic fiber outer coat of microfibrils, but small areas of the cell surface also fused directly to inner-core elastin. The morphological rearrangement of the cytoskeleton was minimal in both types of attachment areas. The location of these forward facing attachments is consistent with mechanisms for pulling the invasive cell through the gap. Lamellopodia formation and clustering of cytoplasmic organelles occurred more commonly at the forward-facing part of the cell. Morphometry of the reconstructions showed that a contraction of the whole cell occurred during the squeezing/migration process suggestive of an additional pushing process. However, our invasive cell lines showed marked differences in the degree of cell shrinkage. The process of adhesion and squeezing of tumor cells through elastin meshworks in vivo is clearly a complex phenomenon. Changes in cell surface activity appear to play a significant role in establishing the necessary 'foothold' component of invasion and, possibly, in the generation of tractive force as well. PMID:1887432

  20. Treadmill exercise induces murine cardiac allograft survival and generates regulatory T cell.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Masateru; Jin, Xiangyuan; Yin, Enzhi; Shimokawa, Tomoki; Niimi, Masanori

    2015-03-01

    Exercise therapy has been associated with improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. The role of exercise therapy in heart transplant recipients is of great interest for the transplant society, although concerning the effect of exercise therapy, there is little knowledge at present. We analyzed the effects of exercise on alloimmune responses in murine cardiac allograft transplantation. CBA mice (H2(k) ) underwent transplantation of C57Bl/6 (H2(b) ) hearts and exercised on a treadmill. Untreated CBA recipients rejected C57Bl/6 cardiac grafts acutely (median survival time [MST], 7 days). CBA recipients treated with treadmill for 1 week after transplantation, and for 1 week both before and after transplantation prolonged allograft survivals (MSTs, 35 and 18 days, respectively). However, treadmill exercise recipients for 1 week before transplantation were not effective to allograft survival (MST, 8 days). Adoptive transfer of whole splenocytes and CD4(+) cells from treadmill exercise recipients significantly prolonged allograft survival in naive secondary recipients (MSTs, 30 and 52 days, respectively), suggesting that regulatory cells was generated after treadmill exercise. Moreover, flow cytometry studies showed that CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) cell population increased in treadmill exercise recipients. Therefore, postoperative but not pre-operative exercise could induce prolongation of survival of fully allogeneic cardiac allografts and generate CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. PMID:25406375

  1. Typhonium flagelliforme inhibits the proliferation of murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro and induces apoptosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Syam; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Al-Zubairi, Adel S; Aspollah Sukari, Mohamed; Abdullah, Rasedee; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Beng, Ng Kuan; Isa, Nurbaity Mohd

    2010-11-01

    Typhonium flagelliforme (TF) is a tropical plant, traditionally used by the ethnic population of Malaysia for the cure of various cancers. This plant had shown to induce antiproliferative effect as well as apoptosis in cancer cells. However, there is no available information to address that TF affects murine leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated in vitro and in vivo effects of TF on murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells. It was found that the growth of leukemia cells in vitro was inhibited by the various extracts of TF. Among these fractions, the dichloromethane (DCM) tuber extracts of TF showed the lowest IC(50) (24.0 ± 5.2 ?g/ml) and had demonstrated apoptogenic effect when observed under fluorescent microscope. We investigated the in vivo effects of DCM tuber extracts of TF on murine leukemia cells, and the results showed that the counts of immature granulocytes and monocytes were significantly decreased in peripheral blood of BALB/c leukemia mice after the oral administration of DCM tuber extracts of TF for 28 days with three doses (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg). These results were confirmed by observing the spleen histopathology and morphology of enlarged spleen and liver in leukemia mice when compared with the control. Furthermore, the cell death mechanism in the spleen tissue of treated mice was found via apoptosis. PMID:20569984

  2. Cytotoxic mechanisms of murine lymphokine-activated killer cells: functional and biochemical characterization of homogeneous populations of spleen LAK cells.

    PubMed

    Zychlinsky, A; Joag, S; Liu, C C; Young, J D

    1990-04-01

    A highly purified population of murine lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells was obtained by selecting plastic-adherent splenocytes after incubation in high doses of recombinant IL-2. The population obtained was shown to be more than 95% positive for the cell marker asialo-GM1, and negative for both Lyt-1 (CD5) and Lyt-2 (CD8). The cells presented typical large granular lymphocyte morphology, and killed NK-susceptible target cells in an exclusively calcium-dependent fashion. A target cell DNA fragmentation activity of LAK cells could be detected even before target cell death. The presence of Hanukkah Factor/granzyme A/serine esterase 1, CTLA-1/granzyme B/serine esterase 2, and pore-forming protein (PFP/perforin) in these LAK cells was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis, suggesting that these markers are not exclusively associated with cytotoxic T lymphocytes. On immunoblots, antibodies specific for a lymphocyte PFP/perforin reacted with a 70-kDa protein of LAK cells. PFP/perforin was localized by immunofluorescence to the cell granules. A 50-kDa protein antigenically related to the macrophage cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was detected by immunoblotting and localized by immunofluorescence to both the cell granules and the cytosol. No RNA for TNF, however, could be detected using TNF-specific probes, suggesting that LAK cells may contain a cytotoxic factor which is related to, but distinct from, TNF. The work presented here demonstrates that cytotoxic mediators identified in cell lines are also present in primary cell cultures. PMID:1690083

  3. Menstrual Blood-derived Cells Confer Human Dystrophin Expression in the Murine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy via Cell Fusion and Myogenic Transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chang-Hao; Uyama, Taro; Miyado, Kenji; Terai, Masanori; Kyo, Satoru; Kiyono, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common lethal genetic disorder in children, is an X-linked recessive muscle disease characterized by the absence of dystrophin at the sarcolemma of muscle fibers. We examined a putative endometrial progenitor obtained from endometrial tissue samples to determine whether these cells repair muscular degeneration in a murine mdx model of DMD. Implanted cells conferred human dystrophin in degenerated muscle of immunodeficient mdx mice. We then examined menstrual blood–derived cells to determine whether primarily cultured nontransformed cells also repair dystrophied muscle. In vivo transfer of menstrual blood–derived cells into dystrophic muscles of immunodeficient mdx mice restored sarcolemmal expression of dystrophin. Labeling of implanted cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein and differential staining of human and murine nuclei suggest that human dystrophin expression is due to cell fusion between host myocytes and implanted cells. In vitro analysis revealed that endometrial progenitor cells and menstrual blood–derived cells can efficiently transdifferentiate into myoblasts/myocytes, fuse to C2C12 murine myoblasts by in vitro coculturing, and start to express dystrophin after fusion. These results demonstrate that the endometrial progenitor cells and menstrual blood–derived cells can transfer dystrophin into dystrophied myocytes through cell fusion and transdifferentiation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17314403

  4. Characterization of thyroid cancer cell lines in murine orthotopic and intracardiac metastasis models.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jennifer A; Pike, Laura A; Lund, Greg; Zhou, Qiong; Kessler, Brittelle E; Bauerle, Kevin T; Sams, Sharon B; Haugen, Bryan R; Schweppe, Rebecca E

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence has been increasing over time, and it is estimated that ?1950 advanced thyroid cancer patients will die of their disease in 2015. To combat this disease, an enhanced understanding of thyroid cancer development and progression as well as the development of efficacious, targeted therapies are needed. In vitro and in vivo studies utilizing thyroid cancer cell lines and animal models are critically important to these research efforts. In this report, we detail our studies with a panel of authenticated human anaplastic and papillary thyroid cancer (ATC and PTC) cell lines engineered to express firefly luciferase in two in vivo murine cancer models-an orthotopic thyroid cancer model as well as an intracardiac injection metastasis model. In these models, primary tumor growth in the orthotopic model and the establishment and growth of metastases in the intracardiac injection model are followed in vivo using an IVIS imaging system. In the orthotopic model, the ATC cell lines 8505C and T238 and the PTC cell lines K1/GLAG-66 and BCPAP had take rates >90 % with final tumor volumes ranging 84-214 mm(3) over 4-5 weeks. In the intracardiac model, metastasis establishment was successful in the ATC cell lines HTh74, HTh7, 8505C, THJ-16T, and Cal62 with take rates ?70 %. Only one of the PTC cell lines tested (BCPAP) was successful in the intracardiac model with a take rate of 30 %. These data will be beneficial to inform the choice of cell line and model system for the design of future thyroid cancer studies. PMID:25800363

  5. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  6. Antileukemic effect of zerumbone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier in WEHI-3B cell-induced murine leukemia model

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Rasedee, Abdullah; How, Chee Wun; Zeenathul, Nazariah Allaudin; Chartrand, Max Stanley; Yeap, Swee Keong; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Tan, Sheau Wei; Othman, Hemn Hassan; Ajdari, Zahra; Namvar, Farideh; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Daneshvar, Nasibeh; Begum, Hasina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer nanotherapy is progressing rapidly with the introduction of many innovative drug delivery systems to replace conventional therapy. Although the antitumor activity of zerumbone (ZER) has been reported, there has been no information available on the effect of ZER-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) (ZER-NLC) on murine leukemia cells. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo effects of ZER-NLC on murine leukemia induced with WEHI-3B cells were investigated. The results from 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, Hoechst 33342, Annexin V, cell cycle, and caspase activity assays showed that the growth of leukemia cells in vitro was inhibited by ZER-NLC. In addition, outcomes of histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, and Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling analyses revealed that the number of leukemia cells in the spleen of BALB/c leukemia mice significantly decreased after 4 weeks of oral treatment with various doses of ZER-NLC. Western blotting and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays confirmed the antileukemia effects of ZER-NLC. In conclusion, ZER-NLC was shown to induce a mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway in murine leukemia. Loading of ZER in NLC did not compromise the anticancer effect of the compound, suggesting ZER-NLC as a promising and effective delivery system for treatment of cancers. PMID:25767386

  7. Interactions of Francisella tularensis with Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and the Murine Respiratory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faron, Matthew; Fletcher, Joshua R.; Rasmussen, Jed A.; Apicella, Michael A.; Jones, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is classified as a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC due to its low infectious dose and the possibility that the organism can be used as a bioweapon. The low dose of infection suggests that Francisella is unusually efficient at evading host defenses. Although ~50 cfu are necessary to cause human respiratory infection, the early interactions of virulent Francisella with the lung environment are not well understood. To provide additional insights into these interactions during early Francisella infection of mice, we performed TEM analysis on mouse lungs infected with F. tularensis strains Schu S4, LVS and the O-antigen mutant Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn. For all three strains, the majority of the bacteria that we could detect were observed within alveolar type II epithelial cells at 16 hours post infection. Although there were no detectable differences in the amount of bacteria within an infected cell between the three strains, there was a significant increase in the amount of cellular debris observed in the air spaces of the lungs in the Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant compared to either the Schu S4 or LVS strain. We also studied the interactions of Francisella strains with human AT-II cells in vitro by characterizing the ability of these three strains to invade and replicate within these cells. Gentamicin assay and confocal microscopy both confirmed that F. tularensis Schu S4 replicated robustly within these cells while F. tularensis LVS displayed significantly lower levels of growth over 24 hours, although the strain was able to enter these cells at about the same level as Schu S4 (1 organism per cell), as determined by confocal imaging. The Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant that we have previously described as attenuated for growth in macrophages and mouse virulence displayed interesting properties as well. This mutant induced significant airway inflammation (cell debris) and had an attenuated growth phenotype in the human AT-II cells. These data extend our understanding of early Francisella infection by demonstrating that Francisella enter significant numbers of AT-II cells within the lung and that the capsule and LPS of wild type Schu S4 helps prevent murine lung damage during infection. Furthermore, our data identified that human AT-II cells allow growth of Schu S4, but these same cells supported poor growth of the attenuated LVS strain in vitro. Collectively, these data further our understanding of the role of AT-II cells in Francisella infections. PMID:26010977

  8. Murine Double Minute-2 Prevents p53-Overactivation-Related Cell Death (Podoptosis) of Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Thomasova, Dana; Bruns, Hauke A; Kretschmer, Victoria; Ebrahim, Martrez; Romoli, Simone; Liapis, Helen; Kotb, Ahmed M; Endlich, Nicole; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2015-07-01

    Murine double minute-2 (MDM2), an E3 ligase that regulates the cell cycle and inflammation, is highly expressed in podocytes. In podocyte injury, MDM2 drives podocyte loss by mitotic catastrophe, but the function of MDM2 in resting podocytes has not been explored. Here, we investigated the effects of podocyte MDM2 deletion in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, MDM2 knockdown by siRNA caused increased expression of p53 and podocyte death, which was completely rescued by coknockdown of p53. Apoptosis, pyroptosis, pyronecrosis, necroptosis, ferroptosis, and parthanatos were excluded as modes of occurrence for this p53-overactivation-related cell death (here referred to as podoptosis). Podoptosis was associated with cytoplasmic vacuolization, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and dysregulated autophagy (previously described as paraptosis). MDM2 knockdown caused podocyte loss and proteinuria in a zebrafish model, which was consistent with the phenotype of podocyte-specific MDM2-knockout mice that also showed the aforementioned ultrastructual podocyte abnormalities before and during progressive glomerulosclerosis. The phenotype of both animal models was entirely rescued by codeletion of p53. We conclude that MDM2 maintains homeostasis and long-term survival in podocytes by preventing podoptosis, a p53-regulated form of cell death with unspecific features previously classified as paraptosis. PMID:25349197

  9. Human muscle–derived stem/progenitor cells promote functional murine peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lavasani, Mitra; Thompson, Seth D.; Pollett, Jonathan B.; Usas, Arvydas; Lu, Aiping; Stolz, Donna B.; Clark, Katherine A.; Sun, Bin; Péault, Bruno; Huard, Johnny

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries and neuropathies lead to profound functional deficits. Here, we have demonstrated that muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells (MDSPCs) isolated from adult human skeletal muscle (hMDSPCs) can adopt neuronal and glial phenotypes in vitro and ameliorate a critical-sized sciatic nerve injury and its associated defects in a murine model. Transplanted hMDSPCs surrounded the axonal growth cone, while hMDSPCs infiltrating the regenerating nerve differentiated into myelinating Schwann cells. Engraftment of hMDSPCs into the area of the damaged nerve promoted axonal regeneration, which led to functional recovery as measured by sustained gait improvement. Furthermore, no adverse effects were observed in these animals up to 18 months after transplantation. Following hMDSPC therapy, gastrocnemius muscles from mice exhibited substantially less muscle atrophy, an increase in muscle mass after denervation, and reorganization of motor endplates at the postsynaptic sites compared with those from PBS-treated mice. Evaluation of nerve defects in animals transplanted with vehicle-only or myoblast-like cells did not reveal histological or functional recovery. These data demonstrate the efficacy of hMDSPC-based therapy for peripheral nerve injury and suggest that hMDSPC transplantation has potential to be translated for use in human neuropathies. PMID:24642464

  10. Cannabidiol-induced apoptosis in murine microglial cells through lipid raft.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Ying; Goble, Kathleen; Mecha, Miriam; Wang, Chia-Chi; Huang, Chung-Hsiung; Guaza, Carmen; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2012-07-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), the major nonpsychotropic phytocannabinoid, induces apoptosis in both immortalized and primary lymphocytes and monocytes. However, contrasting effects of CBD on the apoptosis between normal and immortalized glial cells have been reported. This study investigated the proapoptotic effect of CBD on primary microglial cells. Treatment of murine primary microglial cultures with CBD resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis, as shown by increase in hypodiploid cells and DNA strand breaks, and marked activation of both caspase-8 and -9. Mechanistic studies revealed that antioxidants, including N-acetyl-L-cysteine and glutathione, the G protein-coupled receptor 55 agonist abnormal-CBD and specific antagonists for vanilloid, and CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors did not counteract the apoptosis induced by CBD. In contrast, methyl-?-cyclodextrin (MCD), a lipid raft disruptor, potently attenuated CBD-induced microglial apoptosis and caspase activation. Furthermore, CBD induced lipid raft coalescence and augmented the expression of GM1 ganglioside and caveolin-1, all of which were attenuated by MCD. Taken together, these results suggest that CBD induces a marked proapoptotic effect in primary microglia through lipid raft coalescence and elevated expression of GM1 ganglioside and caveolin-1. PMID:22535572

  11. The Acute Exposure Effects of Inhaled Nickel Nanoparticles on Murine Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liberda, Eric N; Cuevas, Azita K; Qu, Qingshan; Chen, Lung Chi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The discovery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may help to explain observed cardiovascular effects associated with inhaled nickel nanoparticle exposures such as increases in vascular inflammation, generate reactive oxygen species, alter vasomotor tone, and potentiated atherosclerosis in murine species. Methods Following an acute whole body inhalation exposure to 500?g/m3 of nickel nanoparticles for 5 hrs, bone marrow EPCs from C57BL/6 mice were isolated. EPCs were harvested for their RNA or used in a variety of assays including chemotaxis, tube formation, and proliferation. Gene expression was assessed for important receptors involved in EPC mobilization and homing using RT-PCR methods. EPCs, circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPCs), circulating endothelial cells (CECs), and endothelial microparticles (EMPs) were quantified on a BD FACSCalibur to examine endothelial damage and repair associated with the exposure. Results and Conclusions Acute exposure to inhaled nickel nanoparticles significantly increased both bone marrow EPCs as well as their levels in circulation (CEPCs). CECs were significantly elevated indicating that endothelial damage occurred due to the exposure. There was no significant difference in EMPs between the two groups. Tube formation and chemotaxis, but not proliferation, of bone marrow EPCs was impaired in the nickel nanoparticle exposed group. These results coincided with a decrease in the mRNA of receptors involved in EPC mobilization and homing. This data provides new insight into how an acute nickel nanoparticle exposure to half of the current Occupational Safety & Health Administration permissible exposure limit may adversely affect EPCs. PMID:25144474

  12. Mechanism-Based Combination Treatment Dramatically Increases Therapeutic Efficacy in Murine Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins-Salsbury, Jacqueline A.; Shea, Lauren; Jiang, Xuntian; Hunter, Daniel A.; Guzman, A. Miguel; Reddy, Adarsh S.; Qin, Elizabeth Y.; Li, Yedda; Gray, Steven J.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe disease) is a lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by a deficiency in galactocerebrosidase (GALC) activity. In the absence of GALC activity, the cytotoxic lipid, galactosylsphingosine (psychosine), accumulates in the CNS and peripheral nervous system. Oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells are particularly sensitive to psychosine, thus leading to a demyelinating phenotype. Although hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation provides modest benefit in both presymptomatic children and the murine model (Twitcher), there is no cure for GLD. In addition, GLD has been relatively refractory to virtually every experimental therapy attempted. Here, Twitcher mice were simultaneously treated with CNS-directed gene therapy, substrate reduction therapy, and bone marrow transplantation to target the primary pathogenic mechanism (GALC deficiency) and two secondary consequences of GALC deficiency (psychosine accumulation and neuroinflammation). Simultaneously treating multiple pathogenic targets resulted in an unprecedented increase in life span with improved motor function, persistent GALC expression, nearly normal psychosine levels, and decreased neuroinflammation. Treating the primary pathogenic mechanism and secondary targets will likely improve therapeutic efficacy for other LSDs with complex pathological and clinical presentations. PMID:25904800

  13. Pathway aberrations of murine melanoma cells observed in Paired-End diTag transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Kuo Ping; Ariyaratne, Pramila; Xu, Han; Tan, Adrian; Ng, Patrick; Liu, Edison Tak-Bun; Ruan, Yijun; Wei, Chia-Lin; Sung, Wing-Kin Ken

    2007-01-01

    Background Melanoma is the major cause of skin cancer deaths and melanoma incidence doubles every 10 to 20 years. However, little is known about melanoma pathway aberrations. Here we applied the robust Gene Identification Signature Paired End diTag (GIS-PET) approach to investigate the melanoma transcriptome and characterize the global pathway aberrations. Methods GIS-PET technology directly links 5' mRNA signatures with their corresponding 3' signatures to generate, and then concatenate, PETs for efficient sequencing. We annotated PETs to pathways of KEGG database and compared the murine B16F1 melanoma transcriptome with three non-melanoma murine transcriptomes (Melan-a2 melanocytes, E14 embryonic stem cells, and E17.5 embryo). Gene expression levels as represented by PET counts were compared across melanoma and melanocyte libraries to identify the most significantly altered pathways and investigate the expression levels of crucial cancer genes. Results Melanin biosynthesis genes were solely expressed in the cells of melanocytic origin, indicating the feasibility of using the PET approach for transcriptome comparison. The most significantly altered pathways were metabolic pathways, including upregulated pathways: purine metabolism, aminophosphonate metabolism, tyrosine metabolism, selenoamino acid metabolism, galactose utilization, nitrobenzene degradation, and bisphenol A degradation; and downregulated pathways: oxidative phosphorylation, ATPase synthesis, TCA cycle, pyruvate metabolism, and glutathione metabolism. The downregulated pathways concurrently indicated a slowdown of mitochondrial activities. Mitochondrial permeability was also significantly altered, as indicated by transcriptional activation of ATP/ADP, citrate/malate, Mg++, fatty acid and amino acid transporters, and transcriptional repression of zinc and metal ion transporters. Upregulation of cell cycle progression, MAPK, and PI3K/Akt pathways were more limited to certain region(s) of the pathway. Expression levels of c-Myc and Trp53 were also higher in melanoma. Moreover, transcriptional variants resulted from alternative transcription start sites or alternative polyadenylation sites were found in Ras and genes encoding adhesion or cytoskeleton proteins such as integrin, ?-catenin, ?-catenin, and actin. Conclusion The highly correlated results unmistakably point to a systematic downregulation of mitochondrial activities, which we hypothesize aims to downgrade the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and the dependency of cancer cells on angiogenesis. Our results also demonstrate the advantage of using the PET approach in conjunction with KEGG database for systematic pathway analysis. PMID:17594473

  14. Murine and human T-lymphocyte GATA-3 factors mediate transcription through a cis-regulatory element within the human T-cell receptor delta gene enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ko, L J; Yamamoto, M; Leonard, M W; George, K M; Ting, P; Engel, J D

    1991-01-01

    A family of transcriptional activators has recently been identified in chickens; these transcriptional activators recognize a common consensus motif (WGATAR) through a conserved C4 zinc finger DNA-binding domain. One of the members of this multigene family, cGATA-3, is most abundantly expressed in the T-lymphocyte cell lineage. Analysis of human and murine GATA-3 factors shows a striking degree of amino acid sequence identity and similar patterns of tissue specificity of expression in these three organisms. The murine and human factors are abundantly expressed in a variety of human and murine T-cell lines and can activate transcription through a tissue-specific GATA-binding site identified within the human T-cell receptor delta gene enhancer. We infer that the murine and human GATA-3 proteins play a central and highly conserved role in vertebrate T-cell-specific transcriptional regulation. Images PMID:2017177

  15. Thymoquinone Inhibits Murine Leukemia WEHI-3 Cells In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ali Salim, Landa Zeenelabdin; Othman, Rozana; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Al-Jashamy, Karim; Mohd Ali, Hapipah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Dehghan, Firouzeh; Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Omer, Fatima Abd Elmutaal Ahmed; Mohan, Syam

    2014-01-01

    Background Thymoquinone is an active ingredient isolated from Nigella sativa (Black Seed). This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-leukemic effects of thymoquinone on WEHI-3 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings The cytotoxic effect of thymoquinone was assessed using an MTT assay, while the inhibitory effect of thymoquinone on murine WEHI-3 cell growth was due to the induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by chromatin condensation dye, Hoechst 33342 and acridine orange/propidium iodide fluorescent staining. In addition, Annexin V staining for early apoptosis was performed using flowcytometric analysis. Apoptosis was found to be associated with the cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Expression of Bax, Bcl2 and HSP 70 proteins were observed by western blotting. The effects of thymoquinone on BALB/c mice injected with WEHI-3 cells were indicated by the decrease in the body, spleen and liver weights of the animal, as compared to the control. Conclusion Thymoquinone promoted natural killer cell activities. This compound showed high toxicity against WEHI-3 cell line which was confirmed by an increase of the early apoptosis, followed by up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl2, and down-regulation of the apoptotic protein, Bax. On the other hand, high reduction of the spleen and liver weight, and significant histopathology study of spleen and liver confirmed that thymoquinone inhibited WEHI-3 growth in the BALB/c mice. Results from this study highlight the potential of thymoquinone to be developed as an anti-leukemic agent. PMID:25531768

  16. DNA methylation analysis of murine hematopoietic side population cells during aging

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Oluwatosin; Wilson, Gareth A; Emmett, Warren; Morris, Tiffany; Bonnet, Dominique; Schuster, Eugene; Adejumo, Tomas; Beck, Stephan; Pearce, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been found in most tissues/organs. These somatic stem cells produce replacements for lost and damaged cells, and it is not completely understood how this regenerative capacity becomes diminished during aging. To study the possible involvement of epigenetic changes in somatic stem cell aging, we used murine hematopoiesis as a model system. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were enriched for via Hoechst exclusion activity (SP-HSC) from young, medium-aged and old mice and subjected to comprehensive, global methylome (MeDIP-seq) analysis. With age, we observed a global loss of DNA methylation of approximately 5%, but an increase in methylation at some CpG islands. Just over 100 significant (FDR < 0.2) aging-specific differentially methylated regions (aDMRs) were identified, which are surprisingly few considering the profound age-based changes that occur in HSC biology. Interestingly, the polycomb repressive complex -2 (PCRC2) target genes Kiss1r, Nav2 and Hsf4 were hypermethylated with age. The promoter for the Sdpr gene was determined to be progressively hypomethylated with age. This occurred concurrently with an increase in gene expression with age. To explore this relationship further, we cultured isolated SP-HSC in the presence of 5-aza-deoxycytdine and demonstrated a negative correlation between Sdpr promoter methylation and gene expression. We report that DNA methylation patterns are well preserved during hematopoietic stem cell aging, confirm that PCRC2 targets are increasingly methylated with age, and suggest that SDPR expression changes with age in HSCs may be regulated via age-based alterations in DNA methylation. PMID:23949429

  17. DNA methylation analysis of murine hematopoietic side population cells during aging.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, Oluwatosin; Wilson, Gareth A; Emmett, Warren; Morris, Tiffany; Bonnet, Dominique; Schuster, Eugene; Adejumo, Tomas; Beck, Stephan; Pearce, Daniel J

    2013-10-01

    Stem cells have been found in most tissues/organs. These somatic stem cells produce replacements for lost and damaged cells, and it is not completely understood how this regenerative capacity becomes diminished during aging. To study the possible involvement of epigenetic changes in somatic stem cell aging, we used murine hematopoiesis as a model system. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were enriched for via Hoechst exclusion activity (SP-HSC) from young, medium-aged and old mice and subjected to comprehensive, global methylome (MeDIP-seq) analysis. With age, we observed a global loss of DNA methylation of approximately 5%, but an increase in methylation at some CpG islands. Just over 100 significant (FDR<0.2) aging-specific differentially methylated regions (aDMRs) were identified, which are surprisingly few considering the profound age-based changes that occur in HSC biology. Interestingly, the polycomb repressive complex -2 (PCRC2) target genes Kiss1r, Nav2 and Hsf4 were hypermethylated with age. The promoter for the Sdpr gene was determined to be progressively hypomethylated with age. This occurred concurrently with an increase in gene expression with age. To explore this relationship further, we cultured isolated SP-HSC in the presence of 5-aza-deoxycytdine and demonstrated a negative correlation between Sdpr promoter methylation and gene expression. We report that DNA methylation patterns are well preserved during hematopoietic stem cell aging, confirm that PCRC2 targets are increasingly methylated with age, and suggest that SDPR expression changes with age in HSCs may be regulated via age-based alterations in DNA methylation. PMID:23949429

  18. Cytotoxic Effects of Biosynthesized Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on Murine Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Namvar, Farideh; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Azizi, Susan; Tahir, Paridah Mohd; Chartrand, Max Stanley

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic activity and cellular effects of previously prepared ZnO-NPs on murine cancer cell lines using brown seaweed (Sargassum muticum) aqueous extract. Treated cancer cells with ZnO-NPs for 72 hours demonstrated various levels of cytotoxicity based on calculated IC50 values using MTT assay as follows: 21.7?±?1.3??g/mL (4T1), 17.45?±?1.1??g/mL (CRL-1451), 11.75?±?0.8??g/mL (CT-26), and 5.6?±?0.55??g/mL (WEHI-3B), respectively. On the other hand, ZnO-NPs treatments for 72 hours showed no toxicity against normal mouse fibroblast (3T3) cell line. On the other hand, paclitaxel, which imposed an inhibitory effect on WEHI-3B cells with IC50 of 2.25?±?0.4, 1.17?±?0.5, and 1.6?±?0.09??g/mL after 24, 48, and 72 hours treatment, respectively, was used as positive control. Furthermore, distinct morphological changes were found by utilizing fluorescent dyes; apoptotic population was increased via flowcytometry, while a cell cycle block and stimulation of apoptotic proteins were also observed. Additionally, the present study showed that the caspase activations contributed to ZnO-NPs triggered apoptotic death in WEHI-3 cells. Thus, the nature of biosynthesis and the therapeutic potential of ZnO-NPs could prepare the way for further research on the design of green synthesis therapeutic agents, particularly in nanomedicine, for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25784947

  19. Mutations in the M112/M113-Coding Region Facilitate Murine Cytomegalovirus Replication in Human Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Uwe; Handke, Wiebke; Jurak, Igor; Brune, Wolfram

    2010-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses, representatives of the Betaherpesvirinae, cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised hosts. They infect various cells and tissues in their natural host but are highly species specific. For instance, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does not replicate in mouse cells, and human cells are not permissive for murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are so far poorly understood. In the present study we isolated and characterized a spontaneously occurring MCMV mutant that has gained the capacity to replicate rapidly and to high titers in human cells. Compared to the parental wild-type (wt) virus, this mutant formed larger nuclear replication compartments and replicated viral DNA more efficiently. It also disrupted promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein nuclear domains with greater efficiency but caused less apoptosis than did wt MCMV. Sequence analysis of the mutant virus genome revealed mutations in the M112/M113-coding region. This region is homologous to the HCMV UL112-113 region and encodes the viral early 1 (E1) proteins, which are known to play an important role in viral DNA replication. By introducing the M112/M113 mutations into wt MCMV, we demonstrated that they are sufficient to facilitate MCMV replication in human cells and are, at least in part, responsible for the efficient replication capability of the spontaneously adapted virus. However, additional mutations probably contribute as well. These results reveal a previously unrecognized role of the viral E1 proteins in regulating viral replication in different cells and provide new insights into the mechanisms of the species specificity of cytomegaloviruses. PMID:20519391

  20. Mutations in the M112/M113-coding region facilitate murine cytomegalovirus replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Uwe; Handke, Wiebke; Jurak, Igor; Brune, Wolfram

    2010-08-01

    Cytomegaloviruses, representatives of the Betaherpesvirinae, cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised hosts. They infect various cells and tissues in their natural host but are highly species specific. For instance, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does not replicate in mouse cells, and human cells are not permissive for murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are so far poorly understood. In the present study we isolated and characterized a spontaneously occurring MCMV mutant that has gained the capacity to replicate rapidly and to high titers in human cells. Compared to the parental wild-type (wt) virus, this mutant formed larger nuclear replication compartments and replicated viral DNA more efficiently. It also disrupted promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein nuclear domains with greater efficiency but caused less apoptosis than did wt MCMV. Sequence analysis of the mutant virus genome revealed mutations in the M112/M113-coding region. This region is homologous to the HCMV UL112-113 region and encodes the viral early 1 (E1) proteins, which are known to play an important role in viral DNA replication. By introducing the M112/M113 mutations into wt MCMV, we demonstrated that they are sufficient to facilitate MCMV replication in human cells and are, at least in part, responsible for the efficient replication capability of the spontaneously adapted virus. However, additional mutations probably contribute as well. These results reveal a previously unrecognized role of the viral E1 proteins in regulating viral replication in different cells and provide new insights into the mechanisms of the species specificity of cytomegaloviruses. PMID:20519391

  1. Murine Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Are Impaired by Age but Not by Cardiac Dystrophic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Lien-Cheng; Perbellini, Filippo; Gomes, Renata S.M.; Tan, Jun Jie; Vieira, Silvia; Faggian, Giuseppe; Clarke, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    To be clinically relevant as a therapy for heart failure, endogenous progenitor cells must be isolated and expanded from aged and/or diseased tissue. Here, we investigated the effect of age and cardiac impairment resulting from lack of dystrophin on murine cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs). CDCs were isolated and expanded from atrial biopsies from wild-type mice aged 1.5, 6, 18, and 24 months and from mdx mice aged 6 and 18 months. Cardiac function was measured in mdx mice and age-matched wild-type mice using high-resolution cine magnetic resonance imaging. CDCs could be isolated and expanded from all mice, however, the number of cells obtained, and their regenerative potential, decreased with age, as demonstrated by decreased expression of stem cell markers, c-kit and Sca-1, and decreased cell proliferation, migration, clonogenicity, and differentiation. Six-month-old mdx mice showed right ventricular (RV) dilation and reduced RV ejection fraction (EF) in comparison to wild-type mice. Older mdx mice displayed significant RV and left ventricular dilation and decreased EF in both ventricles, compared with age-matched wild-type mice. Mdx mouse hearts contained significantly more fibrotic tissue than age-matched wild-type mouse hearts. However, CDCs isolated from mice aged 6 and 18 months had the same number and regenerative potential from mdx mice and age-matched wild-type mice. Thus, the cardiac progenitor cell population is impaired by age but is not substantially altered by the progressive deterioration in function of the dystrophic heart. PMID:24351030

  2. Stimulation of B-cell lymphopoiesis by interleukin-7 leads to aggravation of murine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, A; Will, A; Vieth, M; Schröppel, K; Röllinghoff, M

    1995-01-01

    The effect of recombinant interleukin-7 (IL-7) on the clinical course of murine leishmaniasis and the development of the accompanying immune response was investigated. Previously, IL-7 has been shown to possess stimulatory capacity for different cell types of the immune and haematopoietic system critically involved in the defence against Leishmania major (L. major), such as macrophages which are activated for the elimination of the parasite by IL-7. In contrast to these in vitro data, the present study indicates that treatment of genetically susceptible BALB/c mice with IL-7 at the onset of the infection leads to enhanced lesion development and a significantly accelerated death of the animals. This was correlated with a 40-fold increased parasite burden in spleens and lymph nodes. While the specific antibody response against L. major was not altered and lymphocytes of IL-7-treated mice produced comparable amounts of the T-helper type-2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4 and IL-10, less interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was measurable after antigenic stimulation of lymph node and spleen cells in vitro. One of the major changes appearing by the first week after infection in IL-7-treated mice was the increase of the total cell number in spleen and lymph nodes draining the local infection. Analysis of the cellular composition revealed that the enhanced cellularity was predominantly due to a rise in the B-cell compartment. Since antigen presentation by B cells has been implicated in the development of Th2 cells, the disease-aggravating activity of IL-7 is thought to be primarily due to augmentation of B lymphopoiesis. PMID:7751025

  3. Enniatin B-induced cell death and inflammatory responses in RAW 267.4 murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Gammelsrud, A.; Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo ; Solhaug, A.; Dendelé, B.; Sandberg, W.J.; Ivanova, L.; Kocbach Bølling, A.; Lagadic-Gossmann, D.; Refsnes, M.; Becher, R.; Eriksen, G.; Holme, J.A.

    2012-05-15

    The mycotoxin enniatin B (EnnB) is predominantly produced by species of the Fusarium genera, and often found in grain. The cytotoxic effect of EnnB has been suggested to be related to its ability to form ionophores in cell membranes. The present study examines the effects of EnnB on cell death, differentiation, proliferation and pro-inflammatory responses in the murine monocyte–macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Exposure to EnnB for 24 h caused an accumulation of cells in the G0/G1-phase with a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1. This cell cycle-arrest was possibly also linked to the reduced cellular ability to capture and internalize receptors as illustrated by the lipid marker ganglioside GM1. EnnB also increased the number of apoptotic, early apoptotic and necrotic cells, as well as cells with elongated spindle-like morphology. The Neutral Red assay indicated that EnnB induced lysosomal damage; supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing accumulation of lipids inside the lysosomes forming lamellar structures/myelin bodies. Enhanced levels of activated caspase-1 were observed after EnnB exposure and the caspase-1 specific inhibitor ZYVAD-FMK reduced EnnB-induced apoptosis. Moreover, EnnB increased the release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1?) in cells primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and this response was reduced by both ZYVAD-FMK and the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me. In conclusion, EnnB was found to induce cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. Caspase-1 appeared to be involved in the apoptosis and release of IL-1? and possibly activation of the inflammasome through lysosomal damage and leakage of cathepsin B. -- Highlights: ? The mycotoxin EnnB induced cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. ? The G0/G1-arrest was linked to a reduced ability to internalize receptors. ? EnnB caused lysosomal damage, leakage of cathepsin B and caspase-1 cleavage. ? Caspase-1 was partly involved in both apoptosis and release of IL-1?. ? There was a synergistic action between EnnB and bacterial LPS.

  4. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kakoki, Katsura; Kamiyama, Haruka; Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  5. Presentation of T-cell epitopes assembled as multiple-antigen peptides to murine and human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Grillot, D; Valmori, D; Lambert, P H; Corradin, G; Del Giudice, G

    1993-01-01

    Multiple-antigen peptide (MAP) constructs containing different T- and B-cell epitopes were assessed for their ability to be specifically recognized by murine and human T-cell clones. The different synthetic MAP constructs consisted of a malaria T-cell epitope or of a human universal tetanus toxin helper T-cell epitope collinearly synthesized with B-cell epitopes from the circumsporozoite proteins of different malaria parasites. All constructs were able to stimulate specifically T-cell clones. Interestingly, T-cell epitopes assembled as MAP constructs did not require processing for the specific stimulation of murine and human T-cell clones, as shown by retention of their stimulatory effect in the presence of glutaraldehyde-fixed antigen-presenting cells. However, processing was required for most of the synthetic constructs containing both T- and B-cell epitopes. Thus, the requirement for processing of these constructs seems to be dictated by the nature of the B-cell epitope present. PMID:7685741

  6. Signaling profiling at the single-cell level identifies a distinct signaling signature in murine hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Wang, Jinyong; Kong, Guangyao; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Jingfang; Liu, Yangang; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function is tightly regulated by cytokine signaling. Although phospho-flow cytometry allows us to study signaling in defined populations of cells, there has been tremendous hurdle to carry out this study in rare HSCs due to unrecoverable critical HSC markers, low HSC number, and poor cell recovery rate. Here, we overcame these difficulties and developed a “HSC phospho-flow” method to analyze cytokine signaling in murine HSCs at the single-cell level and compare HSC signaling profile to that of multipotent progenitors (MPPs), a cell type immediately downstream of HSCs, and commonly used Lin? cKit+ cells (LK cells, enriched for myeloid progenitors). We chose to study signaling evoked from three representative cytokines, stem cell factor (SCF) and thrombopoietin (TPO) that are essential for HSC function, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) that is dispensable for HSCs. HSCs display a distinct TPO and GM-CSF signaling signature from MPPs and LK cells, which highly correlates with receptor surface expression. In contrast, although majority of LK cells express lower levels of cKit than HSCs and MPPs, SCF-evoked ERK1/2 activation in LK cells shows a significantly increased magnitude for a prolonged period. These results suggest that specific cellular context plays a more important role than receptor surface expression in SCF signaling. Our study of HSC signaling at the homeostasis stage paves the way to investigate signaling changes in HSCs under conditions of stress, aging, and hematopoietic diseases. PMID:22628264

  7. Distinct roles for histone methyltransferases G9a and GLP in cancer germ-line antigen gene regulation in human cancer cells and murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Link, Petra A; Gangisetty, Omkaram; James, Smitha R; Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Karpf, Adam R

    2009-06-01

    The H3K9me2 histone methyltransferases G9a and GLP repress Mage-a class cancer germ-line (CG) antigen gene expression in murine embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the role of these enzymes in CG antigen gene regulation in human cancer cells is unknown. Here we show that whereas independent or dual knockdown of G9a and GLP in human cancer cells leads to reduced global and CG antigen promoter-associated H3K9me2 levels, it does not activate CG antigen gene expression. Moreover, CG antigen gene repression is maintained following pharmacologic targeting of G9a or treatment of G9a knockdown cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. However, G9a knockdown cells display increased sensitivity to CG antigen gene activation mediated by the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. To account for these findings, we examined DNA methylation at CG antigen gene promoters in both cell types. We found robust DNA hypomethylation in G9a/GLP targeted murine ES cells but a lack of DNA methylation changes in G9a/GLP targeted human cancer cells; intriguingly, this distinction also extended to markers of global DNA methylation. These data reveal that G9a/GLP is required for DNA methylation of CG antigen genes and genomic DNA in murine ES cells, but not human cancer cells, and implicate DNA methylation status as the key epigenetic mechanism involved in CG antigen gene repression. PMID:19531572

  8. Efficacy of quercetin against chemically induced murine oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DROGUETT, DANIEL; CASTILLO, CHRISTIAN; LEIVA, ELBA; THEODULOZ, CRISTINA; SCHMEDA-HIRSCHMANN, GUILLERMO; KEMMERLING, ULRIKE

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common form of head and neck cancer, and oxidative damage is associated with the development of OSCCs. Antioxidants have therefore been proposed for use as chemoprotective agents against different types of cancer. In the present study, the effect of the antioxidant quercetin, administered at doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg/day, was investigated in an experimental murine model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced carcinogenesis. The survival of the treated animals, the plasmatic levels of reduced glutathione and the type and severity of lesions (according the International Histological Classification of Tumors and Bryne's Multifactorial Grading System for the Invasive Tumor Front) were assessed. Additionally, the organization of the extracellular matrix was analyzed by carbohydrate and collagen histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of the tumor markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen and mutated p53. The results indicate that, despite the promising effect of quercetin in other studies, this drug is ineffective as a chemoprotective agent against 4-NQO-induced OSCC in mice at the assayed doses. PMID:26622865

  9. Up regulation of annexin A2 on murine H22 hepatocarcinoma cells induced by cartilage polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anjun; Liu, Dongyue; Zhao, Sisi; Zheng, Jie; Cao, Dongxu; Zhang, Hong

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a tumor vaccine prepared from H22 hepatocarcinoma cells induced by cartilage polysaccharide. We found out there were specific antigens which combined with antigen-specific antibodies from immune murine serum. Results of western blot analysis showed that about 36 kDa make specific antibodies appeared specific antibodies in antiserum of immune mice, whereas the best immune effects became visible at the induction time of 48 h. Analyses of 2-dimensional electrophoresis identified the specific antigen was annexin A2, which was a glycosylated protein that contained a glycosylation site, closely related to oncogenesis, cancer development, invasion and metastasis. Proteomics indicated that both quantity and conformation of annexin A2 were changed after induced by cartilage polysaccharide. Lastly, we found there was a major increase of annexin A2 mRNA on H22 cells induced by cartilage polysaccharide. In summary, our data suggested that annexin A2, a specific antigen played a key role in antitumor immune response and activating the immune system. It would be a potential type of tumor vaccine which provided new ideas for tumor immunoprophylaxis. PMID:21111695

  10. Novel Lobophorins Inhibit Oral Cancer Cell Growth and Induce Atf4- and Chop-Dependent Cell Death in Murine Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Patricia G; Fribley, Andrew M; Miller, Justin R; Larsen, Martha J; Schultz, Pamela J; Jacob, Renju T; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Kaufman, Randal J; Sherman, David H

    2015-08-13

    As part of the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups (ICBG) Program, we were interested in identifying biologically active unfolded protein response (UPR) inducing compounds from marine microorganisms isolated from Costa Rican biota. With this aim in mind we have now generated more than 33,000 unique prefractionated natural product extracts from marine and terrestrial organisms that have been submitted to the Center of Chemical Genomics (CCG) at the University of Michigan for high throughput screening (HTS). An effective complementary cell-based assay to identify novel modulators of UPR signaling was used for screening extracts. Active fractions were iteratively subjected to reverse-phase HPLC chromatographic analysis, and together with lobophorin A, B, E, and F (1-4), three new lobophorin congeners, designated as CR1 (5), CR2 (6), and CR3 (7) were isolated. Herein, we report that secondary assays revealed that the new lobophorins induced UPR-associated gene expression, inhibited oral squamous cell carcinoma cell growth, and led to UPR-dependent cell death in murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. PMID:26288688

  11. Murine cell line model of proneural glioma for evaluation of anti-tumor therapies.

    PubMed

    Sonabend, Adam M; Yun, Jonathan; Lei, Liang; Leung, Richard; Soderquist, Craig; Crisman, Celina; Gill, Brian J; Carminucci, Arthur; Sisti, Julia; Castelli, Mike; Sims, Peter A; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Canoll, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Molecular subtypes of glioblastoma (GBM) with distinct alterations have been identified. There is need for reproducible, versatile preclinical models that resemble specific GBM phenotypes to facilitate preclinical testing of novel therapies. We present a cell line-based murine proneural GBM model and characterize its response to radiation therapy. Proneural gliomas were generated by injecting PDGF-IRES-Cre retrovirus into the subcortical white matter of adult mice that harbor floxed tumor suppressors (Pten and p53) and stop-floxed reporters. Primary cell cultures were generated from the retrovirus induced tumors and maintained in vitro for multiple passages. RNA sequencing-based expression profiling of the resulting cell lines was performed. The tumorigenic potential of the cells was assessed by intracranial injection into adult naïve mice from different strains. Tumor growth was assessed by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). BLI for tumor cells and brain slices were obtained and compared to in vivo BLI. Response to whole-brain radiation was assessed in glioma-bearing animals. Intracranial injection of Pdgf(+)Pten(-/-)p53(-/-)luciferase(+) glioma cells led to formation of GBM-like tumors with 100 % efficiency (n = 48) and tumorigenesis was retained for more than 3 generations. The cell lines specifically resembled proneural GBM based on expression profiling by RNA-Seq. Pdgf(+)Pten(-/-)p53(-/-)luciferase(+) cell number correlated with BLI signal. Serial BLI measured tumor growth and correlated with size and location by ex vivo imaging. Moreover, BLI predicted tumor-related mortality with a 93 % risk of death within 5 days following a BLI signal between 1 × 10(8) and 5 × 10(8) photons/s cm(2). BLI signal had transient but significant response following radiotherapy, which corresponded to a modest survival benefit for radiated mice (p < 0.05). Intracranial injection of Pdgf(+)Pten(-/-)p53(-/-)luciferase(+) cells constitutes a novel and highly reproducible model, recapitulating key features of human proneural GBM, and can be used to evaluate tumor-growth and response to therapy. PMID:23504257

  12. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Migration After Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in a Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Jonathan; Krueger, Sarah A.; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Torma, John T.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian; Madlambayan, Gerard J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the recruitment of bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within tumor microenvironment after radiation therapy (RT) in a murine, heterotopic tumor model. Methods and Materials: Lewis lung carcinoma tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice and irradiated with 30 Gy given as 2 fractions over 2 days. Tumors were imaged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and measured daily with digital calipers. The HSPC and myelomonocytic cell content was assessed via immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry. Functionality of tumor-associated HSPCs was verified in vitro using colony-forming cell assays and in vivo by rescuing lethally irradiated C57BL/6 recipients. Results: Irradiation significantly reduced tumor volumes and tumor regrowth rates compared with nonirradiated controls. The number of CD133{sup +} HSPCs present in irradiated tumors was higher than in nonirradiated tumors during all stages of regrowth. CD11b{sup +} counts were similar. PET/CT imaging and growth rate analysis based on standardized uptake value indicated that HSPC recruitment directly correlated to the extent of regrowth and intratumor cell activity after irradiation. The BM-derived tumor-associated HSPCs successfully formed hematopoietic colonies and engrafted irradiated mice. Finally, targeted treatment with a small animal radiation research platform demonstrated localized HSPC recruitment to defined tumor subsites exposed to radiation. Conclusions: Hypofractionated irradiation resulted in a pronounced and targeted recruitment of BM-derived HSPCs, possibly as a mechanism to promote tumor regrowth. These data indicate for the first time that radiation therapy regulates HSPC content within regrowing tumors.

  13. Regulation of hemopoiesis: inhibitors and stimulators produced by a murine bone marrow stromal cell line (H-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.; Miller, M.E.; Garnett, H.; Harigaya, K.

    1982-01-01

    A murine cell line (H-1) probably derived from the adventitial reticular cell has been isolated and preserved. This line produces: (1) CSF; (2) a labile inhibitor of CFU-c proliferation with preferential action on granulopoiesis; (3) PGE; (4) proliferation inhibitors of BFU-E and GEMM; and (5) suppression of entry of CFU-S into DNA synthesis in vitro. It is postulated that the adventitial reticular cell (ARC) may play a major regulatory role in hemopoiesis through intramedullary production of the factors described. The nature of the signals that activate the genes in the ARC which are coded for the factors described is not known.

  14. Expression of the platelet-activating factor receptor enhances benzyl isothiocyanate-induced apoptosis in murine and human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi Prakash

    2015-07-01

    Melanoma cells often express platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R), which has been demonstrated to increase metastatic behavior. However, the effect of PAF-R on the responsiveness of melanoma to naturally occurring cytotoxic agents remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to determine the relative cytotoxicity and mechanism of benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), a component of cruciferous vegetables, in melanoma cells expressing PAF-R. To evaluate the importance of PAF-R signaling in melanoma cell growth, PAF-R-negative murine B16F10 cells were transduced with a retrovirus containing the cDNA for PAF-R to generate cells stably expressing PAF-R (B16-PAF-R) or an empty vector (MSCV) to generate PAF-R-deficient B16-MSCV control cells. Activation of PAF-R, using the PAF-R agonist, 1-hexadecyl-2-N-methylcarbamoyl-3-glycerophosphocholine, induced an increase in the proliferation of B16-PAF-R cells compared with the B16-MSCV cells. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed the presence of functional PAF-R in human melanoma SK23MEL cells, but not in SK5MEL cells. The present study investigated the effect of BITC treatments on the survival of murine and human melanoma cells, in the presence or absence of functional PAF-R. The results revealed that treatment with BITC decreased the survival rate of the PAF-R-positive and negative murine and human melanoma cells. However, the expression of PAF-R substantially augmented BITC-mediated cytotoxicity in the PAF-R-positive cells at lower concentrations compared with the PAF-R-negative cells. In order to determine the underlying mechanism, flow cytometric analysis was used, which demonstrated a significant increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the B16-PAF-R cells compared with the B16-MSCV cells, which enhanced apoptosis by BITC, as measured by increased caspase-3/7 luminescence. Notably, the BITC-mediated decreased cell survival rate, increased ROS and increased apoptosis in the B16-PAF-R cells were significantly attenuated by the antioxidant, vitamin C, indicating ROS involvement. Additionally, the WEB2086 PAF-R antagonist, inhibited the BITC-mediated enhancement of apoptosis in the B16-PAF-R cells, indicating a role for PAF-R-signaling in the BITC-mediated effects. These findings indicated that the selectivity of BITC towards PAF?R in melanoma offers a promising chemopreventive agent for PAF-R-positive melanoma treatment. PMID:25695262

  15. Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid ethyl esters differentially enhance B-cell activity in murine obesity[S

    PubMed Central

    Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Fenton, Jenifer; Lallemand, Perrine; Shewchuk, Brian M.; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2014-01-01

    EPA and DHA are not biologically equivalent; however, their individual activity on B cells is unknown. We previously reported fish oil enhanced murine B-cell activity in obesity. To distinguish between the effects of EPA and DHA, we studied the ethyl esters of EPA and DHA on murine B-cell function as a function of time. We first demonstrate that EPA and DHA maintained the obese phenotype, with no improvements in fat mass, adipose inflammatory cytokines, fasting insulin, or glucose clearance. We then tested the hypothesis that EPA and DHA would increase the frequency of splenic B cells. EPA and DHA differentially enhanced the frequency and/or percentage of select B-cell subsets, correlating with increased natural serum IgM and cecal IgA. We next determined the activities of EPA and DHA on ex vivo production of cytokines upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation of B cells. EPA and DHA, in a time-dependent manner, enhanced B-cell cytokines with DHA notably increasing IL-10. At the molecular level, EPA and DHA differentially enhanced the formation of ordered microdomains but had no effect on Toll-like receptor 4 mobility. Overall, the results establish differential effects of EPA and DHA in a time-dependent manner on B-cell activity in obesity, which has implications for future clinical studies. PMID:24837990

  16. Characterization of murine monoclonal anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) produced by idiotypic manipulation with human AECA.

    PubMed

    Levy, Y; Gilburd, B; George, J; Del Papa, N; Mallone, R; Damianovich, M; Blank, M; Radice, A; Renaudineau, Y; Youinou, P; Wiik, A; Malavasi, F; Meroni, P L; Shoenfeld, Y

    1998-07-01

    The IgG fraction of human anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) obtained from a patient with Wegener's granulomatosis was used as immunogen to raise AECA mAb in mice selected among those which developed vasculitis-like lesions after immunization. Three mAb (BGM, 3C8 and 7G2), selected by cyto-ELISA and flow cytometry analyses, featured a specific reactivity with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the mouse endothelial cell line H5V; on the contrary, HEp2 cells, the murine melanoma B16 cell line, the extracellular matrix as well as several other antigens tested were not recognized. BGM mAb, an IgG3 precipitating a 70 kDa structure from HUVEC, was able to induce endothelial cells to secrete amounts of IL-6 significantly higher than irrelevant controls or mAb binding different endothelial antigens (i.e. CD31, CD29, ICAM-1 and HLA class I). BGM mAb induced significant levels of antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (13 +/- 2.5 versus 0.6 +/- 0.03%). To the best of our knowledge, BGM is the first murine mAb specific for human endothelial cells generated by idiotypic manipulation; secondly, its biological properties further support the notion of a pathogenic role for AECA in autoimmune-mediated diseases. PMID:9701024

  17. Nuclear factor-?B mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-?B (NF-?B) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-?B in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-?B on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-?B in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (?-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-?B. Meanwhile, the expression of ?-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-?B blocker. NF-?B blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-?B in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma. PMID:26722396

  18. MiR-34a represses Numbl in murine neural progenitor cells and antagonizes neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Sarah K; Datta, Poppy; Stein, Colleen S; Davidson, Beverly L

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) function is required for normal animal development, in particular in differentiation pathways from stem cell and precursor populations. In neurogenesis, it is becoming increasingly appreciated that miRNAs act at many stages to ensure proper progression. In this study we examined the role of miR-34a in neural progenitor cells (NPC) derived from murine embryonic cortex. We found that over-expression of miR-34a in NPC significantly reduced the neuron yield upon in vitro induction of differentiation. MiR-34a has several predicted targets in the Notch pathway, which operates to balance progenitor self-renewal and differentiation during cortical neurogenesis. We tested several Notch pathway players for regulation by miR-34a in undifferentiated NPC, and found that mRNA and protein levels of Numbl, a negative regulator of Notch signaling, as well as two downstream pro-neural genes usually blocked by Notch signaling, NeuroD1 and Mash1, were diminished, while Notch1 and Cbf1 transcripts were enhanced by miR-34a over-expression. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we verified the Numbl 3'-UTR as a direct miR-34a target. Correspondingly, knock-down of endogenous miR-34a resulted in increased Numbl, NeuroD1 and Mash1, and reduced Notch1 transcript levels. Together these results implicate Numbl as a physiologically relevant target of miR-34a in NPC, allowing for enhanced Notch signaling and inhibition of neuronal differentiation. This work extends our understanding of miR-34a-mediated control of cell differentiation from cancer to mammalian nervous system development. PMID:22701667

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in alveolar epithelial cells and murine lungs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; He, Donghong; Su, Yanlin; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Chun, Jerold; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2011-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid, plays an important role in lung inflammation by inducing the release of chemokines and lipid mediators. Our previous studies have shown that LPA induces the secretion of interleukin-8 and prostaglandin E2 in lung epithelial cells. Here, we demonstrate that LPA receptors contribute to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. Pretreatment with LPA receptor antagonist Ki16425 or downregulation of LPA receptor 1 (LPA1) by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, I-?B kinase, and I-?B in MLE12 epithelial cells. In addition, the blocking of LPA1 also suppressed LPS-induced IL-6 production. Furthermore, LPS treatment promoted interaction between LPA1 and CD14, a LPS coreceptor, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Disruption of lipid rafts attenuated the interaction between LPA1 and CD14. Mice challenged with LPS increased plasma LPA levels and enhanced expression of LPA receptors in lung tissues. To further investigate the role of LPA receptors in LPS-induced inflammation, wild-type, or LPA1-deficient mice, or wild-type mice pretreated with Ki16425 were intratracheally challenged with LPS for 24 h. Knock down or inhibition of LPA1 decreased LPS-induced IL-6 release in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and infiltration of cells into alveolar space compared with wild-type mice. However, no significant differences in total protein concentration in BAL fluids were observed. These results showed that knock down or inhibition of LPA1 offered significant protection against LPS-induced lung inflammation but not against pulmonary leak as observed in the murine model for lung injury. PMID:21821728

  20. Maturation of murine bone marrow dendritic cells induced by acidic Ginseng polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuozhou; Meng, Jingjuan; Xia, Yanjie; Meng, Yiming; Du, Lin; Zhang, Zhenjie; Wang, Enhua; Shan, Fengping

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we report that a acidic polysaccharide (AGP) isolated from a Chinese medicinal herb, named Ginseng (Panax giseng C.A. Meyer), induces maturation of bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) via concrete changes both inside and outside BMDCs. The impacts of AGP on BMDCs were assessed with use of conventional scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) for morphology, flow cytometry (FCM) for key surface molecules, cytochemistry assay, FITC-dextran, bio-assay for phagocytosis and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for production of cytokines. Our results elucidated that PPS promoted maturation of BMDCs via changes as reflected by the down-regulation of acid phosphatase (ACP) activity inside the BMDCs, which occurs when phagocytosis of BMDCs to antigen decreased, while antigen presentation increased upon maturation, higher expression of key surface molecules of MHC II, CD80, CD86, CD83, and CD40, and releasing higher level of cytokines IL-12 and low level of TNF-?. Our study suggest that AGP play marked immunostimulating role on the maturation of murine BMDCs through precise regulation of phagocytosis and enzyme activities inside the BMDCs. PMID:23164755

  1. Expression of mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia virus-related transcripts in AKR mice

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.S.; Laigret, F.; Rodi, C.P.

    1987-03-01

    The authors used a synthetic 16-base-pair mink cell focus-forming (MCF) env-specific oligomer as radiolabeled probe to study MCF murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related transcripts in brain, kidney, liver, spleen, and thymus tissues of AKR mice ranging from 5 weeks to 6 months (mo) of age. Tissue-specific expression of poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs was seen. In addition, all the tissues tested contained 3.0-kb messages. The transcription of these MCF-related mRNAs was independent of the presence of ecotropic and xenotropic MuLVs. In general, expression of the MCF env-related transcripts appeared to peak at 2 mo of age; these messages were barely detectable in brain, kidney, liver, and spleen tissues after 2 mo and in thymus tissue after 4 mo of age. All of the subgenomic MCF env-related mRNAs appeared to contain the 190-base-pair cellular DNA insert, characteristic of the long terminal repeats associated with endogenous MCF env-related proviruses. No genomic-size (8.4-kb) transcripts corresponding to endogenous MCF-related proviruses were detected. An 8.4-kb MCF env-related mRNA was first seen at 3 mo of age, exclusively in thymus tissue. This species most likely represents the first appearance of a recombinant MCF-related MuLV genome. The transcripts which were detected in thymus tissue might be involved in the generation of leukemogenic MCF viruses.

  2. Histopathology of experimentally induced asthma in a murine model of sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Nandedkar, Sandhya D.; Feroah, Thomas R.; Hutchins, William; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Konduri, Kameswari S.; Wang, Jingli; Strunk, Robert C.; DeBaun, Michael R.; Hillery, Cheryl A.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is a comorbid condition associated with increased rates of pain, acute chest syndrome, and premature death in human sickle cell disease (SCD). We developed an experimental asthma model in SCD and control mice expressing either normal human or murine hemoglobin to determine its effect on mortality and lung pathology. To induce lung inflammation, experimental mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) by subcutaneous OVA implantation (Sen), allowed 2 weeks to recover, and then divided into 2 groups, each receiving over a subsequent 10-day period the same dosage of aerosolized OVA but 2 different levels of exposure: 15 minutes (LoSen) and 30 minutes (HiSen). During recovery, 10% of SCD mice died compared with no deaths in control mice. An additional 30% of HiSen SCD mice died during aerosolization compared with 10% in LoSen SCD. Histologic indices of lung inflammation (eg, eosinophil recruitment, airway and vessel wall thickening, and immunoreactive TGF? and fsp-1) and bronchial alveolar lavage fluid eosinophil peroxidase activity differentially increased in sensitized mice compared with unsensitized mice. Our findings indicate SCD mice with experimentally induced asthma are more susceptible to death and pulmonary inflammation compared with control mice, suggesting that asthma contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in SCD. PMID:18579795

  3. Differential effects of liposome-entrapped desferrioxamine on proliferation and erythroid differentiation of murine erythroleukemic Friend cells.

    PubMed

    Nastruzzi, C; Walde, P; Menegatti, E; Gambari, R

    1989-09-01

    It is known that iron chelators (such as desferrioxamine) are potent inhibitors of both cell proliferation and erythroid differentiation. We have shown with in vitro studies that in the case of tumor cells desferrioxamine is even more efficient in inhibiting cell proliferation when entrapped in liposomes consisting of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine. At the same time liposome-entrapped desferrioxamine retains only a slight effect on hexamethylenebisacetamide induction of erythroid differentiation and hemoglobin accumulation of murine erythroleukemic Friend cells. Based on these findings, we propose liposome-entrapped desferrioxamine as potential antineoplastic agent as well as a specific chemical for the study of both iron metabolism and distribution in normal and neoplastic cells. In addition, unlike free desferrioxamine, the liposome-entrapped drug could also be used in combination with inducers of differentiation. With respect to this issue, it is possible that liposome-entrapped desferrioxamine, might permit erythroid differentiation of both neoplastic cells as well as normal stem cells. PMID:2790036

  4. GATA4 is a regulator of astrocyte cell proliferation and apoptosis in the human and murine central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, S; Wolf, A; Picard, D; Hawkins, C; Guha, A

    2009-08-27

    The GATA transcription factors consist of six family members, which bind to the consensus DNA-binding element, W-GATA-R, and are poorly characterized in the central nervous system (CNS). Using retroviral gene trapping on transgenic mouse glioma models, we identified GATA6 to be a novel tumor suppressor gene in glioblastoma multiforme. We now show GATA4, a family member of GATA6, to be expressed in the neurons and glia of normal murine and human embryonic and adult CNS. Silencing GATA4 in normal astrocytes did not alter their growth properties. In contrast, knockdown of Gata4 in p53 null non-transformed murine astrocytes induced transformation, with increased proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy or radiation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, GATA4 expression was lost in a panel of human malignant astrocytoma cell lines. GATA4 overexpression in normal human and murine astrocytes resulted in a cell cycle block in G1 phase, with increased apoptosis. Mechanistically, GATA4 was a transcriptional inducer of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15INK4B, leading to the attenuation of cyclin D1. GATA4 expression was also induced by transforming growth factor-beta, leading to the inhibition of astrocyte proliferation. Collectively, we show that GATA4 is expressed in the embryonic and adult CNS and acts as a negative regulator of astrocyte proliferation and growth. PMID:19543315

  5. Oral administration of carbonic anhydrase I ameliorates murine experimental colitis induced by Foxp3-CD4+CD25- T cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kenichirou; Yamanishi, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Yoshiou; Kumagi, Teru; Hiasa, Yoichi; Matsuura, Bunzo; Abe, Masanori; Onji, Morikazu

    2013-06-01

    IBDs are thought to involve uncontrolled innate and adaptive immunity against intestinal self-antigens and bacterial antigens. Mouse CA I is a major cecal bacterial antigen in fecal extracts and is implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. We show here that oral tolerization to CA I induced antigen-specific protection from intestinal inflammation in a murine model. Oral administration of CA I but not irrelevant antigen (KLH) ameliorated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cell transfer murine colitis and DSS-induced murine colitis. Next, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effects of oral administration, such as induction of ALDH1a2, transcription factors, cytokines, CD103(+)CD11c(+) DCs, and generation of Tregs. Oral administration of CA I induced ALDH1a2 mRNA expression in the MLN and colon. When compared with PBS-treated mice, CA I-treated mice had higher Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg and CD103(+)CD11c(+) DC numbers in the MLN and colon; had higher TGF-? production in the MLN and colon; had lower ROR?t mRNA expression in the MLN and colon; and had lower IL-17 mRNA expression and production in the MLN. These results demonstrate that oral administration of CA I induced antigen-specific immune tolerance by generating Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs and inhibiting Th17 cells in a murine colitis model, thus suggesting that oral tolerization with CA I is an effective therapeutic strategy for IBD regulation. PMID:23547144

  6. Production and Functional Characterization of Murine Osteoclasts Differentiated from ER-Hoxb8-Immortalized Myeloid Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zach, Frank; Mueller, Alexandra; Gessner, André

    2015-01-01

    In vitro differentiation into functional osteoclasts is routinely achieved by incubation of embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, or primary as well as cryopreserved spleen and bone marrow-derived cells with soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Additionally, osteoclasts can be derived from co-cultures with osteoblasts or by direct administration of soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand to RAW 264.7 macrophage lineage cells. However, despite their benefits for osteoclast-associated research, these different methods have several drawbacks with respect to differentiation yields, time and animal consumption, storage life of progenitor cells or the limited potential for genetic manipulation of osteoclast precursors. In the present study, we therefore established a novel protocol for the differentiation of osteoclasts from murine ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid stem cells. We isolated and immortalized bone marrow cells from wild type and genetically manipulated mouse lines, optimized protocols for osteoclast differentiation and compared these cells to osteoclasts derived from conventional sources. In vitro generated ER-Hoxb8 osteoclasts displayed typical osteoclast characteristics such as multi-nucleation, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining of supernatants and cells, F-actin ring formation and bone resorption activity. Furthermore, the osteoclast differentiation time course was traced on a gene expression level. Increased expression of osteoclast-specific genes and decreased expression of stem cell marker genes during differentiation of osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid progenitor cells were detected by gene array and confirmed by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR approaches. In summary, we established a novel method for the quantitative production of murine bona fide osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8 stem cells generated from wild type or genetically manipulated mouse lines. These cells represent a standardized and theoretically unlimited source for osteoclast-associated research projects. PMID:26529319

  7. Production and Functional Characterization of Murine Osteoclasts Differentiated from ER-Hoxb8-Immortalized Myeloid Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Frank; Mueller, Alexandra; Gessner, André

    2015-01-01

    In vitro differentiation into functional osteoclasts is routinely achieved by incubation of embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, or primary as well as cryopreserved spleen and bone marrow-derived cells with soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Additionally, osteoclasts can be derived from co-cultures with osteoblasts or by direct administration of soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand to RAW 264.7 macrophage lineage cells. However, despite their benefits for osteoclast-associated research, these different methods have several drawbacks with respect to differentiation yields, time and animal consumption, storage life of progenitor cells or the limited potential for genetic manipulation of osteoclast precursors. In the present study, we therefore established a novel protocol for the differentiation of osteoclasts from murine ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid stem cells. We isolated and immortalized bone marrow cells from wild type and genetically manipulated mouse lines, optimized protocols for osteoclast differentiation and compared these cells to osteoclasts derived from conventional sources. In vitro generated ER-Hoxb8 osteoclasts displayed typical osteoclast characteristics such as multi-nucleation, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining of supernatants and cells, F-actin ring formation and bone resorption activity. Furthermore, the osteoclast differentiation time course was traced on a gene expression level. Increased expression of osteoclast-specific genes and decreased expression of stem cell marker genes during differentiation of osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid progenitor cells were detected by gene array and confirmed by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR approaches. In summary, we established a novel method for the quantitative production of murine bona fide osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8 stem cells generated from wild type or genetically manipulated mouse lines. These cells represent a standardized and theoretically unlimited source for osteoclast-associated research projects. PMID:26529319

  8. Protein Phosphatase 2A in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Murine Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Yu-Fan; Chen, Mei-Chieh; Huang, Shiu-Wen; Hsu, Ya-Fen; Ou, George; Tsai, Yu-Jou; Hsu, Ming-Jen

    2015-01-01

    The lymphatic endothelium plays an important role in the maintenance of tissue fluid homeostasis. It also participates in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms by which lymphatic endothelial cell responds to inflammatory stimuli. In this study, we explored the mechanisms by which lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in murine lymphatic endothelial cells (SV-LECs). LPS caused increases in cox-2 mRNA and protein levels, as well as in COX-2 promoter luciferase activity in SV-LECs. These actions were associated with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), JNK1/2 and p38MAPK activation, and NF-?B subunit p65 and C/EBP? phosphorylation. PP2A-ASK1 signaling blockade reduced LPS-induced JNK1/2, p38MAPK, p65 and C/EBP? phosphorylation. Transfection with PP2A siRNA reduced LPS’s effects on p65 and C/EBP? binding to the COX-2 promoter region. Transfected with the NF-?B or C/EBP? site deletion of COX-2 reporter construct also abrogated LPS’s enhancing effect on COX-2 promoter luciferase activity in SV-LECs. Taken together, the induction of COX-2 in SV-LECs exposed to LPS may involve PP2A-ASK1-JNK and/or p38MAPK-NF-?B and/or C/EBP? cascade. PMID:26317424

  9. The third helix of the murine Hoxc8 homeodomain facilitates protein transduction in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoung-Ah; Gadi, Jogeswar; Park, Hyoung Woo; Bok, Jinwoong Kim, Myoung Hee

    2008-12-05

    Previously, we have demonstrated that purified Hoxc8 homeoprotein has the ability to penetrate the cellular membrane and can be transduced efficiently into COS-7 cells. Moreover, the Hoxc8 protein is able to form a complex with DNA molecules in vitro and helps the DNA be delivered intracellularly, serving as a gene delivery vehicle. Here, we further analyzed the membrane transduction activity of Hoxc8 protein and provide the evidence that the 16 amino acid (a.a.191-206, 2.23 kDa) third helix of murine Hoxc8 protein is an efficient protein transduction domain (PTD). When the 16 amino acid peptide was fused at the carboxyl terminal of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), the fusion proteins were transduced efficiently into the primary pig fetal fibroblast cells. The transduction efficiency increased in a concentration-dependent manner up to 1 {mu}M, and appeared to plateau above a concentration of 1 {mu}M. When tandem multimers of PTD, EGFP-PTD(2), EGFP-PTD(3), EGFP-PTD(4), and EGFP-PTD(5), were analyzed at 500 nM of concentration, the penetrating efficiency increased in a dose-dependent manner. As the number of PTDs increased, the EGFP signal also increased, although the signal maintained plateau after EGFP-PTD(3). These results indicate that the 16 amino acid third helix is the key element responsible for the membrane transduction activity of Hoxc8 proteins, and further suggest that the small peptide could serve as a therapeutic delivery vehicle for large cargo proteins.

  10. Protective activity of hamamelitannin on cell damage induced by superoxide anion radicals in murine dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Masaki, H; Atsumi, T; Sakurai, H

    1995-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that hamamelitannin (2',5-di-O-galloyl hamamelose) in Hamamelis virginiana L. exhibits potent superoxide-anion scavenging activity. We then examined the physiological and pharmacological activities of hamamelitannin as well as its functional homologues, gallic acid and syringic acid. The following results were obtained: (1) Hamamelitannin has a higher protective activity against cell damages induced by superoxide anions than gallic acid which is the functional moiety of hamamelitannin. The protective activity of hamamelitannin on murine fibroblast-damage induced by superoxide anions was found at a minimum concentration of 50 microM, while the corresponding figure for gallic acid was 100 microM. (2) Pre-treatment of fibroblasts with hamamelitannin enhances cell survival. (3) The superoxide-anion scavenging activity of the compound in terms of its IC50 value (50% inhibition concentration of superoxide anion radicals generated) was evaluated by ESR spin-trapping. Both hamamelitannin (IC50 = 1.31 +/- 0.06 microM) and gallic acid (IC50 = 1.01 +/- 0.03 microM) exhibited high superoxide-anion scavenging activity followed by syringic acid (IC50 = 13.90 +/- 2.38 microM). (4) When hamamelitannin was treated with superoxide anions generated by a KO2-crown ether system, HPLC analysis showed the disappearance of hamamelitannin and the concomitant formation of hamamelitannin-derived radicals (g = 2.005, delta H1 = 2.16 G, delta H2 = 4.69 G) was detected by ESR spectrometry.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7735252

  11. Molecular silencing of Twist1 enhances osteogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells: implication of FGFR2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Miraoui, Hichem; Severe, Nicolas; Vaudin, Pascal; Pagès, Jean-Christophe; Marie, Pierre J

    2010-08-01

    The capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into functional osteoblasts is tightly controlled by transcription factors that trigger osteoblast commitment and differentiation. The role of Twist1, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, in osteogenic differentiation of MSCs remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of Twist1 in the osteogenic differentiation program of murine C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells. We showed that molecular silencing of Twist1 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression moderately increased C3H10T1/2 cell proliferation and had no effect on cell survival. In contrast, Twist1 silencing enhanced osteoblast gene expression and matrix mineralization in vitro. Biochemical analyses revealed that Twist1 silencing increased the expression of FGFR2 protein level, which was reduced by a mutant Runx2. Consistent with this finding, Twist1 silencing increased ERK1/2 and PI3K signaling. Moreover, molecular or pharmacological inhibition of FGFR2 or of ERK1/2 and PI3K signaling partly abolished the increased osteoblast gene expression induced by Twist1 silencing in C3H10T1/2 cells. These results reveal that Twist1 silencing upregulates osteoblast differentiation of murine mesenchymal cells in part via activation of FGFR2 expression and downstream signaling pathways, which provides novel insights into the molecular signals by which this transcription factor regulates the osteogenic differentiation program in MSCs. PMID:20564211

  12. Intravenous anesthetic propofol suppresses prostaglandin E2 production in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inada, Takefumi; Kubo, Kozue; Ueshima, Hironobu; Shingu, Koh

    2011-01-01

    Propofol is an intravenous anesthetic that is widely used for anesthesia and sedation. Dendritic cells (DC) are one of the crucial immune cells that bridge innate and adaptive immunity, in which DC process antigens during innate immune responses to present them to naïve T-cells, leading to an establishment of adaptive immunity. Prostaglandin (PG)-E(2) may be secreted by DC into the microenvironment, considerably influencing DC phenotype and function, and thus determining the fate of adaptive immunity. Since propofol suppresses PGE(2) production in murine macrophages, the primary purpose of the present study was to determine whether propofol also suppresses PGE(2) production in DC. Assuming a positive finding of such suppression, we tested whether this also leads to alterations of interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-10 production and DC surface marker expression, both of which can be modulated by PGE(2). In bone marrow-derived DC, propofol significantly suppressed the PGE(2) production after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Cyclo-oxygenase (COX) protein expression and arachidonic acid release were unaffected, while COX enzyme activity was significantly inhibited by propofol. The propofol-induced COX inhibition did not lead to the increased production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and leukotriene-B(4). Endogenous COX inhibition with propofol, as well as with the selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, did not affect IL-12 and IL-10 production from DC. The surface expression of I-A(b) and CD40 on DC was not changed, while that of CD86 slightly increased, with both propofol and NS-398; expression of CD80 was not affected with propofol, but increased slightly with NS-398. Finally, endogenous COX inhibition with either propofol or NS-398 did not significantly affect the ability of DC to induce allogeneic T-cell proliferation. It is concluded that the intravenous anesthetic propofol suppresses COX enzyme activity in DC, with no consequences with respect to IL-12/IL-10 production and allogeneic T-cell proliferation, while minimal consequences were observed in surface molecule expression. PMID:22035152

  13. The Effects of Inhaled Nickel Nanoparticles on Murine Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberda, Eric N.

    Introduction. Particulate air pollution, specifically nickel found on or in particulate matter, has been associated with an increased risk of mortality in human population studies and can cause increases in vascular inflammation, generate reactive oxygen species, alter vasomotor tone, and potentiate atherosclerosis in murine exposures. With the discovery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a door has been opened which may explain these observed cardiovascular effects associated with inhaled air particles and nickel exposure. In order to further quantify the effects of inhaled nickel nanoparticles and attempt to elucidate how the observed findings from other studies may occur, several whole body inhalation exposure experiments to nickel nanoparticles were performed. Methods. Following whole body exposure to approximately 500mug/m3 of nickel nanoparticles for 5 hrs, bone marrow EPCs from C57BL/6 mice were isolated. EPCs were harvested for their RNA or used in a variety of assays including chemotaxis, tube formation, and proliferation. Gene expression was assessed for important receptors involved in EPC mobilization and homing using RT-PCR methods. EPCs, circulating endothelial progenitor cells, circulating endothelial cells (CECs), and endothelial microparticles (EMPs) were quantified on a BD FACSCalibur to examine endothelial damage and repair associated with the inhalation exposure. Plasma proteins were assessed using the 2D DIGE proteomic approach and commercially available ELISAs. Results and Conclusions. Exposure to inhaled nickel nanoparticles significantly increased both bone marrow EPCs as well as their levels in circulation. CECs were significantly upregulated suggesting that endothelial damage occurred due to the exposure. There was no significant difference in EMPs between the two groups. Tube formation and chemotaxis, but not proliferation, of bone marrow EPCs was impaired in the nickel nanoparticle exposed group. This decrease in EPC function coincided with downregulation of receptors for EPC mobilization and homing. Antioxidant plasma proteins were upregulated post-exposure and transferrin was downregulated. In conclusion, these results indicate that inhalation exposure to Ni nanoparticles below the current OSHA permissible exposure limit for Ni compounds can lead to alterations in bone marrow progenitor cells that may ultimately lead to the development of various cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Evaluation of expression of transferred genes in differentiating myeloid cells: expression of human glucocerebrosidase in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Freas, D L; Correll, P H; Dougherty, S F; Karlsson, S; Pluznik, D H

    1993-06-01

    The retroviral vector LGSN, in which the human glucocerebrosidase (GC) cDNA is driven by the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) long terminal repeat (LTR), was tested for expression in the murine myelomonocytic leukemia cell line M1 before and after induction of differentiation with interleukin-6 (IL-6). Southern analysis of the seven transduced clones selected for neomycin resistance in Geneticin (G-418 sulfate) demonstrated one to eight copies of intact provirus with rearrangements in only two clones. Absolute levels of human GC RNA and protein increased with increased copy numbers of provirus in the clones. Upon induction with IL-6 of the seven transduced clones to the macrophage phenotype, there was no significant change, overall, in RNA levels but some increase in human GC protein levels could be detected. Although this was the average trend, considerable clonal variation in RNA and protein levels was observed upon induction. Transduction of the M1 cells did not interfere with the ability of the cells to differentiate from blasts to macrophages as seen by the appearance of membrane receptors for the constant region of immunoglobulins (Fc gamma RI) and lysozyme production in the differentiated M1 cells. Thus, the M1 cell line can be used for testing retroviral vector expression in myeloid lineages at early and late stages of differentiation. This rapid in vitro testing of potential retroviral vectors will be beneficial for gene therapy of disorders that affect differentiated macrophages such as Gaucher's disease. PMID:7687878

  15. PTH expands short-term murine hemopoietic stem cells through T cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jau-Yi; Adams, Jonathan; Calvi, Laura M.; Lane, Timothy F.; DiPaolo, Richard; Weitzmann, M. Neale

    2012-01-01

    Intermittent parathyroid hormone (iPTH) treatment expands hemopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), but the involved mechanisms and the affected HSPC populations are mostly unknown. Here we show that T cells are required for iPTH to expand short-term HSPCs (ST-HSPCs) and improve blood cell engraftment and host survival after BM transplantation. Silencing of PTH/PTH-related protein receptor (PPR) in T cells abrogates the effects of iPTH, thus demonstrating a requirement for direct PPR signaling in T cells. Mechanistically, iPTH expands ST-HSPCs by activating Wnt signaling in HSPCs and stromal cells (SCs) through T-cell production of the Wnt ligand Wnt10b. Attesting to the relevance of Wnt10b, iPTH fails to expand ST-HSPCs in mice with Wnt10b?/? T cells. Moreover, iPTH fails to promote engraftment and survival after BM transplantation in Wnt10b null mice. In summary, direct PPR signaling in T cells and the resulting production of Wnt10b play a pivotal role in the mechanism by which iPTH expands ST-HSPCs. The data suggest that T cells may provide pharmacologic targets for HSPC expansion. PMID:22955916

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell function in a murine model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Javazon, Elisabeth H; Radhi, Mohamed; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Perry, Jennifer; Archer, David R

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the sickle environment is highly enriched for reactive oxygen species (ROS). We examined the oxidative effects of sickle cell disease on hematopoietic stem cell function in a sickle mouse model. In vitro colony-forming assays showed a significant decrease in progenitor colony formation derived from sickle compared to control bone marrow (BM). Sickle BM possessed a significant decrease in the KSL (c-kit(+), Sca-(1+), Lineage(-)) progenitor population, and cell cycle analysis showed that there were fewer KSL cells in the G(0) phase of the cell cycle compared to controls. We found a significant increase in both lipid peroxidation and ROS in sickle-derived KSL cells. In vivo analysis demonstrated that normal bone marrow cells engraft with increased frequency into sickle mice compared to control mice. Hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from sickle mice, however, demonstrated significant impairment in engraftment potential. We observed partial restoration of engraftment by n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment of KSL cells prior to transplantation. Increased intracellular ROS and lipid peroxidation combined with improvement in engraftment following NAC treatment suggests that an altered redox environment in sickle mice affects hematopoietic progenitor and stem cell function. PMID:22701784

  17. Murine T cell activation is regulated by surfen (bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide)

    SciTech Connect

    Warford, Jordan; Doucette, Carolyn D.; Hoskin, David W.; Easton, Alexander S.

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Surfen is the first inhibitor of glycosaminoglycan function to be studied in murine T cells. •Surfen reduces T cell proliferation stimulated in vitro and in vivo. •Surfen reduces CD25 expression in T cells activated in vivo but not in vitro. •Surfen increases T cell proliferation when T cell receptor activation is bypassed. •Surfen’s effects are blocked by co-administration of heparin sulfate. -- Abstract: Surfen (bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide) binds to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and has been shown to influence their function, and the function of proteoglycans (complexes of GAGs linked to a core protein). T cells synthesize, secrete and express GAGs and proteoglycans which are involved in several aspects of T cell function. However, there are as yet no studies on the effect of GAG-binding agents such as surfen on T cell function. In this study, surfen was found to influence murine T cell activation. Doses between 2.5 and 20 ?M produced a graduated reduction in the proliferation of T cells activated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibody-coated T cell expander beads. Surfen (20 mg/kg) was also administered to mice treated with anti-CD3 antibody to activate T cells in vivo. Lymphocytes from surfen-treated mice also showed reduced proliferation and lymph node cell counts were reduced. Surfen reduced labeling with a cell viability marker (7-ADD) but to a much lower extent than its effect on proliferation. Surfen also reduced CD25 (the ?-subunit of the interleukin (IL)-2 receptor) expression with no effect on CD69 expression in T cells treated in vivo but not in vitro. When receptor activation was bypassed by treating T cells in vitro with phorbyl myristate acetate (10 ng/ml) and ionomycin (100 ng/ml), surfen treatment either increased proliferation (10 ?M) or had no effect (2.5, 5 and 20 ?M). In vitro treatment of T cells with surfen had no effect on IL-2 or interferon-? synthesis and did not alter proliferation of the IL-2 dependent cell line CTLL-2. The effect of surfen was antagonized dose-dependently by co-treatment with heparin sulfate. We conclude that surfen inhibits T cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. When T cell receptor-driven activation is bypassed surfen had a neutral or stimulatory effect on T cell proliferation. The results imply that endogenous GAGs and proteoglycans play a complex role in promoting or inhibiting different aspects of T cell activation.

  18. Differential responses of staurosporine on protein kinase C activity and proliferation in two murine neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mohan, D R; Nagarathna, R; Krishna, M; Jagtap, J C; Shastry, P

    1999-05-24

    We studied the effect of staurosporine (SSP), a broad-spectrum protein kinase inhibitor, on the levels of protein kinase C (PKC) activity and proliferation in two murine neuroblastoma cell lines, Neuro2a and its clone NB41A3. The PKC activity was examined in whole cell lysate, cytosolic and particulate fractions. A differential response to SSP treatment in the enzyme activity in whole cell lysate and particulate fractions was demonstrated in the two cell lines. The data on proliferation indicated that Neuro2a cells were more sensitive to the SSP treatment with significant inhibition in DNA synthesis in a time course study. Our findings suggest that the data on basal levels of PKC activity in tumors will be of significance in studies using PKC inhibitors as an approach for therapeutic intervention. PMID:10395170

  19. Stem cell factor and interleukin-4 induce murine bone marrow cells to develop into mast cells with connective tissue type characteristics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Karimi, K; Redegeld, F A; Heijdra, B; Nijkamp, F P

    1999-04-01

    In this study, we have developed a method to obtain mast cells with connective tissue type mast cell (CTMC) characteristics directly from mouse bone marrow (BM) cells. BM cells were grown for 3 weeks in presence of interleukin-4 (IL-4) plus stem cell factor (SCF). SCF alone poorly supported growth and development of mast cells. IL-4 dose-dependently enhanced the expression of c-kit and high-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc(epsilon)RI) on the cell surface of SCF-cultured BM cells. Furthermore, cytoplasmic granulation and histamine synthesis of BM-derived mast cells were increased in presence of IL-4 and SCF. Histochemical staining demonstrated that granules were safranin positive. BM-derived mast cells could be activated for granule exocytosis (beta-hexosaminidase release) and lipid mediator generation (LTC4 production) via Fc(epsilon)RI after sensitization with IgE and subsequent crosslinking with multivalent antigen. In addition, mast cells derived from BM cells cultured with SCF plus IL-4 could be activated by substance P, a nonimmunologic stimulus, to release beta-hexosaminidase. The results presented indicate that IL-4 and SCF both have a prominent role in the development of mast cells from murine BM cells in vitro. Mast cells can directly be derived from BM cells in presence of SCF and IL-4 and the cultured cells show typical hallmarks of CTMC, indicating that precursor cells for CTMC may be present in BM. The described culture procedure may be useful to investigate the molecular aspects of the development of committed mast cell lineages. PMID:10210323

  20. Enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin and gemcitabine in Brca1-deficient murine mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast cancers due to germline mutations or altered expression of the BRCA1 gene associate with an aggressive clinical course and frequently exhibit a "triple-negative" phenotype, i.e. lack of expression of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors and lack of overexpression of the HER2/NEU oncogene, thereby rendering them relatively insensitive to hormonal manipulation and targeted HER2 therapy, respectively. BRCA1 plays a role in multiple DNA repair pathways, and thus, when mutated, results in sensitivity to certain DNA damaging drugs. Results Here, we used a Brca1 murine mammary epithelial cell (MMEC) model to examine the effect of loss of Brca1 on cellular sensitivity to various chemotherapy drugs. To explore novel therapeutic strategies, we included DNA damaging and non-DNA damaging drugs whose mechanisms are dependent and independent of DNA repair, respectively, and drugs that are used in standard and non-standard lines of therapy for breast cancer. To understand the cellular mechanism, we also determined the role that DNA repair plays in sensitivity to these drugs. We found that cisplatin and gemcitabine had the greatest specific therapeutic benefit to Brca1-deficient MMECs, and that when used in combination produced a synergistic effect. This sensitivity may be attributed in part to defective NER, which is one of the DNA repair pathways normally responsible for repairing DNA adducts produced by cisplatin and is shown in this study to be defective in Brca1-deficient MMECs. Brca1-deficient MMECs were not differentially sensitive to the standard breast cancer chemotherapy drugs doxorubicin, docetaxel or 5-FU. Conclusions Both cisplatin and gemcitabine should be explored in clinical trials for first line regimens for BRCA1-associated and triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:21771338

  1. Loss of STAT3 in murine NK cells enhances NK cell-dependent tumor surveillance.

    PubMed

    Gotthardt, Dagmar; Putz, Eva M; Straka, Elisabeth; Kudweis, Petra; Biaggio, Mario; Poli, Valeria; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias; Sexl, Veronika

    2014-10-01

    The members of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family of transcription factors modulate the development and function of natural killer (NK) cells. NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance is particularly important in the body's defense against hematological malignancies such as leukemia. STAT3 inhibitors are currently being developed, although their potential effects on NK cells are not clear. We have investigated the function of STAT3 in NK cells with Stat3(?/?)Ncr1-iCreTg mice, whose NK cells lack STAT3. In the absence of STAT3, NK cells develop normally and in normal numbers, but display alterations in the kinetics of interferon-? (IFN-?) production. We report that STAT3 directly binds the IFN-? promoter. In various in vivo models of hematological diseases, loss of STAT3 in NK cells enhances tumor surveillance. The reduced tumor burden is paralleled by increased expression of the activating receptor DNAM-1 and the lytic enzymes perforin and granzyme B. Our findings imply that STAT3 inhibitors will stimulate the cytolytic activity of NK cells against leukemia, thereby providing an additional therapeutic benefit. PMID:25185262

  2. Autophagy is a cell survival program for female germ cells in the murine ovary.

    PubMed

    Gawriluk, Thomas R; Hale, Amber N; Flaws, Jodi A; Dillon, Christopher P; Green, Douglas R; Rucker, Edmund B

    2011-06-01

    It is estimated that infertility affects 15-20% of couples and can arise from female or male reproductive defects. Mouse models have ascribed roles to over 100 genes in the maintenance of female fertility. Although previous models have determined roles for apoptosis in male and female fertility, we find that compromised autophagy within the perinatal ovary, through the loss of Becn1 or Atg7, results in the premature loss of female germ cells. Becn1(+/-) ovaries have a 56% reduction of germ cells compared with control ovaries at post-natal day 1, whereas Atg7(-/-) ovaries lack discernable germ cells at this stage. Thus autophagy appears to be a cell survival mechanism to maintain the endowment of female germ cells prior to establishing primordial follicle pools in the ovary. PMID:21464117

  3. CD4(+)CD25(-)Nrp1(+) T cells synergize with rapamycin to prevent murine cardiac allorejection in immunocompetent recipients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Hong, Shanjuan; Shi, Bingyi; Kers, Jesper; Li, Zhouli; Pei, Xiangke; Xu, Liang; Wei, Xing; Cai, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Besides CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), other immunosuppressive T cells also participated in the regulation of immune tolerance. Reportedly, neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) might be one of the molecules by which regulatory cells exert their suppressive effects. Indeed, CD4(+)CD25(-)Nrp1(+) T cells exhibit potent suppressive function in autoimmune inflammatory responses. Here we investigated the specific role of CD4(+)CD25(-)Nrp1(+) T cells in the setting of the transplant immune response. Through MLR assays, we found that CD4(+)CD25(-)Nrp1(+) T cells suppressed the proliferation of naive CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells activated by allogeneic antigen-stimulation. Adoptive transfer of CD4(+)CD25(-)Nrp1(+) T cells synergized with rapamycin to induce long-term graft survival in fully MHC-mismatched murine heart transplantation, which was associated with decreased IFN-?, IL-17 and increased IL-10, TGF-?, Foxp3 and Nrp1 expression in the grafts. Importantly, our data indicated that CD4(+)CD25(-)Nrp1(+) T cell transfer augments the accumulation of Tregs in the recipient, and creates conditions that favored induction of hyporesponsiveness of the T effector cells. In conclusion, this translational study indicates the possible therapeutic potential of CD4(+)CD25(-)Nrp1(+) T cells in preventing allorejection. CD4(+)Nrp1(+) T cells might therefore be used in bulk as a population of immunosuppressive cells with more beneficial properties concerning ex vivo isolation as compared to Foxp3(+) Tregs. PMID:23577203

  4. CD4+CD25?Nrp1+ T Cells Synergize with Rapamycin to Prevent Murine Cardiac Allorejection in Immunocompetent Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bingyi; Kers, Jesper; Li, Zhouli; Pei, Xiangke; Xu, Liang; Wei, Xing; Cai, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Besides CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), other immunosuppressive T cells also participated in the regulation of immune tolerance. Reportedly, neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) might be one of the molecules by which regulatory cells exert their suppressive effects. Indeed, CD4+CD25?Nrp1+ T cells exhibit potent suppressive function in autoimmune inflammatory responses. Here we investigated the specific role of CD4+CD25?Nrp1+ T cells in the setting of the transplant immune response. Through MLR assays, we found that CD4+CD25?Nrp1+ T cells suppressed the proliferation of naive CD4+CD25? T cells activated by allogeneic antigen-stimulation. Adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25?Nrp1+ T cells synergized with rapamycin to induce long-term graft survival in fully MHC-mismatched murine heart transplantation, which was associated with decreased IFN-?, IL-17 and increased IL-10, TGF-?, Foxp3 and Nrp1 expression in the grafts. Importantly, our data indicated that CD4+CD25?Nrp1+ T cell transfer augments the accumulation of Tregs in the recipient, and creates conditions that favored induction of hyporesponsiveness of the T effector cells. In conclusion, this translational study indicates the possible therapeutic potential of CD4+CD25?Nrp1+ T cells in preventing allorejection. CD4+Nrp1+ T cells might therefore be used in bulk as a population of immunosuppressive cells with more beneficial properties concerning ex vivo isolation as compared to Foxp3+ Tregs. PMID:23577203

  5. A murine stromal cell line allows the proliferation of very primitive human CD34++/CD38- progenitor cells in long-term cultures and semisolid assays.

    PubMed

    Issaad, C; Croisille, L; Katz, A; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1993-06-01

    Analysis of molecular mechanisms associated with stem cell commitment and differentiation requires an in vitro assay that identifies the most primitive hematopoietic stem cells in human bone marrow. Such primitive stem cells usually do not form colonies in short-term semisolid assays and are best identified by their ability to initiate sustained hematopoiesis when they are cocultured with competent stromal cells. In this study, we investigated whether a murine marrow stromal cell line (MS-5) that supports colony-forming unit-spleen (CFU-S) maintenance would permit, both in short-term colony assays and long-term cultures, the development of primitive human stem cells sorted on the basis of their high expression of CD34 and lack of expression of CD38 antigen. In short-term colony assays, this population included almost exclusively primitive progenitor cells. MS-5 cells synergized with any combination of interleukin-3, Steel factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, agar-leukocyte conditioned medium, and erythropoietin and increased at least twofold both the cloning efficiency of CD34++/CD38- cells and the size of the colonies. Furthermore, MS-5 cells triggered the development of multipotent blast cell progenitors with a high proliferative potential, which in these conditions represented 1% to 2% of CD34++/CD38- cells. When MS-5 cells were substituted by human stromal cells or when growth factor combinations were used in the absence of stromal cells, much lower numbers of CFU-blast were detected. This selective action of MS-5 on early progenitors was also observed when MS-5 cells were used as feeders in long-term cultures of CD34++/CD38- cells. Murine cells promoted the expansion of high proliferative potential primitive progenitor cells up to 3 months, although they did not support their differentiation in mature clonogenic progenitors or terminally differentiated cells. Sustained hematopoiesis in these longterm cultures was accounted for by 2% to 5% of initial CD34++/CD38- cells as estimated by limiting dilution experiments. Mechanisms by which murine stromal cells act specifically on human primitive stem cells are unclear, but from our data this effect is unlikely to be explained solely by known species cross-reactive growth factors. Further manipulation of this long-term coculture system should prove useful in identifying stromal molecules regulating commitment and differentiation of early human progenitor cells. PMID:7684620

  6. PI3K-AKT signaling is a downstream effector of retinoid prevention of murine basal cell carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    So, Po-Lin; Wang, Grace Y.; Wang, Kevin; Chuang, Mindy; Calinisan Chiueh, Venice; Kenny, Paraic A.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. We have demonstrated previously that topical application of the retinoid prodrug tazarotene profoundly inhibits murine BCC carcinogenesis via RAR?-mediated regulation of tumor cell transcription. Since topical retinoids can cause adverse cutaneous effects and since tumors can develop resistance to retinoids, we have investigated mechanisms downstream of tazarotene’s anti-tumor effect in this model. Specifically we have used (i) global expression profiling to identify and (ii) functional cell-based assays to validate the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway as a downstream target pathway of tazarotene’s action. Crucially, we have demonstrated that pharmacologic inhibition of this downstream pathway profoundly reduces murine BCC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These data identify PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling as a highly attractive target for BCC chemoprevention and indicate more generally that this pathway may be, in some contexts, an important mediator of retinoid anti-cancer effects. PMID:24449057

  7. PI3K-AKT signaling is a downstream effector of retinoid prevention of murine basal cell carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    So, Po-Lin; Wang, Grace Y; Wang, Kevin; Chuang, Mindy; Chiueh, Venice Calinisan; Kenny, Paraic A; Epstein, Ervin H

    2014-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. We have demonstrated previously that topical application of the retinoid prodrug tazarotene profoundly inhibits murine BCC carcinogenesis via retinoic acid receptor ?-mediated regulation of tumor cell transcription. Because topical retinoids can cause adverse cutaneous effects and because tumors can develop resistance to retinoids, we have investigated mechanisms downstream of tazarotene's antitumor effect in this model. Specifically we have used (i) global expression profiling to identify and (ii) functional cell-based assays to validate the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway as a downstream target pathway of tazarotene's action. Crucially, we have demonstrated that pharmacologic inhibition of this downstream pathway profoundly reduces murine BCC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These data identify PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling as a highly attractive target for BCC chemoprevention and indicate more generally that this pathway may be, in some contexts, an important mediator of retinoid anticancer effects. PMID:24449057

  8. Neutralizing murine TGF?R2 promotes a differentiated tumor cell phenotype and inhibits pancreatic cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ostapoff, Katherine T; Cenik, Bercin Kutluk; Wang, Miao; Ye, Risheng; Xu, Xiaohong; Nugent, Desiree; Hagopian, Moriah M; Topalovski, Mary; Rivera, Lee B; Carroll, Kyla D; Brekken, Rolf A

    2014-09-15

    Elevated levels of TGF? are a negative prognostic indicator for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer; as a result, the TGF? pathway is an attractive target for therapy. However, clinical application of pharmacologic inhibition of TGF? remains challenging because TGF? has tumor suppressor functions in many epithelial malignancies, including pancreatic cancer. In fact, direct neutralization of TGF? promotes tumor progression of genetic murine models of pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that neutralizing the activity of murine TGF? receptor 2 using a monoclonal antibody (2G8) has potent antimetastatic activity in orthotopic human tumor xenografts, syngeneic tumors, and a genetic model of pancreatic cancer. 2G8 reduced activated fibroblasts, collagen deposition, microvessel density, and vascular function. These stromal-specific changes resulted in tumor cell epithelial differentiation and a potent reduction in metastases. We conclude that TGF? signaling within stromal cells participates directly in tumor cell phenotype and pancreatic cancer progression. Thus, strategies that inhibit TGF?-dependent effector functions of stromal cells could be efficacious for the therapy of pancreatic tumors. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4996-5007. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25060520

  9. The Role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in Maintenance of Ex Vivo Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Hamid, Zariyantey; Lin Lin, Winnie Hii; Abdalla, Basma Jibril; Bee Yuen, Ong; Latif, Elda Surhaida; Mohamed, Jamaludin; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Paik Wah, Chow; Budin, Siti Balkis

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells- (HSCs-) based therapy requires ex vivo expansion of HSCs prior to therapeutic use. However, ex vivo culture was reported to promote excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), exposing HSCs to oxidative damage. Efforts to overcome this limitation include the use of antioxidants. In this study, the role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in maintenance of cultured murine bone marrow-derived HSCs was investigated. Aqueous extract of Roselle was added at varying concentrations (0–1000?ng/mL) for 24 hours to the freshly isolated murine bone marrow cells (BMCs) cultures. Effects of Roselle on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and DNA damage were investigated. Roselle enhanced the survival (P < 0.05) of BMCs at 500 and 1000?ng/mL, increased survival of Sca-1+ cells (HSCs) at 500?ng/mL, and maintained HSCs phenotype as shown from nonremarkable changes of surface marker antigen (Sca-1) expression in all experimental groups. Roselle increased (P < 0.05) the GSH level and SOD activity but the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was unaffected. Moreover, Roselle showed significant cellular genoprotective potency against H2O2-induced DNA damage. Conclusively, Roselle shows novel property as potential supplement and genoprotectant against oxidative damage to cultured HSCs. PMID:25405216

  10. Vitrification by Ultra-fast Cooling at a Low Concentration of Cryoprotectants in a Quartz Microcapillary: A Study Using Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoming; Park, Eric Y.H.; Fowler, Alex; Yarmush, Martin L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Conventional cryopreservation protocols for slow-freezing or vitrification involve cell injury due to ice formation/cell dehydration or toxicity of high cryoprotectant (CPA) concentrations, respectively. In this study, we developed a novel cryopreservation technique to achieve ultra-fast cooling rates using a quartz microcapillary (QMC). The QMC enabled vitrification of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells using an intracellular cryoprotectant concentration in the range used for slowing freezing (1–2 M). The cryoprotectants used included 2 M 1,2-propanediol (PROH, cell membrane permeable) and 0.5 M extracellular trehalose (cell membrane impermeable). More than 70% of the murine ES cells post-vitrification attached with respect to non-frozen control cells, and the proliferation rates of the two groups were similar. Preservation of undifferentiated properties of the pluripotent murine ES cells post vitrification cryopreservation was verified using three different types of assays: the expression of transcription factor Oct-4, the presentation of the membrane surface glycoprotein SSEA-1, and the elevated expression of the intracellular enzyme alkaline phosphatase. These results indicate that vitrification at a low concentration (2 M) of intracellular cryoprotectants is a viable and effective approach for the cryopreservation of murine embryonic stem cells. PMID:18462712

  11. Effects of Electromagnetic Stimulation on Cell Density and Neural Markers in Murine Enteric Cell Cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Carreon-Rodriguez, A.; Belkind-Gerson, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Canedo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-11

    Availability of adult stem cells from several organs like bone marrow, umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood has become a powerful therapeutic tool for many chronic diseases. Potential of adult stem cells for regeneration extents to other tissues among them the nervous system. However two obstacles should be resolved before such cells could be currently applied in clinical practice: a) slow growth rate and b) ability to form enough dense colonies in order to populate a specific injury or cellular deficiency. Many approaches have been explored as genetic differentiation programs, growth factors, and supplemented culture media, among others. Electromagnetic field stimulation of differentiation, proliferation, migration, and particularly on neurogenesis is little known. Since the biological effects of ELF-EMF are well documented, we hypothesize ELF-EMF could affect growth and maturation of stem cells derived of enteric tissue.

  12. Effects of Electromagnetic Stimulation on Cell Density and Neural Markers in Murine Enteric Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreón-Rodríguez, A.; Belkind-Gerson, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Cañedo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-01

    Availability of adult stem cells from several organs like bone marrow, umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood has become a powerful therapeutic tool for many chronic diseases. Potential of adult stem cells for regeneration extents to other tissues among them the nervous system. However two obstacles should be resolved before such cells could be currently applied in clinical practice: a) slow growth rate and b) ability to form enough dense colonies in order to populate a specific injury or cellular deficiency. Many approaches have been explored as genetic differentiation programs, growth factors, and supplemented culture media, among others. Electromagnetic field stimulation of differentiation, proliferation, migration, and particularly on neurogenesis is little known. Since the biological effects of ELF-EMF are well documented, we hypothesize ELF-EMF could affect growth and maturation of stem cells derived of enteric tissue.

  13. In vitro-generated MDSCs prevent murine GVHD by inducing type 2 T cells without disabling antitumor cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Messmann, Joanna J; Reisser, Tanja; Leithäuser, Frank; Lutz, Manfred B; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Strauss, Gudrun

    2015-08-27

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) inhibit T-cell expansion and functions by versatile mechanisms such as nutrient depletion, nitrosylation, or apoptosis. Since graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is characterized by the expansion of donor-derived T cells destroying recipient tissue, we analyzed whether MDSCs can be used for GVHD prevention in murine allogeneic bone marrow transplantation models. Transplantation of MDSCs, generated from bone marrow cells by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/G-CSF in vitro, inhibited GVHD-induced death and attenuated histologic GVHD, whereas antitumor cytotoxicity of alloantigen-specific T cells was maintained. MDSCs expanded in vivo and invaded lymphatic and GVHD target organs. Major histocompatibility complex class I expression on MDSCs was dispensable for their suppressive capacity. Inhibition of GVHD required the presence of MDSCs during T-cell priming, whereas allogeneic T-cell numbers and homing in lymphoid and GVHD target organs were not considerably affected in MDSC-treated mice. However, MDSCs skewed allogeneic T cells toward type 2 T cells upregulating T helper 2 (Th2)-specific cytokines. Type 2 T-cell induction was indispensable for GVHD prevention since MDSC treatment failed to prevent GVHD when allogeneic STAT6-deficient T cells, which are unable to differentiate into Th2 cells, were transplanted. MDSC-induced Th2 induction might be applicable for GVHD treatment in clinical settings. PMID:26185131

  14. Growth-related variations in the glycosaminoglycan synthesis of ultraviolet light-induced murine cutaneous fibrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Piepkorn, M.; Carney, H.; Linker, A.

    1985-08-01

    Glycosaminoglycan synthesis was studied in cell populations of ultraviolet light-induced murine cutaneous fibrosarcoma cells under conditions of varying growth rates in vitro. After labeling with the precursors, /sup 3/H-glucosamine and /sup 35/SO/sub 4/, sulfated glycosaminoglycans recoverable by direct proteolysis of the culture monolayers increased approximately 5-fold on a per cell basis from sparsely populated, exponential cell cultures (greater than 85% of cells in S, G2, or M phases) to stationary cultures inhibited by high cell density (greater than 50% of cells in G1). Within this cell surface-associated material, the relative ratio of heparan sulfate to the chondroitin sulfates was approximately 60/40% under conditions of exponential growth; in the growth-arrested cultures, the reverse ratio was found. The substratum attached material, obtained from the flask surface after ethyl glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA)-mediated detachment of the monolayers, contained relatively more hyaluronic acid, heparan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfates in the most actively proliferating cultures compared with the growth-inhibited cell populations. Furthermore, heparan sulfate and the chondroitin sulfates, which were enriched in the substratum material and in the cell pellet of exponential cultures, showed a relative shift to the cell surface-associated compartment (releasable by mild trypsinization after EGTA-mediated cell detachment) and to the compartment loosely associated with the pericellular matrix (i.e., released into the supernatant during detachment of the monolayers in the presence of EGTA).

  15. Production of antibodies against glycolipids from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall in aerosol murine models of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cardona, P J; Julián, E; Vallès, X; Gordillo, S; Muñoz, M; Luquin, M; Ausina, V

    2002-06-01

    Evolution of antibodies against glycolipids from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall has been studied for the first time in experimental murine models of tuberculosis induced by aerosol, in which infection, reinfection, reactivation, prophylaxis and treatment with antibiotics have been assayed. Results show a significant humoral response against these antigens, where diacyltrehaloses (DAT) and sulpholipid I (SL-I) elicited higher antibody levels than protein antigens like antigen 85 protein complex (Ag85), culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and purified protein derivative (PPD). Only immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies have been detected against DAT and SL-I. Their evolution has a positive correlation with bacillary concentration in tissues. PMID:12028568

  16. Adipose tissue derived stromal stem cell therapy in murine ConA-derived hepatitis is dependent on myeloid-lineage and CD4+ T-cell suppression.

    PubMed

    Higashimoto, Mami; Sakai, Yoshio; Takamura, Masayuki; Usui, Soichiro; Nasti, Alessandro; Yoshida, Keiko; Seki, Akihiro; Komura, Takuya; Honda, Masao; Wada, Takashi; Furuichi, Kengo; Ochiya, Takahiro; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2013-11-01

    Mesenchymal stromal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive therapeutic model for regenerative medicine due to their pluripotency. MSCs are used as a treatment for several inflammatory diseases, including hepatitis. However, the detailed immunopathological impact of MSC treatment on liver disease, particularly for adipose tissue derived stromal stem cells (ADSCs), has not been described. Here, we investigated the immuno-modulatory effect of ADSCs on hepatitis using an acute ConA C57BL/6 murine hepatitis model. i.v. administration of ADSCs simultaneously or 3 h post injection prevented and treated ConA-induced hepatitis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed higher numbers of CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), and F4/80(+) cells in the liver of ConA-induced hepatitis mice was ameliorated after the administration of ADSCs. Hepatic expression of genes affected by ADSC administration indicated tissue regeneration-related biological processes, affecting myeloid-lineage immune-mediating Gr-1(+) and CD11b(+) cells. Pathway analysis of the genes expressed in ADSC-treated hepatic inflammatory cells revealed the possible involvement of T cells and macrophages. TNF-? and IFN-? expression was downregulated in hepatic CD4(+) T cells isolated from hepatitis livers co-cultured with ADSCs. Thus, the immunosuppressive effect of ADSCs in a C57BL/6 murine ConA hepatitis model was dependent primarily on the suppression of myeloid-lineage cells and, in part, of CD4(+) T cells. PMID:23934743

  17. UTILITY OF THE MURINE ERYTHROLEUKEMIC CELL (MELC) IN ASSESSING MECHANISMS OF ACTION OF DNA-ACTIVE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICANTS: APPLICATION TO 5-FLUOROURACIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murine erythroleukemic cells (MELC) exposed to 2-deoxy-5-azacytidine (D-AZA) or to the active cyclophosphamide (CP) metabolites phosphoramide mustard (PAM) and 4-hydroxycyclo-phosphamide (OHCP) reveal cell-cycle perturbations similar to those seen in limb bud nuclei of gestation ...

  18. Melphalan Alone or Conjugated to a Follicle Stimulating Hormone-? Peptide Kills Murine Testicular Cells in vitro and Transiently Suppresses Murine Spermatogenesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Amory, John K.; Hong, SungWoo; Yu, Xiaozhong; Muller, Charles H.; Faustman, Elaine; Goldstein, Alex

    2014-01-01

    New approaches to sterilizing male animals are needed to control captive and wild animal populations. We sought to develop a non-surgical method of permanent sterilization for male animals by administering the gonadotoxicant melphalan conjugated to peptides derived from the ?-chain of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH?). We hypothesized that conjugating melphalan to FSH? peptides would magnify the gonadotoxic effects of melphalan while minimizing systemic toxicity. The ability of conjugates of melphalan and FSH? peptides to kill murine testicular cells was first tested in vitro in a three-dimensional testicular cell co-culture system. In this system, melphalan caused considerable cell death as measured both by increases in LDH concentrations in the culture supernatant and direct visualization of the cultures. Of the conjugates tested, melphalan conjugated to a 20 amino acid peptide derived from human FSH? consisting of amino acids 33-53 (FSH? (33-53)-melphalan) was very potent, with cell cytotoxicity and LDH release roughly one-half that of melphalan. The effects of melphalan and FSH? (33-53)-melphalan on spermatogenesis were then tested in vivo in mature C56Bl/6 male mice. Four weeks after intraperitoneal injection, all mice treated with either FSH? (33-53)-melphalan or melphalan had ~75% reductions in testicular spermatid counts compared with control animals. Testicular histology revealed significant reduction in mature spermatids and spermatocytes in most tubules. However, 12 weeks after the injection, testicular spermatid counts and histology were similar to controls, except in one animal receiving FSH? (33-53)-melphalan that had no apparent spermatogenesis. We conclude that melphalan and FSH? (33-53)-melphalan are potent gonadotoxicants in male mice resulting in marked suppression of spermatogenesis 4 weeks after a single intraperitoneal injection. However, this effect is transient in most mice as spermatogenesis is similar to control animals 12 weeks after drug administration. Melphalan or FSH? (33-53)-melphalan may be useful for the temporary control of fertility in male animals, but additional research will be needed to develop a single dose method of permanent sterilization for male animals. PMID:24746827

  19. Spatially Fractionated Radiation Induces Cytotoxicity and Changes in Gene Expression in Bystander and Radiation Adjacent Murine Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Asur, Rajalakshmi S.; Sharma, Sunil; Chang, Ching-Wei; Penagaricano, Jose; Kommuru, Indira M.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Corry, Peter M.; Griffin, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been extensively studied at low doses, since evidence of bystander induced cell killing and other effects on unirradiated cells were found to be predominant at doses up to 0.5 Gy. Therefore, few studies have examined bystander effects induced by exposure to higher doses of radiation, such as spatially fractionated radiation (GRID) treatment. In the present study, we evaluate the ability of GRID treatment to induce changes in GRID adjacent (bystander) regions, in two different murine carcinoma cell lines following exposure to a single irradiation dose of 10 Gy. Murine SCK mammary carcinoma cells and SCCVII squamous carcinoma cells were irradiated using a brass collimator to create a GRID pattern of nine circular fields 12 mm in diameter with a center-to-center distance of 18 mm. Similar to the typical clinical implementation of GRID, this is approximately a 50:50 ratio of direct and bystander exposure. We also performed experiments by irradiating separate cultures and transferring the medium to unirradiated bystander cultures. Clonogenic survival was evaluated in both cell lines to determine the occurrence of radiation-induced bystander effects. For the purpose of our study, we have defined bystander cells as GRID adjacent cells that received approximately 1 Gy scatter dose or unirradiated cells receiving conditioned medium from irradiated cells. We observed significant bystander killing of cells adjacent to the GRID irradiated regions compared to sham treated controls. We also observed bystander killing of SCK and SCCVII cells cultured in conditioned medium obtained from cells irradiated with 10 Gy. Therefore, our results confirm the occurrence of bystander effects following exposure to a high-dose of radiation and suggest that cell-to-cell contact is not required for these effects. In addition, the gene expression profile for DNA damage and cellular stress response signaling in SCCVII cells after GRID exposure was studied. The occurrence of GRID-induced bystander gene expression changes in significant numbers of DNA damage and cellular stress response signaling genes, providing molecular evidence for possible mechanisms of bystander cell killing. PMID:22559204

  20. Role of the extracellular matrix on the growth and differentiated phenotype of murine colonic adenocarcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Walling, J M; Blackmore, M; Hickman, J A; Townsend, K M

    1991-03-12

    The growth and differentiation characteristics of MAC 15 murine adenocarcinoma cells, derived from routine passage in vivo for growth in vitro on a plastic substrate (MAC15j cells), were compared under conditions in which the cells were seeded onto a substrate of type-I collagen which was either attached to plastic or was released to float free in medium. Cells grown on a plastic substrate consisted of a heterogeneous, largely anaplastic population with a putative enterocytic morphology but with no evidence of junctional complexes or cell polarity typical of an epithelial phenotype. MAC 15j cells from cultures grown on a plastic substrate reestablished a moderate to well-defined degree of differentiation when transplanted back into NMRI mice. When MAC 15j cells were seeded from plastic onto type-I collagen, either attached to plastic or free-floating, tight junctional complexes were formed and the cells began to attain a more recognizable, columnar and polarised epithelial morphology. Cells grown on a type-I collagen gel which was free-floating showed a selective expression of alkaline phosphatase at the apical surfaces of approximately 10% of the cells. This expression was detectable by electron microscope histochemistry but could not be detected biochemically. Treatment of MAC 15j cells grown on a released collagen matrix with tetramethyl-urea (20mM) accelerated the expression of alkaline phosphatase activity at the apical surface as detected by microscopy. PMID:2004858

  1. CD4+ T cells play a crucial role for lenalidomide in vivo anti-tumor activity in murine multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Bi, Enguang; Hong, Sungyoul; Qian, Jianfei; Zheng, Chengyun; Wang, Michael; Yi, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Lenalidomide modulates the host immune response against myeloma via multiple actions. Although these effects have been elucidated in vitro, the central action of lenalidomide-mediated anti-myeloma immune response in vivo is not clear. To investigate its immune action in vivo, we selected the murine myeloma cell line 5TGM1, which is resistant to direct tumoricidal effects of lenalidomide in vitro and in immunodeficient mice, but sensitive to lenalidomide treatment in 5TGM1-bearing immunocompetent mice. Depletion of CD4+ T cells, but not NK cells, B cells, or CD8+ T cells, deprived lenalidomide of its therapeutic effects on 5TGM1-bearing immunocompetent mice. Lenalidomide significantly increased the numbers of IFN-?-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells but had no effects on NK cells and B cells in this mouse model. Lenalidomide slightly decreased the number of CD25+Foxp3+ T cells but increased perforin expression in CD8+ T cells in vivo. Using this mouse model for investigation of anti-tumor immune action of lenalidomide, we demonstrated that lenalidomide facilitated a type-1 anti-tumor immune response in vivo. The CD4+ T cell subset may play a critical role in the lenalidomide-mediated anti-myeloma immune response in vivo. PMID:26447613

  2. Cytoplasmic synthesis of globin RNA in differentiated murine erythroleukemia cells: possible involvement of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Volloch, V.

    1986-03-01

    Three lines of evidence indicate that RNA-dependent RNA synthesis occurs in mouse erythroleukemia cells. The first involves labeling studies with (/sup 3/H)uridine and shows a greater initial labeling rate of globin RNA in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus. Labeled globin RNA found in the cytoplasm after a very short pulse with tritiated uridine is of the mature 9S size while labeled globin RNA in the nuclei is exclusively in the form of 15S precursor molecules, suggesting that cytoplasmic globin RNA is not of nuclear origin. A high concentration of actinomycin D has no effect on the initial rate of labeling of cytoplasmic globin RNA, supporting this conclusion. Other experiments showed that the labeling of cytoplasmic globin RNA does not involve end addition to preexisting globin RNA. The second line of evidence is the identification of globin RNA minus strand in the cytoplasm of differentiated murine erythroleukemia cells by hybridization with single-stranded DNA probes containing the strand of the same sense as globin mRNA. This material has the same electrophoretic mobility as globin RNA and hybridizes with probes containing only the 5' part or only the 3' part of the gene suggesting that it is a full size copy of globin RNA. Finally, in murine erythroleukemia cells an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity is detected by using poly(A) oligo(U) as a template-primer combination. This activity increases significantly after induction, suggesting that it is differentiation specific.

  3. Protective effect of kombucha tea against tertiary butyl hydroperoxide induced cytotoxicity and cell death in murine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Semantee; Manna, Prasenjit; Gachhui, Ratan; Sil, Parames C

    2011-07-01

    Kombucha (KT), a fermented black tea (BT), is known to have many beneficial properties. In the present study, antioxidant property of KT has been investigated against tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) induced cytotoxicity using murine hepatocytes. TBHP, a reactive oxygen species inducer, causes oxidative stress resulting in organ pathophysiology. Exposure to TBHP caused a reduction in cell viability, increased membrane leakage and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries in hepatocytes. TBHP exposure disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptosis as evidenced by flow cytometric analyses. KT treatment, however, counteracted the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented apoptotic cell death of the hepatocytes. BT treatment also reverted TBHP induced hepatotoxicity, however KT was found to be more efficient. This may be due to the formation of antioxidant molecules like D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone (DSL) during fermentation process and are absent in BT. Moreover, the radical scavenging activities of KT were found to be higher than BT. Results of the study showed that KT has the potential to ameliorate TBHP induced oxidative insult and cell death in murine hepatocytes more effectively than BT. PMID:21800502

  4. CD4+ invariant natural killer T cells protect from murine GVHD lethality through expansion of donor CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneidawind, Dominik; Pierini, Antonio; Alvarez, Maite; Pan, Yuqiong; Baker, Jeanette; Buechele, Corina; Luong, Richard H.; Meyer, Everett H.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated donor T cells lead to destruction of host tissues resulting in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We investigated the impact of highly purified (>95%) donor CD4+ invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells on GVHD in a murine model of allogeneic HCT. We found that low doses of adoptively transferred donor CD4+ iNKT cells protect from GVHD morbidity and mortality through an expansion of donor CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). These Tregs express high levels of the Ikaros transcription factor Helios and expand from the Treg pool of the donor graft. Furthermore, CD4+ iNKT cells preserve T-cell–mediated graft-versus-tumor effects. Our studies reveal new aspects of the cellular interplay between iNKT cells and Tregs in the context of tolerance induction after allogeneic HCT and set the stage for clinical translation. PMID:25293774

  5. Effect of space relevant radiation exposure on differentiation and mineralization of murine osteoprogenitor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Patrick; Hu, Yueyuan; Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Reitz, Guenther

    Extended exposure to altered gravity conditions like during long-term space flight results in significant bone loss. Exposure to ionizing radiation for cancer therapy causes bone damage and may increase the risk of fractures. Similarly, besides altered gravity conditions, astronauts on exploratory missions beyond low-Earth orbit will be exposed to high-energy heavy ions in addition to proton and photon radiation, although for prolonged periods and at lower doses and dose rates compared with therapy. Space conditions may place astronauts at a greater risk for mission-critical fractures. Until now, little is known about the effects of space radiation on the skeletal system especially on osteoprogenitor cells. Accelerator facilities are used to simulate parts of the radiation environment in space. Heavy ion accelerators therefore could be used to assess radiation risks for astronauts who will be exposed to higher radiation doses e.g. on a Mars mission. The aim of the present study was to determine the biological effects of spaceflight-relevant radiation exposure on the cellular level using murine osteoprogenitor cell lines compared to nonirradiated controls. To gain a deeper understanding of bone cell differenti-ation and mineralization after exposure to heavy ions, we examined gene expression modulation of bone specific transcription factors, osteoblast specific marker genes as well as genes function as coupling factors that link bone resorption to bone formation. We investigated the transcrip-tional modulation of type I collagen (Col I), osteocalcin (Ocn), Transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the bone specific transcription factor Runx2 (Cbfa1). To gain deeper insight into potential cellular mechanisms involved in cellular response after ex-posure to heavy ions, we investigated gene expression modulations after exposure to energetic carbon ions (35 MeV/u, 73.2 keV/µm), iron ions (1000 MeV/u, 150 keV/µm) and lead ions (29 MeV/u, 9600 keV/µm) versus low LET X-rays. Exposure to X-irradiation dose-dependently increased the mRNA levels of Runx2 (cbfa1) whereas expression values of OCN and TGF-?1 were elevated at later time points. Exposure to heavy ions provoked a more marked effect on bone specific gene expression within the differentiation process. Collectively, our results indi-cate that heavy ions facilitate differentiation more effectively than X-rays as a major response in the progeny of irradiated osteoprogenitor cells. The data presented allow us to suggest that exposure to ionizing radiation interferes with bone formation at the level of cellular differenti-ation. In this regard, further experiments are needed to investigate gene expression patterns in mammalian cells that respond to differentiation after exposure to ionizing radiation.

  6. Murine splenic hematopoietic subpopulations: the enlarged undifferentiated subset in New Zealand black mice is multipotent stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, V; Huppi, K; Lizzio, E; Hoffman, T

    1994-01-01

    We recently reported that a significant population of the murine splenic non-T, non-B "null" cell compartment consists of non-lineage-specific, undifferentiated cells which are in the G0 and G1 phases of the cell cycle and that their numbers are particularly high in the spleens of New Zealand Black mice. A highly enriched population of these non-lineage-specific cells obtained by successive elimination of differentiated cells was further purified to homogeneity by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The morphologic, phenotypic, and histochemical characteristics of this purified population suggest that these cells may be primitive hematopoietic stem cells. The germ line configuration of the genomic DNA establishes that these are uncommitted stem cells. In vivo, these cells form day 12 colonies in the spleen and liver of lethally irradiated recipients and confer radioprotection. These cells also differentiate into T- and B-cell lineages and reconstitute the immunodeficiency in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency. In response to a combination of a very few early-acting lymphokines and/or stromal cell-conditioned medium in vitro, these cells differentiate into both myeloid and lymphoid cell types. More of these cells are obtained from the enlarged spleens of New Zealand Black mice than from those of BALB/c mice. The presence of a comparatively higher number of stem cells in the spleen than in the marrow or fetal liver provides an alternative, and possibly superior, source of uncommitted stem cells for a variety of experimental investigations or therapeutic manipulations. Images PMID:7496931

  7. Deferasirox shows in vitro and in vivo antileukemic effects on murine leukemic cell lines regardless of iron status.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hyoung; Jang, Pil Sang; Chung, Nack Gyun; Cho, Bin; Jeong, Dae Chul; Kim, Hack Ki

    2013-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown the antiproliferative effect of iron chelating agents (ICAs), which have been used traditionally in patients with secondary iron overload (SIO). Because the in vivo model for these studies has been animals with normal iron status, the antileukemic effect of ICAs in the SIO condition has not been determined clearly. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of ICAs in murine leukemic cell lines regarding the iron status. The viability of both EL4 cells and L1210 cells incubated with either deferoxamine (DFO) or deferasirox (DFX) decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was most prominent in L1210 cells treated with DFX. The viability of L1210 cells incubated with both ICAs did not change regardless of the presence of ferric chloride. The percentage of apoptosis in L1210 cells treated with DFO or DFX increased in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the expression of Fas showed no significant change. The non-SIO mice and SIO mice bearing L1210 cells showed longer survival than other groups when treated with DFX, whereas the SIO mice treated with DFO showed shorter survival than the control group. The tumor was significantly smaller in the SIO mice treated with DFX or DFO compared with the control group. The iron content of the liver or the tumor in SIO mice decreased after ICA treatment. This study indicates an antileukemic effect of DFX regardless of iron status and suggests that the use of DFX has a survival benefit for SIO leukemia murine model in terms of iron chelation and antileukemic therapy. PMID:23415674

  8. Virulence-Associated Genome Mutations of Murine Rotavirus Identified by Alternating Serial Passages in Mice and Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Masatoshi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although significant clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed in many countries, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a cell culture-adapted murine rotavirus EB strain in mouse pups or in cell cultures alternately and repeatedly and fully sequenced all 11 genes of 21 virus samples passaged in mice or in cell cultures. Sequence analysis revealed that mouse-passaged viruses that regained virulence almost consistently acquired four kinds of amino acid (aa) substitutions in VP4 and substitution in aa 37 (Val to Ala) in NSP4. In addition, they gained and invariably conserved the 3? consensus sequence in NSP1. The molecular changes occurred along with the acquisition of virulence during passages in mice and then disappeared following passages in cell cultures. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed the aa 37 site as important for its diarrheagenic activity in mice. These genome changes are likely to be correlated with rotavirus virulence. IMPORTANCE Serial passage of a virulent wild-type virus in vitro often results in loss of virulence of the virus in an original animal host, while serial passage of a cell culture-adapted avirulent virus in vivo often gains virulence in an animal host. Actually, live attenuated virus vaccines were originally produced by serial passage in cell cultures. Although clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a murine rotavirus by alternating switch of host (mice or cell cultures) repeatedly and sequenced the eleven genes of the passaged viruses to identify mutations associated with the emergence or disappearance of virulence. Sequence analysis revealed that changes in three genes (VP4, NSP1, and NSP4) were associated with virulence in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed its diarrheagenic activity in mice. These genome changes are likely to be correlated with rotavirus virulence. PMID:24599996

  9. Myeloid derived suppressor cell infiltration of murine and human gliomas is associated with reduction of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Baisakhi; Rayman, Patricia; Huang, Pengjing; Grabowski, Matthew; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Finke, James H; Vogelbaum, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are bone marrow derived cells with immunosuppressive properties. We have shown previously that MDSCs numbers are elevated in the circulation of GBM patients and that they produce reversible T cell dysfunction. Here, we evaluated whether MDSCs infiltrate human GBM tissues, and whether a commonly used mouse model of GBM reproduces the biology of MDSCs that is observed in patients. We evaluated tumor specimens from patients with newly diagnosed GBM. We harvested and evaluated normal brain, tumors and hematopoietic tissues from control, vehicle and sunitinib-treated mice. In human GBM tumors, MDSCs represented 5.4 ± 1.8 % of total cells. The majority of MDSCs (CD33+HLADR-) were lineage negative (CD14-CD15-), followed by granulocytic (CD15+CD14-) and monocytic (CD15-CD14+) subtypes. In murine GBM tumors, MDSCs were 8.06 ± 0.78 % of total cells, of which more were monocytic (M-MDSC, CD11b+ Gr1-low) than granulocytic (G-MDSC, CD11b+ Gr1-high). Treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib decreased the infiltration of both granulocytic and monocytic MDSCs in murine GBM tumors. In the hematopoietic tissues, circulating G-MDSC blood levels were reduced after sunitinib treatment. In tumors, both CD3(+) and CD4(+) T cell counts increased following sunitinib treatment (p ? 0.001). Total T cell proliferation (p < 0.001) and interferon gamma production (p = 0.004) were increased in the spleens of sunitinib treated mice. Sunitinib-treated mice survived longer than vehicle-treated mice (p = 0.002). MDSCs are present in both human and mouse GBM tumors. Sunitinib may have an immunostimulatory effect, as its use is associated with a reduction in G-MDSCs and improvement in anti-tumor immune function. PMID:25579983

  10. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces testicular toxicity by upregulation of oxidative stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and deregulation of germ cell development in adult murine testis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Fu, Jianfang; Zhang, Shun; Zhao, Jie; Xie, Nianlin; Cai, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how chemotherapeutic agents mediate testicular toxicity is crucial in light of compelling evidence that male infertility, one of the severe late side effects of intensive cancer treatment, occurs more often than they are expected to. Previous study demonstrated that bortezomib (BTZ), a 26S proteasome inhibitor used to treat refractory multiple myeloma (MM), exerts deleterious impacts on spermatogenesis in pubertal mice via unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that intermittent treatment with BTZ resulted in fertility impairment in adult mice, evidenced by testicular atrophy, desquamation of immature germ cells and reduced caudal sperm storage. These deleterious effects may originate from the elevated apoptosis in distinct germ cells during the acute phase and the subsequent disruption of Sertoli-germ cell anchoring junctions (AJs) during the late recovery. Mechanistically, balance between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and Akt/ERK pathway appeared to be indispensable for AJ integrity during the late testicular recovery. Of particular interest, the upregulated testicular apoptosis and the following disturbance of Sertoli-germ cell interaction may both stem from the excessive oxidative stress elicited by BTZ exposure. We also provided the in vitro evidence that AMPK-dependent mechanisms counteract follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) proliferative effects in BTZ-exposed Sertoli cells. Collectively, BTZ appeared to efficiently prevent germ cells from normal development via multiple mechanisms in adult mice. Employment of antioxidants and/or AMPK inhibitor may represent an attractive strategy of fertility preservation in male MM patients exposed to conventional BTZ therapy and warrants further investigation. PMID:25886977

  11. Dynamic Support Culture of Murine Skeletal Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Improves Their Cardiogenic Potential In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Neef, Klaus; Treskes, Philipp; Xu, Guoxing; Drey, Florian; Srinivasan, Sureshkumar Perumal; Saric, Tomo; Nembo, Erastus; Semmler, Judith; Nguemo, Filomain; Stamm, Christof; Cowan, Douglas B.; Deppe, Antje-Christin; Scherner, Maximilian; Wittwer, Thorsten; Hescheler, Jürgen; Wahlers, Thorsten; Choi, Yeong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the main cause of death in western countries and its burden is increasing worldwide. It typically involves irreversible degeneration and loss of myocardial tissue leading to poor prognosis and fatal outcome. Autologous cells with the potential to regenerate damaged heart tissue would be an ideal source for cell therapeutic approaches. Here, we compared different methods of conditional culture for increasing the yield and cardiogenic potential of murine skeletal muscle-derived stem cells. A subpopulation of nonadherent cells was isolated from skeletal muscle by preplating and applying cell culture conditions differing in support of cluster formation. In contrast to static culture conditions, dynamic culture with or without previous hanging drop preculture led to significantly increased cluster diameters and the expression of cardiac specific markers on the protein and mRNA level. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies revealed similarities to pacemaker action potentials and responsiveness to cardiac specific pharmacological stimuli. This data indicates that skeletal muscle-derived stem cells are capable of adopting enhanced cardiac muscle cell-like properties by applying specific culture conditions. Choosing this route for the establishment of a sustainable, autologous source of cells for cardiac therapies holds the potential of being clinically more acceptable than transgenic manipulation of cells. PMID:26357517

  12. SiRNA In Vivo-Targeted Delivery to Murine Dendritic Cells by Oral Administration of Recombinant Yeast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Liu, Zhongtian; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Tingting; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    SiRNA therapeutics promise a future where any target in the transcriptome could be potentially addressed. However, the delivery of SiRNAs and targeting of particular cell types or organs are major challenges. A novel, efficient, and safe delivery system for promising the introduction of SiRNAs into particular cell types within living organisms is of great significance. Our previous studies have proved that recombinant protein (MSTN) and exogenous gene (EGFP) as vaccines, and furthermore functional CD40 shRNA expression can be delivered into dendritic cells (DCs) in mouse by oral administration of recombinant yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Here, we describe the details of the promising and innovative approach based on oral administration of recombinant yeast that allows in vivo-targeted delivery of functional SiRNA to murine intestinal DCs. PMID:26472450

  13. Identification of a novel role of RING finger protein 11 promoting the metastasis of murine melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Hai-Jie; Gao, Shan-Shan; Wang, Mian; Shi, Yu; Cheng, Bin-Feng; Feng, Zhi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of skin cancer death owing to its highly metastatic nature and resistance to chemotherapy. It may account for 80% of the deaths relating to skin cancers. Once it progressed to metastatic stage, no current effective treatment is available for melanoma. Therefore, in-depth understanding of the mechanism underlying the metastatic process is imperative and would be of great help for improving the treatment of melanoma. Here, wedemonstrate that RING finger protein 11 (RNF11) disruption by insertional mutagenesis impairs the metastatic potential of murine melanoma B16F10 cells. The requirement of RNF11 in the migration of melanoma cells is further confirmed by gene knockdown and overexpression experiments in vitro. Together, our findings suggest a novel role of RNF11 in promoting the metastasis of melanoma cells which may potentially be useful for the treatment of melanoma by developing a new intervention target. PMID:26550462

  14. Stepwise adaptation of murine cytomegalovirus to cells of a foreign host for identification of host range determinants.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Pawletko, Kerstin; Indenbirken, Daniela; Schumacher, Uwe; Brune, Wolfram

    2015-06-01

    Ever since their first isolation 60 years ago, cytomegaloviruses have been recognized as being highly species specific. They replicate only in cells of their own or a closely related host species, while cells of phylogenetically more distant hosts are usually not permissive for viral replication. For instance, human cytomegalovirus replicates in human and chimpanzee fibroblasts but not in rodent cells, and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) replicates in cells of mice and rats but not in primate cells. However, the viral and cellular factors determining the narrow host range of cytomegaloviruses have remained largely unknown. We show that MCMV can be adapted stepwise to replicate in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE-1) cells and human fibroblasts. The human RPE-1 cells used for the initial adaptation step showed a pronounced contact inhibition and produced very low level of interferon-? transcripts upon cytomegalovirus infection, suggesting that these cells provide a particularly favorable environment for adaptation. By whole genome sequencing of the 230 kbp viral genomes of several adapted mutants, a limited number of mutations were detected. Comparison of several human cell-adapted MCMV clones and introduction of specific mutations into the wild-type MCMV genome by site-directed mutagenesis allows for the identification of viral host range determinants and provides the basis for elucidating the molecular basis of the cytomegalovirus host species specificity. PMID:25788395

  15. In situ analysis of lung antigen-presenting cells during murine pulmonary infection with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-González, Alexander; García-Romo, Gina S; Aguilar-León, Diana; Calderon-Amador, Juana; Hurtado-Ortiz, Raquel; Orozco-Estevez, Hector; Lambrecht, Bart N; Estrada-García, Iris; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2004-06-01

    Scarce information exists about the role of lung antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in vivo during pulmonary tuberculosis. As APCs activate cellular immunity, following intratracheal inoculation with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we assessed in situ lung APC recruitment, distribution, granuloma involvement, morphology and mycobacterial burden by using MHC-CII, CD14, scavenger receptor class A (SRA), the murine dendritic cell (DC)-restricted marker CD11c and Ziehl-Neelsen staining. CD11c(+) DC and CD14(+) cell recruitment into lungs appeared by day 14, continuing until day 60. MHC-CII(+) cells increased since day 7, persisting until day 60. Thus, virulent mycobacteria delays (14-21 days) lung APC recruitment compared to model antigens and nonvirulent bacilli (24-48 h). Regarding granuloma constitution, highly bacillary CD14(+) and SRA(+) cells were centrally located. MHC-CII(+) cells were more peripheral, with less mycobacteria. CD11c(+) cells were heterogeneously distributed within granulomas, with scarce bacilli. When labelling lung suspensions for MHC-CII and classifying cells as macrophages or DC, then staining for Ziehl-Neelsen, a remarkable segregation was found regarding bacillary burden. Most macrophage-like cells contained numerous bacilli, while DC had no or scarce mycobacteria. This implies differential APC contributions in situ during pulmonary tuberculosis regarding mycobacterial uptake, granuloma involvement and perhaps bacillary growth. PMID:15255967

  16. Transcription factor co-occupied regions in the murine genome constitute T-helper-cell subtype-specific enhancers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhuo; Hecklau, Katharina; Gross, Fridolin; Bachmann, Ivo; Venzke, Melanie; Karl, Martin; Schuchhardt, Johannes; Radbruch, Andreas; Herzel, Hanspeter; Baumgrass, Ria

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate cell-type-specific gene expression programs by combinatorial binding to cis-genomic elements, particularly enhancers, subsequently leading to the recruitment of cofactors, and the general transcriptional machinery to target genes. Using data integration of genome-wide TF binding profiles, we defined regions with combinatorial binding of lineage-specific master TFs (T-BET, GATA3, and ROR-?t) and STATs (STAT1 and STAT4, STAT6, and STAT3) in murine T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 cells, respectively. Stringently excluding promoter regions, we revealed precise genomic elements which were preferentially associated with the enhancer marks p300 and H3K4me1. Furthermore, closely adjacent TF co-occupied regions constituted larger enhancer domains in the respective Th-cell subset (177 in Th1, 141 in Th2, and 266 in Th17 cells) with characteristics of so-called super-enhancers. Importantly, 89% of these super-enhancer regions were Th-cell subtype-specific. Genes associated with super-enhancers, including relevant Th-cell genes (such as Ifng in Th1, Il13 in Th2, and Il17a in Th17 cells), showed strong transcriptional activity. Altogether, the discovered catalog of enhancers provides information about crucial Th-cell subtype-specific regulatory hubs, which will be useful for revealing cell-type-specific gene regulation processes. PMID:26300430

  17. Notch1 co-opts lymphoid enhancer factor 1 for survival of murine T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Christina; Reschly, Erica J; Zagort, Derek E; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Beverly, Levi J; Capobianco, Anthony; Pear, Warren S; Kee, Barbara L

    2007-10-01

    Oncogenic Notch1 mutations are found in most T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias in humans and T-cell lymphomas in mice. However, the mechanism by which Notch1 promotes transformation or maintains malignant cell survival has not been determined fully. Here, we report that expression of the transcription factor lymphoid enhancer factor 1 (Lef1) is Notch dependent in murine T-cell lymphomas in vitro and in vivo, and that the intracellular domain of Notch1 (ICN1) is present at the Lef1 promoter. Lef1 expression is not Notch dependent in primary T-cell progenitors, but Lef1 mRNA is increased by ectopic expression of ICN1 in these cells. We show that Lef1 is required for survival of T-cell lymphoma lines, and that ectopic expression of Lef1 delays lymphoma cell death in the absence of Notch signaling, indicating that Lef1 is an important Notch target in these cells. Therefore, Notch1 co-opts Lef1 during the process of transformation to maintain survival of T-cell lymphomas. PMID:17585052

  18. The specificity of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells in vitro: Fresh normal murine tissues are resistant to LAK-mediated lysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lefor, A.T.; Rosenberg, S.A. )

    1991-01-01

    We have previously reported that murine splenocytes incubated in the lymphokine interleukin-2 acquire the ability to mediate the lysis of a variety of fresh tumor cells in short-term chromium-51 release assays. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells on fresh normal murine tissues. The susceptibility to lysis by LAK cells of single cell suspensions from a variety of murine tissues including lung, kidney, bone marrow, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, intestinal mucosa, liver, and fetus was studied. While kidney, intestinal mucosa, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were clearly not lysed, there was a very low level of lysis of lung, bone marrow, liver, and fetus in repeated experiments. Separation of the cell suspensions of lung and bone marrow demonstrated much higher lysis of the adherent cell population, corresponding to an increased number of macrophages in the target cell suspension. Macrophages represent a population of cells particularly sensitive to lysis by LAK cells. All of the normal tissues were highly lysable by LAK cells in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity assays in the presence of the appropriate anti-H-2 antibody. In a series of cold target inhibition studies, fresh normal murine kidney, lung, and bone marrow did not inhibit the lysis of the LAK-sensitive tumor target MCA-102, further demonstrating that fresh normal tissues share little if any of the determinant recognized by LAK cells on tumor targets. However, the MCA-105 and MCA-106 tumors, and the YAC cell line, all of which are sensitive to LAK cell lysis, did inhibit the lysis of MCA-102 tumor. These studies suggest that a common determinant is present on LAK-sensitive tissues that is absent or present in very low amounts on fresh normal tissues.

  19. Dimethyl sulfoxide affects the amount of extrachromosomal spleen focus-forming virus DNA in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, F G; Axelrod, D E

    1983-01-01

    We used Southern blot hybridization to titrate and map restriction enzyme cleavage sites of a 6.3-kilobase-pair species of extrachromosomal viral DNA found in derivatives of the 745A line of murine erythroleukemia cells, which vary in their ability to be induced to differentiate by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Greater than an eightfold variation was observed in the amount of this DNA, with the largest amounts being found in cells that were resistant to the induction of differentiation by DMSO. This increase in the level of extrachromosomal viral DNA was found to be dependent upon the continued presence of DMSO in the culture medium. The increase was shown not to be due to an immediate stimulatory effect of this agent on the synthesis or maintenance of this DNA, since cell lines sensitive to the differentiation-inducing effects of DMSO were shown to undergo a transient reduction in the amount of extrachromosomal viral DNA after the addition of DMSO to the culture medium. In addition to the 6.3-kilobase-pair linear form found in the cytoplasm, in some preparations two hybridizing bands were observed that migrated in agarose gels in the position expected of covalently closed circular species of viral DNA. Restriction enzyme mapping of the cytoplasmic linear form indicated a close relationship of this DNA to two polycythemic strains of spleen focus-forming virus that have been molecularly cloned by other workers. No obvious change in the number or arrangement of chromosomal viral sequences could be detected after treating cells with DMSO. Thus, the exposure of murine erythroleukemia cells to DMSO caused an obvious change in the amount of extrachromosomal spleen focus-forming virus DNA but no obvious change in the integration of the provirus. Images PMID:6298449

  20. Roles of Chaperone/Usher Pathways of Yersinia pestis in a Murine Model of Plague and Adhesion to Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatkoff, Matthew; Runco, Lisa M.; Pujol, Celine; Jayatilaka, Indralatha; Furie, Martha B.; Bliska, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia pestis and many other Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria use the chaperone/usher (CU) pathway to assemble virulence-associated surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae. Y. pestis has two well-characterized CU pathways: the caf genes coding for the F1 capsule and the psa genes coding for the pH 6 antigen. The Y. pestis genome contains additional CU pathways that are capable of assembling pilus fibers, but the roles of these pathways in the pathogenesis of plague are not understood. We constructed deletion mutations in the usher genes for six of the additional Y. pestis CU pathways. The wild-type (WT) and usher deletion strains were compared in the murine bubonic (subcutaneous) and pneumonic (intranasal) plague infection models. Y. pestis strains containing deletions in CU pathways y0348-0352, y1858-1862, and y1869-1873 were attenuated for virulence compared to the WT strain by the intranasal, but not subcutaneous, routes of infection, suggesting specific roles for these pathways during pneumonic plague. We examined binding of the Y. pestis WT and usher deletion strains to A549 human lung epithelial cells, HEp-2 human cervical epithelial cells, and primary human and murine macrophages. Y. pestis CU pathways y0348-0352 and y1858-1862 were found to contribute to adhesion to all host cells tested, whereas pathway y1869-1873 was specific for binding to macrophages. The correlation between the virulence attenuation and host cell binding phenotypes of the usher deletion mutants identifies three of the additional CU pathways of Y. pestis as mediating interactions with host cells that are important for the pathogenesis of plague. PMID:22851745

  1. Enhanced pyrimidine dimer repair in cultured murine epithelial cells transfected with the denV gene of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Kusewitt, D F; Budge, C L; Ley, R D

    1994-04-01

    The patch size for excision repair of ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced pyrimidine dimers was determined in cultured murine epithelial cells with normal and enhanced pyrimidine dimer repair capabilities. Cells with enhanced pyrimidine dimer repair were produced by transfecting 308 cells with the denV gene of bacteriophage T4; this gene encodes the enzyme endonuclease V. Pyrimidine dimer repair following exposure to UV from an FS-40 sunlamp was determined by micrococcal dimer-specific nuclease digestion and alkaline sucrose ultracentrifugation. Patch size ws estimated based on the photolytic lability of bromodeoxyuridine-substituted DNA. Excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in denV-transfected 308 cells was enhanced two- to threefold. Production of mRNA from the denV gene in cell lines with enhanced repair was confirmed by RNA blotting. In control cells, the patch size for excision repair of DNA photoproducts was estimated to be 34 nucleotides per photoproduct removed; in denV-transfected cells, a smaller average patch size of 10-16 nucleotides per photoproduct removed was calculated. Thus, endonuclease V activity appears to alter not only the extent, but also the nature of excision repair in UV-exposed mammalian epithelial cells. PMID:8151125

  2. Adsorption and transport of charged vs. neutral hydrophobic molecules at the membrane of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Eckenrode, Heather M; Dai, Hai-Lung; Wilhelm, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The adsorption and transport of hydrophobic molecules at the membrane surface of pre- and post-DMSO induced differentiated murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells were examined by time- and wavelength-resolved second harmonic light scattering. Two medium (<600 Da) hydrophobic molecules, cationic malachite green (MG) and neutral bromocresol purple (BCP), were investigated. While it was observed that the MG cation adsorbs onto the surface of the MEL cell, neutral BCP does not. It is suggested that an electrostatic interaction between the opposite charges of the cation and the MEL cell surface is the primary driving force for adsorption. Comparisons of adsorption density and free energy, measured at different pH and cell morphology, indicate that the interaction is predominantly through sialic acid carboxyl groups. MG cation adsorption densities have been determined as (0.6±0.3)×10(6) ?m(-2) on the surface of undifferentiated MEL cells, and (1.8±0.5)×10(7) ?m(-2) on differentiated MEL cells, while the deduced adsorption free energies are effectively identical (ca. -10.9±0.1 and -10.8±0.1 kcal mol(-1), respectively). The measured MG densities indicate that the total number of surface carboxyl groups is largely conserved following differentiation, and therefore the density of carboxylic groups is much larger on the differentiated cell surface than the undifferentiated one. Finally, in contrast to synthetic liposomes and bacterial membranes, surface adsorbed MG cations are unable to traverse the MEL cell membrane. PMID:25660095

  3. Nodular inflammatory foci are sites of T cell priming and control of murine cytomegalovirus infection in the neonatal lung.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Felix R; Heller, Katrin; Halle, Stephan; Keyser, Kirsten A; Busche, Andreas; Marquardt, Anja; Wagner, Karen; Boelter, Jasmin; Bischoff, Yvonne; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Arens, Ramon; Messerle, Martin; Förster, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Neonates, including mice and humans, are highly susceptible to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. However, many aspects of neonatal CMV infections such as viral cell tropism, spatio-temporal distribution of the pathogen as well as genesis of antiviral immunity are unknown. With the use of reporter mutants of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) we identified the lung as a primary target of mucosal infection in neonatal mice. Comparative analysis of neonatal and adult mice revealed a delayed control of virus replication in the neonatal lung mucosa explaining the pronounced systemic infection and disease in neonates. This phenomenon was supplemented by a delayed expansion of CD8(+) T cell clones recognizing the viral protein M45 in neonates. We detected viral infection at the single-cell level and observed myeloid cells forming "nodular inflammatory foci" (NIF) in the neonatal lung. Co-localization of infected cells within NIFs was associated with their disruption and clearance of the infection. By 2-photon microscopy, we characterized how neonatal antigen-presenting cells (APC) interacted with T cells and induced mature adaptive immune responses within such NIFs. We thus define NIFs of the neonatal lung as niches for prolonged MCMV replication and T cell priming but also as sites of infection control. PMID:24348257

  4. Characterization of Murine Pituitary-Derived Cell Lines Tpit/F1, Tpit/E and TtT/GF

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIDA, Saishu; HIGUCHI, Masashi; UEHARU, Hiroki; NISHIMURA, Naoto; TSUDA, Mitsuyoshi; YAKO, Hideji; CHEN, Mo; MITSUISHI, Hideo; SANO, Yoshiya; KATO, Takako; KATO, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary is an important endocrine tissue of the vertebrate that produces and secretes many hormones. Accumulating data suggest that several types of cells compose the pituitary, and there is growing interest in elucidating the origin of these cell types and their roles in pituitary organogenesis. Therein, the histogenous cell line is an extremely valuable experimental tool for investigating the function of derived tissue. In this study, we compared gene expression profiles by microarray analysis and real-time PCR for murine pituitary tumor-derived non-hormone-producing cell lines TtT/GF, Tpit/F1 and Tpit/E. Several genes are characteristically expressed in each cell line: Abcg2, Nestin, Prrx1, Prrx2, CD34, Eng, Cspg4 (Ng2), S100? and nNos in TtT/GF; Cxcl12, Raldh1, Msx1 and Twist1 in Tpit/F1; and Cxadr, Sox9, Cdh1, EpCAM and Krt8 in Tpit/E. Ultimately, we came to the following conclusions: TtT/GF cells show the most differentiated state, and may have some properties of the pituitary vascular endothelial cell and/or pericyte. Tpit/F1 cells show the epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes with stemness still in a transiting state. Tpit/E cells have a phenotype of epithelial cells and are the most immature cells in the progression of differentiation or in the initial endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Thus, these three cell lines must be useful model cell lines for investigating pituitary stem/progenitor cells as well as organogenesis. PMID:24881870

  5. Ameboid cells in spermatogenic cysts of caecilian testis.

    PubMed

    Smita, Mathew; Jancy, M George; Akbarsha, M A; Oommen, Oommen V

    2005-03-01

    Sertoli cells constitute a permanent feature of the testis lobules in caecilians irrespective of the functional state of the testis. The developing germ cells are intimately associated with the Sertoli cells, which are adherent to the basal lamina, until spermiation. There are irregularly shaped cells in the cores of the testis lobules that interact with germ cells at the face opposite to their attachment with Sertoli cells. These irregularly shaped (ameboid) cells first appear in the lumen of the cysts containing primary spermatocytes and are continually present until spermiation. We did not observe any cytoplasmic continuity between a Sertoli cell and an ameboid cell. Both light microscopic and TEM observations reveal a phagocytic role for the ameboid cells: they scavenge the residual bodies shed by spermatozoa. Organization of the ameboid cells is grossly different from that of the spermatogenic and Sertoli cells. They appear to develop from the epithelium at the juncture of the collecting ductule with the testis lobule. PMID:15688448

  6. Identification of four murine cDNAs encoding putative protein kinases from primitive embryonic stem cells differentiated in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Biesecker, L G; Gottschalk, L R; Emerson, S G

    1993-01-01

    Protein kinases transduce signals from extracellular ligands in the hematopoietic and other systems through direct phosphorylation of tyrosine, serine, or threonine residues. Little is known about the ligands and receptors that are important in the earliest stages of development--i.e., stem cell self-renewal and lineage commitment. We have made use of the lineage differentiation potential of the murine embryonic stem cell system to clone partial cDNAs encoding four putative protein kinases. Three of the four genes contain the highly conserved residues Asp-Phe-Gly in domain VII of the protein kinase family. These genes are candidates for receptors or downstream effectors of cytokines that regulate self-renewal and lineage commitment in embryogenesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8346215

  7. p53 is active in murine stem cells and alters the transcriptome in a manner that is reminiscent of mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Yan, H; Solozobova, V; Zhang, P; Armant, O; Kuehl, B; Brenner-Weiss, G; Blattner, C

    2015-01-01

    Since it was found that p53 is highly expressed in murine embryonic stem cells, it remained a mystery whether p53 is active in this cell type. We show that a significant part of p53 is localised in the nucleus of murine embryonic stem cells and that the majority of this nuclear p53 is bound to DNA. According to its nuclear localisation, we show that p53 alters the transcriptional program of stem cells. Nevertheless, the anti-proliferative activity of p53 is compromised in stem cells, and this control is due, at least in part, to the high amount of MdmX that is present in embryonic stem cells and bound to p53. Instead of the anti-proliferative activity that p53 has in differentiated cells, p53 controls transcription of pro-proliferative genes in embryonic stem cells including c-myc and c-jun. The impeded anti-proliferative activity of p53 and the induction of certain proto-oncogenes by p53 in murine embryonic stem cells can explain why stem cells proliferate efficiently despite having high levels of p53. PMID:25719246

  8. Novel cytotoxic exhibition mode of antimicrobial peptide anoplin in MEL cells, the cell line of murine Friend leukemia virus-induced leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Na; Fu, Cai-Yun; Zhang, Shi-Fu; Chen, Wei; Jin, Yuan-Ting; Zhao, Fu-Kun

    2013-09-01

    Anoplin is a recently discovered antimicrobial peptide (AMP) isolated from the venom sac of the spider wasp Anoplius samariensis, and it is one of the shortest ?-helical AMP found naturally to date consisting of only ten amino acids. Previous results showed that anoplin exhibits potent antimicrobial activity but little hemolytic activity. In this study, we synthesized anoplin, studied its cytotoxicity in Friend virus-induced leukemia cells [murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells], and proposed its possible mechanism. Our results showed that anoplin could inhibit the proliferation of MEL cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner via disrupting the integrity of cell membrane, which indicated that anoplin exerts its cytotoxicity efficacy. In addition, the cell cycle distribution of MEL cells was arrested in the G?/G? phase significantly. However, anoplin could not induce obvious apoptosis in MEL cells, as well as anoplin could not induce visible changes on morphology and quantity in the bone marrow cells isolated from normal mice. All of these results indicate that anoplin, as generally believed, is a selective AMP, a value characteristic in the design of safe therapeutic agents. The cytotoxicity of anoplin on MEL cells was mainly attributable to the plasma membrane perturbation and also to the intracellular events such as the arrest of cell cycle. Although this is an initial study that explored the activity of anoplin in vitro rather than in vivo, with the increasing resistance of conventional chemotherapy, there is no doubt that anoplin has desirable feature to be developed as a novel and selective anticancer agent. PMID:23873700

  9. Human cytochrome c enters murine J774 cells and causes G{sub 1} and G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraoka, Yoshinori; Granja, Ana Teresa; Fialho, Arsenio M.; Schlarb-Ridley, Beatrix G.; Das Gupta, Tapas K.; Chakrabarty, Ananda M.; Yamada, Tohru . E-mail: tohru@uic.edu

    2005-12-16

    Cytochrome c is well known as a carrier of electrons during respiration. Current evidence indicates that cytochrome c also functions as a major component of apoptosomes to induce apoptosis in eukaryotic cells as well as an antioxidant. More recently, a prokaryotic cytochrome c, cytochrome c {sub 551} from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been shown to enter in mammalian cells such as the murine macrophage-like J774 cells and causes inhibition of cell cycle progression. Much less is known about such functions by mammalian cytochromes c, particularly the human cytochrome c. We now report that similar to P. aeruginosa cytochrome c {sub 551}, the purified human cytochrome c protein can enter J774 cells and induce cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 1} to S phase, as well as at the G{sub 2}/M phase at higher concentrations. Unlike P. aeruginosa cytochrome c {sub 551} which had no effect on the induction of apoptosis, human cytochrome c induces significant apoptosis and cell death in J774 cells, presumably through inhibition of the cell cycle at the G{sub 2}/M phase. When incubated with human breast cancer MCF-7 and normal mammary epithelial cell line MCF-10A1 cells, human cytochrome c entered in both types of cells but induced cell death only in the normal MCF-10A1 cells. The ability of human cytochrome c to enter J774 cells was greatly reduced at 4 deg. C, suggesting energy requirement in the entry process.

  10. The Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene 3’ Enhancers Induce Bcl2 Deregulation and Lymphomagenesis in Murine B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Hong; Noonan, Emily J.; Wang, Jinghong; Duan, Hong; Ma, Lawrence; Michie, Sara; Boxer, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    Human follicular B-cell lymphoma is associated with the t(14;18) chromosomal translocation that juxtaposes the Bcl2 proto-oncogene with the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus, resulting in the deregulated expression of Bcl2. Our previous studies have shown that the Igh 3’ enhancers deregulate Bcl2 expression in vitro. However, the effects of the Igh 3’ enhancer elements on Bcl2 expression in vivo are not known. To investigate the role of the Igh 3’ enhancers in Bcl2 deregulation, we used gene targeting to generate knock-in mice in which four DNase I hypersensitive regions from the murine Igh 3’ region were integrated 3’ of the Bcl2 locus. Increased levels of Bcl2 mRNA and protein were observed in the B cells of Igh-3’E-bcl2 mice. B cells from Igh-3’E-bcl2 mice demonstrated an extended survival in vitro compared with B cells from wild-type mice. The Bcl2 promoter shift from P1 (the 5’ promoter) to P2 (the 3’ promoter) was observed in B cells from Igh-3’E-bcl2 mice, similar to human t(14;18) lymphomas. The IgH-3’E-bcl2 mice developed monoclonal B-cell follicular lymphomas, which were slowly progressive. These studies demonstrate that the Igh 3’ enhancers play an important role in the deregulation of Bcl2 and B-cell lymphomagenesis in vivo. PMID:21606958

  11. Colony formation by subpopulations of T lymphocytes. IV. Inhibitory effect of hydrocortisone on human and murine T cell subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Claësson, M H; Röpke, C

    1983-01-01

    The sensitivity of human T lymphocyte colony formation to hydrocortisone (HCS) was studied in the presence and absence of an exogenous source of interleukin-2(IL-2). In the presence of IL-2, T colony formation by T inducer/helper (Th) cells was found to be 100-fold more resistant to the inhibitory effect of HCS in vitro than colony formation by T suppressor/cytotoxic (Tsc) cells, the IC50 values for HCS being 10(-4)M and 10(-6)M, respectively. In the absence of IL-2,Tsc cells do not form colonies and T cell colony formation by Th cells is inhibited 50% by less than 5 x 10(-8)M HCS. T lymphocyte colony formation by murine cortical thymocytes in vitro was inhibited by physiological concentrations of HCS in vitro, the IC50 value being 2 x 10(-8)M HCS. T cell colony formation by medullary thymocytes and peripheral lymphocytes was found to be 100-fold more resistant to HCS than control cells, the IC50 value being 2 x 10(-6)M HCS. PMID:6228355

  12. Pannexin1 channels act downstream of P2X7 receptors in ATP-induced murine T-cell death

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Kenji F; Sáez, Pablo J; Harcha, Paloma A; Aguila, Hector L; Sáez, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Death of murine T cells induced by extracellular ATP is mainly triggered by activation of purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs). However, a link between P2X7Rs and pannexin1 (Panx1) channels, which are non-selective, has been recently demonstrated in other cell types. In this work, we characterized the expression and cellular distribution of pannexin family members (Panxs 1, 2 and 3) in isolated T cells. Panx1 was the main pannexin family member clearly detected in both helper (CD4+) and cytotoxic (CD8+) T cells, whereas low levels of Panx2 were found in both T-cell subsets. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, Panx1 channels were found to mediate most ATP-induced ethidium uptake since this was drastically reduced by Panx1 channel blockers (10Panx1, Probenecid and low carbenoxolone concentration) and absent in T cells derived from Panx1?/? mice. Moreover, electrophysiological measurements in wild-type CD4+ cells treated with ATP unitary current events and pharmacological sensitivity compatible with Panx1 channels were found. In addition, ATP release from T cells treated with 4Br-A23187, a calcium ionophore, was completely blocked with inhibitors of both connexin hemichannels and Panx1 channels. Panx1 channel blockers drastically reduced the ATP-induced T-cell mortality, indicating that Panx1 channels mediate the ATP-induced T-cell death. However, mortality was not reduced in T cells of Panx1?/? mice, in which levels of P2X7Rs and ATP-induced intracellular free Ca2+ responses were enhanced suggesting that P2X7Rs take over Panx1 channels lose-function in mediating the onset of cell death induced by extracellular ATP. PMID:24590064

  13. Studies of variation in inherent sensitivities to radiation, 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate in a series of human and murine tumor cell lines in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, A.S.; Whelan, R.D.H.; Hill, B.T.

    1984-01-01

    Clinical studies have reported reduced response rates to subsequent chemotherapy in certain tumors recurring after radiotherapy. These authors have investigated whether there are any correlations between radiation and drug responses in vitro using a range of murine and human tumor cell lines. They have compared sensitivities to X-irradiation and to 24 hr exposures to two widely used antitumor drugs, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil. The 4 murine lines selected showed a range of radiation responses with Do values of 0.48-0.76 Gy. Methotrexate sensitivities also exhibited an 800-fold difference which appeared to correlate inversely with radiation response. Sensitivity to 5-FU was less variable in these cells and was unrelated to radiation response. In contrast, in the human lines tested, no correlations were observed between drug sensitivities and radiation response. The six lines tested showed a range of radiation responses with Do values of 0.66-1.59 Gy. Methotrexate sensitivities ranged only over a 150-fold concentration but, contrasting with data from the murine cells, no correlation with radiation response was apparent. Similarly, no correlations between response to 5-fluorouracil and radiation or 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate were noted, which is inconsistent with results using murine cells.

  14. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  15. HMGB1-Promoted and TLR2/4-Dependent NK Cell Maturation and Activation Take Part in Rotavirus-Induced Murine Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenmei; Zhao, Wentao; Peng, Fei; Xiang, Ying; Chen, Gang; Chen, Tao; Chai, Chengwei; Zheng, Shuaiyu; Watkins, Daniel J.; Feng, Jiexiong

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies show that NK cells play important roles in murine biliary atresia (BA), and a temporary immunological gap exists in this disease. In this study, we found high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) and TLRs were overexpressed in human and rotavirus-induced murine BA. The overexpressed HMGB1 released from the nuclei of rotavirus-infected cholangiocytes, as well as macrophages, activated hepatic NK cells via HMGB1-TLRs-MAPK signaling pathways. Immature NK cells had low cytotoxicity on rotavirus-injured cholangiocytes due to low expression of TLRs, which caused persistent rotavirus infection in bile ducts. HMGB1 up-regulated the levels of TLRs of NK cells and promoted NK cell activation in an age-dependent fashion. As NK cells gained increasing activation as mice aged, they gained increasing cytotoxicity on rotavirus-infected cholangiocytes, which finally caused BA. Adult NK cells eliminated rotavirus-infected cholangiocytes shortly after infection, which prevented persistent rotavirus infection in bile ducts. Moreover, adoptive transfer of mature NK cells prior to rotavirus infection decreased the incidence of BA in newborn mice. Thus, the dysfunction of newborn NK cells may, in part, participate in the immunological gap in the development of rotavirus induced murine BA. PMID:24651485

  16. Immunomodulation in host-protective immune response against murine tuberculosis through regulation of the T regulatory cell function.

    PubMed

    Das, Shibali; Halder, Kuntal; Goswami, Avranil; Chowdhury, Bidisha Paul; Pal, Nishith K; Majumdar, Subrata

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is characterized by an infection in lung and spleen. In the present study, we have elucidated the mechanism by which Mycobacterium indicus pranii renders protection in in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We observed that Mycobacterium indicus pranii treated infected C57BL/6 mice showed a strong host-protective Th1 immune response along with a marked decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines, TGF-?, and IL-10-secreting CD4(+) T cells. This Mycobacterium indicus pranii mediated decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines was correlated with the reduction in the elevated frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory cells, along with the reduced TGF-? production from these T regulatory cells in tuberculosis-infected mice. This reduction in the T regulatory cell population was a result of effective modulation of STAT4-STAT5 transcription factor counter-regulation by Mycobacterium indicus pranii, which in turn, reduced the immunosuppressive activity of T regulatory cells. Thus, these findings put forward a detailed mechanistic insight into Mycobacterium indicus pranii mediated regulation of the T regulatory cell functioning during experimental murine tuberculosis, which might be helpful in combating Mycobacterium-induced pathogenesis. PMID:26156009

  17. Identification of the receptor for erythropoietin on human and murine erythroleukemia cells and modulation by phorbol ester and dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Broudy, V.C.; Lin, N.; Egrie, J.; De Haen, C.; Weiss, T.; Papayannopoulou, T.; Adamson, J.W.

    1988-09-01

    Erythropoietin, a glycoprotein that regulates erythropoiesis, initiates its biological effects by binding to a cell-surface receptor. Little is known about the structure of the erythropoietin receptor and the events that follow binding of erythropoietin to its receptor, in part because of the difficulty of obtaining sufficient quantities of cells that express the erythropoietin receptor. The authors used both iodinated and metabolically labeled erythropoietin to characterize the receptor on a variety of erythroleukemia cell lines not previously tested, and they have identified both human and murine cell lines that display large numbers of erythropoietin receptors. Both erythropoietin-responsive and -nonresponsive cell lines exhibit a single class of binding sites. Induction of the erythroid phenotype by dimethylsulfoxide or its suppression by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was accompanied by an increase or decrease, respectively, in erythropoietin receptor number. Affinity crosslinking of /sup 125/I labeled erythropoietin to the receptor identified two proteins corresponding to estimated molecular masses of 95 and 105 kDa. The OCIM1, Rauscher, and GM979 erythroleukemia cell lines provide a useful model for the study of postreceptor signaling events, as well as a convenient source for purification of the erythropoietin receptor.

  18. Establishment of a novel clonal murine bone marrow stromal cell line for assessment of p53 responses to genotoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunov, Nikolai V.; Morris, James E.; Greenberger, J S.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2002-10-15

    The p53 protein is widely regarded as an important sensor of genotoxic damage in cells, and mutations in p53 are the most frequent observed in human cancers. Rapid assays for evaluating the potential of a chemical or physical agent to alter the transcriptional regulatory role of p53 may therefore serve as useful tools in toxicological research. In this study, the use of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a live cell reporter to assess the transactivation response of p53 to chemical and physical agents was evaluated. A stable murine bone marrow stromal cell line (D2XRIIGFP24) expressing EGFP under control of p53 response elements was established. D2XRIIGFP24 cells displayed low constitutive background fluorescence which was significantly enhanced in response to exposure to agents that induced of p53 protein levels. Increases in EGFP fluorescence in response to oxidative and nitrosative stress as well as UVC irradiation were dose-dependent, detectable within 3 hours of expo sure and correlated closely with the amount of p53 protein accumulated within the cell. The results demonstrate the potential for rapid and early detection of p53 transactivation using the EGFP reporter approach and indicate this approach is adaptable to a variety of fluorescent assay techniques and a useful cell model for molecular toxicology research.

  19. Very Small Embryonic- Like stem cells (VSELs) are present in adult murine organs: ImageStream based morphological analysis and distribution studies

    PubMed Central

    Zuba-Surma, Ewa K.; Kucia, Magdalena; Wu, Wan; Klich, Izabela; Lillard, James W.; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we purified a population of CXCR4+/Oct-4+/SSEA-1+/Sca-1+/Lin-/CD45- Very Small Embryonic-Like stem cells (VSELs) from adult murine bone marrow (BM). After employing flow cytometry, ImageStream analysis, confocal microscopy, and real time RT-PCR, we report that similar cells could be also identified and isolated from several organs in adult mice. The highest total numbers of Oct-4+ VSELs were found in the brain, kidneys, muscles, pancreas, and BM. These observations support our hypothesis that a population of very primitive cells expressing germ line/epiblast markers (Oct-4, SSEA-1) is deposited early during embryogenesis in various organs and survives into adulthood. Further studies are needed to determine whether these cells, after being isolated from various adult human organs similarly to their murine BM-derived counterparts, are endowed with pluripotent stem cell properties. PMID:18951465

  20. TGF-? stimulation in human and murine cells reveals commonly affected biological processes and pathways at transcription level

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The TGF-? signaling pathway is a fundamental pathway in the living cell, which plays a key role in many central cellular processes. The complex and sometimes contradicting mechanisms by which TGF-? yields phenotypic effects are not yet completely understood. In this study we investigated and compared the transcriptional response profile of TGF-?1 stimulation in different cell types. For this purpose, extensive experiments are performed and time-course microarray data are generated in human and mouse parenchymal liver cells, human mesenchymal stromal cells and mouse hematopoietic progenitor cells at different time points. We applied a panel of bioinformatics methods on our data to uncover common patterns in the dynamic gene expression response in respective cells. Results Our analysis revealed a quite variable and multifaceted transcriptional response profile of TGF-?1 stimulation, which goes far beyond the well-characterized classical TGF-?1 signaling pathway. Nonetheless, we could identify several commonly affected processes and signaling pathways across cell types and species. In addition our analysis suggested an important role of the transcription factor EGR1, which appeared to have a conserved influence across cell-types and species. Validation via an independent dataset on A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells largely confirmed our findings. Network analysis suggested explanations, how TGF-?1 stimulation could lead to the observed effects. Conclusions The analysis of dynamical transcriptional response to TGF-? treatment experiments in different human and murine cell systems revealed commonly affected biological processes and pathways, which could be linked to TGF-?1 via network analysis. This helps to gain insights about TGF-? pathway activities in these cell systems and its conserved interactions between the species and tissue types. PMID:24886091

  1. A comparative study of transfection methods for RNA interference in bone marrow-derived murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, C D; Fang, J J; Pedersen, A E

    2009-11-01

    Selective gene silencing using RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to be an efficient method for manipulation of cellular functions. In this study, we compare three previously established methods for transfection of murine bone marrow-derived DC (BM-DC). We tested the efficacy of electroporation with the Mouse Nucleofector kit((R)) from Amaxa Biosystems and lipid-based transfection methods using transfection reagents from Santa Cruz Biotechnology or Genlantis. To analyse the transfection efficacy we used FITC-conjugated siRNA as a positive control together with CD80 and CD86 specific siRNA. We show that electroporation using the Mouse Nucleofector kit((R)) from Amaxa Biosystems was not an efficient method to transfect BM-DC with siRNA in our hands. Transfection with Santa Cruz Biotechnology reagents resulted in up to 59% FITC-siRNA positive cells, but did not result in effective silencing of CD80 surface expression. In contrast, the most effective method was the lipid-based method using the siRNA transfection reagent GeneSilencer((R)) from Genlantis. This protocol resulted in up to 92% FITC-siRNA positive cells after 4 h which declined to 62% and 59% 24 and 48 h post-transfection, respectively. The transfected BM-DC remained CD11c positive, expressed high MHC class II and intermediate CD40 and were functional as APC. In conclusion, this protocol was effective for manipulation of murine BM-DC function through the use of specific siRNA and such methods can be important for the future study of DC-T cell interactions. PMID:19874549

  2. Lipoprotein in the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus is a major inducer of nitric oxide production in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Joong; Ahn, Ki Bum; Jeon, Jun Ho; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Finlay, B Brett; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes inflammation at infection sites by inducing various inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO). To identify the staphylococcal virulence factors contributing to NO production, we compared the ability of ethanol-killed wild-type S. aureus and mutant strains lacking lipoteichoic acid (?ltaS), lipoproteins (?lgt), or d-alanine (?dltA) to stimulate NO production in a murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, and the primary macrophages derived from C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type, ?ltaS, and ?dltA strains induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner but this response was not observed when the cells were stimulated with the ?lgt strain. Moreover, purified lipoproteins triggered NO production in macrophages. Coincident with NO induction, the wild-type, ?ltaS, and ?dltA strains induced expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) at both mRNA and protein levels whereas ?lgt failed to induce iNOS protein or mRNA. Transient transfection followed by a reporter gene assay and Western blotting experiments demonstrated that wild-type, ?ltaS, and ?dltA strains, but not the ?lgt strain, induced substantial activation of NF-?B and STAT1 phosphorylation, both of which are known to be crucial for iNOS expression. Moreover, wild-type, ?ltaS, and ?dltA strains increased Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) activation, which is known to mediate S. aureus-induced innate immunity, whereas the ?lgt strain did not. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoproteins in the cell wall of S. aureus play a major role in the induction of NO production in murine macrophages through activation of the TLR2 receptor. PMID:25600878

  3. Generation of murine cardiac pacemaker cell aggregates based on ES-cell-programming in combination with Myh6-promoter-selection.

    PubMed

    Rimmbach, Christian; Jung, Julia J; David, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of the "sick sinus syndrome" is based on artificial pacemakers. These bear hazards such as battery failure and infections. Moreover, they lack hormone responsiveness and the overall procedure is cost-intensive. "Biological pacemakers" generated from PSCs may become an alternative, yet the typical content of pacemaker cells in Embryoid Bodies (EBs) is extremely low. The described protocol combines "forward programming" of murine PSCs via the sinus node inducer TBX3 with Myh6-promoter based antibiotic selection. This yields cardiomyocyte aggregates consistent of >80% physiologically functional pacemaker cells. These "induced-sinoatrial-bodies" ("iSABs") are spontaneously contracting at yet unreached frequencies (400-500 bpm) corresponding to nodal cells isolated from mouse hearts and are able to pace murine myocardium ex vivo. Using the described protocol highly pure sinus nodal single cells can be generated which e.g. can be used for in vitro drug testing. Furthermore, the iSABs generated according to this protocol may become a crucial step towards heart tissue engineering. PMID:25742394

  4. Purine oversecretion in cultured murine lymphoma cells deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase: genetic model for inherited hyperuricemia and gout.

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, B; Wormsted, M A; Cohen, M B; Martin, D W

    1982-01-01

    Alterations in several specific enzymes have been associated with increased rates of purine synthesis de novo in human and other mammalian cells. However, these recognized abnormalities in humans account for only a few percent of the clinical cases of hyperuricemia and gout. We have examined in detail the rates of purine production de novo and purine excretion by normal and by mutant (AU-100) murine lymphoma T cells (S49) 80% deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase [IMP:L-aspartate ligase (GDP-forming), EC 6.3.4.4]. The intracellular ATP concentration of the mutant cells is slightly diminished, but their GTP is increased 50% and their IMP, four-fold. Compared to wild-type cells, the AU-100 cells excrete into the culture medium 30- to 50-fold greater amounts of purine metabolites consisting mainly of inosine. Moreover, the AU-100 cell line overproduces total purines. In an AU-100-derived cell line, AU-TG50B, deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8), purine nucleoside excretion is increased 50- to 100-fold, and de novo synthesis is even greater than that for AU-100 cells. The overexcretion of purine metabolites by the AU-100 cells seems to be due to the primary genetic deficiency of adenylosuccinate synthetase, a deficiency that requires the cell to increase intracellular IMP in an attempt to maintain ATP levels. As a consequence of elevated IMP pools, large amounts of inosine are secreted into the culture medium. We propose that a similar primary genetic defect may account for the excessive purine excretion in some patients with dominantly inherited hyperuricemia and gout. Images PMID:6957854

  5. Induction of DNA-strand breaks after X- irradiation in murine bone cells of various differentiation capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, P.; Hellweg, C. E.; Kirchner, S.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Horneck, G.

    Bone loss resulting from long-duration space flight is a well known medical risk for space travellers, as a weakened skeleton is more susceptible to bone fractures. In addition to weightlessness the astronaut is also exposed to cosmic ionizing radiation. In order to elucidate changes in bone cell metabolism by ionizing radiation, a ground-based bone cell model has been developed. This model consists of a bunch of immortalized murine osteocyte, osteoblast and pre-osteoblast cell lines representing discrete stages of differentiation: The osteocyte cell line MLO-Y4 (obtained from L. Bonewald, Kansas City, USA), the osteoblast cell line OCT-1 (obtained from D. Chen, San Antonio, USA), and the subclones 4 and 24 of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 (obtained from ATCC, Manassas, Virginia, USA). Regarding their growth properties, MLO-Y4 cells show the highest growth velocity with a doubling time of 15.8 h. The osteoblast cell line OCT-1 has a doubling time of 27.3 h. The respective values for MC3T3-E1 subclone 24 and S4 are 90.5 h and 51.6 h. To investigate the stage of differentiation, the expression of alkaline phosphatase, of osteocalcin and of E11 was examined. Survival after X-ray exposure was determined using the colony forming ability test. The resulting dose-effect relationships revealed significant differences. The parameter D0 of the survival curves ranges between 1.8 Gy for OCT-1, 1.9 Gy for MLO-Y4, 2.0 Gy for subclone 24 and 2,3 Gy for subclone 4. The quantitative acquisition of DNA-strand breaks was performed by Fluorescent Analysis of DNA-Unwinding (FADU). The results can be correlated with the corresponding survival curve. In conclusion, the cell lines with higher differentiation levels are less sensitive to radiation when compared to the lower differentiated osteoblast cell lines.

  6. Systematic Comparison of Gene Expression between Murine Memory and Naive B Cells Demonstrates That Memory B Cells Have Unique Signaling Capabilities1

    PubMed Central

    Tomayko, Mary M.; Anderson, Shannon M.; Brayton, Catherine E.; Sadanand, Saheli; Steinel, Natalie C.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Shlomchik, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Memory B cells play essential roles in the maintenance of long-term immunity and may be important in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, but how these cells are distinguished from their naive precursors is poorly understood. To address this, it would be important to understand how gene expression differs between memory and naive B cells to elucidate memory-specific functions. Using model systems that help overcome the lack of murine memory-specific markers and the low frequency of Agspecific memory and naive cells, we undertook a global comparison of gene expression between memory B cells and their naive precursors. We identified genes with differential expression and confirmed the differential expression of many of these by quantitative RT-PCR and of some of these at the protein level. Our initial analysis revealed differential expression patterns of genes that regulate signaling. Memory B cells have increased expression of genes important in regulating adenosine signaling and in modulating cAMP responses. Furthermore, memory B cells up-regulate receptors that are essential for embryonic stem cell self-renewal. We further demonstrate that one of these, leukemia inhibitory factor receptor, can initiate functional signaling in memory B cells whereas it does not in naive B cells. Thus, memory and naive B cells are intrinsically wired to signal differently from one another and express a functional signaling pathway that is known to maintain stem cells